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Sample records for liquid wastes discharged

  1. Effect of liquid waste discharges from steam generating facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, H.E. Jr.

    1977-09-01

    This report contains a summary of the effects of liquid waste discharges from steam electric generating facilities on the environment. Also included is a simplified model for use in approximately determining the effects of these discharges. Four basic fuels are used in steam electric power plants: three fossil fuels--coal, natural gas, and oil; and uranium--presently the basic fuel of nuclear power. Coal and uranium are expected to be the major fuels in future years. The following power plant effluents are considered: heat, chlorine, copper, total dissolved solids, suspended solids, pH, oil and grease, iron, zinc, chrome, phosphorus, and trace radionuclides.

  2. Effect of liquid waste discharges from steam generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, H.E. Jr.

    1977-09-01

    This report contains a summary of the effects of liquid waste discharges from steam electric generating facilities on the environment. Also included is a simplified model for use in approximately determining the effects of these discharges. Four basic fuels are used in steam electric power plants: three fossil fuels--coal, natural gas, and oil; and uranium--presently the basic fuel of nuclear power. Coal and uranium are expected to be the major fuels in future years. The following power plant effluents are considered: heat, chlorine, copper, total dissolved solids, suspended solids, pH, oil and grease, iron, zinc, chrome, phosphorus, and trace radionuclides

  3. Elimination of liquid discharge to the environment from the TA-50 Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, D.; Williams, N.; Hall, D.; Hargis, K.; Saladen, M.; Sanders, M.; Voit, S.; Worland, P.; Yarbro, S.

    1998-06-01

    Alternatives were evaluated for management of treated radioactive liquid waste from the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility (RLWTF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The alternatives included continued discharge into Mortandad Canyon, diversion to the sanitary wastewater treatment facility and discharge of its effluent to Sandia Canyon or Canada del Buey, and zero liquid discharge. Implementation of a zero liquid discharge system is recommended in addition to two phases of upgrades currently under way. Three additional phases of upgrades to the present radioactive liquid waste system are proposed to accomplish zero liquid discharge. The first phase involves minimization of liquid waste generation, along with improved characterization and monitoring of the remaining liquid waste. The second phase removes dissolved salts from the reverse osmosis concentrate stream to yield a higher effluent quality. In the final phase, the high-quality effluent is reused for industrial purposes within the Laboratory or evaporated. Completion of these three phases will result in zero discharge of treated radioactive liquid wastewater from the RLWTF

  4. Elimination of liquid discharge to the environment from the TA-50 Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, D.; Williams, N.; Hall, D.; Hargis, K.; Saladen, M.; Sanders, M.; Voit, S.; Worland, P.; Yarbro, S.

    1998-06-01

    Alternatives were evaluated for management of treated radioactive liquid waste from the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility (RLWTF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The alternatives included continued discharge into Mortandad Canyon, diversion to the sanitary wastewater treatment facility and discharge of its effluent to Sandia Canyon or Canada del Buey, and zero liquid discharge. Implementation of a zero liquid discharge system is recommended in addition to two phases of upgrades currently under way. Three additional phases of upgrades to the present radioactive liquid waste system are proposed to accomplish zero liquid discharge. The first phase involves minimization of liquid waste generation, along with improved characterization and monitoring of the remaining liquid waste. The second phase removes dissolved salts from the reverse osmosis concentrate stream to yield a higher effluent quality. In the final phase, the high-quality effluent is reused for industrial purposes within the Laboratory or evaporated. Completion of these three phases will result in zero discharge of treated radioactive liquid wastewater from the RLWTF.

  5. Radioactive liquid wastes discharged to ground in the 200 areas during 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    Radioactive liquid wastes discharged to ground during 1974 and since startup within the Production and Waste Management control zone are summarized in tabular form. Estimates of the radioactivity discharged to individual ponds, cribs, and retention sites are also summarized. (LK)

  6. Distribution of the active liquid waste discharge concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, A.H.C.

    1985-03-01

    In assessing the proposal for removing the on-line liquid effluent monitor (LEM) from the Darlington NGS-A design, it was required to estimate the probability that the concentration of β-y emitters in the active liquid waste (ALW) tank discharges exceeds a specified level. To achieve this, it was necessary to know the underlying distribution of the ALW discharge concentration. Since the distribution could only be estimated from the historical data, it was also important to provide the confidence interval for the estimated probability. Using the ALW discharge records of Pickering and Bruce NGS-A, it was found that the log-normal distribution provided the best fit for the data. The frequency of the tank concentration exceeding the specified level of 24000μCi/m 3 was estimated to be 1 in 200,000 years at Bruce NGS-A and 1 in 100,000 years at Pickering. The 99% upper confidence limits are 1 in 2777 years and 1 in 77 years, respectively

  7. Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Discharges in 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Signore, John C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-16

    This report documents radioactive discharges from the TA50 Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facilities (RLWTF) during calendar 2011. During 2011, three pathways were available for the discharge of treated water to the environment: discharge as water through NPDES Outfall 051 into Mortandad Canyon, evaporation via the TA50 cooling towers, and evaporation using the newly-installed natural-gas effluent evaporator at TA50. Only one of these pathways was used; all treated water (3,352,890 liters) was fed to the effluent evaporator. The quality of treated water was established by collecting a weekly grab sample of water being fed to the effluent evaporator. Forty weekly samples were collected; each was analyzed for gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Weekly samples were also composited at the end of each month. These flow-weighted composite samples were then analyzed for 37 radioisotopes: nine alpha-emitting isotopes, 27 beta emitters, and tritium. These monthly analyses were used to estimate the radioactive content of treated water fed to the effluent evaporator. Table 1 summarizes this information. The concentrations and quantities of radioactivity in Table 1 are for treated water fed to the evaporator. Amounts of radioactivity discharged to the environment through the evaporator stack were likely smaller since only entrained materials would exit via the evaporator stack.

  8. 30 CFR 250.217 - What solid and liquid wastes and discharges information and cooling water intake information must...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... What solid and liquid wastes and discharges information and cooling water intake information must accompany the EP? The following solid and liquid wastes and discharges information and cooling water intake... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What solid and liquid wastes and discharges...

  9. Radioactive liquid waste discharged from Nuclear Electric licensed sites during 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, L.S.; Odell, K.J.

    1993-03-01

    This report presents the detailed isotopic composition of radioactive liquid waste discharged from Nuclear Electric licensed sites in 1991. Liquid discharges from those Magnox stations using pond storage of irradiated fuel contained low levels of activation and fission products, while those from Wylfa and the AGR stations contained lower levels of activation products with only traces of fission products. Discharges were similar to those observed in previous years, with any changes concordant with changes in stations' generation performance. (author)

  10. 30 CFR 250.248 - What solid and liquid wastes and discharges information and cooling water intake information must...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... following solid and liquid wastes and discharges information and cooling water intake information must... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What solid and liquid wastes and discharges information and cooling water intake information must accompany the DPP or DOCD? 250.248 Section 250.248...

  11. Radioactive liquid wastes discharged to ground in the 200 Areas during 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.D.; Poremba, B.E.

    1979-01-01

    This document is issued quarterly for the purpose of summarizing the radioactive liquid wastes that have been discharged to the ground in the 200 Areas. In addition to data for 1978, cumulative data since plant startup are presented. Also, in this document is a listing of decayed activity to the various plant sites

  12. Disposal of liquid radioactive waste - discharge of radioactive waste waters from hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwieg, F.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given about legal prescriptions in the FRG concerning composition and amount of the liquid waste substances and waste water disposal by emitting into the sewerage, waste water decay systems and collecting and storage of patients excretions. The radiation exposure of the population due to drainage of radioactive waste water from hospitals lower by more than two orders than the mean exposure due to nuclear-medical use. (HP) [de

  13. Radioactive liquid wastes discharged to ground in the 200 areas during the first three quarters of 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.D.

    1974-01-01

    An overall summary of radioactive liquid wastes discharged to ground during the first three quarters of 1974 and since startup within the Production and Waste Management control zone is presented in tabular form. Estimates of the radioactivity discharged to individual ponds, cribs, and specific retention sites are given. (LK)

  14. Toxicity limitation on radioactive liquid waste discharge at OPG Nuclear Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobson, T.; Lovasic, Z.; Nicolaides, G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Municipal and Industrial Strategy for Abatement (MISA) regulation, which came into effect in 1995 in Ontario (Ontario Regulation 215/95 under the Environmental Protection Act). This imposed additional limitations on liquid discharges from power generating stations. The MISA regulation has divided discharges into non-event and event streams, which have to be monitored for the prescribed parameters and for toxicity. Radioactive Waste Management Systems fall into the category of non-event streams. Standard toxicity testing involves monitoring lethality of Daphnia Magna and Rainbow trout in the effluent. The new legislation has imposed a need to address several issues: acute toxicity, complying with the specific limits prescribed by the regulation and, in the long run chronic toxicity

  15. Contaminant transport modelling in tidal influenced water body for low level liquid waste discharge out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sanjay; Naidu, Velamala Simhadri

    2018-01-01

    Low level liquid waste is generated from nuclear reactor operation and reprocessing of spent fuel. This waste is discharged into the water body after removing bulk of its radioactivity. Dispersion of contaminant mainly depends on location of outfall and hydrodynamics of water body. For radiological impact assessment, in most of the analytical formulations, source term is taken as continuous release. However, this may not be always true as the water level is influenced by tidal movement and the selected outfall may come under intertidal zone in due course of the tidal cycle. To understand these phenomena, a case study has been carried out to evaluate hydrodynamic characteristics and dilution potential of outfall located in inter-tidal zone using numerical modelling

  16. Radioactive liquid wastes discharged to ground in the 200 areas during 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, R.C.

    1986-03-01

    This document summarizes radioactive liquids discharged to the ground in the 200 areas of the Hanford site and is provided pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5484.1A, ''Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements.'' There are twenty-eight liquid discharge streams in the 200 areas excluding sanitary sewers. Twenty-five streams were normally or potentially contaminated with radioactive material in 1985. Two streams had no potential for radioactive contamination but were included as adjustments in this report to maintain an accurate record of the total volume of the discharges to each disposal site. One stream, the 242-S Evaporator cooling water discharge, was not used during 1985

  17. Liquid waste sampling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosuge, Tadashi

    1998-01-01

    A liquid pumping pressure regulator is disposed on the midway of a pressure control tube which connects the upper portion of a sampling pot and the upper portion of a liquid waste storage vessel. With such a constitution, when the pressure in the sampling pot is made negative, and liquid wastes are sucked to the liquid pumping tube passing through the sampling pot, the difference between the pressure on the entrance of the liquid pumping pressure regulator of the pressure regulating tube and the pressure at the bottom of the liquid waste storage vessel is made constant. An opening degree controlling meter is disposed to control the degree of opening of a pressure regulating valve for sending actuation pressurized air to the liquid pumping pressure regulator. Accordingly, even if the liquid level of liquid wastes in the liquid waste storage vessel is changed, the height for the suction of the liquid wastes in the liquid pumping tube can be kept constant. With such procedures, sampling can be conducted correctly, and the discharge of the liquid wastes to the outside can be prevented. (T.M.)

  18. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide sets out the radiation safety requirements and limits for the treatment of radioactive waste. They shall be observed when discharging radioactive substances into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid, low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste treatment plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilisation of nuclear energy or natural resources.

  19. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The guide sets out the radiation safety requirements and limits for the treatment of radioactive waste. They shall be observed when discharging radioactive substances into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid, low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste treatment plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilisation of nuclear energy or natural resources

  20. Vadose zone monitoring plan using geophysical nuclear logging for radionuclides discharged to Hanford liquid waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    During plutonium production at Hanford, large quantities of hazardous and radioactive liquid effluent waste have been discharged to the subsurface (vadose zone). These discharges at over 330 liquid effluent disposal facilities (ie. cribs, ditches, and ponds) account for over 3,000,000 curies of radioactive waste released into the subsurface. It is estimated that 10% of the contaminants have reached the groundwater in many places. Continuing migration may further impact groundwater quality in the future. Through the RCRA Operational Monitoring Program, a Radionuclide Logging System (RLS) has been obtained by Hanford Technical Services (HTS) and enhanced to measure the distribution of contaminants and monitor radionuclide movement in existing groundwater and vadose zone boreholes. Approximately 100 wells are logged by HTS each year in this program. In some cases, movement has been observed years after discharges were terminated. A similar program is in place to monitor the vadose zone at the Tank Farms. This monitoring plan describes Hanford Programs for monitoring the movement of radioactive contamination in the vadose zone. Program background, drivers, and strategy are presented. The objective of this program is to ensure that DOE-RL is aware of any migration of contaminants in the vadose zone, such that groundwater can be protected and early actions can be taken as needed

  1. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    According to the Section 24 of the Finnish Radiation Decree (1512/91), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety shall specify the concentration and activity limits and principles for the determination whether a waste can be defined as a radioactive waste or not. The radiation safety requirements and limits for the disposal of radioactive waste are given in the guide. They must be observed when discharging radioactive waste into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste disposal plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilization of nuclear energy of natural resources. (4 refs., 1 tab.)

  2. Radioactive liquid waste solidifying device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Yoshio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the requirement for discharge gas processing and avoid powder clogging in a facility suitable to the volume-reducing solidification of regenerated liquid wastes containing sodium sulfate. Constitution: Liquid wastes supplied to a liquid waste preheater are heated under a pressure higher than the atmospheric pressure at a level below the saturation temperature for that pressure. The heated liquid wastes are sprayed from a spray nozzle from the inside of an evaporator into the super-heated state and subjected to flash distillation. They are further heated to deposit and solidify the solidification components in the solidifying evaporation steams. The solidified powder is fallen downwardly and heated for removing water content. The recovered powder is vibrated so as not to be solidified and then reclaimed in a solidification storage vessel. Steams after flash distillation are separated into gas, liquid and solids by buffles. (Horiuchi, T.)

  3. Liquid waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kaname; Obe, Etsuji; Wakamatsu, Toshifumi.

    1989-01-01

    In a liquid waste processing device for processing living water wastes discharged from nuclear power plant facilities through a filtration vessel and a sampling vessel, a filtration layer disposed in the filtration vessel is divided into a plurality of layers along planes vertical to the direction of flow and the size of the filter material for each of the divided layers is made finer toward the downstream. Further, the thickness of the filtration material in each of the divided layers is also reduced toward the downstream. The filter material is packed such that the porosity in each of the divided layers is substantially identical. Further, the filtration material is packed in a mesh-like bag partitioned into a desired size and laid with no gaps to the planes vertical to the direction of the flow. Thus, liquid wastes such as living water wastes can be processed easily and simply so as to satisfy circumstantial criteria without giving undesired effects on the separation performance and life time and with easy replacement of filter. (T.M.)

  4. Management of Discharge of Low Level Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated in Medical, Educational, Research and Industrial Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-15

    Although published information on management technologies suitable for radioactive effluents is readily available, smaller facilities such as hospitals, universities and research laboratories in some countries can benefit from more detailed guidance on identifying optimal arrangements for effectively managing their radioactive liquid effluents. A wide range of circumstances exist globally, given that the generation of radioactive liquid effluents may be regular or irregular, and the liquid effluents may be suitable for direct discharge to the environment, or may require a period of decay storage prior to discharge. Countries typically fit into one of the four following categories with respect to the status of their arrangements for the management of radioactive liquid effluents: (1) The country does not have sufficient technical, regulatory and organizational infrastructure to effectively manage its radioactive liquid effluents; (2) The country's technical infrastructure for effectively managing its radioactive liquid effluents is almost sufficient, but it is not supported by an acceptable level of regulatory and organizational capacity (e.g. legal infrastructure, administrative infrastructure); (3) The country has sufficient technical, regulatory and organizational capacity, but it is known that the application of the requirements for proper management of radioactive liquid effluents is, in many cases, not being carried out to the standard indicated by official reports; (4) The country has well developed and established regulatory and organizational capacity, which is complemented by an acceptable level of relevant technical infrastructure such that the radioactive liquid effluents can be properly managed. Facilities, as well as countries, in the first three categories will find information in this publication to assist their further development. Even countries that already have the necessary infrastructure to properly manage their liquid radioactive effluents may

  5. Management of Discharge of Low Level Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated in Medical, Educational, Research and Industrial Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    Although published information on management technologies suitable for radioactive effluents is readily available, smaller facilities such as hospitals, universities and research laboratories in some countries can benefit from more detailed guidance on identifying optimal arrangements for effectively managing their radioactive liquid effluents. A wide range of circumstances exist globally, given that the generation of radioactive liquid effluents may be regular or irregular, and the liquid effluents may be suitable for direct discharge to the environment, or may require a period of decay storage prior to discharge. Countries typically fit into one of the four following categories with respect to the status of their arrangements for the management of radioactive liquid effluents: (1) The country does not have sufficient technical, regulatory and organizational infrastructure to effectively manage its radioactive liquid effluents; (2) The country's technical infrastructure for effectively managing its radioactive liquid effluents is almost sufficient, but it is not supported by an acceptable level of regulatory and organizational capacity (e.g. legal infrastructure, administrative infrastructure); (3) The country has sufficient technical, regulatory and organizational capacity, but it is known that the application of the requirements for proper management of radioactive liquid effluents is, in many cases, not being carried out to the standard indicated by official reports; (4) The country has well developed and established regulatory and organizational capacity, which is complemented by an acceptable level of relevant technical infrastructure such that the radioactive liquid effluents can be properly managed. Facilities, as well as countries, in the first three categories will find information in this publication to assist their further development. Even countries that already have the necessary infrastructure to properly manage their liquid radioactive effluents may

  6. State Waste Discharge Permit application, 183-N Backwash Discharge Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173--216 (or 173--218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). The Consent Order No. DE91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. Liquid effluents on the Hanford Site have been classified as Phase I, Phase II, and Miscellaneous Streams. The Consent Order No. DE91NM-177 establishes milestones for State Waste Discharge Permit application submittals for all Phase I and Phase II streams, as well as the following 11 Miscellaneous Streams as identified in Table 4 of the Consent Order No. DE91NM-177.

  7. Low level radioactive waste management and discharge policies in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezdemir, T.; Oezdemir, C.; Uslu, I.

    2005-01-01

    The legal infrastructure in Turkey for the management of low-level radioactive waste covers the liquid, solid and gaseous wastes. Management of these radioactive wastes is briefly described in this paper. Moreover, delay and decay tank systems that are used to collect and store the low level radioactive wastes as a part of low-level radioactive effluent discharge policy are introduced. (author)

  8. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Kikuchi, M; Funabashi, K; Yusa, H; Horiuchi, S

    1978-12-21

    Purpose: To decrease the volume of radioactive liquid wastes essentially consisting of sodium hydroxide and boric acid. Method: The concentration ratio of sodium hydroxide to boric acid by weight in radioactive liquid wastes essentially consisting of sodium hydroxide and boric acid is adjusted in the range of 0.28 - 0.4 by means of a pH detector and a sodium concentration detector. Thereafter, the radioactive liquid wastes are dried into powder and then discharged.

  9. Liquid waste processing at Comanche Peak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes-Edwards, L.M.; Edwards, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the radioactive waste processing at Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station. Topics covered are the following: Reduction of liquid radioactive discharges (system leakage, outage planning); reduction of waste resin generation (waste stream segregation, processing methodology); reduction of activity released and off-site dose. 8 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Radiological effect of caesium-137 and strontium-90 on aquatic system of the pathway of the discharged liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinakhom, F.; Pothipin, K.; Supaokit, P.

    1984-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the radiological effect from the release of treated liquid radioactive waste to the fresh water environment in order to the protection of human health. The emphasis in this program was concentrated on Sr-90 and Cs-137 analyses on Sr-90 and Cs-137 analyses in surface water, water-plants and fish collected during August 1980 to July 1981. Sr-90 concentration was separated by solvent extraction (TBP-tributyl phosphate) procedure. Beta radioactivity of the two nuclides were measured in the form of yttrium oxalate (Y-90, the daughter nuclide of Sr-90) and caesium phospho-molybdate using a low-background anticoincidence proportional counter. To interpret the result obtained, the analytical data were converted to percent derived working limits (%DWL) using Derived Working Limit acquired from the value of (MPC) and water consumption rate stipulated by ICRP as 100% DWL. The value of %DWL is a useful and convenient index to judge the hazardous from radiation exposed by a certain group of people. The interpretation of the result revealed the equivalence of %DWL of Sr-90 and Cs-137 in canal-fish and swamp cabbage for people resided nearby the canal who obtained their whole protein from consumption of that fish from canal and vegetation grown in that water. The value above was equal 2.5 percent which means that this critical group of people exposed to the radiation only 2.5 percent of that intake limit recommended by ICRP. Thus, the amounts of waste disposed of from waste treatment plant into the canal were too small to have a radiological effect on the environment

  11. Transport of Zn (II by TDDA-Polypropylene Supported Liquid Membranes and Recovery from Waste Discharge Liquor of Galvanizing Plant of Zn (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanif Ur Rehman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The facilitated passage of Zn (II across flat sheet supported liquid membrane saturated with TDDA (tri-n-dodecylamine in xylene membrane phase has been investigated. The effect of acid and metal ion concentration in the feed solution, the carrier concentration in membrane phase, stripping agent concentration in stripping phase, and coions on the extraction of Zn (II was investigated. The stoichiometry of the extracted species, that is, complex, was investigated on slope analysis method and it was found that the complex (LH2·Zn(Cl2 is responsible for transport of Zn (II. A mathematical model was developed for transport of Zn (II, and the predicted results strongly agree with experimental ones. The mechanism of transport was determined by coupled coion transport mechanism with H+ and Cl− coupled ions. The optimized SLM was effectively used for elimination of Zn (II from waste discharge liquor of galvanizing plant of Zn (II.

  12. Healthcare liquid waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, D R; Pradhan, B; Pathak, R P; Shrestha, S C

    2010-04-01

    The management of healthcare liquid waste is an overlooked problem in Nepal with stern repercussions in terms of damaging the environment and affecting the health of people. This study was carried out to explore the healthcare liquid waste management practices in Kathmandu based central hospitals of Nepal. A descriptive prospective study was conducted in 10 central hospitals of Kathmandu during the period of May to December 2008. Primary data were collected through interview, observation and microbiology laboratory works and secondary data were collected by records review. For microbiological laboratory works,waste water specimens cultured for the enumeration of total viable counts using standard protocols. Evidence of waste management guidelines and committees for the management of healthcare liquid wastes could not be found in any of the studied hospitals. Similarly, total viable counts heavily exceeded the standard heterotrophic plate count (p=0.000) with no significant difference in such counts in hospitals with and without treatment plants (p=0.232). Healthcare liquid waste management practice was not found to be satisfactory. Installation of effluent treatment plants and the development of standards for environmental indicators with effective monitoring, evaluation and strict control via relevant legal frameworks were realized.

  13. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atencio, B.P.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations; the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

  14. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atencio, B.P.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department and Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-E Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

  15. Method of processing decontaminating liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusaka, Ken-ichi

    1989-01-01

    When decontaminating liquid wastes are processed by ion exchange resins, radioactive nuclides, metals, decontaminating agents in the liquid wastes are captured in the ion exchange resins. When the exchange resins are oxidatively deomposed, most of the ingredients are decomposed into water and gaseous carbonic acid and discharged, while sulfur ingredient in the resins is converted into sulfuric acid. In this case, even less oxidizable ingredients in the decontaminating agent made easily decomposable by oxidative decomposition together with the resins. The radioactive nuclides and a great amount of iron dissolved upon decontamination in the liquid wastes are dissolved in sulfuric acid formed. When the sulfuric acid wastes are nuetralized with sodium hydroxide, since they are formed into sodium sulfate, which is most popular as wastes from nuclear facilities, they can be condensated and solidified by existent waste processing systms to thereby facilitate the waste processing. (K.M.)

  16. Radioactive liquid waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Susumu; Kuroda, Noriko; Matsumoto, Hiroyo.

    1991-01-01

    The present device comprises a radioactive liquid wastes concentration means for circulating radioactive liquid wastes between each of the tank, a pump and a film evaporator thereby obtaining liquid concentrates and a distilled water recovery means for condensing steams separated by the film evaporator by means of a condenser. It further comprises a cyclizing means for circulating the resultant distilled water to the upstream after the concentration of the liquid concentrates exceeds a predetermined value or the quality of the distilled water reaches a predetermined level. Further, a film evaporator having hydrophilic and homogeneous films is used as a film evaporator. Then, the quality of the distilled water discharged from the present device to the downstream can always satisfy the predetermined conditions. Further, by conducting operation at high concentration while interrupting the supply of the processing liquids, high concentration up to the aimed concentration can be attained. Further, since the hydrophilic homogeneous films are used, carry over of the radioactive material accompanying the evaporation is eliminated to reduce the working ratio of the vacuum pump. (T.M.)

  17. Radioactive liquid waste filtering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inami, Ichiro; Tabata, Masayuki; Kubo, Koji.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent clogging in filter materials and improve the filtration performance for radioactive liquid wastes without increasing the amount of radioactive wastes. Constitution: In a radioactive waste filtering device, a liquid waste recycling pipe and a liquid recycling pump are disposed for recycling the radioactive liquid wastes in a liquid wastes vessel. In this case, the recycling pipe and the recycling pump are properly selected so as to satisfy the conditions capable of making the radioactive liquid wastes flowing through the pipe to have the Reynolds number of 10 4 - 10 5 . By repeating the transportation of radioactive liquid wastes in the liquid waste vessel through the liquid waste recycling pipe by the liquid waste recycling pump and then returning them to the liquid waste vessel again, particles of fine grain size in the suspended liquids are coagulated with each other upon collision to increase the grain size of the suspended particles. In this way, clogging of the filter materials caused by the particles of fine grain size can be prevented, thereby enabling to prevent the increase in the rising rate of the filtration differential pressure, reduce the frequency for the occurrence of radioactive wastes such as filter sludges and improve the processing performance. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. State waste discharge permit application, 200-E chemical drain field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect ground would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). The Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. This document presents the State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) application for the 200-E Chemical Drain Field. Waste water from the 272-E Building enters the process sewer line directly through a floor drain, while waste water from the 2703-E Building is collected in two floor drains, (north and south) that act as sumps and are discharged periodically. The 272-E and 2703-E Buildings constitute the only discharges to the process sewer line and the 200-E Chemical Drain Field

  19. State waste discharge permit application, 200-E chemical drain field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect ground would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). The Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. This document presents the State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) application for the 200-E Chemical Drain Field. Waste water from the 272-E Building enters the process sewer line directly through a floor drain, while waste water from the 2703-E Building is collected in two floor drains, (north and south) that act as sumps and are discharged periodically. The 272-E and 2703-E Buildings constitute the only discharges to the process sewer line and the 200-E Chemical Drain Field.

  20. Preliminary Characterization of the Liquid Discharge of the Mexico Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Rojas, A

    2001-01-01

    The generation and wrong handling of hospital waste constitutes a serious problem at national level. In this work, a preliminary characterization of the discharge it liquidates of the Mexico Hospital is carried out. For it, different pouring points were analyzed inside the institution; they are: Laundry, Central Kitchen, Clinical Laboratory, X-Rays, Laboratory of Biomass, Morgue, and the final discharge of the hospital. This with the purpose of knowing the handling of the liquid waste in the health center, the sanitary quality of these liquids and their influence in the raw waters of the Mexico Hospital in the receiving body. For this study, we first coordinated with the personnel of each department to know about the handling and type of liquid residuals that are discharged to the system of pipes. Later on the physical-chemical and biological tests were carried out with base in two compound samplings done the days October 26 and November 4 1998. Among the carried out tests we have: pH, DBO, DQO, SAAM, Fatty and Oils, Temperature, Nitrogen and Faecal Coniforms, depending on the characteristics of their origin point. At the end of the study, the obtained results were evaluated for each studied pouring point, and then the influence of these focuses on the quality of the raw waters of the hospital that discharge in a gulch located to the northwest side of the facilities was analyzed. The obtained results allow to preliminarily know the characterization of the liquid discharge of the Mexico Hospital and it was classified as a source of contamination. The Hospital requires of a biological treatment plant for those biodegradable poured liquids, and of a system of chemical treatment for that type of products used in the processes characteristic of each department. It is also required to take into account measures of reduction of contamination that diminish the quantity of waste from the source. (Author) [es

  1. Treatment of ORNL liquid low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.B.; Brown, C.H. Jr.; Fowler, V.L.; Robinson, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    Discontinuation of the hydrofracture disposal method at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has caused intensive efforts to reduce liquid waste generation. Improving the treatment of slightly radioactive liquid waste, called process waste, has reduced the volume of the resulting contaminated liquid radioactive waste effluent by 66%. Proposed processing improvements could eliminate the contaminated liquid effluent and reduce solid low-level waste by an additional one-third. The improved process meets stringent discharge limits for radionuclides. Discharge limits for radionuclides are expected to be enforced at the outfall of the treatment plant to a creek; currently, limits are enforced at the reservation boundary. Plant discharge is monitored according to the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for ORNL. 1 ref., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. State Waste Discharge Permit application, 100-N Sewage Lagoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173--216 (or 173--218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Since the influent to the sewer lagoon is domestic waste water, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used. Although the 100-N Sewage Lagoon is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. The 100-N Sewage Lagoon serves the 100-N Area and other Hanford Site areas by receiving domestic waste from two sources. A network of sanitary sewer piping and lift stations transfers domestic waste water from the 100-N Area buildings directly to the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Waste is also received by trucks that transport domestic waste pumped from on site septic tanks and holding tanks. Three ponds comprise the 100-N Sewage Lagoon treatment system. These include a lined aeration pond and stabilization pond, as well as an unlined infiltration pond. Both piped-in and trucked-in domestic waste is discharged directly into the aeration pond

  3. Effect of municipal liquid waste on corrosion susceptibility of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This investigation studied the effect of municipal liquid waste discharged into the environment within Kano municipal area on the corrosion susceptibility of galvanized steel pipe burial underground. Six stagnant and six moving municipal liquid waste samples were used for the investigation. The corrosion rate of the ...

  4. State waste discharge permit application: 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (Project W-049H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    As part of the original Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Concent Order negotiations, US DOE, US EPA and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground to the Hanford Site are subject to permitting in the State Waste Discharge Permit Program (SWDP). This document constitutes the SWDP Application for the 200 Area TEDF stream which includes the following streams discharged into the area: Plutonium Finishing Plant waste water; 222-S laboratory Complex waste water; T Plant waste water; 284-W Power Plant waste water; PUREX chemical Sewer; B Plant chemical sewer, process condensate, steam condensate; 242-A-81 Water Services waste water

  5. State waste discharge permit application: 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (Project W-049H)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    As part of the original Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Concent Order negotiations, US DOE, US EPA and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground to the Hanford Site are subject to permitting in the State Waste Discharge Permit Program (SWDP). This document constitutes the SWDP Application for the 200 Area TEDF stream which includes the following streams discharged into the area: Plutonium Finishing Plant waste water; 222-S laboratory Complex waste water; T Plant waste water; 284-W Power Plant waste water; PUREX chemical Sewer; B Plant chemical sewer, process condensate, steam condensate; 242-A-81 Water Services waste water.

  6. Decontamination liquid waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enda, Masami; Hosaka, Katsumi.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid wastes after electrolytic reduction are caused to flow through an anionic exchange membrane in a diffusion dialysis step, and liquid wastes and dialyzed water are passed in a countercurrent manner. Since acids in the liquid wastes transfer on the side of the dialyzed water due to the difference of concentration between the liquid wastes and the dialyzed water, acids can be easily recovered from the liquid wastes. If the acid-removed liquid wastes are put to electrodeposition in an electrodepositing step, the electrodepositing reactions between radioactive materials such as Co ion, Mn ion and leached metals such as Fe ions and Cr ions are caused preferentially to hydrogen generation reaction on a metal deposition cathode. Accordingly, metal ions can be easily separated from the liquid wastes. Since the separated liquid wastes are an aqueous solution in which cerium ions as a decontaminant and an acid at low concentration are dissolved, the concentration thereof is controlled by mixing them to acid recovering water after the diffusion dialysis and they can be reused as the decontaminant. (T.M.)

  7. Method of vitrificating fine-containing liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, Minoru; Matsunaka, Kazuhisa.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns a vitrificating method of liquid wastes containing fines (metal powder discharged upon cutting fuel cans) used in a process for treating high level radioactive liquid wastes or a process for treating liquid wastes from nuclear power plants. Liquid wastes containing fines, slurries, etc. are filtered by a filter vessel comprising glass fibers. The fines are supplied as they are to a glass melting furnace placed in the vessel. Filterates formed upon filteration are mixed with other high level radioactive wastes and supplied together with starting glass material to the glass melting furnace. Since the fine-containing liquid wastes are processed separately from high radioactive liquid wastes, clogging of pipeways, etc. can be avoided, supply to the melting furnace is facilitated and the operation efficiency of the vitrification process can be improved. (I.N.)

  8. Water quality for liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuniwa, Fumio; Maekoya, Chiaki; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Yano, Hiroaki; Watahiki, Kazuo.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the automation of the operation for a liquid wastes processing system by enabling continuous analysis for the main ingredients in the liquid wastes accurately and rapidly. Constitution: The water quality monitor comprises a sampling pipeway system for taking out sample water for the analysis of liquid wastes from a pipeway introducing liquid wastes to the liquid wastes concentrator, a filter for removing suspended matters in the sample water and absorption photometer as a water quality analyzer. A portion of the liquid wastes is passed through the suspended matter filter by a feedpump. In this case, sulfate ions and chloride ions in the sample are retained in the upper portion of a separation color and, subsequently, the respective ingredients are separated and leached out by eluting solution. Since the leached out ingredients form ferric ions and yellow complexes respectively, their concentrations can be detected by the spectrum photometer. Accordingly, concentration for the sodium sulfate and sodium chloride in the liquid wastes can be analyzed rapidly, accurately and repeatedly by which the water quality can be determined rapidly and accurately. (Yoshino, Y.)

  9. Immobilization of organic liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a portland cement immobilization process for the disposal treatment of radioactive organic liquid wastes which would be generated in a a FFTF fuels reprocessing line. An incineration system already on-hand was determined to be too costly to operate for the 100 to 400 gallons per year organic liquid. Organic test liquids were dispersed into an aqueous phosphate liquid using an emulsifier. A total of 109 gallons of potential and radioactive aqueous immiscible organic liquid wastes from Hanford 300 Area operations were solidified with portland cement and disposed of as solid waste during a 3-month test program with in-drum mixers. Waste packing efficiencies varied from 32 to 40% and included pump oils, mineral spirits, and TBP-NPH type solvents

  10. Acid fractionation for low level liquid waste cleanup and recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gombert, D. II; McIntyre, C.V.; Mizia, R.E.; Schindler, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    At the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, low level liquid wastes containing small amounts of radionuclides are concentrated via a thermosyphon evaporator for calcination with high level waste, and the evaporator condensates are discharged with other plant wastewater to a percolation pond. Although all existing discharge guidelines are currently met, work has been done to reduce all waste water discharges to an absolute minimum. In this regard, a 15-tray acid fractionation column will be used to distill the mildly acidic evaporator condensates into concentrated nitric acid for recycle in the plant. The innocuous overheads from the fractionator having a pH greater than 2, are superheated and HEPA filtered for atmospheric discharge. Nonvolatile radionuclides are below detection limits. Recycle of the acid not only displaces fresh reagent, but reduces nitrate burden to the environment, and completely eliminates routine discharge of low level liquid wastes to the environment

  11. State Waste Discharge Permit application for industrial discharge to land: 200 East Area W-252 streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This document constitutes the WAC 173-216 State Waste Discharge Permit application for six W-252 liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site. Appendices B through H correspond to Section B through H in the permit application form. Within each appendix, sections correspond directly to the respective questions on the application form. The appendices include: Product or service information; Plant operational characteristics; Water consumption and waterloss; Wastewater information; Stormwater; Other information; and Site assessment

  12. State waste discharge permit application: Hydrotest, maintenance and construction discharges. Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    On December 23, 1991, the US DOE< Richland Operation Office (RL) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) agreed to adhere to the provisions of the Department of Ecology Consent Order No. DE91NM-177 (216 Consent Order) (Ecology and US DOE 1991). The 216 Consent Order list regulatory milestones for liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site and requires compliance with the permitting requirements of Washington Administrative Code. Hanford Site liquid effluent streams discharging to the soil column have been categorized on the 216 Consent Order as follows: Phase I Streams; Phase II Streams; Miscellaneous Streams. Phase I and Phase II Streams were initially addressed in two report. Miscellaneous Streams are subject to the requirements of several milestones identified in the 216 Consent Order. This document constitutes the Categorical State Waste Discharge Permit application for hydrotest,maintenance and construction discharges throughout the Hanford Site. This categorical permit application form was prepared and approved by Ecology

  13. State waste discharge permit application: Hydrotest, maintenance and construction discharges. Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    On December 23, 1991, the US DOE< Richland Operation Office (RL) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) agreed to adhere to the provisions of the Department of Ecology Consent Order No. DE91NM-177 (216 Consent Order) (Ecology and US DOE 1991). The 216 Consent Order list regulatory milestones for liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site and requires compliance with the permitting requirements of Washington Administrative Code. Hanford Site liquid effluent streams discharging to the soil column have been categorized on the 216 Consent Order as follows: Phase I Streams; Phase II Streams; Miscellaneous Streams. Phase I and Phase II Streams were initially addressed in two report. Miscellaneous Streams are subject to the requirements of several milestones identified in the 216 Consent Order. This document constitutes the Categorical State Waste Discharge Permit application for hydrotest,maintenance and construction discharges throughout the Hanford Site. This categorical permit application form was prepared and approved by Ecology.

  14. Radioactive liquid waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Yoshikawa, Jun; Noda, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Fumio.

    1995-01-01

    Floor drainages are mixed with low electroconductive liquid wastes, and after filtering the mixed liquid wastes by a hollow thread membrane filters, they are subjected to a desalting treatment by a desalter. The mixing ratio of the floor drainages to the lower electroconductive liquid wastes is determined to not more than 50wt%. With such procedures, since ionic ingredients are further diluted by mixing the floor drainages to the low electroconductive liquid wastes, sufficient margin can be provided up to the saturation of the ion exchange resins of the desalter, to maintain the ion exchange performance for a long period of time. Further, the recovery of the amount of permeation water and a differential pressure of filtration upon back washing of the hollow thread membrane filters is facilitated, thereby enabling to perform regeneration easily at high efficiency. (T.M.)

  15. Processing method for discharged radioactive laundry water waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumida, Tatsuo; Kitsukawa, Ryozo; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Kiuchi, Yoshimasa; Hattori, Yasuo.

    1995-01-01

    In order to process discharged radioactive laundry water wastes safely and decrease radioactive wastes, bubbling of a surface active agent in a detergent which causes a problem upon its condensation is suppressed, so that the liquid condensate are continuously and easily dried into a powder. A nonionic surface active agent is used against the bubbling of the surface active agent. In addition, the bubbling in an the evaporation can is reduced, and the powderization is facilitated by adding an appropriate inorganic builder. (T.M.)

  16. Method of processing liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naba, Katsumi; Oohashi, Takeshi; Kawakatsu, Ryu; Kuribayashi, Kotaro.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To process radioactive liquid wastes with safety by distillating radioactive liquid wastes while passing gases, properly treating the distillation fractions, adding combustible and liquid synthetic resin material to the distillation residues, polymerizing to solidify and then burning them. Method: Radioactive substance - containing liquid wastes are distillated while passing gases and the distillation fractions containing no substantial radioactive substances are treated in an adequate method. Synthetic resin material, which may be a mixture of polymer and monomer, is added together with a catalyst to the distillation residues containing almost of the radioactive substances to polymerize and solidify. Water or solvent in such an extent as not hindering the solidification may be allowed if remained. The solidification products are burnt for facilitating the treatment of the radioactive substances. The resin material can be selected suitably, methacrylate syrup (mainly solution of polymethylmethacrylate and methylmethacrylate) being preferred. (Seki, T.)

  17. Plasma-liquid system with rotational gliding discharge with liquid electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedybaliuk, O.A.; Solomenko, O.V; Martysh, E.V.; Fedirchuk, I.I.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma-liquid system based on rotational gliding discharge with one liquid electrode was developed. Emission spectra of plasma of rotational gliding discharge with one liquid electrode were investigated. Discovered effective mechanism of controlling non-isothermal level of plasma in dynamic plasma-liquid systems. Major mechanism of expulsion of metal anode material from plasma-liquid systems with rotational discharges was shown.

  18. Solid and liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluchet, J.; Desroches, J.

    1977-01-01

    The problems raised by the solid and liquid radioactive wastes from the CEA nuclear centres are briefly exposed. The processing methods developed at the Saclay centre are described together with the methods for the wastes from nuclear power plants and reprocessing plants. The different storage techniques used at the La Hague centre are presented. The production of radioactive wastes by laboratories, hospitals and private industry is studied for the sealed sources and the various radioactive substances used in these plants. The cost of the radioactive wastes is analysed: processing, transport, long term storage [fr

  19. Radioactive liquid waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Tetsuya; Kuramitsu, Kiminori; Ishii, Tomoharu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a system for processing radioactive liquid wastes containing laundry liquid wastes, shower drains or radioactive liquid wastes containing chemical oxygen demand (COD) ingredients and oil content generated from a nuclear power plant. Namely, a collecting tank collects radioactive liquid wastes. A filtering device is connected to the exit of the collective tank. A sump tank is connected to the exit of the filtering device. A powdery active carbon supplying device is connected to the collecting tank. A chemical fluid tank is connected to the collecting tank and the filtering device by way of chemical fluid injection lines. Backwarding pipelines connect a filtered water flowing exit of the filtering device and the collecting tank. The chemical solution is stored in the chemical solution tank. Then, radioactive materials in radioactive liquid wastes generated from a nuclear power plant are removed by the filtering device. The water quality standard specified in environmental influence reports can be satisfied. In the filtering device, when the filtering flow rate is reduced, the chemical fluid is supplied from the chemical fluid tank to the filtering device to recover the filtering flow rate. (I.S.)

  20. Method of processing low-level radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Ichiro; Sugai, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively reduce the radioactivity density of low-level radioactive liquid wastes discharged from enriched uranium conversion processing steps or the likes. Method: Hydrazin is added to low-level radioactive liquid wastes, which are in contact with iron hydroxide-cation exchange resins prepared by processing strongly acidic-cation exchange resins with ferric chloride and aqueous ammonia to form hydrorizates of ferric ions in the resin. Hydrazine added herein may be any of hydrazine hydrate, hydrazine hydrochloride and hydranine sulfate. The preferred addition amount is more than 100 mg per one liter of the liquid wastes. If it is less than 100 mg, the reduction rate for the radioactivety density (procession liquid density/original liquid density) is decreased. This method enables to effectively reduce the radioactivity density of the low-level radioactive liquid wastes containing a trace amount of radioactive nucleides. (Yoshihara, H.)

  1. Liquid discharges from the use of radionuclides in medicine (diagnosis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barquero, R.; Agulla, M.M.; Ruiz, A.

    2008-01-01

    The production and discharge of liquid radioactive wastes as excreta from patients undergoing Nuclear Medicine Diagnostic (NMD) in a hospital were studied. Instantaneous and accumulated activity, discharged from the hospital to the sewage system, has been estimated keeping in mind radionuclide decay. This study would enable estimation of the environmental impact due to NMD procedures. Annual accumulated activities of 2.2 GBq ( 131 I), 1.847 GBq ( 99m Tc), 0.743 GBq ( 123 I), 0.337 GBq ( 67 Ga), 0.169 GBq ( 111 In) and 0.033 GBq ( 201 Tl) result from our model when applied to a European hospital. A comparison is made with calculations by other authors that do not consider the radionuclide decay and who overestimate by two orders of magnitude. Doses to critical people as sewage treatment workers are also significantly reduced. So, our results stress the importance of including the decay in the calculations

  2. Liquid discharges from patients undergoing {sup 131}I treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barquero, R. [Servicio de Radiofisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Universitario Rio Hortega, E-47010 Valladolid (Spain)], E-mail: rbarquero@hurh.sacyl.es; Basurto, F. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47010 Valladolid (Spain); Nunez, C. [Servicio de Radiofisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, FJD, E-82001 Madrid (Spain); Esteban, R. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Clinico Universitario, E-47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2008-10-15

    This work discusses the production and management of liquid radioactive wastes as excretas from patients undergoing therapy procedures with {sup 131}I radiopharmaceuticals in Spain. The activity in the sewage has been estimated with and without waste radioactive decay tanks. Two common therapy procedures have been considered, the thyroid cancer (4.14 GBq administered per treatment), and the hyperthyroidism (414 MBq administered per treatment). The calculations were based on measurements of external exposure around the 244 hyperthyroidism patients and 23 thyroid cancer patients. The estimated direct activity discharged to the sewage for two thyroid carcinomas and three hyperthyroidisms was 14.57 GBq and 1.27 GBq, respectively, per week; the annual doses received by the most exposed individual (sewage worker) were 164 {mu}Sv and 13 {mu}Sv, respectively. General equations to calculate the activity as a function of the number of patient treated each week were also obtained.

  3. Boiling water reactor liquid radioactive waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The standard sets forth minimum design, construction and performance requirements with due consideration for operation of the liquid radioactive waste processing system for boiling water reactor plants for routine operation including design basis fuel leakage and design basis occurrences. For the purpose of this standard, the liquid radioactive waste processing system begins at the interfaces with the reactor coolant pressure boundary, at the interface valve(s) in lines from other systems and at those sumps and floor drains provided for liquid waste with the potential of containing radioactive material. The system terminates at the point of controlled discharge to the environment, at the point of interface with the waste solidification system and at the point of recycle back to storage for reuse. The standard does not include the reactor coolant clean-up system, fuel pool clean-up system, sanitary waste system, any nonaqueous liquid system or controlled area storm drains

  4. Radioactive liquid wastes processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauda, Kenzo; Koshiba, Yukihiko; Yagi, Takuro; Yamazaki, Hideki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To carry out optimum photooxidizing procession following after the fluctuation in the density of organic materials in radioactive liquid wastes to thereby realize automatic remote procession. Constitution: A reaction tank is equipped with an ultraviolet lamp and an ozone dispersing means for the oxidizing treatment of organic materials in liquid wastes under the irradiation of UV rays. There are also provided organic material density measuring devices to the inlet and outlet of the reaction tank, and a control device for controlling the UV lamp power adjusting depending on the measured density. The output of the UV lamp is most conveniently adjusted by changing the applied voltage. The liquid wastes in which the radioactivity dose is reduced to a predetermined level are returned to the reaction tank by the operation of a switching valve for reprocession. The amount of the liquid wastes at the inlet is controlled depending on the measured ozone density by the adjusting valve. In this way, the amount of organic materials to be subjected to photolysis can be kept within a certain limit. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Radioactive waste management at a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, C.S.; Fryer, R.H.; Witbeck, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the radioactive waste production and management at a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), which is operated for the US Department of Energy by the Argonne National Laboratory at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Since this facility, in addition to supplying power has been used to demonstrate the breeder, fuel cycling, and recently operations with defective fuel elements, various categories of waste have been handled safely over some 14 years of operation. Liquid wastes are processed such that the resulting effluent can be discharged to an uncontrolled area. Solid wastes up to 10,000 R/hr are packaged and shipped contamination-free to a disposal site or interim storage with exposures to personnel approximately 10 mrem. Gaseous waste discharges are low such as 143 Ci of noble gases in 1978 and do not have a significant effect on the environment even with operations with breached fuel

  6. Apparatus of vaporizing and condensing liquid radioactive wastes and its operation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Hiromitsu; Tajima, Fumio.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent corrosion of material for a vapor-condenser and a vapor heater and to prevent radioactive contamination of heated vapor. Structure: Liquid waste is fed from a liquid feeding tank to a vapor-condenser to vaporize and condense the waste. Uncondensed liquid waste, which is not in a level of a given density, is temporally stored in a batch tank through a switching valve and a pipe. Prior to successive feeding from the liquid feeding tank, the uncondensed liquid waste within the batch tank is returned by a return pump to the condenser, after which a new liquid is fed from the liquid feeding tank for re-vaporization and condensation in the vapor-condenser. Then, similar operation is repeated until the uncondensed liquid waste assumes a given density, and when the uncondensed liquid waste reaches a given density, the condensed liquid waste is discharged into the storage tank through the switching valve. (Ohara, T.)

  7. Filters for radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshiba, Yukihiko; Kawashima, Akio

    1980-01-01

    In the crud generated in the reactor cooling water for nuclear power plants, iron oxides (hematite and magnetite) are contained as the main components, and also Co, Mn, Fe, Cr exist as radioactive nuclides. A new filter to separate these cruds, nuclepore membrane filter (NPMF), was investigated for its adaptability, and has been adopted as a practical filter for radioactive liquid wastes. The NPMF has such features as the possibility of complete automation of operation, no generation of secondary wastes, and easy maintenance, because the NPMF has uniform circular holes in poly-carbonate thin films, and shows the properties of stable filtering of particulates, capability of back washing, and others. The elements mounted in a practical system have such construction that the membrane is cut in the form of doughnut, and sandwiched with 100 mesh polyester nets (spacer); the obtained unit filter (cassette) is mounted on the stackable plate of the same size; and 80 pieces of this cassette are formed in a filter of 4 m 2 filtering area. The performance varies with the properties of suspended matters and the turbidity of wastes. For example, the filtered liquid of 0.1 ppm or less can be obtained when the 1 μm filter material is used to treat the liquid waste containing 1 to 100 ppm suspended matters. Usually back washed water is produced by about 1/100 of treated liquid wastes. The lifetime of the membrane is expected to be 1 or 2 years if crud is the main component. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  8. Method of processing radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motojima, Kenji; Kawamura, Fumio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the efficiency of removing radioactive cesium from radioactive liquid waste by employing zeolite affixed to metallic compound ferrocyanide as an adsorbent. Method: Regenerated liquid waste of a reactor condensation desalting unit, floor drain and so forth are collected through respective supply tubes to a liquid waste tank, and the liquid waste is fed by a pump to a column filled with zeolite containing a metallic compound ferrocyanide, such as with copper, zinc, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel or the like. The liquid waste from which radioactive cesium is removed is dried and pelletized by volume reducing and solidifying means. (Yoshino, Y.)

  9. Radioactive liquid waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inakuma, Masahiko; Takahara, Nobuaki; Hara, Satomi.

    1996-01-01

    Laundry liquid wastes and shower drains containing radioactive materials generated in a nuclear power plant are removed with radioactive materials by a fiber filtration device and an activated carbon filtration device to satisfy standers of water quality described in the environmental effect investigation report. Spent activated carbon is dehydrated together with the back-wash liquid from the fiber filtration device and the activated carbon filtration device using a Nutsche-type filtration dryer. With such procedures, the scale of the facility is minimized, space for devices, maintenance for equipments and radiation dose rate are reduced. (T.M.)

  10. State waste discharge permit application for cooling water and condensate discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggard, R.D.

    1996-08-12

    The following presents the Categorical State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) Application for the Cooling Water and Condensate Discharges on the Hanford Site. This application is intended to cover existing cooling water and condensate discharges as well as similar future discharges meeting the criteria set forth in this document.

  11. Liquidation of wastes as tuition topic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolar, K.; Hysplerova, L.; Holy, I.

    1999-01-01

    Authors deal in this paper with tuition project aimed on the liquidation of wastes. Structure of project includes next thematic complex: classification of inorganic and organic wastes; characterization of wastes and proposition for their liquidation (detoxication) or recyclation; chemical (physical) nature of neutralize of inorganic and organic wastes; general method of neutralize of wastes; analytical methods necessary for control of course of neutralize (detoxication) of wastes. This tuition project allows for students to know manipulation with wastes and methods of their liquidation from ecologic point of view

  12. Treatment of low- and intermediate-level liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This report aims at giving the reader details of the experience gained in the treatment of both low- and intermediate-level radioactive liquid wastes. The treatment comprises those operations to remove radioactivity from the wastes and those that change only its chemical composition, so as to permit its discharge. Considerable experience has been accumulated in the satisfactory treatment of such wastes. Although there are no universally accepted definitions for low- and intermediate-level liquid radioactive wastes, the IAEA classification (see section 3.2) is used in this report. The two categories differ from one another in the fact that for low-level liquids the actual radiation does not require shielding during normal handling of the wastes. Liquid wastes which are not considered in this report are those from mining and milling operations and the high-level liquid wastes resulting from fuel reprocessing. These are referred to in separate IAEA reports. Likewise, wastes from decommissioning operations are not within the scope of this report. Apart from the description of existing methods and facilities, this report is intended to provide advice to the reader for the selection of appropriate solutions to waste management problems. In addition, new and promising techniques which are either being investigated or being considered for the future are discussed

  13. Liquid waste treatment system. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, M.N.; Houston, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Pretreatment of high-level liquid radioactive waste (HLW) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) involved three distinct processing operations: decontamination of liquid HLW in the Supernatant Treatment System (STS); volume reduction of decontaminated liquid in the Liquid Waste Treatment System (LWTS); and encapsulation of resulting concentrates into an approved cement waste form in the Cement Solidification System (CSS). Together, these systems and operations made up the Integrated Radwaste Treatment System (IRTS)

  14. Method of processing radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Kuribayashi, Hiroshi; Soda, Kenzo; Mihara, Shigeru.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain satisfactory plastic solidification products rapidly and smoothly by adding oxidizers to radioactive liquid wastes. Method: Sulfuric acid, etc. are added to radioactive liquid wastes to adjust the pH value of the liquid wastes to less than 3.0. Then, ferrous sulfates are added such that the iron concentration in the liquid wastes is 100 mg/l. Then, after adjusting pH suitably to the drying powderization by adding alkali such as hydroxide, the liquid wastes are dried and powderized. The resultant powder is subjected to plastic solidification by using polymerizable liquid unsaturated polyester resins as the solidifying agent. The thus obtained solidification products are stable in view of the physical property such as strength or water proofness, as well as stable operation is possible even for those radioactive liquid wastes in which the content ingredients are unknown. (Takahashi, M.)

  15. Electrochemical treatment of liquid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.T. [Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Under this task, electrochemical treatment processes are being evaluated and developed for the destruction of organic compounds and nitrates/nitrites and the removal of other hazardous species from liquid wastes stored throughout the DOE complex. This technology targets the (1) destruction of nitrates, nitrites and organic compounds; (2) removal of radionuclides; and (3) removal of RCRA metals. The development program consists of five major tasks: (1) evaluation of electrochemical reactors for the destruction and removal of hazardous waste components, (2) development and validation of engineering process models, (3) radioactive laboratory-scale tests, (4) demonstration of the technology in an engineering-scale reactor, and (5) analysis and evaluation of test data. The development program team is comprised of individuals from national laboratories, academic institutions, and private industry. Possible benefits of this technology include: (1) improved radionuclide separation as a result of the removal of organic complexants, (2) reduction in the concentrations of hazardous and radioactive species in the waste (e.g., removal of nitrate, mercury, chromium, cadmium, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 106}Ru), (3) reduction in the size of the off-gas handling equipment for the vitrification of low-level waste (LLW) by reducing the source of NO{sub x} emissions, (4) recovery of chemicals of value (e.g. sodium hydroxide), and (5) reduction in the volume of waste requiring disposal.

  16. Treatment of complex electroplating waste by 'zero discharge' technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, B.Q.; Ram Sankar, P.; Jain, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    Surface treatment processes generate lot of liquid waste, which contains toxic substances and are potentially harmful to the living beings. It is extremely difficult to treat the pollutants where processes and frequencies are not fixed. In Chemical Treatment Facility of RRCAT, surface treatment processes are user dependent and makes the electroplating waste very complicated. Initially the waste was treated by simple chemical transformation technique in which heavy metal ions are converted to hydroxide precipitates. Non metallic ions that contribute much to the plating waste could not be treated by this process. To remove maximum possible pollutants, many experiments were conducted on the laboratory scale. Based on those results, a pilot ion exchange plant of various resins was introduced in the process to achieve disposal quality effluent. Anionic load of Phosphate, Nitrate and fluoride caused frequent anionic bed exhaustions and polymeric network damaging. To avoid this phenomenon a new setup was designed. This pre treatment has the capacity to treat 500 litres per hour connected to a platter with clarifier followed by high pressure carbon and pebbles filters. Analysis of these ions was carried out on the advanced ion chromatography system and is found free of toxic metals, phosphate and fluoride. This effluent can be reused by adding a reverse osmosis system followed by ion exchange system to produce good quality de mineralized water needed for surface treatment activities. In this paper we describe the existing status of effluent treatment facility and future plans for achieving 'zero discharge'. (author)

  17. Liquid radioactive waste processing system for pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    This Standard sets forth design, construction, and performance requirements, with due consideration for operation, of the Liquid Radioactive Waste Processing System for pressurized water reactor plants for design basis inputs. For the purpose of this Standard, the Liquid Radioactive Waste Processing System begins at the interfaces with the reactor coolant pressure boundary and the interface valve(s) in lines from other systems, or at those sumps and floor drains provided for liquid waste with the potential of containing radioactive material; and it terminates at the point of controlled discharge to the environment, at the point of interface with the waste solidification system, and at the point of recycle back to storage for reuse

  18. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes by solidification with cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Matsuura, Hiroyuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To subject radioactive liquid wastes to a cement solidification treatment after heating and drying it by a thin film scrape-off drier to render it into the form of power, and then molding it into pellets for the treatment. Structure: Radioactive liquid wastes discharged from a nuclear power plant or nuclear reactor are supplied through a storage tank into a thin film scrape-off drier. In the drier, the radioactive liquid wastes are heated to separate the liquid, and the residue is taken out as dry powder from the scrape-off apparatus. The powder obtained in this way is molded into pellets of a desired form. These pellets are then packed in a drum can or similar container, into which cement paste is then poured for solidification. (Moriyama, K.)

  19. Electrochemical treatment of liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, D.

    1996-01-01

    Electrochemical treatment processes are being evaluated and developed for the destruction of organic compounds and nitrates/nitrites and the removal of other hazardous species from liquid wastes stored throughout the DOE complex. This activity consists of five major tasks: (1) evaluation of different electrochemical reactors for the destruction and removal of hazardous waste components, (2) development and validation of engineering process models, (3) radioactive laboratory-scale tests, (4) demonstration of the technology in an engineering-scale size reactor, and (5) analysis and evaluation of testing data. The development program team is comprised of individuals from federal, academic, and private industry. Work is being carried out in DOE, academic, and private industrial laboratories

  20. Treatment of liquid radioactive waste: Precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gompper, K.

    1982-01-01

    After introductory remarks about waste types to be treated, specific treatment methods are discussed and examples are given for treatment processes carried out with different types of liquid wastes from nuclear power plants, research centers and fuel reprocessing plants. (RW)

  1. Radioactive liquid waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Takashi; Baba, Tsutomu; Fukazawa, Tetsuo; Matsuda, Masami; Chino, Koichi; Ikeda, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    As an adsorbent used for removing radioactive nuclides such as cesium and strontium from radioactive liquid wastes generated from a reprocessing plant, a silicon compound having siloxane bonds constituted by silicon and oxygen and having silanol groups constituted by silicon, oxygen and hydrogen, or an inorganic material mainly comprising aluminosilicate constituted with silicon, oxygen and aluminum is used. In the adsorbent of the present invention, since silica main skeletons are partially decomposed in an aqueous alkaline solution to newly form silanol groups having a cation adsorbing property, pretreatment such as pH adjustment is not necessary. (T.M.)

  2. Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility: Environmental Information Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haagenstad, H.T.; Gonzales, G.; Suazo, I.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the treatment of radioactive liquid waste is an integral function of the LANL mission: to assure U.S. military deterrence capability through nuclear weapons technology. As part of this mission, LANL conducts nuclear materials research and development (R&D) activities. These activities generate radioactive liquid waste that must be handled in a manner to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Radioactive liquid waste currently generated at LANL is treated at the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), located at Technical Area (TA)-50. The RLWTF is 30 years old and nearing the end of its useful design life. The facility was designed at a time when environmental requirements, as well as more effective treatment technologies, were not inherent in engineering design criteria. The evolution of engineering design criteria has resulted in the older technology becoming less effective in treating radioactive liquid wastestreams in accordance with current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory requirements. Therefore, to support ongoing R&D programs pertinent to its mission, LANL is in need of capabilities to efficiently treat radioactive liquid waste onsite or to transport the waste off site for treatment and/or disposal. The purpose of the EID is to provide the technical baseline information for subsequent preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the RLWTF. This EID addresses the proposed action and alternatives for meeting the purpose and need for agency action.

  3. Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility: Environmental Information Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haagenstad, H.T.; Gonzales, G.; Suazo, I.L.

    1993-11-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the treatment of radioactive liquid waste is an integral function of the LANL mission: to assure U.S. military deterrence capability through nuclear weapons technology. As part of this mission, LANL conducts nuclear materials research and development (R ampersand D) activities. These activities generate radioactive liquid waste that must be handled in a manner to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Radioactive liquid waste currently generated at LANL is treated at the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), located at Technical Area (TA)-50. The RLWTF is 30 years old and nearing the end of its useful design life. The facility was designed at a time when environmental requirements, as well as more effective treatment technologies, were not inherent in engineering design criteria. The evolution of engineering design criteria has resulted in the older technology becoming less effective in treating radioactive liquid wastestreams in accordance with current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory requirements. Therefore, to support ongoing R ampersand D programs pertinent to its mission, LANL is in need of capabilities to efficiently treat radioactive liquid waste onsite or to transport the waste off site for treatment and/or disposal. The purpose of the EID is to provide the technical baseline information for subsequent preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the RLWTF. This EID addresses the proposed action and alternatives for meeting the purpose and need for agency action

  4. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurumada, Norimitsu; Shibata, Setsuo; Wakabayashi, Toshikatsu; Kuribayashi, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the procession of liquid wastes containing insoluble salts of boric acid and calcium in a process for solidifying under volume reduction of radioactive liquid wastes containing boron. Method: A soluble calcium compound (such as calcium hydroxide, calcium oxide and calcium nitrate) is added to liquid wastes whose pH value is adjusted neutral or alkaline such that the molar ratio of calcium to boron in the liquid wastes is at least 0.2. Then, they are agitated at a temperature between 40 - 70 0 C to form insoluble calcium salt containing boron. Thereafter, the liquid is maintained at a temperature less than the above-mentioned forming temperature to age the products and, thereafter, the liquid is evaporated to condensate into a liquid concentrate containing 30 - 80% by weight of solid components. The concentrated liquid is mixed with cement to solidify. (Ikeda, J.)

  5. Final treatment of liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svolik, S.

    2004-01-01

    Final treatment of liquid radioactive wastes which are produced by 1 st and 2 nd bloc of the Mochovce NPP, prepares the NPP in its natural range. The purpose of the equipment is liquidation of wastes, which are formed at production. Wastes are warehoused in the building of active auxiliary plants in the present time, where are reservoirs in which they are deposited. Because they are already feeling and in 2006 year they should be filled definitely, it is necessary to treat them in that manner, so as they may be liquidated. Therefore the Board of directors of the Slovenske elektrarne has disposed about construction of final treatment of liquid radioactive wastes in the Mochovce NPP. Because of transport the wastes have to be treated in the locality of power plant. Technically, the final treatment of the wastes will be interconnected with building of active operation by bridges. These bridges will transport the wastes for treatment into processing centre

  6. Method of processing concentrated liquid waste in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Kazuyuki; Kitsukawa, Ryozo; Ohashi, Satoru.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the oxidizable material in the concentrated liquid wastes discharged from nuclear power plants. Constitution: Nitrate bacteria are added to liquid wastes in a storage tank for temporarily storing concentrated liquid wastes or relevant facilities thereof. That is, nitrites as the oxidizable material contained in the concentrated liquid wastes are converted into nitrate non-deleterious to solidification by utilizing biological reaction of nitrate bacteria. For making the conversion more effectively, required time for the biological reaction of the nitrate bacteria is maintained from the injection of nitrate bacteria to solidification, thereby providing advantageous conditions for the propagation of the nitrate bacteria. In this way, there is no problem for the increase of the volume of the powdery wastes formed by the addition of inhibitor for the effect of oxidizable material. Further, heating upon solidification which is indispensable so far is no more necessary to simplify the facility and the operation. Furthermore, the solidification inhibiting material can be reduced stably and reliably under the same operation conditions even if the composition of the liquid wastes is charged or varied. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Recovery of Mercury From Contaminated Liquid Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Base Contract program emphasized the manufacture and testing of superior sorbents for mercury removal, testing of the sorption process at a DOE site, and determination of the regeneration conditions in the laboratory. During this project, ADA Technologies, Inc. demonstrated the following key elements of a successful regenerable mercury sorption process: (1) sorbents that have a high capacity for dissolved, ionic mercury; (2) removal of ionic mercury at greater than 99% efficiency; and (3) thermal regeneration of the spent sorbent. ADA's process is based on the highly efficient and selective sorption of mercury by noble metals. Contaminated liquid flows through two packed columns that contain microporous sorbent particles on which a noble metal has been finely dispersed. A third column is held in reserve. When the sorbent is loaded with mercury to the point of breakthrough at the outlet of the second column, the first column is taken off-line and the flow of contaminated liquid is switched to the second and third columns. The spent column is regenerated by heating. A small flow of purge gas carries the desorbed mercury to a capture unit where the liquid mercury is recovered. Laboratory-scale tests with mercuric chloride solutions demonstrated the sorbents' ability to remove mercury from contaminated wastewater. Isotherms on surrogate wastes from DOE's Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee showed greater than 99.9% mercury removal. Laboratory- and pilot-scale tests on actual Y-12 Plant wastes were also successful. Mercury concentrations were reduced to less than 1 ppt from a starting concentration of 1,000 ppt. The treatment objective was 50 ppt. The sorption unit showed 10 ppt discharge after six months. Laboratory-scale tests demonstrated the feasibility of sorbent regeneration. Results show that sorption behavior is not affected after four cycles

  8. Application of ion exchange in liquid radioactive waste management of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Puskar; Chopra, S K; Sharma, P D [Nuclear Power Corporation, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    The operation of nuclear power plants would necessarily result in generation of gaseous, liquid and solid radioactive wastes. The wastes are treated/conditioned to ensure that the permissible discharge limits laid down by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board of India are complied with. The wastes are segregated on activity levels, types of radioisotopes present and chemical nature of liquid streams. The basic philosophy of various treatment techniques is to concentrate and contain as much activity as possible. It is of utmost importance that the wastes are effectively treated by proven methods/processes. The radiochemical nature of waste generated is one of the parameters to select a treatment/conditioning method. The paper presents an outline of various processes adopted for treatment of liquid waste and ion exchange processes, their application in liquid waste management in detail. Projected quantities of liquid wastes for the current designs are included. (author). 2 tabs.

  9. Management of liquid radioactive wastes at PNRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, C.M.

    1994-10-01

    Liquid wastes accepted at PNRI waste management facility are generated by hospitals and research institutions from all over the country including those generated from the research laboratories within the PNRI. The operation of the Philippine TRIGA Research Reactor is also a potential source of liquid waste to be handled and managed by the facility in the future. This technical report is a result of the study of the present status and development of the management of liquid wastes at PNRI. (auth.). 8 refs.; 3 figs.; 4 tabs

  10. Liquid radioactive wastes from hospitals by polymeric membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnal, J.M.; Sancho, M.; Verdu, G.; Campayo, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Streams containing I''125 produced from RIA process, classified as radioactive waste of low activity, are generated by all different treatments applied in IN VITRO techniques. Consequently, an accumulation of solutions containing I''125 is produced in the order of 50-100 L/month approximately. The storage at sanitary centres and the accumulation caused by it creates a serious problem in the hospital. According to the specific activity and the installation spill authorization, one can choose between three ways of handling: direct discharge, temporal storage until the radioactive waste come to decay and then discharged, waste management by the authorised company (ENRESA). If the third way of discharge is applied the treatment of waste using membranes should be considered. Using membranes, important reduction coefficients in volume in the order of 10:1 are obtained. The aim of this work is the declassification of the I''125 solutions as a liquid radioactive waste using membrane techniques. Both, a radioactive concentrated waste and non-contaminated waste are obtained. (Author)

  11. Liquid secondary waste. Waste form formulation and qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hill, K. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); King, W. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nichols, R. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    The Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) currently treats aqueous waste streams generated during Site cleanup activities. When the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) begins operations, a liquid secondary waste (LSW) stream from the WTP will need to be treated. The volume of effluent for treatment at the ETF will increase significantly. Washington River Protection Solutions is implementing a Secondary Liquid Waste Immobilization Technology Development Plan to address the technology needs for a waste form and solidification process to treat the increased volume of waste planned for disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility IDF). Waste form testing to support this plan is composed of work in the near term to demonstrate the waste form will provide data as input to a performance assessment (PA) for Hanford’s IDF.

  12. Liquid secondary waste: Waste form formulation and qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hill, K. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nichols, R. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-07-31

    The Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) currently treats aqueous waste streams generated during site cleanup activities. When the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) begins operations, including Direct Feed Low Activity Waste (DFLAW) vitrification, a liquid secondary waste (LSW) stream from the WTP will need to be treated. The volume of effluent for treatment at the ETF will increase significantly. The powdered salt waste form produced by the ETF will be replaced by a stabilized solidified waste form for disposal in Hanford’s Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Washington River Protection Solutions is implementing a Secondary Liquid Waste Immobilization Technology Development Plan to address the technology needs for a waste form and solidification process to treat the increased volume of waste planned for disposal at the IDF. Waste form testing to support this plan is composed of work in the near term to provide data as input to a performance assessment (PA) for Hanford’s IDF. In 2015, three Hanford Liquid Secondary Waste simulants were developed based on existing and projected waste streams. Using these waste simulants, fourteen mixes of Hanford Liquid Secondary Waste were prepared and tested varying the waste simulant, the water-to-dry materials ratio, and the dry materials blend composition.1 In FY16, testing was performed using a simulant of the EMF process condensate blended with the caustic scrubber—from the Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter—, processed through the ETF. The initial EMF-16 simulant will be based on modeling efforts performed to determine the mass balance of the ETF for the DFLAW.2 The compressive strength of all of the mixes exceeded the target of 3.4 MPa (500 psi) to meet the requirements identified as potential IDF Waste Acceptance Criteria in Table 1 of the Secondary Liquid Waste Immobilization Technology Development Plan.3 The hydraulic properties of the waste forms tested (hydraulic conductivity

  13. Concepts for detritiation of waste liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.M.; Van Brunt, V.; Garber, A.R.; King, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium is formed in thermal nuclear reactors both by neutron activation of elements such as deuterium and lithium and by ternary fission in the fuel. It is a weak beta-emitter with a short half-life, 12.3 years, and its radiological significance in reactor discharges is very low. In heavy-water-cooled and -moderated reactors, such as the SRS reactors, the tritium concentration in the moderator is sufficiently high to cause a potential hazard to operators, so research and development programs have been carried out on processes to remove the tritium. Detritiation of light water has also been the subject of major R ampersand D efforts world-wide, because reprocessing operations can generate significant quantities of tritium in liquid waste, and high concentrations of tritium may arise in some aqueous streams in future fusion reactors. This paper presents a review of some of the methods that have been proposed, studied, and developed for removal of tritium from light and heavy water, along with some new concepts for aqueous detritiation directly from liquid oxide (HTO) bearing feed streams

  14. Sampling and characterization of radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zepeda R, C.; Monroy G, F.; Reyes A, T.; Lizcano, D.; Cruz C, A. C.

    2017-09-01

    To define the management of radioactive liquid wastes stored in 200 L drums, its isotope and physicochemical characterization is essential. An adequate sampling, that is, representative and homogeneous, is fundamental to obtain reliable analytical results, therefore, in this work, the use of a sampling mechanism that allows collecting homogenous aliquots, in a safe way and minimizing the generation of secondary waste is proposed. With this mechanism, 56 drums of radioactive liquid wastes were sampled, which were characterized by gamma spectrometry, liquid scintillation, and determined the following physicochemical properties: ph, conductivity, viscosity, density and chemical composition by gas chromatography. 67.86% of the radioactive liquid wastes contains H-3 and of these, 47.36% can be released unconditionally, since it presents activities lower than 100 Bq/g. 94% of the wastes are acidic and 48% have viscosities <50 MPa s. (Author)

  15. Treatment of hazardous wastes by DC thermal plasma arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toru, Iwao; Yafang, Liu; Furuta, N.; Tsuginori, Inaba

    2001-01-01

    The temperature of the DC thermal plasma arc discharge is discussed, and examples of the waste treatment for the inorganic compounds such as fly ash, asbestos, and for the organic compounds such as the toxic dioxines and TBT by using the DC plasma arc discharge are shown. In addition, the plasma treatment by using a radiant power emitted from the DC plasma arc discharge is also shown as another new kind of ones. (authors)

  16. The immobilization of organic liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes a portland cement immobilization process for the disposal treatment of radioactive organic liquid wastes which would be generated in a FFTF fuels reprocessing line. An incineration system already on-hand was determined to be too costly to operate for the 100 to 400 gallons per year organic liquid. Organic test liquids were dispersed into an aqueous phosphate liquid using an emulsifier. A total of 109 gallons of potential and radioactive aqueous immiscible organic liquid wastes from Hanford 300 Area operations were solidified with portland cement and disposed of as solid waste during a 3 month test program with in-drum mixers. Waste packing efficiencies varied from 32 to 40% and included pump oils, mineral spirits, and TBP-NPH type solvents

  17. Waste water discharges into natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marri, P.; Barsanti, P.; Mione, A.; Posarelli, M.

    1996-12-01

    The aqueous discharges into natural waters is a very technical solution expecially for surface buoyant discharges. It is not only convenient to limit the concentration levels of the discharges, but also to improve the turbolent processes that diluite the discharge. Mostly these processes depend by some geometric parameters of the discharge and by some physical parameters of the effluent and of the receiving water body. An appropriate choice of some parameters, using also suitable mathematical models, allows to design discharges with a very high dilution; so the decreasing of the pollutant levels is improved and the environmental impact can be reduced versus a not diluted effluent. The simulations of a mathematical model, here described, prove that in some circumstances, expecially in case of discharges of fresh water into saline water bodies with a low velocity of the current, the dilution is poor; the effluent can be trapped in a narrow water surface layer where the pollutant concentrations remain high. also far away from the discharge point

  18. Waste Treatment Plant Liquid Effluent Treatability Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUECK, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) provided a forecast of the radioactive, dangerous liquid effluents expected to be generated by the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The forecast represents the liquid effluents generated from the processing of 25 distinct batches of tank waste through the WTP. The WTP liquid effluents will be stored, treated, and disposed of in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) evaluated the treatability of the WTP liquid effluents in the LERFIETF. The evaluation was conducted by comparing the forecast to the LERFIETF treatability envelope, which provides information on the items that determine if a liquid effluent is acceptable for receipt and treatment at the LERFIETF. The WTP liquid effluent forecast is outside the current LERFlETF treatability envelope. There are several concerns that must be addressed before the WTP liquid effluents can be accepted at the LERFIETF

  19. Discharge of radionuclides in liquid effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggleby, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    One of the aims of the Radiation Health Committee of the National Health and Medical Research Council, through Council recommendations, is to achieve some degree of uniformity in State legislation applied to the public health aspects of radiation. In developing the recommendation on the discharge of radionuclides to sewerage systems the Committee made use of the comparatively new concept of the Annual Limit on Intake (ALI)

  20. Water reuse achieved by zero discharge of aqueous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelchner, B.L.

    1976-01-01

    Plans for zero discharge of aqueous waste from ERDA's nuclear weapons plant near Denver are discussed. Two plants - a process waste treatment facility now under construction, and a reverse osmosis desalting plant now under design, will provide total reuse of waste water for boiler feed and cooling tower supply. Seventy million gallons of water per year will be conserved and downstream municipalities will be free of inadvertent pollution hazards

  1. Reduction of INTEC Analytical Radioactive Liquid Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, V.J.; Hu, J.S.; Chambers, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    This report details the evaluation of the reduction in radioactive liquid waste from the analytical laboratories sent to the Process Effluent Waste system (deep tanks). The contributors are the Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD), the Waste Operations Department, the laboratories at CPP-637, and natural run off. Other labs were contacted to learn the methods used and if any new technologies had emerged. A waste generation database was made from the current methods in used in the ALD. From this database, methods were targeted to reduce waste. Individuals were contacted on ways to reduce waste. The results are: a new method generating much less waste, several methods being handled differently, some cleaning processes being changed to reduce waste, and changes to reduce chemicals to waste

  2. Static gas-liquid interfacial direct current discharge plasmas using ionic liquid cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, T.; Baba, K.; Hatakeyama, R.

    2009-01-01

    Due to the unique properties of ionic liquids such as their extremely low vapor pressure and high heat capacity, we have succeeded in creating the static and stable gas (plasmas)-liquid (ionic liquids) interfacial field using a direct current discharge under a low gas pressure condition. It is clarified that the ionic liquid works as a nonmetal liquid electrode, and furthermore, a secondary electron emission coefficient of the ionic liquid is larger than that of conventional metal electrodes. The plasma potential structure of the gas-liquid interfacial region, and resultant interactions between the plasma and the ionic liquid are revealed by changing a polarity of the electrode in the ionic liquid. By utilizing the ionic liquid as a cathode electrode, the positive ions in the plasma region are found to be irradiated to the ionic liquid. This ion irradiation causes physical and chemical reactions at the gas-liquid interfacial region without the vaporization of the ionic liquid.

  3. Pulsed high voltage electric discharge disinfection of microbially contaminated liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anpilov, A M; Barkhudarov, E M; Christofi, N; Kop'ev, V A; Kossyi, I A; Taktakishvili, M I; Zadiraka, Y

    2002-01-01

    To examine the use of a novel multielectrode slipping surface discharge (SSD) treatment system, capable of pulsed plasma discharge directly in water, in killing micro-organisms. Potable water containing Escherichia coli and somatic coliphages was treated with pulsed electric discharges generated by the SSD. The SSD system was highly efficient in the microbial disinfection of water with a low energy utilization (eta approximately 10-4 kW h l-1). The SSD treatment was effective in the destruction of E. coli and its coliphages through the generation of u.v. radiation, ozone and free radicals. The non-thermal treatment method can be used for the eradication of micro-organisms in a range of contaminated liquids, including milk, negating the use of pasteurization. The method utilizes multipoint electric discharges capable of treating large volumes of liquid under static and flowing regimes.

  4. Method of concentrating radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive liquid wastes generated from nuclear power facilities are caused to flow into a vessel incorporated with first hydrophobic porous membranes. Then, the radioactive liquid wastes are passed through the first hydrophobic porous membranes under an elevated or reduced pressure to remove fine particles contained in the liquid wastes. The radioactive liquid wastes passed through the first membranes are stored in a temporary store a vessel and steams generated under heating are passed through the second hydrophobic porous membranes and then cooled and concentrated as condensates. In this case, the first and the second hydrophobic porous membranes have a property of passing steams but not water and, for example, are made of tetrafluoroethylen resin type thin membranes. Accordingly, since the fine particles can be removed by the first hydrophobic porous membranes, lowering of the concentration rate due to the deposition of solid contents to the membranes upon concentration can be prevented. (I.S.)

  5. Solid and liquid radioactive waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzyski, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    The technology for the treatment of low - and intermediate-level radioactive solid and liquid wastes is somewhat extensive. Some main guidance on the treatment methods are shown, based on informations contained in technical reports and complementary documents. (author) [pt

  6. Treatment of radioactive organics liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Galarce, Tania

    1999-01-01

    Because of the danger that radioactive wastes can pose to society and to the environment a viable treatment alternative must be developed to prepare these wastes for final disposal. The waste studied in this work is a liquid organic waste contaminated with the radioisotope tritium. This must be treated and then changed into solid form in a 200 liter container. This study defined an optimum formulation that immobilizes the liquid waste. The organic waste is first submitted to an absorption treatment, with Celite absorbent, which had the best physical characteristics from the point of view of radioactive waste management. Then this was solidified by forming a cement mortar, using a highly resistant local cement, Polpaico 400. Various mixes were tested, with different water/cement, waste/absorbent and absorbed waste/cement ratios, until a mixture that met the quality control requirements was achieved. The optimum mixture obtained has a water/cement ratio of 0.35 (p/p) that is the amount of water needed to make the mixture workable, and minimum water for hydrating the cement; a waste/absorbent ration of 0.5 (v/v), where the organic liquid is totally absorbed, and is incorporated in the solid's crystalline network; and an absorbed waste/cement ratio of 0.8 (p/p), which represents the minimum amount of cement needed to obtain a solid product with the required mechanical resistance. The mixture's components join together with no problem, to produce a good workable mixture. It takes about 10 hours for the mixture to harden. After 14 days, the resulting solid product has a resistance to compression of 52 Kgf/cm2. The formulation contains 22.9% immobilized organic waste, 46.5% cement, 14.3% Celite and 16.3% water. Organic liquid waste can be treated and a solid product obtained, that meets the qualitative and quantitative parameters required for its disposal. (CW)

  7. Method for storage of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesky, H.; Wunderer, A.

    1978-01-01

    When nuclear fuel is reprocessed, apart from liquid radioactive wastes in certain cases also oxyhydrogen, i.e. a mixture of oxygen and hydrogen, is formed by radiolysis. It is proposed to remove the decay heat that will be formed by means of boiling cooling, to condense the steam and to recycle the condensate to the liquid waste store. The oxyhydrogen is to be rarefied by means of the steam and then catalytically recombined. The most advantageous process steps are discussed. (RW) [de

  8. Method for solidifying liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berreth, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The quantity of nitrous oxides produced during the solidification of liquid radioactive wastes containing nitrates and nitrites can be substantially reduced by the addition to the wastes of a stoichiometric amount of urea which, upon heating, destroys the nitrates and nitrites, liberating nontoxic N 2 , CO 2 and NH 3 . 5 claims, no drawings

  9. Discharged of the nuclear wastes by health service centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazur, G.; Jednorog, S.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper Polish national regulation in radiation protection on nuclear medical domain was discussed. The method of utilized nuclear wastes in medical and science centres was deliberate. From many years activity of wastes from Nuclear Medicine Department of Central Clinical Hospital Armed Forces Medical Academy and Radiation Protection Department of Armed Forces Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology was measured. In debate centres radiation monitoring was performed. In this purpose the beta global activity and gamma spectrometry measurement of discharged wastes occurred. From last year in discussed centres wastes activity do not increased permissible levels. (author). 3 refs, 5 tabs

  10. Treatment of liquid wastes from uranium hydrometallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraga G, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Different treatments for low activity liquid wastes, generated by the hidromettalurgy of uranium ore are studied. A process of treatment was chosen which includes a neutralization with lime and limestone and a selective removal of Ra-226, through ion-exchange resins. A plant, with a capacity of treatment of 1 m 3 /h of liquid effluents was scoped. (author)

  11. Spray drying of liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, R.F.; Monat, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Full scale performance tests of a Koch spray dryer were conducted on simulated liquid radioactive waste streams. The liquid feeds simulated the solutions that result from radwaste incineration of DAW an ion exchange resins, as well as evaporator bottoms. The integration of the spray dryer into a complete system is discussed

  12. The simultaneous discharge of liquid and grains from a silo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Álvarez, A. M.; Hidalgo-Caballero, S.; Pacheco-Vázquez, F.

    2018-04-01

    The flow rate of water through an orifice at the bottom of a container depends on the hydrostatic pressure whereas for a dry granular material it is nearly constant. But what happens during the simultaneous discharge of grains and liquid from a silo? By measuring the flow rate as a function of time, we found that (i) different regimes appear, going from the constant flow rate to a hydrostatic-like discharge depending on the aperture size and grain diameter, (ii) the mixed material is always discharged faster than dry grains but slower than liquid, (iii) for the mixture, the liquid level drops faster than the grain level, but they are always linearly proportional to one another, and (iv) a sudden growth in the flow rate happens during the transition from a biphasic discharge to a single phase discharge. These results are associated to the competition between the decrease in hydrostatic pressure above the granular bed and the hydrodynamic resistance. A model combining Darcy's law with Bernoulli and mass conservation equations is proposed, and the numerical results are in good agreement with experiments.

  13. Solid and Liquid Waste Drying Bag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwiller, Eric (Inventor); Hogan, John A. (Inventor); Fisher, John W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for processing waste from human activities, including solids, liquids and vapors. A fluid-impermeable bag, lined with a liquid-impermeable but vapor-permeable membrane, defining an inner bag, is provided. A vacuum force is provided to extract vapors so that the waste is moved toward a selected region in the inner bag, extracted vapors, including the waste vapors and vaporized portions of the waste liquids are transported across the membrane, and most or all of the solids remain within the liner. Extracted vapors are filtered, and sanitized components thereof are isolated and optionally stored. The solids remaining within the liner are optionally dried and isolated for ultimate disposal.

  14. The reformation of liquid hydrocarbons in an aqueous discharge reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xuming

    2015-04-21

    We present an aqueous discharge reactor for the reformation of liquid hydrocarbons. To increase a dielectric constant of a liquid medium, we added distilled water to iso-octane and n-dodecane. As expected, we found decreased discharge onset voltage and increased discharge power with increased water content. Results using optical emission spectroscopy identified OH radicals and O atoms as the predominant oxidative reactive species with the addition of water. Enriched CH radicals were also visualized, evidencing the existence of cascade carbon-carbon cleavage and dehydrogenation processes in the aqueous discharge. The gaseous product consisted primarily of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and unsaturated hydrocarbons. The composition of the product was readily adjustable by varying the volume of water added, which demonstrated a significant difference in composition with respect to the tested liquid hydrocarbon. In this study, we found no presence of CO2 emissions or the contamination of the reactor by solid carbon deposition. These findings offer a new approach to the reforming processes of liquid hydrocarbons and provide a novel concept for the design of a practical and compact plasma reformer. © 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  15. The reformation of liquid hydrocarbons in an aqueous discharge reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xuming; Cha, Min Suk

    2015-01-01

    We present an aqueous discharge reactor for the reformation of liquid hydrocarbons. To increase a dielectric constant of a liquid medium, we added distilled water to iso-octane and n-dodecane. As expected, we found decreased discharge onset voltage and increased discharge power with increased water content. Results using optical emission spectroscopy identified OH radicals and O atoms as the predominant oxidative reactive species with the addition of water. Enriched CH radicals were also visualized, evidencing the existence of cascade carbon–carbon cleavage and dehydrogenation processes in the aqueous discharge. The gaseous product consisted primarily of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and unsaturated hydrocarbons. The composition of the product was readily adjustable by varying the volume of water added, which demonstrated a significant difference in composition with respect to the tested liquid hydrocarbon. In this study, we found no presence of CO 2 emissions or the contamination of the reactor by solid carbon deposition. These findings offer a new approach to the reforming processes of liquid hydrocarbons and provide a novel concept for the design of a practical and compact plasma reformer. (paper)

  16. The liquidation of liquid radioactive waste on nuclear medicine departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueriova, A.

    1995-01-01

    The most serious problems for Clinic of Nuclear Medicine of National Oncological Institute, Bratislava (CNM) is the localization of CNM in the downtown, inside the hospital area with the dilution water deficit. This department is the only one in Slovak Republic performing therapeutical applications. To be able to perform the necessary amount of therapies and also to introduce a new therapeutical methods, in 1992-1994 the old liquidation waste disposal station (LWDS) was reconstructed with the aim to satisfy the newest requirements of radiation hygiene. LWDS is the 5-floor object partly underground which satisfied the requirements for liquidation of radioactive liquid waste from diagnostic procedures(annually 5000 patients) and also from 200 therapeutical applications annually (15 beds, 720 GBq iodine-131). The capacity of LWDS is able to store about 90 m 3 liquid radioactive waste. Part of the underground spaces are used for the storage of solid radioactive trash. The liquid waste from CNM is collected through isolated metal sewage system to the storage with continuous observation of water specific activity. According to the activity, the liquid waste is placed to the 5 decay storages with the volume about 15 m 3 . The six one serves for the case of technical accident. When the activity declines, the liquid waste is diluted with non active medical trash to the level which is acceptable by low about radiation hygiene protection. The storage walls are made from barium-concrete 25-50 cm thick which is enough for sufficient protection of operation staff and also for walking around persons. Double-layer high quality chemical material prevents the water leak and diffusion of radionuclides into the concrete. Technology consists of cast-iron drains, powerful slush pumps, operation valves, regulation technology from dosimetric system for continuous monitoring of specific activity, for managing system with powerful industrial computer

  17. The liquidation of liquid radioactive waste on nuclear medicine departments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fueriova, A [National Oncological Institue, Bratislava (Slovakia). Hospital St. Elis, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine

    1996-12-31

    The most serious problems for Clinic of Nuclear Medicine of National Oncological Institute, Bratislava (CNM) is the localization of CNM in the downtown, inside the hospital area with the dilution water deficit. This department is the only one in Slovak Republic performing therapeutical applications. To be able to perform the necessary amount of therapies and also to introduce a new therapeutical methods, in 1992-1994 the old liquidation waste disposal station (LWDS) was reconstructed with the aim to satisfy the newest requirements of radiation hygiene. LWDS is the 5-floor object partly underground which satisfied the requirements for liquidation of radioactive liquid waste from diagnostic procedures(annually 5000 patients) and also from 200 therapeutical applications annually (15 beds, 720 GBq iodine-131). The capacity of LWDS is able to store about 90 m{sup 3} liquid radioactive waste. Part of the underground spaces are used for the storage of solid radioactive trash. The liquid waste from CNM is collected through isolated metal sewage system to the storage with continuous observation of water specific activity. According to the activity, the liquid waste is placed to the 5 decay storages with the volume about 15 m{sup 3}. The six one serves for the case of technical accident. When the activity declines, the liquid waste is diluted with non active medical trash to the level which is acceptable by low about radiation hygiene protection. The storage walls are made from barium-concrete 25-50 cm thick which is enough for sufficient protection of operation staff and also for walking around persons. Double-layer high quality chemical material prevents the water leak and diffusion of radionuclides into the concrete. Technology consists of cast-iron drains, powerful slush pumps, operation valves, regulation technology from dosimetric system for continuous monitoring of specific activity, for managing system with powerful industrial computer.

  18. Food waste management using an electrostatic separator with corona discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Koonchun; Lim, Sooking; Teh, Pehchiong

    2015-05-01

    In Malaysia, municipal solid waste contains a high portion of organic matters, typically contributed by food waste. It is estimated that about 45% of the municipal waste are food waste, followed by the non-food waste such as plastics, metals, glass and others. Food waste, while being properly sorted and contamination free from non-food waste, can be reused (e.g. fertiliser) instead of being landfilled. Therefore, recycling of food waste is crucial not only from the view point of waste management, but also with respect to the reduction of resource losses and greenhouse gases emission. A new waste separation process involved food particles, non-food particles and electrostatic discharge was investigated in this study. The empirical results reveal that the corona electrostatic separation is an environmental-friendly way in recovering foods from municipal waste. The efficiency of the separator, under same operating conditions, varies with the particle size of the food and non-food particles. The highest efficiency of 82% is recorded for the particle sizes between 1.5 and 3.0 mm.

  19. Food waste management using an electrostatic separator with corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Koonchun; Teh, Pehchiong; Lim, Sooking

    2015-01-01

    In Malaysia, municipal solid waste contains a high portion of organic matters, typically contributed by food waste. It is estimated that about 45% of the municipal waste are food waste, followed by the non-food waste such as plastics, metals, glass and others. Food waste, while being properly sorted and contamination free from non-food waste, can be reused (e.g. fertiliser) instead of being landfilled. Therefore, recycling of food waste is crucial not only from the view point of waste management, but also with respect to the reduction of resource losses and greenhouse gases emission. A new waste separation process involved food particles, non-food particles and electrostatic discharge was investigated in this study. The empirical results reveal that the corona electrostatic separation is an environmental-friendly way in recovering foods from municipal waste. The efficiency of the separator, under same operating conditions, varies with the particle size of the food and non-food particles. The highest efficiency of 82% is recorded for the particle sizes between 1.5 and 3.0 mm

  20. Food waste management using an electrostatic separator with corona discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Koonchun; Teh, Pehchiong [Faculty of Engineering and Green Technology, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (Malaysia); Lim, Sooking [Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    In Malaysia, municipal solid waste contains a high portion of organic matters, typically contributed by food waste. It is estimated that about 45% of the municipal waste are food waste, followed by the non-food waste such as plastics, metals, glass and others. Food waste, while being properly sorted and contamination free from non-food waste, can be reused (e.g. fertiliser) instead of being landfilled. Therefore, recycling of food waste is crucial not only from the view point of waste management, but also with respect to the reduction of resource losses and greenhouse gases emission. A new waste separation process involved food particles, non-food particles and electrostatic discharge was investigated in this study. The empirical results reveal that the corona electrostatic separation is an environmental-friendly way in recovering foods from municipal waste. The efficiency of the separator, under same operating conditions, varies with the particle size of the food and non-food particles. The highest efficiency of 82% is recorded for the particle sizes between 1.5 and 3.0 mm.

  1. Partial Discharge Phase Distribution Of Palm Oil As Insulating Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rajab

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the low biodegradability level of mineral oil and its susceptibility to the fire, palm oil was proposed as alternative insulating liquid. This paper discusses partial discharge (PD in palm oil under sinusoidal voltages and the comparison with mineral oil. PD was generated using a needle-plane electrode configuration which is enable enhancing electric field at the needle tip. PD pulses were detected using RC detector and they were measured using a Computer-based partial discharge measurement system. The results showed that PD activities in both oils are similar. The PD was initiated at the negative polarity of applied voltage. The discharges took place in both polarity’s of applied voltage with PD number was higher at negative one. Several discharges phenomena showed the presence of space charge which changed electric field and governed PD activities besides the main field introduced by voltage application.

  2. 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility Supplemental Information to the Hanford Facility Contingency Plan (DOE/RL-93-75)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edens, V.G.

    1998-03-01

    The 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility located at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site started receiving part of the N Reactor liquid radioactive effluent flow in 1983. In September 1985, the 1325-N Facility became the primary liquid waste disposal system for the N Reactor. The facility is located approximately 60 feet above and 2000 feet east of the shore of the Columbia River. Waste stream discharges were ceased in April 1991.Specific information on types of waste discharged to 1325-N are contained within the Part A, Form 3, Permit application of this unit

  3. State waste discharge permit application 400 Area secondary cooling water. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This document constitutes the Washington Administrative Code 173-216 State Waste Discharge Permit Application that serves as interim compliance as required by Consent Order DE 91NM-177, for the 400 Area Secondary Cooling Water stream. As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site that affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permitting Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order DE 91NM-177. The Consent Order DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. Based upon compositional and flow rate characteristics, liquid effluent streams on the Hanford Site have been categorized into Phase 1, Phase 2, and Miscellaneous streams. This document only addresses the 400 Area Secondary Cooling Water stream, which has been identified as a Phase 2 stream. The 400 Area Secondary Cooling Water stream includes contribution streams from the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility, the Maintenance and Storage Facility, the 481-A pump house, and the Fast Flux Test Facility

  4. Radiolytic decomposition of dioxins in liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Changli; Taguchi, M.; Hirota, K.; Takigami, M.; Kojima, T.

    2006-01-01

    The dioxins including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are some of the most toxic persistent organic pollutants. These chemicals have widely contaminated the air, water, and soil. They would accumulate in the living body through the food chains, leading to a serious public health hazard. In the present study, radiolytic decomposition of dioxins has been investigated in liquid wastes, including organic waste and waste-water. Dioxin-containing organic wastes are commonly generated in nonane or toluene. However, it was found that high radiation doses are required to completely decompose dioxins in the two solvents. The decomposition was more efficient in ethanol than in nonane or toluene. The addition of ethanol to toluene or nonane could achieve >90% decomposition of dioxins at the dose of 100 kGy. Thus, dioxin-containing organic wastes can be treated as regular organic wastes after addition of ethanol and subsequent γ-ray irradiation. On the other hand, radiolytic decomposition of dioxins easily occurred in pure-water than in waste-water, because the reaction species is largely scavenged by the dominant organic materials in waste-water. Dechlorination was not a major reaction pathway for the radiolysis of dioxin in water. In addition, radiolytic mechanism and dechlorinated pathways in liquid wastes were also discussed. (authors)

  5. Treatment of liquid radioactive waste: Evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, R.

    1982-01-01

    About 10.000 m 3 of low active liquid waste (LLW) arise in the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe. Chemical contents of this liquid waste are generally not declared. Resulting from experiments carried out in the Center during the early sixties, the evaporator facility was built in 1968 for decontamination of LLW. The evaporators use vapor compression and concentrate recirculation in the evaporator sump by pumps. Since 1971 the medium active liquid waste (MLW) from the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK) was decontaminated in this evaporator facility, too. By this time the amount of low liquid waste (LLW) had been decontaminated without mentionable interruptions. Afterwards a lot of interruptions of operations occurred, mainly due to leakages of pumps, valves and pipes. There was also a very high radiation level for the operating personnel. As a consequence of this experience a new evaporator facility for decontamination of medium active liquid waste was built in 1974. This facility started operation in 1976. The evaporator has natural circulation and is heated by steam through a heat exchanger. (orig./RW)

  6. INEEL Radioactive Liquid Waste Reduction Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, C.B.; Tripp, J.L.; Archibald, K.E.; Lauerhauss, L.; Argyle, M.D.; Demmer, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Reduction of radioactive liquid waste, much of which is Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed, is a high priority at the Idaho National Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Major strides in the past five years have lead to significant decreases in generation and subsequent reduction in the overall cost of treatment of these wastes. In 1992, the INTEC, which is part of the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL), began a program to reduce the generation of radioactive liquid waste (both hazardous and non-hazardous). As part of this program, a Waste Minimization Plan was developed that detailed the various contributing waste streams, and identified methods to eliminate or reduce these waste streams. Reduction goals, which will reduce expected waste generation by 43%, were set for five years as part of this plan. The approval of the plan led to a Waste Minimization Incentive being put in place between the Department of Energy Idaho Office (DOE-ID) and the INEEL operating contractor, Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO). This incentive is worth $5 million dollars from FY-98 through FY-02 if the waste reduction goals are met. In addition, a second plan was prepared to show a path forward to either totally eliminate all radioactive liquid waste generation at INTEC by 2005 or find alternative waste treatment paths. Historically, this waste has been sent to an evaporator system with the bottoms sent to the INTEC Tank Farm. However, this Tank Farm is not RCRA permitted for mixed wastes and a Notice of Non-compliance Consent Order gives dates of 2003 and 2012 for removal of this waste from these tanks. Therefore, alternative treatments are needed for the waste streams. This plan investigated waste elimination opportunities as well as treatment alternatives. The alternatives, and the criteria for ranking these alternatives, were identified through Value Engineering meetings with all of the waste generators. The most

  7. Recycling of Metal Containing Waste by Liquid-Liquid Extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, H.

    1999-01-01

    Through the years, a large number of liquid-liquid extraction have been proposed for metal waste recovery and recycling(1,2). However, few of them have achieved commercial application. In fact, relatively little information is available on practical operation and economic feasibility. This presentation will give complementary information by describing and comparing three processes, based on the Am MAR hydrometallurgical concept and representing three different modes of operation

  8. Liquid Radioactive Wastes Treatment: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Tse Hung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive wastes are generated during nuclear fuel cycle operation, production and application of radioisotope in medicine, industry, research, and agriculture, and as a byproduct of natural resource exploitation, which includes mining and processing of ores, combustion of fossil fuels, or production of natural gas and oil. To ensure the protection of human health and the environment from the hazard of these wastes, a planned integrated radioactive waste management practice should be applied. This work is directed to review recent published researches that are concerned with testing and application of different treatment options as a part of the integrated radioactive waste management practice. The main aim from this work is to highlight the scientific community interest in important problems that affect different treatment processes. This review is divided into the following sections: advances in conventional treatment of aqueous radioactive wastes, advances in conventional treatment of organic liquid wastes, and emerged technological options.

  9. Development and assessment of closure technology for liquid-waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Relyea, J.F.; Seitz, R.R.; Cammann, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Discharge of low-level liquid wastes into soils was practiced previously at the Hanford Site. Technologies for long-term confinement of subsurface contaminants are needed. Additionally, methods are needed to assess the effectiveness of confinement technologies in remediating potentially diverse environmental conditions. Recently developed site remediation systems and assessment methods for in situ stabilization and isolation of radioactive and other contaminants within and below low-level liquid-waste disposal structures are summarized

  10. 21 CFR 1250.51 - Railroad conveyances; discharge of wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Manager, Interstate Travel Sanitation Sub-Program, HFF-312... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Railroad conveyances; discharge of wastes. 1250.51 Section 1250.51 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  11. Method of solidifying radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetake, Naoto; Kawamura, Fumio; Kikuchi, Makoto; Fukazawa, Tetsuo.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to confine the volatiling ingredients such as cesium in liquid wastes safely in glass solidification products while suppressing the volatilization thereof. Method: Acid salt of tetravalent metal such as titanium phosphate has an intense selective adsorption property to cesium. So liquid wastes stored in a high level liquid wastes tank is mixed with titanium phosphate gels stored in an adsorbent tank, then supplied to a mixer and mixed with a sodium silicate solution stored in a sodium silicate storage tank and boric acid stored in an additive tank, into gel-like state. The gel-like material thus formed is supplied to a drier. After being dried at a temperature of 200sup(o)C - 300sup(o)C, the material is melted under heating at a temperature of 1000sup(o)C - 1100sup(o)C, and then cooled to solidify. (Horiuchi, T.)

  12. Bioprocessing of a stored mixed liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfram, J.H.; Rogers, R.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Finney, R. [Mound Applied Technologies, Miamisburg, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the development and results of a demonstration for a continuous bioprocess for mixed waste treatment. A key element of the process is an unique microbial strain which tolerates high levels of aromatic solvents and surfactants. This microorganism is the biocatalysis of the continuous flow system designed for the processing of stored liquid scintillation wastes. During the past year a process demonstration has been conducted on commercial formulation of liquid scintillation cocktails (LSC). Based on data obtained from this demonstration, the Ohio EPA granted the Mound Applied Technologies Lab a treatability permit allowing the limited processing of actual mixed waste. Since August 1994, the system has been successfully processing stored, {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} LSC waste. The initial LSC waste fed into the system contained 11% pseudocumene and detectable quantities of plutonium. Another treated waste stream contained pseudocumene and tritium. Data from this initial work shows that the hazardous organic solvent, and pseudocumene have been removed due to processing, leaving the aqueous low level radioactive waste. Results to date have shown that living cells are not affected by the dissolved plutonium and that 95% of the plutonium was sorbed to the biomass. This paper discusses the bioprocess, rates of processing, effluent, and the implications of bioprocessing for mixed waste management.

  13. Research of decreasing of the cesium radionuclides discharge in the course pouring of the liquid glass from furnace EhP-500/1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadovskij, B.F.; Borisov, N.B.; Dzekun, E.G.; Skobtsov, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    Cesium radionuclides discharge from the furnace liquid-glass discharge unit are studied and estimates of cesium emission from the glass melt by the stream flow-out and filling the waste storage capacity are performed. The ways for decreasing cesium discharges are indicated and new additional aerosol protection system for high-active glass discharge, providing for high protection efficiency is proposed. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  14. Perturbation of seafloor bacterial community structure by drilling waste discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tan T; Cochrane, Sabine K J; Landfald, Bjarne

    2018-04-01

    Offshore drilling operations result in the generation of drill cuttings and localized smothering of the benthic habitats. This study explores bacterial community changes in the in the upper layers of the seafloor resulting from an exploratory drilling operation at 1400m water depth on the Barents Sea continental slope. Significant restructurings of the sediment microbiota were restricted to the sampling sites notably affected by the drilling waste discharge, i.e. at 30m and 50m distances from the drilling location, and to the upper 2cm of the seafloor. Three bacterial groups, the orders Clostridiales and Desulfuromonadales and the class Mollicutes, were almost exclusively confined to the upper two centimeters at 30m distance, thereby corroborating an observed increase in anaerobicity inflicted by the drilling waste deposition. The potential of these phylogenetic groups as microbial bioindicators of the spatial extent and persistence of drilling waste discharge should be further explored. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Electrical processes for liquid waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, A.D.; Bridger, N.J.; Junkison, A.R.; Pottinger, J.S.

    1987-08-01

    This report describes the development of electrical techniques for the treatment of liquid waste streams. Part I is concerned with solid/liquid separation and the demonstration of the electrokinetic thickening of flocs at inorganic membranes suitable for intermediate-level wastes and electrochemical cleaning of stainless steel microfilters and graphite ultrafilters. Part II describes work on the development of electrochemical ion exchange, particularly the use of inorganic absorption media and polarity reversal to enhance system selectivity. Work on the adsorption and desorption of plutonium in acid nitrate solution at various electrode materials is also included. (author)

  16. Distortion of liquid film discharging from twin-fluid atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehring, C.; Sirignano, W. A.

    2001-11-01

    The nonlinear distortion and disintegration of a thin liquid film exiting from a two-dimensional twin-fluid atomizer is analyzed numerically. Pulsed gas jets impacting on both sides of the discharging liquid film at the atomizer exit generate dilational and/or sinuous deformations of the film. Both liquid phase and gas phase are inviscid and incompressible. For the liquid phase the so-called long-wavelength approximation is employed yielding a system of unsteady one-dimensional equations for the planar film. Solution of Laplace's equation for the velocity potential yields the gas-phase velocity field on both sides of the liquid stream. Coupling between both phases is described through kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions at the phase interfaces, and includes the solution of the unsteady Bernoulli equation to determine the gas-phase pressure along the interfaces. Both gas- and liquid-phase equations are solved simultaneously. Solution of Laplace's equation for the gas streams is obtained by means of a boundary-element method. Numerical solutions for the liquid phase use the Lax-Wendroff method with Richtmyer splitting. Sheet distortion resulting from the stagnation pressure of the impacting gas jets and subsequent disturbance amplification due to Kelvin-Helmholtz effects are studied for various combinations of gas-pulse timing, gas-jet impact angles, gas-to-liquid-density ratio, liquid-phase Weber number and gas-jet-to-liquid-jet-momentum ratio. Dilational and sinuous oscillations of the liquid are examined and film pinch-off is predicted.

  17. The Global Rise of Zero Liquid Discharge for Wastewater Management: Drivers, Technologies, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tiezheng; Elimelech, Menachem

    2016-07-05

    Zero liquid discharge (ZLD)-a wastewater management strategy that eliminates liquid waste and maximizes water usage efficiency - has attracted renewed interest worldwide in recent years. Although implementation of ZLD reduces water pollution and augments water supply, the technology is constrained by high cost and intensive energy consumption. In this critical review, we discuss the drivers, incentives, technologies, and environmental impacts of ZLD. Within this framework, the global applications of ZLD in the United States and emerging economies such as China and India are examined. We highlight the evolution of ZLD from thermal- to membrane-based processes, and analyze the advantages and limitations of existing and emerging ZLD technologies. The potential environmental impacts of ZLD, notably greenhouse gas emission and generation of solid waste, are discussed and the prospects of ZLD technologies and research needs are highlighted.

  18. Liquid low level waste management expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrada, J.J.; Abraham, T.J.; Jackson, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    An expert system has been developed as part of a new initiative for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) systems analysis program. This expert system will aid in prioritizing radioactive waste streams for treatment and disposal by evaluating the severity and treatability of the problem, as well as the final waste form. The objectives of the expert system development included: (1) collecting information on process treatment technologies for liquid low-level waste (LLLW) that can be incorporated in the knowledge base of the expert system, and (2) producing a prototype that suggests processes and disposal technologies for the ORNL LLLW system. 4 refs., 9 figs

  19. Processing method and processing device for liquid waste containing surface active agent and radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Takashi; Matsuda, Masami; Baba, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Ryozo; Yukita, Atsushi.

    1998-01-01

    Washing liquid wastes containing surface active agents and radioactive materials are sent to a deaerating vessel. Ozone is blown into the deaerating vessel. The washing liquid wastes dissolved with ozone are introduced to a UV ray irradiation vessel. UV rays are irradiated to the washing liquid wastes, and hydroxy radicals generated by photodecomposition of dissolved ozone oxidatively decompose surface active agents contained in the washing liquid wastes. The washing liquid wastes discharged from the UV ray irradiation vessel are sent to an activated carbon mixing vessel and mixed with powdery activated carbon. The surface active agents not decomposed in the UV ray irradiation vessel are adsorbed to the activated carbon. Then, the activated carbon and washing liquid wastes are separated by an activated carbon separating/drying device. Radioactive materials (iron oxide and the like) contained in the washing liquid wastes are mostly granular, and they are separated and removed from the washing liquid wastes in the activated carbon separating/drying device. (I.N.)

  20. Cementation of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenkov, V.

    2004-01-01

    The cementation methods for immobilisation of radioactive wastes are discussed in terms of methodology, chemistry and properties of the different types of cements as well as the worldwide experience in this field. Two facilities for cementation - DEWA and MOWA - are described in details

  1. Process equipment waste and process waste liquid collection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The US DOE has prepared an environmental assessment for construction related to the Process Equipment Waste (PEW) and Process Waste Liquid (PWL) Collection System Tasks at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. This report describes and evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed action (and alternatives). The purpose of the proposed action would be to ensure that the PEW and PWL collection systems, a series of enclosed process hazardous waste, and radioactive waste lines and associated equipment, would be brought into compliance with applicable State and Federal hazardous waste regulations. This would be accomplished primarily by rerouting the lines to stay within the buildings where the lined floors of the cells and corridors would provide secondary containment. Leak detection would be provided via instrumented collection sumps locate din the cells and corridors. Hazardous waste transfer lines that are routed outside buildings will be constructed using pipe-in-pipe techniques with leak detection instrumentation in the interstitial area. The need for the proposed action was identified when a DOE-sponsored Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) compliance assessment of the ICPP facilities found that singly-contained waste lines ran buried in the soil under some of the original facilities. These lines carried wastes with a pH of less than 2.0, which were hazardous waste according to the RCRA standards. 20 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  2. Optimization of a packed bed reactor for liquid waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, C.A.; Brower, M.J.; Coogan, J.J.; Tennant, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe an optimization study of a packed bed reactor (PBR), developed for the treatment of hazardous liquid wastes. The focus is on the destruction of trichloroethylene (TCE). The PBR technology offers many distinct advantages over other processes: simple design, high destruction rates (99.99%), low costs, ambient pressure operation, easy maintenance and scaleability. The cost effectiveness, optimal operating parameters and scaleability were determined. As a second stage of treatment, a silent discharge plasma (SDP) reactor was installed to further treat offgases from the PBR. A primary advantage of this system is closed loop operation, where exhaust gases are continuously recycled and not released into the atmosphere

  3. Bituminization of liquid radioactive waste. Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G'oshev, G.S.; Gradev, G.D.; Stefanova, I.G.; Milusheva, A.G.; Guteva, E.S.; Stefanov, G.I.

    1991-01-01

    The elaborated technology for bituminization of liquid radioactive wastes (salt concentrates) is characterized by the fact that the bituminization process takes place in two stages: concentration of the liquid residue and evaporation of the water with simultaneous homogeneous incorporation of the salts in the melted bitumen. An experimental installation for bituminization of salt concentrates was designed on the basis of this technology. The experience accumulated during the design and construction of the installation for bituminization of salt concentrates could be used for designing and constructing an industrial installation for bituminization of the liquid residue of the nuclear power plants. 2 tabs., 3 figs., 3 refs

  4. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Kuribayashi, Nobuhide; Minami, Yuji; Kamiyama, Hisashi

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To greatly reduce the quantity of radioactive liquid wastes by subjecting the same to drying treatment, and to granulate the thus formed dry powders to prevent scattering thereof thereby to fill a storage vessel safely with the powders without contaminating the surroundings. Constitution: Radioactive liquid wastes within a storage tank are supplied to a drier where the wastes are subjected to evaporation treatment, and pulverized. The thus dried powders are temporarily stored in a hopper by means of a screw feeder. The dry powders which have reached a predetermined quantity are supplied to a stirrer-granulator by means of a quantitative screw feeder, and mixed and stirred with a binder sent from a binder storage tank through a binder quantity determining device, whereby the powders are granulated. After the granulation, the granulated powders are extruded by a centrifugal force, and filled in the storage vessel by way of a conduit. (Yoshino, Y.)

  5. The treatment and disposal of liquid waste in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    Paper presented by the head of the Industrial Chemistry Group at AERE Harwell at a symposium held by the University of Newcastle upon Tyne (UK) in association with the Institute of Water Pollution Control and the Institution of Chemical Engineers in September 1977. Main headings are as follows: general introduction; units of measurement of radioactivity; environmental considerations (disposal authorisations, natural background, critical path approach, discharges to the sea, discharges to rivers); types of liquid waste (general, high level wastes, wastes from chemical processing stages, wastes from nuclear power stations, miscellaneous wastes); treatment techniques (general, evaporation, chemical precipitation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis); disposal of radioactive concentrates (high level wastes, sludges, exhausted ion exchangers, etc.). It is concluded that the main task remaining is to find the best means of ultimate disposal of high level wastes. (U.K.)

  6. Treatment of low alpha activity liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nannicini, R.; Fenoglio, F.; Pozzi, L.

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear industry considers so big safety problems that the purifying treatment of liquid wastes must always provide for a complete recycle of the liquid strems from the production processes as regard this problem. ''Enea-Comb-Ifec'' people from saluggia, already previously engages with verifying and setting-up ''Sol-Gel'' process for the recover of uranium-plutonium solutions coming from irradiated fuel reprocessing, started an experimental work, with the assistance of ''Cnr-Irsa'' from Rome, on the applicability of the biological treatment to the purification of liquid wastes coming from the production process itself. The present technical report gives, besides a short description of the ''Sol-Gel'' process, the first results, only relating to the biological stage of the whole proposed purifyng treatment, included the final results of the experimental work, object of a contract between ''Enea-Ifec'' and ''Snam progetti'' from Fano

  7. 40 CFR 761.269 - Sampling liquid PCB remediation waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sampling liquid PCB remediation waste..., AND USE PROHIBITIONS Cleanup Site Characterization Sampling for PCB Remediation Waste in Accordance with § 761.61(a)(2) § 761.269 Sampling liquid PCB remediation waste. (a) If the liquid is single phase...

  8. Liquid wastes concentrating and solidifying device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiyoshi, Hideki; Ninokata, Yoshihide.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a device for concentrating to solidify radioactive liquid wastes at large solidifying speed and with high decontaminating coefficient, without requirement for automatic control. Constitution: An asphalt solidifying device is disposed below a centrifugal thin film drier, and powder resulted from the drier is directly solidified with asphalt by utilizing the rotation of the drier for the mixing operation in the asphalt vessel. If abnormality should occur in the operation of the drier, resulting liquid wastes can be received and solidified in the asphalt vessel. The liquid wastes are heated to dry in a vessel main body having the heating surface at the circumferential surface. The vessel main body provided with a nozzle for supplying liquid to be treated disposed slantwise at the upper portion of the heating face, scrapers which rotate and slidingly contact the heating face and nozzles which jet out chemicals to the heating face behind the scrapers. Below the vessel main body, are disposed a funnel-like hopper for receiving falling scales, rotary vanes, and the likes by which the scales are introduced into the asphalt solidifying vessel. (Moriyama, K.)

  9. Combustion chamber for solid and liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vcelak, L.; Kocica, J.; Trnobransky, K.; Hrubes, J. (VSCHT, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1989-04-01

    Describes combustion chamber incorporated in a new boiler manufactured by Elitex of Kdyne to burn waste products and occasionally liquid and solid waste from neighboring industries. It can handle all kinds of solids (paper, plastics, textiles, rubber, household waste) and liquids (volatile and non-volatile, zinc, chromium, etc.) and uses coal as a fuel additive. Its heat output is 3 MW, it can burn 1220 kg/h of coal (without waste, calorific value 11.76 MJ/kg) or 500 kg/h of coal (as fuel additive, calorific value 11.76 MJ/kg) or 285 kg/h of solid waste (calorific value 20.8 MJ/kg). Efficiency is 75%, capacity is 103 m{sup 3} and flame temperature is 1,310 C. Individual components are designed for manufacture in small engineering workshops with basic equipment. A disk absorber with alkaline filling is fitted for removal of harmful substances arising when PVC or tires are combusted.

  10. Characterization of radioactive organic liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez A, I.; Monroy G, F.; Quintero P, E.; Lopez A, E.; Duarte A, C.

    2014-10-01

    With the purpose of defining the treatment and more appropriate conditioning of radioactive organic liquid wastes, generated in medical establishments and research centers of the country (Mexico) and stored in drums of 208 L is necessary to characterize them. This work presents the physical-chemistry and radiological characterization of these wastes. The samples of 36 drums are presented, whose registrations report the presence of H-3, C-14 and S-35. The following physiochemical parameters of each sample were evaluated: ph, conductivity, density and viscosity; and analyzed by means of gamma spectrometry and liquid scintillation, in order to determine those contained radionuclides in the same wastes and their activities. Our results show the presence of H-3 (61%), C-14 (13%) and Na-22 (11%) and in some drums low concentrations of Co-60 (5.5%). In the case of the registered drums with S-35 (8.3%) does not exist presence of radioactive material, so they can be liberated without restriction as conventional chemical wastes. The present activities in these wastes vary among 5.6 and 2312.6 B g/g, their ph between 2 and 13, the conductivities between 0.005 and 15 m S, the densities among 1.05 and 1.14, and the viscosities between 1.1 and 39 MPa. (Author)

  11. Discharge and Treatment of Waste Water in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the waste water treatment situation in the area of Esbjerg. This example was chosen because the situation in Esbjerg is typical of that of most towns in Denmark, and because Esbjerg is closest to the British situation with respect to the receiving water. Esbjerg has...... a population of 70.000 inhabitans, and waste water treatment takes place in two treatment plants. These plants are now being extended to perform tertiary treatment, to fulfil the new Danish requirements. From 1992, the maximum average concentrations allowed for municipal waste water discharges to receiving...... waters will be; 15 mg/1 for BOD5, 8 mg/1 for total nitrogen, and 1.5 mg/1 for total phosphorus. These general requirements cover all types of receiving waters, but regional authorities have, in a number of cases, fixed lower values for sensitive areas....

  12. Pretreatment method for radioactive iodine-containing liquid wastes and pretreatment device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakaida, Yasuo.

    1996-01-01

    Heretofore, radioactive iodine-containing liquid wastes have been discharged directly to a storing and decaying storage vessel to conduct a water draining treatment. In the present invention, the radioactive iodine-containing liquid wastes to be discharged are not discharged to the storage vessel directly but injected to a filling tank, as a pretreatment, to distinguish whether proteins are mixed in the liquid wastes or not. When proteins are mixed, miscellaneous materials such as proteins are recovered and removed by a protein processing system. When proteins are not mixed, radioactive iodine is recovered and removed directly by an iodine processing system. With such procedures, water draining treatment in the storing and decaying storage vessel is mitigated, and even when the amount of the radioactive iodine-containing liquid wastes is increased, the existent maintaining and decaying storage vessel can be used as it is. Accordingly, a safe water draining treatment with good efficiency can be conducted relative to radioactive iodine-containing liquid wastes at a reduced cost. (T.M.)

  13. Devoluming method of acidic radioactive liquid waste and processing system therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Takamori; Honda, Tadahiro

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive liquid wastes such as liquid wastes discharged from chemical decontamination (containing free acids, metal salts dissolved in acids, not-dissolved iron rust and radioactive metals) are introduced to an acid recovering device using a diffusion permeation membrane and separated to a deacidified liquid and separated acid liquid. The separated acid liquid mainly comprising free acids is recovered to a tank for recovered acids, and used repeatedly for removing crud. The deacidified liquid mainly comprising salts is concentrated in a reverse osmosis membrane (RO) concentration device. RO concentrated liquid containing radioactive metals is dried, and salts are decomposed in a drying/salt-decomposing device and separated into metal oxides and a mixed gas of an acidic gas and steams. The gas is cooled in an acid absorbing device and recovered as free acids. The metal oxides containing radioactive metals are solidified. (I.N.)

  14. Liquid Secondary Waste Grout Formulation and Waste Form Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, B. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snyder, Michelle M. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-05-23

    This report describes the results from liquid secondary waste (LSW) grout formulation and waste form qualification tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate new formulations for preparing a grout waste form with high-sulfate secondary waste simulants and the release of key constituents from these grout monoliths. Specific objectives of the LSW grout formulation and waste form qualification tests described in this report focused on five activities: 1.preparing new formulations for the LSW grout waste form with high-sulfate LSW simulants and solid characterization of the cured LSW grout waste form; 2.conducting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1313 leach test (EPA 2012) on the grout prepared with the new formulations, which solidify sulfate-rich Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) off-gas condensate secondary waste simulant, using deionized water (DIW); 3.conducting the EPA Method 1315 leach tests (EPA 2013) on the grout monoliths made with the new dry blend formulations and three LSW simulants (242-A evaporator condensate, Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) leachate, and WTP off-gas condensate) using two leachants, DIW and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water (VZPW); 4.estimating the 99Tc desorption Kd (distribution coefficient) values for 99Tc transport in oxidizing conditions to support the IDF performance assessment (PA); 5.estimating the solubility of 99Tc(IV)-bearing solid phases for 99Tc transport in reducing conditions to support the IDF PA.

  15. Cleaning of spent solvent and method of processing cleaning liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Masaki; Kawada, Tomio; Tamura, Nobuhiko.

    1993-01-01

    Spent solvents discharged from a solvent extracting step mainly comprise n-dodecane and TBP and contain nuclear fission products and solvent degradation products. The spent solvents are cleaned by using a sodium chloride free detergent comprising hydrazine oxalate and hydrazine carbonate in a solvent cleaning device. Nitric acid is added to the cleaning liquid wastes containing spent detergents extracted from the solvent cleaning device, to control an acid concentration. The detergent liquid wastes of controlled acid concentration are sent to an electrolysis oxidation bath as electrolytes and electrochemically decomposed in carbonic acid gas, nitrogen gas and hydrogen gas. The decomposed gases are processed as off gases. The decomposed liquid wastes are processed as a waste nitric acid solution. This can provide more effective cleaning. In addition, the spent detergent can be easily decomposed in a room temperature region. Accordingly, the amount of wastes can be decreased. (I.N.)

  16. Method of processing radioactive cesium liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Hiroaki; Asaoka, Sachio; Kondo, Tadami; Suzuki, Isao.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To convert and settle cesium, mainly, Cs-137 in liquid wastes in the form of pollucites, that is, cesium-containing ores. Constitution: Water, silica, alumina and alkali metal source are mixed with radioactive liquid wastes containing cesium as the main metal element ingredient, to which an onium compound is further added and they are brought into reaction till pollucite ores (Cs 16 (Al 16 Si 32 O 96 )) are formed. Since most portion of cesium is thus settled in the form of pollucites, storage safety can be attained. Further, the addition of the onium compound can moderate the condition and shorten the time till the pollucite ores are formed. The onium compound usable herein includes tetramethyl ammonium. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. [Mechanism of the organic pollutant degradation in water by hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-nan; Ma, Jun; Yang, Shi-dong

    2007-09-01

    The method of hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge was investigated for the removal of phenol. The results indicate that this new method can remove phenol in water effectively. The removal rate increases with increasing voltage and air aeration. The production quantity of H2O2 and O3 is measured respectively in the discharge region and the production quantity increases with increasing of voltage and air aeration. The energy consumption analysis indicates that with increasing the voltage, the increase extent of the phenol removal rate is smaller than the energy's, so the increase of energy efficiency is very small. Air aeration increases the energy consumption. At the same time, a considerable part of energy in the overall input energy makes the temperature of the solution increase, and more energy is transformed into heat, which leads to the waste of energy.

  18. Liquid-Phase Electrical Discharges: Fundamental Mechanisms and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franclemont, Joshua

    The increased demand in alternative energy in recent decades has generated significant interest in cleaner fuel sources including hydrogen and syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide). Hydrogen and syngas are both primarily produced through the steam reforming of hydrocarbons, specifically natural gas. Although other processes are known, the cheapest source of these fuels is currently through the heating of natural gas in the presence of steam and a catalyst. However, due to the emissions associated with the steam reforming of natural gas and the lack of low cost, efficient, and reliable onboard hydrogen storage technologies for fuel cell powered vehicles, attention has been focused on plasma-assisted reforming of hydrocarbons. Plasma processes can be implemented onboard and are able to directly reform liquid hydrocarbons and alcohols without external heating or catalysts. In addition to hydrogen and syngas, the plasma-assisted reforming of hydrocarbons and alcohols offers other desirable products such as C2 gases (ethane, ethylene, and acetylene), methanol and ethanol. The primary goal of this study is to investigate the fundamental chemical reactions occurring during plasma-assisted reforming of liquid hydrocarbons and alcohols using streamer-like pulsed electrical discharges. Due to the relatively unexplored field of chemical reactions in liquid plasmas, the focus of this study is on elucidating chemical pathways responsible for the formation of hydrogen, syngas, and other products during the direct reforming of liquid methanol, glycerol, and pentane as model species.

  19. CHARACTERISATION OF SOLID AND LIQUID PINEAPPLE WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Abdullah

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The pineapple waste is contain high concentration of biodegradable organic material and suspended solid. As a result it has a high BOD and extremes of pH conditions. The pineapple wastes juice contains mainly sucrose, glucose, fructose and other nutrients. The characterisation this waste is needed to reduce it by  recycling to get raw material or  for  conversion into useful product of higher value added products such as organic acid, methane , ethanol, SCP and enzyme. Analysis of sugar indicates that liquid waste contains mainly sucrose, glucose and fructose.  The dominant sugar was fructose, glucose and sucrose.  The fructose and glucose levels were similar to each other, with fructose usually slightly higher than glucose. The total sugar and citric acid content were 73.76 and 2.18 g/l. The sugar content in solid waste is glucose and fructose was 8.24 and 12.17 %, no sucrose on this waste

  20. Bituminization of liquid radioactive wastes. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradev, G.D.; Ivanov, V.I.; Stefanova, I.G.; Milusheva, A.G.; Guteva, E.S.; Zhelyazkov, V.T.; Stefanov, G.I.; G'oshev, G.S.

    1991-01-01

    Salt-bitumen products are produced by the method of 'hot mixing' of some Bulgarian bitumens (road bitumen PB 66/99 and the hydroinsulating bitumen HB 80/25) and salts (chlorides, sulphates, borates, salt mixtures modelling the liquid waste from nuclear power plants) in different ratios to determine the optimum conditions for bituminization of liquid radioactive waste. The penetration, ductility and softening temperature were determined. The sedimentation properties and the thermal resistance of the various bitumen-salt mixtures were studied. The most suitable bitumen for technological research at the Kozloduy NPP was found to be the road bitumen PB 66/90 with softening temperature at 48 o C. The optimum amount of salts incorporated in the bitumen - about 45% - was found. No exothermal effects were observed in the bituminization process in the temperature range of up to 200 o C. The results obtained may be useful in the elaboration of a technology for bituminization of liquid radioactive wastes in the Kozloduy NPP. 4 tabs., 5 figs., 4 refs

  1. Processing method for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro

    1991-01-01

    Drainages, such as water after used for washing operators' clothes and water used for washing hands and for showers have such features that the radioactive concentration is extremely low and detergent ingredients and insoluble ingredients such as waste threads, hairs and dirts are contained. At present, waste threads are removed by a strainer. Then, after measuring the radioactivity and determining that the radioactivity is less than a predetermined concentration, they are released to circumstances. However, various organic ingredients such as detergents and dirts in the liquid wastes are released as they are and it is not preferred in respect of environmental protection. Then, in the present invention, activated carbon is filled in a container orderly so that the diameter of the particles of the activated carbon is increased in the upper layer and decreased in the lower layer, and radioactive liquid wastes are passed through the container. With such a constitution. Both of soluble substances and insoluble substances can be removed efficiently without causing cloggings. (T.M.)

  2. Molten metal technologies advance waste processing systems for liquid radioactive waste treatment for PWRs and BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, Gary; Vance, Jene N.

    1997-01-01

    Molten Metal Technologies (MMT) has recently acquired a proprietary filtration process for specific use in radioactive liquid waste processing systems. The filtration system has been incorporated in to a PWR liquid radwaste system which is currently being designed for the ComEd Byron Nuclear Station. It has also been adopted as the prefiltration step up from of the two RO systems which were part of the VECTRA acquisition and which are currently installed in the ComEd Dresden and Lacily Nuclear Stations. The filtration process has been successfully pilot-tested at both Byron and Dresden and is currently being tested at LaSalle. The important features of the filtration process are the high removal efficiencies for particulates, including colloidal particles, and the low solid waste volume generation per gallon filtered which translates into very small annual solid waste volumes. This filtration process system has been coupled with the use of selective ion exchange media in the PWR processing system to reduce the solid waste volumes generated compared to the current processing methods and to reduce the curie quantities discharged to the environs. In the BWR processing system, this filtration method allows the coupling of an RO system to provide for recycling greater than 95% of the liquid radwaste back to the plant for reuse while significantly reducing the solid waste volumes and operating costs. This paper discusses the process system configurations for the MMT Advanced Waste Processing Systems for both PWRs and BWRs. In addition, the pilot test data and full-scale performance projections for the filtration system are discussed which demonstrate the important features of the filtration process

  3. Study of the Treatment of the Liquid Radioactive Waste Nong Son Uranium Ore Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ba Tien; Trinh Giang Huong; Luu Cao Nguyen; Harvey, L.K.; Tran Van Quy

    2011-01-01

    Liquid waste from Nong Son uranium ore processing is treated with concentrated acid, agglomerated, leached, run through ion exchange and then treated with H 2 O 2 to precipitate yellowcake. The liquid radioactive waste has a pH of 1.86 and a high content of radioactive elements, such as: [U] 143.898 ppm and [Th] = 7.967 ppm. In addition, this waste contains many polluted chemical elements with high content, such as arsenic, mercury, aluminum, iron, zinc, magnesium, manganese and nickel. The application of the general method as one stage precipitation or precipitation in coordination with BaCl 2 is not effective. These methods generated a large amount of sludge with poor settling characteristics. The volume of final treated waste was large. This paper introduces the investigation of the treatment of this liquid radioactive waste by the method of two stage of precipitation in association with polyaluminicloride (PAC) and polymer. The impact of factors: pH, neutralizing agents, quantity of PAC and polymer to effect precipitation and improve the settling characteristics during processing was studied. The results showed that the processing of liquid radioactive waste treatment through two stages: first stage at pH = 3 and the second stage at pH = 8.0 with limited PAC and polymer (A 101) resulted in significant reduced volume of the treated waste. The discharged liquid satisfied the requirement of the National Technical Regulation on Industrial Waste Water (QCVN 24:2009). (author)

  4. Liquid centrifugation for nuclear waste partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of liquid centrifugation for nuclear waste partitioning is examined for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste Program currently under study at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Centrifugation might have application for the separation of the LiF-BeF 2 salt from heavier radioactive materials fission product and actinides in the separation of fission product from actinides, in the isotope separation of fission-product cesium before transmutation of the 137 Cs and 135 Cs, and in the removal of spallation product from the liquid lead target. It is found that useful chemical separations should be possible using existing materials for the centrifuge construction for all four cases with the actinide fraction in fission product perhaps as low as 1 part in 10 7 and the fraction of 137 CS in 133 Cs being as low as a few parts in 10 5 . A centrifuge cascade has the advantage that it can be assembled and operated as a completely closed system without a waste stream except that associated with maintenance or replacement of centrifuge components

  5. Regulation, proportionality and discharges of radioactive wastes: UK perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, Bob; Butler, Gregg; Mc Glynn, Grace

    2008-01-01

    billion per annum, orders of magnitude below the level assumed by National Radiological Protection Board in their 1993 valuation of collective dose. Arguably, UK Operators have already been driven by the Regulator to go considerably beyond the (subjective) requirements of ALARA with respect to discharges from their sites, and the resources invested to reach the current very low levels of discharges have been, and continue to be, clearly disproportionate to any benefits gained. Despite this, the UK nuclear industry is under intense pressure from the regulatory bodies to reduce its already small discharges still further. This is not the case in other European countries. The consequences of such socio-political primacy in decision making has been a significant contributory factor in driving the costs of UK nuclear generation and waste management to levels where the economics of nuclear generation in the GB have been artificially skewed to make it more prohibitive. This paper questions the practical application of ALARA, especially consistency in the treatment of risk and hazard; and proportionate and cost effective delivery of public, worker and environmental protection. It then suggests a solution to these issues. (author)

  6. Volume reduction/solidification of liquid radioactive waste using bitumen at Ontario Hydro's Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, J.E.; Baker, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    Ontario Hydro at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A' has undertaken a program to render the station's liquid radioactive waste suitable for discharge to Lake Huron by removing sufficient radiological and chemical contaminants to satisfy regulatory requirements for emissions. The system will remove radionuclide and chemical contaminants from five different plant waste streams. The contaminants will be immobilized and stored at on-site radioactive waste storage facilities and the purified streams will be discharged. The discharge targets established by Ontario Hydro are set well below the limits established by the Ontario Ministry of Environment (MOE) and are based on the Best Available Technology Economically Achievable Approach (B.A.T.E.A.). ADTECHS Corporation has been selected by Ontario Hydro to provide volume reduction/solidification technology for one of the five waste streams. The system will dry and immobilize the contaminants from a liquid waste stream in emulsified asphalt using thin film evaporation technology

  7. New Approaches to Cleaning Liquid Radioactive Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabulonov, Yu.L.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The industrial cleaning methods of liquid radioactive waste and technologically contaminated solutions, which contain heavy metals and radionuclides, are considered. It is shown that in the case when heavy metal ions exclusively exist in ionic form, the cleaning method with highest efficiency is electrodialysis. In the case when components, which must be removed, are in ionic and colloidal forms at the same time, the previous destruction of colloidal and organic matter (method of hydrodynamic cavitation, lowtemperature plasma etc is necessary. The developed «PTANK» method enables an effective purification of multicomponent metalcontaining man-made solutions, which contain additionally organic substances and complexes. Development of advanced membrane technologies, creation of complex recycling schemes and their synergistic combination will provide an opportunity to achieve deep cleaning of technologically contaminated solutions and minimize the amount of secondary wastes.

  8. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Fumio; Funabashi, Kiyomi; Matsuda, Masami.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the performance of removing metal ions in ion exchange resins for use in clean-up of service water or waste water in BWR type reactors. Method: A column filled with activated carbon is disposed at the pre- or post-stage of a clean-up system using ion exchange resins disposed for the clean-up of service water or waste water of a nuclear reactor so that organics contained in water may be removed through adsorption. Since the organic materials are thus adsorbed and eliminated, various types of radioactive ions contained in radioactive liquid are no more masked and the performance of removing ions in the ion exchanger resins of the clean-up device can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  9. Management of radioactive wastes (solids and liquids) of CDTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, M.A.S. do; Reis, L.C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Estimates of solid and liquid radioactive wastes produced in CDTN, the foreseen treatment and the responsibilities of various organs of CDTN involved in radioactive waste management are presented. (C.M.)

  10. Method of solidifying liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekar, A.; Petrovic, J.; Timulak, J.

    1987-01-01

    Liquid radioactive waste containing boric acid salts is mixed with zeolite tuff and neutralized by lime. Power plant fly ash containing single-component or mixed Portland cement is then added to the mixture. Prior to packaging, anion-active bitumen emulsion or an aqueous emulsion of fatty acid salts and of free fatty acids insoluble in water can be added. Examples are given listing accurate proportions of the individual components. The advantage of the said solidification method is the use of easily available raw materials and improved values of extractability of the resulting product radionuclides. (E.S.)

  11. Treatment of hazardous organic wastes using silent discharge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosocha, L.A.; Anderson, G.K.; Bechtold, L.A.; Coogan, J.J.; Heck, H.G.; Kang, M.; McCulla, W.H.; Tennant, R.A.; Wantuck, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    During the past two decades, interest in applying non-equilibrium plasmas to the removal of hazardous chemicals from gaseous media has been growing, in particular from heightened concerns over the pollution of our environment and a growing body of environmental regulations. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we are currently engaged in a project to develop non-equilibrium plasma technology for hazardous waste treatment. Our present focus is on dielectric-barrier discharges, which are historically called silent electrical discharges. This type of plasma is also named a silent discharge plasma (SDP). We have chosen this method due to its potential for high energy efficiency, its scientific and technological maturity, and its scalability. The SDP process has been demonstrated to be reliable and economical for the industrial-scale synthesis of ozone, where municipal water treatment plants frequently require the on-site generation of thousands of kilograins per day (Eliasson ampersand Kogelschatz). The related methods of corona processing are presently the focus of work at other institutions, particularly for flue gas processing. Both SDP and corona processes are characterized by the production of large quantities of highly reactive free radicals, especially atomic oxygen O(3P) and the hydroxyl OH, in the gaseous medium and their subsequent reaction with contaminants. Our primary objective is to convert hazardous or toxic chemicals into non-hazardous compounds or into materials which are more amenable to treatment. In the ideal case, the hazardous wastes are destructively oxidized to simpler, non-hazardous compounds plus CO2 and H2O. Sometimes the reaction products are still potentially hazardous, but are easily treated by conventional methods to yield non-hazardous products

  12. Device for concentrating radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Takuji; Uchiyama, Yoshio; Ukaji, Hideo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the heat-transfer surface of a heat-transfer tube from adhering scale. Constitution: A differential-pressure generator is provided between a heater and an evaporator in order to make the vapor pressure at the heater side higher than that at the evaporator side. Pressure detectors are installed at the heating can outlet and at the evaporating can inlet. The detected pressure is converted to a signal, which is applied to a flow rate regulator, and so differential pressure production valve is operated. Thus, it can prevent the formation of a liquid lost region due to the evaporation under the pressure-decrease at the heating can side during the concentrating operation of the radioactive liquid waste, and also prevents the corrosion or explosion of the heat transfer tube due to the deposition of scale even if temperature of the heat transfer surface of the heat transfer tube is abnormally increased. (J.P.N.)

  13. Advances in technologies for the treatment of low and intermediate level radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In recent years the authorized maximum limits for radioactive discharges into the environment have been reduced considerably, and this, together with the requirement to minimize the volume of waste for storage or disposal and to declassify some wastes from intermediate to low level or to non-radioactive wastes, has initiated studies of ways in which improvements can be made to existing decontamination processes and also to the development of new processes. This work has led to the use of more specific precipitants and to the establishment of ion exchange treatment and evaporation techniques. Additionally, the use of combinations of some existing processes or of an existing process with a new technique such as membrane filtration is becoming current practice. New biotechnological, solvent extraction and electrochemical methods are being examined and have been proven at laboratory scale to be useful for radioactive liquid waste treatment. In this report an attempt has been made to review the current research and development of mature and advanced technologies for the treatment of low and intermediate level radioactive liquid wastes, both aqueous and non-aqueous. Non-aqueous radioactive liquid wastes or organic liquid wastes typically consist of oils, reprocessing solvents, scintillation liquids and organic cleaning products. A brief state of the art of existing processes and their application is followed by the review of advances in technologies, covering chemical, physical and biological processes. 213 refs, 33 figs, 3 tabs

  14. Development of Characterization Protocol for Mixed Liquid Radioactive Waste Classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norasalwa Zakaria; Syed Asraf Wafa; Wo, Y.M.; Sarimah Mahat; Mohamad Annuar Assadat Husain

    2017-01-01

    Mixed organic liquid waste generated from health-care and research activities containing tritium, carbon-14, and other radionuclide posed specific challenges in its management. Often, this waste becomes legacy waste in many nuclear facilities and being considered as 'problematic' waste. One of the most important recommendations made by IAEA is to perform multistage processes aiming at declassification of the waste. At this moment, approximately 3000 bottles of mixed liquid waste, with estimated volume of 6000 litres are currently stored at the National Radioactive Waste Management Centre, Malaysia and some have been stored for more than 25 years. The aim of this study is to develop a characterization protocol towards reclassification of these wastes. The characterization protocol entails waste identification, waste screening and segregation, and analytical radionuclides profiling using analytical procedures involving gross alpha beta, and gamma spectrometry. The results obtained from the characterization protocol are used to establish criteria for speedy classification of the waste. (author)

  15. Development of characterization protocol for mixed liquid radioactive waste classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakaria, Norasalwa, E-mail: norasalwa@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Waste Technology Development Centre, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Wafa, Syed Asraf [Radioisotop Technology and Innovation, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Wo, Yii Mei [Radiochemistry and Environment, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Mahat, Sarimah [Material Technology Group, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Mixed liquid organic waste generated from health-care and research activities containing tritium, carbon-14, and other radionuclides posed specific challenges in its management. Often, these wastes become legacy waste in many nuclear facilities and being considered as ‘problematic’ waste. One of the most important recommendations made by IAEA is to perform multistage processes aiming at declassification of the waste. At this moment, approximately 3000 bottles of mixed liquid waste, with estimated volume of 6000 litres are currently stored at the National Radioactive Waste Management Centre, Malaysia and some have been stored for more than 25 years. The aim of this study is to develop a characterization protocol towards reclassification of these wastes. The characterization protocol entails waste identification, waste screening and segregation, and analytical radionuclides profiling using various analytical procedures including gross alpha/ gross beta, gamma spectrometry, and LSC method. The results obtained from the characterization protocol are used to establish criteria for speedy classification of the waste.

  16. Liquid effluent retention facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This appendix to the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application contains pumps, piping, leak detection systems, geomembranes, leachate collection systems, earthworks and floating cover systems

  17. Potential of membrane processes in management of radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Surender; Jain, Savita; Raj, Kanwar

    2010-01-01

    Various categories of radioactive liquid waste are generated during operations and maintenance of nuclear installations. The potential of membrane processes for the treatment of low-level radioactive liquids is discussed in this paper

  18. Engineering study radioactive liquid waste treatment plant refurbishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suazo, I.L.

    1994-01-01

    This feasibility study will investigate the opportunities, restrictions and cost impact to refurbish the existing Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Plant (RLWTP) while utilizing the same basic criteria that was used in the development of the new Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). The objective of this study is to perform a more in-depth analysis of refurbishing the existing than has been done in the past so as to provide a basis for comparison between refurbishing the existing or constructing a new. The existing plant is located at Technical Area 50 (TA-50) within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The initial structure was built in 1963. Over the ensuing years, the building has been modified and several additions have been constructed. In 1966, laboratories, ion exchange and pretreatment functions were added. The decontamination and decommissioning activities and ventilation equipment were added in 1984. The following assumptions are the basic parameters considered in the development of a design concept to refurbish the RLWTP: (1) Allow continued operation of the during retrofit construction. (2) Design the necessary expansion within the site constraints. (3) Satisfy National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) permit conditions and other environmental regulations. (4) Comply with present DOE Orders and building code requirements. The refurbishment concept is a phased demolition and construction process

  19. Low level radioactive liquid waste treatment at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.A.; Lasher, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    A new Process Waste Treatment Plant has been constructed at ORNL. The wastes are processed through a precipitation-clarification step and then through an ion exchange step to remove the low-level activity in the waste before discharge into White Oak Creek

  20. Physico-chemical treatment of liquid waste on an industrial plant for electrocoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlakar, Matej; Levstek, Marjetka; Stražar, Marjeta

    2017-10-01

    Wastewater from washing, oil separators, the metal processing and detergent industries, was tested and treated for treatment of different types of liquid waste at industrial level at Domžale-Kamnik Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP). The effect of implementing the electrocoagulation (EC) and flotation processes, respectively, is analysed and includes the duration of the EC implementation, voltage, number of electrodes, and chemical addition, as well as the pH effect and conductivity. The tests were performed not only on various types of liquid waste, but also on different mixtures of liquid waste. Laboratory analysis of the samples before and after EC have shown an effective reduction not only in organic loads in accordance with the COD (chemical oxygen demand) parameter, but also in mineral oil content, toxic metal concentration, and surfactants. The COD in liquid waste from the detergent industry was reduced by 73% and the content of surfactants by 64%. In liquid waste from the metal processing industry, the COD decreased by up to 95%, while the content of toxic metals decreased from 59 to 99%. Similar phenomena were shown in liquid waste from oil separators, where the COD was reduced to 33% and the concentration of mineral oils by 99%. Some of the liquid wastes were mixed together in the ratio 1:1, thus allowing testing of the operation of EC technology in heterogeneous liquid waste, where the final result proved to be effective cleaning as well. After treatment in the process of EC, the limit values of the treated water proved appropriate for discharge into the sewerage system.

  1. Future radioactive liquid waste streams study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, A.S.

    1993-11-01

    This study provides design planning information for the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Predictions of estimated quantities of Radioactive Liquid Waste (RLW) and radioactivity levels of RLW to be generated are provided. This information will help assure that the new treatment facility is designed with the capacity to treat generated RLW during the years of operation. The proposed startup date for the RLWTF is estimated to be between 2002 and 2005, and the life span of the facility is estimated to be 40 years. The policies and requirements driving the replacement of the current RLW treatment facility are reviewed. Historical and current status of RLW generation at Los Alamos National Laboratory are provided. Laboratory Managers were interviewed to obtain their insights into future RLW activities at Los Alamos that might affect the amount of RLW generated at the Lab. Interviews, trends, and investigation data are analyzed and used to create scenarios. These scenarios form the basis for the predictions of future RLW generation and the level of RLW treatment capacity which will be needed at LANL

  2. Future radioactive liquid waste streams study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, A.S.

    1993-11-01

    This study provides design planning information for the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Predictions of estimated quantities of Radioactive Liquid Waste (RLW) and radioactivity levels of RLW to be generated are provided. This information will help assure that the new treatment facility is designed with the capacity to treat generated RLW during the years of operation. The proposed startup date for the RLWTF is estimated to be between 2002 and 2005, and the life span of the facility is estimated to be 40 years. The policies and requirements driving the replacement of the current RLW treatment facility are reviewed. Historical and current status of RLW generation at Los Alamos National Laboratory are provided. Laboratory Managers were interviewed to obtain their insights into future RLW activities at Los Alamos that might affect the amount of RLW generated at the Lab. Interviews, trends, and investigation data are analyzed and used to create scenarios. These scenarios form the basis for the predictions of future RLW generation and the level of RLW treatment capacity which will be needed at LANL.

  3. State waste discharge permit application for the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility and the State-Approved Land Disposal Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    Application is being made for a permit pursuant to Chapter 173--216 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC), to discharge treated waste water and cooling tower blowdown from the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) to land at the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). The ETF is located in the 200 East Area and the SALDS is located north of the 200 West Area. The ETF is an industrial waste water treatment plant that will initially receive waste water from the following two sources, both located in the 200 Area on the Hanford Site: (1) the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) and (2) the 242-A Evaporator. The waste water discharged from these two facilities is process condensate (PC), a by-product of the concentration of waste from DSTs that is performed in the 242-A Evaporator. Because the ETF is designed as a flexible treatment system, other aqueous waste streams generated at the Hanford Site may be considered for treatment at the ETF. The origin of the waste currently contained in the DSTs is explained in Section 2.0. An overview of the concentration of these waste in the 242-A Evaporator is provided in Section 3.0. Section 4.0 describes the LERF, a storage facility for process condensate. Attachment A responds to Section B of the permit application and provides an overview of the processes that generated the wastes, storage of the wastes in double-shell tanks (DST), preliminary treatment in the 242-A Evaporator, and storage at the LERF. Attachment B addresses waste water treatment at the ETF (under construction) and the addition of cooling tower blowdown to the treated waste water prior to disposal at SALDS. Attachment C describes treated waste water disposal at the proposed SALDS

  4. Plasmas in Multiphase Media: Bubble Enhanced Discharges in Liquids and Plasma/Liquid Phase Boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushner, Mark Jay [University of Michigan

    2014-07-10

    In this research project, the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with multi-phase media was computationally investigated. Multi-phase media includes liquids, particles, complex materials and porous surfaces. Although this investigation addressed fundamental plasma transport and chemical processes, the outcomes directly and beneficially affected applications including biotechnology, medicine and environmental remediation (e.g., water purification). During this project, we made advances in our understanding of the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas in the form of dielectric barrier discharges and plasma jets with organic materials and liquids. We also made advances in our ability to use computer modeling to represent these complex processes. We determined the method that atmospheric pressure plasmas flow along solid and liquid surfaces, and through endoscopic like tubes, deliver optical and high energy ion activation energy to organic and liquid surfaces, and produce reactivity in thin liquid layers, as might cover a wound. We determined the mechanisms whereby plasmas can deliver activation energy to the inside of liquids by sustaining plasmas in bubbles. These findings are important to the advancement of new technology areas such as plasma medicine

  5. Study of the FeSO4 effectivity as a carrier for Sr 90 separation from liquid strontium waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djoko Sardjono.

    1978-01-01

    The effectiveness of FeSO 4 as a carrier for removing Sr 90 from the strontium liquid waste is studied. This research is concerned with the study of the capacity of FeSO 4 as a carrier for removing Sr 90 from the strontium liquid waste. The method being used in the experiment is an application of the coprecipitation method to reduce the activity of the strontium liquid waste to a certain activity that is safe enough to be discharged in the environment. (author)

  6. Vitrification of high-level liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varani, J.L.; Petraitis, E.J.; Vazquez, Antonio.

    1987-01-01

    High-level radioactive liquid wastes produced in the fuel elements reprocessing require, for their disposal, a preliminary treatment by which, through a series of engineering barriers, the dispersion into the biosphere is delayed by 10 000 years. Four groups of compounds are distinguished among a great variety of final products and methods of elaboration. From these, the borosilicate glasses were chosen. Vitrification experiences were made at a laboratory scale with simulated radioactive wastes, employing different compositions of borosilicate glass. The installations are described. A series of tests were carried out on four basic formulae using always the same methodology, consisting of a dry mixture of the vitreous matrix's products and a dry simulated mixture. Several quality tests of the glasses were made 1: Behaviour in leaching following the DIN 12 111 standard; 2: Mechanical resistance; parameters related with the facility of the different glasses for increasing their surface were studied; 3: Degree of devitrification: it is shown that devitrification turns the glasses containing radioactive wastes easily leachable. From all the glasses tested, the composition SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , B 2 O 3 , Na 2 O, CaO shows the best retention characteristics. (M.E.L.) [es

  7. Osmosis process for leachate treatment in industrial platform: Economic and performances evaluations to zero liquid discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingolani, Diego; Eusebi, Anna Laura; Battistoni, Paolo

    2017-12-01

    The industrial processes require large quantities of water. The presence of discharges results not only in significant environmental impact but implies wastage of water resources. This problem could be solved treating and reusing the produced wastewaters and applying the new zero liquid discharge approach. This paper discusses the design and the performances of reverse osmosis membranes for the upgrading of full scale platform for industrial liquid wastes. The final effluent from the ultrafiltration unit of the full scale plant was monitored to design the reverse osmosis unit. Previous modelling phase was used to evaluate the specific ordinary and maintenance costs and the final effluent quality (2.7 €/m 3 ). The system was designed in triple stages at different operative pressures. The economic feasibility and the payback period of the technology at different percentages of produced permeate were determined. The recovery of 90% was identified as profitable for the reverse osmosis application. One experimental pilot plant applying the reverse osmosis was used to test the final effluent. Moreover, the same flow was treated with second pilot system based on the forward osmosis process. The final efficiencies were compared. Removals higher than 95% using the reverse system were obtained for the main macropollutants and ions. No sustainable applicability of the forward osmosis was determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of diatomaceous to liquid organic wastes adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanhueza M, Azucena; Padilla S, Ulises

    1999-01-01

    Background: One of the radioactive wastes that the Radioactive Wastes Management Unit must process are organic liquids from external generators and from sections of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN). The wastes from external generators contain H 3 and C 14; while the wastes from the CCHEN are contaminated with uranium. The total volume of liquid organic wastes that must be treated is 5 m3. The options recommended for processing these wastes are incineration or the adsorption of the organic liquid by some adsorbing medium and its subsequent immobilization in cement molds. Due to the cost of incineration, the adsorption method was chosen for study. Objective: To find the optimum amount of adsorbent to be saturated with radioactive organic liquid from liquid scintillation and to study immobilization in cement molds. Methodology: Adsorption granulated (1568 Merck) and diatom earth were tested as adsorbent mediums. The adsorbents were mixed in different ratios of volume with the organic liquid. Then the waste was mixed with different water/cement ratios to define the best immobilization conditions. Conclusions: The tests carried out with 2 adsorbents recommended in the literature and available in the CCHEN show that as adsorbent waste ratio decreases, the percentage of liquid adsorbed increases, as expected: a greater volume of adsorbent retains a greater quantity of liquid, with an increase in the final volume, depending on the adsorbent used. Of these adsorbents, the diatom earth was better for treating liquid organic wastes. It had 100% adsorption and an increased volume of 0%, which is more than enough from the volumetric point of view of waste management. The ratio 0.8 liquid/adsorbent also showed good characteristics, but more study is needed to decide on the above, since liquid remains to be adsorbed. This work must continue to study the repeatability of results, to obtain physical and radiological characteristics for the immobilized products and to

  9. Processing method for liquid waste containing various kinds of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyabe, Keiji; Nabeshima, Masahiro; Ozeki, Noboru; Muraki, Tsutomu.

    1996-01-01

    Various kind of radioactive materials and heavy metal elements dissolved in liquid wastes are removed from the liquid wastes by adsorbing them on chitin or chitosan. In this case, a hydrogen ion concentration in the liquid wastes is adjusted to a pH value of from 1 to 3 depending on the kinds of the radioactive materials and heavy metal elements to be removed. Since chitin or chitosan has a special ion exchange performance or adsorbing performance, chemical species comprising radioactive materials or heavy metals dissolved in the liquid wastes are adsorbed thereto by ion adsorption or physical adsorption. With such procedures, radioactive materials and heavy metal elements are removed from the liquid wastes, and the concentration thereof can be reduced to such a level that they can be discharged into environments. On the other hand, since chitin or chitosan adsorbing the radioactive materials and heavy metal elements has a structure of polysaccharides, it is easily burnt into gaseous carbon dioxide. Accordingly, the amount of secondary wastes can remarkably be reduced. (T.M.)

  10. Ion irradiation effects on ionic liquids interfaced with rf discharge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, K.; Kaneko, T.; Hatakeyama, R.

    2007-01-01

    The availability of plasma ion irradiation toward a gas-liquid interface is investigated in a rf discharge system incorporating an ionic liquid. The introduction of the ionic liquid to the plasma causes the formation of a sheath electric field on the ionic liquid surface, resulting in the acceleration of the ions to the ionic liquid and the generation of secondary electrons from the ionic liquid by the ion irradiation. These effects are found to advance the discharge process and enhance the plasma production

  11. Membrane technologies for liquid radioactive waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Harasimowicz, M.; Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.

    1998-01-01

    At Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT) the membrane method for purification of radioactive wastes applied such processes as ultrafiltration (UF), 'seeded' ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis (RO) was developed. On the basis of the results obtained in laboratory experiments the pilot plant for radioactive effluents treatment was built. The plant was composed of UF unit (AMICON H 26P30 capillary module) and two RO units (NITTO NTR 739 HF S-4 spiral wound LPRO modules). The capacity of the pilot plant was up to 200 L/h and the specific activity of wastes purified in the system - below 10 4 Bq/L. Decontamination factor for entire system is higher than 5 x10 3 . Another possibility for radioactive wastes treatment is membrane distillation (MD), non-isothermal process employing hydrophobic polymer membrane, which is developed at INCT now. Preliminary tests with liquid radwaste were carried out on laboratory unit with permeation test-cell holding flat sheet membrane. As a hydrophobic barrier membranes made of two polymers were used: polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polypropylene (PP). The process was arranged in direct contact membrane distillation configuration. The permeate condensed directly in the cold stream (distilled water) and retentate was enriched in radionuclides. The further experiments carried out with capillary module BFMF 06-30-33 (Euro-Sep Ltd.) with polypropylene capillaries, diameter 0.33 mm and cut off 0.6 μm proved previous results. A pilot plant employing GORE-TEX membrane distillation was constructed. The plant can clean the low-level radioactive wastes from nuclear centre, at a throughput about 0.05 m 3 /h

  12. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Esposti, B.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Punjabi-Vinoth, S.; Tchilingurian, G.; Capece, A.; Koel, B.; Roszell, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.; Kubota, S.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2015-01-01

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasma surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceed several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started

  13. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Esposti, B.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Punjabi-Vinoth, S.; Tchilingurian, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Capece, A.; Koel, B.; Roszell, J. [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kubota, S. [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Beiersdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasma surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceed several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started.

  14. Design and operation of off-gas cleaning systems at high level liquid waste conditioning facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The immobilization of high level liquid wastes from the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels is of great interest and serious efforts are being undertaken to find a satisfactory technical solution. Volatilization of fission product elements during immobilization poses the potential for the release of radioactive substances to the environment and necessitates effective off-gas cleaning systems. This report describes typical off-gas cleaning systems used in the most advanced high level liquid waste immobilization plants and considers most of the equipment and components which can be used for the efficient retention of the aerosols and volatile contaminants. In the case of a nuclear facility consisting of several different facilities, release limits are generally prescribed for the nuclear facility as a whole. Since high level liquid waste conditioning (calcination, vitrification, etc.) facilities are usually located at fuel reprocessing sites (where the majority of the high level liquid wastes originates), the off-gas cleaning system should be designed so that the airborne radioactivity discharge of the whole site, including the emission of the waste conditioning facility, can be kept below the permitted limits. This report deals with the sources and composition of different kinds of high level liquid wastes and describes briefly the main high level liquid waste solidification processes examining the sources and characteristics of the off-gas contaminants to be retained by the off-gas cleaning system. The equipment and components of typical off-gas systems used in the most advanced (large pilot or industrial scale) high level liquid waste solidification plants are described. Safety considerations for the design and safe operation of the off-gas systems are discussed. 60 refs, 31 figs, 17 tabs

  15. TECHNICAL NOTE LIQUID WASTE DISPOSAL IN URBAN LOW ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the ideal case the liquid waste can safely be disposed of in a properly designed and integrated network of pipes, which collect and transmit the liquid waste into a treatment plant. However, such a system is costly and needs a substantial amount of initial investment to start operating and subsequently to maintain.

  16. State Waste Discharge Permit Application: Electric resistance tomography testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This permit application documentation is for a State Waste Discharge Permit issued in accordance with requirements of Washington Administrative Code 173-216. The activity being permitted is a technology test using electrical resistance tomography. The electrical resistance tomography technology was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has been used at other waste sites to track underground contamination plumes. The electrical resistance tomography technology measures soil electrical resistance between two electrodes. If a fluid contaminated with electrolytes is introduced into the soil, the soil resistance is expected to drop. By using an array of measurement electrodes in several boreholes, the areal extent of contamination can be estimated. At the Hanford Site, the purpose of the testing is to determine if the electrical resistance tomography technology can be used in the vicinity of large underground metal tanks without the metal tank interfering with the test. It is anticipated that the electrical resistance tomography technology will provide a method for accurately detecting leaks from the bottom of underground tanks, such as the Hanford Site single-shell tanks.

  17. State Waste Discharge Permit Application: Electric resistance tomography testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This permit application documentation is for a State Waste Discharge Permit issued in accordance with requirements of Washington Administrative Code 173-216. The activity being permitted is a technology test using electrical resistance tomography. The electrical resistance tomography technology was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has been used at other waste sites to track underground contamination plumes. The electrical resistance tomography technology measures soil electrical resistance between two electrodes. If a fluid contaminated with electrolytes is introduced into the soil, the soil resistance is expected to drop. By using an array of measurement electrodes in several boreholes, the areal extent of contamination can be estimated. At the Hanford Site, the purpose of the testing is to determine if the electrical resistance tomography technology can be used in the vicinity of large underground metal tanks without the metal tank interfering with the test. It is anticipated that the electrical resistance tomography technology will provide a method for accurately detecting leaks from the bottom of underground tanks, such as the Hanford Site single-shell tanks

  18. Liquid conductor model of instabilities in a pinched discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattnery, A; Lehnert, B [Dept. of Electronics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Lundquist, S [Swedish State Power Board (Sweden)

    1958-07-01

    The pinched gas discharge experiments seem to have been handicapped by the great speed with which the instability develops as well as by the light coming from impurities instead of the main body of pinched gas. In the present work a liquid conductor is used in order to study the structure of the instabilities. The study of a pinch was made with and without the axial magnetic field. In cases with a magnetic field, the currents and fields were chosen so as to give a longitudinal magnetic field equal to or three times the azimuthal field at the boundary of the mercury stream. The study of the results shows that in the case without an external magnetic field there is a similarity between the behavior of the pinch in a stream of mercury and in an ionized gas column. The stabilizing action of the surface tension is small and the instabilities develop easily. The case with an external magnetic field is more complicated. The magnetic lines of force are not frozen into the medium; they can 'escape' from the medium. In this case the magnetic field has no stabilizing effect. The influence of conducting walls around the mercury column will be studied in forthcoming experiments.

  19. PDBD with continuous liquids flows in a discharge reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Méndez, B G; Gutiérrez-León, D G; López-Callejas, R; Valencia-Alvarado, R; Muñoz-Castro, A E; Mercado-Cabrera, A; Peña-Eguiluz, R; Belman-Flores, J M; De la Piedad-Beneitez, A

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, construction and testing of a cylindrical pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (PDBD) reactor aimed to microbiological elimination of Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 bacteria. In the reactor, water flowed continuously and to countercurrent an oxygen gas was injected. The water pumping was carried out with a peristaltic pump type, stainless steel and aluminum constructed, and water was recirculated through norprene tubing. The considered parameters in order to promote energetic efficiency were: the residence time of the water contaminated with bacteria, flow rate of the liquid, shape and material used to build electrodes and dielectric, pressure, and gas injection flow rate. The pulsed power supply parameters are featured by 25-30 kV high voltage, 500 Hz frequency and 30 μs width. The outcome elimination of E. coli bacteria at 10 3 , 10 4 and 10 6 CFU/mL concentrations reached an efficiency over 0.5 log-order in absence of oxygen; while >2 log-orders when oxygen gas was injected during the process. (paper)

  20. Liquid waste treatment at plutonium fuels fabrication facility, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichi; Itoh, Ichiroh; Ohuchi, Jin; Miyo, Hiroaki

    1974-01-01

    The economics in the management of the radioactive liquid waste from Plutonium Fuels Fabrication Facility with sludge-blanket type flocculators has been evaluated. (1) Cost calculation: The cost of chemicals and electricity to treat 1 cubic meter of liquid waste is about 876 yen, while the total operating cost is 250 thousand yen per cubic meter in the case of 140 m 3 /year treatment. These figures are much higher than those for ordinary wastes, due to the particular operation against plutonium. (2) Proposal of the closed system for liquid waste treatment at PFFF: In the case of a closed system using evaporator, ion exchange column and rotary-kiln calciner, the operating cost is estimated at 40 thousand yen per cubic meter of liquid waste. Final radioactivity of treated liquid is below 10 -8 micro curies/ml. (Mori, K.)

  1. Development of new waste form for treatment and disposal of concentrated liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Kyung Kil; Ji, Young Yong

    2010-12-01

    The radioactive waste form should be meet the waste acceptance criteria of national regulation and disposal site specification. We carried out a characterization of rad waste form, especially the characteristics of radioactivity, mechanical and physical-chemical properties in various rad waste forms. But asphalt products is not acceptable waste form at disposal site. Thus we are change the product materials. We select the development of the new process or new materials. The asphalt process is treatment of concentrated liquid and spent-resin and that we decide the Development of new waste form for treatment and disposal of concentrated liquid radioactive waste

  2. Methodology development for radioactive waste treatment of CDTN/BR - liquid low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, Carlos Antonio de

    1996-01-01

    The radioactive liquid wastes generated in Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN) were initially treated by precipitation/filtration and then the resulting wet solid wastes were incorporated in cement. These wastes were composed of different chemicals and different radioactivities and were generated by different sectors. The objective of the waste treatment method was to obtain minimum wet solid waste volume and decontamination and minimum operational cost. The composition of the solid wastes were taken into consideration for compatible cementation process. Approximately 5,400 litres of liquid radioactive wastes were treated by this process during 1992-1995. The volume reduction was 1/24 th and contained 20% solids. (author)

  3. A process for solidifying radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mergan, L.M.; Cordier, J.-P.

    1981-01-01

    In a process for solidifying radioactive liquid waste, its pH is adjusted, solids precipitated and then it is concentrated to about 50% solids content using a thin film evaporator, the concentrate then being dried to powder in a heated mixer. The mixer has a heated wall and working means, e.g. a rotor and helical screw, to shear the dried concentrate from the internal walls, subdivide it into a dry particulate powder, and advance the powder to the mixer outlet. The dried particles are then encapsulated in a suitable matrix. Vapour from the mixer and evaporator is condensed and recycled after any particles have been removed from it. The mixer may both dry the concentrate and mix the dry particles with the encapsulating matrix, and possibly, part of the mixer may be used for pH adjustment and precipitation. (author)

  4. Natural diatomite process for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal [Radioactive Waste Management Unit (RWMU), Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center, Altinsehir Yolu 5 km. Halkali, 34303K Cekmece, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: Erdal.Osmanlioglu@taek.gov.tr

    2007-01-15

    Diatomite has a number of unique physical properties and has found diversified industrial utilization. The filtration characteristics are particularly significant in the purification of liquids. The purpose of this study was to test natural diatomaceous earth (diatomite) as an alternative material that could be used for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste. A pilot-scale column-type device was designed. Natural diatomite samples were ground, sieved and prepared to use as sorption media. In this study, real waste liquid was used as radioactive liquid having special conditions. The liquid waste contained three radionuclides (Cs-137, Cs-134 and Co-60). Following the treatment by diatomite, the radioactivity of liquid waste was reduced from the initial 2.60 Bq/ml to less than 0.40 Bq/ml. The results of this study show that most of the radioactivity was removed from the solution by processing with diatomite.

  5. Natural diatomite process for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2007-01-01

    Diatomite has a number of unique physical properties and has found diversified industrial utilization. The filtration characteristics are particularly significant in the purification of liquids. The purpose of this study was to test natural diatomaceous earth (diatomite) as an alternative material that could be used for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste. A pilot-scale column-type device was designed. Natural diatomite samples were ground, sieved and prepared to use as sorption media. In this study, real waste liquid was used as radioactive liquid having special conditions. The liquid waste contained three radionuclides (Cs-137, Cs-134 and Co-60). Following the treatment by diatomite, the radioactivity of liquid waste was reduced from the initial 2.60 Bq/ml to less than 0.40 Bq/ml. The results of this study show that most of the radioactivity was removed from the solution by processing with diatomite

  6. Natural diatomite process for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2007-01-01

    Diatomite has a number of unique physical properties and has found diversified industrial utilization. The filtration characteristics are particularly significant in the purification of liquids. The purpose of this study was to test natural diatomaceous earth (diatomite) as an alternative material that could be used for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste. A pilot-scale column-type device was designed. Natural diatomite samples were ground, sieved and prepared to use as sorption media. In this study, real waste liquid was used as radioactive liquid having special conditions. The liquid waste contained three radionuclides (Cs-137, Cs-134 and Co-60). Following the treatment by diatomite, the radioactivity of liquid waste was reduced from the initial 2.60 Bq/ml to less than 0.40 Bq/ml. The results of this study show that most of the radioactivity was removed from the solution by processing with diatomite.

  7. Cement encapsulation of low-level waste liquids. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, M.N.; Houston, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Pretreatment of liquid high-level radioactive waste at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) was essential to ensuring the success of high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. By chemically separating the HLW from liquid waste, it was possible to achieve a significant reduction in the volume of HLW to be vitrified. In addition, pretreatment made it possible to remove sulfates, which posed several processing problems, from the HLW before vitrification took place

  8. UKAEA contract no. 3: miscellaneous solid, liquid and gaseous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, B.A.

    1984-12-01

    This document reports work carried out in 1982/83 on the following topics concerned with the treatment and disposal of intermediate level wastes: flowsheeting; dewatering low and medium level radioactive wastes; applications of ultrafiltration in the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes; ion exchange processes; electrical processes for the treatment of medium active liquid wastes; chemical conversion of Zircaloy cladding to oxide; fast reactor fuel element cladding; dissolver residues; fuel cladding and ion exchanger immobilisation - radioactive trials; thermal techniques; development and assessment of medium level waste forms. (U.K.)

  9. Liquid waste management: The case of Bahir Dar, Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human beings pollute the environment with their industrial and domestic wastes. In Bahir Dar Town there is no conventional municipal waste water collection and treatment system. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the liquid waste disposal practices of the residents of Bahir Dar Town and to ...

  10. Waste characterization for radioactive liquid waste evaporators at Argonne National Laboratory - West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    Several facilities at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) generate many thousand gallons of radioactive liquid waste per year. These waste streams are sent to the AFL-W Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) where they are processed through hot air evaporators. These evaporators remove the liquid portion of the waste and leave a relatively small volume of solids in a shielded container. The ANL-W sampling, characterization and tracking programs ensure that these solids ultimately meet the disposal requirements of a low-level radioactive waste landfill. One set of evaporators will process an average 25,000 gallons of radioactive liquid waste, provide shielding, and reduce it to a volume of six cubic meters (container volume) for disposal. Waste characterization of the shielded evaporators poses some challenges. The process of evaporating the liquid and reducing the volume of waste increases the concentrations of RCIU regulated metals and radionuclides in the final waste form. Also, once the liquid waste has been processed through the evaporators it is not possible to obtain sample material for characterization. The process for tracking and assessing the final radioactive waste concentrations is described in this paper, The structural components of the evaporator are an approved and integral part of the final waste stream and they are included in the final waste characterization

  11. Liquid level measurement in high level nuclear waste slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, G.E.; Heckendorn, F.M.; Postles, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Accurate liquid level measurement has been a difficult problem to solve for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The nuclear waste sludge tends to plug or degrade most commercially available liquid-level measurement sensors. A liquid-level measurement system that meets demanding accuracy requirements for the DWPF has been developed. The system uses a pneumatic 1:1 pressure repeater as a sensor and a computerized error correction system. 2 figs

  12. Liquid waste disposal and reuse of waste water; Smaltimento e riuso delle acque reflue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indelicato, S. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Cattedra di Idraulica Agraria; De Dominicis, G. [S.M.T. Societa Mineraria Trasimeno s.p.a.- Gruppo ACEA, Rome (Italy)

    1996-03-01

    The disposal of liquid wastes determine an environmental impact. Waste processing plants reduce this impact but, in case of malfunction or scheduled maintenance are emitted aerosols, odors and noise. Mitigation of this effects is possible with coverage or plants screen.

  13. Liquid waste handling facilities for a conceptual LWR spent fuel reprocessing complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, D.C.; Bradley, R.F.

    1978-01-01

    The waste evaporator systems and the methods for evaporating the liquid wastes of various radioactivity levels are discussed. After the liquid wastes are evaporated and nitric acid is recovered the high-level liquid waste is incorporated into borosilicate glass and the intermediate-level liquid waste into concrete for final disposal

  14. Newly Generated Liquid Waste Processing Alternatives Study, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landman, William Henry; Bates, Steven Odum; Bonnema, Bruce Edward; Palmer, Stanley Leland; Podgorney, Anna Kristine; Walsh, Stephanie

    2002-09-01

    This report identifies and evaluates three options for treating newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The three options are: (a) treat the waste using processing facilities designed for treating sodium-bearing waste, (b) treat the waste using subcontractor-supplied mobile systems, or (c) treat the waste using a special facility designed and constructed for that purpose. In studying these options, engineers concluded that the best approach is to store the newly generated liquid waste until a sodium-bearing waste treatment facility is available and then to co-process the stored inventory of the newly generated waste with the sodium-bearing waste. After the sodium-bearing waste facility completes its mission, two paths are available. The newly generated liquid waste could be treated using the subcontractor-supplied system or the sodium-bearing waste facility or a portion of it. The final decision depends on the design of the sodium-bearing waste treatment facility, which will be completed in coming years.

  15. Treatment of low level radioactive liquid waste containing appreciable concentration of TBP degraded products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsala, T P; Sonavane, M S; Kore, S G; Sonar, N L; De, Vaishali; Raghavendra, Y; Chattopadyaya, S; Dani, U; Kulkarni, Y; Changrani, R D

    2011-11-30

    The acidic and alkaline low level radioactive liquid waste (LLW) generated during the concentration of high level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) prior to vitrification and ion exchange treatment of intermediate level radioactive liquid waste (ILW), respectively are decontaminated by chemical co-precipitation before discharge to the environment. LLW stream generated from the ion exchange treatment of ILW contained high concentrations of carbonates, tributyl phosphate (TBP) degraded products and problematic radio nuclides like (106)Ru and (99)Tc. Presence of TBP degraded products was interfering with the co-precipitation process. In view of this a modified chemical treatment scheme was formulated for the treatment of this waste stream. By mixing the acidic LLW and alkaline LLW, the carbonates in the alkaline LLW were destroyed and the TBP degraded products got separated as a layer at the top of the vessel. By making use of the modified co-precipitation process the effluent stream (1-2 μCi/L) became dischargeable to the environment after appropriate dilution. Based on the lab scale studies about 250 m(3) of LLW was treated in the plant. The higher activity of the TBP degraded products separated was due to short lived (90)Y isotope. The cement waste product prepared using the TBP degraded product was having good chemical durability and compressive strength. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Addition of liquid waste incineration capability to the INEL's low-level waste incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steverson, E.M.; Clark, D.P.; McFee, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    A liquid waste system has recently been installed in the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). In this paper, aspects of the incineration system such as the components, operations, capabilities, capital cost, EPA permit requirements, and future plans are discussed. The principal objective of the liquid incineration system is to provide the capability to process hazardous, radioactively contaminated, non-halogenated liquid wastes. The system consists primarily of a waste feed system, instrumentation and controls, and a liquid burner, which were procured at a capital cost of $115,000

  17. Packed bed reactor treatment of liquid hazardous and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennant, R.A.; Wantuck, P.J.; Vargas, R.

    1992-01-01

    We are developing thermal-based packed bed reactor (PBR) technology as an alternative to incineration for treatment of hazardous organic liquid wastes. The waste streams targeted by this technology are machining fluids contaminated with chlorocarbons and/or chlorofluorocarbons and low levels of plutonium or tritium The PBR offers several distinct advantages including simplistic design, rugged construction, ambient pressure processing, economical operations, as well as ease of scalability and maintainability. In this paper, we provide a description of the apparatus as well as test results using prepared mixtures of machining oils/emulsions with trichloroethylene (TCE), carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ), trichloroethane (TCA), and Freon TF. The current treatment system is configured as a two stage device with the PBR (1st stage) coupled to a silent discharge plasma (SDP) cell. The SDP serves as a second stage for further treatment of the gaseous effluent from the PBR. One of the primary advantages of this two stage system is that its suitability for closed loop operation where radioactive components are well contained and even CO 2 is not released to the environment

  18. Process for treatment of detergent-containing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, K.; Chino, K.; Funabashi, K.; Horiuchi, S.; Motojima, K.

    1984-01-01

    A detergent-containing radioactive liquid waste originating from atomic power plants is concentrated to have about 10 wt. % detergent concentration, then dried in a thin film evaporator, and converted into powder. Powdered activated carbon is added to the radioactive waste in advance to prevent the liquid waste from foaming in the evaporator by the action of surface active agents contained in the detergent. The activated carbon is added in accordance with the COD concentration of the radioactive liquid waste to be treated, and usually at a concentration 2-4 times as large as the COD concentration of the liquid waste to be treated. A powdery product having a moisture content of not more than 15 wt. % is obtained from the evaporator, and pelletized and then packed into drums to be stored for a predetermined period

  19. On the stability of the interface between dense plasma and liquid under electrical pulse discharge in liquid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starchyk, P.D.; Porytskyy, P.V.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that the most important influence on the plasma of electrical pulse discharges in liquid have the processes in a zone of its contact with condensed medium. The investigations of growth of corrugations are conducted which arise on an interface between both the plasma channels of electrical pulse discharges and limiting it liquid. It is shown that the growth of perturbations caused by Rayleigh-Taylor instability are nonlinearly saturated. It is established the interconnection between both the pointed perturbations and the parameters of a dense plasma of discharge channel

  20. Detection of free liquid in containers of solidified radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    Nondestructive detection of the presence of free liquid within a sealed enclosure containing solidified waste is accomplished by measuring the levels of waste at two diametrically opposite locations while slowly tilting the enclosure toward one of said locations. When the measured level remains constant at the other location, the measured level at said one location is noted and any measured difference of levels indicates the presence of liquid on the surface of the solifified waste. The absence of liquid in the enclosure is verified when the measured levels at both locations are equal.

  1. Detection of free liquid in containers of solidified radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1985-01-01

    A method of nondestructively detecting the presence of free liquid within a sealed enclosure containing solidified waste by measuring the levels of waste at two diametrically opposite locations while slowly tilting the enclosure toward one of said locations. When the measured level remains constant at the other location, the measured level at said one location is noted and any measured difference of levels indicates the presence of liquid on the surface of the solidified waste. The absence of liquid in the enclosure is verified when the measured levels at both locations are equal.

  2. [Applications of atomic emission spectrum from liquid electrode discharge to metal ion detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiu-Ling; Wu, Jian; Ying, Yi-Bin

    2010-02-01

    The fast and precise detection of metal ion is an important research project concerning studies in diverse academic fields and different kinds of detecting technologies. In the present paper, the authors review the research on atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge and its applications in the detection of metal ion. In the first part of this paper the principles and characteristics of the methods based on electrochemistry and spectroscopy were introduced. The methods of ion-selective electrode (ISE), anodic stripping voltammetry, atomic emission spectrum and atomic absorption spectrum were included in this part and discussed comparatively. Then the principles and characteristics of liquid electrode spectra for metal ion detection were introduced. The mechanism of the plasma production and the characteristics of the plasma spectrum as well as its advantages compared with other methods were discussed. Secondly, the authors divided the discharge system into two types and named them single liquid-electrode discharge and double-liquid electrode respectively, according to the number of the liquid electrode and the configuration of the discharge system, and the development as well as the present research status of each type was illustrated. Then the characteristics and configurations of the discharge systems including ECGD, SCGD, LS-APGD and capillary discharge were discussed in detail as examples of the two types. By taking advantage of the technology of atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge, the detecting limit of heavy metals such as copper, mercury and argent as well as active metal ions including sodium, potass and magnesium can achieve microg x L(-1). Finally, the advantages and problems of the liquid-electrode discharge applied in detection of metal ion were discussed. And the applications of the atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge were prospected.

  3. Nanosecond Discharge in Bubbled Liquid n-Heptane: Effects of Gas Composition and Water Addition

    KAUST Repository

    Hamdan, Ahmad

    2016-08-30

    Recently, an aqueous discharge reactor was developed to facilitate reformation of liquid fuels by in-liquid plasma. To gain a microscopic understanding of the physical elements behind this aqueous reactor, we investigate nanosecond discharges in liquid n-heptane with single and double gaseous bubbles in the gap between electrodes. We introduce discharge probability (DP) to characterize the stochastic nature of the discharges, and we investigate the dependence of DP on the gap distance, applied voltage, gaseous bubble composition, and the water content in n-heptane/distilled-water emulsified mixtures. Propagation of a streamer through the bubbles indicates no discharges in the liquids. DP is controlled by the properties of the gaseous bubble rather than by the composition of the liquid mixture in the gap with a single bubble; meanwhile, DP is determined by the dielectric permittivity of the liquid mixture in the gap with double bubbles, results that are supported by static electric field simulations. We found that a physical mechanism of increasing DP is caused by an interaction between bubbles and an importance of the dielectric permittivity of a liquid mixture on the local enhancement of field intensity. We also discuss detailed physical characteristics, such as plasma lifetime and electron density within the discharge channel, by estimating from measured emissions with a gated-intensified charge-coupled device and by using spectroscopic images, respectively. © 1973-2012 IEEE.

  4. A mobile system for treating low-salinity low-activity liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, I.A.; Timofeev, E.M.; Panteleev, V.I.; Karlin Yu.V.; Kropotov, V.N.; Slastennikov, Yu.T.; Chuikov, V.Yu.; Demkin, V.I.; Rozhkov, V.T.

    1993-01-01

    Radioactive wastes are produced not only in radiochemical production and nuclear power stations but also in numerous research institutes and industrial organizations. The specific activities of these wastes are low, and the volumes do not exceed a few dozen cubic meters a year at each individual organization, but processing such territorially distributed wastes is complicated. This particularly applies to liquid wastes, whose transportation involves a high risk of contamination if the sealing fails. As a rule, liquid wastes are solidified before transportation to a storage site. In some cases, that simplified approach leads to an unduly large consumption of solidifying materials, and particularly to an increase in volume, while storage is an expensive technique. A considerable volume reduction in the wastes to be stored is provided by processing the liquid wastes to concentrate the radionuclides in a small volume, with the main volume of treated water discharged to the drains. Two styles are possible: a stationary plant for processing wastes at each institution or a mobile one with a centralized service base, e.g., at the storage site. Mobile systems have been reported in world practice, although there is no detailed information on them. From the economic viewpoint, the second approach is preferable because it enables one to conduct such operations with fewer plants and fewer staff. That a mobile concept that was used at the Moscow Radon Cooperative in 1985 in processing liquid wastes at regional storage locations is summarized in this article. Research and development led in 1989 to the manufacture of a prototype mobile system mounted on an MAZ articulated vehicle, which included three basic modules: ultrafiltration, electrodialysis, and filtration ones. Each module is located on a separate framework and is connected to the others by reinforced rubber hoses

  5. Waste analysis plan for the 200 area effluent treatment facility and liquid effluent retention facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballantyne, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    This waste analysis plan (WAP) has been prepared for startup of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) and operation of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF), which are located on the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to obtain and analyze representative samples of dangerous waste managed in these units, and of the nondangerous treated effluent that is discharged to the State-Approved Land Disposal System (SALDS). Groundwater Monitoring at the SALDS will be addressed in a separate plan

  6. Liquid return from gas pressurization of grouted waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, W.J.; Benny, H.L.

    1994-05-01

    The ability to force pore liquids out of a simulated waste grout matrix using air pressure was measured. Specimens cured under various conditions were placed in a permeameter and subjected to increasing air pressure. The pressure was held constant for 24 hours and then stepped up until either liquid was released or 150 psi was reached. One specimen was taken to 190 psi with no liquid release. Permeability to simulated tank waste was then measured. Compressive strength was measured following these tests. This data is to assess the amount of fluid that might be released from grouted waste resulting from the buildup of radiolytically generated hydrogen and other gasses within the waste form matrix. A plot of the unconfined compressive strength versus breakthrough pressures identifies a region of ''good'' grout, which will resist liquid release

  7. Method of processing nitrate-containing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Norito; Nagase, Kiyoharu; Otsuka, Katsuyuki; Ouchi, Jin.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently concentrate nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes by electrolytically dialyzing radioactive liquid wastes to decompose the nitrate salt by using an electrolytic cell comprising three chambers having ion exchange membranes and anodes made of special materials. Method: Nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes are supplied to and electrolytically dialyzed in a central chamber of an electrolytic cell comprising three chambers having cationic exchange membranes and anionic exchange membranes made of flouro-polymer as partition membranes, whereby the nitrate is decomposed to form nitric acid in the anode chamber and alkali hydroxide compound or ammonium hydroxide in the cathode chamber, as well as concentrate the radioactive substance in the central chamber. Coated metals of at least one type of platinum metal is used as the anode for the electrolytic cell. This enables efficient industrial concentration of nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes. (Yoshihara, H.)

  8. Method of processing liquid waste containing fission product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funabashi, Kiyomi; Kawamura, Fumio; Matsuda, Masami; Komori, Itaru; Miura, Eiichi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To prepare solidification products of low surface dose by removing cesium which is main radioactive nuclides from re-processing plants. Method: Liquid wastes containing a great amount of fission products are generated accompanying the reprocessing for spent nuclear fuels. After pH adjustment, the liquid wastes are sent to a concentrator to concentrate the dissolved ingredients. The concentrated liquid wastes are pumped to an adsorption tower in which radioactive cesium contributing much to the surface dose is removed. Then, the liquid wastes are sent by way of a surge tank to a mixing tank, in which they are mixed under stirring with solidifying agents such as cements. Then, the mixture is filled in a drum-can and solidified. According to this invention, since radioactive cesium is removed before solidification, it is possible to prepare solidification products at low surface dose and facilitate the handling of the solidification products. (Horiuchi, T.)

  9. Evaluation of mercury in the liquid waste processing facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Vijay [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shah, Hasmukh [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Occhipinti, John E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, William R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, Richard E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-13

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  10. Vitrification of liquid waste from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Jiawei; Choi, Kwansik; Song, Myung-Jae

    2001-01-01

    Glass is an acceptable waste form to solidify the low-level waste from nuclear power plants (NPPs) because of the simplicity of processing and its unique ability to accept a wide variety of waste streams. Vitrification is being considered to solidify the high-boron-containing liquid waste generated from Korean NPPs. This study dealt with the development of a glass formulation to solidify the liquid waste. Studies were conducted in a borosilicate glass system. Crucible studies have been performed with surrogate waste. Several developed glass frits were evaluated to determine their suitability for vitrifying the liquid waste. The results indicated that the 20 wt% waste oxides loading required could not be obtained using these glass frits. Flyash produced from coal-burning electric power stations, whose major components are SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 , is a desirable glass network former. Detailed product evaluations including waste loading, homogeneity, chemical durability and viscosity, etc., were carried out on selected formulations using flyash. Up to 30 wt% of the waste oxides was successfully solidified into the flyash after the addition of 5-10 wt% Na 2 O at 1200 deg. C

  11. Nanosecond Discharge in Bubbled Liquid n-Heptane: Effects of Gas Composition and Water Addition

    KAUST Repository

    Hamdan, Ahmad; Cha, Min

    2016-01-01

    in liquid n-heptane with single and double gaseous bubbles in the gap between electrodes. We introduce discharge probability (DP) to characterize the stochastic nature of the discharges, and we investigate the dependence of DP on the gap distance, applied

  12. Characteristics of atmospheric pressure air discharges with a liquid cathode and a metal anode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bruggeman, P.; Ribežl, E.; Degroote, J.; Malesevic, A.; Rego, R.; Vierendeels, J.; Leys, C.; Mašláni, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2008), s. 1-11 ISSN 0963-0252 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : atmospheric pressure air discharge * liquid cathode * voltage drop * optical emission spectroscopy Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.685, year: 2008

  13. Pump effect of a capillary discharge in electrically conductive liquids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Baerdemaeker, F.; Šimek, Milan; Leys, C.; Verstraete, W.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 4 (2007), s. 473-485 ISSN 0272-4324 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1043403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : water * conductive * capillary * AC discharge * pump Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.747, year: 2007 http://www.springerlink.com/content/w802073563282272/fulltext.pdf

  14. Membrane Treatment of Liquid Salt Bearing Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, S. A.; Adamovich, D. V.; Demkin, V. I.; Timofeev, E. M.

    2003-01-01

    The main fields of introduction and application of membrane methods for preliminary treatment and processing salt liquid radioactive waste (SLRW) can be nuclear power stations (NPP) and enterprises on atomic submarines (AS) utilization. Unlike the earlier developed technology for the liquid salt bearing radioactive waste decontamination and concentrating this report presents the new enhanced membrane technology for the liquid salt bearing radioactive waste processing based on the state-of-the-art membrane unit design, namely, the filtering units equipped with the metal-ceramic membranes of ''TruMem'' brand, as well as the electrodialysis and electroosmosis concentrators. Application of the above mentioned units in conjunction with the pulse pole changer will allow the marked increase of the radioactive waste concentrating factor and the significant reduction of the waste volume intended for conversion into monolith and disposal. Besides, the application of the electrodialysis units loaded with an ion exchange material at the end polishing stage of the radioactive waste decontamination process will allow the reagent-free radioactive waste treatment that meets the standards set for the release of the decontaminated liquid radioactive waste effluents into the natural reservoirs of fish-farming value

  15. Waste water discharge and its effect on the quality of water of Mahim creek and bay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zingde, M.D.; Desai, B.N.

    Coastal environment around Mahim was monitored to evaluate the effects of domestic and industrial waste water discharge in Mahim Creek, Maharashtra, India. Vertical salinity and DO gradient occasionally observed in the Mahim Bay during postmonsoon...

  16. Categorisation of waste streams arising from the operation of a low active waste incinerator and justification of discharge practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Waste streams arising from the low active waste incinerator at Harwell are described, and the radiological impact of each exposure pathway discussed. The waste streams to be considered are: (i) discharge of scrubber liquors after effluent treatment to the river Thames; (ii) disposal of incinerator ash; and (iii) discharge of airborne gaseous effluents to the atmosphere. Doses to the collective population and critical groups as a result of the operation of the incinerator are assessed and an attempt made to justify the incineration practice by consideration of the radiological impact and monetary costs associated with alternative disposal methods. (author)

  17. A system for destroying mixed and hazardous wastes with no gas or liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, D.W.; Upadhye, R.S.

    1992-04-01

    We developed a conceptual design for a processing system in which the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste would be destroyed, while discharging virtually no gaseous or liquid effluents. Only solid products would be produced. For mixed waste feeds these could then be transported and disposed as low level waste. This system would oxidize the organics using any one of several destruction processes adapted to replace air with a mixture of O 2 and recycled CO 2 . Net production Of CO 2 , HC1, and H 2 O in the dosed recycle system would be scrubbed or reacted to solid products such as CaCO 3 , NaCl, and concrete. This no-effluent design may improve community acceptance of a waste destruction system

  18. Treatment alternatives of liquid radioactive waste containing uranium in phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustamante Escobedo, Mauricio

    2003-01-01

    The UGDR, receives annually 100 [l] of liquid radioactive waste containing, highly acid (pH=0) uranium in phosphoric acid from the Laboratory of Chemical Analysis. This waste must be chemically and radiologically decontaminated before it can be discharged in accordance with local environmental standards. Chemical precipitation and evaporation test were carried out to define the operating conditions for the radiological decontamination of this radioactive waste and to obtain a solid waste that can be conditioned in a cement matrix. The evaporation process generates excellent rates of volume reduction, over 80%, but generates a pulp that is hard handle when submitted to a drying process. Chemical precipitation generates good results for decontaminating these solutions and reducing volume (above 50%) to obtain a uranium free effluent. The treatment with calcium carbonate generated an effluent with a low concentration of polluting agents. A preliminary test was carried out condition these solids in a cement matrix, using ratios of 0.45 waste/cement and 2 of water/cement. The mix prepared with waste from the sodium hydroxide treatment had low mechanical resistance resulting from the saline incrustations. The waste from the calcium carbonate treatment was very porous due to the water evaporation from the highly exothermic reaction between the waste and the cement. The mix of the calcium carbonate generated waste and the cement matrix needs to be optimized, since it generates favorable conditions for adhering with the cement matrix (au)

  19. Plasmachemical oxidation processes in a hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukes, Petr; Locke, Bruce R [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Florida State University, 2525 Pottsdamer Street, Tallahassee, Florida (United States)

    2005-11-21

    Oxidation processes induced in water by pulsed electrical discharges generated simultaneously in the gas phase in close proximity to the water surface and directly in the liquid were investigated in a hybrid series gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor. The mechanism of phenol degradation was studied through its dependence on the gas phase and liquid phase compositions using pure argon and oxygen atmospheres above the liquid and different initial pH values in the aqueous solution. Phenol degradation was significantly enhanced in the hybrid-series reactor compared with the phenol removal by the single-liquid phase discharge reactor. Under an argon atmosphere the mechanism of phenol degradation was mainly caused by the electrophilic attack of OH{center_dot} radicals produced by the liquid phase discharge directly in water and OH{center_dot} radicals produced by the gas phase discharge at the gas-liquid interface. Under an oxygen atmosphere the formation of gaseous ozone dominated over the formation of OH{center_dot} radicals, and the contribution of the gas phase discharge in this case was determined mainly by the dissolution of gaseous ozone into the water and its subsequent interaction with phenol. At high pH phenol was degraded, in addition to the direct attack by ozone, also through indirect reactions of OH{center_dot} radicals formed via a peroxone process by the decomposition of dissolved ozone by hydrogen peroxide produced by the liquid phase discharge. Such a mechanism was proved by the detection of cis,cis-muconic acid and pH-dependent degradation of phenol, which resulted in significantly higher removal of phenol from alkaline solution observed under oxygen atmosphere than in argon.

  20. Plasmachemical oxidation processes in a hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukes, Petr; Locke, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    Oxidation processes induced in water by pulsed electrical discharges generated simultaneously in the gas phase in close proximity to the water surface and directly in the liquid were investigated in a hybrid series gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor. The mechanism of phenol degradation was studied through its dependence on the gas phase and liquid phase compositions using pure argon and oxygen atmospheres above the liquid and different initial pH values in the aqueous solution. Phenol degradation was significantly enhanced in the hybrid-series reactor compared with the phenol removal by the single-liquid phase discharge reactor. Under an argon atmosphere the mechanism of phenol degradation was mainly caused by the electrophilic attack of OH· radicals produced by the liquid phase discharge directly in water and OH· radicals produced by the gas phase discharge at the gas-liquid interface. Under an oxygen atmosphere the formation of gaseous ozone dominated over the formation of OH· radicals, and the contribution of the gas phase discharge in this case was determined mainly by the dissolution of gaseous ozone into the water and its subsequent interaction with phenol. At high pH phenol was degraded, in addition to the direct attack by ozone, also through indirect reactions of OH· radicals formed via a peroxone process by the decomposition of dissolved ozone by hydrogen peroxide produced by the liquid phase discharge. Such a mechanism was proved by the detection of cis,cis-muconic acid and pH-dependent degradation of phenol, which resulted in significantly higher removal of phenol from alkaline solution observed under oxygen atmosphere than in argon

  1. APPLICATION OF PULSE COMBUSTION TO INCINERATION OF LIQUID HAZARDOUS WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a study to determine the effect of acoustic pulsations on the steady-state operation of a pulse combustor burning liquid hazardous waste. A horizontal tunnel furnace was retrofitted with a liquid injection pulse combustor that burned No. 2 fuel oil. Th...

  2. Purification of inkjet ink from water using liquid phase, electric discharge polymerization and cellulosic membrane filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Alexander T; Hsieh, Jeffery S; Lee, Daniel T

    2013-01-01

    A method to separate inkjet ink from water was developed using a liquid phase, electric discharge process. The liquid phase, electric discharge process with filtration or sedimentation was shown to remove 97% of inkjet ink from solutions containing between 0.1-0.8 g/L and was consistent over a range of treatment conditions. Additionally, particle size analysis of treated allyl alcohol and treated propanol confirmed the electric discharge treatment has a polymerization mechanism, and small molecule analysis of treated methanol using gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy confirmed the mechanism was free radical initiated polymerization.

  3. Angra-1 NPP thermal influence on liquid effluent discharge zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Daniel de Araujo

    1996-01-01

    The Angra I Nuclear Power Plant makes use of sea-water to condense the steam generated in its secondary circuit. This water, collected from Itaorna bay, is then chlorinated and discharged, with higher temperature, in the Piraquara de Fora bay. Aiming the study of the marine ecosystem, submitted to the effects of the Nuclear Power Plant discharge water, the temperature, residual chlorine, flora and fauna are periodically monitored. Being sensitive to temperature variations and to chemical products, macroscopic algae are also bio-accumulators and primary producers, because of this, they are considered the main link in the food chain and therefore important bio-indicator. This paper shows the variation of species from the brown algae near the discharge of Angra I Nuclear Power Plant. (author)

  4. Maximum discharge rate of liquid-vapor mixtures from vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, F.J.

    1975-09-01

    A discrepancy exists in theoretical predictions of the two-phase equilibrium discharge rate from pipes attached to vessels. Theory which predicts critical flow data in terms of pipe exit pressure and quality severely overpredicts flow rates in terms of vessel fluid properties. This study shows that the discrepancy is explained by the flow pattern. Due to decompression and flashing as fluid accelerates into the pipe entrance, the maximum discharge rate from a vessel is limited by choking of a homogeneous bubbly mixture. The mixture tends toward a slip flow pattern as it travels through the pipe, finally reaching a different choked condition at the pipe exit

  5. Operating safety requirements for the intermediate level liquid waste system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    The operation of the Intermediate Level Liquid Waste (ILW) System, which is described in the Final Safety Analysis, consists of two types of operations, namely: (1) the operation of a tank farm which involves the storage and transportation through pipelines of various radioactive liquids; and (2) concentration of the radioactive liquids by evaporation including rejection of the decontaminated condensate to the Waste Treatment Plant and retention of the concentrate. The following safety requirements in regard to these operations are presented: safety limits and limiting control settings; limiting conditions for operation; and surveillance requirements. Staffing requirements, reporting requirements, and steps to be taken in the event of an abnormal occurrence are also described

  6. Study on cementation of simulated radioactive borated liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qina; Li Junfeng; Wang Jianlong

    2010-01-01

    To compare sulfoaluminate cement with ordinary Portland cement on their cementation of radioactive borated liquid waste and to provide more data for formula optimization, simulated radioactive borated liquid waste were solidified by the two cements. 28 d compressive strength and strength losses after water/freezing/irradiation resistance tests were investigated. Leaching test and X-ray diffraction analysis were also conducted. The results show that it is feasible to solidify borated liquid wastes with sulfoaluminate cement and ordinary Portland cement with formulas used in the study. The 28 d compressive strengths, strength losses after tests and simulated nuclides leaching rates of the solidified waste forms meet the demand of GB 14569.1-93. The sulfoaluminate cement formula show better retention of Cs + than ordinary Portland cement formula. Boron, in form of B (OH) 4 - , incorporate in ettringite as solid solutions. (authors)

  7. Desactivation of liquid radioactive wastes of low and medium activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golinski, M.; Charomska, K.

    1978-01-01

    The results of research made according to the prodranm of scientific and technical cooperation of the CMEA countries are discussed. The main direction of these research works is on future improvement of installations for purification of liquid radioactive wastes by chemical methods of coprecipitation and coagulation, ion exchange, sorption, distillation and electrolysis. It was shown that methods of coprecipitation and coagulation have low efficiency and the activity reduction factor seldom was more than 10. In sorption processes different sorbents, both organic and nonorganic were used. The modified bentonite used as a sorbent agent has shown high selectivity towards zesium ions. Waste concentration by means of distillation is an universal but rather expensive method and is applied mainly in the cases of high salts concentration and high specific activity of liquid wastes. Electrolysis, as a method of the liquid wastes purification is used in the USSR and has high efficiency with low energy consumption. (I.T.) [ru

  8. Leak test of the pipe line for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Chuji; Mori, Shoji.

    1976-01-01

    In the Tokai Research Establishment, most of the radioactive liquid waste is transferred to a wastes treatment facility through pipe lines. As part of the pipe lines a cast iron pipe for town gas is used. Leak test has been performed on all joints of the lines. For the joints buried underground, the test was made by radioactivity measurement of the soil; and for the joints in drainage ditch by the pressure and bubble methods. There were no leakage at all, indicating integrity of all the joints. On the other hand, it is also known by the other test that the corrosion of inner surface of the piping due to liquid waste is only slight. The pipe lines for transferring radioactive liquid waste are thus still usable. (auth.)

  9. The reformation of liquid hydrocarbons in an aqueous discharge reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xuming; Cha, Min

    2015-01-01

    deposition. These findings offer a new approach to the reforming processes of liquid hydrocarbons and provide a novel concept for the design of a practical and compact plasma reformer. © 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  10. Means of introducing an analyte into liquid sampling atmospheric pressure glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. Kenneth; Quarles, Jr., Charles Derrick; Russo, Richard E.; Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Carado, Anthony J.

    2017-01-03

    A liquid sampling, atmospheric pressure, glow discharge (LS-APGD) device as well as systems that incorporate the device and methods for using the device and systems are described. The LS-APGD includes a hollow capillary for delivering an electrolyte solution to a glow discharge space. The device also includes a counter electrode in the form of a second hollow capillary that can deliver the analyte into the glow discharge space. A voltage across the electrolyte solution and the counter electrode creates the microplasma within the glow discharge space that interacts with the analyte to move it to a higher energy state (vaporization, excitation, and/or ionization of the analyte).

  11. Using bentonite for NPP liquid waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui Dang Hanh

    2015-01-01

    During operation, nuclear power plants (NPPs) release a large quantity of water waste containing radionuclides required treatment for protection of the radiation workers and the environment. This paper introduces processes used to treat water waste from Paks NPP in Hungary and it also presents the results of a study on the use of Vietnamese bentonite to remove radioactive Caesium from a simulated water waste containing Cs. (author)

  12. Radioactivity in gaseous waste discharged from the separations facilities during 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.D.; Poremba, B.E.

    1979-01-01

    This document is issued quarterly for the purpose of summarizing the radioactive gaseous wastes that are discharged from the facilities of the Rockwell Hanford Operations. Data on alpha and beta emissions during 1978 are presented where relevant to the gaseous effluent. Emission data are not included on gaseous wastes produced within the 200 Areas by other Hanford contractors

  13. Review of the methods to form hydrogen peroxide in electrical discharge plasma with liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Bruce R.; Shih, Kai-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature dealing with the formation of hydrogen peroxide from plasma processes. Energy yields for hydrogen peroxide generation by plasma from water span approximately three orders of magnitude from 4 × 10-2 to 80 g kWh-1. A wide range of plasma processes from rf to pulsed, ac, and dc discharges directly in the liquid phase have similar energy yields and may thus be limited by radical quenching processes at the plasma-liquid interface. Reactor modification using discharges in bubbles and discharges over the liquid phase can provide modest improvements in energy yield over direct discharge in the liquid, but the interpretation is complicated by additional chemical reactions of gas phase components such as ozone and nitrogen oxides. The highest efficiency plasma process utilizes liquid water droplets that may enhance efficiency by sequestering hydrogen peroxide in the liquid and by suppressing decomposition reactions by radicals from the gas and at the interface. Kinetic simulations of water vapor reported in the literature suggest that plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide should approach 45% of the thermodynamics limit, and this fact coupled with experimental studies demonstrating improvements with the presence of the condensed liquid phase suggest that further improvements in energy yield may be possible. Plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide directly from water compares favorably with a number of other methods including electron beam, ultrasound, electrochemical and photochemical methods, and other chemical processes.

  14. Review of the methods to form hydrogen peroxide in electrical discharge plasma with liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, Bruce R; Shih, Kai-Yuan [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    This paper presents a review of the literature dealing with the formation of hydrogen peroxide from plasma processes. Energy yields for hydrogen peroxide generation by plasma from water span approximately three orders of magnitude from 4 x 10{sup -2} to 80 g kWh{sup -1}. A wide range of plasma processes from rf to pulsed, ac, and dc discharges directly in the liquid phase have similar energy yields and may thus be limited by radical quenching processes at the plasma-liquid interface. Reactor modification using discharges in bubbles and discharges over the liquid phase can provide modest improvements in energy yield over direct discharge in the liquid, but the interpretation is complicated by additional chemical reactions of gas phase components such as ozone and nitrogen oxides. The highest efficiency plasma process utilizes liquid water droplets that may enhance efficiency by sequestering hydrogen peroxide in the liquid and by suppressing decomposition reactions by radicals from the gas and at the interface. Kinetic simulations of water vapor reported in the literature suggest that plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide should approach 45% of the thermodynamics limit, and this fact coupled with experimental studies demonstrating improvements with the presence of the condensed liquid phase suggest that further improvements in energy yield may be possible. Plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide directly from water compares favorably with a number of other methods including electron beam, ultrasound, electrochemical and photochemical methods, and other chemical processes.

  15. Volume reduction/solidification of liquid radioactive waste using bitumen at Ontario hydro's Bruce nuclear generating station open-quotes Aclose quotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, J.E.; Baker, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    Ontario Hydro at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station open-quotes Aclose quotes has undertaken a program to render the station's liquid radioactive waste suitable for discharge to Lake Huron by removing sufficient radiological and chemical contaminants from five different plant waste streams. The contaminants will be immobilized and stored at on-site radioactive waste storage facilities and the purified streams will be discharged. The discharge targets established by Ontario Hydro are set well below the limits established by the Ontario Ministry of Environment (MOE) and are based on the Best Available Technology Economically Achievable Approach (B.A.T.E.A.). ADTECHS Corporation has been selected by Ontario Hydro to provide volume reduction/solidification technology for one of the five waste streams. The system will dry and immobilize the contaminants from a liquid waste stream in emulsified asphalt using thin film evaporation technology

  16. Assessment of management alternatives for LWR wastes. Volume 5. Assessment of the radiological impact to the public resulting from discharges of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centner, B.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the assessment of the radiological impact to the public resulting from discharges of radioactive effluents (liquid and gaseous) in connection with the implementation of the Belgian scenario for the management of PWR waste. Both individual and collective doses have been estimated for a critical group of the population living around the nuclear power plants concerned. This study is part of an overall theoretical exercise aimed at evaluating a selection of management wastes for LWR waste based on economical and radiological criteria

  17. Incineration plant for thermal destruction of radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartoli, B.; Lisbonne, P.

    1988-01-01

    Incineration was selected to destroy organic liquids contaminated by radioelements. This treatment offers the advantage of reducing the volume of wastes considerably. Therefore an incineration plant has been built within the nuclear research center of Cadarache. After an experimental work with inactive organic liquids from June 1980 to March 1981, the incineration plant was approved by safety authorities for the incineration of contaminated organic liquids. The capacity ranges from 20l/hr to 50l/hr. On the basis of 6 years of operation and a volume of 200 m3 the incineration plant has shown reliable operating conditions in the destruction of various contaminated organic liquids

  18. Combustion of animal or vegetable based liquid waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikman, Karin; Berg, Magnus

    2002-04-01

    In this project experiences from combustion of animal and vegetable based liquid waste products have been compiled. Legal aspects have also been taken into consideration and the potential for this type of fuel on the Swedish energy market has been evaluated. Today the supply of animal and vegetable based liquid waste products for energy production in Sweden is limited. The total production of animal based liquid fat is about 10,000 tonnes annually. The animal based liquid waste products origin mainly from the manufacturing of meat and bone meal. Since meat and bone meal has been banned from use in animal feeds it is possible that the amount of animal based liquid fat will decrease. The vegetable based liquid waste products that are produced in the processing of vegetable fats are today used mainly for internal energy production. This result in limited availability on the commercial market. The potential for import of animal and vegetable based liquid waste products is estimated to be relatively large since the production of this type of waste products is larger in many other countries compared to Sweden. Vegetable oils that are used as food or raw material in industries could also be imported for combustion, but this is not reasonable today since the energy prices are relatively low. Restrictions allow import of SRM exclusively from Denmark. This is today the only limit for increased imports of animal based liquid fat. The restrictions for handle and combustion of animal and vegetable based liquid waste products are partly unclear since this is covered in several regulations that are not easy to interpret. The new directive for combustion of waste (2000/76/EG) is valid for animal based waste products but not for cadaver or vegetable based waste products from provisions industries. This study has shown that more than 27,400 tonnes of animal based liquid waste products and about 6,000 tonnes of vegetable based liquid waste products were used for combustion in Sweden

  19. Improved liquid waste processing system of PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suehiro, Kazuyasu

    1977-01-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. has engaged in the improvement and enhancement of waste-processing facilities for PWR power stations, and recently established the improved processing system. With this system, it becomes possible to contain radioactive waste gas semi-permanently within plants and to recycle waste liquid after the treatment, thus to make the release of radioactive wastes practically zero. The improved system has the following features, namely the recycling system is adopted, drain is separated and each separated drain is treated by specialized process, the reboiler type evaporator and the reverse osmosis equipment are used, and the leakless construction is adopted for the equipments. The radioactive liquid wastes in PWR power stations are classified into coolant drain, drain from general equipments, chemical drain and cleaning water. The outline of the improved processing system and the newly developed equipments such as the reboiler type evaporator and the reverse osmosis equipment are explained. With the evaporator, the concentration rate of waste liquid can be raised to about three times, and foaming waste can be treated efficiently. The decontamination performance is excellent. The reverse osmosis treatment is stable and reliable method, and is useful for the treatment of cleaning water. It is also effective for concentrating treatment. The unmanned automatic operation is possible. (Kako, I.)

  20. Expert system for liquid low-level waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrada, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    An expert system prototype has been developed to support system analysis activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for waste management tasks. This expert system will aid in prioritizing radioactive waste streams for treatment and disposal by evaluating the severity and treatability of the problem as well as the final waste form. The objectives of the expert system development included: (1) collecting information on process treatment technologies for liquid low-level waste (LLLW) that can be incorporated in the knowledge base of the expert system, and (2) producing a prototype that suggests processes and disposal technologies for the ORNL LLLW system. The concept under which the expert system has been designed is integration of knowledge. There are many sources of knowledge (data bases, text files, simulation programs, etc.) that an expert would regularly consult in order to solve a problem of liquid waste management. The expert would normally know how to extract the information from these different sources of knowledge. The general scope of this project would be to include as much pertinent information as possible within the boundaries of the expert system. As a result, the user, who may not be an expert in every aspect of liquid waste management, may be able to apply the content of the information to a specific waste problem. This paper gives the methodological steps to develop the expert system under this general framework

  1. Measurement of partial discharge inception characteristics in sub-cooled liquid nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, J.Y.; Lee, S.H.; Shin, W.J.; Khan, Umer A.; Oh, S.H.; Seong, J.K.; Lee, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    We measured partial discharge and partial discharge initiation voltage of subcooled liquid nitrogen. Various kinds of test samples have been prepared. Sub-cooled temperature in liquid nitrogen were changed. The number of PD pluses were decreased when 68 K liquid nitrogen was used. Sub-cooled liquid nitrogen has positive effects to suppress PD activities. Partial discharge (PD) measurement is one of the effective diagnostic techniques to predict abnormal high voltage dielectric insulation conditions of the electric equipments. PD diagnostic techniques were also could be utilized to evaluate the conditions of cryogenic dielectric insulation media of high temperature superconducting electric equipment in liquid nitrogen. Generally, liquid nitrogen at 77 K is used as cryogenic and dielectric media for high temperature superconducting devices for high voltage electric power systems. But due to generation of bubbles during quench conditions which cause harmful effect on the properties of liquid nitrogen insulation, sub-cooled nitrogen under 77 K was also employed to suppress bubble formation. In this work, investigation of PD characteristics of sub-cooled liquid nitrogen was conducted in order to clarify the relation between PD inception and the temperature of liquid nitrogen. It was observed that measured PDIV (PD inception voltage) shows little differences according to the sub-cooled temperature of liquid nitrogen, but the magnitude and total numbers of PD has been slightly decreased according the decrease of cooled temperature of liquid nitrogen. From experimental results, it was deduced that the sub-cooled liquid nitrogen from 68 K to 77 K, could be applicable without any considerations of the variation of PDIV.

  2. Treatment of mixed radioactive liquid wastes at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.

    1994-01-01

    Aqueous mixed waste at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is traditionally generated in small volumes with a wide variety of compositions. A cooperative effort at ANL between Waste Management (WM) and the Chemical Technology Division (CMT) was established, to develop, install, and implement a robust treatment operation to handle the majority of such wastes. For this treatment, toxic metals in mixed-waste solutions are precipitated in a semiautomated system using Ca(OH) 2 and, for some metals, Na 2 S additions. This step is followed by filtration to remove the precipitated solids. A filtration skid was built that contains several filter types which can be used, as appropriate, for a variety of suspended solids. When supernatant liquid is separated from the toxic-metal solids by decantation and filtration, it will be a low-level waste (LLW) rather than a mixed waste. After passing a Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test, the solids may also be treated as LLW

  3. Treatment of mixed wastes by thermal plasma discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz A, L.V.

    2007-01-01

    The present study has as purpose to apply the technology of thermal plasma in the destruction of certain type of waste generated in the ININ. As first instance, origin, classification and disposition of the radioactive waste generated in the ININ is identified. Once identified the waste, the waste to treat is determined based on: the easiness of treating him with plasma, classification and importance. Later on, a substance or compound settles down (sample model) that serves as indicative of the waste for its physical-chemical characteristics, this is made because in the Thermal Plasma Applications Laboratory is not had the license to work with radioactive material. The sample model and the material to form the vitreous matrix are characterized before and after the treatment in order to evaluating their degradation and vitrification. During the treatment by means of the thermal plasma, the appropriate conditions are determined for the degradation and vitrification of the waste. Also, it is carried out an energy balance in the system to know the capacity to fuse the material depending the transfer of existent heat between the plasma and the material to treat. Obtaining favorable results, it thought about to climb in the project and by this way to help to solve one of the environmental problems in Mexico, as they are it the mixed wastes. (Author)

  4. Glass-solidification method for high level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kazuhiro; Kometani, Masayuki; Sasage, Ken-ichi.

    1996-01-01

    High level liquid wastes are removed with precipitates mainly comprising Mo and Zr, thereafter, the high level liquid wastes are mixed with a glass raw material comprising a composition having a B 2 O 3 /SiO 2 ratio of not less than 0.41, a ZnO/Li 2 O ratio of not less than 1.00, and an Al 2 O 3 /Li 2 O ratio of not less than 2.58, and they are melted and solidified into glass-solidification products. The liquid waste content in the glass-solidification products can be increased up to about 45% by using the glass raw material having such a predetermined composition. In addition, deposition of a yellow phase does not occur, and a leaching rate identical with that in a conventional case can be maintained. (T.M.)

  5. Seismic evaluation of existing liquid low level waste system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, C.R.; Holmes, R.M.; Kincaid, J.H.; Singhal, M.K.; Stockdale, B.I.; Walls, J.C.; Webb, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    The existing liquid low level waste (LLLW) system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is used to collect, neutralize, concentrate, and store the radioactive and toxic waste from various sources at the Laboratory. The waste solutions are discharged from source facilities to individual collection tanks, transferred by underground piping to an evaporator facility for concentration, and pumped through the underground piping to storage in underground tanks. The existing LLLW system was installed in the 1950s with several system additions up to the present. The worst-case accident postulated is an earthquake of sufficient magnitude to rupture the tanks and/or piping so as to damage the containment integrity to the surrounding soil and environment. The objective of an analysis of the system is to provide a level of confidence in the seismic resistance of the LLLW system to withstand the postulated earthquake

  6. Discharge of water containing waste emanating from land to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    containing waste (wastewater), which emanates from land-based sources and which directly impact on the marine environment. These sources include sea outfalls, storm water drains, canals, rivers and diffuse sources of pollution. To date ...

  7. Deep injection disposal of liquid radioactive waste in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, M.G.; Ballou, L.; Rybal'chenko, A.I.; Pimenov, M.K.; Kostin, P.P.

    1998-01-01

    Originally published in Russian, Deep Injection Disposal is the most comprehensive account available in the West of the Soviet and Russian practice of disposing of radioactive wastes into deep geological formations. It tells the story of the first 40 years of work in the former Soviet Union to devise, test, and execute a program to dispose by deep injection millions of cubic meters of liquid radioactive wastes from nuclear materials processing. The book explains decisions involving safety aspects, research results, and practical experience gained during the creation and operation of disposal systems. Deep Injection Disposal will be useful for studying other problems worldwide involving the economic use of space beneath the earth's surface. The material in the book is presented with an eye toward other possible applications. Because liquid radioactive wastes are so toxic and the decisions made are so vital, information in this book will be of great interest to those involved in the disposal of nonradioactive waste

  8. Generation of ozone by pulsed corona discharge over water surface in hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukes, Petr [Department of Pulse Plasma Systems, Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Za Slovankou 3, PO Box 17, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Clupek, Martin [Department of Pulse Plasma Systems, Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Za Slovankou 3, PO Box 17, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Babicky, Vaclav [Department of Pulse Plasma Systems, Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Za Slovankou 3, PO Box 17, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Janda, Vaclav [Department of Water Technology and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 160 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Sunka, Pavel [Department of Pulse Plasma Systems, Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Za Slovankou 3, PO Box 17, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2005-02-07

    Ozone formation by a pulse positive corona discharge generated in the gas phase between a planar high voltage electrode made from reticulated vitreous carbon and a water surface with an immersed ground stainless steel plate electrode was investigated under various operating conditions. The effects of gas flow rate (0.5-3 litre min{sup -1}), discharge gap spacing (2.5-10 mm), applied input power (2-45 W) and gas composition (oxygen containing argon or nitrogen) on ozone production were determined. Ozone concentration increased with increasing power input and with increasing discharge gap. The production of ozone was significantly affected by the presence of water vapour formed through vaporization of water at the gas-liquid interface by the action of the gas phase discharge. The highest energy efficiency for ozone production was obtained using high voltage pulses of approximately 150 ns duration in Ar/O{sub 2} mixtures with the maximum efficiency (energy yield) of 23 g kW h{sup -1} for 40% argon content.

  9. Generation of ozone by pulsed corona discharge over water surface in hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukes, Petr; Clupek, Martin; Babicky, Vaclav; Janda, Vaclav; Sunka, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Ozone formation by a pulse positive corona discharge generated in the gas phase between a planar high voltage electrode made from reticulated vitreous carbon and a water surface with an immersed ground stainless steel plate electrode was investigated under various operating conditions. The effects of gas flow rate (0.5-3 litre min -1 ), discharge gap spacing (2.5-10 mm), applied input power (2-45 W) and gas composition (oxygen containing argon or nitrogen) on ozone production were determined. Ozone concentration increased with increasing power input and with increasing discharge gap. The production of ozone was significantly affected by the presence of water vapour formed through vaporization of water at the gas-liquid interface by the action of the gas phase discharge. The highest energy efficiency for ozone production was obtained using high voltage pulses of approximately 150 ns duration in Ar/O 2 mixtures with the maximum efficiency (energy yield) of 23 g kW h -1 for 40% argon content

  10. China's Scientific Investigation for Liquid Waste Treatment Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liangjin, B.; Meiqiong, L.; Kelley, D.

    2006-01-01

    Post World War II created the nuclear age with several countries developing nuclear technology for power, defense, space and medical applications. China began its nuclear research and development programs in 1950 with the establishment of the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) located near Beijing. CIAE has been China's leader in nuclear science and technical development with its efforts to create advanced reactor technology and upgrade reprocessing technology. In addition, with China's new emphasis on environmental safety, CIAE is focusing on waste treatment options and new technologies that may provide solutions to legacy waste and newly generated waste from the full nuclear cycle. Radioactive liquid waste can pose significant challenges for clean up with various treatment options including encapsulation (cement), vitrification, solidification and incineration. Most, if not all, nuclear nations have found the treatment of liquids to be difficult, due in large part to the high economic costs associated with treatment and disposal and the failure of some methods to safely contain or eliminate the liquid. With new environmental regulations in place, Chinese nuclear institutes and waste generators are beginning to seek new technologies that can be used to treat the more complex liquid waste streams in a form that is safe for transport and for long-term storage or final disposal. [1] In 2004, CIAE and Pacific Nuclear Solutions, a division of Pacific World Trade, USA, began discussions about absorbent technology and applications for its use. Preliminary tests were conducted at CIAE's Department of Radiochemistry using generic solutions, such as lubricating oil, with absorbent polymers for solidification. Based on further discussions between both parties, it was decided to proceed with a more formal test program in April, 2005, and additional tests in October, 2005. The overall objective of the test program was to apply absorbent polymers to various waste streams

  11. Treatment of low-level liquid radioactive wastes by electrodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DelDebbio, J.A.; Donovan, R.I.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the results of pilot plant studies on the use of electrodialysis (ED) for the removal of radioactive and chemical contaminants from acidic low-level radioactive wastes resulting from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations. Decontamination efficiencies are reported for strontium-90, cesium-137, iodine-129, ruthenium-106 and mercury. Data for contaminant adsorption on ED membranes and liquid waste volumes generated are also presented

  12. Effectiveness of liquid radioactive waste purification by inorganic granulated sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarevskij, V.M.; Stepanets, O.V.; Sharygin, L.M.; Matveev, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Study results on purification of simulative and real liquid radioactive wastes from fission products radionuclides and by inorganic corrosion-nature sorbents 'Thermoxide' are presented. Properties by sorption of cesium, strontium and cobalt are studied; results of experiments on purification of weakly-salted water solutions (waste waters, ships drainage tanks, showers and laundries) of the Beloyarsk NPP are presented. Sorbents source characteristics are determined. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Low level radioactive liquid waste decontamination by electrochemical way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronche, E.

    1994-10-01

    As part of the work on decontamination treatments for low level radioactive aqueous liquid wastes, the study of an electro-chemical process has been chosen by the C.E.A. at the Cadarache research centre. The first part of this report describes the main methods used for the decontamination of aqueous solutions. Then an electro-deposition process and an electro-dissolution process are compared on the basis of the decontamination results using genuine radioactive aqueous liquid waste. For ruthenium decontamination, the former process led to very high yields (99.9 percent eliminated). But the elimination of all the other radionuclides (antimony, strontium, cesium, alpha emitters) was only favoured by the latter process (90 percent eliminated). In order to decrease the total radioactivity level of the waste to be treated, we have optimized the electro-dissolution process. That is why the chemical composition of the dissolved anode has been investigated by a mixture experimental design. The radionuclides have been adsorbed on the precipitating products. The separation of the precipitates from the aqueous liquid enabled us to remove the major part of the initial activity. On the overall process some operations have been investigated to minimize waste embedding. Finally, a pilot device (laboratory scale) has been built and tested with genuine radioactive liquid waste. (author). 77 refs., 41 tabs., 55 figs., 4 appendixes

  14. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes by using zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, T; Mimura, H

    1975-09-18

    The object is to processing radioactive liquid waste by zeolites to be fixed to a solidified body having a very small lixiviation property. The nuclide in radioactive liquid waste is exchanged and adsorbed into natural or synthetic zeolites, which are then burnt to a temperature lower than 1000/sup 0/C -- melting point. Thus, the zeolite structure is broken to form fine amorphous silicate aluminate or silicate aluminate of the nuclide exchanged and adsorbed. Both are very hard to be soluble in water. Further, the lixiviation from the solidified body is limited to the surface thereof, and it will no longer be detected in a few days.

  15. Technical report on treatment of radioactive slurry liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Gyeong Hwan; Jo, Eun Sung; Park, Seung Kook; Jung, Ki Jung

    1999-06-01

    By literature survey, this report deals with the technology on typical pre-treatment and filtration of radioactive slurry liquid waste, produced during the operation of TRIGA Mark-II, III research reactor, and produced during the decommission/decontamination of TRIGA Mark-II, III research reactor. It is reviewed pre-treatment procedure, both physical and chemical that optimise the dewatering characteristics, and also surveyed types of dewatering devices based on centrifuges, vacuum and pressure filters with particular reference to various combined field approaches using two or more complementary driving forces to achieve better performance. Dewatering operations and devises on filtration of radioactive slurry liquid waste are also analysed. (author)

  16. Convective instabilities in liquid centrifugation for nuclear wastes separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camassa, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The separation of fission products from liquid solutions using centrifugal forces may prove an effective alternative to chemical processing in cases where radioactive materials necessitate minimal mixed-waste products or when allowing access to sophisticated chemical processing is undesirable. This investigation is a part of the effort to establish the feasibility of using liquid centrifugation for nuclear waste separation in the Accelerator Driven Energy Production (ADEP) program. A number of fundatmental issues in liquid centrifugation with radioactive elements need to be addressed in order to validate the approach and provide design criteria for experimental liquid salt (LiF and BeF{sub 2}) centrifuge. The author concentrates on one such issue, the possible onset of convective instabilities which could inhibit separation.

  17. Treatment of radioactive liquid organic waste using bacteria community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafael Vicente de Padua Ferreira; Solange Kazumi Sakata; Maria Helena Bellini; Julio Takehiro Marumo; Fernando Dutra; Patricia Busko Di Vitta; Maria Helena Tirollo Taddei

    2012-01-01

    Waste management plays an important role in radioactive waste volume reduction as well as lowering disposal costs and minimizing the environment-detrimental impact. The employment of biomass in the removal of heavy metals and radioisotopes has a significant potential in liquid waste treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the radioactive waste treatment by using three different bacterial communities (BL, BS, and SS) isolated from impacted areas, removing radioisotopes and organic compounds. The best results were obtained in the BS and BL community, isolated from the soil and a lake of a uranium mine, respectively. BS community was able to remove 92% of the uranium and degraded 80% of tributyl phosphate and 70% of the ethyl acetate in 20 days of experiments. BL community removed 81% of the uranium and degraded nearly 60% of the TBP and 70% of the ethyl acetate. SS community collected from the sediment of Sao Sebastiao channel removed 76% of the uranium and 80% of the TBP and 70% of the ethyl acetate. Both americium and cesium were removed by all communities. In addition, the BS community showed to be more resistant to radioactive liquid waste than the other communities. These results indicated that the BS community is the most viable for the treatment of large volumes of radioactive liquid organic waste. (author)

  18. Preliminary Characterization of the Liquid Discharge of the Mexico Hospital; Caracterizacion Preliminar de la Descarga Liquida del Hospital Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Rojas, A

    2001-07-01

    The generation and wrong handling of hospital waste constitutes a serious problem at national level. In this work, a preliminary characterization of the discharge it liquidates of the Mexico Hospital is carried out. For it, different pouring points were analyzed inside the institution; they are: Laundry, Central Kitchen, Clinical Laboratory, X-Rays, Laboratory of Biomass, Morgue, and the final discharge of the hospital. This with the purpose of knowing the handling of the liquid waste in the health center, the sanitary quality of these liquids and their influence in the raw waters of the Mexico Hospital in the receiving body. For this study, we first coordinated with the personnel of each department to know about the handling and type of liquid residuals that are discharged to the system of pipes. Later on the physical-chemical and biological tests were carried out with base in two compound samplings done the days October 26 and November 4 1998. Among the carried out tests we have: pH, DBO, DQO, SAAM, Fatty and Oils, Temperature, Nitrogen and Faecal Coniforms, depending on the characteristics of their origin point. At the end of the study, the obtained results were evaluated for each studied pouring point, and then the influence of these focuses on the quality of the raw waters of the hospital that discharge in a gulch located to the northwest side of the facilities was analyzed. The obtained results allow to preliminarily know the characterization of the liquid discharge of the Mexico Hospital and it was classified as a source of contamination. The Hospital requires of a biological treatment plant for those biodegradable poured liquids, and of a system of chemical treatment for that type of products used in the processes characteristic of each department. It is also required to take into account measures of reduction of contamination that diminish the quantity of waste from the source. (Author) [Spanish] La generacion y mal manejo de desechos hospitalarios

  19. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Li, He-Ping, E-mail: liheping@tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Nie, Qiu-Yue [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province 150001 (China)

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A–X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  20. Solidification of intermediate level liquid waste - ILLW, CEMEX waste form qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, V.; Guerra, M.; Pancotti, F.; Maio, V.

    2015-01-01

    In the Sogin EUREX Facility about 125 m 3 of intermediate level radioactive waste and about 113 m 3 of low level radioactive waste, produced during the re-processing of MTR and CANDU fuel, are stored. Solidification of these wastes is planned in order to fulfill the specific requirements established by the Safety Authority, taking into account the criteria set up in a Technical Guide on the issue of radioactive waste management. The design of a cementation plant (CEMEX) of all liquid radioactive wastes is currently ongoing. The process requires that the liquid waste is neutralized with NaOH (NaOH 19 M) and metered into 440 liter drum together with the cement, while the mixture is stirred by a lost paddle ('in drum mixing process'). The qualification of the Waste Form consists of all the activities demonstrating that the final cemented product has the minimum requirements (mechanical, chemical and physical characteristics) compliant with all the subsequent management phases: long-term interim storage, transport and long-term disposal of the waste. All tests performed to qualify the conditioning process for immobilizing first extraction cycle (MTR and CANDU) and second extraction cycle liquid wastes, gave results in compliance with the minimum requirements established for disposal

  1. Removal of dissolved and suspended radionuclides from Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, S.D.; Nankani, F.D.; Bray, L.A.; Eakin, D.E.; Larson, D.E.

    1990-12-01

    It was determined during Preliminary Design of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant that certain intermediate process liquid waste streams should be decontaminated in a way that would permit the purge of dissolved chemical species from the process recycle shop. This capability is needed to ensure proper control of product glass chemical composition and to avoid excessive corrosion of process equipment. This paper discusses the process design of a system that will remove both radioactive particulates and certain dissolved fission products from process liquid waste streams. Supporting data obtained from literature sources as well as from laboratory- and pilot-scale tests are presented. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  2. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department Annual Operating Report, CY 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1994-02-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the waste management operations section of the liquid and gaseous waste operations department at ORNL for 1993. The process waste, liquid low-level waste, gaseous waste systems activities are reported, as well as the low-level waste solidification project. Upgrade activities is the various waste processing and treatment systems are summarized. A maintenance activity overview is provided, and program management, training, and other miscellaneous activities are covered

  3. Updated Liquid Secondary Waste Grout Formulation and Preliminary Waste Form Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saslow, Sarah A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Russell, Renee L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Asmussen, Robert M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sahajpal, Rahul [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This report describes the results from liquid secondary waste grout (LSWG) formulation and cementitious waste form qualification tests performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS). New formulations for preparing a cementitious waste form from a high-sulfate liquid secondary waste stream simulant, developed for Effluent Management Facility (EMF) process condensates merged with low activity waste (LAW) caustic scrubber, and the release of key constituents (e.g. 99Tc and 129I) from these monoliths were evaluated. This work supports a technology development program to address the technology needs for Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) liquid secondary waste (LSW) solidification and supports future Direct Feed Low-Activity Waste (DFLAW) operations. High-priority activities included simulant development, LSWG formulation, and waste form qualification. The work contained within this report relates to waste form development and testing and does not directly support the 2017 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). However, this work contains valuable information for use in PA maintenance past FY17, and for future waste form development efforts. The provided data should be used by (i) cementitious waste form scientists to further understanding of cementitious dissolution behavior, (ii) IDF PA modelers who use quantified constituent leachability, effective diffusivity, and partitioning coefficients to advance PA modeling efforts, and (iii) the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractors and decision makers as they assess the IDF PA program. The results obtained help fill existing data gaps, support final selection of a LSWG waste form, and improve the technical defensibility of long-term waste form performance estimates.

  4. Studies of nanosecond pulse surface ionization wave discharges over solid and liquid dielectric surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrishchev, Vitaly; Leonov, Sergey; Adamovich, Igor V

    2014-01-01

    Surface ionization wave discharges generated by high-voltage nanosecond pulses, propagating over a planar quartz surface and over liquid surfaces (distilled water and 1-butanol) have been studied in a rectangular cross section test cell. The discharge was initiated using a custom-made, alternating polarity, high-voltage nanosecond pulse plasma generator, operated at a pulse repetition rate of 100–500 Hz, with a pulse peak voltage and current of 10–15 kV and 7–20 A, respectively, a pulse FWHM of ∼100 ns, and a coupled pulse energy of 2–9 mJ/pulse. Wave speed was measured using a capacitive probe. ICCD camera images demonstrated that the ionization wave propagated predominantly over the quartz wall or over the liquid surface adjacent to the grounded waveguide placed along the bottom wall of the test cell. Under all experimental conditions tested, the surface plasma ‘sheet’ was diffuse and fairly uniform, both for positive and negative polarities. The parameters of ionization wave discharge propagating over distilled water and 1-butanol surfaces were close to those of the discharge over a quartz wall. No perturbation of the liquid surface by the discharge was detected. In most cases, the positive polarity surface ionization wave propagated at a higher speed and over a longer distance compared to the negative polarity wave. For all three sets of experiments (surface ionization wave discharge over quartz, water and 1-butanol), wave speed and travel distance decreased with pressure. Diffuse, highly reproducible surface ionization wave discharge was also observed over the liquid butanol–saturated butanol vapor interface, as well as over the distilled water–saturated water vapor interface, without buffer gas flow. No significant difference was detected between surface ionization discharges sustained using single-polarity (positive or negative), or alternating polarity high-voltage pulses. Plasma emission images yielded preliminary evidence of charge

  5. Biodegradation of radioactive organic liquid waste from spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Rafael Vicente de Padua

    2008-01-01

    The research and development program in reprocessing of low burn-up spent fuel elements began in Brazil in 70's, originating the lab-scale hot cell, known as Celeste located at Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN - CNEN/SP. The program was ended at the beginning of 90's, and the laboratory was closed down. Part of the radioactive waste generated mainly from the analytical laboratories is stored waiting for treatment at the Waste Management Laboratory, and it is constituted by mixture of aqueous and organic phases. The most widely used technique for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes is the solidification in cement matrix, due to the low processing costs and compatibility with a wide variety of wastes. However, organics are generally incompatible with cement, interfering with the hydration and setting processes, and requiring pre -treatment with special additives to stabilize or destroy them. The objective of this work can be divided in three parts: organic compounds characterization in the radioactive liquid waste; the occurrence of bacterial consortia from Pocos de Caldas uranium mine soil and Sao Sebastiao estuary sediments that are able to degrade organic compounds; and the development of a methodology to biodegrade organic compounds from the radioactive liquid waste aiming the cementation. From the characterization analysis, TBP and ethyl acetate were chosen to be degraded. The results showed that selected bacterial consortia were efficient for the organic liquid wastes degradation. At the end of the experiments the biodegradation level were 66% for ethyl acetate and 70% for the TBP. (author)

  6. SPEEDUP simulation of liquid waste batch processing. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannahan, K.L.; Aull, J.E.; Dimenna, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has accumulated radioactive hazardous waste for over 40 years during the time SRS made nuclear materials for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. This waste is being stored as caustic slurry in a large number of 1 million gallon steel tanks, some of which were initially constructed in the early 1950's. SRS and DOE intend to clean up the Site and convert this waste into stable forms which then can be safely stored. The liquid waste will be separated into a partially decontaminated low-level and radioactive high-level waste in one feed preparation operation, In-Tank Precipitation. The low-level waste will be used to make a concrete product called saltstone in the Saltstone Facility, a part of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The concrete will be poured into large vaults, where it will be permanently stored. The high-level waste will be added to glass-formers and waste slurry solids from another feed preparation operation, Extended Sludge Processing. The mixture will then be converted to a stable borosilicate glass by a vitrification process that is the other major part of the DWPF. This glass will be poured into stainless steel canisters and sent to a temporary storage facility prior to delivery to a permanent underground storage site

  7. Application of macrophytes as biosorbents for radioactive liquid waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Ludmila Cabreira

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive waste as any other type of waste should be treated and disposed adequately. It is necessary to consider its physical, chemical and radiological characteristics for choosing the appropriate action for the treatment and final disposal. Many treatment techniques currently used are economically costly, often invalidating its use and favoring the study of other treatment techniques. One of these techniques is biosorption, which demonstrates high potential when applied to radioactive waste. This technology uses materials of biological origin for removing metals. Among potential biosorbents found, macrophyte aquatics are useful because they may remove uranium present in the liquid radioactive waste at low cost. This study aims to evaluate the biosorption capacity of macrophyte aquatics Pistia stratiotes, Limnobium laevigatum, Lemna sp and Azolla sp in the treatment of liquid radioactive waste. This study was divided into two stages, the first one is characterization and preparation of biosorption and the other is tests, carried out with uranium solutions and real samples. The biomass was tested in its raw form and biosorption assays were performed in polypropylene vials containing 10 ml of solution of uranium or 10ml of radioactive waste and 0.20g of biomass. The behavior of biomass was evaluated by sorption kinetics and isotherm models. The highest sorption capacities found was 162.1 mg / g for the macrophyte Lemna sp and 161.8 mg / g for the Azolla sp. The equilibrium times obtained were 1 hour for Lemna sp, and 30 minutes for Azolla sp. With the real waste, the macrophyte Azolla sp presented a sorption capacity of 2.6 mg / g. These results suggest that Azolla sp has a larger capacity of biosorption, therefore it is more suitable for more detailed studies of treatment of liquid radioactive waste. (author)

  8. Waste heat discharges in the aquatic environment -- impact and monitoring 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Studies on ecological impacts, on fishes in particular, of waste heat discharges in the aquatic environment are briefly reviewed. These studies cover the susceptibility of fishes to disease and predation, population biology, parasite proliferation and its impact on fishes, synergistic effects due to heat and other stresses such as chemicals, pollutant, lowering of saturation limit of dissolved oxygen at elevated temperature and radioactivity. Experiences of monitoring waste heat discharges at the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS) and the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) are presented. Entrainment losses and impingement losses are also reviewed. Requirements for thermal monitoring are mentioned. (M.G.B.)

  9. Liquid radioactive wastes from hospitals by polymeric membrane; Tratamiento de residuos liquidos radiactivos hospitalarios mediante membranas polimericas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnal, J M; Sancho, M; Verdu, G [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain); Campayo, J M [LAINSA (Spain)

    1998-12-01

    Streams containing I``125 produced from RIA process, classified as radioactive waste of low activity, are generated by all different treatments applied in IN VITRO techniques. Consequently, an accumulation of solutions containing I``125 is produced in the order of 50-100 L/month approximately. The storage at sanitary centres and the accumulation caused by it creates a serious problem in the hospital. According to the specific activity and the installation spill authorization, one can choose between three ways of handling: direct discharge, temporal storage until the radioactive waste come to decay and then discharged, waste management by the authorised company (ENRESA). If the third way of discharge is applied the treatment of waste using membranes should be considered. Using membranes, important reduction coefficients in volume in the order of 10:1 are obtained. The aim of this work is the declassification of the I``125 solutions as a liquid radioactive waste using membrane techniques. Both, a radioactive concentrated waste and non-contaminated waste are obtained. (Author)

  10. Analysis of 99Tc in the radioactive liquid waste after extraction into suitable solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonar, N.L.; Vaishali De; Pardeshi, V.; Raghvendra, Y.; Valsala, T.P.; Sonavane, M.S.; Kulkarni, Y.; Raj Kanwar

    2012-01-01

    99 Tc is one of the long lived fission product with high fission yield. >From radioactive waste management point of view it is very much essential to evaluate the concentration of technetium in the radioactive liquid waste in order to finalise the treatment process to extract/isolate it from the stream which is discharged to the environment. For the estimation of 99 Tc in the radioactive liquid waste stream, extraction of the stable complex of technetium-tetraphenyl arsonium chloride (TPAC) into chloroform followed by beta counting was studied. Various parameters like pH, time of equilibration, concentration of TPAC in chloroform, use of other solvent for extraction as well as interference of various other radionuclides present in the waste were also studied. The radioactive liquid waste being handled in plant contains high concentrations of salts in the form of sodium nitrate. Hence effect of salt concentration on the percentage extraction was also evaluated. The extraction behavior does not dependent on change in the pH of the solution. Almost 99.5% extraction was observed in the pH range of 1-13.0. High concentration of salt is affecting the extraction. However, this can be taken care by diluting the radioactive waste. It takes almost 90 min time for maximum extraction. Presence of radionuclides like 137 Cs, 90 Sr are not interfering the extraction of 99 Tc. However, 106 Ru is getting slightly extracted along with 99 Tc. The error due to 106 Ru can be eliminated by taking gamma spectrum and deducting the activity from the total beta activity to get 99 Tc activity. Nitrobenzene can be used for extraction of Tc-TPAC complex in place of chloroform. (author)

  11. effect of municipal liquid waste on corrosion susceptibility

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Kogo, A. A.. Department of Integrated Science, Federal College of Education, Kano, Nigeria. ... The corrosion rate of the galvanized steel pipe was measured using the gravimetric ... Key words: Liquid waste, galvanized steel, weight loss, gravimetric, corrosion, leaking ... the side of the test tubes, so that each side would be.

  12. Liquid waste management: The case of Bahir Dar, Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    liquid waste management practices of the community; to assess the .... Logistic regression was performed to assess the impact of a number of factors on the .... the ever-growing Bahir Dar Town with modern buildings using flush toilets will ...

  13. Device for the disposal of radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomizawa, Toshi; Inoue, Tadashi.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To adsorb and collect radioactive nuclide ions contained in the radioactive liquid waste to select and separate thereof. Structure: A unitary disposing tank comprises an insulative cylindrical tank, an unsoluble cathode plate positioned thereunder and formed with a number of liquid inlet holes, an adsorbent layer filled with unsoluble electrically conductive substances having a large surface area in contact with the cathode plate, and an unsoluble anode plate positioned at the upper part of the cylindrical disposing tank so as not to come into contact with the adsorbent layer and formed with a number of liquid inlets, whereby one or more disposing tanks are stacked in a layer fashion, and a DC voltage is applied between the anode and cathode plates to flow a liquid to be disposed into the disposing tanks so that the radioactive metal ion nuclide in the liquid may be adsorbed and collected by the cathode and the adsorbent layer for selection and separation. (Ohara, T.)

  14. Liquid waste management at nuclear power plant with WWER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabouni, Zahra.

    1995-07-01

    Management of radioactive wastes have become an area of ever increasing important in nuclear power plants. This is due to the fact that national and international regulations will only allow activity release to the environment based on ALARA principles. Radioactive liquids in the nuclear power plant originate as leakage from equipment, as drains from reactor and auxiliary systems, from decontamination and cleaning operations, from active laundry and from personnel showers. They will collected through the controlled zone of the plant in sumps and automatically pumped to large tanks and then to treatment system. The radioactive wastes are separated and categorized according to their main physical and chemical properties. Methods most frequently applied for low and intermediate level; liquid wastes are: chemical treatment (precipitation), ion exchange, and evaporation, and the decontamination ors are a few hundred, 10 2 -10 4 and 10 3 -10 6 , respectively. As a result of the treatment of radioactive liquids by mentioned methods a concentration of activity takes place in filter media, ion exchange resins, and evaporator concentrates. Before the semi-solid wastes shipped for storage, it has to be solidified in order to handle and transport in easier way. The solidification of wastes can take place by different methods. The general methods are: cementation, and bituminization processes. The selection of each process will depend on many factors which should be considered during the design phase. (author)

  15. Generation of reactive species in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge with liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelong, ZHANG; Jie, SHEN; Cheng, CHENG; Zimu, XU; Weidong, XIA

    2018-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure helium/water dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma is used to investigate the generation of reactive species in a gas-liquid interface and in a liquid. The emission intensity of the reactive species is measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) with different discharge powers at the gas-liquid interface. Spectrophotometry is used to analyze the reactive species induced by the plasma in the liquid. The concentration of OH radicals reaches 2.2 μm after 3 min of discharge treatment. In addition, the concentration of primary long-lived reactive species such as H2O2, {{{{NO}}}3}- and O3 are measured based on plasma treatment time. After 5 min of discharge treatment, the concentration of H2O2, {{{{NO}}}3}-, and O3 increased from 0 mg · L-1 to 96 mg · L-1, 19.5 mg · L-1, and 3.5 mg · L-1, respectively. The water treated by plasma still contained a considerable concentration of reactive species after 6 h of storage. The results will contribute to optimizing the DBD plasma system for biological decontamination.

  16. Removal of Radioactive Pollutants by Liquid Emulsion Membrane From Liquid Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yossef, Y.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive liquid waste should be safely managed because it is potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. Several methods were used for treatment of liquid waste, such as liquid emulsion membrane (LEM). In this work, liquid emulsion membrane using Tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) plus Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (HDEHP) as mobile carriers, hydrochloric acid (HCl) as stripping agents and an emulsifying agent (span 80) was used for the extraction of uranium ions from radioactive liquid waste. Various parameters influencing the permeation of uranium ions through the membrane have been optimized to separate uranium ions from radioactive liquid waste such as: the effects of membrane material, carrier concentration, operating conditions, etc. were examined; moreover, the transport mechanism of this uranium was also studied. The internal mass transfer in the water/oil (W/O) emulsion drop, the external mass transfer around the drop, the rates of formation, and the decomposition of the complex at the external aqueous-organic interface were considered. The results show that, the liquid emulsion membrane which consists of (25% by volume HDEHP, 0.005 M + 75% by volume TBP, 0.01 M) as extractant (carrier), span 80, 4% (v/v) (sorbitan monooleate) as surfactant agent, hydrochloric acid (HCl), (1.0 M) as stripping agent. From the results, the maximum extraction percent of uranium ions (nearly about of 100%) occurred at the operating conditions: stirring speed =500 rpm, the ratio between LEM and feed phase (liquid waste) = 20 ml: 100 ml, the ratio between organic phase (membrane phase) to internal aqueous phase (stripping phase) = 1.0 and the ph value of the external aqueous phase equal to 5.0.

  17. Method for the disposal of radioactive waste liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Kamiya, K; Kuriyama, O

    1976-03-19

    A method is presented to solidify radioactive waste liquids such as washing liquids containing radioactive material generated in an atomic power plant to thereby facilitate transport of them. A drum can is inserted into a drum can supporting vessel and carried by a truck toward and under the evaporation chamber. A lifter is upwardly extended by an elevator to provide an intimate contact between the lower end of a steam chamber and the upper end of the drum can through a seal ring. Next, a mixture of a washing waste liquid and a defoaming agent is filled from a supply pipe into the drum can in spraying manner. Into a heater is supplied heated vapor from a heated vapor supply pipe to vaporize and condense the waste liquids. The vaporized vapor passes through a demister and is condensed by a condenser. After the condensed liquids of a predetermined concentration have been obtained, a lifter is retracted to cause the drum can to be moved under a cement mixer to feed cement into the drum can for mixing and solidifying it therein.

  18. Process and device for liquid organic waste processing by sulfuric mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspart, A.; Gillet, B.; Lours, S.; Guillaume, B.

    1990-01-01

    In a chemical reactor containing sulfuric acid are introduced the liquid waste and nitric acid at a controlled flow rate for carbonization of the waste and oxidation of carbon on sulfur dioxide, formed during carbonization, regenerating simultaneously sulfuric acid. Optical density of the liquid is monitored to stop liquid waste feeding above a set-point. The liquid waste can be an organic solvent such as TBP [fr

  19. Measuring the availability to sediments and biota of radionuclides in wastes discharged to the sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, M.D.; Hunt, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    Radionuclides in waste discharged to the sea are taken up by marine sediments and organisms. The concentrations observed in these materials are determined by a complex process depending upon present and past discharges, and the rates of decay, dispersion, uptake and elimination. A simple, semi-empirical model is derived to predict current concentrations from historical discharges. An important parameter in this model is the mean availability time, the average time for which the radionuclide is effectively available to the material. Maximum likelihood estimates of the model's parameters are derived. The theory is applied to data collected in the marine environment near British Nuclear Fuels plc, Sellafield. (Author)

  20. A new method for decontamination of radioactive waste using low-pressure arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Furukawa, Shizue; Adachi, Kazuo; Amakawa, Tadashi; Kanbe, Hiromi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the decontamination features of the low-pressure arc-discharge method for radioactive waste generated in the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants were examined. The low-pressure arc-discharge method was applied to type 304 stainless-steel, type 316L stainless-steel, alloy 600 and carbon-steel covered with radioactive corrosion products. Approximately, 80% of the radioactivity build up on stainless-steels could be removed by the low-pressure arc discharge

  1. Supported liquid inorganic membranes for nuclear waste separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Ramesh R; DeBusk, Melanie M; DelCul, Guillermo D; Delmau, Laetitia H; Narula, Chaitanya K

    2015-04-07

    A system and method for the extraction of americium from radioactive waste solutions. The method includes the transfer of highly oxidized americium from an acidic aqueous feed solution through an immobilized liquid membrane to an organic receiving solvent, for example tributyl phosphate. The immobilized liquid membrane includes porous support and separating layers loaded with tributyl phosphate. The extracted solution is subsequently stripped of americium and recycled at the immobilized liquid membrane as neat tributyl phosphate for the continuous extraction of americium. The sequestered americium can be used as a nuclear fuel, a nuclear fuel component or a radiation source, and the remaining constituent elements in the aqueous feed solution can be stored in glassified waste forms substantially free of americium.

  2. Containment of solidified liquid hazardous waste in domal salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenico, P.A.; Lerman, A.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, the solidification of hazardous liquid waste has become a viable option in waste management. The solidification process results in an increased volume but more stable waste form that must be disposed of or stored in a dry environment. An environment of choice in south central Texas is domal salt. The salt dome currently under investigation has a water content of 0.002 percent by weight and a permeability less than one nanodarcy. A question that must be addressed is whether a salt dome has a particular set of attributes that will prevent the release of contaminants to the environment. From a regulatory perspective, a ''no migration'' petition must be approved by the U.S.E.P.A. for the containment facility. By ''no migration'' it is implied that the waste must be contained for 10,000 years. A demonstration that this condition will be met will require model calculations and such models must be based on the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste form and the geologic environment. In particular, the models must address the rate of brine infiltration into the caverns, providing information on how fast an immobile solid waste form could convert to a more mobile liquid state. Additionally, the potential for migration by both diffusion and advection is of concern. Lastly, given a partially saturated cavern, the question of how far gaseous waste will be transported over the 10,000 year containment period must also be addressed. Results indicate that the containment capabilities of domal salt are exceptional. A nominal volume of brine will seep into the cavern and most voids between the injected solidified waste pellets will remain unsaturated. Very small quantities of hazardous constituents will be leached from the waste pellets

  3. VUJE experience with cementation of liquid and wet radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravarik, Kamil; Holicka, Zuzana; Pekar, Anton; Zatkulak, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Liquid and wet LLW generated during operation as well as decommissioning of NPPs is treated with different methods and fixed in a suitable fixation matrix so that a final product meets required criteria for its disposal in a final repository. Cementation is an important process used for fixation of liquid and wet radioactive waste such as concentrate, spent resins and sludge. Active cement grout is also used for fixation of low level solid radioactive waste loaded in final packing containers. VUJE Inc. has been engaged in research of cementation for long. The laboratory for analyzing radioactive waste properties, prescription of cementation formulation and estimation of final cement product properties has been established. Experimental, semi-production cementation plant has been built to optimize operation parameters of cementation. VUJE experience with cementation of liquid and wet LLW is described in the presented paper. VUJE has assisted in commissioning of Jaslovske Bohunice Treatment Centre. Cement formulations for treatment of concentrate, spent resins and sludge have been developed. Research studies on the stability of a final concrete packaging container for disposal in repository have been performed. Gained experience has been further utilized for design and manufacture of several cementation plants for treatment of various liquid and wet LLW. Their main technological and technical parameters as well as characterization of treated waste are described in the paper. Applications include the Mochovce Final Treatment Centre, Movable Cementation Facility utilizing in-drum mixing for treatment of sludge, Cementation Facility for treatment of tritiated water in Latvia and Cementation Facility for fixation of liquid and solid institutional radioactive waste in Bulgaria, which utilizes lost stirrer mixer. (author)

  4. Waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutson, G.V.

    1996-01-01

    Numerous types of waste are produced by the nuclear industry ranging from high-level radioactive and heat-generating, HLW, to very low-level, LLW and usually very bulky wastes. These may be in solid, liquid or gaseous phases and require different treatments. Waste management practices have evolved within commercial and environmental constraints resulting in considerable reduction in discharges. (UK)

  5. Treatment of liquid waste containing alpha nuclides by adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jishu, Zeng; Xiguang, Su; Dejing, Xia; Sianhua, Fan [China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China). Radiochemistry Dept.

    1997-02-01

    In this paper, experimental investigations on the removal of actinides from a decontaminating waste stream by using adsorption technique following the cementation of a resultant absorbent sludge are described. One kind of apatites was selected as an actinide absorbent from a number of indigenous materials by batch equilibrium tests. The influence of contact time, temperature, particle size and pH variables on the adsorption of actinides is given. The removal of total alpha activity is higher tan 97% by absorbent precipitation process when the absorbent addition percentage of the liquid waste is more than 3.25 wt%, making alpha-activity level of the primary waste stream below 3.7 x 10{sup 3} Bq/L, which can meet the acceptance requirements of the Low Level Radwaste Treatment Plant. The studies on the cementation of the absorbent sludge included the selection of cements used for solidification, formulation and characterization of the selected cemented waste forms. The results obtained have shown that both 525 type Portland cement and 325 type Portland pozzolana cement were compatible with the absorbent sludge. The selected cemented waste forms meet the requirements of the Chinese National Standard (GB 14569.1-93): Characteristic Requirements for Solidified Waste of Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste - Cement Solidified Waste. (author). 9 refs, 3 figs, 14 tabs.

  6. Treatment of liquid waste containing alpha nuclides by adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Jishu; Su Xiguang; Xia Dejing; Fan Sianhua

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, experimental investigations on the removal of actinides from a decontaminating waste stream by using adsorption technique following the cementation of a resultant absorbent sludge are described. One kind of apatites was selected as an actinide absorbent from a number of indigenous materials by batch equilibrium tests. The influence of contact time, temperature, particle size and pH variables on the adsorption of actinides is given. The removal of total alpha activity is higher tan 97% by absorbent precipitation process when the absorbent addition percentage of the liquid waste is more than 3.25 wt%, making alpha-activity level of the primary waste stream below 3.7 x 10 3 Bq/L, which can meet the acceptance requirements of the Low Level Radwaste Treatment Plant. The studies on the cementation of the absorbent sludge included the selection of cements used for solidification, formulation and characterization of the selected cemented waste forms. The results obtained have shown that both 525 type Portland cement and 325 type Portland pozzolana cement were compatible with the absorbent sludge. The selected cemented waste forms meet the requirements of the Chinese National Standard (GB 14569.1-93): Characteristic Requirements for Solidified Waste of Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste - Cement Solidified Waste. (author). 9 refs, 3 figs, 14 tabs

  7. Lime treatment of liquid waste containing heavy metals, radionuclides and organics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuPont, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on lime treatment of liquid waste containing heavy metals, radio nuclides and organics. Lime is wellknown for its use in softening drinking water the treatment of municipal wastewaters. It is becoming important in the treatment of industrial wastewater and liquid inorganic hazardous waste; however, there are many questions regarding the use of lime for the treatment of liquid hazardous waste

  8. The Comparison on Treatment Method of Liquid Radioactive Waste in Yonggwang No 3 and 4 and No 5 and 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Yu Sun; Kim, Soong Pyung; Lee, Seung Jin

    2004-01-01

    Most of the low-level liquid radioactive wastes generated from PWR plants are classified into high or low total suspended solid(HTDS or LTDS), and into radiochemical and radioactive laundry waste. Although the evaporation process has a high decontamination ability, it has several problems such as corrosion, foam, and congestion. A new liquid waste disposal process using the ion-exchange demineralizer(IED), instead of the current evaporation process, has been introduced into the Yonggwang NPP No 5 and 6. These two methods have been compared to understand the differences in this study. Aspects compared here were the released radioactivity amount of the liquid radioactive wastes, the dose of off-site residents, the decontamination factor, and the amount of the solid radioactive wastes. The IED system is designed to discharge higher radioactivity about 20% than the evaporating system, and the actual radioactivity released from the evaporating and IED system were 0.473 mCi and 1.098 mCi, respectively. The radioactivity released from the IED was 2.32 times higher than that of the evaporating system. The dose of off-site residents was 2.97 x 10 -6 mSv for the evaporating system, and 6.47 x 10 -6 mSv for IED. The decontamination factor(DF) of the evaporator is, in most cases, far lower than the lower limits of detection(LLD) with the Ge-Li detector. Due to the low concentration of the liquid wastes collected from the liquid waste system, the decontamination factor of IED is very low. Since there is not enough data on the amount of solid radioactive wastes generated by the evaporation system, the comparison on these two systems has been conducted on the basis of the design, and the comparison result was that the evaporating system generated more wastes about 40% than IED.

  9. The Comparison on Treatment Method of Liquid Radioactive Waste in Yonggwang No 3 and 4 and No 5 and 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Yu Sun; Kim, Soong Pyung [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Jin [RedTek CO., LTD., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-09-15

    Most of the low-level liquid radioactive wastes generated from PWR plants are classified into high or low total suspended solid(HTDS or LTDS), and into radiochemical and radioactive laundry waste. Although the evaporation process has a high decontamination ability, it has several problems such as corrosion, foam, and congestion. A new liquid waste disposal process using the ion-exchange demineralizer(IED), instead of the current evaporation process, has been introduced into the Yonggwang NPP No 5 and 6. These two methods have been compared to understand the differences in this study. Aspects compared here were the released radioactivity amount of the liquid radioactive wastes, the dose of off-site residents, the decontamination factor, and the amount of the solid radioactive wastes. The IED system is designed to discharge higher radioactivity about 20% than the evaporating system, and the actual radioactivity released from the evaporating and IED system were 0.473 mCi and 1.098 mCi, respectively. The radioactivity released from the IED was 2.32 times higher than that of the evaporating system. The dose of off-site residents was 2.97 x 10{sup -6} mSv for the evaporating system, and 6.47 x 10{sup -6} mSv for IED. The decontamination factor(DF) of the evaporator is, in most cases, far lower than the lower limits of detection(LLD) with the Ge-Li detector. Due to the low concentration of the liquid wastes collected from the liquid waste system, the decontamination factor of IED is very low. Since there is not enough data on the amount of solid radioactive wastes generated by the evaporation system, the comparison on these two systems has been conducted on the basis of the design, and the comparison result was that the evaporating system generated more wastes about 40% than IED.

  10. Observation of OH radicals produced by pulsed discharges on the surface of a liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanazawa, Seiji; Kawano, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Furuki, Takashi; Akamine, Shuichi; Ichiki, Ryuta; Ohkubo, Toshikazu [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Oita University, 700 Dannoharu, Oita 870-1192 (Japan); Kocik, Marek; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy, E-mail: skana@cc.oita-u.ac.jp [Szewalski Institute of Fluid Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences Fiszera 14, 80-952, Gdansk (Poland)

    2011-06-15

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays an important role in plasma chemistry at atmospheric pressure. OH radicals have a higher oxidation potential compared with other oxidative species such as free radical O, atomic oxygen, hydroperoxyl radical (HO{sub 2}), hydrogen peroxide(H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and ozone. In this study, surface discharges on liquids (water and its solutions) were investigated experimentally. A pulsed streamer discharge was generated on the liquid surface using a point-to-plane electrode geometry. The primary generation process of OH radicals is closely related to the streamer propagation, and the subsequent secondary process after the discharge has an influence on the chemical reaction. Taking into account the timescale of these processes, we investigated the behavior of OH radicals using two different diagnostic methods. Time evolution of the ground-state OH radicals above the liquid surface after the discharge was observed by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. In order to observe the ground-state OH, an OH [A {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}(v' = 1) <- X {sup 2}{Pi}(v'' = 0)] system at 282 nm was used. As the secondary process, a portion of OH radicals diffused from gas phase to the liquid surface and dissolved in the liquid. These dissolved OH radicals were measured by a chemical probe method. Terephthalic acid was used as an OH radical trap and fluorescence of the resulting 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid was measured. This paper directly presents visualization of OH radicals over the liquid surface by means of LIF, and indirectly describes OH radicals dissolved in water by means of a chemical method.

  11. Observation of OH radicals produced by pulsed discharges on the surface of a liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Seiji; Kawano, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Furuki, Takashi; Akamine, Shuichi; Ichiki, Ryuta; Ohkubo, Toshikazu; Kocik, Marek; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy

    2011-06-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays an important role in plasma chemistry at atmospheric pressure. OH radicals have a higher oxidation potential compared with other oxidative species such as free radical O, atomic oxygen, hydroperoxyl radical (HO2), hydrogen peroxide(H2O2) and ozone. In this study, surface discharges on liquids (water and its solutions) were investigated experimentally. A pulsed streamer discharge was generated on the liquid surface using a point-to-plane electrode geometry. The primary generation process of OH radicals is closely related to the streamer propagation, and the subsequent secondary process after the discharge has an influence on the chemical reaction. Taking into account the timescale of these processes, we investigated the behavior of OH radicals using two different diagnostic methods. Time evolution of the ground-state OH radicals above the liquid surface after the discharge was observed by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. In order to observe the ground-state OH, an OH [A 2∑+(v' = 1) <-- X 2Π(v'' = 0)] system at 282 nm was used. As the secondary process, a portion of OH radicals diffused from gas phase to the liquid surface and dissolved in the liquid. These dissolved OH radicals were measured by a chemical probe method. Terephthalic acid was used as an OH radical trap and fluorescence of the resulting 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid was measured. This paper directly presents visualization of OH radicals over the liquid surface by means of LIF, and indirectly describes OH radicals dissolved in water by means of a chemical method.

  12. WASTE TREATMENT PLANT (WTP) LIQUID EFFLUENT TREATABILITY EVALUATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUECK, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    A forecast of the radioactive, dangerous liquid effluents expected to be produced by the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) was provided by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI 2004). The forecast represents the liquid effluents generated from the processing of Tank Farm waste through the end-of-mission for the WTP. The WTP forecast is provided in the Appendices. The WTP liquid effluents will be stored, treated, and disposed of in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Both facilities are located in the 200 East Area and are operated by Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) for the US. Department of Energy (DOE). The treatability of the WTP liquid effluents in the LERF/ETF was evaluated. The evaluation was conducted by comparing the forecast to the LERF/ETF treatability envelope (Aromi 1997), which provides information on the items which determine if a liquid effluent is acceptable for receipt and treatment at the LERF/ETF. The format of the evaluation corresponds directly to the outline of the treatability envelope document. Except where noted, the maximum annual average concentrations over the range of the 27 year forecast was evaluated against the treatability envelope. This is an acceptable approach because the volume capacity in the LERF Basin will equalize the minimum and maximum peaks. Background information on the LERF/ETF design basis is provided in the treatability envelope document

  13. New type of discharge-produced plasma source for extreme ultraviolet based on liquid tin jet electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koshelev, K.N.; Krivtsun, V.M.; Ivanov, V.; Yakushev, O.; Chekmarev, A.; Koloshnikov, V.; Snegirev, E.; Medvedev, Viacheslav

    2012-01-01

    A new approach for discharge-produced plasma (DPP) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources based on the usage of two liquid metallic alloy jets as discharge electrodes has been proposed and tested. Discharge was ignited using laser ablation of one of the cathode jets. A system with two jet electrodes was

  14. A high recovery membrane process for purification of low-level radioactive liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Samadi, R. [Ontario Power Generation, Pickering, Ontario (Canada); Davloor, R.; Harper, B., E-mail: ram.davloor@brucepower.com [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    An advanced Active Liquid Waste Treatment System (ALWTS) was designed placed in-service at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A' in 1999. As part of this unique system an innovative high recovery reverse osmosis system (ROS) was installed to concentrate the contaminants into a small retentate stream that can be processed on-site or sent off-site for disposal. The permeate is discharged to the lake. The overall permeate recovery of the system is greater than 98%. This patented system which saw its first commercial application at the station has now operated continuously for over thirteen years. It has enabled the ALWTS to consistently produce high quality effluent that exceeds environmental discharge limits. This paper discusses the high recovery membrane process its unique design features aimed at minimizing the volume of rejects its separation performance operating history. (author)

  15. A high recovery membrane process for purification of low-level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Samadi, R.; Davloor, R.; Harper, B.

    2013-01-01

    An advanced Active Liquid Waste Treatment System (ALWTS) was designed placed in-service at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A' in 1999. As part of this unique system an innovative high recovery reverse osmosis system (ROS) was installed to concentrate the contaminants into a small retentate stream that can be processed on-site or sent off-site for disposal. The permeate is discharged to the lake. The overall permeate recovery of the system is greater than 98%. This patented system which saw its first commercial application at the station has now operated continuously for over thirteen years. It has enabled the ALWTS to consistently produce high quality effluent that exceeds environmental discharge limits. This paper discusses the high recovery membrane process its unique design features aimed at minimizing the volume of rejects its separation performance operating history. (author)

  16. Sulphate in Liquid Nuclear Waste: from Production to Containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenoir, M.; Grandjean, A.; Ledieu, A.; Dussossoy, J.L.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Barre, Y.; Tronche, E. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM/LDMC, Batiment 208 BP17171, Bagnols sur Ceze, 30207 (France)

    2009-06-15

    Nuclear industry produces a wide range of low and intermediate level liquid radioactive wastes which can include different radionuclides such as {sup 90}Sr. In La Hague reprocessing plant and in the nuclear research centers of CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique), the coprecipitation of strontium with barium sulphate is the technique used to treat selectively these contaminated streams with the best efficiency. After the decontamination process, low and intermediate level activity wastes incorporating significant quantities of sulphate are obtained. The challenge is to find a matrix easy to form and with a good chemical durability which is able to confine this kind of nuclear waste. The current process used to contain sulphate-rich nuclear wastes is bituminization. However, in order to improve properties of containment matrices and simplify the process, CEA has chosen to supervise researches on other materials such as cements or glasses. Indeed, cements are widely used for the immobilization of a variety of wastes (low and intermediate level wastes) and they may be an alternative matrix to bitumen. Even if Portland cement, which is extensively used in the nuclear industry, presents some disadvantages for the containment of sulphate-rich nuclear wastes (risk of swelling and cracking due to delayed ettringite formation), other cement systems, such as calcium sulfo-aluminate binders, may be valuable candidates. Another matrix to confine sulphate-rich waste could be the glass. One of the advantages of this material is that it could also immobilize sulphate containing high level nuclear waste which is present in some countries. This waste comes from the use of ferrous sulfamate as a reducing agent for the conversion of Pu{sup 4+} to Pu{sup 3+} in the partitioning stage of the actinides during reprocessing. Sulphate solubility in borosilicate glasses has already been studied in CEA at laboratory and pilot scales. At a pilot scale, low level liquid waste has been

  17. Corrosion of steel tanks in liquid nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Giordano, Celia M.; Saenz, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand how solution chemistry would impact on the corrosion of waste storage steel tanks at the Hanford Site. Future tank waste operations are expected to process wastes that are more dilute with respect to some current corrosion inhibiting waste constituents. Assessment of corrosion damage and of the influence of exposure time and electrolyte composition, using simulated (non-radioactive) wastes, of the double-shell tank wall carbon steel alloys is being conducted in a statistically designed long-term immersion experiment. Corrosion rates at different times of immersion were determined using both weight-loss determinations and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Localized corrosion susceptibility was assessed using short-term cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves. The results presented in this paper correspond to electrochemical and weight-loss measurements of the immersed coupons during the first year of immersion from a two year immersion plan. A good correlation was obtained between electrochemical measurements, weight-loss determinations and visual observations. Very low general corrosion rates ( -1 ) were estimated using EIS measurements, indicating that general corrosion rate of the steel in contact with liquid wastes would no be a cause of tank failure even for these out-of-chemistry limit wastes. (author) [es

  18. Separation and recovery of ruthenium from radioactive liquid waste for specific medical applications - wealth from waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pente, A.S.; Ramchandran, M.; Wawale, P.R.; Thorat, Vidya; Gireesan, Prema; Katarni, V.G.; Kumar, Amar; Kaushik, C.P.; Raj, Kanwar

    2010-01-01

    In recent past, 106 Ru has emerged as one of the promising β - emitting radionuclide used in brachytherapy for the treatment of choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma due to its favorable nuclear decay characteristics. A plaque with low amount of 106 Ru activity of the order of 12 - 26 MBq (0.3 - 0.7 mCi ) is suitable for the above treatment and can be used for an adequate duration of 1-2 years due to suitable half-life (T 1/2 = 1.02 y). In order to undertake the preparation of 106 Ru plaque, an indigenous availability of this radionuclide with acceptable purity was explored from radioactive liquid waste having wide spectrum of fission products in line with wealth from waste strategy. Process methodology has been developed and standardized at Process Control Laboratory of Waste Immobilization Plant (WIP), Trombay for separation of 106 Ru from radioactive liquid waste for intended medical application. (author)

  19. Application of reverse osmosis membrane technology for liquid radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Juan

    2010-01-01

    Liquid radioactive waste (LRW) processing should bear an acceptable level of residual radioactivity for discharge and meet the request of energy saving and waste minimization. Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane technology has been developed as a novel process for LRW processing. Five basic operating parameters of flux, recovery factor, rejection factor, concentration factor and decontamination factor were described, and the latter two parameters were the most important. Concentration factor and decontamination factor should be as high as possible and simultaneously the operating cost for membrane filtration should be low. Technical design considerations for membrane process were discussed and optimized from the aspects of pretreatment, membrane module choice and arrangement and membrane clear out. Application and investigation of RO membrane technology for LRW processing were introduced and it should be noted that the RO membrane technology has been introduced into overseas nuclear power plants for LRW processing and interiorly in the stage of investigation. (authors)

  20. Assessment of industrial liquid waste management in Omdurman Industrial Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elnasri, R. A. A.

    2003-04-01

    This study was conducted mainly to investigate the effects of industrial liquid waste on the environment in the Omdurman area. Various types of industries are found around Omdurman. According to the ISC the major industries are divided into eight major sub-sectors, each sub-sector is divided into types of industries. Special consideration was given to the liquid waste because of its effects. In addition to the available data, personal observation supported by photographs, laboratory analyses were carried on the industrial effluents. The investigated parameters in the analysis were, BOD, COD, O and G, Cr, TDS, TSS, pH, temp and conductivity. Interviews were conducted with waste handling workers in the industries, in order to assess the effects of industrial pollution. The results obtained showed that pollutants produced by all the factories were found to exceed the accepted levels of the industrial pollution control. The effluents disposed of in the sites allotted by municipal authorities have adverse effects on the surrounding environment and public health and amenities. Accordingly the study recommends that the waste water must be pretreated before being disposed of in site allotted by municipal authorities. Develop an appropriate system for industrial waste proper management. The study established the need to construct a sewage system in the area in order to minimize the pollutants from effluents. (Author)

  1. Assessment of industrial liquid waste management in Omdurman Industrial Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elnasri, R A. A. [Institute of Environmental Studies, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2003-04-15

    This study was conducted mainly to investigate the effects of industrial liquid waste on the environment in the Omdurman area. Various types of industries are found around Omdurman. According to the ISC the major industries are divided into eight major sub-sectors, each sub-sector is divided into types of industries. Special consideration was given to the liquid waste because of its effects. In addition to the available data, personal observation supported by photographs, laboratory analyses were carried on the industrial effluents. The investigated parameters in the analysis were, BOD, COD, O and G, Cr, TDS, TSS, pH, temp and conductivity. Interviews were conducted with waste handling workers in the industries, in order to assess the effects of industrial pollution. The results obtained showed that pollutants produced by all the factories were found to exceed the accepted levels of the industrial pollution control. The effluents disposed of in the sites allotted by municipal authorities have adverse effects on the surrounding environment and public health and amenities. Accordingly the study recommends that the waste water must be pretreated before being disposed of in site allotted by municipal authorities. Develop an appropriate system for industrial waste proper management. The study established the need to construct a sewage system in the area in order to minimize the pollutants from effluents. (Author)

  2. Radioactive waste discharges from UKAEA establishments during 1996 and associated monitoring results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, A.K.M.; Forbes, S.A.; Hughes, B.; Richardson, E.

    1997-08-01

    This annual report is published by the Safety Directorate of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) and provides information on radioactive discharges from its sites. The Culcheth site was closed and then redeveloped during the end of 1993 and the Springfields site became part of BNFL in October 1994. No operations involving the need to discharge radioactivity are undertaken at the Risley site. After discussions with the Authorising Departments at that time, the discharge authorisations were revoked on 1 July 1994. These sites are therefore no longer included in this report. UKAEA has published annual radioactive waste discharges and associated monitoring results since 1963. This report is intended to give a relatively short factual overview of UKAEA waste discharge and disposal, and its impact on the environment. Additional information may be found in annual discharge reports published by the individual UKAEA establishments and the UKAEA Report on Safety and the Environment 1996-97 due to be issued at the end of September 1997. (UK)

  3. Characterisation of discharge areas of radionuclides originating from nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, L.; Woerman, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigate if there are certain landscape elements that will generally act as discharge areas for radio-nuclides leaking from a subsurface deposit of nuclear waste. We also characterize the typical properties that distinguish these areas from others. Understanding the processes controlling the clustering of discharge to certain areas is an additional topic of study. Landscape topography is the most important driving force for groundwater flow. Because groundwater is the main transporting agent for migrating radio-nuclides, the topography will determine the flow paths of leaking radionuclides. How topography and heterogeneities in the subsurface affect the discharge distribution of the radionuclides is the main scope of this study. An analytical and a numerical model are used. Conclusions are: Our results suggest that the varieties of landscape elements which have potential for receiving significant amounts of radio-nuclides are limited. To save recourses, the surficial radiological assessments should therefore be focused in these areas. Furthermore, the discharge areas of groundwater from repository depth have defining characteristics that distinguish them from discharge areas of shallower groundwater flow cells. Due to the similarities within deep groundwater discharge areas, one can make site-specific analyses of those areas, which have a broad applicability for migration of radio-nuclides originating from a nuclear waste repository (author)(tk)

  4. Removal of actinide elements from liquid scintillation cocktail wastes using liquid-liquid extraction and demulsification techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltz, K.; Landsberger, S.; Srinivasan, B.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1994-01-01

    For many years liquid scintillation cocktail (LSC) wastes have been generated and stored at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). These wastes are stored in thousands of 10--20 m scintillation vials, many of which contain elements with Z > 88. Because storage space is limited, disposal of this waste is pressing. These wastes could be commercially incinerated if the radionuclides with Z>88 are reduced to sufficiently low levels. However, there is currently no deminimus level for these radionuclides, and separation techniques are still being tested. The University of Illinois is conducting experiments to separate radionuclides with Z > 88 from simulated LSC wastes by using liquid-liquid extraction (LLX) and demulsification techniques. The actinide elements are removed from the LSC by extraction into an aqueous phase after the cocktail has been demulsified. The aqueous and organic phases are separated and the organic phase, now free from radionuclides with Z > 88, can be sent to a commercial incineration facility. The aqueous phase may be treated and disposed of using existing techniques. The LLX separation techniques used solutions of sodium oxalate, aluminum nitrate, and tetrasodium EDTA at varying concentrations. These extractants were mixed with the simulated waste in a 1:1 volume ratio. Using 1.0M Na 4 EDTA salt solutions, decontamination ratios as high as 230 were achieved

  5. Productive Liquid Fertilizer from Liquid Waste Tempe Industry as Revealed by Various EM4 Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartini, S.; Letsoin, F.; Kristijanto, A. I.

    2018-04-01

    Recently, using of productive liquid fertilizer assumed as a proper and practical fertilizer for plant productivity purposes. Various ways of enrichment of liquid fertilizer were done to achieve certain quality. The purpose of this research was to determine the proper additional formulation in the process of making productive liquid fertilizer based on the various concentration of EM4 as well as comparated the result with SNI. Liquid tempe waste were collected from some tempe industries at Sidorejo Kidul village, Tingkir district, Salatiga. The concentration of EM4 which were added to the tempe wastewater are 0%; 0.20%; 0.40%; 0.60%; 0.80%; 1.00% respectively. The pH, temperature, C total, N total, C/N ratio, and PO4 3- were measured. Data was analyzed by using Randomize Completely Block Design (RCBD) with 6 treatments and 4 replications. Comparison between the average, the Honestly Significance Deference (HSD) 5% was used. The results showed that the addition of EM4 indicated there were a significant progress. Moreover, the most effective formula to increase the quality of productive liquid fertilizer from liquid waste tempe was found in addition of 1.00% EM4 with the gained analysis value for the C total, N total, C/N ratio, and degree of PO4 3- as follows : 4.395 ± 1.034%; 1.470 ± 0.081%; 3.01 ± 0.756; 685.28 ± 70.44 ppm . Associated with the need fulfillment of SNI hence can be concluded that result of Productive Liquid Fertilizer (PLF) from liquid waste tempe successfully fulfill SNI of liquid fertilizer for pH parameter and total N, only.

  6. Studies on radioactive liquid waste treatment by reverse osmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Akio; Shimoura, Kazukuni; Tsutsui, Tenson

    1982-01-01

    Reverse osmosis is a simple process and has relatively high decontamination factor comparing to other processes used for the treatment of radioactive liquid waste. Furthermore the quantity of secondary waste of this process is small. In this study, test solution containing nine elements such as cesium, strontium, cobalt etc. in chloride forms are treated by reverse osmosis. Permeate rate decreases as the increase of osmotic pressure of feed solution and is expressed by linear equation. Decontamination factor of cations of univalency is more than ten, and about one tenth of that of bivalency. Decontamination factors of all the elements used in this experiment are approximately estimated using the solution-diffusion model. (author)

  7. Treatment systems for liquid wastes generated in chemical analysis laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linda Berrio; Oscar Beltran; Edison Agudelo; Santiago Cardona

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, handling of liquid wastes from chemical analysis laboratories is posing problems to different public and private organizations because of its requirements of an integrated management. This article reviews various treatment technologies and its removal efficiencies in order to establish criteria for selecting the system and the appropriate variables to achieve research objectives as well as environmental sustainability. Review begins with a description of the problem and continues with the study of treatments for laboratory wastes. These technologies are segregated into physicochemical and biological treatments that comprise a variety of processes, some of which are considered in this review.

  8. Screening of Acetic Acid Bacteria from Pineapple Waste for Bacterial Cellulose Production using Sago Liquid Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Arfa Yanti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cellulose is a biopolymer produced by fermentation process with the help of bacteria. It has numerous applications in industrial sector with its characteristic as a biodegradable and nontoxic compound in nature. The potential application of BC is limited by its production costs, because BC is produced from expensive culture media. The use of cheap carbon and nutrient sources such as sago liquid waste is an interesting strategy to overcome this limitation. The objective of this study was to obtain the AAB strain that capable to produce bacterial cellulose from sago liquid waste. Isolation of AAB strains was conducted using CARR media and the screening of BC production was performed on Hestrin-Schramm (HS media with glucose as a carbon source. The strains of AAB then were evaluated for their cellulose-producing capability using sago liquid waste as a substrate. Thirteen strains of AAB producing BC were isolated from pineapple waste (pineapple core and peel and seven of them were capable to produce BC using sago liquid waste substrate. One of the AAB strains produced a relatively high BC, i.e. isolate LKN6. The result of morphological and biochemical test was proven that the bacteria was Acetobacter xylinum. The result of this study showed that A. xylinum LKN6 can produce a high yield of BC, therefore this strain is potentially useful for its utilization as a starter in bacterial cellulose production. 

  9. Quantity assessment of waste in the dismantlement of liquid waste treatment plant and its actual state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Takafumi; Mitsuhashi, Ishi; Matsumoto, Tetsuo; Morishima, Kayoko; Tanzawa, Tomio

    2016-01-01

    From the progress of decommissioning project work of Tokyo City University Atomic Energy Research Institute, this paper reports the comparison between the actual amount of the waste generated during dismantlement work at liquid waste treatment facilities and the assessment quantity before starting the dismantlement. The quantity assessment was made on the basis of the installation license application, design specifications, drawings, records, history of use, site investigation results, etc. Since this quantity assessment did not take into account the dismantling contents of reservoir concrete, the assessed quantity of non-radioactive waste (NR waste) did not match the sum of actual NR waste. However, if an actually generated quantity of concrete of radioactive waste was added to the quantity assessment as NR waste, the quantity of actually generated NR waste and that of assessed NR waste were nearly consistent, which verified the validity of this assessment. This method is considered to be able to be utilized in the future quantity assessment of decommissioning work and the like. On the other hand, it was found that the number of drums that were actually stored tended to increase more than the estimated number of drum conversion. In old buildings, it is necessary to take into account the generation of waste other than radioactive materials in the quantity assessment stage and dismantlement stage. (A.O.)

  10. Corona discharge secondary ionization of laser desorbed neutral molecules from a liquid matrix at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turney, Kevin [Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Harrison, W.W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)]. E-mail: harrison@chem.ufl.edu

    2006-06-15

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is studied at atmospheric pressure using liquid sampling methods. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer couples to an open sample stage accessed by a UV laser for desorption and ionization. Also coupled to the sampling state is a corona discharge for auxiliary ionization of desorbed neutral molecules. The interaction of the laser desorption and corona ionization is studied for a range of desorption conditions, showing enhanced analyte ionization, but the effect is analytically advantageous only at low desorption rates. The effect of corona discharge voltage was also explored. The decoupling of neutral molecule formation and subsequent ionization provides an opportunity to study each process separately.

  11. Corona discharge secondary ionization of laser desorbed neutral molecules from a liquid matrix at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turney, Kevin; Harrison, W.W.

    2006-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is studied at atmospheric pressure using liquid sampling methods. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer couples to an open sample stage accessed by a UV laser for desorption and ionization. Also coupled to the sampling state is a corona discharge for auxiliary ionization of desorbed neutral molecules. The interaction of the laser desorption and corona ionization is studied for a range of desorption conditions, showing enhanced analyte ionization, but the effect is analytically advantageous only at low desorption rates. The effect of corona discharge voltage was also explored. The decoupling of neutral molecule formation and subsequent ionization provides an opportunity to study each process separately

  12. The mechanism of liquid metal jet formation in the cathode spot of vacuum arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gashkov, M. A.; Zubarev, N. M.; Mesyats, G. A.; Uimanov, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    We have theoretically studied the dynamics of molten metal during crater formation in the cathode spot of vacuum arc discharge. At the initial stage, a liquid-metal ridge is formed around the crater. This process has been numerically simulated in the framework of the two-dimensional axisymmetric heat and mass transfer problem in the approximation of viscous incompressible liquid. At a more developed stage, the motion of liquid metal loses axial symmetry, which corresponds to a tendency toward jet formation. The development of azimuthal instabilities of the ridge is analyzed in terms of dispersion relations for surface waves. It is shown that maximum increments correspond to instability of the Rayleigh-Plateau type. Estimations of the time of formation of liquid metal jets and their probable number are obtained.

  13. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report CY 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1997-03-01

    This annual report summarizes operating activities dealing with the process waste system, the liquid low-level waste system, and the gaseous waste system. It also describes upgrade activities dealing with the process and liquid low-level waste systems, the cathodic protection system, a stack ventilation system, and configuration control. Maintenance activities are described dealing with nonradiological wastewater treatment plant, process waste treatment plant and collection system, liquid low-level waste system, and gaseous waste system. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits/reviews/tours, and environmental restoration support

  14. The spatio-temporal dynamic pattern of rural domestic solid waste discharge of China and its challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Guangjin; Kong, Lingqiang; Liu, Xiaojuan; Yuan, Wenping

    2018-04-01

    At present, construction of rural domestic waste treatment facilities is seriously lagging, and in many cases, treatment facilities do not yet exist in some villages of China. Serious rural waste pollution has not only impacted the quality of surface water and groundwater but also the atmosphere and the living environment of farmers of China. There are relatively few studies of rural domestic waste pollution, especially with respect to the spatio-temporal dynamic pattern of rural domestic waste discharge. Using survey data and income per capita, we calculated rural domestic waste discharge per capita per day. From this, we calculated provincial rural domestic waste discharge. According to our study, rural domestic waste discharge was 1.42 × 10 8 t/year in 2000. This number increased to 2.3 × 10 8 t/year in 2006 and to 2.47 × 10 8 t/year in 2010. Rural domestic waste increased dramatically while the actual rural population and the proportion of the rural population declined. When examining the eight regions, the rural domestic waste discharge of northeastern China, Qinghai-Tibet, middle China, and southwestern China had increased dramatically, while that of northern China, southern China, and eastern China increased relatively slowly. The economies of northern China, southern China, and eastern China are more developed; their rural domestic waste discharge has been high since 2000 and has continued to increase slowly. In northeastern China, Qinghai-Tibet, middle China, and southwestern China, rural domestic waste discharge was low in 2000; however, in the ten-year period from 2000 to 2010, their rural domestic waste discharge increased dramatically.

  15. Disposal of radioactive wastes from Czechoslovak nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, L.

    In gaseous radioactive waste disposal, aerosol particles are filtered and gaseous wastes are discharged in the environment. The filters and filter materials used are stored on solid radioactive waste storage sites in the individual power plants. Liquid radioactive wastes are concentrated and the concentrates are stored. Distillates and low-level radioactive waste water are discharged into the hydrosphere. Solid radioactive wastes are stored without treatment in power plant bunkers. Bituminization and cementation of liquid radioactive wastes are discussed. (H.S.)

  16. Development of a process to reduce the uranium concentration of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentealba Toro, Edgardo David

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of radioactive waste management is to prevent the discharge of waste into the biosphere, a function carried out in Chile by the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN), which stores around 500 [L] of these organic and inorganic waste in cans coming from research of Universities and CCHEN' laboratories. Within the inorganic liquid waste are concentrations of Uranyl salts with sulfates, chlorides and phosphates. The purpose of this work is to develop at laboratory level a process to concentrate and precipitate uranium salts (Sulfate and Uranyl Chloride) present in radioactive liquid effluents, because in the case of these very long period wastes in liquid state, the most widely used processes are aimed at concentrating or extracting radioactive compounds through separation processes, for their conditioning and final storage under conditions whose radiological risk is minimized. The selected process is liquid-liquid extraction, being evaluated solvents such as benzene and kerosene with the following extractants: tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO), di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (DEHPA) and Cyanex© 923. To determine the extraction conditions, which allow to reduce the concentration of uranium to values lower than 10 ppm, the extractant concentration was modified from 0.05 to 0.41 [M] with solvent volume / residue (VO/VA) ratios of 0.2 to 0.5, at an initial concentration of 8,446 [gU/L] and subsequent precipitation of uranium extracted by a reaction with ammonium carbonate. From these experimental tests the maximum extraction conditions were determined. To the generated effluents, a second stage of extraction was necessary in order to reduce its concentration below 10 [mg / L]. The experimental tests allowed to reduce the concentration under 2.5 [mgU/L], equivalent to 99.97% extraction efficiency. The tests with Cyanex© 923 in replacement of the TOPO, allowed to obtain similar results and even better in some cases, due to the fact that final

  17. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, M.A.; Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1993-03-01

    A total of 6.05 x 10{sup 7} gal of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) ion exchange system during CY 1992. This averaged to 115 gpm throughout the year. When necessary, a wastewater sidestream of 50--80 gpm was treated through the use of a natural zeolite treatment system. An additional 8.00 x 10{sup 6} gal (average of 15 gpm throughout the year) were treated by the zeolite system. Therefore, the average total flow treated at the PWTP for CY 1992 was 130 gpm. In mid-June, the zeolite system was repiped to allow it the capability to treat the ion exchange system`s discharge due to rising Cs problems in the wastewater. While being used to treat the ion exchange system`s discharge, it cannot treat a sidestream of wastewater. During the year, the regeneration of the cation exchange resins resulted in the generation of 7.83 x 10{sup 3} gal of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) concentrate and 1.15 x 10{sup 4} gal of LLLW evaporator feed. The head-end softening process (precipitation/clarification) generated 604 drums (4.40 x 10{sup 3} ft{sup 3}) of solid low-level waste sludge. The zeolite treatment system generated approximately 8.40 x 10{sup 2} ft{sup 3} of spent zeolite resin, which was turned over to the Solid Waste Operations Department for disposal. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at the PWTP. Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4 show a comparison of operations at the PWTP in 1992 with previous years. Figure 5 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1987. A total of 1.55 x 10{sup 8} gal of liquid waste (average of 294 gpm throughout the year) was treated at the Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). Of this amount, 1.40 x 10{sup 7} gal were treated by the precipitation/clarification process for removal of heavy metals. Twenty-five boxes (1.60 x 10{sup 3} ft{sup 3}) of solid sludge generated by the precipitation/clarification process were removed from the filter press room.

  18. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, M.A.; Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1993-03-01

    A total of 6.05 x 10[sup 7] gal of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) ion exchange system during CY 1992. This averaged to 115 gpm throughout the year. When necessary, a wastewater sidestream of 50--80 gpm was treated through the use of a natural zeolite treatment system. An additional 8.00 x 10[sup 6] gal (average of 15 gpm throughout the year) were treated by the zeolite system. Therefore, the average total flow treated at the PWTP for CY 1992 was 130 gpm. In mid-June, the zeolite system was repiped to allow it the capability to treat the ion exchange system's discharge due to rising Cs problems in the wastewater. While being used to treat the ion exchange system's discharge, it cannot treat a sidestream of wastewater. During the year, the regeneration of the cation exchange resins resulted in the generation of 7.83 x 10[sup 3] gal of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) concentrate and 1.15 x 10[sup 4] gal of LLLW evaporator feed. The head-end softening process (precipitation/clarification) generated 604 drums (4.40 x 10[sup 3] ft[sup 3]) of solid low-level waste sludge. The zeolite treatment system generated approximately 8.40 x 10[sup 2] ft[sup 3] of spent zeolite resin, which was turned over to the Solid Waste Operations Department for disposal. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at the PWTP. Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4 show a comparison of operations at the PWTP in 1992 with previous years. Figure 5 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1987. A total of 1.55 x 10[sup 8] gal of liquid waste (average of 294 gpm throughout the year) was treated at the Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). Of this amount, 1.40 x 10[sup 7] gal were treated by the precipitation/clarification process for removal of heavy metals. Twenty-five boxes (1.60 x 10[sup 3] ft[sup 3]) of solid sludge generated by the precipitation/clarification process were removed from the filter

  19. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, M.A.; Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1993-03-01

    A total of 6.05 x 10 7 gal of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) ion exchange system during CY 1992. This averaged to 115 gpm throughout the year. When necessary, a wastewater sidestream of 50--80 gpm was treated through the use of a natural zeolite treatment system. An additional 8.00 x 10 6 gal (average of 15 gpm throughout the year) were treated by the zeolite system. Therefore, the average total flow treated at the PWTP for CY 1992 was 130 gpm. In mid-June, the zeolite system was repiped to allow it the capability to treat the ion exchange system's discharge due to rising Cs problems in the wastewater. While being used to treat the ion exchange system's discharge, it cannot treat a sidestream of wastewater. During the year, the regeneration of the cation exchange resins resulted in the generation of 7.83 x 10 3 gal of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) concentrate and 1.15 x 10 4 gal of LLLW evaporator feed. The head-end softening process (precipitation/clarification) generated 604 drums (4.40 x 10 3 ft 3 ) of solid low-level waste sludge. The zeolite treatment system generated approximately 8.40 x 10 2 ft 3 of spent zeolite resin, which was turned over to the Solid Waste Operations Department for disposal. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at the PWTP. Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4 show a comparison of operations at the PWTP in 1992 with previous years. Figure 5 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1987. A total of 1.55 x 10 8 gal of liquid waste (average of 294 gpm throughout the year) was treated at the Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). Of this amount, 1.40 x 10 7 gal were treated by the precipitation/clarification process for removal of heavy metals. Twenty-five boxes (1.60 x 10 3 ft 3 ) of solid sludge generated by the precipitation/clarification process were removed from the filter press room

  20. Application of membrane technologies for liquid radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Membrane separation processes have made impressive progress since the first synthesis of membranes almost 40 years ago. This progress was driven by strong technological needs and commercial expectations. As a result the range of successful applications of membranes and membrane processes is continuously broadening. In addition, increasing application of membrane processes and technologies lies in the increasing variations of the nature and characteristics of commercial membranes and membrane apparatus. The objective of the report is to review the information on application of membrane technologies in the processing of liquid radioactive waste. The report covers the various types of membranes, equipment design, range of applications, operational experience and the performance characteristics of different membrane processes. The report aims to provide Member States with basic information on the applicability and limitations of membrane separation technologies for processing liquid radioactive waste streams

  1. Method of processing liquid wastes containing radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kaname; Shirai, Takamori; Nemoto, Kuniyoshi; Yoshikawa, Jun; Matsuda, Takeshi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the number of solidification products by removing, particularly, Co-60 that is difficult to remove in a radioactive liquid wastes containing a water-soluble chelating agent, by adsorbing Co-60 to a specific chelating agent. Method: Liquid wastes containing radioactive cobalt and water-soluble chelating agent are passed through the layer of less water-soluble chelating agent that forms a complex compound with cobalt in an acidic pH region. Thus, the chelating compound of radioactive cobalt (particularly Co-60) is eliminated by adsorbing the same on a specific chelating agent layer. The chelating agent having Co-60 adsorbed thereon is discarded as it is through the cement- or asphalt-solidification process, whereby the number of solidification products to be generated can significantly be suppressed. (Moriyama, K.)

  2. Liquid waste processing from TRIGA spent fuel storage pits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchtela, Karl

    1988-01-01

    At the Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities and also at other facilities running TRIGA reactors, storage pits for spent fuel elements are installed. During the last revision procedure, the reactor group of the Atominstitute decided to refill the storage pits and to get rid of any contaminated storage pit water. The liquid radioactive waste had been pumped to polyethylene vessels for intermediate storage before decontamination and release. The activity concentration of the storage pit water at the Aominstitute after a storage period of several years was about 40 kBq/l, the total amount of liquid in the storage pits was about 0.25 m 3 . It was attempted to find a simple and inexpensive method to remove especially the radioactive Cesium from the waste solution. Different methods for decontamination like distillation, precipitation and ion exchange are discussed

  3. Quantitative determination of total cesium in highly active liquid waste by using liquid electrode plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Van-Khoai; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Taguchi, Shigeo; Takamura, Yuzuru; Surugaya, Naoki; Kuno, Takehiko

    2018-06-01

    A sensitive analytical method for determination of total cesium (Cs) in highly active liquid waste (HALW) by using modified liquid electrode plasma optical emission spectrometry (LEP-OES) is developed in this study. The instrument is modified to measure radioactive samples in a glove box. The effects of important factors, including pulsed voltage sequence and nitric acid concentration, on the emission of Cs are investigated. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) are 0.005 mg/L and 0.02 mg/L, respectively. The achieved LOD is one order lower than that of recently developed spectroscopic methods using liquid discharge plasma. The developed method is validated by subjecting a simulated HALW sample to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The recoveries obtained from a spike-and-recovery test are 96-102%, implying good accuracy. The method is successfully applied to the quantification of Cs in a real HALW sample at the Tokai reprocessing plant in Japan. Apart from dilution and filtration of the HALW sample, no other pre-treatment process is required. The results agree well with the values obtained using gamma spectrometry. The developed method offers a reliable technique for rapid analysis of total Cs in HALW samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Wow Technology’s innovative radioactive liquid waste treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, A.

    2015-07-01

    WOW presents its revolutionary technology and equipment for liquid radioactive waste treatment: outperforming ultimate water decontamination and purification process, enhanced sludge concentration, no secondary waste nor consumables, fully automated, remote controlled and self-decontaminating device. The WOW’s technology is based upon a never before observed discovery of fluid dynamics science: the possibility of performing a molecular separation between solute and suspended elements and the solvent. The combination of such a molecular separation process with a standard vacuum evaporation improves the abatement performances by thousands of times, with respect to those of the state of the art vacuum evaporators. In addition to this, no secondary waste is produced during the process, as no filters, membranes, resins or additives are used. WOW equipment, automated and remote controlled, self decontaminates after use and can be designed and constructed either tailored to the application needs or with a modular approach for enhanced transportability and application flexibility. After the preliminary verification by CNR, the Italian National Research Center, Wow Technology decontamination device was tested c/o LENA, the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy of the University of Pavia, Italy with a simulated solution 6000 times more contaminated than the nuclear reactor’s cooling water of Fukushima-Daiichi NPP. In addition to that, WOW Technology was also used in a real case at the Radiochemistry laboratory of the Pavia’s University Chemistry department. Both the above mentioned contaminated fluids have been successfully decontaminated without production of additional or secondary waste WOW Technology has already performed on industrial scale c/o the Nuclear Repository of S.S.M. in Saluggia, Italy: 45000 liters of acid radioactive solution have been successfully decontaminated to a Decontamination Factor (DF) of 335000 for Cs-137 by one single evaporation step and

  5. Analysis Of Liquid Waste Management At Dr. Mohammad Hoesin Palembang's Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Hartini, Resi; Hasyim, Hamzah; Ainy, Asmaripa

    2011-01-01

    Background : The hospital is an institution that service activities of preventive, curative, rehabilitative and promotive health. These activities produce solid, liquid, and gas waste. Liquid waste can cause diseases and environment pollution so need special waste management. Dr. Mohammad Hoesin Palembang's Hospital producea lot of liquid waste. Method : This study is a descriptive research with qualitative approach. Sources of information consist four informants. The research are using dept...

  6. Boron Removal in Radioactive Liquid Waste by Forward Osmosis Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dooseong; Choi, Hei Min; Lee, Kune Woo; Moon Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    These wastes contain about 0.3-0.8 wt% boric acid and have been concentrated through an evaporation treatment. Boric acid tends to crystallize owing to its solubility, and to plug the evaporator. The volume reduction obtained through evaporation is limited by the amount of boric acid in the waste. As an emerging technology, forward osmosis (FO) has attracted growing interest in wastewater treatment and desalination. FO is a membrane process in which water flows across a semi-permeable membrane from a feed solution of lower osmotic pressure to a draw solution of higher osmotic pressure. However, very few studies on the removal of boron by FO have been performed. The objective of this study is to evaluate the possibility of boron separation in radioactive liquid waste by FO. In this study, the performance of FO was investigated to separate boron in the simulated liquid waste under the factors such as pH, osmotic pressure, ionic strength of the solution, and membrane characteristic. The boron separation in radioactive borate liquid waste was investigated with an FO membrane. When the feed solution containing boron is treated by the FO membrane, the boron permeation depends on the type of membrane, membrane orientation, pH of the feed solution, salt and boron concentration in the feed solution, and osmotic pressure of the draw solution. The boron flux begins to decline from pH 7, and increases with an increase in the osmotic driving force. The boron flux of the CTA-ES and ALFD membrane orientation is higher than those of the CTA-NW and ALFF orientation, respectively. The boron permeation rate is constant regardless of the osmotic pressure and membrane orientation. The boron flux decreases slightly with the salt concentration, but it is not heavily influenced at a low salt concentration.

  7. Boron Removal in Radioactive Liquid Waste by Forward Osmosis Membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Dooseong; Choi, Hei Min; Lee, Kune Woo; Moon Jeikwon

    2014-01-01

    These wastes contain about 0.3-0.8 wt% boric acid and have been concentrated through an evaporation treatment. Boric acid tends to crystallize owing to its solubility, and to plug the evaporator. The volume reduction obtained through evaporation is limited by the amount of boric acid in the waste. As an emerging technology, forward osmosis (FO) has attracted growing interest in wastewater treatment and desalination. FO is a membrane process in which water flows across a semi-permeable membrane from a feed solution of lower osmotic pressure to a draw solution of higher osmotic pressure. However, very few studies on the removal of boron by FO have been performed. The objective of this study is to evaluate the possibility of boron separation in radioactive liquid waste by FO. In this study, the performance of FO was investigated to separate boron in the simulated liquid waste under the factors such as pH, osmotic pressure, ionic strength of the solution, and membrane characteristic. The boron separation in radioactive borate liquid waste was investigated with an FO membrane. When the feed solution containing boron is treated by the FO membrane, the boron permeation depends on the type of membrane, membrane orientation, pH of the feed solution, salt and boron concentration in the feed solution, and osmotic pressure of the draw solution. The boron flux begins to decline from pH 7, and increases with an increase in the osmotic driving force. The boron flux of the CTA-ES and ALFD membrane orientation is higher than those of the CTA-NW and ALFF orientation, respectively. The boron permeation rate is constant regardless of the osmotic pressure and membrane orientation. The boron flux decreases slightly with the salt concentration, but it is not heavily influenced at a low salt concentration

  8. Processing method and device for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Toshiaki; Nishi, Takashi; Matsuda, Masami; Yukita, Atsushi.

    1997-01-01

    When only suspended particulate ingredients are contained as COD components in radioactive washing liquid wastes, the liquid wastes are heated by a first process, for example, an adsorption step to adsorb the suspended particulate ingredients to an activated carbon, and then separating and removing the suspended particulate ingredients by filtration. When both of the floating particle ingredients and soluble organic ingredients are contained, the suspended particulate ingredients are separated and removed by the first process, and then soluble organic ingredients are removed by other process, or both of the suspended particulate ingredients and the soluble organic ingredients are removed by the first process. In an existent method of adding an activated carbon and then filtering them at a normal temperature, the floating particle ingredients cover the layer of activated carbon formed on a filter paper or fabric to sometimes cause clogging. However, according to the method of the present invention, since disturbance by the floating particle ingredients does not occur, the COD components can be separated and removed sufficiently without lowering liquid waste processing speed. (T.M.)

  9. Physical and chemical properties of SSM-discharge in the system gas-liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyak, V.Ya.; Olszewski, S.V.; Evstigneev, M.A.; Tsybulev, P.N.; Voronin, P.N.

    1996-01-01

    Investigation on the influence of solved Na 2 SO 4 and NaOH concentrations on discharge plasma contacting solution, and on the influence of discharge parameters on metal precipitation speed, as well as chemical analysis of precipitant in the system plasma - water solution were performed. After plasma treatment of water solutions of Zn and Al nitrates flake-like and snow-white precipitations appear. Differential thermal and atom-adsorption analysis of precipitations show that metals precipitate as hydroxides. Investigation of the influence of SSM-discharge polarity on plasma-chemical precipitation efficiency show that positive polarity of liquid electrode is more preferable. Probably, this fact takes place because plasma electrode of the second subsystem is the cathode, and thus reactions of cations (metal ions) are more intensive near it. (authors)

  10. Analysis of adaptability of radioactive liquid effluent discharge under normal condition of inland nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yueping; Zhang Bing; Chen Yang; Zhu Lingqing; Tao Yunliang; Shangguan Zhihong

    2011-01-01

    The discharge of radioactive liquid effluent from inland nuclear power plant under normal operation is an important part to be considered in environmental impact assessment. Requirements of newly revised and upcoming standards GB 6249 and GB 14587 are introduced in this paper. Through an example of an inland NPP siting in the preliminary feasibility study phase, the adaptability to the relevant regulations in the site selection is analyzed. Also, the concerned problems in the design of AP1000 units are addressed. (authors)

  11. Notice of intent to discharge water contaminants. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Eddy County, NM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, J.S.; Porter, K.R.; Register, J.K.

    1983-04-01

    This report provides information in support of a ''Notice of Intent to Discharge Water Contaminants,'' pursuant to Section 1-201 of the New Mexico Water Quality Control Commission Regulations. The anticipated discharges are not expected to move directly or indirectly into groundwater. These discharges will be caused by activities related to the construction of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a US Department of Energy (DOE) research and development program to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from defense activities and programs of the United States. The facility is to be developed in deep layers of bedded salt. The WIPP site is located in Eddy County, New Mexico, about 26 miles east of Carlsbad. The US Department of Energy, WIPP Project Office, Albuquerque, New Mexico, as the sponsor of the project, is responsible for any discharges from the site. The following sections describe generally the WIPP construction activities. Pertinent site conditions, potential sources of discharges and their expected effects, and proposed groundwater monitoring efforts are also described

  12. Evaluation of nanofiltration membranes for treatment of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Elizabeth Eugenio de Mello

    2013-01-01

    The physicochemical behavior of two nanofiltration membranes for treatment of a low-level radioactive liquid waste (carbonated water) was investigated through static, dynamic and concentration tests. This waste was produced during conversion of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) in the cycle of nuclear fuel. This waste contains about 7.0 mg L -1 of uranium and cannot be discarded to the environment without an adequate treatment. In static tests membrane samples were immersed in the waste for 24 to 5000 h. Their transport properties (hydraulic permeability, permeate flux, sulfate and chloride ions rejection) were evaluated before and after immersion in the waste using a permeation flux front system under 0.5 MPa. The selective layer (polyamide) was characterized by zeta potential, contact angle, scanning electron microscopy for field emission, atomic force microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence and thermogravimetric analysis before and after static tests. In dynamic tests the waste was permeated under 0.5 MPa, and the membranes showed rejection to uranium above 85% were obtained. The short-term static tests (24-72 h) showed that the selective layer and surface charge of the membranes were not chemical changed, according infrared spectra data. After 5000 h a coating layer was released from the membranes, poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA. After this loss the rejection for uranium decreased. Permeation and concentration of the waste were carried out in permeation flux tangential system under 1.5 MPa. The rejection of uranium was around 90% for permeation tests. In concentration tests the permeated was collected continuously until about 80% reduction of the feed volume. The rejection of uranium was of the 97%. The nanofiltration membranes tested were efficient to concentrate the uranium from the waste. (author)

  13. Treatment of low-level radioactive waste liquid by reverse osmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L.P.; Sen Gupta, S.K.; Slade, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The processing of low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) liquids that result from operation of nuclear power plants with reverse osmosis systems is not common practice. A demonstration facility is operating at Chalk River Laboratories (of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited), processing much of the LLRW liquids generated at the site from a multitude of radioactive facilities, ranging from isotope production through decontamination operations and including chemical laboratory drains. The reverse osmosis system comprises two treatment steps--spiral wound reverse osmosis followed by tubular reverse osmosis--to achieve an average volume reduction factor of 30:1 and a removal efficiency in excess of 99% for most radioactive and chemical species. The separation allows the clean effluent to be discharged without further treatment. The concentrated waste stream of 3 wt% total solids is further processed to generate a solid product. The typical lifetimes of the membranes have been nearly 4000 hours, and replacement was required based on increased pressure drops and irreversible loss of permeate flux. Four years of operating experience with the reverse osmosis system, to demonstrate its practicality and to observe and record its efficiency, maintenance requirements and effectiveness, have proven it to be viable for volume reduction and concentration of LLRW liquids generated from nuclear-power-plant operations

  14. Dissolution of agro-waste in ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kiat Moon; Ngoh, Gek Cheng; Chua, Adeline Seak May

    2010-01-01

    Full text: There are abundant of agro-wastes being produced in Malaysia. One of the largely produced agro wastes is the sago hampas. It is known as a strong environmental pollutant due to its cellulosic fibrous material. However, the presence of the starch, cellulose and hemicelluloses in the hampas can be converted into valuable products such as reducing sugars. Hence, this study was performed to investigate the ability of ionic liquids in hydrolysing the ligno celluloses biomass into reducing sugars. Three types of ionic liquids were used, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIM Cl), 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium acetate (EMIM Ac) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate (EMIM DEP). The reaction was performed by heating the reaction mixture of sago hampas and ionic liquids at 100 degree Celsius. The concentrations of reducing sugars in the hydrolysates were determined by DNS method. Maximum concentration of reducing sugars were 0.424, 0.299, 0.260 mg/ml for BmimCl, EmimAc and EmimDEP respectively. These concluded that the selected ionic liquids were inefficient in hydrolysing the sago hampas to reducing sugars. (author)

  15. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Newly Generated Liquid Waste Demonstration Project Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    A research, development, and demonstration project for the grouting of newly generated liquid waste (NGLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center is considered feasible. NGLW is expected from process equipment waste, decontamination waste, analytical laboratory waste, fuel storage basin waste water, and high-level liquid waste evaporator condensate. The potential grouted waste would be classed as mixed low-level waste, stabilized and immobilized to meet RCRA LDR disposal in a grouting process in the CPP-604 facility, and then transported to the state

  16. Radiological discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodliffe, J.

    1990-01-01

    Current practice of North Sea States on the discharge and disposal of liquid radioactive wastes to the North Sea are based on the declaration issued at the Second International Conference on the Protection of the North Sea, known as the London Declaration. This has three main points the first of which emphasises the application of the Best Available Technology to protect the North Sea, the second provides a framework on which future controls on radioactive discharges should be based. The third identifies two parts of the framework; to take into account the recommendations of international organizations and that any repositories of radioactive waste which are built should not pollute the North Sea. This chapter looks at how the concensus based on the London Declaration is working, gauges the progress made in the implementation of the policy goal, identifies existing and future areas for concern and proposes ways of strengthening the control of radioactive discharges. The emphasis is on the United Kingdom practice and regulations for liquid wastes, most of which comes from the Sellafield Reprocessing Plant. (author)

  17. Technical report on natural evaporation system for radioactive liquid waste treatment arising from TRIGA research reactors' decontamination and decommissioning activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, J. S.; Jung, K. J.; Baek, S. T.; Jung, U. S.; Park, S. K.; Jung, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    This technical report described that radioactive liquid waste treatment for dismantling/decontamination of TRIGA Mark research reactor in Seoul. That is, we try safety treatment of operation radioactive liquid waste during of operating TRIGA Mark research reactor and dismantling radioactive liquid waste during R and D of research reactor hereafter, and by utilizing of new natural evaporation facility with describing design criteria of new natural evaporation facility. Therefore, this technical report described the quantity of present radioactive liquid waste and dismantling radioactive liquid waste hereafter, analysis the status of radial-rays/radioactivity, and also treatment method of this radioactive liquid waste. Also, we derived the method that the safeguard of outskirts environment and the cost down of radioactive liquid waste treatment by minimize of the radioactive liquid waste quantities, through-out design/operation of new natural evaporation facility for treatment of operation radioactive liquid waste and dismantling radioactive liquid waste. (author). 6 refs., 12 tabs., 5 figs

  18. Using benchmarking to minimize common DOE waste streams. Volume 1, Methodology and liquid photographic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, V.

    1994-04-01

    Finding innovative ways to reduce waste streams generated at Department of Energy (DOE) sites by 50% by the year 2000 is a challenge for DOE`s waste minimization efforts. This report examines the usefulness of benchmarking as a waste minimization tool, specifically regarding common waste streams at DOE sites. A team of process experts from a variety of sites, a project leader, and benchmarking consultants completed the project with management support provided by the Waste Minimization Division EM-352. Using a 12-step benchmarking process, the team examined current waste minimization processes for liquid photographic waste used at their sites and used telephone and written questionnaires to find ``best-in-class`` industrv partners willing to share information about their best waste minimization techniques and technologies through a site visit. Eastman Kodak Co., and Johnson Space Center/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) agreed to be partners. The site visits yielded strategies for source reduction, recycle/recovery of components, regeneration/reuse of solutions, and treatment of residuals, as well as best management practices. An additional benefit of the work was the opportunity for DOE process experts to network and exchange ideas with their peers at similar sites.

  19. Potential radiation damage: Storage tanks for liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    High level waste at SRS is stored in carbon steel tanks constructed during the period 1951 to 1981. This waste contains radionuclides that decay by alpha, beta, or gamma emission or are spontaneous neutronsources. Thus, a low intensity radiation field is generated that is capable of causing displacement damage to the carbon steel. The potential for degradation of mechanical properties was evaluated by comparing the estimated displacement damage with published data relating changes in Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact energy to neutron exposure. Experimental radiation data was available for three of the four grades of carbonsteel from which the tanks were constructed and is applicable to all four steels. Estimates of displacement damage arising from gamma and neutron radiation have been made based on the radionuclide contents for high level waste that are cited in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Liquid Waste Handling Facilities in the 200-Area. Alpha and beta emissions do not penetrate carbon steel to a sufficient depth to affect the bulk properties of the tank walls but may aggravate corrosion processes. The damage estimates take into account the source of the waste (F- or H-Area), the several types of tank service, and assume wateras an attenuating medium. Estimates of displacement damage are conservative because they are based on the highest levels of radionuclide contents reported in the SAR and continuous replenishment of the radionuclides

  20. The Recovery of Zinc Heavy Metal from Industrial Liquid Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panggabean, Sahat M.

    2000-01-01

    It had been studied the recovery of zinc heavy metal from liquid waste of electroplating industry located at East Jakarta. The aim of this study was to minimize the waste arisen from industrial activities by taking out zinc metal in order to reused on-site. The method of recovery was two steps precipitation using NaOH reagent and pH variation. The first step of precipitation at pH optimum around 6 yielded iron metal. The second step at pH optimum around 10 yielded zinc metal. The zinc metal was taken out assessed to the possibility of reused at that fabric. By applying its, it will yield the volume reduction of sludge waste about 36.1% or 53.2% of zinc metal containing in the waste. It means the cost of waste treatment will be lower. Beside its, the effluent arisen from the method had fulfill the maximum limit and it allowed to release to the environment. (author)

  1. Low and medium level liquid waste processing at the new La Hague reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, D.

    1986-05-01

    Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels produces low and medium activity liquid wastes. These radioactive wastes are decontamined before release in environment. The new effluent processing plant, which is being built at La Hague, is briefly described. Radionuclides are removed from liquid wastes by coprecipitation. The effluent is released after decantation and filtration. Insoluble sludges are conditioned in bitumen [fr

  2. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report CY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents details about the operation of the liquid and gaseous waste department of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the calendar year 1994. Topics discussed include; process waste system, upgrade activities, low-level liquid radioactive waste solidification project, maintenance activities, and other activities such as training, audits, and tours

  3. Radiation exposure from liquid discharges from I-131 therapy rooms into a piping system in the building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuntawiroon, M.; Sritongkul, N.; Pusuwan, P.; Chaudakshetrin, P.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Over 80% of the activity from patients undergoing radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer is eliminated during the first three days. In our iodine therapy unit, numbers of hospitalized patients have increased from less than 200 in 2004 to more than 300 patients in 2006. The total amount of activity used is about 1,900 MBq, and the estimated amount excreted would then be about 1,800 MBq. This results in significant volume of liquid discharges into the piping system. In this study, we monitored external dose rates in non-radiation areas adjacent to pipeline connections in the building to ensure that the dose to any individual in these areas does not exceed 1 mSv per year. Materials and Methods: Exposure rates in areas adjacent to the pipeline junction connections were measured periodically from April 2006 to February 2007, five floors below the therapy unit. The measurements were made inside the wall in contact with the junction, behind the wall and in hallways 1 meter from the wall, using a GM detector or an ionization chamber. The results were recorded in μSv/h and the dose received was estimated for members of the public. Results: Significant increases in dose rates were detected in three floors below the unit. They were 2030, 1025 and 515 Sv/h at contact with the pipeline connections, 915, 1015 and 35 μSv/h behind the wall, and 36, 56 and 25 μSv/h in hallways on floors 1, 2 and 3 respectively. After appropriate wall shielding had been provided, dose rate behind the wall reduced to 23 μSv/h, and to 0.52 μSv/h in hallways. By using an occupancy factor 1/4 for hallways, the calculated dose meets the public dose limits of 1 mSv per year. Conclusions: Therapeutic application of 131 I for the treatment of thyroid cancer generates a significant amount of liquid waste into the sewers. These low activity wastes originate mainly from toilets, showers, wash basins and floor drains. Although waste discharges can be handled without exceeding the permissible

  4. Radiation exposure from liquid discharges from I-131 therapy rooms into the piping system of a hospital building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuntawiroon, M.; Sritongkul, N.; Pusuwan, P.; Chaudakshetrin, P.

    2008-01-01

    Over 80% of the activity from patients undergoing radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer is eliminated during the first three days. In our I-131 therapy unit, the number of hospitalized patients has increased from less than 200 in 2004 to more than 300 in 2006. The total amount of radio activity used is about 1,800 GBq per year, and the estimated amount excreted is calculated to be about 1,500 GBq. This results in significant volume of contaminated liquid discharges into the piping system. In this study, we monitored external dose rates in non-radiation use areas adjacent to pipeline connections in the building to ensure that the dose to non-occupational workers who reside in offices below the unit does not exceed 1 mSv per year. Exposure rates in areas adjacent to the pipeline junction connections were measured periodically from April 2006 to February 2007 five floors below the therapy unit. The measurements were made inside the wall at contact with the junction, outside the wall and in hallways at 1 meter from the wall, using a GM detector or an ionization chamber. The results were recorded in μSv/h and the dose received was estimated for members of the public. Significant increases in dose rates were detected in three floors below the unit. They were 20--30, 10--30 and 5--15 μSv/h at contact with the pipeline connections, 9--15, 10--15 and 3--5 μSv/h outside the wall, and 3--6, 4--6 and 2--5 μSv/h in hallways on floors 1, 2 and 3 respectively. After appropriate wall shielding has been provided, dose rate outside the wall was reduced to 1.4 μSv/h, and to 0.5.3 μSv/h in hallways. By using an occupancy factor 1/4 for hallways, the calculated dose now meets the public dose limits of 1 mSv per year. Therapeutic application of I-131 for the treatment of thyroid cancer generates a significant amount of contaminated liquid waste into the sewers. These wastes originate mainly from toilets, showers, wash basins and floor drains. Although waste discharges can be

  5. Determination of chemical forms of C-14 in liquid discharges from nuclear power plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Světlík, Ivo; Fejgl, M.; Povinec, P. P.; Kořínková, Tereza; Tomášková, Lenka; Pospíchal, J.; Kurfiřt, M.; Striegler, R.; Kaufmanová, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 177, OCT (2017), s. 256-260 ISSN 0265-931X Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : analytical routines * dissolved organic forms of C-14 (DIC) * dissolved inorganic forms of C-14 (DOC) * Nuclear power plant (NPP) * liquid releases Subject RIV: DL - Nuclear Waste, Radioactive Pollution ; Quality OBOR OECD: Environment al sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 2.310, year: 2016

  6. Innovative processes for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacary, V.; Barre, Y.; Plasari, E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Because of the high salinity (0.5 to 2 M) of liquid wastes and the variability of their composition, the method which is the most appropriate and commonly used to remove the contaminants consists in the in situ formation of adsorbent particles in the waste stream. This technique is often called coprecipitation. To increase the efficiency of this treatment, a study is performed to point out the impact of the choice of the process and the influence of operating parameters (mean residence time, stirring speed, etc.) on the formation of crystals and ultimately on their ability to capture radionuclide. Barium sulphate was chosen as a reference because it is a well known precipitate and a material used in the decontamination facilities to remove radiostrontium. Two issues are encountered with the classic treatments which are consequences of the variability of effluents composition. On the one hand when high activity effluents have to be treated, the efficiency of the classic processes can not be sufficient and the liquid must be once again decontaminated. Thus the volume of disposal waste produced by the treatment is doubled. On the other hand when low activity effluents have to be treated, the classic processes produce a low activity waste. Consequently the volume of storage occupied by this waste is disproportionate with regard to its low activity. To return the more flexible process, various configurations were tested. They can be classified in two categories: improvements of the classic treatments and new types of reactors. Because of the good results which are obtained, these processes are patent pending. To support the experimental investigations, a modelling study at the reactor scale is initiated to distinguish the influence of each process parameter. These models assume that the surface of adsorbent particles is continuously renewed by crystal growth. The aim of this work is to determine the decisive parameters which allow the

  7. Characterization of a dielectric barrier discharge in contact with liquid and producing a plasma activated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neretti, G.; Taglioli, M.; Colonna, G.; Borghi, C. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work a low-temperature plasma source for the generation of plasma activated water (PAW) is developed and characterized. The plasma reactor was operated by means of an atmospheric-pressure air dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The plasma generated is in contact with the water surface and is able to chemically activate the liquid medium. Electrodes were supplied by both sinusoidal and nanosecond-pulsed voltage waveforms. Treatment times were varied from 2 to 12 min to increase the energy dose released to the water by the DBD plasma. The physics of the discharge was studied by means of electrical, spectroscopic and imaging diagnostics. The interaction between the plasma and the liquid was investigated as well. Temperature and composition of the treated water were detected. Images of the discharges showed a filamentary behaviour in the sinusoidal case and a more homogeneous behaviour in the nanosecond-pulsed one. The images and the electrical measurements allowed to evaluate an average electron number density of about 4  ×  1019 and 6  ×  1017 m-3 for the sinusoidal and nanosecond-pulsed discharges respectively. Electron temperatures in the range of 2.1÷2.6 eV were measured by using spectroscopic diagnostics. Rotational temperatures in the range of 318-475 K were estimated by fitting synthetic spectra with the measured ones. Water temperature and pH level did not change significantly after the exposure to the DBD plasma. The production of ozone and hydrogen peroxide within the water was enhanced by increasing the plasma treatment time and the energy dose. Numerical simulations of the nanosecond-pulsed discharge were performed by using a self-consistent coupling of state-to-state kinetics of the air mixture with the Boltzmann equation of free electron kinetics. Temporal evolution of the electron energy distribution function shows departure from the Maxwellian distribution especially during the afterglow phase of the discharge. When

  8. Solidification of acidic liquid waste from 99Mo isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The production of the radioisotope molybdenum-99 by the fission process began at ANSTO in the late 1960's. Molybdenum-99, with a half life of 66 hours, decays by beta emission to produce technetium-99m, a metastable isotope. Technetium-99m is the most widely used medical radioisotope due to its near ideal properties, particularly the radioactive half life of only 6 hours. ANSTO has been producing generators for around 30 years for distribution to hospitals and nuclear medicine centres. These generators produce technetium-99m for medical use by decay of the contained molybdenum-99. To produce molybdenum-99, uranium dioxide pellets enriched to 2.2% 235 U are irradiated in ANSTO's HIFAR reactor for about one week. The irradiated pellets are subsequently dissolved in nitric acid to allow the recovery of the molybdenum. An acidic intermediate level liquid waste results from this processing. A primary waste results from the raw leach solution (after removal of the molybdenum onto a packed alumina column) and a weaker secondary waste is produced from a series of column washing steps. The waste solution contains uranium, the majority of the other fission products and low levels of ammonia in a nitric acid solution. This liquid waste had been accumulating and stored in specially designed shielded tanks in a storage facility. A process has been developed at ANSTO to convert this intermediate level liquid waste into a crystalline solid form of considerably less volume and mass, for improved storage. The operation comprises three processing steps. The lower strength secondary waste solution first requires concentration, with the removal of water and some acid into a condensate. The condensate is chemically neutralised and treated through the conventional water treatment plant. Concentrated solution is then treated in a batch chemical process to reduce the low levels of ammonia to very low levels. The final evaporation process removes further water and acid and

  9. The Sonophysics and Sonochemistry of Liquid Waste Quantification and Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matula, Thomas J.

    1998-06-01

    This research is being conducted to (a) perform an in-depth and comprehensive study of the fundamentals of acoustic cavitation and nonlinear bubble dynamics, (b) elucidate the fundamental physics of sonochemical reactions, (c) examine the potential of sonoluminescence to quantify and monitor the presence of alkali metals and other elements in waste liquids, (d) design and evaluate more effective sonochemical reactors for waste remediation, and (e) determine the optimal acoustical parameters in the use of sonochemistry for liquid-waste-contaminant remediation. So far cells have been designed for multibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL) and single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) spectroscopy experiments. Positive results have been obtained in both systems using a Raman system which covers the wavelength range from 790 to 1,070 nm. Further progress from year-1 involved the use of the newly discovered technique of changing the pressure head above the cavitation field to increase the light emission from MBSL. A second method for changing the pressure head involves pressure-jumping, whereby the pressure in the head space above the solution is quickly increased to a new steady value.

  10. Liquid waste processing from plutonium (III) oxalate precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, A.; Cassaniti, P.; Orosco, E.H.

    1990-01-01

    Plutonium (III) oxalate filtrates contain about 0.2M oxalic acid, 0.09M ascorbic acid, 0.05M hydrazine, 1M nitric acid and 20-100 mg/l of plutonium. The developed treatment of liquid wastes consist in two main steps: a) Distillation to reduce up to 10% of the initial volume and refluxing to destroy organic material. Then, the treated solution is suitable to adjust the plutonium at the tetravalent state by addition of hydrogen peroxide and the nitric molarity up to 8.6M. b) Recovery and purification of plutonium by anion exchange using two columns in series containing Dowex 1-X4 resin. With the proposed process, it is possible to transform 38 litres of filtrates with 40mg/l of Pu into 0.1 l of purified solution with 15-20g/l of Pu. This solution is suitable to be recycled in the Pu (III) oxalate precipitation process. This process has several potential advantages over similar liquid waste treatments. These include: 1) It does not increase the liquid volume. 2) It consumes only few reagents. 3) The operations involved are simple, requiring limited handling and they are feasible to automatization. 4) The Pu recovery factor is about 99%. (Author) [es

  11. Recovering low-turbidity cutting liquid from silicon slurry waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tzu-Hsuan; Shih, Yu-Pei

    2014-04-30

    In order to recover a low-turbidity polyalkylene glycol (PAG) liquid from silicon slurry waste by sedimentation, temperatures were adjusted, and acetone, ethanol or water was used as a diluent. The experimental results show that the particles in the waste would aggregate and settle readily by using water as a diluent. This is because particle surfaces had lower surface potential value and weaker steric stabilization in PAG-water than in PAG-ethanol or PAG-acetone solutions. Therefore, water is the suggested diluent for recovering a low-turbidity PAG (sedimentation. After 50 wt.% water-assisted sedimentation for 21 days, the solid content of the upper liquid reduced to 0.122 g/L, and the turbidity decreased to 44 NTU. The obtained upper liquid was then vacuum-distillated to remove water. The final recovered PAG with 0.37 NTU had similar viscosity and density to the unused PAG and could be reused in the cutting process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of Dye Wastewater by Using a Hybrid Gas/Liquid Pulsed Discharge Plasma Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Na; Li Jie; Wu Yan; Masayuki, Sato

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid gas/liquid pulsed discharge plasma reactor using a porous ceramic tube is proposed for dye wastewater treatment. High voltage pulsed discharge plasma was generated in the gas phase and simultaneously the plasma channel was permeated through the tiny holes of the ceramic tube into the water phase accompanied by gas bubbles. The porous ceramic tube not only separated the gas phase and liquid phase but also offered an effective plasma spreading channel. The effects of the peak pulse voltage, additive gas varieties, gas bubbling rate, solution conductivity and TiO 2 addition were investigated. The results showed that this reactor was effective for dye wastewater treatment. The decoloration efficiency of Acid Orange II was enhanced with an increase in the power supplied. Under the studied conditions, 97% of Acid Orange II in aqueous solution was effectively decolored with additive oxygen gas, which was 51% higher than that with argon gas, and the increasing O 2 bubbling rate also benefited the decoloration of dye wastewater. Water conductivity had a small effect on the level of decoloration. Catalysis of TiO 2 could be induced by the pulsed discharge plasma and addition of TiO 2 aided the decoloration of Acid Orange II.

  13. Penetration of gas discharge through the gas–liquid interface into the bulk volume of conductive aqueous solution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoffer, Petr; Koláček, Karel; Stelmashuk, Vitaliy; Lukeš, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 11 (2015), s. 3868-3875 ISSN 0093-3813 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-12987S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : atmospheric - pressure plasmas * electric discharges * liquids * water Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.958, year: 2015

  14. Method of decontamination for uranium oxide particles floating in liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terakado, Tsutomu; Ebara, Tsuneo; Sato, Kuniaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly treat liquid waste containing uranium oxide particles floating in it and to enable substantially complete decontamination. Method: An iron salt such as ferrous sulfate or the like is added to liquid waste with floating uranium oxide particles, an alkaline solution such as caustic soda or the like is then added to the liquid waste while feeding compressed air at 0.1 to 0.02 l/sec. per ton of liquid waste, and the pH of the liquid waste is made to from 6.5 to 7.5. Thereafter, the feed of compressed air is stopped, the liquid waste is allowed to stand, and is then filtered. (Aizawa, K.)

  15. LIQUID WASTE FROM SEPTIC TANKS AS A SOURCE OF MICROBIOLOGICAL POLLUTION OF GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Nowak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pollution of soil and water environment by liquid waste originating from septic tanks is a huge problem in Poland. This applies especially to rural areas. Negative changes are observed both in the vicinity of the leaking tanks, from which concentrated and rotten sewage infiltrates into the ground, and in surface water as well as arable land, to which impurities from the emptied tanks are discharged. The paper presents the scale of the practice of uncontrolled domestic sewage discharge into the environment on the example of selected municipality. Presented data were compared with the results of the qualitative assessment of groundwater, which is collected in the same municipality for waterworks. In a significant number of wells, water was not safe in sanitary terms, as the presence of microbiological contamination was recorded. Among determined microorganisms, the indicator organisms of domestic waste pollution prevailed. Water quality problems have been reported at intake points located near the properties equipped with septic tanks or in places, to which sewage from emptying septic tanks were transferred in an uncontrolled manner. In this way it has been shown that there is a relationship between improperly maintained wastewater management and groundwater quality collected for the purpose of water supply.

  16. Method of electrolytic processing for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Katsuyuki; Takahashi, Yoshiharu; Tamai, Hideaki.

    1989-01-01

    Radioactive liquid wastes containing sodium compounds are electrolized using mercury as a cathode. As a result, they are separated into sodium-containing metal amalgam and residues. Metals containing sodium are separated from amalgam, purified and re-utilized, while mercury is recycled to the electrolysis vessel. The foregoing method can provide advantageous effect such as: (1) volume of the wastes to be processed can be reduced, (2) since processing can be carried out at a relatively low temperature, low boiling elements can be handled with no evaporization, (3) useful elements can be recovered and (4) other method than glass solidification can easily be employed remarkable volume-reduction of solidification products can be expected. (K.M.)

  17. Low-level liquid waste decontamination by inorganic ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.O.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Improved processes are being developed to treat contaminated liquid wastes that have been and continue to be generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The most serious contaminants are 137 Cs and 90 Sr, and certain inorganic ion-exchange material have given promising results. Nickel and cobalt hexacyanoferrate (II) compounds are extremely selective for cesium removal, with distribution coefficients in excess of 10 6 even in the presence of high cesium and moderate potassium concentrations. Sodium titanate is selective for strontium removal from solutions with high alkali metal concentrations, especially at high pH. These separations are so efficient that one or two stages of simple, batch separation can yield large DFs (∼10 4 ) while still generating small volumes of solid waste

  18. Characterization of actinide-bearing sediments underlying liquid waste disposal facilities at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, S.M.; Ames, L.L.

    1975-09-01

    Past liquid waste disposal practices at the U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration's Hanford Reservation have included the discharges of solutions containing trace quantities of actinides directly into the ground via structures collectively termed ''trenches''. Characterization of samples from two of these trenches, the 216-Z-9 and the 216-Z-1A(a), has been initiated to determine the present form and migration potential of plutonium stored in sediments which received high salt, acidic waste liquids. Analysis of samples acquired by drilling has revealed that the greatest measured concentration of Pu, approximately 10 6 μCi 239 Pu/liter of sediment, occurs in both facilities just below the points of release of the waste liquids. This concentration decreases to approximately 10 3 μCi 239 Pu/liter of sediment within the first 2 meters of the underlying sediment columns and to approximately 10 μCi 239 Pu/liter of sediment at the maximum depth sampled (9 meters). Examination of relatively undisturbed sediment cores illustrated two types of Pu occurrence responsible for this distribution. One of these types is composed of Pu particles (greater than 70 wt percent PuO 2 ) added to the disposal site in the same form. This ''particulate'' type was ''filtered out'' within the upper 1 meter of the sediment column, accounting for the high concentration of Pu/liter of sediment in this region. The second type of Pu (less than 0.5 wt percent PuO 2 ) was originally disposed of as soluble Pu(IV). This ''nonparticulate'' type penetrated deeper within the sediment profile and was deposited in association with silicate hydrolysis of the sediment fragments

  19. Design and manufacturing concrete cells for shielding and storing radioactive semi liquid waste (resin) from MPR-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudjijanto-MS; Bahdir-Johan

    2003-01-01

    Semi liquid or quasi solid waste on Multipurpose Reactor G.A. Siwabessy (MPR-GAS) produced from operating resin rinsing systems and resin disposal systems during changes insert trap resin. Volume of the disposal resin waste in the filter mixed-bed per operation rinsing period are approx. 1.00 m 3 (in the Primary Cooling Water Treatment System) with activity ∼ 18.6 Ci/m 3 (0.688 TBq/m 3 ), 0.50 m 3 (in the Radioisotope Storage Pool Water Treatment System) with activity approx ∼ 0.162 Ci/m 3 (5.99 x 10 3 MBq/m 3 ) and 0.50 m 3 (in the Interim Spent Fuel Storage Pool Water Treatment System) with activity ∼ 0.162 Ci/m 3 (5.99 x 10 3 MBq/m 3 ) respectively. On the discharging and unloading, the gross radioactivity concentration of the resin waste loaded in the disposal resin waste tank are approx. 10 Ci/m 3 (0.37 TBq/m 3 ). After 6 months delayed, this activity is still 0.32 Ci/m 3 (11.84 GBq/m 3 ). Based on this data, some concrete cells to storage resin waste as semi liquid or quasi solid waste produced continuously by MPR-GAS installation has been designed and manufactured eternally

  20. Treatment of fast reactor liquid waste- electrochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahato, Swapan Kumar; Sudha, R.; Anthonysamy, S.; Muralidaran, P.

    2015-01-01

    During the operation of fast reactors, components get wetted by sodium. The sodium wetted primary components such as pumps and intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) in fast reactors are cleaned free of sodium followed by suitable chemical decontamination process before taking them for maintenance or for disposal. This helps in reduction of radiation dose to the operating personnel. Sodium cleaning and decontamination generates large volumes of liquid effluent. The activity in the liquid effluent during sodium cleaning/decontamination is due to 22 Na, 54 Mn, 58 Co, 60 Co, 59 Fe, 137 Cs and 134 Cs. It is required to chemically treat the effluent to reduce the activity levels prior to storage in tanks and transportation to the waste management facility for final disposal. Conventionally the ion exchange method is used for removal of radionuclides which produces large quantities of secondary waste. A method which is suitable both for removal of radionuclides present in low concentration and that avoids generation of large quantities of secondary waste is required. Hence an electrochemical method for metal ion removal is attempted in this work which produces little or no secondary waste. Electrochemical method towards removal of manganese ions was finalized earlier using reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) from simulated decontamination solution containing a mixture of sulphuric and phosphoric acids. In continuation of the experiments for the removal of cesium ions from simulated cleaning solution which has an alkaline pH, a thin film of nickel hexacyanoferrate (NiHCF) was deposited electrochemically on the surface of RVC. Hexacyanoferrates are known for selectively binding cesium. This NiHCF coated RVC was used for electrodeposition of Cs ions. NiHCF coated and Cs deposited RVC was characterized using SEM/EDX analysis. EDX analysis confirms the presence of Cs on NiHCF coated RVC. (author)

  1. Advanced evaporation/concentration treatment technology for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhijian; Lu Zhiming; Yu Ruixia

    1997-01-01

    A new and effective two stage moisture separator which removes remaining water droplet and free ion in secondary steam can be added between the evaporator and the condenser of existing liquid waste treatment system. Its addition increases decontamination factor to more than ten times. Ion content in condensed water is decreased considerably. Condensed water meets emission standard without passing through ion exchanger. Detail fundamentals are analysed and results are given: (1) system diagram, (2) structure sketch of the two stage moisture separator, (3) laboratory test results

  2. Microbial accumulation of uranium from nuclear liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    This investigation includes the isolation, identification and the fluctuations of the population densities of microorganisms in the nuclear liquid waste released by some laboratories of Iraqi Atomic Energy Commission. The efficiency of uranium accumulation on isolates (22 bacterial strains, 24 fungal strains and 6 yeast strains) was assessed in aqueous solution using fluorometric techniques. Two of the isolated microoganisms namely Bacillus sp. -15B and Mucor sp.16F showed exceptionally high attitude towards uranium accumulation. Optimal conditions required for efficient accumulation and recovery of uranium was then studied using the two selected isolates. 10 figs.; 162 refs.; 16 tabs

  3. Selion offers a unique system for treating liquid nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tusa, E.; Kurki, H. [ed.

    1998-07-01

    Studies on the treatment of liquid nuclear waste have been conducted actively in the IVO Group since the early 1980s. And the work has borne fruit: the CsTreat and SrTreat ion exchange products, developed by the IVO Group, were launched three years ago. The ion exchangers have already been in full use at a number of sites throughout the world. In addition, they are currently being tested at many nuclear research institutes and power plants in the USA, Japan and Europe

  4. Disposal of liquid radioactive wastes through wells or shafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes disposal of liquids and, in some cases, suitable solids and/or entrapped gases, through: (1) well injection into deep permeable strata, bounded by impermeable layers; (2) grout injection into an impermeable host rock, forming fractures in which the waste solidifies; and (3) slurrying into excavated subsurface cavities. Radioactive materials are presently being disposed of worldwide using all three techniques. However, it would appear that if the techniques were verified as posing minimum hazards to the environment and suitable site-specific host rock were identified, these disposal techniques could be more widely used

  5. Use of liquid membranes for treatment of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozol, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The reprocessing operations produce liquid wastes in which the main components are nitric acid and sodium nitrate. The goal of the experiments is to separate trace amounts of radioactive elements from these acidic and high sodium nitrate content solutions. CMPO, a neutral bifunctional organophosphorus compound, and crown compounds (DC18 C6 - B21 C7) are able to extract respectively actinides, strontium and cesium from these high salinity solutions. The supported liquid membrane (SLM) render the use of expensive tailor-made extractant molecules like CMPO or crown ethers possible. The results obtained for the extraction of actinides and strontium are promising, but research must now be oriented towards improving the stability of the membrane

  6. Laboratory development of methods for centralized treatment of liquid low-level waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.D.; Bostick, D.T.; Burgess, M.W.; Taylor, P.A.; Perona, J.J.; Kent, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    Improved centralized treatment methods are needed in the management of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). LLLW, which usually contains radioactive contaminants at concentrations up to millicurie-per-liter levels, has accumulated in underground storage tanks for over 10 years and has reached a volume of over 350,000 gal. These wastes have been collected since 1984 and are a complex mixture of wastes from past nuclear energy research activities. The waste is a highly alkaline 4-5 M NaNO 3 solution with smaller amounts of other salts. This type of waste will continue to be generated as a consequence of future ORNL research programs. Future LLLW (referred to as newly generated LLLW or NGLLLW) is expected to a highly alkaline solution of sodium carbonate and sodium hydroxide with a smaller concentration of sodium nitrate. New treatment facilities are needed to improve the manner in which these wastes are managed. These facilities must be capable of separating and reducing the volume of radioactive contaminants to small stable waste forms. Treated liquids must meet criteria for either discharge to the environment or solidification for onsite disposal. Laboratory testing was performed using simulated waste solutions prepared using the available characterization information as a basis. Testing was conducted to evaluate various methods for selective removal of the major contaminants. The major contaminants requiring removal from Melton Valley Storage Tank liquids are 90 Sr and 137 Cs. Principal contaminants in NGLLLW are 9O Sr, 137 Cs, and 106 Ru. Strontium removal testing began with literature studies and scoping tests with several ion-exchange materials and sorbents

  7. PNGMDR 2013-2015. The management of liquid and gaseous tritium-containing wastes from the non-electronuclear sector. Progress status by the end of 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    After having briefly evoked the characteristics of tritium-containing radioactive wastes, and the associated issues for storage or warehousing, and also outlined that warehousing solutions are designed for solid wastes whereas tritium is often used under its liquid and gaseous form, this report addresses the case of these liquid and gaseous tritium-containing radioactive wastes. A first part addresses gaseous tritium-containing wastes, discusses their inventory without taking tritium-containing objects belonging to the National Defence. Thus, Tritium is present in lightning arresters, in radio-luminescent objects, in emergency exit panels. The present location of these wastes is commented, and the constraints related to their taking into charge by the Aube waste centre are discussed: issue of releases, regulatory requirements, acceptance technical specifications, determination of the gaseous Tritium LAS (limit of acceptance of a sealed source). The report proposes an overview of alternative pathways to storage in the Aube storage centre: destruction and discharge when authorized, use of new equipment developed by the ANDRA, taking over by the country of origin or recycling, decay warehousing. The next part of the report addresses liquid tritium-containing wastes, proposes a brief inventory, and briefly evokes two options: combustion, or discharge when authorized

  8. Standard criteria for disposal of liquid radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants into surface waters (river systems)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, V.V.; Tsybizov, I.S.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive products discharge into natural water streams results in the necessity to regulate nuclear power plant discharges to ensure radiation safety (RS) for population using a river and surrounding river territory. To ensure RS it is necessary to set scientific-founded standards of permissible discharge level of liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) from nuclear power plant assuring observance of hygienic requirements for surface water puring. Volume of permissible LRW discharge into river systems must be set both with provision for concrete physical-geographycal conditions, specficity of utilizing the river and river valley and social-economical peculiarities of crtical population groups. The value of permissible LRW discharge into river systems is determined by three criterion groups: radiological, ecological and hydrological ones. By means of radiological group the internal and external irradiation doses for the whole body and its separate organs are set and RS of population is determined. Ecological criteria include a number of parameters (coefficients of accumulation, distribution and transition) determining quantitative ratios between radioactive element contents in water and separate links of biological chains: soil/water, fish/water, vegetables/water and others. Hydrological criteria determine the degree of waste dilution in rivers, control radioactive contamination of flood-lands areas and in common with ecological criteria determine radionuclide contents in soil and food products. A method of determining average annual values of LRW dilution in river waters is presented [ru

  9. Application of dispersion and dose assessment models to the solid and liquid wastes facilities of Ezeiza radioactive waste management area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado, Valeria A.; Lopez, Fabio O.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a dose assessment of the critic group from the near surface facility for solid and liquid waste, located at Ezeiza Atomic Center in Argentina (Ezeiza Radioactive Waste Management Area-AGE). The calculations were made using several approaches about source term. The activities for each radionuclide and facility were taken from the National Atomic Energy Commission's Inventory that corresponds to the first trimester of 2005. The radioactive decay of each radionuclide was considered. The work was performed in two steps. In the first step, using the Nuclide Dispersion in Phreatic Aquifer Model (DRAF), the dispersion of the contaminants into the phreatic aquifer until the discharge point at a superficial water course was considered. In the second step, the Consequences of Releases to the Environment Assessment Methodology Program (PC CREAM) was used for the study of radionuclides dispersion in superficial water course and dose calculations. The results from this paper show that, for every studied radionuclide, the doses involved are significantly lower than the values established by current regulations. On the other hand, those results put in evidence the utility of simple models in estimating the order of magnitude of expected concentrations and doses. It is important to highlight that the obtained results can be used only in the context of the suppositions that were made. (author) [es

  10. Risk assessment and quality improvement of liquid waste management in Taiwan University chemical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chao-Chung; Chen, Ming-Shu

    2018-01-01

    The policy of establishing new universities across Taiwan has led to an increase in the number of universities, and many schools have constructed new laboratories to meet students' academic needs. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of laboratory accidents from the liquid waste in universities. Therefore, how to build a safety system for laboratory liquid waste disposal has become an important issue in the environmental protection, safety, and hygiene of all universities. This study identifies the risk factors of liquid waste disposal and presents an agenda for practices to laboratory managers. An expert questionnaire is adopted to probe into the risk priority procedures of liquid waste disposal; then, the fuzzy theory-based FMEA method and the traditional FMEA method are employed to analyze and improve the procedures for liquid waste disposal. According to the research results, the fuzzy FMEA method is the most effective, and the top 10 potential disabling factors are prioritized for improvement according to the risk priority number (RNP), including "Unclear classification", "Gathering liquid waste without a funnel or a drain pan", "Lack of a clearance and transport contract", "Liquid waste spill during delivery", "Spill over", "Decentralized storage", "Calculating weight in the wrong way", "Compatibility between the container material and the liquid waste", "Lack of dumping and disposal tools", and "Lack of a clear labels for liquid waste containers". After tracking improvements, the overall improvement rate rose to 60.2%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. BPEO as a Guide to Decision Making in the Authorisation of Radioactive Waste Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, Michael; Collier, David; Stone, Andrew; Keep, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    The Environment Agency (EA) and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) are the independent public bodies responsible for regulating the disposal of radioactive wastes in the UK in order to ensure protection of people and the environment. Operators at nuclear sites must obtain authorisation from the relevant Agency, granted under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 (RSA93), in order to make disposals of radioactive waste. Draft Statutory Guidance to the EA on the Regulation of Radioactive Discharges into the Environment from Nuclear Licensed Sites was published by the Government in October 2000. The Guidance establishes an obligation on the EA to ensure that proper consideration is given to the identification and evaluation of alternatives, in order to ensure that the Best Practicable Environmental Option (BPEO) is chosen, before authorisations can be granted. Such a requirement supplements and reinforces current regulatory practice in the UK, whereby nuclear site operators may be required (under Improvement Conditions attached to existing authorisations) to review waste management strategies on a regular basis in order to demonstrate that they represent the BPEO. SEPA shares a common interest with EA in use of the BPEO concept in the regulation of radioactive waste management, for both operational licensing and decommissioning projects. There has been no single standard methodology or guidance to Agency staff on application of the BPEO concept to radioactive waste management. BPEO studies presented by nuclear site operators have therefore been considered on a case-by-case basis. In the light of this, and taking account of the specific requirements emerging from the new Statutory Guidance, EA and SEPA have jointly supported the development of guidance for use by the Agencies in reviewing and assessing BPEO studies submitted in relation to authorisations granted under RSA93. This paper describes activities that have been undertaken to support the

  12. Synergistic effects of liquid and gas phase discharges using pulsed high voltage for dyes degradation in the presence of oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Zhou, Minghua; Lei, Lecheng

    2005-07-01

    The technology of combined liquid and gas phase discharges (LGD) using pulsed high voltage for dyes degradation was developed in this study. Apparent synergistic effects for Acid orange II (AO) degradation in the presence of oxygen were observed. The enhancement of AO degradation rate was around 302%. Furthermore, higher energy efficiency was obtained comparing with individual liquid phase discharge (LD) or gas phase discharge process (GD). The AO degradation in the presence of oxygen by LGD proceeded through the direct ozone oxidation and the ozone decomposition induced by LD. Important operating parameters such as electrode distance, applied voltage, pulse repetition rate, and types of dyes were further investigated.

  13. Application of biosorbents in treatment of the radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Rafael Vicente de Padua

    2014-01-01

    Radioactive liquid waste containing organic compounds need special attention, because the treatment processes available are expensive and difficult to manage. The biosorption is a potential treatment technique that has been studied in simulated wastes. The biosorption term is used to describe the removal of metals, non-metals and/or radionuclides by a material from a biological source, regardless of its metabolic activity. Among the potential biomasses, agricultural residues have very attractive features, as they allow for the removal of radionuclides present in the waste using a low cost biosorbent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential use of different biomass originating from agricultural products (coconut fiber, coffee husk and rice husk) in the treatment of real radioactive liquid organic waste. Experiments with these biomass were made including 1) Preparation, activation and characterization of biomasses; 2) Conducting biosorption assays; and 3) Evaluation of the product of immobilization of biomasses in cement. The biomasses were tested in raw and activated forms. The activation was carried out with diluted HNO 3 and NaOH solutions. Biosorption assays were performed in polyethylene bottles, in which were added 10 mL of radioactive waste or waste dilutions in deionized water with the same pH and 2% of the biomass (w/v). At the end of the experiment, the biomass was separated by filtration and the remaining concentration of radioisotopes in the filtrate was determined by ICP-OES and gamma spectrometry. The studied waste contains natural uranium, americium-241 and cesium-137. The adopted contact times were 30 min, 1, 2 and 4 hours and the concentrations tested ranged between 10% and 100%. The results were evaluated by maximum experimental sorption capacity and isotherm and kinetics ternary models. The highest sorption capacity was observed with raw coffee husk, with approximate values of 2 mg/g of U (total), 40 x 10 -6 mg/g of Am-241 and 50 x10 -9

  14. Assessment of the Impact of Radioactive Disposals and Discharges from the United Kingdom Low Level Waste Repository on the Ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an assessment of the impacts to ecosystems and wildlife species from radioactive discharges and disposals at the United Kingdom's low level waste disposal facility in West Cumbria. The assessment was undertaken in response to a requirement in the site's current authorisation and comprised a detailed desk based review along with an exercise to screen relevant monitoring data from the site against generic assessment criteria and undertake a numerical risk assessment. Much of the site is vegetated, comprising a variety of habitats including grassland, relict dune heath and surface water bodies. Furthermore, the site is located adjacent to a coastal/estuarine area which is protected as it provides a habitat of high ecological value and species of animals and plants are present that are rare, endangered or vulnerable. However, the current impact of aerial and liquid radioactive discharges from the low level waste repository on ecosystems and wildlife species is considered to be low. Site monitoring data also indicate that there has been a reduction of radionuclide activities in ground and surface water and leachates over time, a result of measures initiated to minimise rainwater infiltration and improve leachate management associated with the disposal area. A quantitative assessment was undertaken to assess future impacts to relevant terrestrial, fresh water and marine ecosystems. This showed that modelled peak radionuclide concentrations in the first 4,000 years after site closure were not sufficiently high to cause potential impact to any of these ecosystems or associated wildlife. This cut-off date was chosen as it is considered probable that, due to the effects of future climate and landscape change and, unless actions are taken to defend the coastline, the site is likely to be disrupted by coastal erosion in the next 4,000 years. (authors)

  15. Characterization of Discharge Areas of Radionuclides Originating From Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, L.; Xu, S.; Worman, A.

    2009-05-01

    If leakages in nuclear waste repositories located in crystalline bedrock arise, radionuclides will reach the biosphere and cause a risk of radiological impact. The extent of the radiological impact depends on in which landscape elements the radionuclides emerge. In this study, we investigate if there are certain landscape elements that generally will act as discharge areas for radionuclides leaking from subsurface deposits. We also characterize the typical properties that distinguish these areas from others. In humid regions, landscape topography is the most important driving force for groundwater flow. Because groundwater is the main transporting agent for migrating radionuclides, the topography will determine the flowpaths of leaking radionuclides. How topography and heterogeneities in the subsurface affect the discharge distribution of the radionuclides is therefore an important scope of this study. To address these issues, we developed a 3-D transport model. Our analyses are based on site-specific data from two different areas in Sweden, Forsmark, Uppland, and Oskarshamn, Småland. The Swedish Nuclear Waste Management Company (SKB) has selected these two areas as candidate areas for a deep repository of nuclear waste and the areas are currently subject to site investigations. Our results suggest that there are hot-spots in the landscape i.e. areas with high probability of receiving large amounts of radionuclides from a leaking repository of nuclear waste. The hot-spots concentrate in the sea, streams, lakes and wetlands. All these elements are found at lower elevations in the landscape. This pattern is mostly determined by the landscape topography and the locations of fracture zones. There is a relationship between fracture zones and topography, and therefore the importance of the topography for the discharge area distribution is not contradicted by the heterogeneity in the bedrock. The varieties of landscape elements which have potential for receiving

  16. Decontamination of liquid radioactive waste by thorium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousselle, J.; Grandjean, S.; Dacheux, N.; Genet, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the field of the complete reexamination of the chemistry of thorium phosphate and of the improvement of the homogeneity of Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (TPD, Th 4 (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 ) prepared at high temperature, several crystallized compounds were prepared as initial powdered precursors. Due to the very low solubility products associated to these phases, their use in the field of the efficient decontamination of high-level radioactive liquid waste containing actinides (An) was carefully considered. Two main processes (called 'oxalate' and 'hydrothermal' chemical routes) were developed through a new concept combining the decontamination of liquid waste and the immobilization of the actinides in a ceramic matrix (TPD). In phosphoric media ('hydrothermal route'), the key-precursor was the Thorium Phosphate Hydrogen Phosphate hydrate (Th 2 (PO 4 ) 2 (HPO 4 ). H 2 O, TPHP, solubility product log(K S,0 0 ) ∼ - 67). The replacement of thorium by other tetravalent actinides (U, Np, Pu) in the structure, leading to the preparation of Th 2-x/2 An x/2 (PO 4 ) 2 (HPO 4 ). H 2 O solid solutions, was examined. A second method was also considered in parallel to illustrate this concept using the more well-known precipitation of oxalate as the initial decontamination step. For this method, the final transformation to single phase TPD containing actinides was purchased by heating a mixture of phosphate ions with the oxalate precipitate at high temperature. (authors)

  17. Liquid radioactive waste processing improvement of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nery, Renata Wolter dos Reis; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Monteiro, Jose Luiz Fontes

    2005-01-01

    The study evaluate an inorganic ion exchange to process the low level liquid radwaste of PWR nuclear plants, so that the level of the radioactivity in the effluents and the solid waste produced during the treatment of these liquid radwaste can be reduced. The work compares two types of ion exchange materials, a strong acid cation exchange resin, that is the material typically used to remove radionuclides from PWR nuclear plants wastes, and a mordenite zeolite. These exchange material were used to remove cesium from a synthetic effluent containing only this ion and another effluent containing cesium and cobalt. The breakthrough curves of the zeolite and resin using a fix bed reactor were compared. The results demonstrated that the zeolite is more efficient than the resin in removing cesium from a solution containing cesium and cobalt. The results also showed that a bed combining zeolite and resin can process more volume of an effluent containing cesium and cobalt than a bed resin alone. (author)

  18. Chemical treatment of radioactive liquid wastes from medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo A, J.

    1995-01-01

    This work is a study about the treatment of the most important radioactive liquid wastes from medical usages, generated in medical institutions with nuclear medicine services. The radionuclides take in account are 32 P, 35 S, 125 I. The treatments developed and improved were specific chemical precipitations for each one of the radionuclides. This work involve to precipitate the radionuclide from the liquid waste, making a chemical compound insoluble in the aqueous phase, for this process the radionuclide stay in the precipitate, lifting the aqueous phase with a very low activity than the begin. The 32 P precipitated in form of Ca 3 32 P O 4 and Ca 2 H 32 P O 4 with a value for Decontamination Factor (DF) at the end of the treatment of 32. The 35 S was precipitated in form of Ba 35 SO 4 with a DF of 26. The 125 I was precipitated in Cu 125 I to obtain a DF of 24. The results of the treatments are between the limits given for the International Atomic Energy Agency and the 10 Code of Federal Regulation 20, for the safety release at the environment. (Author)

  19. Real-time alpha monitoring of a radioactive liquid waste stream at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.D.; Whitley, C.R.; Rawool-Sullivan, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This poster display concerns the development, installation, and testing of a real-time radioactive liquid waste monitor at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The detector system was designed for the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility so that influent to the plant could be monitored in real time. By knowing the activity of the influent, plant operators can better monitor treatment, better segregate waste (potentially), and monitor the regulatory compliance of users of the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System. The detector system uses long-range alpha detection technology, which is a nonintrusive method of characterization that determines alpha activity on the liquid surface by measuring the ionization of ambient air. Extensive testing has been performed to ensure long-term use with a minimal amount of maintenance. The final design was a simple cost-effective alpha monitor that could be modified for monitoring influent waste streams at various points in the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System.

  20. Liquid radioactive waste processing system in Improved OPR-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soonmin; Kim, Kiljung; Park, Jungsu

    2008-01-01

    The design goal of liquid rad waste system is to minimize the release of radioactive materials to the environment, the occupational radiation exposure to workers, and the solid rad waste volume generated from LRS operation. In 1998, KOPEC in conjunction with KHNP (Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.) started a special task study which had been focused on the worldwide advanced technologies in the liquid rad waste process area by considering the design goals above. As a result of this task, KOPEC and KHNP finally decided to adopt a reverse osmosis processing method for Improved OPR-1000 in Korea. The advanced LRS design incorporating the R/O process has been introduced into Shin-Wolsong 1 and 2 (SWN 1 and 2) as well as Shin-Kori 1 and 2 (SKN 1 and 2), which are recently under construction, and also is adopted for Shin-Kori 3 and 4 (SKN 3 and 4) and Shin-Ulchin 1 and 2 (SUN 1 and 2), which are planned for the near future construction as the first APR-1400 type of Korean reactors. The LRS shop performance test for SKN 1 and 2 (Improved OPR-1000 R/O package system) was conducted by DOOSAN and DTS (Diversified Technologies Services, Inc) in January, 2008. The purpose of the test was to demonstrate the performance of actual R/O system to be installed in SKN 1 and 2 site. In this paper, overall system configuration and the shop performance test result is presented based on Improved OPR-1000 LRS R/O Package system

  1. Uranium Extraction From Artificial Liquid Waste Using Continuous Extraction Liquid membrane Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusdianasari; Buchari

    2002-01-01

    The continuous extraction of uranium from artificial liquid waste by emulsion liquid membrane was carried out using one stage mixer-settler. This emulsion liquid membrane containing di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D2EHPA) and tri-n-buthyl phosphate (TBP) as carrier were carried out using one stage mixer-settler. The optimum condition gave the ratio of emulsion velocity to the feed velocity 1:4 and steady state reached after five minutes. The optimum condition was obtained at the 90.91 % of uranium recovered from raffinate, using EDTA as the masking agent with concentration 5x10 - 2 M . The total concentration of carrier was 3% with ratio D2EHPA and TBP 3:1. The emulsion liquid membrane has high relative selectivity after steady state with separation factors were α U , N i= 115,43 and α U , Fe 328,55. The result of experiment showed that emulsion liquid membrane containing D2EHPA and TBP as carrier have good performance for continuous system

  2. Gas-liquid hybrid discharge-induced degradation of diuron in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jingwei; Zheng, Zheng; Luan, Jingfei; Li, Kunquan; Wang, Lianhong; Feng, Jianfang

    2009-05-30

    Degradation of diuron in aqueous solution by gas-liquid hybrid discharge was investigated for the first time. The effect of output power intensity, pH value, Fe(2+) concentration, Cu(2+) concentration, initial conductivity and air flow rate on the degradation efficiency of diuron was examined. The results showed that the degradation efficiency of diuron increased with increasing output power intensity and increased with decreasing pH values. In the presence of Fe(2+), the degradation efficiency of diuron increased with increasing Fe(2+) concentration. The degradation efficiency of diuron was decreased during the first 4 min and increased during the last 10 min with adding of Cu(2+). Decreasing the initial conductivity and increasing the air flow rate were favorable for the degradation of diuron. Degradation of diuron by gas-liquid hybrid discharge fitted first-order kinetics. The pH value of the solution decreased during the reaction process. Total organic carbon removal rate increased in the presence of Fe(2+) or Cu(2+). The generated Cl(-1), NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-), oxalic acid, acetic acid and formic acid during the degradation process were also detected. Based on the detected Cl(-1) and other intermediates, a possible degradation pathway of diuron was proposed.

  3. Degradation of gas-liquid gliding arc discharge on Acid Orange II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, J.H.; Liu, Y.N.; Bo, Zh.; Li, X.D.; Cen, K.F.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of pH value, initial concentration of dye solution and temperature on the degradation efficiency of Acid Orange II (AO7) using gas-liquid gliding arc discharge were investigated. The influences of pH value and temperature on degradation efficiency were not apparent. Increasing initial solution concentration caused the decrease of degradation rate and the increase of absolute degradation quantity. Considering energy efficiency and absolute degradation quantity, the gas-liquid gliding arc discharge is fit for treating high concentration organic wastewater. A possible mineralization pathway was proposed through the analysis of intermediate products detected by gas chromatograph coupled with mass spectrophotometer (GC-MS) and ion chromatograph (IC). Hydroxyl radicals reacted with the azo linkage-bearing carbon of a hydroxy-substituted ring, leading to the cleavage of -C-N- and degradation of AO7. The solution biodegradability was significantly improved (BOD 5 /COD from 0.02 to 0.43). The toxicity of intermediate products was lower than that of the initial Acid Orange II

  4. Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) System for Flue-Gas Derived Water From Oxy-Combustion Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen J. Gerdemann; John Clark

    2011-10-16

    Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, Oregon, have patented a process - Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Capturing CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel combustion generates a significant water product which can be tapped for use in the power plant and its peripherals. Water condensed in the IPR{reg_sign} process may contain fly ash particles, sodium (from pH control), and sulfur species, as well as heavy metals, cations and anions. NETL is developing a treatment approach for zero liquid discharge while maximizing available heat from IPR. Current treatment-process steps being studied are flocculation/coagulation, for removal of cations and fine particles, and reverse osmosis, for anion removal as well as for scavenging the remaining cations. After reverse osmosis process steps, thermal evaporation and crystallization steps will be carried out in order to build the whole zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system for flue-gas condensed wastewater. Gypsum is the major product from crystallization process. Fast, in-line treatment of water for re-use in IPR seems to be one practical step for minimizing water treatment requirements for CO{sub 2} capture. The results obtained from above experiments are being used to build water treatment models.

  5. Discharge characteristics of an ablative pulsed plasma thruster with non-volatile liquid propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, William Yeong Liang; Schönherr, Tony; Koizumi, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-01

    Pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs) are a form of electric spacecraft propulsion. They have an extremely simple structure and are highly suitable for nano/micro-spacecraft with weights in the kilogram range. Such small spacecraft have recently experienced increased growth but still lack suitable efficient propulsion systems. PPTs operate in a pulsed mode (one discharge = one shot) and typically use solid polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as a propellant. However, new non-volatile liquids in the perfluoropolyether (PFPE) family have recently been found to be promising alternatives. A recent study presented results on the physical characteristics of PFPE vs. PTFE, showing that PFPE is superior in terms of physical characteristics such as its resistance to carbon deposition. This letter will examine the electrical discharge characteristics of PFPE vs. PTFE. The results demonstrate that PFPE has excellent shot-to-shot repeatability and a lower discharge resistance when compared with PTFE. Taken together with its physical characteristics, PFPE appears to be a strong contender to PTFE as a PPT propellant.

  6. An investigation to adopt zero liquid discharge in textile dyeing using advanced oxidation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmd, F.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel idea of using ozone oxidation at the end of reactive dyeing process was explored in order to achieve zero discharge dyeing. An advanced oxidative treatment was given during the dyeing process to remove unfixed and hydrolyzed reactive dyes from cotton substrate. Three different shades were dyed using vinylsulphone reactive class of dyes. At the end of fixation step, washing of fabrics was carried out using appropriate quantities of ozone in the process. Ozone oxidation continued until the liquor was decolorized around 95-100% and COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) was reduced about 80-90%, thus achieving zero liquid discharge dyeing process. The decolouration efficiency of wastewater was regarded as an indicative of removal of dyes from the textile materials because fabric was being washed continuously in the same liquor. Fabric samples dyed with conventional and new methods were compared in terms of change in shade, colourfastness properties, colour stripping, and fabric appearance. Overall results showed that the use of ozone during reactive dyeing can result in less water consumption, reduced process time, and zero discharge of coloured effluents from textile dyeing factories. (author)

  7. Optical and structural properties of colloidal zirconia nanoparticles prepared by arc discharge in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peymani forooshani, Reza; Poursalehi, Reza; Yourdkhani, Amin

    2018-01-01

    Zirconia is one of the important ceramic materials with unique properties such as high melting point, high ionic conductivity, high mechanical properties and low thermal conductivity. Therefore, zirconia is one of the useful materials in refractories, thermal barriers, cutting tools, oxygen sensors electrolytes, catalysis, catalyst supports and solid oxide fuel cells. Recently, direct current (DC) arc discharge is extensively employed to synthesis of metal oxide nanostructures in liquid environments. The aim of this work is the synthesis of colloidal zirconia nanoparticles by DC arc discharge method in water as a medium. Arc discharge was ignited between two pure zirconium electrodes in water. Optical and structural properties of prepared colloidal nanoparticles were investigated. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and UV-visible spectroscopy, were employed for characterization of particle size, morphology, crystal structure and optical properties, respectively. SEM images demonstrate that the nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average size lower than 38 nm. The XRD patterns of the nanoparticles were consistent with tetragonal and monoclinic zirconia crystal structures. The optical transmission spectra of the colloidal solution show optical characteristic of zirconia nanoparticles as a wide band gap semiconductor with no absorption peak in visible wavelength with the considerable amount of oxygen deficiency. Oxidation of colloidal nanoparticles in water could be explained via reaction with either dissociated oxygen from water in hot plasma region or with dissolved oxygen in water. The results provide a simple and flexible method for preparation of zirconia nanoparticles with a capability of mass production without environmental footprints.

  8. Separation of transuranium elements and fission products from medium activity aqueous liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gompper, K.; Kunze, S.; Eden, G.; Loesch, G.; Zemski, C.

    1986-01-01

    In the course of work performed between January 1981 and June 1985 on the separation of TRU elements and fission products three liquid alpha containing waste streams were treated: - medium level waste solutions, - waste solutions from the acid digestion of burnable alpha containing solid residues, - waste solutions from mixed oxide fuel element fabrication. The method of separation was initially developed and optimized with simulating substances. Subesequently it was tested with real waste solutions

  9. Final Treatment Center Project for Liquid and Wet Radioactive Waste in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravarik, K.; Stubna, M.; Pekar, A.; Krajc, T.; Zatkulak, M.; Holicka, Z.; Slezak, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Final Treatment Center (FTC) for Mochovce nuclear power plant (NPP) is designed for treatment and final conditioning of radioactive liquid and wet waste produced from plant operation. Mochovce NNP uses a Russian VVER-440 type reactor. Treated wastes comprise radioactive concentrates, spent resin and sludge. VUJE Inc. as an experienced company in field of treatment of radioactive waste in Slovakia has been chosen as main contractor for technological part of FTC. This paper describes the capacity, flow chart, overall waste flow and parameters of the main components in the FTC. The initial project was submitted for approval to the Slovak Electric plc. in 2003. The design and manufacture of main components were performed in 2004 and 2005. FTC construction work started early in 2004. Initial non-radioactive testing of the system is planned for summer 2006 and then radioactive tests are to be followed. A one-year trial operation of facility is planned for completion in 2007. SE - VYZ will be operates the FTC during trial operation and after its completion. SE - VYZ is subsidiary company of Slovak Electric plc. and it is responsible for treatment with radioactive waste and spent fuel in the Slovak republic. SE - VYZ has, besides of other significant experience with operation of Jaslovske Bohunice Treatment Centre. The overall capacity of the FTC is 870 m 3 /year of concentrates and 40 m 3 /year of spent resin and sludge. Bituminization and cementation were provided as main technologies for treatment of these wastes. Treatment of concentrate is performed by bituminization. Concentrate and bitumen are metered into a thin film evaporator with rotating wiping blades. Surplus water is evaporated and concentrate salts are embedded in bitumen. Bitumen product is discharged into 200 l steel drums. Spent resin and sludge are decanted, dried and mixed with bitumen. These mixtures are also discharged into 200 l steel drums. Drums are moved along bituminization line on a roller

  10. Feasibility of corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry for direct analysis of samples extracted by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Riahi, Farhad

    2014-05-23

    The capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) for direct analysis of the samples extracted by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was investigated and evaluated, for the first time. To that end, an appropriate new injection port was designed and constructed, resulting in possibility of direct injection of the known sample volume, without tedious sample preparation steps (e.g. derivatization, solvent evaporation, and re-solving in another solvent…). Malathion as a test compound was extracted from different matrices by a rapid and convenient DLLME method. The positive ion mobility spectra of the extracted malathion were obtained after direct injection of carbon tetrachloride or methanol solutions. The analyte responses were compared and the statistical results revealed the feasibility of direct analysis of the extracted samples in carbon tetrachloride, resulting in a convenient methodology. The coupled method of DLLME-CD-IMS was exhaustively validated in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, recovery, and enrichment factor. Finally, various real samples of apple, river and underground water were analyzed, all verifying the feasibility and success of the proposed method for the easy extraction of the analyte using DLLME separation before the direct analysis by CD-IMS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Discharges of nuclear waste into the Kola Bay and its impact on human radiological doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matishov, Genady G.; Matishov, Dimitry G.; Namjatov, Alexey A.; Carroll, JoLynn; Dahle, Salve

    2000-01-01

    The civilian nuclear icebreaker facility, RTP ''ATOMFLOT,'' is located in Kola Bay, Northwest Russia, as are several nuclear installations operated by the Russian Northern Fleet. A treatment plant at the Atomflot facility discharges purified nuclear waste into the bay at an annual rate of 500 m 3 . As a result of plant modifications this rate will soon increase to 5000 m 3 /yr. Evidence of minor leakages of 60 Co are reported by in the vicinity of Atomflot as well as near several military installations in Kola and the adjacent Motovsky Bays. 137 Cs levels reported in the present study for seawater and seaweed collected from locations within the bays are at expected levels except in the vicinity of Atomflot, where the 137 Cs level in a seaweed sample was 46±5 Bq/kg w.w. indicating significant uptake of radionuclides to biota. Uptake also may be occurring in higher trophic levels of the food web through environmental exchange and/or biotransformation. We consider the impact of the present and anticipated discharges from Atomflot through a radiological dose assessment for humans consuming fish from Kola Bay. Mixing and transport of nuclear waste is simulated using a simple box model. Maximum doses, assuming consumption of 100 kg/yr of fish, are below 10 -9 Sv/yr; the planned ten-fold increase in the discharge of treated waste will increase the doses to below 10 -8 Sv/yr. Using data on radionuclide levels in sediments and assuming equilibrium partitioning of radionuclides among sediment, seawater and fish, we estimate that the total doses to humans consuming fish from different areas of Kola and Motovsky Bays, including adjacent to military-controlled nuclear installations, are ∼10 -7 Sv/yr. Nuclear activities in Kola and Motovsky Bays thus far have had minimal impact on the environment. Discharges from the treatment plant currently account for less than 0.2% of the total dose predictions. The increase in discharges from the treatment plant is not expected to change

  12. Generation of ozone by pulsed corona discharge over water surface in hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Petr; Člupek, Martin; Babický, Václav; Šunka, Pavel; Janda, V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 3 (2005), s. 409-416 ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/02/1026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Corona discharge * hybrid reactor * ozone * water treatment Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.957, year: 2005

  13. Role of cathode identity in liquid chromatography particle beam glow discharge mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, M.V. Balarama [Department of Chemistry, Biosystems Research Complex, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-1905 (United States); Marcus, R.K. [Department of Chemistry, Biosystems Research Complex, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-1905 (United States)], E-mail: marcusr@clemson.edu

    2008-06-15

    A detailed evaluation of the role of cathode identity on the analytical and spectral characteristics of various organic, organometallic and metal analytes using liquid chromatography-particle beam/glow discharge mass spectrometry (LC-PB/GDMS) has been carried out. A d.c. discharge, operating with argon as the support gas, was used throughout this work. In this study, Cu which has a relatively high sputtering rate, Ni which has moderate sputtering rate and Ta which has very low sputtering rate, are taken as cathode materials to study the ionization, fragmentation, and analytical characteristics of organic (caffeine, epigallocatechin gallate, peptide as representative compounds), organometallic (selenomethionine, triethyl lead chloride as representative compounds) and metal (Fe, La, Cs and Pb) species. A range of discharge gas pressures (26.6-106.4 Pa) and currents (0.2-1.5 mA) were investigated with the test cathodes to determine their influence on the spectral composition and overall analytical response for the various test species. Calibration plots were obtained for all of the species for each of the three cathodes to determine the respective limits of detection. Relative detection limits in the range of 0.02 to 15 ng mL{sup -1} (0.002-1.5 ng, absolute) for the test species were found to be in the order of Cu > Ni > Ta; which follows the order of the sputtering characteristics of the respective cathodes. These studies rendered information about the respective discharge parameters' role in choosing the most appropriate cathode identity in PB-GDMS for application in the areas of organic, organometallic and inorganic species analysis.

  14. Electric field measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in air over liquid water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeni Simeni, Marien; Baratte, Edmond; Zhang, Cheng; Frederickson, Kraig; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2018-01-01

    Electric field in nanosecond pulse discharges in ambient air is measured by picosecond four-wave mixing, with absolute calibration by a known electrostatic field. The measurements are done in two geometries, (a) the discharge between two parallel cylinder electrodes placed inside quartz tubes, and (b) the discharge between a razor edge electrode and distilled water surface. In the first case, breakdown field exceeds DC breakdown threshold by approximately a factor of four, 140 ± 10 kV cm-1. In the second case, electric field is measured for both positive and negative pulse polarities, with pulse durations of ˜10 ns and ˜100 ns, respectively. In the short duration, positive polarity pulse, breakdown occurs at 85 kV cm-1, after which the electric field decreases over several ns due to charge separation in the plasma, with no field reversal detected when the applied voltage is reduced. In a long duration, negative polarity pulse, breakdown occurs at a lower electric field, 30 kV cm-1, after which the field decays over several tens of ns and reverses direction when the applied voltage is reduced at the end of the pulse. For both pulse polarities, electric field after the pulse decays on a microsecond time scale, due to residual surface charge neutralization by transport of opposite polarity charges from the plasma. Measurements 1 mm away from the discharge center plane, ˜100 μm from the water surface, show that during the voltage rise, horizontal field component (Ex ) lags in time behind the vertical component (Ey ). After breakdown, Ey is reduced to near zero and reverses direction. Further away from the water surface (≈0.9 mm), Ex is much higher compared to Ey during the entire voltage pulse. The results provide insight into air plasma kinetics and charge transport processes near plasma-liquid interface, over a wide range of time scales.

  15. Method and apparatus for glass solidification porcessing for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torada, Shin-ichiro; Masaki, Toshio; Sakai, Akira.

    1989-01-01

    Glass material supplied to a glass melting furnace is made in the form of a glass container. Then, radioactive liquid wastes are directly injected into the glass vessel and the glass vessel injected with the radioactive liquid wastes is charged into the glass melting furnace. The glass material and the radioactive liquid wastes are supplied simultaneously to the glass melting furnace. Then, corresponding to the amount of the glass material used for the glass vessel, the amount of the radioactive liquid wastes injected to the inside thereof is controlled to thereby set the mixing ratio between the glass material and the radioactive liquid wastes. Further, by controlling the number of the glass vessels injected with the radioactive liquid wastes to be charged into the glass melting furnace, the amount of supplying the radioactive liquid wastes and the glass material is controlled. This can easily maintain constant the amount of the glass material and the radioacative liquid wastes supplied to the glass melting furnace and the mixing ratio thereof. (T.M.)

  16. Design of mobile receiving and treatment equipment for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Jinsong; Guo Weiqun; Lu Jingbin

    2012-01-01

    The advantage and disadvantage of radioactive liquid waste treatment technology are analyzed in this paper. The experimental disposal equipment for radioactive liquid waste with complicated sources is designed by combining the far infrared calcification technology with evaporation technology. It has advantages of low energy consuming and high decontamination efficiency. The frothy and dirt appear rarely in this equipment. (authors)

  17. Radiation doses to members of the public near to Sellafield, Cumbria, from liquid discharges 1952-98.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D; Lambers, B; Gray, J

    2000-06-01

    Liquid wastes containing low levels of radioactivity have been discharged to the Irish Sea from the nuclear fuel reprocessing site at Sellafield since operations began in the early 1950s, and monitoring of radioactivity in foodstuffs has been undertaken over many years. Based on the best available monitoring data, supplemented by modelled values where necessary, doses to local critical groups have been reassessed using the most recent dosimetry. Contemporary habits data have been used where available, again supplemented by assumed habits where necessary. During the 1950s and 1960s the highest doses were received by individuals consuming Cumbrian Porphyra as laverbread, and peak doses around 0.8 to 1.0 mSv year(-1) have been estimated. During the 1970s and 1980s the critical exposure group switched to consumers of local fish and shellfish, with peak doses possibly reaching 2.5 to 3.0 mSv year(-1). Latterly, doses to all marine-related groups have declined to less than 150 to 200 microSv year(-1). At all times, doses have been within the appropriate limits set for members of the public.

  18. Industrial solid and liquid waste treatment processes; Les procedes de traitement des dechets industriels solides et liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-11-01

    This catalogue gives information on 68 chemical, mechanical, magnetic, electrical, thermal, etc. techniques for the processing of solid, viscous and liquid, common or special, industrial wastes. The various processes are presented as files, which are easily retrievable through keywords, waste type or industry codes, processing types, distributors. Technologies, performances and applications of each techniques are presented, together with references and company contacts

  19. Process of liquid radioactive waste treatment in nuclear power plant and development trend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiean; Wang Xin; Liu Dan; Zhu Laiye; Chen Bin

    2014-01-01

    The popular liquid radioactive waste treatment methods in nuclear power plants (NPP) are Chemical precipitation, evaporation, ion exchange, membrane treatment, chemical coagulation and activated carbon absorption and so on. 'Filter + activated carbon absorption (Chemical coagulation) + ion exchange' has a good prospect for development, as its simple process, high decontamination factor, low energy consumption and smaller secondary wastes. Also the process is used in Sanmen and Haiyang Projects. The severe incident in NPP set an even higher demand on liquid radioactive waste treatment. The new type treatment materials, optimization of the existed treatment, combination of treatment and the mobile treatment facility is the development trend in liquid radioactive waste treatment in NPP. (authors)

  20. Compilation of data to estimate groundwater migration potential for constituents in active liquid discharges at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, L.L.; Serne, R.J.

    1991-03-01

    A preliminary characterization of the constituents present in the 33 liquid waste streams at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has been completed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. In addition, Westinghouse Hanford has summarized the soil characteristics based on drill logs collected at each site that receives these liquid wastes. Literature searches were conducted and available Hanford-specific data were tabulated and reviewed. General literature on organic chemicals present in the liquid waste streams was also reviewed. Using all of this information, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a best estimate of the transport characteristics (water solubility and soil adsorption properties) for those radionuclides and inorganic and organic chemicals identified in the various waste streams. We assume that the potential for transport is qualified through the four geochemical parameters: solubility, distribution coefficient, persistence (radiogenic or biochemical half-life), and volatility. Summary tables of these parameters are presented for more than 50 inorganic and radioactive species and more than 50 organic compounds identified in the liquid waste streams. Brief descriptions of the chemical characteristics of Hanford sediments, solubility, and adsorption processes, and of how geochemical parameters are used to estimate migration in groundwater-sediment environments are also presented. Groundwater monitoring data are tabulated for wells neighboring the facilities that receive the liquid wastes. 91 refs., 16 figs., 23 tabs.

  1. Compilation of data to estimate groundwater migration potential for constituents in active liquid discharges at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ames, L.L.; Serne, R.J.

    1991-03-01

    A preliminary characterization of the constituents present in the 33 liquid waste streams at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has been completed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. In addition, Westinghouse Hanford has summarized the soil characteristics based on drill logs collected at each site that receives these liquid wastes. Literature searches were conducted and available Hanford-specific data were tabulated and reviewed. General literature on organic chemicals present in the liquid waste streams was also reviewed. Using all of this information, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a best estimate of the transport characteristics (water solubility and soil adsorption properties) for those radionuclides and inorganic and organic chemicals identified in the various waste streams. We assume that the potential for transport is qualified through the four geochemical parameters: solubility, distribution coefficient, persistence (radiogenic or biochemical half-life), and volatility. Summary tables of these parameters are presented for more than 50 inorganic and radioactive species and more than 50 organic compounds identified in the liquid waste streams. Brief descriptions of the chemical characteristics of Hanford sediments, solubility, and adsorption processes, and of how geochemical parameters are used to estimate migration in groundwater-sediment environments are also presented. Groundwater monitoring data are tabulated for wells neighboring the facilities that receive the liquid wastes. 91 refs., 16 figs., 23 tabs

  2. Determination of service standard time for liquid waste parameter in certification institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembiring, M. T.; Kusumawaty, D.

    2018-02-01

    Baristand Industry Medan is a technical implementation unit under the Industrial and Research and Development Agency, the Ministry of Industry. One of the services often used in Baristand Industry Medan is liquid waste testing service. The company set the standard of service 9 working days for testing services. At 2015, 89.66% on testing services liquid waste does not meet the specified standard of services company. The purpose of this research is to specify the standard time of each parameter in testing services liquid waste. The method used is the stopwatch time study. There are 45 test parameters in liquid waste laboratory. The measurement of the time done 4 samples per test parameters using the stopwatch. From the measurement results obtained standard time that the standard Minimum Service test of liquid waste is 13 working days if there is testing E. coli.

  3. Electrochemical ion-exchange for medium active liquid waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridger, N.J.; Turner, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    Electrochemical ion-exchange has already been demonstrated to be a robust, effective process for the treatment of active liquid wastes -with high decontamination and volume reduction factors, and only a low energy requirement. The primary aim of this new programme is to scale up this process - initially to 0.1m 3 /h, and ultimately to 1 3 m/h. A new 0.4m 2 electrode module has been designed and constructed, together with 3m 3 feed tanks for the first phase of this work. Further development work is also being carried out on alternative electrode designs and fabrication methods, as well as new exchange media (including inorganic absorbers and organic chelating resins) in order to optimize selectivity performance. (author)

  4. Boron removal in radioactive liquid waste by forward osmosis membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doo Seong Hwang; Hei Min Choi; Kune Woo Lee; Jei Kwon Moon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated the treatment of boric acid contained in liquid radioactive waste using a forward osmosis membrane. The boron permeation through the membrane depends on the type of membrane, membrane orientation, pH of the feed solution, salt and boron concentration in the feed solution, and osmotic pressure of the draw solution. The boron flux begins to decline from pH 7 and increases with an increase of the osmotic driving force. The boron flux decreases slightly with the salt concentration, but is not heavily influenced by a low salt concentration. The boron flux increases linearly with the concentration of boron. No element except for boron was permeated through the FO membrane in the multi-component system. The maximum boron flux is obtained in an active layer facing a draw solution orientation of the CTA-ES membrane under conditions of less than pH 7 and high osmotic pressure. (authors)

  5. Electrolytic treatment of liquid waste containing ammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, R.; Ogawa, N.; Ohtsuka, K.; Ohuchi, J.

    1981-01-01

    A study was made on the safe decomposition of ammonium nitrate, which is the main component of α-liquid waste from plutonium fuel facilities, by means of electrolytic reduction and thermal decomposition. In the first stage, ammonium nitrate is reduced to ammonium nitrite by electrolytic reduction using an electrolyser with a cation exchange membrane as a diaphragm. In the second stage, ammonium nitrite is decomposed to N 2 and H 2 O. The alkaline region and a low temperature are preferable for electrolytic reduction and the acidic region and high temperature for thermal decomposition. A basis was established for an ammonium nitrate treatment system in aqueous solution through the operation of a bench-scale unit, and the operating data obtained was applied to the basic design of a 10-m 3 /a facility. (author)

  6. Low-level liquid waste decontamination by organic ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.D.; Campbell, D.O.; Dillow, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Improved processes are being developed to treat contaminated liquid wastes that have been and continue to be generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Promising results have been obtained for cesium removal with a new resorcinol-based organic resin developed at the Savannah River Site. In tests of cesium removal, it was superior to other available resins, such as Duolite CS-100, with the distribution coefficient being limited primarily by competition from potassium and nearly independent of the sodium concentration. The optimum pH was approximately 12.5 in high NaNO 3 concentrations (>2 M). A fairly low flow velocity was required to yield sharp breakthrough of the loaded cesium. The resin was much less effective for strontium removal, which was limited by competition from sodium. If both cesium and strontium must be removed, another resin column or a mixed bed with a chelating resin should be used

  7. PIEZOELECTRIC WAVEGUIDE SENSOR FOR MEASURING PULSE PRESSURE IN CLOSED LIQUID VOLUMES AT HIGH VOLTAGE ELECTRIC DISCHARGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Zhekul

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Investigations of the characteristics of pressure waves presuppose the registration of the total profile of the pressure wave at a given point in space. For these purposes, various types of «pressure to the electrical signal» transmitters (sensors are used. Most of the common sensors are unsuitable for measuring the pulse pressure in a closed water volume at high hydrostatic pressures, in particular to study the effect of a powerful high-voltage pulse discharge on increasing the inflow of minerals and drinking water in wells. The purpose of the work was to develop antijamming piezoelectric waveguide sensor for measuring pulse pressure at a close distance from a high-voltage discharge channel in a closed volume of a liquid. Methodology. We have applied the calibration method as used as a secondary standard, the theory of electrical circuits. Results. We have selected the design and the circuit solution of the waveguide pressure sensor. We have developed a waveguide pulse-pressure sensor DTX-1 with a measuring loop. This sensor makes it possible to study the spectral characteristics of pressure waves of high-voltage pulse discharge in closed volumes of liquid at a hydrostatic pressure of up to 20 MPa and a temperature of up to 80 °C. The sensor can be used to study pressure waves with a maximum amplitude value of up to 150 MPa and duration of up to 80 µs. According to the results of the calibration, the sensitivity of the developed sensor DTX-1 with a measuring loop is 0.0346 V/MPa. Originality. We have further developed the theory of designing the waveguide piezoelectric pulse pressure sensors for measuring the pulse pressure at a close distance from a high-voltage discharge channel in a closed fluid volume by controlling the attenuation of the amplitude of the pressure signal. Practical value. We have developed, created, calibrated, used in scientific research waveguide pressure pulse sensors DTX-1. We propose sensors DTX-1 for sale

  8. 324 Building liquid waste handling and removal system project plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, J.E.

    1998-07-29

    This report evaluates the modification options for handling radiological liquid waste generated during decontamination and cleanout of the 324 Building. Recent discussions indicate that the Hanford site railroad system will be closed by the end of FY 1998 necessitating the need for an alternate transfer method. The issue of handling of Radioactive Liquid Waste (RLW) from the 324 Building (assuming the 340 Facility is not available to accept the RLW) has been examined in at least two earlier engineering studies (Parsons 1997a and Hobart 1997). Each study identified a similar preferred alternative that included modifying the 324 Building RLWS to allow load-out of wastewater to a truck tanker, while making maximum use of existing piping, tanks, instrumentation, controls and other features to minimize costs and physical changes to the building. This alternative is accepted as the basis for further discussion presented in this study. The goal of this engineering study is to verify the path forward presented in the previous studies and assure that the selected alternative satisfies the 324 Building deactivation goals and objectives as currently described in the project management plan. This study will also evaluate options available to implement the preferred alternative and select the preferred option for implementation of the entire system. Items requiring further examination will also be identified. Finally, the study will provide a conceptual design, schedule and cost estimate for the required modifications to the 324 Building to allow removal of RLW. Attachment 5 is an excerpt from the project baseline schedule found in the Project Management Plan.

  9. Solid and liquid radioactive waste management of the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) - NUCLEBRAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzella, M.F.R.; Miaw, S.T.W.; Mourao, R.P.; Prado, M.A.S. do; Reis, L.C.A.; Santos, P.O.; Silva, E.M.P.

    1986-01-01

    Low level liquid and solid wastes are produced in several laboratories of the NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT CENTER (CDTN)-NUCLEBRAS. In the last years, the intensification of technical activities at the Center has increased the radioactive waste volumes. Therefore, the implementation of a Radioactive Waste Management Program has begun. This Program includes the systematic of activities from the waste collection to the transportation for the final disposal. The liquid and solid waste are collected separately in proper containers and stored for later treatment according to the processes available or under development at the Center. (Author) [pt

  10. Solid and liquid radioactive waste management of the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN)- Nuclebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzella, M.F.R.; Mourao, R.P.; Reis, L.C.A.; Silva, E.M.P.; Miaw, S.T.W.; Prado, M.A.S.; Santos, P.O.

    1986-01-01

    Low level liquid and solid wastes are produced in several laboratories of the NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT CENTER (CDTN) - NUCLEBRAS. In the last years, the intensification of technical activities at the Center has increased the radioactive waste volumes. Therefore, the implementation of a Radioactive Waste Management Program has begun. This Program includes the systematic of activities from the waste collection to the transportation for the final disposal. The liquid and solid waste are collected separately in proper containers and stored for later treatment according to the processes available or under development at the Center. (Author) [pt

  11. Risk comparison of different treatment and disposal strategies of high level liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Dong

    1997-01-01

    The risk of different treatment and disposal strategies of high level liquid radioactive waste from spent fuel reprocessing is estimated and compared. The conclusions obtained are that risk difference from these strategies is very small and high level liquid waste can be reduced to middle and low level waste, if the decontamination factor for 99 Tc is large enough, which is the largest risk contributor in the high level radioactive waste from spent fuel reprocessing. It is also shown that the risk of high level radioactive waste could be reduced by the technical strategy of combining partitioning and transmutation

  12. Study of alternative methods for the management of liquid scintillation counting wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche-Farmer, L.

    1980-02-01

    The Nuclear Engineering Waste Disposal Site in Richland, Washington, is the only radioactive waste disposal facility that will accept liquid scintillation counting wastes (LSCW) for disposal. That site is scheduled to discontinue receiving LSCW by the end of 1982. This document explores alternatives presently available for management of LSCW: evaporation, distillation, solidification, conversion, and combustion

  13. MECHANISMS GOVERNING TRANSIENTS FROM THE BATCH INCINERATION OF LIQUID WASTES IN ROTARY KILNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    When "containerized" liquid wastes, bound on sorbents. are introduced into a rotary kiln in a batch mode, transient phenomena in-volving heat transfer into, and waste mass transfer out of, the sorbent can oromote the raoid release of waste vaoor into the kiln environment. This ra...

  14. Monitoring of the radioactive liquid effluents discharged from IPEN-CNEN/SP. Optimization of the procedures adopted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    The main purpose of a radioactive liquid effluents monitoring of a nuclear installation is to determine the amount of radioactivity discharged to the environment, as well as, to verify if this activity is below the authorized discharge limits established by the competent authority. Although this control has been established on a routine basis since the beginning of operation of the nuclear installations available at IPEN, the growing of such facilities in the last years has implied in an increase in the number of samples to be analyzed. The aim of this work is, therefore, to optimize the procedures adopted in the Environmental Monitoring Division of IPEN-CNEN/SP for the activity measurement of the liquid effluents discharged to the environment. Since these effluents are discharged to Pinheiros river, which presents a high dilution factor, a study is also carried out in order to verify if the activity present can be measured by the equipment available. (author)

  15. Electrochemical ion-exchange for active liquid waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, A.D.; Bridger, N.J.; Jones, C.P.

    1992-10-01

    Electrochemical ion exchange (EIX) has been firmly established as an effective process for the treatment of a wide range of liquid radioactive wastes. Both organic (for low specific activity streams) and inorganic systems (for higher activity wastes) have been demonstrated. A low cost current feeder electrode has also been developed, with a projected lifetime of > 6 years. While cation EIX can be used for the treatment of low salt content streams, combination with anion EIX to control the pH can extend its range of application. At the same time, it is also able to remove activity complexed in an anionic form. AEIX has also demonstrated its ability to remove radionuclides with insoluble hydroxides (eg Co, U and Pu) from both high and low salt content streams. EIX has been successfully scaled-up form the bench-top scale by increasing electrode size by a factor of 11, and then by operating five units in parallel. An improvement in performance of by a factor 3 was observed over a simple increase in area, due to the minimization of edge effects in the larger units. The most significant advantage of EIX is its compactness -with plant sizes of 1000). (Author)

  16. Low-level liquid waste decontamination by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.O.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.

    1991-12-01

    Improved processes are being developed to treat contaminated liquid wastes that have been and continue to be generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Both inorganic and organic ion-exchange methods have given promising results. Nickel and cobalt hexacyanoferrate(2) compounds are extremely selective for cesium removal, with distribution coefficients in excess of 10 6 and remarkable insensitivity to competition from sodium and potassium. They tend to lose effectiveness at pH > ∼11, but some formulations are useful for limited periods of time up to pH ∼13. Sodium titanate is selective for strontium removal at high pH. The separations are so efficient that simple batch processes can yield large decontamination factors while generating small volumes of solid waste. A resorcinol-based resin developed at the Savannah River Site gave superior cesium removal, compared with other organic ion exchangers; the distribution coefficient was limited primarily by competition from potassium and was nearly independent of sodium. The optimum pH was ∼12.5. It was much less effective for strontium removal, which was limited by competition from sodium. 8 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs

  17. Radiolytic gas formation in high-level liquid waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodda, B.-G.; Dix, Siegfried; Merz, E.R.

    1989-01-01

    High-level fission product waste solutions originating from the first-cycle raffinate stream of spent fast breeder reactor fuel reprocessing have been investigated gas chromatographically for their radiolytic and chemical gas production. The solutions showed considerable formation of hydrogen, carbon dioxide and dinitrogen oxide, whereas atmospheric oxygen was consumed completely within a short time. In particular, carbon dioxide resulted from the radiolytic degradation of entrained organic solvent. After nearly complete degradation of the organic solvent, the influence of hydrazine and nitrogen dioxide on hydrogen formation was investigated. Hydrazinium hydroxide led to the formation of dinitrogen oxide and nitrogen. After 60 d, the concentration of dinitrogen oxide had reduced to zero, whereas the amount of nitrogen formed had reached a maximum. This may be explained by simultaneous chemical and radiolytic reactions leading to the formation of dinitrogen oxide and nitrogen and photolytic fission of dinitrogen oxide. Addition of sodium nitrite resulted in the rapid formation of dinitrogen oxide. The rate of hydrogen production was not changed significantly after the addition of hydrazine or nitrite. The results indicate that under normal operating conditions no dangerous hydrogen radiolysis yields should develop in the course of reprocessing and high-level liquid waste tank storage. Organic entrainment may lead to enhanced radiolytic decomposition and thus to considerable hydrogen production rates and pressure build-up in closed systems. (author)

  18. Waste Field Characteristics, Ultimate Mixing and Dilution in Surface Discharge of Dense Jets into Stagnant Water Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Direct discharges of municipal and industrial waste waters into water bodies through marine outfalls are considered as a common way to dispose the generated waste in coastal zones. Marine discharge, intensifying flow mixing and entrainment, decrease the concentration of polutant up to accepted concentration and meet the guideline values and to make possible continues discharge of flow into matine environment. During last years due to quick development of coastal desalination plants, surface discharge of preduced salty water into seas and oceans has increased significantly. In this study, releases of dense jets from surface rectangular channel into stagnant bodies are experimentally studied. The location of flow plunge point, impact point and discharge ultimate dilution were drown out by a digital video technology. In addition, using some conductivity probes located in ambient floor, waste filed dilution in flow impact point and discharge ultimate dilution were identified. Finally the obtained results were plotted and explained along with some diagrams to show flow non-dimensional behavior. The results showed that the properties of flow are changing directly with ambient water depth and discharge initial fluxes.

  19. Biodegradation of bituminous products from processing liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibensky, L.; Krejci, F.; Hladky, E.; Halama, D.

    1988-01-01

    One of the possible ways of disturbing the stability of bituminous products from liquid radioactive waste processing, is biodegradation caused by common microorganisms. Pseudomonas bacteria and a Bacillus cereus culture were selected for experimental study of cultivation of microorganisms. Experiments with mixed cultures were also performed. Pitches, ajatin and imidazoline were used as inhibitors. The thin layer and the emulsion methods were used in assessing biological corrosion. The results of the experiments are discussed with respect to the dependence of bacterial growth on bitumen biodegradation, the effect of pH on bitumen degradation and the effect of inhibitors on bitumen biodegradation. The salts contained in bituminous products were not found to significantly affect the rate of destruction. The degree of degradation was found to mainly depend on the bitumen, its chemical composition, and on the conditions of storage. It was also found that inhibitor additions in some cases modified the properties of the matrix such that it became more liquid. The coefficient of extractibility thus increased of matrix salts. The recultivation of bacteria on a full-value medium resulted in the loss of the inhibitory effect. In some cases, the inhibitor even stimulated the growth of microorganisms. The use of inhibitors in an effort to achieve biostability of bituminous products thus did not solve the problem. (Z.M.). 2 tabs., 9 refs

  20. Public exposure due to radioactive liquid effluent discharges from Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares/IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocca, Fatima F.D.

    1995-01-01

    The physical and social-economic characterization of aquatic environment influenced by IPEN was performed and possible exposure pathways were identified. The effective dose equivalent to the critical groups were estimated by using a mathematic model that simulate radionuclide transport through environment components, and dosimetric models that relate activity at environment components to public exposure. This study has concluded that there is not a single critical group that receives the highest dose equivalents from the source, but all the populational groups potentially exposed receive doses at the same level, and then all of them must be considered in a radiological assessment process. The results showed that the public exposure due to liquid discharges from IPEN remains bellow established dose limits. (author). 58 refs., 28 figs., 24 tabs

  1. Growth of linear Ni-filled carbon nanotubes by local arc discharge in liquid ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagara, Takuya [Department of Electric Engineering, Graduated School of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Surugadai Kanda, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Kurumi, Satoshi [Department of Electric Engineering, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Surugadai Kanda, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Suzuki, Kaoru, E-mail: kaoru@ele.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp [Department of Electric Engineering, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Surugadai Kanda, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The cylindrical geometry of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) allows them to be filled with metal catalysts; the resulting metal-filled CNTs possess different properties depending on the filler metal. Here we report the synthesis of Ni-filled CNTs in which Ni is situated linearly and homogeneously by local arc discharge in liquid ethanol. The structural characteristics of synthesized Ni-filled CNTs were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the relationship between pyrolysis conditions and the length and diameter of Ni-filled CNTs was examined. The encapsulated Ni was identified by a TEM-equipped energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope and found to have a single-crystal fcc structure by nano-beam diffraction. The features of linear Ni-filled CNT are expected to be applicable to probes for magnetic force microscopy.

  2. Method of treating the waste liquid of a washing containing a radioactive substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawaguchi, Yusuke; Tsuyuki, Takashi; Kaneko, Masato; Sato, Yasuhiko; Yamaguchi, Takashi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To separate waste liquid resulting from washing and which contains a radioactive substance and surface active agent into high purity water and a solid waste substance containing a small quantity of surface active agent. Structure: To waste liquid from a waste liquid tank is added a pH adjusting agent for adjusting the pH to 5.5, and the resultant liquid is sent to an agglomeration reaction tank, in which an inorganic agglomerating agent is added to the waste liquid to cause a major proportion of the radioactive substance and surface active agent to form flocks produced through agglomeration. Then, the waste liquid is sent from the agglomeration reaction tank to a froth separation tank, to which air is supplied through a perforated plate to cause frothing. The over-flowing liquid is de-frothed, and then the insoluble matter is separated as sludge, followed by hydroextraction and drying for solidification. The treated liquid extracted from a froth separation tank is sent to an agglomerating agent recovery tank for separation of the agglomeration agent, and then the residual surface active agent is removed by adsorption in an active carbon adsorption tower, followed by concentration by evaporation in an evaporating can. The concentrated liquid is extracted and then solidified with cement or asphalt. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Effects of easily ionizable elements on the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venzie, Jacob L.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    A series of studies has been undertaken to determine the susceptibility of the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) atomic emission source to easily ionizable element (EIE) effects. The initial portions of the study involved monitoring the voltage drop across the plasma as a function of the pH to ascertain whether or not the conductivity of the liquid eluent alters the plasma energetics and subsequently the analyte signal strength. It was found that altering the pH (0.0 to 2.0) in the sample matrix did not significantly change the discharge voltage. The emission signal intensities for Cu(I) 327.4 nm, Mo(I) 344.7 nm, Sc(I) 326.9 nm and Hg(I) 253.6 nm were measured as a function of the easily ionizable element (sodium and calcium) concentration in the injection matrix. A range of 0.0 to 0.1% (w/v) EIE in the sample matrix did not cause a significant change in the Cu, Sc, and Mo signal-to-background ratios, with only a slight change noted for Hg. In addition to this test of analyte response, the plasma energetics as a function of EIE concentration are assessed using the ratio of Mg(II) to Mg(I) (280.2 nm and 285.2 nm, respectively) intensities. The Mg(II)/Mg(I) ratio showed that the plasma energetics did not change significantly over the same range of EIE addition. These results are best explained by the electrolytic nature of the eluent acting as an ionic (and perhaps spectrochemical) buffer

  4. Experimental research on bypass evaporation tower technology for zero liquid discharge of desulfurization wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuangchen; Chai, Jin; Wu, Kai; Xiang, Yajun; Jia, Shaoguang; Li, Qingsong

    2018-03-20

    Zero liquid discharge (ZLD) of wastewater has become the trend of environmental governance after the implementation of 'The Action Plan for Prevention and Treatment of Water Pollution' in China, desulfurization wastewater has gained more attention due to its complex composition and heavy metals. However, current technologies for ZLD have some shortcomings such as high cost and insufficient processing capacity, ZLD cannot be achieved actually. This paper proposes a new evaporation drying technology. An independent bypass evaporation tower was built, part of the hot flue gas before the air preheater was introduced into the evaporation tower for desulfurization wastewater evaporation, and the generated dust after evaporation was discharged back to the flue duct before electrostatic precipitator. This paper reports on the performance of desulfurization wastewater evaporation and the characteristics of evaporation products in depth and makes a comprehensive discussion of the impact on the existing equipment based on the self-designed evaporation tower. Research suggests that this technology has high system reliability and little effect on subsequent equipment and provides theoretical and practical data. Due to environmental policies and huge market demand for ZLD of desulfurization wastewater, bypass evaporation tower technology has a great application prospect in the future.

  5. Review of Potential Candidate Stabilization Technologies for Liquid and Solid Secondary Waste Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Scheele, Randall D.; Um, Wooyong; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2010-01-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has initiated a waste form testing program to support the long-term durability evaluation of a waste form for secondary wastes generated from the treatment and immobilization of Hanford radioactive tank wastes. The purpose of the work discussed in this report is to identify candidate stabilization technologies and getters that have the potential to successfully treat the secondary waste stream liquid effluent, mainly from off-gas scrubbers and spent solids, produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Down-selection to the most promising stabilization processes/waste forms is needed to support the design of a solidification treatment unit (STU) to be added to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). To support key decision processes, an initial screening of the secondary liquid waste forms must be completed by February 2010.

  6. Biodiesel production using fatty acids from food industry waste using corona discharge plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubas, A L V; Machado, M M; Pinto, C R S C; Moecke, E H S; Dutra, A R A

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to describe an alternative and innovative methodology to transform waste, frying oil in a potential energy source, the biodiesel. The biodiesel was produced from fatty acids, using a waste product of the food industry as the raw material. The methodology to be described is the corona discharge plasma technology, which offers advantages such as acceleration of the esterification reaction, easy separation of the biodiesel and the elimination of waste generation. The best conditions were found to be an oil/methanol molar ratio of 6:1, ambient temperature (25 °C) and reaction time of 110 min and 30 mL of sample. The acid value indicates the content of free fatty acids in the biodiesel and the value obtained in this study was 0.43 mg KOH/g. Peaks corresponding to octadecadienoic acid methyl ester, octadecanoic acid methyl ester and octadecenoic acid methyl ester, from the biodiesel composition, were identified using GC-MS. A major advantage of this process is that the methyl ester can be obtained in the absence of chemical catalysts and without the formation of the co-product (glycerin). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Corrosion of a carbon steel in simulated liquid nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenz Gonzalez, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    This work is part of a collaboration agreement between CNEA (National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina) and USDOE (Department of Energy of the United States of America), entitled 'Tank Corrosion Chemistry Cooperation', to study the corrosion behavior of carbon steel A537 class 1 in different simulated non-radioactive wastes in order to establish the safety concentration limits of the tank waste chemistry at Hanford site (Richland-US). Liquid high level nuclear wastes are stored in tanks made of carbon steel A537 (ASTM nomenclature) that were designed for a service life of 20 to 50 years. A thickness reduction of some tank walls, due to corrosion processes, was detected at Hanford site, beyond the existing predicted values. Two year long-term immersion tests were started using non radioactive simulated liquid nuclear waste solutions at 40 C degrees. This work extends throughout the first year of immersion. The simulated solutions consist basically in combinations of the 10 most corrosion significant chemical components: 5 main components (NaNO 3 , NaCl, NaF, NaNO 2 and NaOH) at three concentration levels and 5 secondary components at two concentration levels. Measurements of the general corrosion rate with time were performed for carbon steel coupons, both immersed in the solutions and in the vapor phases, using weight loss and electrochemistry impedance spectroscopy techniques. Optic and scanning electron microscopy examination, analysis of U-bend samples and corrosion potential measurements, were also done. Localized corrosion susceptibility (pitting and crevice corrosion) was assessed in isolated short-term tests by means of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves. The effect of the simulated waste composition on the corrosion behavior of A537 steel was studied based on statistical analyses. The Surface Response Model could be successfully applied to the statistical analysis of the A537 steel corrosion in the studied solutions. General corrosion was not

  8. Radiological assessment and management of radioactive spill in a liquid waste treatment facility - Case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, H.A.; Shawky, S.; Ibrahiem, N.

    2002-01-01

    The radiological assessment and management of radioactive spill from liquid waste treatment facility is presented. The incident contaminated the area surrounding the treatment facility with various radionuclides, which were dispersed into the soil. A method based on the European basic safety standards was used to contain the risks associated with the contaminated site. The introduced case study proceeded up to the stage of simplified risk study, since the site is small and it was relatively easy to remove and store the contaminated soil. According to the obtained results, the removal of the upper 30-cm would be considered as appropriate remedying action to resume background level. One of the most important basic concepts of radiation protection in nuclear facilities is the continuity of monitoring radiological release to the environment. It is known that from nuclear facilities only very small amounts of radioactivity are discharged with the liquid effluents and the exhaust air into the environment. Recent studies screening the natural and artificial radionuclide in soil samples from the investigated area revealed normal background concentrations with no anomalies

  9. Approach to a system of removal of 131I of liquid discharges in a health unit of nuclear medicine using 127I as a reference standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Emeterio; Mayorga, Manuel A.; Quiverio, Noelia M.; Villada, Julian D.

    2013-01-01

    The 131 I prepared as potassium iodide (KI) or sodium iodide (NaI) is given to patients to treat some diseases related to the thyroid gland, in doses of 15 to 30 mCi for hyperthyroidism and 100 to 300 mCi in treatments of thyroid cancer. Up to 80% of the administered activity is discarded by the patient through the body fluids over a period of 24 h; these radioactive waste must be controlled and accordingly the different countries based on radiological impact studies establishing maximum release rates. In Colombia, the Resolution 180005 2010 establishes 1000 Bq/day (2.7027x10 -5 Ci /day), 10000 Bq/month (2.7027x10 -4 mCi/month) or 100000 Bq/year (2.7027x10 -3 mCi/year), this restriction requires implementing waste management methods generated by patients before discharge to the sewage networks. The method of retention of these wastes through tanks, without any treatment generates a high potential risk, therefore, this study shows three alternatives to remove the 131 I in the amount of waste liquids, to generate a small solid residue in secure containers, allowing pouring fluids with radioactive traces without exceeding the limits. The sizing of the system applicable to nuclear medicine services depends on the workload of the service and combines the three methods described here by a control system, which does not require the direct intervention of staff, optimizing safety and radiation protection in the service. (author)

  10. Sampling and characterization of radioactive liquid wastes; Muestreo y caracterizacion de desechos liquidos radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zepeda R, C.; Monroy G, F.; Reyes A, T.; Lizcano, D. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Cruz C, A. C., E-mail: carla.zepeda@inin.gob.mx [SEP, Instituto Tecnologico de Orizaba, Av. Oriente 9, Col. Emiliano Zapata, 94320 Orizaba, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2017-09-15

    To define the management of radioactive liquid wastes stored in 200 L drums, its isotope and physicochemical characterization is essential. An adequate sampling, that is, representative and homogeneous, is fundamental to obtain reliable analytical results, therefore, in this work, the use of a sampling mechanism that allows collecting homogenous aliquots, in a safe way and minimizing the generation of secondary waste is proposed. With this mechanism, 56 drums of radioactive liquid wastes were sampled, which were characterized by gamma spectrometry, liquid scintillation, and determined the following physicochemical properties: ph, conductivity, viscosity, density and chemical composition by gas chromatography. 67.86% of the radioactive liquid wastes contains H-3 and of these, 47.36% can be released unconditionally, since it presents activities lower than 100 Bq/g. 94% of the wastes are acidic and 48% have viscosities <50 MPa s. (Author)

  11. Influence of radiation on the system liquid radioactive wastes: geologic formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Balukova, V.D.; Kabakchi, S.A.; Medvedeva, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    Introduction of liquid radioactive wastes into deep strata-collectors results in a number of physical-chemical processes: precipitation, dissolution, complex formation, sorption, etc. The area occupied by the injected waste and changes in the nature of the liquid phase depend primarily on radiolysis processes in the heterogeneous system of liquid waste-stratal material occurring at elevated temperatures and pressures. Experiments that simulate actual conditions of temperature, pressure and high radiation levels on this system have been performed. Results are presented for radiolytic gas formation and for changes in the liquid phase and sorption capacity of stratal minerals. It is shown that the temperature increase in the stratum-collector significantly enhances waste decomposition processes, promotes sorption of radionuclides and decreases the mobility of the waste in the formation

  12. Aspects of chemistry in management of radioactive liquid wastes from nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeotikar, R.G.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear energy is the only source available to the mankind to fulfill the continuous and ever increasing demand of energy. The public acceptance and popularity of nuclear energy depends to a large extent on management of radioactive waste. The nuclear waste management demands eco-friendly process/systems. This article highlights the sources of different types of radioactive liquid wastes generated in the nuclear installation and their treatment process. The radioactive liquid waste is classified mainly into three categories based on activity levels e.g. low, intermediate and high level. The management of radioactive liquid waste is very critical because of its 'mobility and liquid' nature. Secondly the liquid wastes have wide range of activity and chemistry spectrum and their volumes are also different. Hence the methods for management of different types of liquid wastes are also different. Mostly the treatment and conditioning processes are chemical processes. The chemistry involved in the treatment and conditioning of these wastes, problems related with chemistry for each processes and efforts to solve these problems, aspects of adoption on plant scale, etc., have been discussed in this article. (author)

  13. Transportation of liquid mixed waste in the US: Is it really a problem?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborti, S.; DeBiase, T.

    1993-01-01

    The transportation of liquid radioactive wastes has often been perceived to be a problem because of the potential consequences from hypothetical accident scenarios and the difficulties that may be encountered in the handling and containment of liquids. This paper focuses specifically to determine if the transportation of these wastes are severely restricted by the regulations. The paper also compares current practices for the transportation of liquid mixed waste in the US with that of France to provide an international perspective on the issue. The review of the regulations and current practices shows that the transportation of liquid mixed waste is by no means prohibited, and also that the majority of the regulations do not impose any additional restrictions because of the physical form of the waste. Rather, the selection of an authorized package primarily depends on the quantity of radioactivity and the specific radionuclides involved. Although the selection process for an authorized package for liquid mixed wastes is fairly straightforward, it seems that the difficulties in transporting liquid mixed waste can be attributed to the lack of readily available Type A packages designed for transporting liquids

  14. The Influence of Extractant TOA, Stirring Time on the Extraction ProcessLiquid-liquid, and Liquid Membrane on the Liquid Wastes Containing Cd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayitno; Djoko-Sardjono; Nurimaniwati; Adhe-Helmayani

    2000-01-01

    The influence of extractant and stirring time on the reduction componentcadmium on liquid wastes has been investigated. The method of experimentalused the extraction with liquid membrane emulsion. The parameters to beinvestigated were extractant amount tri-n octylamine (TOA), duration ofstirring time. In this investigated, extractant amount was varied from 5 to25 % (v/v) TOA, duration of stirring time varied from 5 to minutes. Theresult of experimental can be concluded that the best condition obtained forreducing cadmium component was on extractant amount 20 % (v/v) TOA, stirringtime 25 minutes. The best condition for reducing the cadmium component wasefficiency factor 98.35%. (author)

  15. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge as a secondary excitation source: Assessment of plasma characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manard, Benjamin T. [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gonzalez, Jhanis J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sarkar, Arnab [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Dong, Meirong; Chirinos, Jose; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marcus, R. Kenneth [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has been assessed as a secondary excitation source with a parametric evaluation regarding carrier gas flow rate, applied current, and electrode distance. With this parametric evaluation, plasma optical emission was monitored in order to obtain a fundamental understanding with regards to rotational temperature (T{sub rot}), excitation temperature (T{sub exc}), electron number density (n{sub e}), and plasma robustness. Incentive for these studies is not only for a greater overall fundamental knowledge of the APGD, but also in instrumenting a secondary excitation/ionization source following laser ablation (LA). Rotational temperatures were determined through experimentally fitting of the N{sub 2} and OH molecular emission bands while atomic excitation temperatures were calculated using a Boltzmann distribution of He and Mg atomic lines. The rotational and excitation temperatures were determined to be ∼ 1000 K and ∼ 2700 K respectively. Electron number density was calculated to be on the order of ∼ 3 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} utilizing Stark broadening effects of the Hα line of the Balmer series and a He I transition. In addition, those diagnostics were performed introducing magnesium (by solution feed and laser ablation) into the plasma in order to determine any perturbation under heavy matrix sampling. The so-called plasma robustness factor, derived by monitoring Mg II/Mg I emission ratios, is also employed as a reflection of potential perturbations in microplasma energetics across the various operation conditions and sample loadings. While truly a miniaturized source (< 1 mm{sup 3} volume), the LS-APGD is shown to be quite robust with plasma characteristics and temperatures being unaffected upon introduction of metal species, whether by liquid or laser ablation sample introduction. - Highlights: • Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) • LS-APGD as a secondary

  16. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge as a secondary excitation source: Assessment of plasma characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manard, Benjamin T.; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Sarkar, Arnab; Dong, Meirong; Chirinos, Jose; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has been assessed as a secondary excitation source with a parametric evaluation regarding carrier gas flow rate, applied current, and electrode distance. With this parametric evaluation, plasma optical emission was monitored in order to obtain a fundamental understanding with regards to rotational temperature (T rot ), excitation temperature (T exc ), electron number density (n e ), and plasma robustness. Incentive for these studies is not only for a greater overall fundamental knowledge of the APGD, but also in instrumenting a secondary excitation/ionization source following laser ablation (LA). Rotational temperatures were determined through experimentally fitting of the N 2 and OH molecular emission bands while atomic excitation temperatures were calculated using a Boltzmann distribution of He and Mg atomic lines. The rotational and excitation temperatures were determined to be ∼ 1000 K and ∼ 2700 K respectively. Electron number density was calculated to be on the order of ∼ 3 × 10 15 cm −3 utilizing Stark broadening effects of the Hα line of the Balmer series and a He I transition. In addition, those diagnostics were performed introducing magnesium (by solution feed and laser ablation) into the plasma in order to determine any perturbation under heavy matrix sampling. The so-called plasma robustness factor, derived by monitoring Mg II/Mg I emission ratios, is also employed as a reflection of potential perturbations in microplasma energetics across the various operation conditions and sample loadings. While truly a miniaturized source ( 3 volume), the LS-APGD is shown to be quite robust with plasma characteristics and temperatures being unaffected upon introduction of metal species, whether by liquid or laser ablation sample introduction. - Highlights: • Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) • LS-APGD as a secondary excitation source for laser-ablated (LA

  17. Best available technology for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midkiff, W.S.; Romero, R.L.; Suazo, I.L.; Garcia, R.; Parsons, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    The existing Los Alamos National Laboratory TA-50 liquid radioactive waste treatment plant RLWP has been in service for over thirty years, during this period many technical, regulatory, and processing changes have occurred. The existing facility can no longer comply with the demands and requirements for continued operation, and would not be able to comply with anticipated stringent future contaminant discharge limitations. Either a major upgrading or replacement of the existing facility is required. In order to assess the most appropriate means of providing an adequate facility to comply with predicted requirements for Ta-50, this Best Available Technology (BAT) Study was conducted to compare feasible technical and economic alternatives in order to define the most favorable technology configuration. This report consists of eleven sections. Section 1 provides a general introduction and background of the TA-50 operations and the basis for this study. Section 2 provides a technical discussion of the unit processes at TA-50 and several other comparable operations at other DOE sites. Section 3 addresses the evaluation and selection of appropriate treatment processes. Section 4 provides an analysis of environmental issues and concerns. Section 5 presents the rationale for the selection of preferred process configurations. Section 6 is the evaluation of operational issues. Section 7 addresses energy and resource use topics. Section 8 provides an economic analysis, and Section 9 summarizes the evaluation and the identification of the BAT. These sections are augmented by appendices. The report identifies the construction of a new radioactive liquid waste treatment facility as the BAT. Based on the information analyzed for this study, this option appears to provide the best combination of environmental compliance, operability, and economic value

  18. Method of cement-solidification of radioactive liquid wastes containing surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Yusa, H

    1979-04-10

    Purpose: To provide the subject method comprising the steps of adjusting the concentration of the surfactant to a value less than the predetermined value even when the concentration of the surfactant is high, and rendering the uniaxial compression strength of the cement-solidification body into more than the defined fabrication reference value. Method: To radioactive liquid wastes there are applied means for boiling and heating liquid wastes by addition of sulfuric acid, means for cracking surfactants by the addition of oxidants and means for precipitating and arresting surfactants. After suppressing the hindrance of the cement hydration reaction by surfactants, the radioactive liquid wastes are cement-solidified. (Nakamura, S.).

  19. Radiological map evolution in the treatment of 137Cs liquid wastes by a reverse osmosis plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnal, J.M.; Sancho, M.; Verdu, G.; Gozalvez, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    As a result of an accidental 1 37C s source melting in one of the furnaces of a stainless steel production company located in Spain, a part of the factory was radioactively contaminated. LAINSA (Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales S.A.) company took charge of the plant decontamination process, in which 40 m 3 , approximately, of 1 37C s contaminated water with a mean activity of 300 kBq/L were generated. After some preliminary tests in which the efficiency of reverse osmosis (RO) process in the treatment of 1 37C s contaminated effluent was proved, the radioactive liquid waste was treated by a reverse osmosis plant designed by the Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department of the Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV), and built by LAINSA company. Membrane techniques (microfiltration, ultrafiltration, nanofiltration and reverse osmosis) have become common in the treatment of radioactive effluents having substitute conventional treatments such as evaporation and ionic exchange. The main advantages of membrane processes used for concentrating radioactive wastes are moderate operating conditions, simple apparatus, high decontamination factors and low energy consumption. The treatment was carried out by the research team UPV-LAINSA, and it consisted in the application of reverse osmosis (RO) process with the main objective of reducing the waste volume to be disposed, obtaining a treated liquid with an activity less than the legal discharge limit for 1 37C s radioisotope (300 Bq/L). When working with radioactive effluents it is very important the radiological vigilance of working areas because it ensures that neither exposed personnel nor general public receive doses above established limits. Radiological vigilance consists in determining (continuously or periodically) radiation and contamination levels in working areas and even in those places where personnel can temporarily stand. The aim of this paper is to assess the evolution of radiation levels of the

  20. Groundwater recharge and discharge scenarios for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.W.; Steinborn, T.L.; Thorson, L.D.

    1979-01-01

    Twelve potential scenarios have been identified whereby groundwater may enter or exit a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. The 12 scenarios may be grouped into 4 categories or failure modes: dissolution, fracturing, voids, and penetration. Dissolution modes include breccia pipe and breccia blanket formation, and dissolution around boreholes. Fracture modes include flow through preexisting or new fractures and the effects of facies changes. Voids include interstitial voids (pores) and fluid inclusions. Penetration modes include shaft and borehole sealing failures, undetected boreholes, and new mines or wells constructed after repository decommissioning. The potential importance of thermal effects on groundwater flow patterns and on the recharge-discharge process is discussed. The appropriate levels of modeling effort, and the interaction between the adequacy of the geohydrologic data base and the warranted degree of model complexity are also discussed

  1. ICPP radioactive liquid and calcine waste technologies evaluation final report and recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Using a formalized Systems Engineering approach, the Latched Idaho Technologies Company developed and evaluated numerous alternatives for treating, immobilizing, and disposing of radioactive liquid and calcine wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Based on technical analysis data as of March, 1995, it is recommended that the Department of Energy consider a phased processing approach -- utilizing Radionuclide Partitioning for radioactive liquid and calcine waste treatment, FUETAP Grout for low-activity waste immobilization, and Glass (Vitrification) for high-activity waste immobilization -- as the preferred treatment and immobilization alternative.

  2. Design and implementation of an intensified coprecipitation reactor for the treatment of liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flouret, Julie; Barre, Yves; Muhr, Herve; Plasari, Edouard

    2013-01-01

    decrease of barium nitrate flow rate reduces the volume of sludge generated by the process keeping a high efficiency of strontium decontamination: DF = 400. An excess of sulphate is necessary to perform an efficient decontamination, but the molar ratio sulphate/barium can be reduced to 3 instead of 4.9 used industrially. The reactor/classifier also represents an efficient device for the coprecipitation process intensification. Indeed, it can sensibly reduce the final installation size while treating important volume of effluents. This innovative reactor optimizes both the decontamination efficiency of radioactive liquid wastes and the reduction of sludge volume. A reduction of sulphate ions in the discharge is also possible, which is environmentally friendly. (authors)

  3. The Addition of Hatchery Liquid Waste to Dairy Manure Improves Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WRT Lopes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to determine the optimal inclusion level of liquid egg hatchery waste for the anaerobic co-digestion of dairy cattle manure. A completely randomized experimental was applied, with seven treatments (liquid hatchery waste to cattle manure ratios of0: 100, 5:95, 10:90, 15:85, 20:80, 25:75 and 30:70, with five replicates (batch digester model each. The evaluated variables were disappearance of total solids (TS, volatile solids (VS, and neutral detergent fiber (NDF, and specific production of biogas and of methane. Maximum TS and VS disappearance of 41.3% and 49.6%, were obtained at 15.5% and 16.0% liquid hatchery waste inclusion levels. The addition of 22.3% liquid hatchery considerably reduced NDF substrate content (53.2%. Maximum specific biogas production was obtained with 17% liquid hatchery waste, with the addition of 181.7 and 229.5 L kg-1TS and VS, respectively. The highest methane production, at 120.1 and 151.8 L CH4 kg-1TS and VS, was obtained with the inclusion of 17.5 and 18.0% liquid hatchery waste, respectively. The addition of liquid hatchery waste atratios of up to 15.5%in co-digestion with cattle manure reduced solid and fiber levels in the effluent, and improved biogas and methane production.

  4. Performance of cement solidification with barium for high activity liquid waste including sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waki, Toshikazu; Yamada, Motoyuki; Horikawa, Yoshihiko; Kaneko, Masaaki; Saso, Michitaka; Haruguchi, Yoshiko; Yamashita, Yu; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    The target liquid waste to be solidified is generated from PWR primary loop spent resin treatment with sulphate acid, so, its main constituent is sodium sulphate and the activity of this liquid is relatively high. Waste form of this liquid waste is considered to be a candidate for the subsurface disposal. The disposed waste including sulphate is anticipated to rise a concentration of sulphate ion in the ground water around the disposal facility and it may cause degradation of materials such as cement and bentonite layer and comprise the disposal facility. There could be two approaches to avoid this problem, the strong design of the disposal facility and the minimization of sulphaste ion migration from the solidified waste. In this study, the latter approach was examined. In order to keep the low concentration of sulphate ion in the ground water, it is effective to make barium sulphate by adding barium compound into the liquid waste in solidification. However, adding equivalent amount of barium compound with sulphate ion causes difficulty of mixing, because production of barium sulphate causes high viscosity. In this study, mixing condition after and before adding cement into the liquid waste was estimated. The mixing condition was set with consideration to keep anion concentration low in the ground water and of mixing easily enough in practical operation. Long term leaching behavior of the simulated solidified waste was also analyzed by PHREEQC. And the concentration of the constitution affected to the disposal facility was estimated be low enough in the ground water. (author)

  5. Ecotoxicological screen of Potential Release Site 50-006(d) of Operable Unit 1147 of Mortandad Canyon and relationship to the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facilities project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, G.J.; Newell, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    Potential ecological risk associated with soil contaminants in Potential Release Site (PRS) 50-006(d) of Mortandad Canyon at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was assessed by performing an ecotoxicological risk screen. The PRS surrounds Outfall 051, which discharges treated effluent from the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility. Discharge at the outfall is permitted under the Clean Water Act National Pollution Discharge Elimination System. Radionuclide discharge is regulated by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.5. Ecotoxicological Screening Action Levels (ESALSs) were computed for nonradionuclide constituents in the soil, and human risk SALs for radionuclides were used as ESALs. Within the PRS and beginning at Outfall 051, soil was sampled at three points along each of nine linear transects at 100-ft intervals. Soil samples from 3 depths for each sampling point were analyzed for the concentration of a total of 121 constituents. Only the results of the surface sampling are reported in this report

  6. Concentration of High Level Radioactive Liquid Waste. Basic data acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juvenelle, A.; Masson, M.; Garrido, M.H. [DEN/VRH/DRCP/SCPS/LPCP, BP 17171 - 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In order to enhance its knowledge about the concentration of high level liquid waste (HLLW) from the nuclear fuel reprocessing process, a program of studies was defined by Cea. In a large field of acidity, it proposes to characterize the concentrated solution and the obtained precipitates versus the concentration factor. Four steps are considered: quantification of the salting-out effect on the concentrate acidity, acquisition of solubility data, precipitates characterisation versus the concentration factor through aging tests and concentration experimentation starting from simulated fission products solutions. The first results, reported here, connect the acidity of the concentrated solution to the concentration factor and allow us to precise the field of acidity (4 to 12 N) for the next experiments. In this field, solubility data of various elements (Ba, Sr, Zr...) are separately measured at room temperature, in nitric acid in a first time, then in the presence of various species present in medium (TBP, PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}). The reactions between these various elements are then investigated (formation of insoluble mixed compounds) by following the concentration cations in solution and characterising the precipitates. (authors)

  7. Modified microspheres for cleaning liquid wastes from radioactive nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilin, Lev; Drozhzhin, Valery

    2007-01-01

    An effective solution of nuclear industry problems related to deactivation of technological and natural waters polluted with toxic and radioactive elements is the development of inorganic sorbents capable of not only withdrawing radioactive nuclides, but also of providing their subsequent conservation under conditions of long-term storage. A successful technical approach to creation of sorbents can be the use of hollow aluminosilicate microspheres. Such microspheres are formed from mineral additives during coal burning in furnaces of boiler units of electric power stations. Despite some reduction in exchange capacity per a mass unit of sorbents the latter have high kinetic characteristics that makes it possible to carry out the sorption process both in static and dynamic modes. Taking into account large industrial resources of microspheres as by-products of electric power stations, a comparative simplicity of the modification process, as well as good kinetic and capacitor characteristics, this class of sorbents can be considered promising enough for solving the problems of cleaning liquid radioactive wastes of various pollution levels. (authors)

  8. The radiation exposure of the UK population from liquid effluents discharged from civil nuclear installations in the UK in 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camplin, W.C.; Clark, M.J.; Delow, C.E.

    1982-04-01

    The collective effective dose equivalent commitment to the UK population from routine liquid discharges by civil nuclear establishments during 1978 has been estimated at 134 man Sv. The major pathway considered in the assessment was the consumption of seafoods, because most discharges were made directly to sea. Over 90% of this collective dose commitment will be delivered within a few years of the discharges, and caesium-137 from the nuclear fuel reprocessing facility at Windscale (now known as Sellafield) will have made the main contribution to this commitment. These discharges were primarily due to corrosion of nuclear fuel during storage at the reprocessing plant, and there is no simple relationship between the level of collective dose commitment and the amount of energy generated by nuclear means during 1978. (author)

  9. State-of-the-art of liquid waste disposal for geothermal energy systems: 1979. Report PNL-2404

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defferding, L.J.

    1980-06-01

    The state-of-the-art of geothermal liquid waste disposal is reviewed and surface and subsurface disposal methods are evaluated with respect to technical, economic, legal, and environmental factors. Three disposal techniques are currently in use at numerous geothermal sites around the world: direct discharge into surface waters; deep-well injection; and ponding for evaporation. The review shows that effluents are directly discharged into surface waters at Wairakei, New Zealand; Larderello, Italy; and Ahuachapan, El Salvador. Ponding for evaporation is employed at Cerro Prieto, Mexico. Deep-well injection is being practiced at Larderello; Ahuachapan; Otake and Hatchobaru, Japan; and at The Geysers in California. All sites except Ahuachapan (which is injecting only 30% of total plant flow) have reported difficulties with their systems. Disposal techniques used in related industries are also reviewed. The oil industry's efforts at disposal of large quantities of liquid effluents have been quite successful as long as the effluents have been treated prior to injection. This study has determined that seven liquid disposal methods - four surface and three subsurface - are viable options for use in the geothermal energy industry. However, additional research and development is needed to reduce the uncertainties and to minimize the adverse environmental impacts of disposal. (MHR)

  10. Disposal of Liquid Wastes from Parlors and Milkhouses. Special Circular 154.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooding, N. Henry

    This circular provides information to assist in assessing the pollution potential of liquid wastes from parlors and milkhouses. Approaches to resolving problems through stabilization lagoons, irrigation, and tank collection as mandated in statutory authority are discussed. (CS)

  11. Filtration of Oak Ridge National Laboratory simulated liquid low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, V.L.; Hewitt, J.D.

    1989-08-01

    A method for disposal of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) is being developed in which the material will be solidified in cement and stored in an aboveground engineered storage facility. The acceptability of the final waste form rests in part on the presence or absence of transuranic isotopes. Filtration methods to remove transuranic isotopes from the bulk liquid stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) were investigated in this study. Initial batch studies using waste from MVST indicate that >99.9% of the transuranic isotopes can be removed from the bulk liquid by simple filtration. Bench-scale studies with a nonradioactive surrogate waste indicate that >99.5% of the suspended solids can be removed from the bulk liquid via inertial crossflow filtration. 4 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs

  12. In situ radiological characterization to support a test excavation at a liquid waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keele, B.D.; Bauer, R.G.; Blewett, G.R.; Troyer, G.L.

    1994-05-01

    An in situ radiological detection system was developed to support a small test excavation at a liquid waste disposal site at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Instrumentation, calibration and comparisons to samples are discussed

  13. Geophysical investigation of the 116-H-1 liquid waste disposal trench, 100-HR-1 operable unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstrom, K.A.; Mitchell, T.H.

    1996-04-01

    A geophysical investigation and data integration were conducted for the 116-H-1 Liquid Waste Disposal Trench, which is located in the 100-HR-1 Operable Unit. The 116-H-1 Liquid Waste Disposal Trench is also known as the 107-H Liquid Waste Disposal Trench, the 107-H Rupture Effluent Trench, and the 107-H Trench (Deford and Einan 1995). The trench was primarily used to hold effluent from the 107-H Retention Basin that had become radioactive from contact with ruptured fuel elements. The effluent may include debris from the ruptured fuel elements (Koop 1964). The 116-H-1 Liquid Waste Disposal Trench was also used to hold water and sludge from the 107-H Retention Basin during the basin's deactivation in 1965

  14. Management of radioactive liquid and solid wastes at the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, Tenson; Shimoura, K.; Koyama, A.

    1977-11-01

    In this report, the management of radioactive liquid and solid wastes at the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University during past 6 years, from April in 1971 to March in 1977 are reviewed. (auth.)

  15. Six-year experiences in the operation of a low level liquid waste treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, S.-J.; Hwang, S.-L.; Tsai, C.-M.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of a low level liquid waste treatment plant is described. The plant is designed for the disposal of liquid waste produced primarily by a 40 MW Taiwan Research Reactor as well as a fuel fabrication plant for the CANDU type reactor and a radioisotopes production laboratory. The monthly volume treated is about 600-2500 ton of low level liquid waste. The activity levels are in the range of 10 -5 -10 -3 μCi/cm 3 . The continuous treatment system of the low level liquid waste treatment plant and the treatment data collected since 1973 are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of continuous and batch processes are compared. In the continuous process, the efficiency of sludge treatment, vermiculite ion exchange and the adsorption of peat are investigated for further improvement. (H.K.)

  16. Biogas production from the mechanically pretreated, liquid fraction of sorted organic municipal solid wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Lassman, A; Méndez-Contreras, J M; Martínez-Sibaja, A; Rosas-Mendoza, E S; Vallejo-Cantú, N A

    2017-06-01

    The high liquid content in fruit and vegetable wastes makes it convenient to mechanically separate these wastes into mostly liquid and solid fractions by means of pretreatment. Then, the liquid fraction can be treated using a high-rate anaerobic biofilm reactor to produce biogas, simultaneously reducing the amount of solids that must be landfilled. In this work, the specific composition of municipal solid waste (MSW) in a public market was determined; then, the sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste was treated mechanically to separate and characterize the mostly liquid and solid fractions. Then, the mesophilic anaerobic digestion for biogas production of the first fraction was evaluated. The anaerobic digestion resulted in a reduced hydraulic retention time of two days with high removal of chemical oxygen demand, that is, 88% on average, with the additional benefit of reducing the mass of the solids that had to be landfilled by about 80%.

  17. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes the operating activities, upgrade activities, maintenance, and other activities regarding liquid and gaseous low level radioactive waste management at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits, tours, and environmental restoration support

  18. Designing testing service at baristand industri Medan’s liquid waste laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumawaty, Dewi; Napitupulu, Humala L.; Sembiring, Meilita T.

    2018-03-01

    Baristand Industri Medan is a technical implementation unit under the Industrial and Research and Development Agency, the Ministry of Industry. One of the services often used in Baristand Industri Medan is liquid waste testing service. The company set the standard of service is nine working days for testing services. At 2015, 89.66% on testing services liquid waste does not meet the specified standard of services company because of many samples accumulated. The purpose of this research is designing online services to schedule the coming the liquid waste sample. The method used is designing an information system that consists of model design, output design, input design, database design and technology design. The results of designing information system of testing liquid waste online consist of three pages are pages to the customer, the recipient samples and laboratory. From the simulation results with scheduled samples, then the standard services a minimum of nine working days can be reached.

  19. Antibiotic Resistance Gene Abundances Associated with Waste Discharges to the Almendares River near Havana, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Considerable debate exists over the primary cause of increased antibiotic resistance (AR) worldwide. Evidence suggests increasing AR results from overuse of antibiotics in medicine and therapeutic and nontherapeutic applications in agriculture. However, pollution also can influence environmental AR, particularly associated with heavy metal, pharmaceutical, and other waste releases, although the relative scale of the “pollution” contribution is poorly defined, which restricts targeted mitigation efforts. The question is “where to study and quantify AR from pollution versus other causes to best understand the pollution effect”. One useful site is Cuba because industrial pollution broadly exists; antibiotics are used sparingly in medicine and agriculture; and multiresistant bacterial infections are increasing in clinical settings without explanation. Within this context, we quantified 13 antibiotic resistance genes (ARG; indicators of AR potential), 6 heavy metals, 3 antibiotics, and 17 other organic pollutants at 8 locations along the Almendares River in western Havana at sites bracketing known waste discharge points, including a large solid waste landfill and various pharmaceutical factories. Significant correlations (p < 0.05) were found between sediment ARG levels, especially for tetracyclines and β-lactams (e.g., tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), blaOXA), and sediment Cu and water column ampicillin levels in the river. Further, sediment ARG levels increased by up to 3 orders of magnitude downstream of the pharmaceutical factories and were highest where human population densities also were high. Although explicit links are not shown, results suggest that pollution has increased background AR levels in a setting where other causes of AR are less prevalent. PMID:21133405

  20. Handling and storage of high-level liquid wastes from reprocessing of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finsterwalder, L.

    1982-01-01

    The high level liquid wastes arise from the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels, which are dissolved in aqueous acid solution, and the plutonium and unburned uranium removed in the chemical separation plant. The remaining solution, containing more than 99% of the dissolved fission products, together with impurities from cladding materials, corrosion products, traces of unseparated plutonium and uranium and most of the transuranic elements, constitutes the high-level waste. At present, these liquid wastes are usually concentrated by evaporation and stored as an aqueous nitric acid solution in high-integrity stainless-steel tanks. There is now world-wide agreement that, for the long term, these liquid wastes should be converted to solid form and much work is in progress to develop techniques for the solidification of these wastes. This paper considers the design requirements for such facilities and the experience gained during nearly 30 years of operation. (orig./RW)

  1. Functions and requirements document, WESF decoupling project, low-level liquid waste system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, J.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-27

    The Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) was constructed in 1974 to encapsulate and store cesium and strontium which were isolated at B Plant from underground storage tank waste. The WESF, Building 225-B, is attached physically to the west end of B Plant, Building 221-B, 200 East area. The WESF currently utilizes B Plant facilities for disposing liquid and solid waste streams. With the deactivation of B Plant, the WESF Decoupling Project will provide replacement systems allowing WESF to continue operations independently from B Plant. Four major systems have been identified to be replaced by the WESF Decoupling Project, including the following: Low Level Liquid Waste System, Solid Waste Handling System, Liquid Effluent Control System, and Deionized Water System.

  2. Evaluation of process alternatives for solidification of the West Valley high-level liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holton, L.K.; Larson, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the West Valley Solidification Project (WVSP) in 1980. The project purpose is to demonstrate removal and solidification of the high-level liquid wastes (HLLW) presently stored in tanks at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC), West Valley, New York. As part of this effort, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a study to evaluate process alternatives for solidifcation of the WNYNSC wastes. Two process approaches for waste handling before solidification, together with solidification processes for four terminal and four interim waste forms, were considered. The first waste-handling approach, designated the salt/sludge separation process, involves separating the bulk of the nonradioactive nuclear waste constituents from the radioactive waste constituents, and the second waste-handling approach, designated the combined-waste process, involves no waste segregation prior to solidification. The processes were evaluated on the bases of their (1) readiness for plant startup by 1987, (2) relative technical merits, and (3) process cost. The study has shown that, based on these criteria, the salt/sludge separation process with a borosilicate glass waste form is preferred when producing a terminal waste form. It was also concluded that if an interim waste form is to be used, the preferred approach would be the combined waste process with a fused-salt waste form

  3. Thermal treatment of historical radioactive solid and liquid waste into the CILVA incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deckers, Jan; Mols, Ludo

    2007-01-01

    Since the very beginning of the nuclear activities in Belgium, the incineration of radioactive waste was chosen as a suitable technique for achieving an optimal volume reduction of the produced waste quantities. Based on the 35 years experience gained by the operation of the old incinerator, a new industrial incineration plant started nuclear operation in May 1995, as a part of the Belgian Centralized Treatment/Conditioning Facility named CILVA. Up to the end of 2006, the CILVA incinerator has burnt 1660 tonne of solid waste and 419 tonne of liquid waste. This paper describes the type and allowable radioactivity of the waste, the incineration process, heat recovery and the air pollution control devices. Special attention is given to the treatment of several hundreds of tonne historical waste from former reprocessing activities such as alpha suspected solid waste, aqueous and organic liquid waste and spent ion exchange resins. The capacity, volume reduction, chemical and radiological emissions are also evaluated. BELGOPROCESS, a company set up in 1984 at Dessel (Belgium) where a number of nuclear facilities were already installed is specialized in the processing of radioactive waste. It is a subsidiary of ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian Nuclear Waste Management Agency. According to its mission statement, the activities of BELGOPROCESS focus on three areas: treatment, conditioning and interim storage of radioactive waste; decommissioning of shut-down nuclear facilities and cleaning of contaminated buildings and land; operating of storage sites for conditioned radioactive waste. (authors)

  4. Cross flow filtration of Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, V.L.; Hewitt, J.D.

    1989-12-01

    A new method for disposal of Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level radioactive waste is being developed as an alternative to hydrofracture. The acceptability of the final waste form rests in part on the presence or absence of transuranic (TRU) isotopes. Inertial cross flow filtration was used in this study to determine the potential of this method for separation of the TRU isotopes from the bulk liquid stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks. 7 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  5. Evaluation of mercury in liquid waste processing facilities - Phase I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Occhipinti, J. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, R. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  6. Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste Processing Facilities - Phase I Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Occhipinti, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Wilmarth, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  7. Development of a test system for high level liquid waste partitioning

    OpenAIRE

    Duan Wu H.; Chen Jing; Wang Jian C.; Wang Shu W.; Wang Xing H.

    2015-01-01

    The partitioning and transmutation strategy has increasingly attracted interest for the safe treatment and disposal of high level liquid waste, in which the partitioning of high level liquid waste is one of the critical technical issues. An improved total partitioning process, including a tri-alkylphosphine oxide process for the removal of actinides, a crown ether strontium extraction process for the removal of strontium, and a calixcrown ether cesium extra...

  8. Design of Biochemical Oxidation Process Engineering Unit for Treatment of Organic Radioactive Liquid Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainus Salimin; Endang Nuraeni; Mirawaty; Tarigan, Cerdas

    2010-01-01

    Organic radioactive liquid waste from nuclear industry consist of detergent waste from nuclear laundry, 30% TBP-kerosene solvent waste from purification or recovery of uranium from process failure of nuclear fuel fabrication, and solvent waste containing D 2 EHPA, TOPO, and kerosene from purification of phosphoric acid. The waste is dangerous and toxic matter having low pH, high COD and BOD, and also low radioactivity. Biochemical oxidation process is the effective method for detoxification of organic waste and decontamination of radionuclide by bio sorption. The result process are sludges and non radioactive supernatant. The existing treatment facilities radioactive waste in Serpong can not use for treatment of that’s organics waste. Dio chemical oxidation process engineering unit for continuous treatment of organic radioactive liquid waste on the capacity of 1.6 L/h has been designed and constructed the equipment of process unit consist of storage tank of 100 L capacity for nutrition solution, 2 storage tanks of 100 L capacity per each for liquid waste, reactor oxidation of 120 L, settling tank of 50 L capacity storage tank of 55 L capacity for sludge, storage tank of 50 capacity for supernatant. Solution on the reactor R-01 are added by bacteria, nutrition and aeration using two difference aerators until biochemical oxidation occurs. The sludge from reactor of R-01 are recirculated to the settling tank of R-02 and on the its reverse operation biological sludge will be settled, and supernatant will be overflow. (author)

  9. Evaluation of Absorbents for Compatibility with Site Generated Hazardous and Mixed Liquid Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oji, L.N.

    2002-01-01

    SRS Solid Waste requested SRTC to perform a literature-based evaluation of sorbents, which are compatible with hazardous mixed waste being generated on site. Polypropylene-based materials and ground corn cob (Toxi-dry), because of their compatibility with the Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) process, are the only two spill stabilization agents which are recommended for use on site (IS manual, Waste Acceptance Criteria 3.18). While ensuring minimal potential for undesired reactions between spills and spill control agents, Solid Waste wants to increase the number of site approved absorbents to give waste generators more flexibility in choosing liquid spill immobilization agents

  10. Mixed incineration of RAIW and liquid scintillator waste after storage for decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naba, K.; Nakazato, K.; Kataoka, K.

    1993-01-01

    Most medical radioactive waste is combustible after radioactive decay. Moreover mixed incineration of LLW with biomedical radioactive waste will lessen radiation exposure to the public. This paper describes the total system flowsheet for the processing of liquid scintillator wastes and radioimmunoassay tube wastes containing iodine 125 (after a two-year storage for decay). The process was tested with a 60 kg/hr capacity incinerator from 1987 to 1991; this has been upgraded to a 150 kg/hr incinerator which is used for nonradioactive biomedical waste incineration as well

  11. Denitration and chemical precipitation of medium level liquid wastes and conditioning of high level wastes from low level liquid wastes by a roll dryer and subsequent vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halaszovich, S.; Dix, S.; Harms, R.

    1987-01-01

    Medium level liquid waste (MAW) from the reprocessing need after being fixed in cement an additional shielding to meet required radiation limits for handling and transportation. Normally this shielding consists of concrete and its weight and volume is several times higher than that of the waste product itself. By means of caesium separation using nickel-potassium-hexacyanoferrate and after few years of interim storage waiting for the decay of Ruthenium and Antimony the activities will be reduced below permissible values. (13 MBq/l in waste solution for Cs, 28 MBq/l for Sb and 34 MBq/l for Ru). Below these limits there is no need for additional shielding after cementation in a 400 l drum. Experimental results show, that Caesium can be precipitated and separated effectively not only in laboratory but also in a larger scale under hot cell conditions. The process investigated in this work has been developed from the FIPS process for vitrification of highly radioactive fission product solutions. It consists of: denitration, precipitation, sludge separation, drying and melting

  12. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge as a secondary excitation source: Assessment of plasma characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manard, Benjamin T.; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Sarkar, Arnab; Dong, Meirong; Chirinos, Jose; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has been assessed as a secondary excitation source with a parametric evaluation regarding carrier gas flow rate, applied current, and electrode distance. With this parametric evaluation, plasma optical emission was monitored in order to obtain a fundamental understanding with regards to rotational temperature (Trot), excitation temperature (Texc), electron number density (ne), and plasma robustness. Incentive for these studies is not only for a greater overall fundamental knowledge of the APGD, but also in instrumenting a secondary excitation/ionization source following laser ablation (LA). Rotational temperatures were determined through experimentally fitting of the N2 and OH molecular emission bands while atomic excitation temperatures were calculated using a Boltzmann distribution of He and Mg atomic lines. The rotational and excitation temperatures were determined to be ~ 1000 K and ~ 2700 K respectively. Electron number density was calculated to be on the order of ~ 3 × 1015 cm- 3 utilizing Stark broadening effects of the Hα line of the Balmer series and a He I transition. In addition, those diagnostics were performed introducing magnesium (by solution feed and laser ablation) into the plasma in order to determine any perturbation under heavy matrix sampling. The so-called plasma robustness factor, derived by monitoring Mg II/Mg I emission ratios, is also employed as a reflection of potential perturbations in microplasma energetics across the various operation conditions and sample loadings. While truly a miniaturized source (laser ablation sample introduction.

  13. The incorporation of low and medium level radioactive wastes (solids and liquids) in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, J.D.; Smith, D.L.G.

    1986-01-01

    The use of cement has been investigated for the immobilization of liquid and solid low and medium level radioactive waste. 220 litre mixing trials have demonstrated that the high temperatures generated during the setting of ordinary Portland cement/simulant waste mixes can be significantly reduced by the use of a blend of ground granulated blast furnace slag and ordinary Portland cement. Laboratory and 220 litre trials using simulant wastes showed that the blended cement gave an improvement in properties of the cemented waste product, e.g. stability and reduction in leach rates compared with ordinary Portland cement formulations. A range of 220 litre scale mixing systems for the incorporation of liquid and solid wastes in cement was investigated. The work has confirmed that cement-based processes can be used for the immobilization of most types of low and medium level waste

  14. Stabilization of liquid low-level and mixed wastes: a treatability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, S.; Cheng, Yu-Cheng; Yellowhorse, L.; Peterson, P.

    1996-01-01

    A treatability study has been conducted on liquid low-level and mixed wastes using the stabilization agents Aquaset, Aquaset II, Aquaset II-H, Petroset, Petroset-H, and Petroset and Petroset II. A total of 40 different waste types with activities ranging from 10 -14 to 10 -4 curies/ml have been stabilized. Reported data for each waste include its chemical and radiological composition and the optimum composition or range of compositions (weight of agent/volume of waste) for each stabilization agent used. All wastes were successfully stabilized with one or more of the stabilization agents and all final waste forms passed the Paint Filter Liquids Test (EPA Method 9095)

  15. The Effectivity of Marine Bio-activator and Surimi Liquid Waste Addition of Characteristics Liquid Organic Fertilizer from Sargassum sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putri Wening Ratrinia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOrganic fertilizer is highly recommended for soil and plant because it can improve the productivity and repair physical, chemical, and biological of soil. Sargassum sp. and surimi liquid wastes contain organic matter and nutrient needed by plants and soils. The addition of marine bio-activator which contains bacterial isolates from litter mangrove serves to accelerate the composting time and increases the activity of microorganisms in the decomposition process. The purpose of this study was to determine optimum time and the best formulation of decomposition process organic fertilizer. Raw materials used a waste of seaweed Sargassum sp., marine bio-activator and surimi liquid waste from catfish (Clarias sp.. The research was conducted six treatments control, Sargassum sp. + marine bio-activator, surimi liquid waste , Sargassum sp. + marine bio-activator + surimi liquid waste 80%, 90%, 100%. All treatments were fermented for 9 days and analysed the C-organic, total N, C/N ratio, P2O5, K2O on days 0, 3, 6 and 9. The results showed the optimum fermentation period was on the 6th day. The most optimum concentration of surimi liquid waste added was at a concentration of 90%, with characteristics of the products was C-organic 0.803±0.0115%, total N 740.063±0.0862 ppm, C/N ratio 10.855±0.1562, P2O5 425.603±0.2329 ppm, K2O 2738.627±0.2836 ppm.

  16. The Effectivity of Marine Bio-activator and Surimi Liquid Waste Addition of Characteristics Liquid Organic Fertilizer from Sargassum sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putri Wening Ratrinia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic fertilizer is highly recommended for soil and plant because it can improve the productivity and repair physical, chemical, and biological of soil. Sargassum sp. and surimi liquid wastes contain organic matter and nutrient needed by plants and soils. The addition of marine bio-activator which contains bacterial isolates from litter mangrove serves to accelerate the composting time and increases the activity of microorganisms in the decomposition process. The purpose of this study was to determine optimum time and the best formulation of decomposition process organic fertilizer. Raw materials used a waste of seaweed Sargassum sp., marine bio-activator and surimi liquid waste from catfish (Clarias sp.. The research was conducted six treatments control, Sargassum sp. + marine bio-activator, surimi liquid waste , Sargassum sp. + marine bio-activator + surimi liquid waste 80%, 90%, 100%. All treatments were fermented for 9 days and analysed the C-organic, total N, C/N ratio, P2 O5 , K2 O on days 0, 3, 6 and 9. The results showed the optimum fermentation period was on the 6th day. The most optimum concentration of surimi liquid waste added was at a concentration of 90%, with characteristics of the products was C-organic 0.803 ± 0.0115 %, total N 740.063 ± 0.0862 ppm, C/N ratio 10.855 ± 0.1562, P2 O5 425.603 ± 0.2329 ppm, K2 O 2738.627 ± 0.2836 ppm.

  17. Laboratory simulation of high-level liquid waste evaporation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    The reprocessing of nuclear fuel generates high-level liquid wastes (HLLW) which require interim storage pending solidification. Interim storage facilities are most efficient if the HLLW is evaporated prior to or during the storage period. Laboratory evaporation and storage studies with simulated waste slurries have yielded data which are applicable to the efficient design and economical operation of actual process equipment

  18. Management of radioactive low level liquid, gaseous, and solid wastes in the 200 areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.T.

    1976-01-01

    The practices which are currently used for handling radioactive waste are outlined. These include burial of solid waste, scrubbing of off gas streams, and routing liquid effluents (mostly cooling water) to open ponds where the water percolates to the water table

  19. Recovery of valuable nitrogen compounds from agricultural liquid wastes: potential possibilities, bottlenecks and future technological challenges.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rulkens, W.H.; Klapwijk, A.; Willers, H.C.

    1998-01-01

    Agricultural liquid livestock wastes are an important potential source of valuable nitrogen-containing compounds such as ammonia and proteins. Large volumetric quantities of these wastes are produced in areas with a high livestock production density. Much technological research has been carried out

  20. Self-discharge characteristics of lithium/sulfur batteries using TEGDME liquid electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, H.S.; Ahn, H.J.; Kim, K.W.; Ahn, J.H.; Cho, K.K.; Nam, T.H.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated self-discharge characteristics of Li/S batteries using tetra ethylene glycol dimethylether (TEGDME) electrolyte. The open circuit voltages (OCV) and discharge curves were measured as a function of storage time. The self-discharge of the Li/S battery depended on current collectors. Li/TEGDME/S batteries with stainless steel (SUS) current collector showed the highest self-discharge rate of 59% per month. The self-discharge rate of Li/TEGDME/S battery using Al current collector is 34% during initial 80 days, but only 36% after 360 days storage. The discharge capacity decreases only 2% from 80 to 360 days. The self-discharge of Li/S battery using Al current collector is severe during initial 80 days, but is not an important factor after 80 days. Average self-discharge rate of Li/TEGDME/S battery using Al current collector is 3% per month for 1 year