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Sample records for liquid oxygen tank

  1. 49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and... liquid tank car tanks. ...

  2. Ecodesign of Liquid Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicevska, Jana; Bazbauers, Gatis; Repele, Mara

    2011-01-01

    The subject of the study is a 10 litre liquid fuel tank made of metal and used for fuel storage and transportation. The study dealt with separate life cycle stages of this product, compared environmental impacts of similar fuel tanks made of metal and plastic, as well as analysed the product's end-of-life cycle stage, studying the waste treatment and disposal scenarios. The aim of this study was to find opportunities for improvement and to develop proposals for the ecodesign of 10 litre liquid fuel tank.

  3. Pad B Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Felicia

    2007-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center is home to two liquid hydrogen storage tanks, one at each launch pad of Launch Complex 39. The liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad B has a significantly higher boil off rate that the liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad A. This research looks at various calculations concerning the at Launch Pad B in an attempt to develop a solution to the excess boil off rate. We will look at Perlite levels inside the tank, Boil off rates, conductive heat transfer, and radiant heat transfer through the tank. As a conclusion to the research, we will model the effects of placing an external insulation to the tank in order to reduce the boil off rate and increase the economic efficiency of the liquid hydrogen storage tanks.

  4. Rocking response of tanks containing two liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yu

    1994-01-01

    A study of the dynamic response of upright circular cylindrical liquid storage tanks containing two different liquids under a rocking base motion with an arbitrary temporal variation is presented. Only rigid tanks were studied. The response quantities examined include the hydrodynamic pressure, the sloshing wave height and associated frequencies, and the base shear and moments. Each of these response quantities is expressed as the sum of the so-called impulsive component and convective component. Unlike the case of tanks containing one liquid, in which the response is controlled by one parameter, the height-to-radius ratio, the response of tanks containing two different liquids is controlled by three parameters: the height-to-radius ratio and the mass density ratio and height ratio of the two liquids. The interrelationship of the responses of the tank-liquid system to rocking and lateral base excitations is established by examining numerical results extensively. It is found that some of the response quantities for a tank-liquid system under a rocking base motion can be determined from the corresponding response quantities for an identical tank under a horizontal base motion. ((orig.))

  5. Tanks for liquids: calibration and errors assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espejo, J.M.; Gutierrez Fernandez, J.; Ortiz, J.

    1980-01-01

    After a brief reference to some of the problems raised by tanks calibration, two methods, theoretical and experimental are presented, so as to achieve it taking into account measurement errors. The method is applied to the transfer of liquid from one tank to another. Further, a practical example is developed. (author)

  6. Liquid Oxygen Propellant Densification Unit Ground Tested With a Large-Scale Flight-Weight Tank for the X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2002-01-01

    Propellant densification has been identified as a critical technology in the development of single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicles. Technology to create supercooled high-density liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) is a key means to lowering launch vehicle costs. The densification of cryogenic propellants through subcooling allows 8 to 10 percent more propellant mass to be stored in a given unit volume, thereby improving the launch vehicle's overall performance. This allows for higher propellant mass fractions than would be possible with conventional normal boiling point cryogenic propellants, considering the normal boiling point of LO2 and LH2.

  7. Sloshing analysis of viscous liquid storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uras, R.Z.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of viscosity on the sloshing response of tanks containing viscous liquids is studied using the in-house finite element computer code, FLUSTR-ANL. Two different tank sizes each filled at two levels, are modeled, and their dynamic responses under harmonic and seismic ground motions are simulated. The results are presented in terms of the wave height, and pressures at selected nodes and elements in the finite element mesh. The viscosity manifests itself as a damping effect, reducing the amplitudes. Under harmonic excitation, the dynamic response reaches the steady-state faster as the viscosity value becomes larger. The fundamental sloshing frequency for each study case stays virtually unaffected by an increase in viscosity. For the small tank case, a 5% difference is observed in the fundamental frequency of the smallest (1 cP) and the highest (1000 cP) viscosity cases considered in this study. The fundamental frequencies of the large tank are even less sensitive

  8. Cryogenic Liquid Fluctuations in a Motionless Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Vin Ai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers approximate numerical methods to determine own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations stratification of which changes under any law. The increasing use of cryogenic liquids, liquefied gas, superfluid solutions, and slush liquids in modern mechanical engineering define relevance of a perspective. Interest in the considered problem is also caused by the fact that in cryogenic liquid along with superficial waves there can be internal wave movements penetrating all thickness of liquid in a tank and therefore playing important role in many hydro-dynamic processes.This article considers problems of determining the own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations, partially filling cylindrical tank of any cross section. It is supposed that the change of the liquid particles density due to thermal stratification of entire liquid mass can proceed continuously under any law. To solve numerically a similar problem, a method of trigonometric series (MTS and a method of final elements (MFE were used. When using the MTS method the unknown solution and variable coefficients of the equation were presented in the form of trigonometric series. Further, after multiplication of series and the subsequent mathematical operations the frequency equation was obtained. Bubnov-Galyorkin's approach was used to obtain solutions by the MFE method. Reliability of received numerical results is confirmed by coincidence with frequency results calculated by analytical formulas of solutions of differential equations with constant frequency of buoyancy.

  9. Review of liquid-tank interaction analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Based on a literature survey, various models of increasing sophistication and complexity are presented which might be used to assess the liquid tank interaction effects due to sloshing of contained high level radioactive liquid waste in storage tanks at the NFS site. In addition, the effects of liquid damping, tank bending modes, and nonlinearity of the sloshing liquid are discussed. The results of the survey indicate that due to the compexities encountered in adequately modeling the system, due to the approximations which must be made as regards the tank boundary conditions, and due to the assumptions which must be made regarding the liquid waste dynamic character, the liquid tank interaction at NFS can not be adequately theoretically modeled. It is therefore recommended that experimental scale model tests be performed to assess the effects of liquid tank interaction during seismic excitation of the NFS waste tanks

  10. Liquid Nitrogen (Oxygen Simulant) Thermodynamic Vent System Test Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Tucker, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    In designing systems for the long-term storage of cryogens in low-gravity (space) environments, one must consider the effects of thermal stratification on tank pressure that will occur due to environmental heat leaks. During low-gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS) concept is expected to maintain tank pressure without propellant resettling. A series of TVS tests was conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using liquid nitrogen (LN2) as a liquid oxygen (LO2) simulant. The tests were performed at tank til1 levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%, and with a specified tank pressure control band. A transient one-dimensional TVS performance program is used to analyze and correlate the test data for all three fill levels. Predictions and comparisons of ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature with test data are presented.

  11. Hydrodynamic pressure in a tank containing two liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yu.

    1992-01-01

    A study on the dynamic response of a tank containing two different liquids under seismic excitation is presented. Both analytical and numerical (FEM) methods are employed in the analysis. The results obtained by the two methods are in good agreement. The response functions examined include the hydrodynamic pressure, base shear and base moments. A simple approach that can be used to estimate the fundamental natural frequency of the tank-liquid system containing two liquids is proposed. This simple approach is an extension of the method used for estimating the frequency of a tank-liquid system containing only one liquid. This study shows that the dynamic response of a tank filled with two liquids is quite different from that of an identical tank filled with only one liquid

  12. Liquid Nitrogen (Oxygen Simulent) Thermodynamic Venting System Test Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Tucker, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    In designing systems for the long-term storage of cryogens in low gravity space environments, one must consider the effects of thermal stratification on excessive tank pressure that will occur due to environmental heat leakage. During low gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Venting System (TVS) concept is expected to maintain tank pressure without propellant resettling. The TVS consists of a recirculation pump, Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion valve, and a parallel flow concentric tube heat exchanger combined with a longitudinal spray bar. Using a small amount of liquid extracted by the pump and passing it though the J-T valve, then through the heat exchanger, the bulk liquid and ullage are cooled, resulting in lower tank pressure. A series of TVS tests were conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using liquid nitrogen as a liquid oxygen simulant. The tests were performed at fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25% with gaseous nitrogen and helium pressurants, and with a tank pressure control band of 7 kPa. A transient one-dimensional model of the TVS is used to analyze the data. The code is comprised of four models for the heat exchanger, the spray manifold and injector tubes, the recirculation pump, and the tank. The TVS model predicted ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature are compared with data. Details of predictions and comparisons with test data regarding pressure rise and collapse rates will be presented in the final paper.

  13. Permeation barrier for lightweight liquid hydrogen tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultheiss, D.

    2007-04-16

    For the future usage of hydrogen as an automotive fuel, its on-board storage is crucial. One approach is the storage of liquid hydrogen (LH2, 20 K) in double-walled, vacuum insulated tanks. The introduction of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) as structural material enables a high potential of reducing the weight in comparison to the state-of-the-art stainless steel tanks. The generally high permeability of hydrogen through plastics, however, can lead to long-term degradation of the insulating vacuum. The derived objective of this dissertation was to find and apply an adequate permeation barrier (liner) on CFRP. The investigated liners were either foils adhered on CFRP specimens or coatings deposited on CFRP specimens. The coatings were produced by means of thermal spraying, metal plating or physical vapor deposition (PVD). The materials of the liners included Al, Au, Cu, Ni and Sn as well as stainless steel and diamond-like carbon. The produced liners were tested for their permeation behavior, thermal shock resistance and adherence to the CFRP substrate. Additionally, SEM micrographs were used to characterize and qualify the liners. The foils, although being a good permeation barrier, adhered weakly to the substrate. Furthermore, leak-free joining of foil segments is a challenge still to be solved. The metal plating liners exhibited the best properties. For instance, no permeation could be detected through a 50 {mu}m thick Cu coating within the accuracy of the measuring apparatus. This corresponds to a reduction of the permeation gas flow by more than factor 7400 compared to uncoated CFRP. In addition, the metal platings revealed a high adherence and thermal shock resistance. The coatings produced by means of thermal spraying and PVD did not show a sufficient permeation barrier effect. After having investigated the specimens, a 170 liter CFRP tank was fully coated with 50 {mu}m Cu by means of metal plating. (orig.)

  14. Laterally excited flexible tanks with nonuniform density liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yu

    1996-01-01

    A study of the dynamic responses of flexible tanks containing nonuniform liquid under horizontal base excitations is presented. The system considered is an upright, circular cylindrical tank filled with an incompressible and inviscid liquid in which the density increases with the liquid depth. Only the impulsive components of response are considered in this study since the convective components can be computed by considering the tank to be rigid. It is shown in this study that for tanks with height-to-radius ratios between 0.3 and 1.2, the response quantities may be estimated utilizing the rigid tank solutions. Also, it is found that the pressure distribution along the tank wall is not sensitive to the detailed distribution function of the liquid density, and that the base shear and moments for the tank with nonuniform liquid can be estimated conservatively by assuming that the tank is filled with an equivalent uniform liquid density that preserves the total liquid weight. Finally, a simple equation for evaluating the fundamental natural frequency of the system is proposed

  15. 49 CFR 174.304 - Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars... (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars. A tank car containing a Class 3 (flammable liquid) material, other... the liquid from the tank car to permanent storage tanks of sufficient capacity to receive the entire...

  16. Moment of inertia of liquid in a tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyeong Joong Lee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the inertial properties of fully filled liquid in a tank were studied based on the potential theory. The analytic solution was obtained for the rectangular tank, and the numerical solutions using Green's 2nd identity were obtained for other shapes. The inertia of liquid behaves like solid in recti-linear acceleration. But under rotational acceleration, the moment of inertia of liquid becomes small compared to that of solid. The shapes of tank investigated in this study were ellipse, rectangle, hexagon, and octagon with various aspect ratios. The numerical solutions were compared with analytic solution, and an ad hoc semi-analytical approximate formula is proposed herein and this formula gives very good predictions for the moment of inertia of the liquid in a tank of several different geometrical shapes. The results of this study will be useful in analyzing of the motion of LNG/LPG tanker, liquid cargo ship, and damaged ship.

  17. Investigation of the organic matter in inactive nuclear tank liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenley, R.L.; Griest, W.H.

    1990-08-01

    Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology for regulatory organics fails to account for the organic matter that is suggested by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) inactive nuclear waste-tank liquids and sludges. Identification and measurement of the total organics are needed to select appropriate waste treatment technologies. An initial investigation was made of the nature of the organics in several waste-tank liquids. This report details the analysis of ORNL wastes

  18. Glass Bubbles Insulation for Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J. P.; SaintCyr, W. W.; Barrett, T. M.; Baumgartner, R. G.; Lott, J. W.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    A full-scale field application of glass bubbles insulation has been demonstrated in a 218,000 L liquid hydrogen storage tank. This work is the evolution of extensive materials testing, laboratory scale testing, and system studies leading to the use of glass bubbles insulation as a cost efficient and high performance alternative in cryogenic storage tanks of any size. The tank utilized is part of a rocket propulsion test complex at the NASA Stennis Space Center and is a 1960's vintage spherical double wall tank with an evacuated annulus. The original perlite that was removed from the annulus was in pristine condition and showed no signs of deterioration or compaction. Test results show a significant reduction in liquid hydrogen boiloff when compared to recent baseline data prior to removal of the perlite insulation. The data also validates the previous laboratory scale testing (1000 L) and full-scale numerical modeling (3,200,000 L) of boiloff in spherical cryogenic storage tanks. The performance of the tank will continue to be monitored during operation of the tank over the coming years. KEYWORDS: Glass bubble, perlite, insulation, liquid hydrogen, storage tank.

  19. SSI effects for a tank containing two liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yu.

    1994-01-01

    Following a brief review of a mechanical model which permits consideration of the flexibility of the tank wall and the supporting medium, the effects of the soil-structure interaction on the dynamic response of a laterally excited tank that contains two liquids are examined. The quantities examined include the hydrodynamic pressure, base shear and moments. The results are compared with those obtained with no soil-structure interaction. Only the impulsive component of response is examined; the convective component is for all practical purposes unaffected by soil-structure interaction. It is shown that for the conditions considered, soil-structure interaction reduces the peak response of the tank-liquid system

  20. Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Integrated Power and Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banker, Brian; Ryan, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The proposed paper will cover ongoing work at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) on integrated power and propulsion for advanced human exploration. Specifically, it will present findings of the integrated design, testing, and operational challenges of a liquid oxygen / liquid methane (LOx/LCH4) propulsion brassboard and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system. Human-Mars architectures point to an oxygen-methane economy utilizing common commodities, scavenged from the planetary atmosphere and soil via In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), and common commodities across sub-systems. Due to the enormous mass gear-ratio required for human exploration beyond low-earth orbit, (for every 1 kg of payload landed on Mars, 226 kg will be required on Earth) increasing commonality between spacecraft subsystems such as power and propulsion can result in tremendous launch mass and volume savings. Historically, propulsion and fuel cell power subsystems have had little interaction outside of the generation (fuel cell) and consumption (propulsion) of electrical power. This was largely due to a mismatch in preferred commodities (hypergolics for propulsion; oxygen & hydrogen for fuel cells). Although this stove-piped approach benefits from simplicity in the design process, it means each subsystem has its own tanks, pressurization system, fluid feed system, etc. increasing overall spacecraft mass and volume. A liquid oxygen / liquid methane commodities architecture across propulsion and power subsystems would enable the use of common tankage and associated pressurization and commodity delivery hardware for both. Furthermore, a spacecraft utilizing integrated power and propulsion could use propellant residuals - propellant which could not be expelled from the tank near depletion due to hydrodynamic considerations caused by large flow demands of a rocket engine - to generate power after all propulsive maneuvers are complete thus utilizing

  1. Structural design of liquid oxygen/liquid methane robotic lander JANUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaidez, Mariana

    As the attempt to send humans to Mars has gained momentum in the last decade, the need to find alternative propellants that are safer, less toxic, and yields a better performance has become apparent [1]. Liquid methane and oxygen have emerged as a suitable alternative. In addition, the incorporation of liquid methane/liquid oxygen into the propulsion system has demonstrated an increase in engine performance, as well as a reduction in the volume, size and complexity of the propulsion system. In an attempt to further understand the technologies that are possible to develop using liquid oxygen (LO 2) and liquid methane (LCH4), a preliminary design of a robotic lander JANUS is being completed by the Center for Space Exploration and Technology Research (cSTER). The structural design of the vehicle is important because it acts as the skeleton of the vehicle and dictates the maneuverability of the robotic lander. To develop the structure of the robotic lander, six different design vehicle concepts with varying tank configurations were considered. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was completed on each model to optimize each vehicle. Trade studies were completed to choose the best design for JANUS. Upon completion of the trade studies the design for the first prototype of JANUS was initiated in which the tank and thrust modules were designed. This thesis will describe the design process for the structural design of the JANUS.

  2. Moment of inertia of liquid in a tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Gyeong Joong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the inertial properties of fully filled liquid in a tank were studied based on the potential theory. The analytic solution was obtained for the rectangular tank, and the numerical solutions using Green’s 2nd identity were obtained for other shapes. The inertia of liquid behaves like solid in recti-linear acceleration. But under rotational acceleration, the moment of inertia of liquid becomes small compared to that of solid. The shapes of tank investigated in this study were ellipse, rectangle, hexagon, and octagon with various aspect ratios. The numerical solu¬tions were compared with analytic solution, and an ad hoc semi-analytical approximate formula is proposed herein and this formula gives very good predictions for the moment of inertia of the liquid in a tank of several different geometrical shapes. The results of this study will be useful in analyzing of the motion of LNG/LPG tanker, liquid cargo ship, and damaged ship.

  3. Safety evaluation for packaging transport of LSA-II liquids in MC-312 cargo tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlstrom, R.F.

    1996-09-11

    This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes the onsite transfer of bulk LSA-II radioactive liquids in the 222-S Laboratory Cargo Tank and Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility Cargo Tanks (which are U.S. Department of Transportation MC-312 specification cargo tanks) from their operating facilities to tank farm facilities.

  4. Safety evaluation for packaging (Onsite) transport of LSA-II liquids in MC-312 cargo tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlstrom, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes the onsite transfer of bulk LSA-II radioactive liquids in the 222-S Laboratory Cargo Tank and Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility Cargo Tanks (which are U.S. Department of Transportation MC-312 specification cargo tanks) from their operating facilities to tank farm facilities

  5. Determination of oxygen in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre, M. de la; Lapena, J.; Galindo, F.; Couchoud, M.; Celis, B. de; Lopez-Araquistain, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The behaviour is analysed of a device for 'in-line' sampling and vacuum distillation. With this procedure 95 results were obtained for the solubility of oxygen in liquid sodium at temperatures between 125 0 and 300 0 C. The correlation between the concentration of oxygen in a saturation state and the corresponding temperature is represented by: 1g C = 6,17 - 2398/T, where C expressed ppm of oxygen by weight and T is the saturation temperature in 0 K. Reference is also made to the first results obtained with the electrochemical oxygen meter and the system for taking and recording data. (author)

  6. Behaviour of oxygen in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre Cabezas, M. de la

    1975-01-01

    In this work, the vacuum distillation method has been used for the determination of oxygen concentration in liquid sodium. During this investigation, more than 800 analyses have been made and a fluctuation of between 15 and 20$ has been noted in the results. The performance of a cold trap to remove oxygen from sodium has been studied and the corresponding mass transfer coefficient evaluated. The value of this coefficient was in good agreement with those achieved by other workers. (Authors) 69 refs

  7. Elephant's foot phenomenon in liquid storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.Q.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a method for analyzing the seismic response of a flat bottomed cylindrical liquid storage tank to vertical earthquake excitation. Here, vertical earthquake acceleration is considered to correspond to an increase in the density of a stored liquid. Taking into account the vertical and horizontal earthquake loads, hydrostatic pressure, and considering restrictive moment and shear forces at shell-bottom welded joint, the author has calculated circumferential and longitudinal stresses. These are combined to more accurately approximate the stresses at the base shell course. The calculated result closely conforms to the actual damage, termed ''elephant's foot,'' observed in the fuel storage tanks damaged in the Tangshan earthquake. This result shows that the ''elephant's foot'' phenomenon is not caused by buckling of the tank shell due to longitudinal compressive stresses resulting from horizontal earthquake acceleration, but rather by the combined stresses in the base shell course of the storage tank exceeding the yield strength of the shell course material. The effect due to vertical earthquake load is more than the effect from the horizontal load. Finally, some earthquake resistant methods to prevent the ''elephant's foot'' phenomenon are suggested by the author.

  8. Annular Air Leaks in a liquid hydrogen storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, AG; Youngquist, RC; Starr, SO

    2017-12-01

    Large liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage tanks are vital infrastructure for NASA, the DOD, and industrial users. Over time, air may leak into the evacuated, perlite filled annular region of these tanks. Once inside, the extremely low temperatures will cause most of the air to freeze. If a significant mass of air is allowed to accumulate, severe damage can result from nominal draining operations. Collection of liquid air on the outer shell may chill it below its ductility range, resulting in fracture. Testing and analysis to quantify the thermal conductivity of perlite that has nitrogen frozen into its interstitial spaces and to determine the void fraction of frozen nitrogen within a perlite/frozen nitrogen mixture is presented. General equations to evaluate methods for removing frozen air, while avoiding fracture, are developed. A hypothetical leak is imposed on an existing tank geometry and a full analysis of that leak is detailed. This analysis includes a thermal model of the tank and a time-to-failure calculation. Approaches to safely remove the frozen air are analyzed, leading to the conclusion that the most feasible approach is to allow the frozen air to melt and to use a water stream to prevent the outer shell from chilling.

  9. Radiation exposure rate and liquid level measurement inside a high level liquid waste (HLLW) storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sur, B.; Yue, S.; Thekkevarriam, A.

    2007-01-01

    An instrument based on an inexpensive, small silicon diode has been developed and used to measure, for the first time, the gamma radiation exposure rate profile inside a 6.4 mm diameter reentrant thermo-well tube, immersed in the highly radioactive liquid solution in an HLLW storage tank. The measurement agrees with previous calculations of exposure rate, and provides confirmation for safe and effective radiation work plans and material selection for investigations and remediation of the storage tank facility. The measured radiation exposure rate profile is also used to confirm that the position of tank internal structures have not changed because of aging and corrosion, and to obtain, within a few mm, the level of liquid inside the tank. (author)

  10. Potential radiation damage: Storage tanks for liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    High level waste at SRS is stored in carbon steel tanks constructed during the period 1951 to 1981. This waste contains radionuclides that decay by alpha, beta, or gamma emission or are spontaneous neutronsources. Thus, a low intensity radiation field is generated that is capable of causing displacement damage to the carbon steel. The potential for degradation of mechanical properties was evaluated by comparing the estimated displacement damage with published data relating changes in Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact energy to neutron exposure. Experimental radiation data was available for three of the four grades of carbonsteel from which the tanks were constructed and is applicable to all four steels. Estimates of displacement damage arising from gamma and neutron radiation have been made based on the radionuclide contents for high level waste that are cited in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Liquid Waste Handling Facilities in the 200-Area. Alpha and beta emissions do not penetrate carbon steel to a sufficient depth to affect the bulk properties of the tank walls but may aggravate corrosion processes. The damage estimates take into account the source of the waste (F- or H-Area), the several types of tank service, and assume wateras an attenuating medium. Estimates of displacement damage are conservative because they are based on the highest levels of radionuclide contents reported in the SAR and continuous replenishment of the radionuclides

  11. Corrosion of steel tanks in liquid nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Giordano, Celia M.; Saenz, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand how solution chemistry would impact on the corrosion of waste storage steel tanks at the Hanford Site. Future tank waste operations are expected to process wastes that are more dilute with respect to some current corrosion inhibiting waste constituents. Assessment of corrosion damage and of the influence of exposure time and electrolyte composition, using simulated (non-radioactive) wastes, of the double-shell tank wall carbon steel alloys is being conducted in a statistically designed long-term immersion experiment. Corrosion rates at different times of immersion were determined using both weight-loss determinations and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Localized corrosion susceptibility was assessed using short-term cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves. The results presented in this paper correspond to electrochemical and weight-loss measurements of the immersed coupons during the first year of immersion from a two year immersion plan. A good correlation was obtained between electrochemical measurements, weight-loss determinations and visual observations. Very low general corrosion rates ( -1 ) were estimated using EIS measurements, indicating that general corrosion rate of the steel in contact with liquid wastes would no be a cause of tank failure even for these out-of-chemistry limit wastes. (author) [es

  12. Oxygen mass transfer in a stirred tank bioreactor using different impeller configurations for environmental purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a miniature stirred tank bioreactor was designed for treatment of waste gas containing benzene, toluene and xylene. Oxygen mass transfer characteristics for various twin and single-impeller systems were investigated for 6 configurations in a vessel with 10 cm of inner diameter and working volume of 1.77L. Three types of impellers, namely, Rushton turbine, Pitched 4blades and Pitched 2blades impellers with downward pumping have been used. Deionized water was used as a liquid phase. With respect to other independent variables such as agitation speed, aeration rate, type of sparger, number of impellers, the relative performance of these impellers was assessed by comparing the values of (KLa) as a key parameter. Based on the experimental data, empirical correlations as a function of the operational conditions have been proposed, to study the oxygen transfer rates from air bubbles generated in the bioreactor. It was shown that twin Rushton turbine configuration demonstrates superior performance (23% to 77% enhancement in KLa) compared with other impeller compositions and that sparger type has negligible effect on oxygen mass transfer rate. Agitation speeds of 400 to 800 rpm were the most efficient speeds for oxygen mass transfer in the stirred bioreactor. PMID:23369581

  13. Monitoring and analysis of liquid storage in LNG tank based on different support springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hua; Sun, Jianping; Li, Ke; Wu, Zheng; Chen, Qidong; Chen, Guodong; Cao, Can

    2018-04-01

    With the rapid development of social modernization, LNG vehicles are springing up in daily life. However, it is difficult to monitor and judge the liquid storage tanks accurately and quickly. Based on this, this paper presents a new method of liquid storage monitoring, LNG tank on-line vibration monitoring system. By collecting the vibration frequency of LNG tank and tank liquid and supporting spring system, the liquid storage quality in the tank can be calculated. In this experiment, various vibration modes of the tank spring system are fully taken into account. The vibration effects of different types of support springs on the LNG tank system were investigated. The results show that the spring model has a great influence on the test results. This study provides a technical reference for the selection of suitable support springs for liquid storage monitoring.

  14. Foil bearing performance in liquid nitrogen and liquid oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genge, Gary G.; Saville, Marshall; Gu, Alston

    1993-01-01

    Space transfer vehicles and other power and propulsion systems require long-life turbopumps. Rolling-element bearings used in current turbopumps do not have sufficient life for these applications. Process fluid foil bearings have established long life, with exceptional reliability, over a wide range of temperatures and fluids in many high-speed turbomachinery applications. However, actual data on bearing performance in cryogenic fluids has been minimal. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and AlliedSignal Aerospace Systems and Equipment (ASE) have attempted to characterize the leaf-type compliant foil bearing in oxygen and nitrogen. The work performed under a joint internal research and development program between Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and ASE demonstrated that the foil bearing has load capacities of at least 266 psi in liquid oxygen and 352 psi in liquid nitrogen. In addition, the bearing demonstrated a direct damping coefficient of 40 to 50 lb-sec/in. with a damping ratio of .7 to 1.4 in. liquid nitrogen using a bearing sized for upper-stage turbopumps. With the results from this testing and the years of successful use in air cycle machines and other applications, leaf-type compliant foil bearings are ready for testing in liquid oxygen turbopumps.

  15. Total hydrocarbon content (THC) testing in liquid oxygen (LOX) systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghelli, B. J.; Obregon, R. E.; Ross, H. R.; Hebert, B. J.; Sass, J. P.; Dirschka, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    The measured Total Hydrocarbon Content (THC) levels in liquid oxygen (LOX) systems at Stennis Space Center (SSC) have shown wide variations. Examples of these variations include the following: 1) differences between vendor-supplied THC values and those obtained using standard SSC analysis procedures; and 2) increasing THC values over time at an active SSC test stand in both storage and run vessels. A detailed analysis of LOX sampling techniques, analytical instrumentation, and sampling procedures will be presented. Additional data obtained on LOX system operations and LOX delivery trailer THC values during the past 12-24 months will also be discussed. Field test results showing THC levels and the distribution of the THC's in the test stand run tank, modified for THC analysis via dip tubes, will be presented.

  16. Total Hydrocarbon Content (THC) Testing in Liquid Oxygen (LOX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghelli, B. J.; Obregon, R. E.; Ross, H. R.; Hebert, B. J.; Sass, J. P.; Dirschka, G. E.

    2016-01-01

    The measured Total Hydrocarbon Content (THC) levels in liquid oxygen (LOX) systems at Stennis Space Center (SSC) have shown wide variations. Examples of these variations include the following: 1) differences between vendor-supplied THC values and those obtained using standard SSC analysis procedures; and 2) increasing THC values over time at an active SSC test stand in both storage and run vessels. A detailed analysis of LOX sampling techniques, analytical instrumentation, and sampling procedures will be presented. Additional data obtained on LOX system operations and LOX delivery trailer THC values during the past 12-24 months will also be discussed. Field test results showing THC levels and the distribution of the THC's in the test stand run tank, modified for THC analysis via dip tubes, will be presented.

  17. Liquid oxygen liquid acquisition device bubble point tests with high pressure lox at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurns, J. M.; Hartwig, J. W.

    2012-04-01

    When transferring propellant in space, it is most efficient to transfer single phase liquid from a propellant tank to an engine. In earth's gravity field or under acceleration, propellant transfer is fairly simple. However, in low gravity, withdrawing single-phase fluid becomes a challenge. A variety of propellant management devices (PMDs) are used to ensure single-phase flow. One type of PMD, a liquid acquisition device (LAD) takes advantage of capillary flow and surface tension to acquire liquid. The present work reports on testing with liquid oxygen (LOX) at elevated pressures (and thus temperatures) (maximum pressure 1724 kPa and maximum temperature 122 K) as part of NASA's continuing cryogenic LAD development program. These tests evaluate LAD performance for LOX stored in higher pressure vessels that may be used in propellant systems using pressure fed engines. Test data shows a significant drop in LAD bubble point values at higher liquid temperatures, consistent with lower liquid surface tension at those temperatures. Test data also indicates that there are no first order effects of helium solubility in LOX on LAD bubble point prediction. Test results here extend the range of data for LOX fluid conditions, and provide insight into factors affecting predicting LAD bubble point pressures.

  18. Two-dimensional thermal analysis of liquid hydrogen tank insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babac, Gulru; Sisman, Altug [Istanbul Technical University, Energy Institute, Ayazaga campus, 34469 Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey); Cimen, Tolga [Jaguar and Landrover, Banbury Road, Gaydon, Warwick CV35 0RR (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) storage has the advantage of high volumetric energy density, while boil-off losses constitute a major disadvantage. To minimize the losses, complicated insulation techniques are necessary. In general, Multi Layer Insulation (MLI) and a Vapor-Cooled Shield (VCS) are used together in LH{sub 2} tanks. In the design of an LH{sub 2} tank with VCS, the main goal is to find the optimum location for the VCS in order to minimize heat leakage. In this study, a 2D thermal model is developed by considering the temperature dependencies of the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of hydrogen gas. The developed model is used to analyze the effects of model considerations on heat leakage predictions. Furthermore, heat leakage in insulation of LH{sub 2} tanks with single and double VCS is analyzed for an automobile application, and the optimum locations of the VCS for minimization of heat leakage are determined for both cases. (author)

  19. Seismic performance of spherical liquid storage tanks: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Alessandra; Demartino, Cristoforo; Greco, Rita; Rago, Carlo; Sulpizio, Concetta; Vanzi, Ivo

    2018-02-01

    Spherical storage tanks are widely used for various types of liquids, including hazardous contents, thus requiring suitable and careful design for seismic actions. On this topic, a significant case study is described in this paper, dealing with the dynamic analysis of a spherical storage tank containing butane. The analyses are based on a detailed finite element (FE) model; moreover, a simplified single-degree-of-freedom idealization is also set up and used for verification of the FE results. Particular attention is paid to the influence of sloshing effects and of the soil-structure interaction for which no special provisions are contained in technical codes for this reference case. Sloshing effects are investigated according to the current literature state of the art. An efficient methodology based on an "impulsive-convective" decomposition of the container-fluid motion is adopted for the calculation of the seismic force. With regard to the second point, considering that the tank is founded on piles, soil-structure interaction is taken into account by computing the dynamic impedances. Comparison between seismic action effects, obtained with and without consideration of sloshing and soil-structure interaction, shows a rather important influence of these parameters on the final results. Sloshing effects and soil-structure interaction can produce, for the case at hand, beneficial effects. For soil-structure interaction, this depends on the increase of the fundamental period and of the effective damping of the overall system, which leads to reduced design spectral values.

  20. Sampling of charged liquid radwaste stored in large tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchemitcheff, E.; Domage, M.; Bernard-Bruls, X.

    1995-01-01

    The final safe disposal of radwaste, in France and elsewhere, entails, for liquid effluents, their conversion to a stable solid form, hence implying their conditioning. The production of conditioned waste with the requisite quality, traceability of the characteristics of the packages produced, and safe operation of the conditioning processes, implies at least the accurate knowledge of the chemical and radiochemical properties of the effluents concerned. The problem in sampling the normally charged effluents is aggravated for effluents that have been stored for several years in very large tanks, without stirring and retrieval systems. In 1992, SGN was asked by Cogema to study the retrieval and conditioning of LL/ML chemical sludge and spent ion-exchange resins produced in the operation of the UP2 400 plant at La Hague, and stored temporarily in rectangular silos and tanks. The sampling aspect was crucial for validating the inventories, identifying the problems liable to arise in the aging of the effluents, dimensioning the retrieval systems and checking the transferability and compatibility with the downstream conditioning process. Two innovative self-contained systems were developed and built for sampling operations, positioned above the tanks concerned. Both systems have been operated in active conditions and have proved totally satisfactory for taking representative samples. Today SGN can propose industrially proven overall solutions, adaptable to the various constraints of many spent fuel cycle operators

  1. Polynomial Digital Control of a Series Equal Liquid Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobála Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-delays are mainly caused by the time required to transport mass, energy or information, but they can also be caused by processing time or accumulation. Typical examples of such processes are e.g. pumps, liquid storing tanks, distillation columns or some types of chemical reactors. In many cases time-delay is caused by the effect produced by the accumulation of a large number of low-order systems. Several industrial processes have the time-delay effect produced by the accumulation of a great number of low-order systems with the identical dynamic. The dynamic behavior of series these low-order systems is expressed by high-order system. One of possibilities of control of such processes is their approximation by low-order model with time-delay. The paper is focused on the design of the digital polynomial control of a set of equal liquid cylinder atmospheric tanks. The designed control algorithms are realized using the digital Smith Predictor (SP based on polynomial approach – by minimization of the Linear Quadratic (LQ criterion. The LQ criterion was combined with pole assignment.

  2. Observations of Confinement of a Paramagnetic Liquid in Model Propellant Tanks in Microgravity by the Kelvin Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, John; Gray, Donald D.; Barnard, Austin; Hazelton, Jennifer; Lechliter, Matthew; Starn, Andrew; Battleson, Charles; Glaspell, Shannon; Kreitzer, Paul; Leichliter, Michelle

    2002-11-01

    The magnetic Kelvin force has been proposed as an artificial gravity to control the orientation of paramagnetic liquid propellants such as liquid oxygen in a microgravity environment. This paper reports experiments performed in the NASA "Weightless Wonder" KC-135 aircraft, through the Reduced Gravity Student Flight Opportunities Program. The aircraft flies through a series of parabolic arcs providing about 25 s of microgravity in each arc. The experiment was conceived, designed, constructed, and performed by the undergraduate student team and their two faculty advisors. Two types of tanks were tested: square-base prismatic tanks 5 cm x 5 cm x 8.6 cm and circular cylinders 5 cm in diameter and 8.6 cm tall. The paramagnetic liquid was a 3.3 molar solution of MnCl2 in water. Tests were performed with each type of tank filled to depths of 1 cm and 4 cm. Each test compared a pair of tanks that were identical except that the base of one was a pole face of a 0.6 Tesla permanent magnet. The Kelvin force attracts paramagnetic materials toward regions of higher magnetic field. It was hypothesized that the Kelvin force would hold the liquid in the bottom of the tanks during the periods of microgravity. The tanks were installed in a housing that could slide on rails transverse to the flight direction. By manually shoving the housing, an identical impulse could be provided to each tank at the beginning of each period of microgravity. The resulting fluid motions were videotaped for later analysis.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Jet-Induced Mixing of a Large Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Vandresar, N. T.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect of fluid mixing on the depressurization of a large liquid hydrogen storage tank. The test tank is approximately ellipsoidal, having a volume of 4.89 m(exp 3) and an average wall heat flux of 4.2 W/m(exp 2) due to external heat input. A mixer unit was installed near the bottom of the tank to generate an upward directed axial jet flow normal to the liquid-vapor interface. Mixing tests were initiated after achieving thermally stratified conditions in the tank either by the introduction of hydrogen gas into the tank or by self-pressurization due to ambient heat leak through the tank wall. The subcooled liquid jet directed towards the liquid-vapor interface by the mixer induced vapor condensation and caused a reduction in tank pressure. Tests were conducted at two jet submergence depths for jet Reynolds numbers from 80,000 to 495,000 and Richardson numbers from 0.014 to 0.52. Results show that the rate of tank pressure change is controlled by the competing effects of subcooled jet flow and the free convection boundary layer flow due to external tank wall heating. It is shown that existing correlations for mixing time and vapor condensation rate based on small scale tanks may not be applicable to large scale liquid hydrogen systems.

  4. Wine evolution and spatial distribution of oxygen during storage in high-density polyethylene tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Alamo-Sanza, María; Laurie, V Felipe; Nevares, Ignacio

    2015-04-01

    Porous plastic tanks are permeable to oxygen due to the nature of the polymers with which they are manufactured. In the wine industry, these types of tanks are used mainly for storing wine surpluses. Lately, their use in combination with oak pieces has also been proposed as an alternative to mimic traditional barrel ageing. In this study, the spatial distribution of dissolved oxygen in a wine-like model solution, and the oxygen transfer rate (OTR) of high-density polyethylene tanks (HDPE), was analysed by means of a non-invasive opto-luminescence detector. Also, the chemical and sensory evolution of red wine, treated with oak pieces, and stored in HDPE tanks was examined and compared against traditional oak barrel ageing. The average OTR calculated for these tanks was within the commonly accepted amounts reported for new barrels. With regards to wine evolution, a number of compositional and sensory differences were observed between the wines aged in oak barrels and those stored in HDPE tanks with oak barrel alternatives. The use of HDPE tanks in combination with oak wood alternatives is a viable alternative too for ageing wine. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Tank issues: Design and placement of floating liquid monitoring wells. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedinger, M.S.

    1993-02-01

    Liquid product monitoring is the predominant method of external leak detection where the water table is within the zone of excavation. The paper discusses the use of liquid product monitors at new and old tank installations for detecting leaks from underground hydrocarbon storage tanks. The paper discusses the site conditions under which liquid product monitors can be effectively used, conditions which may mitigate or prevent the effective use of liquid product monitors, and the construction and placement of liquid product monitoring wells. Liquid product monitors are not used to determine the rate of tank leak. The rate of tank lead can be determined by other methods such as inventory or internal monitoring methods. Effective use of liquid product monitors or any other method of leak detection requires training and experience on the part of the user

  6. Liquid films on shake flask walls explain increasing maximum oxygen transfer capacities with elevating viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Heiner; Azizan, Amizon; Kümmel, Anne; Liao, Anping; Peter, Cyril P; Fonseca, João A; Hermann, Robert; Duarte, Tiago M; Büchs, Jochen

    2014-02-01

    In biotechnological screening and production, oxygen supply is a crucial parameter. Even though oxygen transfer is well documented for viscous cultivations in stirred tanks, little is known about the gas/liquid oxygen transfer in shake flask cultures that become increasingly viscous during cultivation. Especially the oxygen transfer into the liquid film, adhering on the shake flask wall, has not yet been described for such cultivations. In this study, the oxygen transfer of chemical and microbial model experiments was measured and the suitability of the widely applied film theory of Higbie was studied. With numerical simulations of Fick's law of diffusion, it was demonstrated that Higbie's film theory does not apply for cultivations which occur at viscosities up to 10 mPa s. For the first time, it was experimentally shown that the maximum oxygen transfer capacity OTRmax increases in shake flasks when viscosity is increased from 1 to 10 mPa s, leading to an improved oxygen supply for microorganisms. Additionally, the OTRmax does not significantly undermatch the OTRmax at waterlike viscosities, even at elevated viscosities of up to 80 mPa s. In this range, a shake flask is a somehow self-regulating system with respect to oxygen supply. This is in contrary to stirred tanks, where the oxygen supply is steadily reduced to only 5% at 80 mPa s. Since, the liquid film formation at shake flask walls inherently promotes the oxygen supply at moderate and at elevated viscosities, these results have significant implications for scale-up. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Design of a 500 lbf liquid oxygen and liquid methane rocket engine for suborbital flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillo, Jesus Eduardo

    Liquid methane (LCH4)is the most promising rocket fuel for our journey to Mars and other space entities. Compared to liquid hydrogen, the most common cryogenic fuel used today, methane is denser and can be stored at a more manageable temperature; leading to more affordable tanks and a lighter system. The most important advantage is it can be produced from local sources using in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) technology. This will allow the production of the fuel needed to come back to earth on the surface of Mars, or the space entity being explored, making the overall mission more cost effective by enabling larger usable mass. The major disadvantage methane has over hydrogen is it provides a lower specific impulse, or lower rocket performance. The UTEP Center for Space Exploration and Technology Research (cSETR) in partnership with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been the leading research center for the advancement of Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Liquid Methane (LCH4) propulsion technologies. Through this partnership, the CROME engine, a throattable 500 lbf LOX/LCH4 rocket engine, was designed and developed. The engine will serve as the main propulsion system for Daedalus, a suborbital demonstration vehicle being developed by the cSETR. The purpose of Daedalus mission and the engine is to fire in space under microgravity conditions to demonstrate its restartability. This thesis details the design process, decisions, and characteristics of the engine to serve as a complete design guide.

  8. Impulsive response of nonuniform density liquid in a laterally excited tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.; Chang, Y.W.

    1994-04-01

    A study on the impulsive component of the dynamic response of a liquid of nonuniform density in a tank undergoing lateral base excitations is presented. The system considered is a circular cylindrical tank containing an incompressible and inviscid liquid whose density increases with the liquid depth. The density distribution along the depth can be of any arbitrary continuous or discontinuous function. In the analysis, the liquid field is divided into n layers. The thickness of the liquid layers can be different, but the density of each liquid layer is considered to be uniform and is equal to the value of the original liquid density at the mid-height of that layer. The problem is solved by the eigenfunction expansion in conjunction with the transfer matrix technique. The effect of the nonuniform liquid density on the impulsive component of the dynamic response is illustrated in a numerical example in which the linear and cosine distributions of the liquid density are assumed. The response quantities examined include the impulsive pressure, base shear and moments. The results are presented in tabular and graphical forms. It is found that the impulsive pressure distribution along the tank wall is not sensitive to the detailed distribution function of the density, and the base shear and moments for the nonuniform liquid can be estimated by assuming an equivalent uniform liquid density that preserves the total liquid weight. The effect of tank flexibility is assessed by a simple approach in which the response quantities for flexible tanks are evaluated by simplified equations

  9. Heater for Combustible-Gas Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, Walter B.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed heater for pressurizing hydrogen, oxygen, or another combustible liquid or gas sealed in immersion cup in pressurized tank. Firmly supported in finned cup, coiled rod transfers heat through liquid metal to gas tank. Heater assembly welded or bolted to tank flange.

  10. Application of mass-spring model in seismic analysis of liquid storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiayi; Bai Xinran; Li Xiaoxuan

    2013-01-01

    There are many tanks for storing liquid in nuclear power plant. When seismic analysis is performed, swaying of liquid may change the mechanical parameters of those tanks, such as the center of mass and the moment of inertia, etc., so the load due to swaying of liquid can't be neglected. Mass-spring model is a simplified model to calculate the dynamic pressure of liquid in tank under earthquake, which is derived by the theory of Housner and given in the specification of seismic analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures and Commentary-4-98 (ASCE-4-98 for short hereinafter). According to the theory of Housner and ASCE-4-98, the mass-spring 3-D FEM model for storage tank and liquid in it was established, by which the force of stored liquid acted on liquid storage tank in nuclear power plant under horizontal seismic load was calculated. The calculated frequency of liquid swaying and effect of liquid convection on storage tank were compared with those calculated by simplified formula. It is shown that the results of 3-D FEM model are reasonable and reliable. Further more, it is more direct and convenient compared with description in ASCE-4-98 when the mass-spring model is applied to 3-D FEM model for seismic analysis, from which the displacement and stress distributions of the plate-shell elements or the 3-D solid finite elements can be obtained directly from the seismic input model. (authors)

  11. Pressurization of a Flightweight, Liquid Hydrogen Tank: Evaporation & Condensation at a Liquid/Vapor Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mark E. M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis and simulation of evaporation and condensation at a motionless liquid/vapor interface. A 1-D model equation, emphasizing heat and mass transfer at the interface, is solved in two ways, and incorporated into a subgrid interface model within a CFD simulation. Simulation predictions are compared with experimental data from the CPST Engineering Design Unit tank, a cryogenic fluid management test tank in 1-g. The numerical challenge here is the physics of the liquid/vapor interface; pressurizing the ullage heats it by several degrees, and sets up an interfacial temperature gradient that transfers heat to the liquid phase-the rate limiting step of condensation is heat conducted through the liquid and vapor. This physics occurs in thin thermal layers O(1 mm) on either side of the interface which is resolved by the subgrid interface model. An accommodation coefficient of 1.0 is used in the simulations which is consistent with theory and measurements. This model is predictive of evaporation/condensation rates, that is, there is no parameter tuning.

  12. The Impact of Sloshing Liquids on Ship Stability for Various Dimensions of Partly Filled Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemyslaw Krata

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Liquid sloshing phenomenon taking place in partly filled ships’ tanks directly affects the stability of a vessel. However, only static calculations are carried out onboard ships nowadays and static transfer of liquid weight is taken into account in the course of routine stability calculation. The paper is focused on a dynamic heeling moment due to liquid sloshing in tanks onboard ships. A number of numerical simulations of liquid sloshing taking place in a moving tank is carried out. The wide range of ship’s tanks is taken into account. The conducted CFD simulations are experimentally verified. Finally, the method of an assessment of the liquid sloshing impact on ship transverse stability is worked out. The key point of the method is a dynamic coefficient describing relation of the researched dynamic heeling moment and the quasi-static one in terms of dynamic stability of a vessel which is related to the weather criterion of ship stability assessment.

  13. Insulation systems for liquid methane fuel tanks for supersonic cruise aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, H. F.; Delduca, D.

    1972-01-01

    Two insulation systems for tanks containing liquid methane in supersonic cruise-type aircraft were designed and tested after an extensive materials investigation. One system is an external insulation and the other is an internal wet-type insulation system. Tank volume was maximized by making the tank shape approach a rectangular parallelopiped. One tank was designed to use the external insulation and the other tank to use the internal insulation. Performance of the external insulation system was evaluated on a full-scale tank under the temperature environment of -320 F to 700 F and ambient pressures of ground-level atmospheric to 1 psia. Problems with installing the internal insulation on the test tank prevented full-scale evaluation of performance; however, small-scale testing verified thermal conductivity, temperature capability, and installed density.

  14. Installation of the liquid nitrogen tank for the external cryogenics system

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The picture shows the installation of the 50000l liquid nitrogen tank in its first position next to the SHL annex of the SX5 building. The tank will be moved to its final position after the completion of the surface tests.

  15. Updated Drainable Interstitial Liquid Volume Estimates for 119 Single Shell Tanks (SST) Declared Stabilized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FIELD, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    This document assesses the volume of drainable interstitial liquid (DIL) and pumpable liquid remaining in 119 single-shell tanks (SSTs) that were previously stabilized. Based on the methodology and assumptions presented, the DIL exceeded the stabilization criterion of less than 50,000 gal in two of the 119 SSTs. Tank 241-C-102 had an estimated DIL of 62,000 gal, and the estimated DIL for tank 241-BY-103 was 58,000 gal. In addition, tanks 241-BX-103, 241-T-102, and 241-T-112 appear to exceed the stabilization criterion of 5,000 gal supernatant. An assessment of the source of the supernatant in these tanks is beyond the scope of this document. The actual DIL and pumpable liquid remaining volumes for each tank may vary significantly from estimated volumes as a result of specific tank waste characteristics that are not currently measured or defined. Further refinement to the pumpable liquid and DIL volume estimates may be needed as additional tank waste information is obtained

  16. Study on Calculation of Liquid Level And Storage of Tanks for LNG-fueled Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Wang, Guoqing; Liu, Chang

    2018-01-01

    As the ongoing development of the application of LNG as a clean energy in waterborne transport industry, the fleet scale of LNG-fueled vessels enlarged and the safety operation has attracted more attention in the industry. Especially the accurate detection of liquid level of LNG tanks is regarded as an important issue to ensure a safe and stable operation of LNG-fueled ships and a key parameter to keep the proper functioning of marine fuel storage system, supply system and safety control system. At present, detection of LNG tank liquid level mainly adopts differential pressure detection method. Liquid level condition could be found from the liquid level reference tables. However in practice, since LNG-fueled vessels are generally not in a stationary state, liquid state within the LNG tanks will constantly change, the detection of storage of tanks only by reference to the tables will cause deviation to some extent. By analyzing the temperature under different pressure, the effects of temperature change on density and volume integration calculation, a method of calculating the liquid level and storage of LNG tanks is put forward making the calculation of liquid level and actual storage of LNG tanks more accurately and providing a more reliable basis for the calculation of energy consumption level and operation economy for LNG-fueled vessels.

  17. Numerical simulation on stir system of jet ballast in high level liquid waste storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yingchun

    2012-01-01

    The stir system of jet ballast in high level liquid waste storage tank was simulation object. Gas, liquid and solid were air, sodium nitrate liquor and titanium whitening, respectively. The mathematic model based on three-fluid model and the kinetic theory of particles was established for the stir system of jet ballast in high level liquid waste storage tank. The CFD commercial software was used for solving this model. The detail flow parameters as three phase velocity, pressure and phase loadings were gained. The calculated results agree with the experimental results, so they can well define the flow behavior in the tank. And this offers a basic method for the scale-up and optimization design of the stir system of jet ballast in high level liquid waste storage tank. (author)

  18. 49 CFR 173.319 - Cryogenic liquids in tank cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Federal Railroad Administration may be made by e-mail to [email protected] or telephone call to (202....113A60W. (e) Special requirements for class DOT 113 tank cars—(1) A class DOT-113 tank car need not be... integrity test. When required by paragraph (e)(1) of this section, either of the following thermal integrity...

  19. Assessment of single-shell tank residual-liquid issues at Hanford Site, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, K.S.; Stout, L.A.; Napier, B.A.; Reisenauer, A.E.; Landstrom, D.K.

    1983-06-01

    This report provides an assessment of the overall effectiveness and implications of jet pumping the interstitial liquids (IL) from single-shell tanks at Hanford. The jet-pumping program, currently in progress at Hanford, involves the planned removal of IL contained in 89 of the 149 single-shell tanks and its transfer to double-shell tanks after volume reduction by evaporation. The purpose of this report is to estimate the public and worker doses associated with (1) terminating pumping immediately, (2) pumping to a 100,000-gal limit per tank, (3) pumping to a 50,000-gal limit per tank, and (4) pumping to the maximum practical liquid removal level of 30,000 gal. Assessment of the cost-effectiveness of these various levels of pumping in minimizing any undue health and safety risks to the public or worker is also presented

  20. DESIGN OF LIQUID-STORAGE TANK: RESULTS OF SOFTWARE MODELING VS CALCULATIONS ACCORDING TO EUROCODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matko Gulin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to show the design process of a liquid-storage tank shell according to Eurocode and compare the results obtained using the norms with those from a finite element method (FEM analysis. The calculations were performed for an aboveground vertical steel water-storage tank with a variable thickness wall and stiffening ring on top. First, the types of liquid storage tanks are briefly explained. Second, the given tank is described. Third, an analysis of the tank wall according to the Eurocode was carried out. The FEM analysis was performed using the Scia Engineer ver. 17 software. Finally, all the results are presented in tables and compared.

  1. Engineering evaluation of alternatives: Technologies for monitoring interstitial liquids in single-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Jenkins, C.E.

    1996-02-01

    A global search of mature, emerging, and conceptual tank liquid monitoring technologies, along with a historical review of Hanford tank farm waste monitoring instrumentation, was conducted to identify methods for gauging the quantity of interstitial waste liquids contained in Hanford SSTs. Upon completion of the search, an initial screening of alternatives was conducted to identify candidates which might be capable of monitoring interstitial tank liquids. The nine candidate technologies that were selected, evaluated, and ranked are summarized. Hydrostatic tank gauging (HTG) is the technology generally recommended for gauging the quantity of process materials contained in Hanford SSTs. HTG is a mass-based technique that has the capability for continuous remote monitoring. HTG has the advantages of no moving parts, intrinsic safety, and potentially gauging a one-million gal tank with a precision of approximately ±500 pounds (i.e., ±62 gal of water or ±0.02 in. of level in a 75 ft diameter tank). HTG is relatively inexpensive and probe design, construction, testing, installation, and operation should be straightforward. HTG should be configured as part of a hybrid tank gauging system. A hybrid system employs two or more independent measurement systems which function in concert to provide redundancy, improved accuracy, and maximum information at minimum cost. An excellent hybrid system choice for monitoring interstitial liquids in SSTs might be the combination of HTG with thermal differential technology

  2. Comparison of domiciliary oxygen using liquid oxygen and concentrator in northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Ling Su

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Patients in the LOG used oxygen for longer hours, went on more outings, and were more likely to travel with oxygen than patients in the OCG. Being ambulatory with liquid oxygen might enable patients with COPD to walk more effectively.

  3. Fractional Consumption of Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen During the Space Shuttle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Jonathan K.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle uses the propellants, liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, to meet part of the propulsion requirements from ground to orbit. The Kennedy Space Center procured over 25 million kilograms of liquid hydrogen and over 250 million kilograms of liquid oxygen during the 3D-year Space Shuttle Program. Because of the cryogenic nature of the propellants, approximately 55% of the total purchased liquid hydrogen and 30% of the total purchased liquid oxygen were used in the Space Shuttle Main Engines. The balance of the propellants were vaporized during operations for various purposes. This paper dissects the total consumption of liqUid hydrogen and liqUid oxygen and determines the fraction attributable to each of the various processing and launch operations that occurred during the entire Space Shuttle Program at the Kennedy Space Center.

  4. Liquid Hydrogen Propellant Tank Sub-Surface Pressurization with Gaseous Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Cartagena, W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of a propellant tank pressurization system with the pressurant diffuser intentionally submerged beneath the surface of the liquid. Propellant tanks and pressurization systems are typically designed with the diffuser positioned to apply pressurant gas directly into the tank ullage space when the liquid propellant is settled. Space vehicles, and potentially propellant depots, may need to conduct tank pressurization operations in micro-gravity environments where the exact location of the liquid relative to the diffuser is not well understood. If the diffuser is positioned to supply pressurant gas directly to the tank ullage space when the propellant is settled, then it may become partially or completely submerged when the liquid becomes unsettled in a microgravity environment. In such case, the pressurization system performance will be adversely affected requiring additional pressurant mass and longer pressurization times. This series of tests compares and evaluates pressurization system performance using the conventional method of supplying pressurant gas directly to the propellant tank ullage, and then supplying pressurant gas beneath the liquid surface. The pressurization tests were conducted on the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) located at Test Stand 300 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). EDU is a ground based Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) test article supported by Glenn Research Center (GRC) and MSFC. A 150 ft3 propellant tank was filled with liquid hydrogen (LH2). The pressurization system used regulated ambient helium (GHe) as a pressurant, a variable position valve to maintain flow rate, and two identical independent pressurant diffusers. The ullage diffuser was located in the forward end of the tank and was completely exposed to the tank ullage. The submerged diffuser was located in the aft end of the tank and was completely submerged when the tank liquid level was 10% or greater

  5. Radiological characterization of liquid effluent hold up tank for generating data base for future decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapkal, Jyotsna A.; Singh, Pratap; Verma, Amit; Yadav, R.K.B.; Thakare, S.V.

    2018-01-01

    Operations at Radiological laboratory facilities are involved in fabrication of high activity radioactive sources like 60 Co, 192 1r and 137 Cs, handling of long lived radionuclides like 137 Cs/ 90 Sr, radiochemical processing and production of short-lived radioisotopes for medical diagnosis and treatment of patients. Typical liquid waste management feature at any Radiological Laboratory facility primarily consists of effluent tanks which store the liquid effluent wastes generated during radiochemical processing and fabrication of reactor produced radioisotopes. The liquid waste generated from various laboratories are collected to low level sump tanks from where it is transferred to hold up tanks. The liquid waste is transferred to centralized effluent treatment plant, analysis and characterization of the same is carried out. This paper explains the characterization study of samples drawn from the liquid effluent tank which would be helpful for planning for decontamination as well as for decommissioning and in management of radioactive wastes. In this study the crud deposited at the bottom of tank was collected for gamma spectrometry analysis. Radiation field was measured, at the bottom of the tank for correlating the activity present and the radiation field

  6. Dynamic analysis of liquid storage tank including hydrodynamic interaction by boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, I.T.; Ting, K.

    1987-01-01

    Dynamic response of liquid storage tanks considering the hydrodynamic interactions due to earthquake ground motion has been extensively studied. Several finite element procedures, such as Balendra et. al. (1982) and Haroun (1983), have been devoted to investigate the dynamic interaction between the deformable wall of the tank and the liquid. Further, if the geometry of the storage tank can not be described by axi-symmetric case, the tank wall and the fluid domain must be discretized by three dimensional finite elements to investigate the fluid-structure-interactions. Thus, the need of large computer memory and expense of vast computer time usually make this analysis impractical. To demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of the solution technique developed herein, the dynamic behavior of ground-supported, deformed, cylindrical tank with incompressible fluid conducted by Haroun (1983) are analyzed. Good correlations of hydrodynamic pressure distribution between the computed results with the referenced solutions are noted. The fluid compressibility significantly affects the hydrodynamic pressures of the liquid-tank-interactions and the work which is done on this discussion is still little attention. Thus, the influences of the compressibility of the liquid on the reponse of the liquid storage due to ground motion are then drawn. By the way, the complex-valued frequency response functions for hydrodynamic forces of Haroun's problem are also displayed. (orig./GL)

  7. Influence of slosh baffles on thermodynamic performance in liquid hydrogen tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan; Li, Cui

    2018-03-15

    A calibrated CFD model is built to investigate the influence of slosh baffles on the pressurization performance in liquid hydrogen (LH 2 ) tank. The calibrated CFD model is proven to have great predictive ability by compared against the flight experimental results. The pressure increase, thermal stratification and wall heat transfer coefficient of LH 2 tank have been detailedly studied. The results indicate that slosh baffles have a great influence on tank pressure increase, fluid temperature distribution and wall heat transfer. Owning to the existence of baffles, the stratification thickness increases gradually with the distance from tank axis to tank wall. While for the tank without baffles, the stratification thickness decreases firstly and then increases with the increase of the distance from the axis. The "M" type stratified thickness distribution presents in tank without baffles. One modified heat transfer coefficient correlation has been proposed with the change of fluid temperature considered by multiplying a temperature correction factor. It has been proven that the average relative prediction errors of heat transfer coefficient reduced from 19.08% to 4.98% for the wet tank wall of the tank, from 8.93% to 4.27% for the dry tank wall, respectively, calculated by the modified correlation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Tank 241-C-103 organic vapor and liquid characterization and supporting activities, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The action proposed is to sample the vapor space and liquid waste and perform other supporting activities in Tank 241-C-103 located in the 241-C Tank Farm on the Hanford Site. Operations at Tank 241-C-103 are curtailed because of an unreviewed safety question (USQ) concerning flammability issues of the organic waste in the tank. This USQ must be resolved before normal operation and surveillance of the tank can resume. In addition to the USQ, Tank 241-C-103 is thought to be involved in several cases of exposure of individuals to noxious vapors. This safety issue requires the use of supplied air for workers in the vicinity of the tank. Because of the USQ, the US Department of Energy proposes to characterize the waste in the vapor space and the organic and aqueous layers, to determine the volume of the organic layer. This action is needed to: (1) assess potential risks to workers, the public, and the environment from continued routine tank operations and (2) provide information on the waste material in the tank to facilitate a comprehensive safety analysis of this USQ. The information would be used to determine if a flammable condition within the tank is credible. This information would be used to prevent or mitigate an accident during continued waste storage and future waste characterization. Alternatives to the proposed activities have been considered in this analysis

  9. Space shuttle with common fuel tank for liquid rocket booster and main engines (supertanker space shuttle)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    An operation and schedule enhancement is shown that replaces the four-body cluster (Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO), external tank, and two solid rocket boosters) with a simpler two-body cluster (SSO and liquid rocket booster/external tank). At staging velocity, the booster unit (liquid-fueled booster engines and vehicle support structure) is jettisoned while the remaining SSO and supertank continues on to orbit. The simpler two-bodied cluster reduces the processing and stack time until SSO mate from 57 days (for the solid rocket booster) to 20 days (for the liquid rocket booster). The areas in which liquid booster systems are superior to solid rocket boosters are discussed. Alternative and future generation vehicles are reviewed to reveal greater performance and operations enhancements with more modifications to the current methods of propulsion design philosophy, e.g., combined cycle engines, and concentric propellant tanks.

  10. Underground disposal of tanks containing liquid and inflammable hydrocarbons; Mise sous talus ou sous terre des reservoirs contenant des hydrocarbures liquides inflammables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukuczka, P.; Giovannini, B.; Caumont, M.; Varin, F

    2001-09-15

    The protection from thermal and mechanical stresses, of hazardous products tanks, by earth covering, is often used since many years in France and in many countries of Europe. In the case of hydrocarbons tanks, only small capacity tanks are covering. The aim of this report is to evaluate the feasibility of this technique for big capacity tanks as refinery tanks. It details the different typologies of tanks containing inflammable liquids and the associated systems, examines if the covering technique presents some special difficulties and precises the specifications needed for the new tanks being covering. (A.L.B.)

  11. Acoustically Forced Coaxial Hydrogen / Liquid Oxygen Jet Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Conference Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 18 Mar 2016 – 15 May 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Acoustically Forced Coaxial Hydrogen / Liquid Oxygen Jet...perform, display, or disclose the work. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES For presentation at 28th Annual Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems...serious problems in the development of liquid rocket engines. In order to understand and predict them, it is necessary to understand how representative

  12. Evaluation and ranking of the tank focus area solid liquid separation needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D.J.

    1995-08-17

    The Tank Focus Area (TFA) of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) addresses remediation of liquid waste currently stored in underground tanks. Several baseline technologies for treatment of tank waste can be categorized into three types of solid liquid separation: (a) removal of radioactive species that have been absorbed or precipitated, (b) pretreatment for ion exchange, and (c) volume reduction of sludge and wash water. The solids formed from precipitation or absorption of radioactive ions require separation from the liquid phase to permit treatment of the liquid as Low Level Waste. Prior to ion exchange of radioactive ions, removal of insoluble solids is needed to prevent bed fouling and downstream contamination. Volume reduction of washed sludge solids would reduce the tank space required for interim storage. The scope of this document is to evaluate the solid/liquid separations needed to permit treatment of tank wastes to accomplish these goals. The document summarizes previous alkaline waste testing, with an emphasis on crossflow filtration, to-obtain a general understanding of the behavior of radioactive wastes on available equipment. The document also provides general information about filtration and a path forward for testing.

  13. Evaluation and ranking of the tank focus area solid liquid separation needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCadbe, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Tank Focus Area (TFA) of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) addresses remediation of liquid waste currently stored in underground tanks. Several baseline technologies for treatment of tank waste can be categorized into three types of solid liquid separation: (a) removal of radioactive species that have been absorbed or precipitated, (b) pretreatment for ion exchange, and (c) volume reduction of sludge and wash water. The solids formed from precipitation or absorption of radioactive ions require separation from the liquid phase to permit treatment of the liquid as Low Level Waste. Prior to ion exchange of radioactive ions, removal of insoluble solids is needed to prevent bed fouling and downstream contamination. Volume reduction of washed sludge solids would reduce the tank space required for interim storage. The scope of this document is to evaluate the solid/liquid separations needed to permit treatment of tank wastes to accomplish these goals. The document summarizes previous alkaline waste testing, with an emphasis on crossflow filtration, to-obtain a general understanding of the behavior of radioactive wastes on available equipment. The document also provides general information about filtration and a path forward for testing

  14. Oxygen Distribution and Potential Ammonia Oxidation in Floating, Liquid Manure Crusts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Daniel Aagren; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Floating, organic crusts on liquid manure, stored as a result of animal production, reduce emission of ammonia (NH3) and other volatile compounds during storage. The occurrence of NO2- and NO3- in the crusts indicate the presence of actively metabolizing NH3 oxidizing bacteria (AOB) which may...... be partly responsible for this mitigation effect. Six manure tanks with organic covers (straw and natural) were surveyed to investigate the prevalence and potential activity of AOB and its dependence on the O2 availability in the crust matrix as studied by electrochemical profiling. Oxygen penetration...... microorganisms, including AOB. The microbial activity may thus contribute to a considerable reduction of ammonia emissions from slurry tanks with well-developed crusts....

  15. Study of oxygen mass transfer coefficient and oxygen uptake rate in a stirred tank reactor for uranium ore bioleaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zokaei-Kadijani, S.; Safdari, J.; Mousavian, M.A.; Rashidi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mass transfer coefficient does not depend on biomass concentration. ► The pulp density has a negative effect on mass transfer coefficient. ► The pulp density is the unique factor that affects maximum OUR. ► In this work, Neale’s correlation is corrected for prediction of mass transfer coefficient. ► Biochemical reaction is a limiting factor in the uranium bioleaching process. - Abstract: In this work, the volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient and the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) were studied for uranium ore bioleaching process by Acidthiobacillus ferrooxidans in a stirred tank reactor. The Box-Bohnken design method was used to study the effect of operating parameters on the oxygen mass transfer coefficient. The investigated factors were agitation speed (rpm), aeration rate (vvm) and pulp density (% weight/volume) of the stirred tank reactor. Analysis of experimental results showed that the oxygen mass transfer coefficient had low dependence on biomass concentration but had higher dependence on the agitation speed, aeration rate and pulp density. The obtained biological enhancement factors were equal to ones in experiments. On the other hand, the obtained values for Damkohler number (Da < 0.468) indicated that the process was limited by the biochemical reaction rate. Experimental results obtained for oxygen mass transfer coefficient were correlated with the empirical relations proposed by Garcia-Ochoa and Gomez (2009) and Neale and Pinches (1994). Due to the high relative error in the correlation of Neale and Pinches, that correlation was corrected and the coefficient of determination was calculated to be 89%. The modified correlation has been obtained based on a wide range of operating conditions, which can be used to determine the mass transfer coefficient in a bioreactor

  16. Comparison of different methods for liquid level adjustment in tank prover calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, D A; Farias, E C; Gabriel, P C; Aquino, M H; Gomes, R S E; Aibe, V Y

    2015-01-01

    The adjustment of the liquid level during the calibration of tank provers with fixed volume is normally done by overfill but it can be done in different ways. In this article four level adjustment techniques are compared: plate, pipette, ruler and overfill adjustment. The adjustment methods using plate and pipette presented good agreement with the tank's nominal volume and lower uncertainty among the tested methods

  17. Analyses of liquid-gas two-phase flow in fermentation tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, Takashi; Serizawa, Akimi; Takahashi, Osamu; Kawara, Zensaku; Gofuku, Akio; Kataoka, Isao.

    1993-01-01

    The understanding of two-phase flow is one of the important problems for both design and safety analyses of various engineering systems. For example, the flow conditions in beer fermentation tanks have an influence on the quality of production and productivity of tank. In this study, a two-dimensional numerical calculation code based on the one-pressure two-fluid model is developed to understand the circulation structure of low quality liquid-gas two-phase flows induced by bubble plume in a tank. (author)

  18. Modification of a liquid hydrogen tank for integrated refrigeration and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, A. M.; Jumper, K. M.; Fesmire, J. E.; Notardonato, W. U.

    2015-12-01

    The modification and outfitting of a 125,000-liter liquid hydrogen tank was performed to provide integrated refrigeration and storage capability. These functions include zero boil-off, liquefaction, and densification and therefore require provisions for sub-atmospheric tank pressures within the vacuum-jacketed, multilayer insulated tank. The primary structural modification was to add stiffening rings inside the inner vessel. The internal stiffening rings were designed, built, and installed per the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, to prevent collapse in the case of vacuum jacket failure in combination with sub-atmospheric pressure within the tank. For the integrated refrigeration loop, a modular, skeleton-type heat exchanger, with refrigerant temperature instrumentation, was constructed using the stiffening rings as supports. To support the system thermal performance testing, three custom temperature rakes were designed and installed along the 21-meter length of the tank, once again using rings as supports. The temperature rakes included a total of 20 silicon diode temperature sensors mounted both vertically and radially to map the bulk liquid temperature within the tank. The tank modifications were successful and the system is now operational for the research and development of integrated refrigeration technology.

  19. 49 CFR 393.67 - Liquid fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... a front tire in a straight ahead position. In determining whether a fuel tank on a truck or truck... this section. The specified tests are a measure of performance only. Alternative procedures which assure that equipment meets the required performance standards may be used. . (1) Safety venting system...

  20. Corrosion control of carbon steel radioactive-liquid storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ji Young.

    1997-05-01

    As the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) continues vitrification operation and begins decontamination activities, it is vital to continue to maintain the integrity of the high-level waste tanks and prevent further corrosion that may disrupt the operation. This report describes the current operational status and some corrosion concerns with corresponding control measure recommendations. 14 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  1. Numerical Simulation of Liquids Draining From a Tank Using OpenFOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakri, Fadhilah Mohd; Sukri Mat Ali, Mohamed; Zaki Shaikh Salim, Sheikh Ahmad; Muhamad, Sallehuddin

    2017-08-01

    Accurate simulation of liquids draining is a challenging task. It involves two phases flow, i.e. liquid and air. In this study draining a liquid from a cylindrical tank is numerically simulated using OpenFOAM. OpenFOAM is an open source CFD package and it becomes increasingly popular among the academician and also industries. Comparisons with theoretical and results from previous published data confirmed that OpenFOAM is able to simulate the liquids draining very well. This is done using the gas-liquid interface solver available in the standard library of OpenFOAM. Additionally, this study was also able to explain the physics flow of the draining tank.

  2. Surveillance and maintenance plan for the inactive liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    ORNL has a total of 54 inactive liquid low-level waste (ILLLW) tanks. In the past, these tanks were used to contain radioactive liquid wastes from various research programs, decontamination operations, and reactor operations. The tanks have since been removed from service for various reasons; the majority were retired because of their age, some due to integrity compromises, and others because they did not meet the current standards set by the Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA). Many of the tanks contain residual radioactive liquids and/or sludges. Plans are to remediate all tanks; however, until remediation of each tank, this Surveillance and Maintenance (S ampersand M) Plan will be used to monitor the safety and inventory containment of these tanks

  3. A Continuous Liquid-Level Sensor for Fuel Tanks Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. Pozo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A standard problem in large tanks at oil refineries and petrol stations is that water and fuel usually occupy the same tank. This is undesirable and causes problems such as corrosion in the tanks. Normally, the water level in tanks is unknown, with the problems that this entails. We propose herein a method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR to detect in real time the interfaces in a tank which can simultaneously contain water, gasoline (or diesel and air. The plasmonic sensor is composed of a hemispherical glass prism, a magnesium fluoride layer, and a gold layer. We have optimized the structural parameters of the sensor from the theoretical modeling of the reflectance curve. The sensor detects water-fuel and fuel-air interfaces and measures the level of each liquid in real time. This sensor is recommended for inflammable liquids because inside the tank there are no electrical or electronic signals which could cause explosions. The sensor proposed has a sensitivity of between 1.2 and 3.5 RIU−1 and a resolution of between 5.7 × 10−4 and 16.5 × 10−4 RIU.

  4. Safety analysis of exothermic reaction hazards associated with the organic liquid layer in tank 241-C-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postma, A.K.; Bechtold, D.B.; Borsheim, G.L.; Grisby, J.M.; Guthrie, R.L.; Kummerer, M.; Turner, D.A.; Plys, M.G.

    1994-03-01

    Safety hazards associated with the interim storage of a potentially flammable organic liquid in waste Tank C-103 are identified and evaluated. The technical basis for closing the unreviewed safety question (USQ) associated with the floating liquid organic layer in this tank is presented

  5. Functions and Requirements for Automated Liquid Level Gauge Instruments in Single-Shell and Double-Shell Tank Farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARPENTER, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    This functions and requirements document defines the baseline requirements and criteria for the design, purchase, fabrication, construction, installation, and operation of automated liquid level gauge instruments in the Tank Farms. This document is intended to become the technical baseline for current and future installation, operation and maintenance of automated liquid level gauges in single-shell and double-shell tank farms

  6. Safety analysis of exothermic reaction hazards associated with the organic liquid layer in tank 241-C-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postma, A.K.; Bechtold, D.B.; Borsheim, G.L.; Grisby, J.M.; Guthrie, R.L.; Kummerer, M.; Turner, D.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Plys, M.G. [Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Safety hazards associated with the interim storage of a potentially flammable organic liquid in waste Tank C-103 are identified and evaluated. The technical basis for closing the unreviewed safety question (USQ) associated with the floating liquid organic layer in this tank is presented.

  7. Development of oxygen sensors for use in liquid metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nieuwenhove, Rudi; Ejenstam, Jesper; Szakalos, Peter

    2015-01-01

    For generation IV reactor concepts, based on liquid metal cooling, there is a need for robust oxygen sensors which can be used in the core of the reactor since corrosion can only be kept sufficiently low by controlling the dissolved oxygen content in the liquid metal. A robust, ceramic membrane type sensor has been developed at IFE/Halden (Norway) and tested in an autoclave system at KTH (Sweden). The sensor has been tested in lead-bismuth at 550 deg. C and performed well. (authors)

  8. Development of oxygen sensors for use in liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nieuwenhove, Rudi [Institutt for Energiteknikk, Halden, (Norway); Ejenstam, Jesper; Szakalos, Peter [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Stockholm, (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    For generation IV reactor concepts, based on liquid metal cooling, there is a need for robust oxygen sensors which can be used in the core of the reactor since corrosion can only be kept sufficiently low by controlling the dissolved oxygen content in the liquid metal. A robust, ceramic membrane type sensor has been developed at IFE/Halden (Norway) and tested in an autoclave system at KTH (Sweden). The sensor has been tested in lead-bismuth at 550 deg. C and performed well. (authors)

  9. Transient thermal analysis for radioactive liquid mixing operations in a large-scaled tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. Y.; Smith, F. G. III

    2014-01-01

    A transient heat balance model was developed to assess the impact of a Submersible Mixer Pump (SMP) on radioactive liquid temperature during the process of waste mixing and removal for the high-level radioactive materials stored in Savannah River Site (SRS) tanks. The model results will be mainly used to determine the SMP design impacts on the waste tank temperature during operations and to develop a specification for a new SMP design to replace existing longshaft mixer pumps used during waste removal. The present model was benchmarked against the test data obtained by the tank measurement to examine the quantitative thermal response of the tank and to establish the reference conditions of the operating variables under no SMP operation. The results showed that the model predictions agreed with the test data of the waste temperatures within about 10%

  10. Statistical Sampling For In-Service Inspection Of Liquid Waste Tanks At The Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, S.

    2011-01-01

    Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) is implementing a statistical sampling strategy for In-Service Inspection (ISI) of Liquid Waste (LW) Tanks at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. As a component of SRS's corrosion control program, the ISI program assesses tank wall structural integrity through the use of ultrasonic testing (UT). The statistical strategy for ISI is based on the random sampling of a number of vertically oriented unit areas, called strips, within each tank. The number of strips to inspect was determined so as to attain, over time, a high probability of observing at least one of the worst 5% in terms of pitting and corrosion across all tanks. The probability estimation to determine the number of strips to inspect was performed using the hypergeometric distribution. Statistical tolerance limits for pit depth and corrosion rates were calculated by fitting the lognormal distribution to the data. In addition to the strip sampling strategy, a single strip within each tank was identified to serve as the baseline for a longitudinal assessment of the tank safe operational life. The statistical sampling strategy enables the ISI program to develop individual profiles of LW tank wall structural integrity that collectively provide a high confidence in their safety and integrity over operational lifetimes.

  11. Simplified design and evaluation of liquid storage tanks relative to earthquake loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poole, A.B.

    1994-06-01

    A summary of earthquake-induced damage in liquid storage tanks is provided. The general analysis steps for dynamic response of fluid-filled tanks subject to horizontal ground excitation are discussed. This work will provide major attention to the understanding of observed tank-failure modes. These modes are quite diverse in nature, but many of the commonly appearing patterns are believed to be shell buckling. A generalized and simple-to-apply shell loading will be developed using Fluegge shell theory. The input to this simplified analysis will be horizontal ground acceleration and tank shell form parameters. A dimensionless parameter will be developed and used in predictions of buckling resulting from earthquake-imposed loads. This prediction method will be applied to various tank designs that have failed during major earthquakes and during shaker table tests. Tanks that have not failed will also be reviewed. A simplified approach will be discussed for early design and evaluation of tank shell parameters and materials to provide a high confidence of low probability of failure during earthquakes.

  12. The study on compatibility of polymer matrix resins with liquid oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ge; Li Xiaodong; Yan Rui; Xing Suli

    2006-01-01

    Liquid oxygen (LOX) polymer composite tank is very important in the development of next generation of launch vehicles. To study LOX compatible polymeric matrix resins, three kinds of epoxy resins were studied. LOX impact test was used to evaluate polymers' compatibility with LOX. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to analyze polymers' oxidation. It seemed that polymers with better anti-oxidation properties, characterized by lower oxidation weight gain, lower weight loss and lower flash point, behaved better LOX compatibility. Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy confirmed the chemical reactions during the LOX impact process on the surface of polymers were similar to the oxidation reaction in gaseous oxygen (GOX) at high temperatures, which indicated the chemical mechanism of LOX compatibility of polymers was just oxidation reaction. In this way, two new epoxy resins with desirable LOX compatibility were acquired by modification

  13. Persistence of pathogens in liquid pig manure processed in manure tanks and biodigesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Betancur H.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the persistence of virus, bacteria, mold, yeast and parasites in liquid pig manure, processed in biodigesters and manure tanks in the central-western part of Colombia. Materials and methods. A directed observational study analyzed descriptively was carried out in three pig farms located where the manure tanks were assembled and its biodigesters were used. A sampling of liquid pig manure was taken to assess the presence of 26 pathogens at the beginning of the study and another one at the end of the process in manure tanks and biodigesters. For the manure tank, a 250 liters tank was filled with fresh pig manure and was analyzed after three days of storage. The biodigesters were of continuous flow and its effluents were analyzed, according to the specific hydraulic retention times. The diagnostic techniques were those recommended specifically for each microorganism and were carried out in certified labs by the Colombian Animal Health authority. Results. Of the 26 pathogens that were investigated, 15 appeared in the fresh pig manure used in pig manure tanks and 12 in the one used in biodigestors. In manure tanks, Porcine Circovirus type 2 (PCV2, mold, yeast, Salmonella spp., Balantidium coli and Strongylids did not persist. In biodigesters, PCV2, yeast, Strongylids, B. coli and Strongyloides spp., did not persist. Conclusions. In both manure tanks and biodigesters, a variation could be seen in pathogen persistency, indicating that they act as transformation systems of pig manure for the removal of the latter, as long as the storage times are increased if the efficiency wants to be improved.

  14. Selection of liquid-level monitoring method for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory inactive liquid low-level waste tanks, remedial investigation/feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    Several of the inactive liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contain residual wastes in liquid or solid (sludge) form or both. A plan of action has been developed to ensure that potential environmental impacts from the waste remaining in the inactive LLLW tank systems are minimized. This document describes the evaluation and selection of a methodology for monitoring the level of the liquid in inactive LLLW tanks. Criteria are established for comparison of existing level monitoring and leak testing methods; a preferred method is selected and a decision methodology for monitoring the level of the liquid in the tanks is presented for implementation. The methodology selected can be used to continuously monitor the tanks pending disposition of the wastes for treatment and disposal. Tanks that are empty, are scheduled to be emptied in the near future, or have liquid contents that are very low risk to the environment were not considered to be candidates for installing level monitoring. Tanks requiring new monitoring equipment were provided with conductivity probes; tanks with existing level monitoring instrumentation were not modified. The resulting data will be analyzed to determine inactive LLLW tank liquid level trends as a function of time

  15. Induction heating of liquids with an L-LC resonant tank

    OpenAIRE

    Quirós Jacobo, Francisco Javier; Martín Segura, Guillermo; Heredero Peris, Daniel; Montesinos Miracle, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Induction heating (IH) systems are used in many applications because they present many advantages compared other heating methods like quicker heating or faster start-up. This paper studies the application of IH systems for liquid heating using an L-LC resonant tank.

  16. Fleet Composition of Rail Tank Cars That Transport Flammable Liquids: 2013-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-05

    Section 7308 of the Fixing America's Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act; P. L. 114-94; December 4, 2015) requires the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) to assemble and collect data on rail tank cars transporting Class 3 flammable liquids (box...

  17. Nonlinear roll damping of a barge with and without liquid cargo in spherical tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhua Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Damping plays a significant role on the maximum amplitude of a vessel's roll motion, in particular near the resonant frequency. It is a common practice to predict roll damping using a linear radiation–diffraction code and add that to a linearized viscous damping component, which can be obtained through empirical, semi-empirical equations or free decay tests in calm water. However, it is evident that the viscous roll damping is nonlinear with roll velocity and amplitude. Nonlinear liquid cargo motions inside cargo tanks also contribute to roll damping, which when ignored impedes the accurate prediction of maximum roll motions. In this study, a series of free decay model tests is conducted on a barge-like vessel with two spherical tanks, which allows a better understanding of the nonlinear roll damping components considering the effects of the liquid cargo motion. To examine the effects of the cargo motion on the damping levels, a nonlinear model is adopted to calculate the damping coefficients. The liquid cargo motion is observed to affect both the linear and the quadratic components of the roll damping. The flow memory effect on the roll damping is also studied. The nonlinear damping coefficients of the vessel with liquid cargo motions in spherical tanks are obtained, which are expected to contribute in configurations involving spherical tanks.

  18. Lunar Oxygen Production and Metals Extraction Using Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, Matthew; Paley, Mark Steven; Donovan, David N.; Karr, Laurel J.

    2009-01-01

    Initial results indicate that ionic liquids are promising media for the extraction of oxygen from lunar regolith. IL acid systems can solubilize regolith and produce water with high efficiency. IL electrolytes are effective for water electrolysis, and the spent IL acid media are capable of regeneration.

  19. Waste Tank Organic Safety Project: Analysis of liquid samples from Hanford waste tank 241-C-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.H.; Bean, R.M.

    1994-03-01

    A suite of physical and chemical analyses has been performed in support of activities directed toward the resolution of an Unreviewed Safety Question concerning the potential for a floating organic layer in Hanford waste tank 241-C-103 to sustain a pool fire. The analysis program was the result of a Data Quality Objectives exercise conducted jointly with staff from Westinghouse Hanford Company and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The organic layer has been analyzed for flash point, organic composition including volatile organics, inorganic anions and cations, radionuclides, and other physical and chemical parameters needed for a safety assessment leading to the resolution of the Unreviewed Safety Question. The aqueous layer underlying the floating organic material was also analyzed for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide composition, as well as other physical and chemical properties. This work was conducted to PNL Quality Assurance impact level III standards (Good Laboratory Practices)

  20. Study on Orbital Liquid Transport and Interface Behavior in Vane Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Qi; Rui, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Liquid propellant tank is used to supply gas free liquid for spacecraft as an important part of propulsion system. The liquid behavior dominated by surface tension in microgravity is obviously different with that on the ground, which put forward a new challenge to the liquid transport and relocation. The experiments which are investigated at drop tower in National Microgravity Lab have concentrated on liquid relocation following thruster firing. Considered that the liquid located at the bottom in the direction of the acceleration vector, a sphere scale vane tank is used to study the liquid-gas interface behaviors with different acceleration vector and different filling independently and we obtain a series of stable equilibrium interface and relocation time. We find that there is an obvious sedimentation in the direction of acceleration vector when fill rate greater than 2% fill. Suggestions have been put forward that outer vanes transferring liquid to the outlet should be fixed and small holes should be dogged at the vane close to the center post to improve the liquid flow between different vanes when B0 is greater than 2.5. The research about liquid transport alone ribbon vanes is simulated though software Flow3D. The simulation process is verified by comparing the liquid lip and vapor-liquid interface obtained from drop tower experiment and simulation result when fill rate is 15%. Then the influence of fill rate, numbers of vanes and the gap between vane and wall is studied through the same simulate process. Vanes' configurations are also changed to study the effect on the lip and liquid volume below some section. Some suggestions are put forward for the design of vanes.

  1. Action plan for response to abnormal conditions in Hanford high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks containing flammable gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1994-03-01

    Radioactive liquid waste tends to produce hydrogen as a result of the interaction of gamma radiation and water. In tanks containing organic chelating agents, additional hydrogen gas as well as nitrous oxide and ammonia can be produced by thermal and radiolytic decomposition of these organics. Several high-level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks, located underground at the Hanford Site, contain waste that retains the gases produced in them until large quantities are released rapidly to the tank vapor space. Tanks filled to near capacity have relatively little vapor space; therefore, if the waste suddenly releases a large amount of hydrogen and nitrous oxide, a flammable gas mixture may result. The most notable waste tank with a flammable gas problem is tank 241-SY-101. Waste in this tank has occasionally released enough flammable gas to burn if an ignition source had been present inside of the tank. Several other waste tanks exhibit similar behavior to a lesser magnitude. Administrative controls have been developed to assure that these Flammable Gas Watch List tanks are safely maintained. Responses have also been developed for off-normal conditions which might develop in these tanks. In addition, scientific and engineering studies are underway to further understand and mitigate the behavior of the Flammable Gas Watch List tanks

  2. The reactions of oxygen and hydrogen with liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, H.

    1981-01-01

    Results so far available as to the reactions and chemical equilibrium of oxygen and hydrogen with liquid sodium have been analyzed critically. The enthalpy values of the reactions have been discussed and supplemented on the basis of corresponding BORN-HABER cycles. The concentration and temperature functions of the hydrogen equilibrium pressure were deduced from experimental results. In relation to the solubility data the solid phases coexisting with liquid sodium in the ternary system Na-O-H have been discussed. The reaction of oxygen with hydrogen in diluted solution in liquid sodium has been investigated in more detail. Interaction coefficients, and the temperature functions of the free energy of formation and the equilibrium constant have been determined. (orig.)

  3. Experimental, Numerical, and Analytical Slosh Dynamics of Water and Liquid Nitrogen in a Spherical Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Jedediah Morse

    2016-01-01

    Understanding, predicting, and controlling fluid slosh dynamics is critical to safety and improving performance of space missions when a significant percentage of the spacecraft's mass is a liquid. Computational fluid dynamics simulations can be used to predict the dynamics of slosh, but these programs require extensive validation. Many experimental and numerical studies of water slosh have been conducted. However, slosh data for cryogenic liquids is lacking. Water and cryogenic liquid nitrogen are used in various ground-based tests with a spherical tank to characterize damping, slosh mode frequencies, and slosh forces. A single ring baffle is installed in the tank for some of the tests. Analytical models for slosh modes, slosh forces, and baffle damping are constructed based on prior work. Select experiments are simulated using a commercial CFD software, and the numerical results are compared to the analytical and experimental results for the purposes of validation and methodology-improvement.

  4. An Improved Spectral Analysis Method for Fatigue Damage Assessment of Details in Liquid Cargo Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng-yuan; Huang, Xiao-ping

    2018-03-01

    Errors will be caused in calculating the fatigue damages of details in liquid cargo tanks by using the traditional spectral analysis method which is based on linear system, for the nonlinear relationship between the dynamic stress and the ship acceleration. An improved spectral analysis method for the assessment of the fatigue damage in detail of a liquid cargo tank is proposed in this paper. Based on assumptions that the wave process can be simulated by summing the sinusoidal waves in different frequencies and the stress process can be simulated by summing the stress processes induced by these sinusoidal waves, the stress power spectral density (PSD) is calculated by expanding the stress processes induced by the sinusoidal waves into Fourier series and adding the amplitudes of each harmonic component with the same frequency. This analysis method can take the nonlinear relationship into consideration and the fatigue damage is then calculated based on the PSD of stress. Take an independent tank in an LNG carrier for example, the accuracy of the improved spectral analysis method is proved much better than that of the traditional spectral analysis method by comparing the calculated damage results with the results calculated by the time domain method. The proposed spectral analysis method is more accurate in calculating the fatigue damages in detail of ship liquid cargo tanks.

  5. Removal of the liquid waste storage tank LV-2 in JRTF. Part 2. Removal works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Fumihiko; Hagiya, Kazuaki; Sunaoshi, Mizuho; Muraguchi, Yoshinori; Satomi, Shinichi; Nemoto, Kouichi; Terunuma, Akihiro; Shiraishi, Kunio; Ito, Shinichi

    2011-06-01

    Dismantling activities of components in JAERI's Reprocessing Test Facility (JRTF) started from 1996 as a part of decommissioning of this facility. Removing out of a large liquid waste storage tank LV-2 as a whole tank from the annex building B without cutting in pieces to confirm safety and efficiency of this method started from 2006. After preparatory works, ceiling of LV-2 room was opened, and LV-2 was transferred. Useful data such as manpower, radiation control and waste amount through these works were collected, and work efficiency was analyzed by using of these data. (author)

  6. Seismic response of unanchored and partially anchored liquid-storage tanks. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, P.K.; Veletsos, A.S.

    1995-12-01

    Ground-mounted vertical storage tanks are important components of nuclear plant safety systems. A systematic study is made of the principal effects of base uplifting on the seismic response of laterally excited, unanchored and partially anchored cylindrical liquid-storage tanks. The study consists of two parts: the first deals with the static uplifting resistance of the flexible base plate, and the second deals with the dynamic response of the uplifting system. An insight into the behavior of the uplifting base plate is first gained with the help of a prismatic beam solution. In Section 2, the solution is implemented exactly, whereas in Section 3 it is implemented approximately by use of the Ritz energy procedure. Solutions are next presented for axisymmetrically and asymmetrically uplifted base plate of tanks, in Section 4. For the axisymmetric case the solution is implemented exactly, as well as approximately by modeling the plate by a series of semiinfinite prismatic beams. The accuracy of the latter approach is confirmed by comparing its predictions with those of the former. In Section 5, a highly efficient and rational method is presented for the dynamic response analysis of uplifting tanks. Both unanchored tanks and partially anchored tanks, for which the number of anchor bolts at the base is insufficient to ensure full fixity, are considered. It is shown that base uplifting may reduce significantly the hydrodynamic pressures, but these reductions may be associated with increased axial compressive stresses in the tank wall and large plastic rotations at the plate-shell junction. For partially anchored tanks, energy loss due to bolt yielding is found to be small

  7. Development and Integration of the Janus Robotic Lander: A Liquid Oxygen-Liquid Methane Propulsion System Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Raul

    Initiatives have emerged with the goal of sending humans to other places in our solar system. New technologies are being developed that will allow for more efficient space systems to transport future astronauts. One of those technologies is the implementation of propulsion systems that use liquid oxygen and liquid methane (LO2-LCH4) as propellants. The benefits of a LO2-LCH4 propulsion system are plenty. One of the main advantages is the possibility of manufacturing the propellants at the destination body. A space vehicle which relies solely on liquid oxygen and liquid methane for its main propulsion and reaction control engines is necessary to exploit this advantage. At the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) MIRO Center for Space Exploration Technology Research (cSETR) such a vehicle is being developed. Janus is a robotic lander vehicle with the capability of vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) which integrates several LO2-LCH 4 systems that are being devised in-house. The vehicle will serve as a testbed for the parallel operation of these propulsion systems while being fed from common propellant tanks. The following work describes the efforts done at the cSETR to develop the first prototype of the vehicle as well as the plan to move forward in the design of the subsequent prototypes that will lead to a flight vehicle. In order to ensure an eventual smooth integration of the different subsystems that will form part of Janus, requirements were defined for each individual subsystem as well as the vehicle as a whole. Preliminary testing procedures and layouts have also been developed and will be discussed to detail in this text. Furthermore, the current endeavors in the design of each subsystem and the way that they interact with one another within the lander will be explained.

  8. LIQUID WASTE FROM SEPTIC TANKS AS A SOURCE OF MICROBIOLOGICAL POLLUTION OF GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Nowak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pollution of soil and water environment by liquid waste originating from septic tanks is a huge problem in Poland. This applies especially to rural areas. Negative changes are observed both in the vicinity of the leaking tanks, from which concentrated and rotten sewage infiltrates into the ground, and in surface water as well as arable land, to which impurities from the emptied tanks are discharged. The paper presents the scale of the practice of uncontrolled domestic sewage discharge into the environment on the example of selected municipality. Presented data were compared with the results of the qualitative assessment of groundwater, which is collected in the same municipality for waterworks. In a significant number of wells, water was not safe in sanitary terms, as the presence of microbiological contamination was recorded. Among determined microorganisms, the indicator organisms of domestic waste pollution prevailed. Water quality problems have been reported at intake points located near the properties equipped with septic tanks or in places, to which sewage from emptying septic tanks were transferred in an uncontrolled manner. In this way it has been shown that there is a relationship between improperly maintained wastewater management and groundwater quality collected for the purpose of water supply.

  9. Applying Additive Manufacturing to a New Liquid Oxygen Turbopump Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Neal, T. Derek

    2016-01-01

    A liquid oxygen turbopump has been designed at Marshall Space Flight Center as part of the in-house, Advanced Manufacturing Demonstrator Engine (AMDE) project. Additive manufacturing, specifically direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) of Inconel 718, is used for 77% of the parts by mass. These parts include the impeller, turbine components, and housings. This paper discusses the impacts of the DMLS fabrication technique on the design of the turbopump and lessons learned during DMLS hardware fabrication and material testing.

  10. Method of calculation of tanks forced ventilation from the remnants of liquid products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С. О. Пузік

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of gasoline compared to other petroleum products in terms of feasibility of their research. Calculations of the duration of ventilation and changes in the concentration of vapors of gasoline remains in the gas space of the vertical tank with a capacity of 1000 m3 (RUS-1000. Nomogram constructed for the quantitative forecast available liquid balances petrol A-95 and the time duration ventylyaiyi RUS-1000 from the remnants of the petrol

  11. ASSESSMENT OF THE ABILITY OF STANDARD SLURRY PUMPS TO MIX MISCIBLE AND IMMISCIBLE LIQUIDS IN TANK 50H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M.

    2011-06-15

    Tank 50H is the feed tank for the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). At present, Tank 50H contains two standard slurry pumps and two Quad Volute slurry pumps. Current requirements and mixing operation is to run three pumps for one hour prior to initiating a feed transfer to SPF. Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste would like to move one or both of the Quad Volute pumps from Tank 50H to Tank 51H to replace pumps in Tank 51H that are failing. In addition, one of the standard pumps in Tank 50H exhibits high seal leakage and vibration. SRS Liquid Waste requested Savannah River National (SRNL) to conduct a study to evaluate the feasibility of mixing the contents of Tank 50H with one to three standard slurry pumps. To determine the pump requirements to blend miscible and immiscible liquids in Tank 50H, the author reviewed the pilot-scale blending work performed for the Salt Disposition Integration Project (SDIP) and the technical literature, and applied the results to Tank 50H to determine the number, size, and operating parameters needed to blend the tank contents. The conclusions from this analysis are: (1) A single rotating standard slurry pump (with a 13.6 ft{sup 2}/s U{sub 0}D) will be able to blend miscible liquids (i.e., salt solution) in Tank 50H within 4.4 hours. (2) Two rotating standard slurry pumps will be able to blend miscible liquids in Tank 50H within 3.1 hours. (3) Three rotating standard slurry pumps will be able to blend miscible liquids in Tank 50H within 2.5 hours. (4) A single rotating standard slurry pump (with a 13.6 ft{sup 2}/s U{sub 0}D) will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets that are less than or equal to 15 micron in diameter. If the droplets are less than 15 micron, they will be dispersed within 4.4 hours. Isopar L{reg_sign} provides a lower bound on the maximum size of droplets that will be dispersed by the slurry pumps in Tank 50H. (5) Two rotating standard slurry pumps will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets less than 15 micron

  12. Experimental tests performed with liquid waste contained in the tank F-710/D at EUREX plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasso, G.; Momo, S.; Pietrelli, L.; Troiani, F.

    1989-11-01

    In this report the result of experimental test performed with real liquid waste earning from reprocessing of MTR nuclear fuel is reported. The aim of the research is to separate the actinides and long-lived radioactive fission products from bulk salt matrix of HLW. Taking into account the chemical and radiochemical composition of the liquid waste, process based on the chemical precipitation and/or adsorption were studied by using the radioactive waste sampled from the tank. The results show that decontamination factors of 100, 1000, 5000 were obtained for Sr, Cs and Pu respectively. (author)

  13. Cardiopulmonary function and oxygen delivery during total liquid ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagogiorgas, Charalambos; Alb, Markus; Herrmann, Peter; Quintel, Michael; Meinhardt, Juergen P

    2011-10-01

    Total liquid ventilation (TLV) with perfluorocarbons has shown to improve cardiopulmonary function in the injured and immature lung; however there remains controversy over the normal lung. Hemodynamic effects of TLV in the normal lung currently remain undetermined. This study compared changes in cardiopulmonary and circulatory function caused by either liquid or gas tidal volume ventilation. In a prospective, controlled study, 12 non-injured anesthetized, adult New Zealand rabbits were primarily conventionally gas-ventilated (CGV). After instrumentation for continuous recording of arterial (AP), central venous (CVP), left artrial (LAP), pulmonary arterial pressures (PAP), and cardiac output (CO) animals were randomized into (1) CGV group and (2) TLV group. In the TLV group partial liquid ventilation was initiated with instillation of perfluoroctylbromide (12 ml/kg). After 15 min, TLV was established for 3 hr applying a volume-controlled, pressure-limited, time-cycled ventilation mode using a double-piston configured TLV. Controls (CGV) remained gas-ventilated throughout the experiment. During TLV, heart rate, CO, PAP, MAP, CVP, and LAP as well as derived hemodynamic variables, arterial and mixed venous blood gases, oxygen delivery, PVR, and SVR did not differ significantly compared to CGV. Liquid tidal volumes suitable for long-term TLV in non-injured rabbits do not significantly impair CO, blood pressure, and oxygen dynamics when compared to CGV. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Simulation and experiment for oxygen-enriched combustion engine using liquid oxygen to solidify CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Jia, Xiaoshe; Pei, Pucheng; Lu, Yong; Yi, Li; Shi, Yan

    2016-01-01

    For capturing and recycling of CO2 in the internal combustion engine, Rankle cycle engine can reduce the exhaust pollutants effectively under the condition of ensuring the engine thermal efficiency by using the techniques of spraying water in the cylinder and optimizing the ignition advance angle. However, due to the water spray nozzle need to be installed on the cylinder, which increases the cylinder head design difficulty and makes the combustion conditions become more complicated. In this paper, a new method is presented to carry out the closing inlet and exhaust system for internal combustion engines. The proposed new method uses liquid oxygen to solidify part of cooled CO2 from exhaust system into dry ice and the liquid oxygen turns into gas oxygen which is sent to inlet system. The other part of CO2 is sent to inlet system and mixed with oxygen, which can reduce the oxygen-enriched combustion detonation tendency and make combustion stable. Computing grid of the IP52FMI single-cylinder four-stroke gasoline-engine is established according to the actual shape of the combustion chamber using KIVA-3V program. The effects of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate are analyzed on the temperatures, the pressures and the instantaneous heat release rates when the EGR rate is more than 8%. The possibility of enclosing intake and exhaust system for engine is verified. The carbon dioxide trapping device is designed and the IP52FMI engine is transformed and the CO2 capture experiment is carried out. The experimental results show that when the EGR rate is 36% for the optimum EGR rate. When the liquid oxygen of 35.80-437.40 g is imported into the device and last 1-20 min, respectively, 21.50-701.30 g dry ice is obtained. This research proposes a new design method which can capture CO2 for vehicular internal combustion engine.

  15. austenitic steel corrosion by oxygen-containing liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivollier, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    France is planning to construct the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. They will use liquid sodium as heat transfer fluid and will be made of 316L(N) austenitic steel as structural materials. To guarantee optimal operation on the long term, the behavior of this steel must be verified. This is why corrosion phenomena of 316L(N) steel by liquid sodium have to be well-understood. Literature points out that several corrosion phenomena are possible. Dissolved oxygen in sodium definitely influences each of the corrosion phenomenon. Therefore, the austenitic steel corrosion in oxygen-containing sodium is proposed in this study. Thermodynamics data point out that sodium chromite formation on 316L(N) steel is possible in sodium containing roughly 10 μg.g -1 of oxygen for temperature lower than 650 C (reactor operating conditions).The experimental study shows that sodium chromite is formed at 650 C in the sodium containing 200 μg.g -1 of oxygen. At the same concentration and at 550 C, sodium chromite is clearly observed only for long immersion time (≥ 5000 h). Results at 450 C are more difficult to interpret. Furthermore, the steel is depleted in chromium in all cases.The results suggest the sodium chromite is dissolved in the sodium at the same time it is formed. Modelling of sodium chromite formation - approached by chromium diffusion in steel (in grain and grain boundaries -, and dissolution - assessed by transport in liquid metal - show that simultaneous formation and dissolution of sodium chromite is a possible mechanism able to explain our results. (author) [fr

  16. Health physics challenges during decontamination for safe disposal of low level liquid effluent tank as inactive scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akila, R.; Sultan, Bajeer; Sarangapani, R.; Jose, M.T.

    2018-01-01

    The Low-level Liquid waste (LLW) generated during the regeneration of mixed bed column of KAMINI reactor is collected in the SS Delay Tanks located on the western side of RML building. It was proposed to dismantle and dispose the tank as solid waste. The tank weighs about 2 ton. An attempt was made to decontaminate the tank to levels below the exempt quantity so as to qualify it as scrap of unrestricted release. This is first time in IGCAR wherein a material used in a radioactive facility for storing LLW is being released as scrap of unrestricted release and this paper discusses about the same

  17. Melton Valley liquid low-level radioactive waste storage tanks evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The Melton Valley Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Storage Tanks (MVSTs) store the evaporator concentrates from the Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLLW) System at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The eight stainless steel tanks contain approximately 375,000 gallons of liquid and sludge waste. These are some of the newer, better-designed tanks in the LLLW System. They have been evaluated and found by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation to comply with all Federal Facility Agreement requirements for double containment. The operations and maintenance aspects of the tanks were also reviewed by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in September 1994. This document also contains an assessment of the risk to the public and ORNL workers from a leak in one of the MVSTs. Two primary scenarios were investigated: (1) exposure of the public to radiation from drinking Clinch River water contaminated by leaked LLLW, and (2) exposure of on-site workers to radiation by inhaling air contaminated by leaked LLLW. The estimated frequency of a leak from one of the MVSTs is about 8 x 10 -4 events per year, or about once in 1200 years (with a 95% confidence level). If a leak were to occur, the dose to a worker from inhalation would be about 2.3 x 10 -1 mrem (with a 95% confidence level). The dose to a member of the public through the drinking water pathway is estimated to be about 7 x 10 -1 mrem (with a 95% confidence level). By comparison with EPA Safe Drinking Water regulations, the allowable lifetime radiation dose is about 300 mrem. Thus, a postulated LLLW leak from the MVSTs would not add appreciably to an individual's lifetime radiation dose

  18. Large-Scale Liquid Hydrogen Tank Rapid Chill and Fill Testing for the Advanced Shuttle Upper Stage Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hedayat, A.; Holt, K. A.; Sims, J.; Johnson, E. F.; Hastings, L. J.; Lak, T.

    2013-01-01

    Cryogenic upper stages in the Space Shuttle program were prohibited primarily due to a safety risk of a 'return to launch site' abort. An upper stage concept addressed this concern by proposing that the stage be launched empty and filled using shuttle external tank residuals after the atmospheric pressure could no longer sustain an explosion. However, only about 5 minutes was allowed for tank fill. Liquid hydrogen testing was conducted within a near-ambient environment using the multipurpose hydrogen test bed 638.5 ft3 (18m3) cylindrical tank with a spray bar mounted longitudinally inside. Although the tank was filled within 5 minutes, chilldown of the tank structure was incomplete, and excessive tank pressures occurred upon vent valve closure. Elevated tank wall temperatures below the liquid level were clearly characteristic of film boiling. The test results have substantial implications for on-orbit cryogen transfer since the formation of a vapor film would be much less inhibited due to the reduced gravity. However, the heavy tank walls could become an asset in normal gravity testing for on-orbit transfer, i.e., if film boiling in a nonflight weight tank can be inhibited in normal gravity, then analytical modeling anchored with the data could be applied to reduced gravity environments with increased confidence.

  19. Structural integrity assessments for the category C liquid low-level waste tank systems at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document provides a report of the efforts made to satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the structural integrity certification of 14 Category C Liquid Low Level Waste (LLLW) Tank Systems on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Within this document, each tank system is described including the associated pipeline segments evaluated as a part of those tank systems. A separate structural integrity assessment was conducted for each of the LLLW Tank Systems, four of which are located in Melton Valley, and ten of which are located in Bethel Valley. The results of the structural integrity assessments are reported herein. The assessments are based on (1) a review of available tank design drawings, (2) a qualitative assessment of corrosion on the tank and pipelines, and primarily, and (3) leak testing program results. Design plans and specifications were reviewed for a general description of the tanks and associated pipelines. Information of primary significance included tank age, material of construction, tank design and construction specifications. Design plans were also reviewed for the layouts and materials of pipeline constructions, and ages of pipelines. Next, a generic corrosion assessment was conducted for each tank system. Information was gathered, when available, related to the historical use of the tank and the likely contents. The corrosion assessments included a qualitative evaluation of the walls of each tank and pipelines associated with each tank, as well as the welds and joints of the systems. A general discussion of the stainless steel types encountered is included in Section 4.0 of this report. The potential for soils to have caused corrosion is also evaluated within the sections on the individual tank systems.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF THE ABILITY OF STANDARD SLURRY PUMPS TO MIX SOLIDS WITH LIQUIDS IN TANK 50H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M.

    2011-11-11

    Tank 50H is the feed tank for the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). In the summer of 2011, Tank 50H contained two standard slurry pumps and two quad volute slurry pumps. Current requirements for mixing operation is to run three pumps for one hour prior to initiating a feed transfer to SPF. Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste moved both of the Quad Volute pumps from Tank 50H to Tank 51H to replace pumps in Tank 51H that were failing. In addition, one of the standard pumps in Tank 50H exhibits high seal leakage and vibration. SRS Liquid Waste requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a study to evaluate the feasibility of mixing the contents of Tank 50H with one to three standard slurry pumps. To determine the pump requirements to mix solids with liquids in Tank 50H, the author reviewed the pilot-scale blending work performed for the Small Column Ion Exchange Process (SCIX), SRNL computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, Tank 50H operating experience, and the technical literature, and applied the results to Tank 50H to determine the number, size, and operating parameters of pumps needed to mix the solid particles with the liquid in Tank 50H. The analysis determined pump requirements to suspend the solids with no 'dead zones', but did not determine the pump requirements to produce a homogeneous suspension. In addition, the analysis determined the pump requirements to prevent the accumulation of a large amount of solid particles under the telescoping transfer pump. The conclusions from this analysis follow: (1) The analysis shows that three Quad Volute pumps should be able to suspend the solid particles expected ({approx}0.6 g/L insoluble solids, {approx}5 micron) in Tank 50H. (2) Three standard slurry pumps may not be able to suspend the solid particles in Tank 50H; (3) The ability of two Quad Volute pumps to fully suspend all of the solid particles in Tank 50H is marginal; and (4) One standard slurry pump should be able to

  1. Design of a reconfigurable liquid hydrogen fuel tank for use in the Genii unmanned aerial vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Patrick; Leachman, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Long endurance flight, on the order of days, is a leading flight performance characteristic for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Liquid hydrogen (LH2) is well suited to providing multi-day flight times with a specific energy 2.8 times that of conventional kerosene based fuels. However, no such system of LH2 storage, delivery, and use is currently available for commercial UAVs. In this paper, we develop a light weight LH2 dewar for integration and testing in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell powered, student designed and constructed, Genii UAV. The fuel tank design is general for scaling to suit various UAV platforms. A cylindrical vacuum-jacketed design with removable end caps was chosen to incorporate various fuel level gauging, pressurizing, and slosh mitigation systems. Heat and mechanical loadings were modeled to compare with experimental results. Mass performance of the fuel tank is characterized by the fraction of liquid hydrogen to full tank mass, and the insulation performance was characterized by effective thermal conductivity and boil-off rate

  2. Design of a reconfigurable liquid hydrogen fuel tank for use in the Genii unmanned aerial vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, Patrick; Leachman, Jacob [HYdrogen Properties for Energy Research (HYPER) Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2920 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    Long endurance flight, on the order of days, is a leading flight performance characteristic for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Liquid hydrogen (LH2) is well suited to providing multi-day flight times with a specific energy 2.8 times that of conventional kerosene based fuels. However, no such system of LH2 storage, delivery, and use is currently available for commercial UAVs. In this paper, we develop a light weight LH2 dewar for integration and testing in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell powered, student designed and constructed, Genii UAV. The fuel tank design is general for scaling to suit various UAV platforms. A cylindrical vacuum-jacketed design with removable end caps was chosen to incorporate various fuel level gauging, pressurizing, and slosh mitigation systems. Heat and mechanical loadings were modeled to compare with experimental results. Mass performance of the fuel tank is characterized by the fraction of liquid hydrogen to full tank mass, and the insulation performance was characterized by effective thermal conductivity and boil-off rate.

  3. Fluid structure interaction modeling of liquid sloshing phenomena in flexible tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolici, S.; Bilegan, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We used Ansys Workbench package to study sloshing phenomena in liquid containers. ► The interaction liquid–structure is modeled considering full and one-way coupling. ► The results obtained with the FSI models were compared against design codes. ► The results have shown that the sloshing is influenced by tank wall elasticity. -- Abstract: The present paper is concerned with the problem of modeling the fluid–structure interaction (FSI) in partially filled liquid containers. The study focuses on the sloshing phenomena and on the coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis with the finite element stress analysis (FEA) used to predict the sloshing wave amplitude, convective mode frequency, pressure exerted on the walls and the effect of sloshing on the anchoring points forces. The interaction between fluids (water and air) and tank wall is modeled considering full and one-way coupling. Using the time history of an earthquake excitation, the results of the FSI model are compared with those obtained employing simplified mechanical models given in design codes. The coupling phenomenon was found to influence the sloshing effect, the impulsive pressure being amplified by the wall elasticity. The applied FSI methodology proves to be feasible in analyzing a 3D full coupled CFD/FEA storage tank subjected to a long time history excitation

  4. Soil-structure interaction effects for laterally excited liquid-tank system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yu; Veletsos, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    Following a brief review of the mechanical model for liquid-storage tanks which permits consideration of the effects of tank and ground flexibility, and lateral and rocking base excitations, the effects of both kinematic and inertia interaction effects on the response of the tank-liquid system are examined and elucidated. The free-field motion is defined by a power spectral density function and an incoherence function, which characterizes the spatial variability of the ground motion due to the vertically incident incoherence waves. The quantities examined are the ensemble means of the peak values of the response. The results are compared with those obtained for no soil-structure interaction and for kinematic interaction to elucidate the nature and relative importance of the two interactions. Only the impulsive actions are examined, the convective actions are for all practical purposes unaffected by both kinematic and inertia interactions. It is shown that the major reduction of the response is attributed to inertia interaction. 20 refs

  5. Study on dynamic buckling behavior of a cylindrical liquid storage tanks under seismic excitation. 1st report, effects of liquid pressure on elephant foot bulge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tomohiro; Morita, Hideyuki; Sugiyama, Akihisa; Kawamoto, Yoji; Sirai, Eiji; Ogo, Hideyasu

    2004-01-01

    When a thin walled cylindrical liquid storage tank is exposed to a very large seismic base excitation, buckling phenomena may be caused such as bending buckling where diamond buckling pattern or elephant foot bulge pattern will be found at the bottom portion, and shear buckling at the middle portion of the tank. In this study, dynamic buckling tests were performed using scale models of thin cylindrical liquid storage tanks for the nuclear power plants. The input seismic acceleration was increased until the elephant foot bulge occurred and the vibrational behavior before and after buckling was investigated. And the effects of static and dynamic liquid pressure on the bending buckling patterns and the buckling critical force was investigated by fundamental tests using small tank models. (author)

  6. Corrosion behavior of welds in oxygen containing liquid lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzel, A.; Weisenburger, A.; Mueller, G. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany). Inst. for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology

    2012-11-01

    Liquid lead (Pb) and lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) have been considered as coolant and/or spallation target in future accelerator driven systems (ADS). Therefore, in the recent years a lot of corrosion experiments on conventional steels were carried out in these heavy liquid metals. Beside these experiments, also tests on welded joints are required. Therefore ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels (P91, P92) as well as an ODS steel were joint with TIG (Tungsten-Inert-Gas), EB (Electron Beam) and friction stir welding. After that, specimens were exposed to 10{sup -6} and 10{sup -8}wt% oxygen containing lead at 550 C for about 2000h. Weld regions having similar chemical composition and similar structure due to a heat treatment after the welding process show a corrosion behaviour under these conditions that is similar to that of the respective bulk material. (orig.)

  7. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT INCREASED LIQUID LEVEL ANALYSIS FOR 241-AP TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TC MACKEY; JE DEIBLER; MW RINKER; KI JOHNSON; SP PILLI; NK KARRI; FG ABATT; KL STOOPS

    2009-01-14

    The essential difference between Revision 1 and the original issue of this report is the analysis of the anchor bolts that tie the steel dome of the primary tank to the concrete tank dome. The reevaluation of the AP anchor bolts showed that (for a given temperature increase) the anchor shear load distribution did not change significantly from the initially higher stiffness to the new secant shear stiffness. Therefore, the forces and displacements of the other tank components such as the primary tanks stresses, secondary liner strains, and concrete tank forces and moments also did not change significantly. Consequently, the revised work in Revision 1 focused on the changes in the anchor bolt responses and a full reevaluation of all tank components was judged to be unnecessary.

  8. Fiber-Optic Determination of N2, O2, and Fuel Vapor in the Ullage of Liquid-Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2008-01-01

    A fiber-optic sensor system has been developed that can remotely measure the concentration of molecular oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), hydrocarbon vapor, and other gases (CO2, CO, H2O, chlorofluorocarbons, etc.) in the ullage of a liquid-fuel tank. The system provides an accurate and quantitative identification of the above gases with an accuracy of better than 1 percent by volume (for O2 or N2) in real-time (5 seconds). In an effort to prevent aircraft fuel tank fires or explosions similar to the tragic TWA Flight 800 explosion in 1996, OBIGGS are currently being developed for large commercial aircraft to prevent dangerous conditions from forming inside fuel tanks by providing an inerting gas blanket that is low in oxygen, thus preventing the ignition of the fuel/air mixture in the ullage. OBIGGS have been used in military aircraft for many years and are now standard equipment on some newer large commercial aircraft (such as the Boeing 787). Currently, OBIGGS are being developed for retrofitting to existing commercial aircraft fleets in response to pending mandates from the FAA. Most OBIGGS use an air separation module (ASM) that separates O2 from N2 to make nitrogen-enriched air from compressed air flow diverted from the engine (bleed air). Current OBIGGS systems do not have a closed-loop feedback control, in part, due to the lack of suitable process sensors that can reliably measure N2 or O2 and at the same time, do not constitute an inherent source of ignition. Thus, current OBIGGS operate with a high factor-of-safety dictated by process protocol to ensure adequate fuel-tank inerting. This approach is inherently inefficient as it consumes more engine bleed air than is necessary compared to a closed-loop controlled approach. The reduction of bleed air usage is important as it reduces fuel consumption, which translates to both increased flight range and lower operational costs. Numerous approaches to developing OBIGGS feedback-control sensors have been under

  9. Design, fabrication and test of a liquid hydrogen titanium honeycomb cryogenic test tank for use as a reusable launch vehicle main propellant tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, Patrick B.; Keller, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV's) utilizing LOX\\LH2 as the propellant require lightweight durable structural systems to meet mass fraction goals and to reduce overall systems operating costs. Titanium honeycomb sandwich with flexible blanket TPS on the windward surface is potentially the lightest-weight and most operable option. Light weight is achieved in part because the honeycomb sandwich tank provides insulation to its liquid hydrogen contents, with no need for separate cryogenic insulation, and in part because the high use temperature of titanium honeycomb reduces the required surface area of re-entry thermal protection systems. System operability is increased because TPS needs to be applied only to surfaces where temperatures exceed approximately 650 K. In order to demonstrate the viability of a titanium sandwich constructed propellant tank, a technology demonstration program was conducted including the design, fabrication and testing of a propellant tank-TPS system. The tank was tested in controlled as well as ambient environments representing ground hold conditions for a RLV main propellant tank. Data collected during each test run was used to validate predictions for air liquefaction, outside wall temperature, boil-off rates, frost buildup and its insulation effects, and the effects of placing a thermal protection system blanket on the external surface. Test results indicated that titanium honeycomb, when used as a RLV propellant tank material, has great promise as a light-weight structural system.

  10. Level trend analysis summary report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory inactive liquid low-level waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory facilities have produced liquid low-level waste (LLLW) that is radioactive and/or hazardous. Storage tanks have been used to collect and store these wastes. Most of the collection system, including the tanks, is located below the ground surface. Many of the systems have been removed from service (i.e., are not inactive) but contain residual amounts of waste liquid and sludges. A plan of action has been developed by DOE to ensure that environmental impacts from the waste remaining in the inactive tanks system are minimized. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) does not require any type of testing or monitoring for the inactive LLLW tanks that are removed from service but does require waste characterization of tanks contents, risk characterization of tanks removed from service, and remediation of the inactive tanks and their contents. This report is form information only and is not required by the FFA. It includes a description of the methodology and results of level trend analyses for the Category D tanks listed in the FFA that currently belong to the Environmental Restoration Program

  11. Standard practice for examination of liquid-Filled atmospheric and Low-pressure metal storage tanks using acoustic emission

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers guidelines for acoustic emission (AE) examinations of new and in-service aboveground storage tanks of the type used for storage of liquids. 1.2 This practice will detect acoustic emission in areas of sensor coverage that are stressed during the course of the examination. For flat-bottom tanks these areas will generally include the sidewalls (and roof if pressure is applied above the liquid level). The examination may not detect flaws on the bottom of flat-bottom tanks unless sensors are located on the bottom. 1.3 This practice may require that the tank experience a load that is greater than that encountered in normal use. The normal contents of the tank can usually be used for applying this load. 1.4 This practice is not valid for tanks that will be operated at a pressure greater than the examination pressure. 1.5 It is not necessary to drain or clean the tank before performing this examination. 1.6 This practice applies to tanks made of carbon steel, stainless steel, aluminum and oth...

  12. Kinetics of liquid lithium reaction with oxygen-nitrogen mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, T.K.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted in order to characterize the kinetics of lithium chemical reaction with a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen. Three mixed gas compositions were used; 80% N 2 and 20% O 2 , 90% N 2 and 10% O 2 , and 95% N 2 and 5% O 2 . The reaction rate was obtained as a function of lithium temperature and the oxygen fraction. Liquid lithium temperature varied from 400 to 1100 0 C. By varying the composition, the degree of inhibition of the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate due to the presence of oxygen was observed. The results indicate that the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate depended on both the fraction of oxygen present and lithium temperature. The lithium nitride layer formed from the reaction also had a significant inhibition effect on the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate while the lithium-oxygen reaction rate was not as greatly hindered. LITFIRE, a computer code which simulates temperature and pressure history in a containment building following lithium spills, was modified by including (1) an improved model for the lithium-nitrogen reaction rate and (2) a model for the lithium-CO 2 reaction. LITFIRE was used to simulate HEDL's LC-2 and LA-5 experiments, and the predicted temperatures and pressures were in a reasonable agreement. Furthermore, LITFIRE was applied to a prototypical fusion reactor containment in order to simulate the consequences of a lithium spill accident. The result indicated that if nitrogen was used as containment building gas during the accident, the consequences of the accident would be less severe than those with air. The pressure rise in the building was found to be reduced by 50% and the maximum temperature of the combustion zone was limited to 900 0 C instead of 1200 0 C in the case of air

  13. Nuclear fuel technology - Tank calibration and volume determination for nuclear materials accountancy - Part 6: Accurate in-tank determination of liquid density in accountancy tanks equipped with dip tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    ISO 18213 deals with the acquisition, standardization, analysis, and use of calibration data to determine liquid volumes in process tanks for accountability purposes. This part of ISO 18213 is complementary to the other parts, ISO 18213-1 (procedural overview), ISO 18213-2 (data standardization), ISO 18213-3 (statistical methods), ISO 18213-4 (slow bubbling rate), ISO 18213-5 (fast bubbling rate). The procedure described in this part of ISO 18213 is a two-step procedure. First, a liquid of known density is used to determine the vertical distance between the tips of the two probes (i.e. to calibrate their separation). The calibration step requires synchronous (or as nearly synchronous as possible) measurements of the pressure exerted at the tips of two probes by the calibration liquid in which they are submerged. The measurements obtained are used to make an accurate determination of probe separation. Second, the unknown density of the process liquid is determined with the aid of the probe separation calibration. The density-determination step also requires (nearly) synchronous measurements of the pressure exerted at the tips of two probes by the process liquid of unknown density. With careful technique, it is possible to make determinations of liquid density with in-tank measurements that approach the accuracy and precision of those made in the laboratory. Moreover, density determinations made with in-tank measurements are automatically made at the observed temperature of the tank liquid. Thus, no additional information about the liquid is required to infer its density at its tank temperature from determinations of its density at some other temperature. Except that the density of the process liquid is generally not well characterized, the steps involved in determining the height of process liquid in the tank are the same as those for determining the height of calibration liquid. Thus, the method of density determination given in this part of ISO 18213 is very

  14. Water level response measurement in a steel cylindrical liquid storage tank using image filter processing under seismic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Wan; Choi, Hyoung-Suk; Park, Dong-Uk; Baek, Eun-Rim; Kim, Jae-Min

    2018-02-01

    Sloshing refers to the movement of fluid that occurs when the kinetic energy of various storage tanks containing fluid (e.g., excitation and vibration) is continuously applied to the fluid inside the tanks. As the movement induced by an external force gets closer to the resonance frequency of the fluid, the effect of sloshing increases, and this can lead to a serious problem with the structural stability of the system. Thus, it is important to accurately understand the physics of sloshing, and to effectively suppress and reduce the sloshing. Also, a method for the economical measurement of the water level response of a liquid storage tank is needed for the exact analysis of sloshing. In this study, a method using images was employed among the methods for measuring the water level response of a liquid storage tank, and the water level response was measured using an image filter processing algorithm for the reduction of the noise of the fluid induced by light, and for the sharpening of the structure installed at the liquid storage tank. A shaking table test was performed to verify the validity of the method of measuring the water level response of a liquid storage tank using images, and the result was analyzed and compared with the response measured using a water level gauge.

  15. Seismic scoping evaluation of high level liquid waste tank vaults at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, P.S.; Uldrich, E.D.; McGee, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    A seismic scoping evaluation of buried vaults enclosing high level liquid waste storage tanks at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant has been performed. The objective of this evaluation was to scope out which of the vaults could be demonstrated to be seismically adequate against the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE). Using approximate analytical methods, earthquake experience data, and engineering judgement, this study determined that one vault configuration would be expected to meet ICPP seismic design criteria, one would not be considered seismically adequate against the SSE, and one could be shown to be seismically adequate against the SSE using nonlinear analysis

  16. Baseline monitoring and simulated liquid release test report for Tank W-9, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with the baseline dry well conductivity monitoring data and simulated liquid release tests to support the use of Gunite and Associated Tank (GAAT) W-9 as a temporary consolidation tank during waste removal operations. Information provided in this report forms part of the technical basis for criticality safety, systems safety, engineering design and waste management as they apply to the GAAT treatability study and waste removal actions

  17. Study on fine particles influence on sodium sulfite and oxygen gas-liquid reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Shuchang; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Shujuan; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering; Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Lab. for Thermal Science and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    Wet limestone scrubbing is the most common flue gas desulfurization process for control of sulfur dioxide emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels, and forced oxidation is a key part of the reaction. During the reaction which controlled by gas-liquid mass transfer, the fine particles' characteristic, size, solid loading and temperature has a great influence on gas-liquid mass transfer. In the present work is to explain how these factors influence the reaction between Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3} and O{sub 2} and find the best react conditions through experiment. The oxidation rate was experimentally studied by contacting pure oxygen with a sodium sulfite solution with active carbon particle in a stirred tank, and the system pressure drop was record by the pressure sensor. At the beginning the pressure is about 215 kPa and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3} is about 0.5mol/L. The temperature is 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 C. Compare the results of no particles included, we can conclude that high temperature, proper loadings and smaller particles resulting in higher mass transfer coefficients k{sub L}.

  18. The Liquid Sustainer Build-up Time Impact on the Emptying Spacecraft Fuel Tank in Free Orbiting Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Sapozhnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trouble-free operation of liquid rocket engines (LRE depends, among other factors, on the nonstop supply of liquid rocket fuel components in the fuel tank feed line with continuous flow.This condition becomes especially relevant for the aerial vehicles (AV in orbital (suborbital environment. With a little filled fuel tanks discontinuity of flow may occur because of pressurizing gas blow-by in the feed line as a result of the funnel generation (with or without vortex formation and so-called phenomenon of dynamic failure of the interface "liquid-gas”.The paper presents a mathematical model of the process of emptying tank initially a little filled and having a reduced level of the gravity acceleration. Using the developed mathematical model a parametric study has been conducted to find how stabilization rate of liquid flow effects on the volume of drained liquid. The computational experiment defines gas blow-by points in the feed line and propellant residuals, depending on the flow rate, physical properties of the fuel components, residual value of the acceleration, and diameter of the feed line.As a result, an effect is discovered that previously has been never mentioned in publications on research of the emptying processes of the aircraft fuel tanks, namely: with abrupt bootstrap of the flow rate a blow-by of gas occurs at the initial stage of emptying tank. In this case, to ensure LRE trouble-free operation there is a need in a special inner-tank device to prevent premature blow-by of pressurizing gas in the tank feed line.

  19. Detailed leak detection test plan and schedule for Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste active tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a plan and schedule for leak testing a portion of the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. It is a concise version of a more general leak testing plan that was prepared in response to the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). This plan includes a schedule for the initial reporting of the leak test results from the various tanks that will be tested. The FFA distinguishes four categories of tank and pipeline systems: new systems (Category A), doubly contained systems (Category B), singly contained systems (Category C), and inactive systems (Category D). The FFA specifically requires leak testing of the Category C systems; there are 14 such tanks addressed in this plan, plus one tank (W-12) that has been temporarily returned to service based on EPA and TDEC concurrence. A schedule for testing these tanks is also included. The plan and schedule also addresses an additional 15 Category B tanks have been demonstrated to meet secondary containment requirements. While these 15 tanks are addressed in this plan for the sake of completeness, they have been removed from the leak testing program based on the design demonstrations that show secondary containment. It is noted that the general plan included 42 tanks. Since that report was issued, 26 of those tanks have passed secondary containment design demonstrations and subsequently have been removed from this leak testing plan. In addition, one tank (LA-104) has been removed from service. Accordingly, this document addresses 15 of the LLLW tanks in the system; plans for testing the pipelines will be described in a separate document

  20. Detailed leak detection test plan and schedule for Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste active tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a plan and schedule for leak testing a portion of the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. It is a concise version of a more general leak testing plan that was prepared in response to the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). This plan includes a schedule for the initial reporting of the leak test results from the various tanks that will be tested. The FFA distinguishes four categories of tank and pipeline systems: new systems (Category A), doubly contained systems (Category B), singly contained systems (Category C), and inactive systems (Category D). The FFA specifically requires leak testing of the Category C systems; there are 14 such tanks addressed in this plan, plus one tank (W-12) that has been temporarily returned to service based on EPA and TDEC concurrence. A schedule for testing these tanks is also included. The plan and schedule also addresses an additional 15 Category B tanks have been demonstrated to meet secondary containment requirements. While these 15 tanks are addressed in this plan for the sake of completeness, they have been removed from the leak testing program based on the design demonstrations that show secondary containment. It is noted that the general plan included 42 tanks. Since that report was issued, 26 of those tanks have passed secondary containment design demonstrations and subsequently have been removed from this leak testing plan. In addition, one tank (LA-104) has been removed from service. Accordingly, this document addresses 15 of the LLLW tanks in the system; plans for testing the pipelines will be described in a separate document.

  1. Physical and Liquid Chemical Simulant Formulations for Transuranic Waste in Hanford Single-Shell Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassat, Scot D.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Russell, Renee L.; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2003-01-01

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is in the process of identifying and developing supplemental process technologies to accelerate the tank waste cleanup mission. A range of technologies is being evaluated to allow disposal of Hanford waste types, including transuranic (TRU) process wastes. Ten Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs) have been identified whose contents may meet the criteria for designation as TRU waste: the B-200 series (241-B-201, -B-202, -B 203, and B 204), the T-200 series (241-T-201, T 202, -T-203, and -T-204), and Tanks 241-T-110 and -T-111. CH2M HILL has requested vendor proposals to develop a system to transfer and package the contact-handled TRU (CH-TRU) waste retrieved from the SSTs for subsequent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Current plans call for a modified ''dry'' retrieval process in which a liquid stream is used to help mobilize the waste for retrieval and transfer through lines and vessels. This retrieval approach requires that a significant portion of the liquid be removed from the mobilized waste sludge in a ''dewatering'' process such as centrifugation prior to transferring to waste packages in a form suitable for acceptance at WIPP. In support of CH2M HILL's effort to procure a TRU waste handling and packaging process, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed waste simulant formulations to be used in evaluating the vendor's system. For the SST CH-TRU wastes, the suite of simulants includes (1) nonradioactive chemical simulants of the liquid fraction of the waste, (2) physical simulants that reproduce the important dewatering properties of the waste, and (3) physical simulants that can be used to mimic important rheological properties of the waste at different points in the TRU waste handling and packaging process. To validate the simulant formulations, their measured properties were compared with the limited data for actual TRU waste samples. PNNL developed the final simulant formulations

  2. Time evolution of the drop size distribution for liquid-liquid dispersion in an agitated tank

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šulc, R.; Kysela, Bohuš; Ditl, P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 3 (2018), s. 543-553 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-20175S Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : liquid–liquid dispersion * drop breakup * drop size distribution * time evolution Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.258, year: 2016

  3. Contamination of liquid oxygen by pressurized gaseous nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; King, Tracy K.; Ngo, Kim Chi

    1989-01-01

    The penetration of pressurized gaseous nitrogen (GN2) into liquid oxygen (LOX) was investigated experimentally in the 7-inch High Temperature Tunnel, the pilot tunnel for the 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel (8'HTT) at Langley Research Center. A preliminary test using a nuclear monitor revealed the extent of the liquid nitrogen (LN2) build-up at the LOX interface as a function of GN2 pressure. Then an adaptation of the differential flash vaporization technique was used to determine the binary diffusivity of the LOX-LN2 system at a temperature of 90.2 K. The measured value D equals 0.000086 sq cm/s + or - 25 percent together with two prior measurements at lower temperatures revealed an excellent fit to the Arrhenius equation, yielding a pre-exponential factor D sub 0 equals 0.0452 sq cm/s and an activation enthalpy H equals 1.08 kcal/mol. At a pressure of 1700 psi and holding time of 15 min, the penetration of LN2 into LOX (to a 1 percent contamination level) was found to be 0.9 cm, indicating but minimal impact upon 8'HTT operations.

  4. Subcooled Liquid Oxygen Cryostat for Magneto-Archimedes Particle Separation by Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, D. K.; Celik, D.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2008-03-01

    An instrument for the separation of particles by density (sorting) is being developed that uses the magneto-archimedes effect in liquid oxygen. With liquid oxygen strongly paramagnetic, the magneto-archimedes effect is an extension of diamagnetic levitation in the sense of increasing the effective buoyancy of a particle. The instrument will be able to separate ensembles of particles from 100 μm to 100 nm in size, and vertically map or mechanically deliver the separated particles. The instrument requires a column of liquid oxygen that is nearly isothermal, free of thermal convection, subcooled to prevent nucleate boiling, and supported against the strong magnetic field used. Thus, the unique cryostat design that meets these requirements is described in the present article. It consists in part of a column of liquid nitrogen below for cooling the liquid oxygen, with the liquid oxygen pressurized by helium gas to prevent nucleate boiling.

  5. Non-linear seismic response of base-isolated liquid storage tanks to bi-directional excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimali, M.K.; Jangid, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    Seismic response of the liquid storage tanks isolated by lead-rubber bearings is investigated for bi-directional earthquake excitation (i.e. two horizontal components). The biaxial force-deformation behaviour of the bearings is considered as bi-linear modelled by coupled non-linear differential equations. The continuous liquid mass of the tank is modelled as lumped masses known as convective mass, impulsive mass and rigid mass. The corresponding stiffness associated with these lumped masses has been worked out depending upon the properties of the tank wall and liquid mass. Since the force-deformation behaviour of the bearings is non-linear, as a result, the seismic response is obtained by the Newmark's step-by-step method. The seismic responses of two types of the isolated tanks (i.e. slender and broad) are investigated under several recorded earthquake ground to study the effects of bi-directional interaction. Further, a parametric study is also carried out to study the effects of important system parameters on the effectiveness of seismic isolation for liquid storage tanks. The various important parameters considered are: (i) the period of isolation, (ii) the damping of isolation bearings and (iii) the yield strength level of the bearings. It has been observed that the seismic response of isolated tank is found to be insensitive to interaction effect of the bearing forces. Further, there exists an optimum value of isolation damping for which the base shear in the tank attains the minimum value. Therefore, increasing the bearing damping beyond a certain value may decrease the bearing and sloshing displacements but it may increase the base shear

  6. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

    2011-01-12

    This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be

  7. Chemical information on tank supernatants, Cs adsorption from tank liquids onto Hanford sediments, and field observations of Cs migration from past tank leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Zachara, J.M.; Burke, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    Borehole gamma-logging profiles beneath the SX-Tank Farm suggest that contamination from Cs-137 extends to at least a depth of 40 m (130 ft), and may extend even deeper. What is presently not known is the pathway that Cs-137 has taken to reach these depths. In this report we provide an analysis of the chemistry of tank supernates with emphasis on the REDOX waste stream disposed in SX tanks, Cs chemistry in aqueous solutions and adsorption properties onto minerals, available data on Cs adsorption onto Hanford sediments, and information on Cs migration from other Hanford tank leaks that have been studied. The data in this report was used to help guide the vadose zone transport analysis of the SX Tank Farm presented in a companion report. The goal of the vadose zone transport modelling is to attempt to explain the depth and extent of the Cs-137 plume under the SX Tank farm, specifically in the vicinity of the greatest leak, near the SX-109 Tank as inferred from the gamma logs (DOE 1996). In solution Cs is present as the monovalent cation and shows very little tendency to form aqueous complexes with inorganic or organic ligands. Cs is expected to adsorb primarily onto selective minerals that have unique adsorption sites. The small Cs{sup +} ion is accommodated on these frayed edge and interlayer sites. Adsorption within the interlayers often leads to collapse of the layers such that the Cs{sup +} ion is effectively trapped and not readily exchangeable by all other common cations. The degree of adsorption is thus only moderately dependent on the types and high concentrations of other cations in leaking tank liquors.

  8. Chemical information on tank supernatants, Cs adsorption from tank liquids onto Hanford sediments, and field observations of Cs migration from past tank leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R.J.; Zachara, J.M.; Burke, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    Borehole gamma-logging profiles beneath the SX-Tank Farm suggest that contamination from Cs-137 extends to at least a depth of 40 m (130 ft), and may extend even deeper. What is presently not known is the pathway that Cs-137 has taken to reach these depths. In this report we provide an analysis of the chemistry of tank supernates with emphasis on the REDOX waste stream disposed in SX tanks, Cs chemistry in aqueous solutions and adsorption properties onto minerals, available data on Cs adsorption onto Hanford sediments, and information on Cs migration from other Hanford tank leaks that have been studied. The data in this report was used to help guide the vadose zone transport analysis of the SX Tank Farm presented in a companion report. The goal of the vadose zone transport modelling is to attempt to explain the depth and extent of the Cs-137 plume under the SX Tank farm, specifically in the vicinity of the greatest leak, near the SX-109 Tank as inferred from the gamma logs (DOE 1996). In solution Cs is present as the monovalent cation and shows very little tendency to form aqueous complexes with inorganic or organic ligands. Cs is expected to adsorb primarily onto selective minerals that have unique adsorption sites. The small Cs + ion is accommodated on these frayed edge and interlayer sites. Adsorption within the interlayers often leads to collapse of the layers such that the Cs + ion is effectively trapped and not readily exchangeable by all other common cations. The degree of adsorption is thus only moderately dependent on the types and high concentrations of other cations in leaking tank liquors

  9. CFD simulations on the dynamics of liquid sloshing and its control in a storage tank for spent fuel applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanapala, V.S.; Velusamy, K.; Patnaik, B.S.V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamics of sloshing in partially filled spent fuel storage tanks is numerically simulated. • Two type of baffle plates were examined towards the control of slosh suppression. • An optimum baffles configuration was obtained, after carrying out systematic investigations. • This vertical baffle design was effective, when tested for a seismic excitation (El centro). - Abstract: Spent nuclear liquid waste is often kept in partially filled storage tanks. When such storage tanks are subjected to wind and/or earthquake induced excitations, this could lead to detrimental conditions. Therefore, storage tank designers should ensure safe design margins and develop methodologies to overcome a wide range of possible scenarios. In the present study, systematic numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the sloshing dynamics of liquid in a storage tank, subjected to seismic excitation. As a precursor, the influence of resonant harmonic excitation on the free surface displacement, pressure distribution, slosh forces etc. is studied. To suppress the free surface fluctuations and the associated slosh force, two types of baffles viz., ring and vertical baffle are examined. Based on the response to an imposed harmonic excitation, the vertical baffle plate in the middle of the tank, was found to be effective and its dimensions are systematically optimized. This baffle geometry was tested for a well known seismic excitation (El Centro) and it was observed to effectively suppress free surface fluctuations and the slosh forces.

  10. A dynamic model of liquid containers (tanks) with legs and probability analysis of response to simulated earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Takafumi; Shimosaka, Haruo

    1980-01-01

    This paper is described on the results of analysis of the response of liquid containers (tanks) to earthquakes. Sine wave oscillation was applied experimentally to model tanks with legs. A model with one degree of freedom is good enough for the analysis. To investigate the reason of this fact, the response multiplication factor of tank displacement was analysed. The shapes of the model tanks were rectangular and cylindrical. Analyses were made by a potential theory. The experimental studies show that the characteristics of attenuation of oscillation was non-linear. The model analysis of this non-linear attenuation was also performed. Good agreement between the experimental and the analytical results was recognized. The probability analysis of the response to earthquake with simulated shock waves was performed, using the above mentioned model, and good agreement between the experiment and the analysis was obtained. (Kato, T.)

  11. Design and analysis of a multi-cell subscale tank for liquid hydrogen storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tapeinos, I.; Koussios, S.; Groves, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines the structural performance of a conformable pressurizable tank consisting of intersecting spherical shells (multi-cell tank). Multi-cell tanks outrival conventional multiple cylindrical tanks in volumetric efficiency when required to fit in a rectangular envelope in the

  12. Leak testing plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low- level waste system (active tanks)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, D.G.; Wise, R.F.; Starr, J.W.; Maresca, J.W. Jr.

    1992-06-01

    A leak testing plan for a portion of the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is provided in the two volumes that form this document. This plan was prepared in response to the requirements of the Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) between the US Department of Energy and two other agencies, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of this agreement was 1 January 1992. The LLLW system is an interconnected complex of tanks and pipelines. The FFA distinguishes four different categories of tank and pipeline systems within this complex: new systems (Category A), doubly contained systems (Category B), singly contained systems (Category C), and inactive systems (Category D). The FFA's specific requirements for leak testing of the Category C systems is addressed in this plan. The plan also addresses leak testing of the Category B portions of the LLLW system. Leak testing of the Category B components was brought into the plan to supplement the secondary containment design demonstration effort that is under way for these components

  13. Seismic analysis of the ICPP high level liquid waste tanks and vaults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uldrich, E.D.; Malik, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Two buried, closely spaced, reinforced concrete vaults founded on base rock were evaluated for gravity and safe shutdown earthquake loads. These vaults enclose steel tanks used to store high level radioactive liquid waste. Detailed 3-dimensional finite element models were used for state-of-the-art structure-soil-structure interaction (SSSI) analyses. Three soil dynamic property profiles were used to address soil variability. Vault accelerations are not significantly affected by the variability of soil dynamic properties. Lower bound soil properties yield maximum member forces and moments. Demands on the side closer to the other vault due to horizontal motions are lower due to SSSI effects. Combined gravity and seismic demand on the vault force resisting system was calculated. The vaults were qualified, using member capacities based on current design codes

  14. Theoretical basis of oxygen pressure control in liquid Pb-Bi using YSZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, S. H.; Hwang, I. S.; Park, B. K.

    2002-01-01

    To develop a liquid Pb-Bi cooled reactor, it is necessary to solve the structural material corrosion problem caused by Pb-Bi. This experiment examine the fundamental behaviors to practically test the oxide film formation on the surface of structural material known as solution of corrosion inhibition in liquid Pb-Bi. The corrosion inhibition through oxide film formation is to prevent metals from dissolving into liquid Pb-Bi though not forming coolants slug resulted from oxidation. In this paper, we examined the oxygen pressure controllability using YSZ in cover gas, and theoretically derived the relationship between oxygen cover gas pressure and dissolved oxygen in liquid Pb-Bi

  15. Nuclear fuel technology - Tank calibration and volume determination for nuclear materials accountancy - Part 4: Accurate determination of liquid height in accountancy tanks equipped with dip tubes, slow bubbling rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    ISO 18213 deals with the acquisition, standardization, analysis, and use of calibration to determine liquid volumes in process tanks for the accountancy of nuclear materials. This part of ISO 18213 is complementary to the other parts, ISO 18213-1 (procedural overview), ISO 18213-2 (data standardization), ISO 18213-3 (statistical methods), ISO 18213-5 (fast bubbling rate) and ISO 18213-6 (in-tank determination of liquid density). The procedure presented herein for determining liquid height from measurements of induced pressure applies specifically when a very slow bubbling rate is employed. A similar procedure that is appropriate for a fast bubbling rate is given in ISO 18213-5. Measurements of the volume and height of liquid in a process accountancy tank are often made in order to estimate or verify the tank's calibration or volume measurement equation. The calibration equation relates the response of the tank's measurement system to some independent measure of tank volume. Beginning with an empty tank, calibration data are typically acquired by introducing a series of carefully measured quantities of some calibration liquid into the tank. The quantity of liquid added, the response of the tank's measurement system, and relevant ambient conditions such as temperature are measured for each incremental addition. Several calibration runs are made to obtain data for estimating or verifying a tank's calibration or measurement equation. A procedural overview of the tank calibration and volume measurement process is given in ISO 18213-1. An algorithm for standardizing tank calibration and volume measurement data to minimize the effects of variability in ambient conditions that prevail during the measurement period is given in ISO 18213-2. The procedure presented in this part of ISO 18213 for determining the height of calibration liquid in the tank from a measurement of the pressure it induces in the tank's measurement system is a vital component of that algorithm. In some

  16. Nuclear fuel technology - Tank calibration and volume determination for nuclear materials accountancy - Part 5: Accurate determination of liquid height in accountancy tanks equipped with dip tubes, fast bubbling rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    ISO 18213 deals with the acquisition, standardization, analysis, and use of calibration to determine liquid volumes in process tanks for the accountancy of nuclear materials. This part of ISO 18213 is complementary to the other parts, ISO 18213-1 (procedural overview), ISO 18213-2 (data standardization), ISO 18213-3 (statistical methods), ISO 18213-5 (fast bubbling rate) and ISO 18213-6 (in-tank determination of liquid density). The procedure presented herein for determining liquid height from measurements of induced pressure applies specifically when a very slow bubbling rate is employed. A similar procedure that is appropriate for a fast bubbling rate is given in ISO 18213-5. Measurements of the volume and height of liquid in a process accountancy tank are often made in order to estimate or verify the tank's calibration or volume measurement equation. The calibration equation relates the response of the tank's measurement system to some independent measure of tank volume. Beginning with an empty tank, calibration data are typically acquired by introducing a series of carefully measured quantities of some calibration liquid into the tank. The quantity of liquid added, the response of the tank's measurement system, and relevant ambient conditions such as temperature are measured for each incremental addition. Several calibration runs are made to obtain data for estimating or verifying a tank's calibration or measurement equation. A procedural overview of the tank calibration and volume measurement process is given in ISO 18213-1. An algorithm for standardizing tank calibration and volume measurement data to minimize the effects of variability in ambient conditions that prevail during the measurement period is given in ISO 18213-2. The procedure presented in this part of ISO 18213 for determining the height of calibration liquid in the tank from a measurement of the pressure it induces in the tank's measurement system is a vital component of that algorithm. In some

  17. Performance of liquid storage tanks during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haroun, M.A.; Mourad, S.A.; Izzeddine, W.

    1991-01-01

    Utilities and industrial facilities in the strong shaking area of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake include a large inventory of tanks of all types. The earthquake induced a few incidents of damage to tanks of old and modern design, and even to a retrofitted tank. This paper documents the performance of tank structures during this seismic event through a detailed description of the damage sustained by ground-based petroleum and water storage tanks and by elevated water tanks. It appears that site amplification of the long period ground motion components was a cause of large amplitude sloshing and the associated damage to tanks built on Bay Mud. It is also apparent that design procedures for ground-based unanchored tanks require a substantial updating to reflect the recent technical advances and the lessons learned for such a type of tanks

  18. Large Spun Formed Friction-Stir Welded Tank Domes for Liquid Propellant Tanks Made from AA2195: A Technology Demonstration for the Next Generation of Heavy Lift Launchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachulla, M.; Pernpeinter, R.; Brewster J.; Curreri, P.; Hoffman, E.

    2010-01-01

    Improving structural efficiency while reducing manufacturing costs are key objectives when making future heavy-lift launchers more performing and cost efficient. The main enabling technologies are the application of advanced high performance materials as well as cost effective manufacture processes. This paper presents the status and main results of a joint industrial research & development effort to demonstrate TRL 6 of a novel manufacturing process for large liquid propellant tanks for launcher applications. Using high strength aluminium-lithium alloy combined with the spin forming manufacturing technique, this development aims at thinner wall thickness and weight savings up to 25% as well as a significant reduction in manufacturing effort. In this program, the concave spin forming process is used to manufacture tank domes from a single flat plate. Applied to aluminium alloy, this process allows reaching the highest possible material strength status T8, eliminating numerous welding steps which are typically necessary to assemble tank domes from 3D-curved panels. To minimize raw material costs for large diameter tank domes for launchers, the dome blank has been composed from standard plates welded together prior to spin forming by friction stir welding. After welding, the dome blank is contoured in order to meet the required wall thickness distribution. For achieving a material state of T8, also in the welding seams, the applied spin forming process allows the required cold stretching of the 3D-curved dome, with a subsequent ageing in a furnace. This combined manufacturing process has been demonstrated up to TRL 6 for tank domes with a 5.4 m diameter. In this paper, the manufacturing process as well as test results are presented. Plans are shown how this process could be applied to future heavy-lift launch vehicles developments, also for larger dome diameters.

  19. Visualisation of gas-liquid mass transfer around a rising bubble in a quiescent liquid using an oxygen sensitive dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Nicolas; Hebrard, Gilles

    2018-02-01

    An approach for visualizing and measuring the mass transfer around a single bubble rising in a quiescent liquid is reported. A colorimetric technique, developed by (Dietrich et al. Chem Eng Sci 100:172-182, 2013) using an oxygen sensitive redox dye was implemented. It was based on the reduction of the colorimetric indicator in presence of oxygen, this reduction being catalysed by sodium hydroxide and glucose. In this study, resazurin was selected because it offered various reduced forms with colours ranging from transparent (without oxygen) to pink (in presence of oxygen). These advantages made it possible to visualize the spatio-temporal oxygen mass transfer around rising bubbles. Images were recorded by a CCD camera and, after post-processing, the shape, size, and velocity of the bubbles were measured and the colours around the bubbles mapped. A calibration, linking the level of colour with the dissolved oxygen concentration, enabled colour maps to be converted into oxygen concentration fields. A rheoscopic fluid was used to visualize the wake of the bubbles. A calculation method was also developed to determine the transferred oxygen fluxes around bubbles of two sizes (d = 0.82 mm and d = 2.12 mm) and the associated liquid-side mass transfer coefficients. The results compared satisfactorily with classical global measurements made by oxygen micro-sensors or from the classical models. This study thus constitutes a striking example of how this new colorimetric method could become a remarkable tool for exploring gas-liquid mass transfer in fluids.

  20. 3-D seismic response analysis of liquid-tank-foundation system by using BEM-FEM-impedance function combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Eu-Kyeong; Park, Jung-Il; Lee, Jong-Rim

    1995-01-01

    A new analytic scheme to resolve the liquid-soil-structure interaction problem in cylindrical liquid storage tanks on the deformable soil is presented. Boundary elements and finite elements are combined to simulate the liquid-structure coupling effect while tuned foundation impedance functions (TFIF's) are representing the motion of the rigid foundation block on the flexible soil. Because the coupled dynamic system is expressed explicitly in terms of mass and stiffness, the developed scheme is applicable to any standard dynamic analysis methodologies. (author)

  1. Zero boil-off methods for large-scale liquid hydrogen tanks using integrated refrigeration and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Swanger, A. M.; E Fesmire, J.; Jumper, K. M.; Johnson, W. L.; Tomsik, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    NASA has completed a series of tests at the Kennedy Space Center to demonstrate the capability of using integrated refrigeration and storage (IRAS) to remove energy from a liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank and control the state of the propellant. A primary test objective was the keeping and storing of the liquid in a zero boil-off state, so that the total heat leak entering the tank is removed by a cryogenic refrigerator with an internal heat exchanger. The LH2 is therefore stored and kept with zero losses for an indefinite period of time. The LH2 tank is a horizontal cylindrical geometry with a vacuum-jacketed, multilayer insulation system and a capacity of 125,000 liters. The closed-loop helium refrigeration system was a Linde LR1620 capable of 390W cooling at 20K (without any liquid nitrogen pre-cooling). Three different control methods were used to obtain zero boil-off: temperature control of the helium refrigerant, refrigerator control using the tank pressure sensor, and duty cycling (on/off) of the refrigerator as needed. Summarized are the IRAS design approach, zero boil-off control methods, and results of the series of zero boil-off tests.

  2. Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.; Yoder, T.S.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility

  3. Oxygen input and oxygen yield of tanks of great depth in theory and practice; Theorie und Praxis von Sauerstoffeintrag und -ertrag bei groesseren Beckentiefen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poepel, H.J.; Wagner, M. [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Wasserversorgung, Abwasserbeseitigung und Raumplanung; Weidmann, F.

    1999-07-01

    Activated sludge tanks are nowadays planned and built with greater depths (8.00 to 12.00 m) than hitherto (4.00 to 6.00 m); some are already in operation. For such depths there exist no confirmed dimensioning approaches. The fundamentals of oxygen transfer in deep tanks are pointed out and a model for calculating the influence of depth is set up. It is confirmed via an extensive test program with variation of water depth, the rate of density of membrane aerators, and air volume flows. It permits converting oxygen supply parameters of an aeration system established for a certain blow-in depth to a given alternative depth. For oxygen yield, too, relations are developed, which indicate gross yield for different compressor types (sliding vane rotary compressor, turbo compressor, screw-type compressor) as a function of blow-in-depth, air volume flow and rate of density with great accuracy. (orig.) [German] Belebungsbecken werden heute tiefer (8,00 bis 12,00 m) als bisher (4,00 bis 6,00 m) geplant, gebaut und bereits betrieben. Fuer diese Tiefen liegen keine gesicherten Bemesssungsansaetze vor. Die Grundlagen des Sauerstoffuebergangs in tiefen Becken werden dargelegt und ein Modell zur Berechnung des Tiefeneinflusses erstellt. Ueber ein ausfuehrliches Versuchsprogramm mit Variation der Wassertiefe, der Belegungsdichte mit Membranbelueftern und der Luftvolumenstroeme wird das Modell bestaetigt. Damit koennen Sauerstoffzufuhrparametern eines Belueftungssystems, die fuer eine bestimmte Einblastiefe bekannt sind, auf beliebige andere Tiefen umgerechnet werden. Auch fuer den Sauerstoffertrag werden Beziehungen entwickelt, die den Bruttoertrag fuer unterschiedliche Verdichterarten (Drehkolben-, Turbo- und Schraubenverdichter) in Abhaengigkeit von Einblastiefe, Luftvolumenstrom und Belegungsdichte mit grosser Genauigkeit festlegen. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of Soil-Structure Interaction on the Seismic Response of Liquid Storage Tanks under Earthquake Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Farajian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil-structure interaction (SSI could affect the seismic response of structures. Since liquid storage tanks are vital structures and must continue their operation under severe earthquakes, their seismic behavior should be studied. Accordingly, the seismic response of two types of steel liquid storage tanks (namely, broad and slender, with aspect ratios of height to radius equal to 0.6 and 1.85 founded on half-space soil is scrutinized under different earthquake ground motions. For a better comparison, the six considered ground motions are classified, based on their pulse-like characteristics, into two groups, named far and near fault ground motions. To model the liquid storage tanks, the simplified mass-spring model is used and the liquid is modeled as two lumped masses known as sloshing and impulsive, and the interaction of fluid and structure is considered using two coupled springs and dashpots. The SSI effect, also, is considered using a coupled spring and dashpot. Additionally, four types of soils are used to consider a wide variety of soil properties. To this end, after deriving the equations of motion, MATLAB programming is employed to obtain the time history responses. Results show that although the SSI effect leads to a decrease in the impulsive displacement, overturning moment, and normalized base shear, the sloshing (or convective displacement is not affected by such effects due to its long period.

  5. Results of sampling the contents of the liquid low-level waste evaporator feed tank W-22 at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, M.B.

    1996-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of the fall 1994 sampling of the contents of the liquid low- level waste (LLLW) tank W-22 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Tank W-22 is the central collection and holding tank for LLLW at ORNL before the waste is transferred to the evaporators. Samples of the tank liquid and sludge were analyzed to determine (1) the major chemical constituents, (2) the principal radionuclides, (3) the metals listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Contract Laboratory Program Inorganic Target Analyte List, (4) organic compounds, and (5) some physical properties. The organic chemical characterization consisted of the determinations of the EPA Contract Laboratory Program Target Compound List semivolatile compounds, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Water-soluble volatile organic compounds were also determined. Information provided in this report forms part of the technical basis in support of (1) waste management for the active LLLW system and (2) planning for the treatment and disposal of the waste

  6. Preliminary evaluation of liquid integrity monitoring methods for gunite and associated tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) are inactive, liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks located in and around the North and South Tank Farms (NTF and STF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These tanks, which contain a supernatant over a layer of radioactive sludge, are the subject of an ongoing treatability study that will determine the best way to remove the sludge and remediate the tanks. As part of this study, a preliminary assessment of liquid integrity (or ''tightness'') monitoring methods for the Gunite tanks has been conducted. Both an external and an internal liquid integrity monitoring method were evaluated, and a preliminary assessment of the liquid integrity of eight Gunite tanks was made with the internal method. The work presented in this report shows that six of the eight GAAT considered here are liquid tight and that, in the case of the other two, data quality was too poor to allow a conclusive decision. The analysis indicates that when the release detection approach described in this report is used during the upcoming treatability study, it will function as a sensitive and robust integrity monitoring system. Integrity assessments based on both the internal and external methods can be used as a means of documenting the integrity of the tanks before the initiation of in-tank operations. Assessments based on the external method can be used during these operations as a means of providing a nearly immediate indication of a release, should one occur. The external method of release detection measures the electrical conductivity of the water found in the dry wells associated with each of the tanks. This method is based on the fact that the conductivity of the liquid in the GAAT is very high, while the conductivity of the groundwater in the dry wells and the underdrain system for the GAAT is very low

  7. Approximate Pressure Distribution in an Accelerating Launch-Vehicle Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed derivation of the equations governing the pressure in a generic liquid-fuel launch vehicle tank subjected to uniformly accelerated motion is presented. The equations obtained are then for the Space Shuttle Superlightweight Liquid-Oxygen Tank at approximately 70 seconds into flight. This generic derivation is applicable to any fuel tank in the form of a surface of revolution and should be useful in the design of future launch vehicles

  8. Risk characterization data manual for Category D inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This manual reports the results of a risk characterization of Category D inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) underground storage tanks (Uses) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The risk characterization is required by the Federal Facility Agreement between the Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office, the Environmental Protection Agency-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The intent of the risk characterization is to determine relative priorities for assessment and remediation. A total of 55 FFA Category D inactive LLLW tanks are discussed in this manual. Of the 39 tanks at ORNL that have been accepted into the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program, all have been sampled for preliminary characterization, except for 5 tanks that were found to be empty plus I that was found not to exist. The remaining 16 tanks are in the Waste Management (WM) Program. Twelve were sampled for preliminary characterization, and four were found empty. Each sampled tank was scored on a scale of I to 5 on the basis of three criteria: (1) leak characteristics, (2) location, and (3) toxicological characteristics of residual sludges and liquids. Each criterion was assigned a weighing factor based on perceived importance. The criterion score multiplied by the weighting factor equaled the tank's total score for that criterion. The three weighted criterion scores for each tank were then summed for a total score for that tank. When the scores for all tanks had been weighted and summed, the tanks were ranked in descending order on the basis of their total scores. The highest possible score for a tank is 30. The descending rank order represents the recommended priorities for evaluation: the higher the score, the higher the priority for evaluation. Of the 54 tanks sampled in the risk characterization, 23 tanks scored 16 or higher, 11 scored between 10 and 15, 5 scored between 4 and 9, and 15 scored 3 or less

  9. Risk characterization data manual for Category D inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This manual reports the results of a risk characterization of Category D inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) underground storage tanks (USTs) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The risk characterization is required by the Federal Facility Agreement between the Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office, the Environmental Protection Agency-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The intent of the risk characterization is to determine relative priorities for assessment and remediation. A total of 55 FFA Category D inactive LLLW tanks are discussed in this manual. Of the 39 tanks at ORNL that have been accepted into the Environmental Restoration (ER) Pregrain, all have been sampled for preliminary characterization, except for 5 tanks that were found to be empty plus 1 that was found not to exist. The remaining 16 tanks are in the Waste Management (WM) Program. Twelve were sampled for preliminary characterization, and four were found empty. Each sampled tank was scored on a scale of I to 5 on the basis of three criteria: (1) leak characteristics, (2) location, and (3) toxicological characteristics of residual sludges and liquids. Each criterion was assigned a weighing factor based on perceived importance. The criterion score multiplied by the weighting factor equaled the tank's total score for that criterion. The three weighted criterion scores for each tank were then summed for a total score for that tank. When the scores for all tanks had been weighted and summed, the tanks were ranked in descending order on the basis of their total scores. The highest possible score for a tank is 30. The descending rank order represents the recommended priorities for evaluation: the higher the score, the higher the priority for evaluation. Of the 54 tanks sampled in the risk characterization, 23 tanks scored 16 or higher, 11 scored between 10 and 15, 5 scored between 4 and 9, and 15 scored 3 or less

  10. Preliminary Sizing Study of Ares-I and Ares-V Liquid Hydrogen Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stanley T.; Harper, David W.

    2012-01-01

    A preliminary sizing study of two cryogenic propellant tanks was performed using a FORTRAN optimization program to determine weight efficient orthogrid designs for the tank barrels sections only. Various tensile and compressive failure modes were considered, including general buckling of cylinders with a shell buckling knockdown factor. Eight independent combinations of three design requirements were also considered and their effects on the tanks weight. The approach was to investigate each design case with a variable shell buckling knockdown factor, determining the most weight efficient combination of orthogrid design parameters. Numerous optimization analyses were performed, and the results presented herein compare the effects of the different design requirements and shell buckling knockdown factor. Through a series of comparisons between design requirements or shell buckling knockdown factors, the relative change in overall tank barrel weights is shown. The findings indicate that the design requirements can substantually increase the tank weight while a less conservative shell buckling knockdown factor can modestly reduce the tank weight.

  11. Monitoring and measurement of oxygen concentrations in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    The measurement of oxygen concentrations in sodium at levels of interest for LMFBR applications is reviewed. Additional data are presented to support the validity of the vanadium-equilibration method as a reference for determination of oxygen concentrations in sodium at levels equal to or less than 15 ppM. Operating experience with electrochemical oxygen meters that have a thoria-yttria electrolyte and a Na--Na 2 O reference electrode is described. Meter lifetimes in excess of one year have generally been achieved for operating temperatures of 352 and 402 0 C, and fairly stable emfs have been observed for periods of several months. 7 fig, 21 references

  12. Combustion Stability Characteristics of the Project Morpheus Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Main Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, John C.; Morehead, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The project Morpheus liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) main engine is a Johnson Space Center (JSC) designed 5,000 lbf-thrust, 4:1 throttling, pressure-fed cryogenic engine using an impinging element injector design. The engine met or exceeded all performance requirements without experiencing any in- ight failures, but the engine exhibited acoustic-coupled combustion instabilities during sea-level ground-based testing. First tangential (1T), rst radial (1R), 1T1R, and higher order modes were triggered by conditions during the Morpheus vehicle derived low chamber pressure startup sequence. The instability was never observed to initiate during mainstage, even at low power levels. Ground-interaction acoustics aggravated the instability in vehicle tests. Analysis of more than 200 hot re tests on the Morpheus vehicle and Stennis Space Center (SSC) test stand showed a relationship between ignition stability and injector/chamber pressure. The instability had the distinct characteristic of initiating at high relative injection pressure drop at low chamber pressure during the start sequence. Data analysis suggests that the two-phase density during engine start results in a high injection velocity, possibly triggering the instabilities predicted by the Hewitt stability curves. Engine ignition instability was successfully mitigated via a higher-chamber pressure start sequence (e.g., 50% power level vs 30%) and operational propellant start temperature limits that maintained \\cold LOX" and \\warm methane" at the engine inlet. The main engine successfully demonstrated 4:1 throttling without chugging during mainstage, but chug instabilities were observed during some engine shutdown sequences at low injector pressure drop, especially during vehicle landing.

  13. Research on Liquid Management Technology in Water Tank and Reactor for Propulsion System with Hydrogen Production System Utilizing Aluminum and Water Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Ryoji; Imamura, Takuya; Sugioka, Masatoshi; Higashino, Kazuyuki

    2017-12-01

    High pressure hydrogen produced by aluminum and water reaction is considered to be applied to space propulsion system. Water tank and hydrogen production reactor in this propulsion system require gas and liquid separation function under microgravity condition. We consider to install vane type liquid acquisition device (LAD) utilizing surface tension in the water tank, and install gas-liquid separation mechanism by centrifugal force which swirling flow creates in the hydrogen reactor. In water tank, hydrophilic coating was covered on both tank wall and vane surface to improve wettability. Function of LAD in water tank and gas-liquid separation in reaction vessel were evaluated by short duration microgravity experiments using drop tower facility. In the water tank, it was confirmed that liquid was driven and acquired on the outlet due to capillary force created by vanes. In addition of this, it was found that gas-liquid separation worked well by swirling flow in hydrogen production reactor. However, collection of hydrogen gas bubble was sometimes suppressed by aluminum alloy particles, which is open problem to be solved.

  14. Investigations of a zirconia solid electrolyte oxygen sensor in liquid lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivai, Abu Khalid, E-mail: rivai.abukhalid@jaea.go.j [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, N1-18, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Takahashi, Minoru, E-mail: mtakahas@nr.titech.ac.j [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, N1-18, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    Investigations of a magnesia-stabilized zirconia solid electrolyte oxygen sensor for oxygen control measurement in liquid lead were carried out. The fluid of Bi/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a reference electrode and a molybdenum wire as a working electrode to detect the output signal of the sensor were used. The Nernst equation was used to estimate the electromotive force (EMF) values theoretically. The temperatures of liquid lead were 500, 550 and 600 deg. C. The results showed that the injection gas temperatures did not affect the detected EMF, the sensor responded well to quick changes of oxygen activity in liquid lead, and the discrepancy between the measured and theoretical EMF of the oxygen sensor output signal was higher at 500 deg. C than at 550 and 600 deg. C.

  15. Analysis of the dynamic behaviour of tanks filled with a liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ousset, Y.; Marquand, D.

    1983-01-01

    The construction of nuclear power plants sets the problem of the resistance of fuel storage tank to seisms. The presence of fluid changes sensitively the dynamic behaviour of the tank, what involves to take it into account. The CETIM choosed the method of integral equations to solve the problem of the calculation of the added mass matrix [Msub(A)] [fr

  16. A study of the transient performance of annular hydrostatic journal bearings in liquid oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharrer, J. K.; Tellier, J. G.; Hibbs, R. I.

    1992-07-01

    A test apparatus was used to simulate a cryogenic turbopump start transient in order to determine the liftoff and touchdown speed and amount of wear of an annular hydrostatic bearing in liquid oxygen. The bearing was made of sterling silver and the journal made of Inconel 718. The target application of this configuration is the pump end bearing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Liquid Oxygen Turbopump. Sixty-one transient cycles were performed in liquid oxygen with an additional three tests in liquid nitrogen to certify the test facility and configuration. The bearing showed no appreciable wear during the testing, and the results indicate that the performance of the bearing was not significantly degraded during the testing.

  17. Waste Characterization Data Manual for the inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This Waste Characterization Data Manual contains the results of an analysis of the contents of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service in accordance with the requirements of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), Section IX.G.1. Section IX.G.1 of the FFA requires waste characterizations be conducted and provided to EPA and TDEC for all LLLW tanks that are removed from service. These waste characterizations shall include the results of sampling and analysis of the tank contents, including wastes, liquids, and sludges. This manual was first issued as ORNL/ER-80 in June 1992. The waste characterization data were extracted from ORNL reports that described tank sampling and analysis conducted in 1988 for 32 out-of-service tanks. This revision of the manual contains waste characterization data for 54 tanks, including the 32 tanks from the 1988 sampling campaign (Sects. 2.1 through 2.32) and the 22 additional tanks from a subsequent sampling campaign in 1992 and 1993 (Sects. 2.33 through 2.54). Data are presented from analyses of volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, radiochemical compounds, and inorganic compounds. As additional data resulting from analyses of out-of-service tank samples become available, they will be added to this manual

  18. A comparison of BNR activated sludge systems with membrane and settling tank solid-liquid separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramphao, M C; Wentzel, M C; Ekama, G A; Alexander, W V

    2006-01-01

    Installing membranes for solid-liquid separation into biological nutrient removal (BNR) activated sludge (AS) systems makes a profound difference not only to the design of the membrane bio-reactor (MBR) BNR system itself, but also to the design approach for the whole wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). In multi-zone BNR systems with membranes in the aerobic reactor and fixed volumes for the anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic zones (i.e. fixed volume fractions), the mass fractions can be controlled (within a range) with the inter-reactor recycle ratios. This zone mass fraction flexibility is a significant advantage of MBR BNR systems over BNR systems with secondary settling tanks (SSTs), because it allows changing the mass fractions to optimise biological N and P removal in conformity with influent wastewater characteristics and the effluent N and P concentrations required. For PWWF/ADWF ratios (fq) in the upper range (fq approximately 2.0), aerobic mass fractions in the lower range (f(maer) settling and long sludge age). However, the volume reduction compared with equivalent BNR systems with SSTs will not be large (40-60%), but the cost of the membranes can be offset against sludge thickening and stabilisation costs. Moving from a flow unbalanced raw wastewater system to a flow balanced (fq = 1) low (usually settled) wastewater strength system can double the ADWF capacity of the biological reactor, but the design approach of the WWTP changes away from extended aeration to include primary sludge stabilisation. The cost of primary sludge treatment then has to be offset against the savings of the increased WWTP capacity.

  19. Risk-based prioritization for the interim remediation of inactive low-level liquid radioactive waste underground storage tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidambariah, V.; Travis, C.C.; Trabalka, J.R.; Thomas, J.K.

    1992-09-01

    The paper presents a risk-based approach for rapid prioritization of low-level liquid radioactive waste underground storage tanks (LLLW USTs), for possible interim corrective measures and/or ultimate closure. The ranking of LLLW USTs is needed to ensure that tanks with the greatest potential for adverse impact on the environment and human health receive top priority for further evaluation and remediation. Wastes from the LLLW USTs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were pumped out when the tanks were removed from service. The residual liquids and sludge contain a mixture of radionuclides and chemicals. Contaminants of concern that were identified in the liquid phase of the inactive LLLW USTs include the radionuclides 90 Sr, 137 Cs, and 233 U and the chemicals carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethane, tetrachloroethene, methyl ethyl ketone, mercury, lead, and chromium. The risk-based approach for prioritization of the LLLW USTs is based upon three major criteria: (1) leaking characteristics of the tank, (2) location of the tanks, and (3) toxic potential of the tank contents. Leaking characteristics of LLLW USTs will aid in establishing the potential for the release of contaminants to environmental media. In this study, only the liquid phase was assumed to be released to the environment. Scoring criteria for release potential of LLLW USTs was determined after consideration of the magnitude of any known leaks and the tank type for those that are not known to leak

  20. Experimental study of hydraulic ram effects on a liquid storage tank: Analysis of overpressure and cavitation induced by a high-speed projectile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecysyn, Nicolas; Bony-Dandrieux, Aurélia; Aprin, Laurent; Heymes, Frédéric; Slangen, Pierre; Dusserre, Gilles; Munier, Laurent; Le Gallic, Christian

    2010-06-15

    This work is part of a project for evaluating catastrophic tank failures caused by impacts with a high-speed solid body. Previous studies on shock overpressure and drag events have provided analytical predictions, but they are not sufficient to explain ejection of liquid from the tank. This study focuses on the hydrodynamic behavior of the liquid after collision to explain subsequent ejection of liquid. The study is characterized by use of high-velocity projectiles and analysis of projectile dynamics in terms of energy loss to tank contents. New tests were performed at two projectile velocities (963 and 1255 m s(-1)) and over a range of viscosities (from 1 to 23.66 mPa s) of the target liquid. Based on data obtained from a high-speed video recorder, a phenomenological description is proposed for the evolution of intense pressure waves and cavitation in the target liquids. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 1996 structural integrity assessments for the Category C Liquid Low-Level Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This document provides a report of the efforts made to satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement for the structural integrity certification of ten Category C Liquid Low Level Waste (LLLW) tank systems on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Within this document, each Category C tank system is described including the associated pipeline segments evaluated as a part of those tank systems. A separate structural integrity assessment was conducted for each of the LLLW Tank Systems, four of which are located in Melton Valley, and six of which are located in Bethel Valley. The results of the structural integrity assessments are reported herein. The assessments are based on (1) a review of available tank design drawings, (2) a qualitative assessment of corrosion on the tank and pipelines, and primarily (3) leak testing program results

  2. 1996 structural integrity assessments for the Category C Liquid Low-Level Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This document provides a report of the efforts made to satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement for the structural integrity certification of ten Category C Liquid Low Level Waste (LLLW) tank systems on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Within this document, each Category C tank system is described including the associated pipeline segments evaluated as a part of those tank systems. A separate structural integrity assessment was conducted for each of the LLLW Tank Systems, four of which are located in Melton Valley, and six of which are located in Bethel Valley. The results of the structural integrity assessments are reported herein. The assessments are based on (1) a review of available tank design drawings, (2) a qualitative assessment of corrosion on the tank and pipelines, and primarily (3) leak testing program results.

  3. ASRDI oxygen technology survey. Volume 5: Density and liquid level measurement instrumentation for the cryogenic fluids oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    Information is presented on instrumentation for density measurement, liquid level measurement, quantity gauging, and phase measurement. Coverage of existing information directly concerned with oxygen was given primary emphasis. A description of the physical principle of measurement for each instrumentation type is included. The basic materials of construction are listed if available from the source document for each instrument discussed. Cleaning requirements, procedures, and verification techniques are included.

  4. Characterization and re-activation of oxygen sensors for use in liquid lead-bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Yuji; Abe, Yuji; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Oigawa, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Control of oxygen concentration in liquid lead-bismuth is one of the most important tasks to develop accelerator driven systems. In order to improve the reliability of oxygen sensors, re-activation treatments were investigated as well as characterization of oxygen sensors for use in liquid lead-bismuth. The oxygen sensor with a solid electrolyte of yttria-stabilized zirconia and a Pt/gas reference electrode showed almost the same electromotive force values in gas and liquid lead-bismuth, respectively, as the theoretical ones at temperatures above 400 deg. C or 450 deg. C. After long-term use of 6500 h, the outputs of the sensor became incorrect in liquid lead-bismuth. The state of the sensor that indicated incorrect outputs could not be recovered by cleaning with a nitric acid. However, it was found that the oxygen sensor became a correct sensor indicating theoretical values in liquid lead-bismuth after re-activation by the Pt-treatment of the outer surface of the sensor.

  5. Static tilt tests of a full-sized cylindrical liquid storage tank model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is explaining a static tilt test with a full-scaled tank model, the objects of which are the above-ground type LNG,LPG and oil storage tanks. Main points of view to investigate are as follows: Stress and deformation at each part of the tank wall, the bottom plate and the anchor straps in case that the anchor straps are very effective; Behavior in case that the anchor straps are not very effective; Behavior in case of no anchors; Influence of the roof above the shell; and Influence of the foundation rigidity under the bottom plate

  6. Thermal stratification in LH2 tank of cryogenic propulsion stage tested in ISRO facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, M.; Raj, R. Edwin; Narayanan, V.

    2017-02-01

    Liquid oxygen and hydrogen are used as oxidizer and fuel respectively in cryogenic propulsion system. These liquids are stored in foam insulated tanks of cryogenic propulsion system and are pressurized using warm pressurant gas supplied for tank pressure maintenance during cryogenic engine operation. Heat leak to cryogenic propellant tank causes buoyancy driven liquid stratification resulting in formation of warm liquid stratum at liquid free surface. This warm stratum is further heated by the admission of warm pressurant gas for tank pressurization during engine operation. Since stratified layer temperature has direct bearing on the cavitation free operation of turbo pumps integrated in cryogenic engine, it is necessary to model the thermal stratification for predicting stratified layer temperature and mass of stratified liquid in tank at the end of engine operation. These inputs are required for estimating the minimum pressure to be maintained by tank pressurization system. This paper describes configuration of cryogenic stage for ground qualification test, stage hot test sequence, a thermal model and its results for a foam insulated LH2 tank subjected to heat leak and pressurization with hydrogen gas at 200 K during liquid outflow at 38 lps for engine operation. The above model considers buoyancy flow in free convection boundary layer caused by heat flux from tank wall and energy transfer from warm pressurant gas etc. to predict temperature of liquid stratum and mass of stratified liquid in tank at the end of engine operation in stage qualification tests carried out in ISRO facility.

  7. 1997 structural integrity assessments for the Category C liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results of a series of evaluations to determine if the individual Category C tank systems retain sufficient structural integrity to continue being used for liquid storage. The approach used to reach the final certification/conclusion consisted of three phases, including: (1) Review of the original engineering design drawings and construction materials to determine whether the tank and line systems were capable of containing liquids without leaking (and also to check that the construction materials were compatible with liquids that might have been placed in these systems). While drawings in this report may be of poor quality, they are copies of the best available originals. (2) A qualitative corrosion assessment conducted in 1995 that further evaluated both the potential internal corrosion effects of materials in the tank and in the potential external corrosion effects of the backfill and native soil at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The ability to accurately measure or predict the amount of corrosion present on both the internal and external walls of the tanks and pipelines is extremely limited. However, when available, data were used to assess the historical tank contents and usage and the probable corrosive effects on the tank system materials of construction. (3) Performance of monthly leak tests were completed on the tanks and annual leak tests were completed on associated testable pipelines. This task was judged to be the most important criteria for determining structural integrity due to the proven performance of the technology and processes involved.

  8. 1997 structural integrity assessments for the Category C liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results of a series of evaluations to determine if the individual Category C tank systems retain sufficient structural integrity to continue being used for liquid storage. The approach used to reach the final certification/conclusion consisted of three phases, including: (1) Review of the original engineering design drawings and construction materials to determine whether the tank and line systems were capable of containing liquids without leaking (and also to check that the construction materials were compatible with liquids that might have been placed in these systems). While drawings in this report may be of poor quality, they are copies of the best available originals. (2) A qualitative corrosion assessment conducted in 1995 that further evaluated both the potential internal corrosion effects of materials in the tank and in the potential external corrosion effects of the backfill and native soil at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The ability to accurately measure or predict the amount of corrosion present on both the internal and external walls of the tanks and pipelines is extremely limited. However, when available, data were used to assess the historical tank contents and usage and the probable corrosive effects on the tank system materials of construction. (3) Performance of monthly leak tests were completed on the tanks and annual leak tests were completed on associated testable pipelines. This task was judged to be the most important criteria for determining structural integrity due to the proven performance of the technology and processes involved

  9. Medium scale fire tests of propane tanks to study the boiling liquid expanding vapour explosion (BLEVE) and transient two-phase jet release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Zhifei

    1994-07-01

    A series of medium scale fire tests were conducted to study boiling liquid expanding vapour explosions (BLEVE) and transient jet releases resulting from thermally induced propane tank ruptures. The tests were conducted using commercial propane contained in automotive propane tanks with a capacity of ca 400 liters. The tanks were brought to failure using a combination of torch and pool fire impingement. Instrumentation was included to measure internal pressure, liquid, vapour and wall temperature distribution, tank and lading mass, external blast overpressure, and fireball thermal radiation. Video and still cameras were used to record the fireball and jet fire shapes and dimensions. Two different kinds of BLEVE failure were observed. For very weak tanks the BLEVE was a single step process where the rupture propagated rapidly along the length of the tank. The duration of these events was measured in milliseconds and it is suggested that the process is driven by the vapour space energy. The other type of BLEVE was a two step process where a crack would start in a weakened area, arrest in a stronger part of the tank, and then start again to end in catastrophic failure. Initial failure and jet type release results in violent boiling and pressure recovery in the tank, leading to restart of the crack and catastrophic failure. Time duration is measured in seconds, and is driven by energy stored in the liquid. A computer model was developed to simulate the transient jet release resulting from finite tank failures, and can predict transient mass flow, tank pressure decay, visible flame length and jet fire thermal radiation. 253 refs., 132 figs., 29 tabs.

  10. Behaviour of oxygen in liquid sodium; Comportamiento del oxigeno disuelto en sodio liquido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torre Cabezas, M. de la

    1975-07-01

    In this work, the vacuum distillation method has been used for the determination of oxygen concentration in liquid sodium. During this investigation, more than 800 analyses have been made and a fluctuation of between 15 and 20$ has been noted in the results. The performance of a cold trap to remove oxygen from sodium has been studied and the corresponding mass transfer coefficient evaluated. The value of this coefficient was in good agreement with those achieved by other workers. (Authors) 69 refs.

  11. Electrochemical study on determination of diffusivity, activity and solubility of oxygen in liquid bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesan, Rajesh [Liquid Metals and Structural Chemistry Division, Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Gnanasekaran, T. [Liquid Metals and Structural Chemistry Division, Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)]. E-mail: gnani@igcar.ernet.in; Srinivasa, Raman S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2006-06-15

    Diffusivity of oxygen in liquid bismuth was measured by potentiostatic method and is given bylg(D{sub O}{sup Bi}/cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1})(+/-0.042)=-3.706-1377/(TK{sup -1})(804oxygen in bismuth was determined by coulometric titrations and using the measured data standard free energy of dissolution of oxygen in liquid bismuth was derived for the reaction:1/2O{sub 2}(g)=[O]{sub Bi}(at.%)and is given by{delta}G{sub O(Bi)}{sup o}/(J.g-atomO{sup -1})(+/-720)=-108784+20.356TK{sup -1}(753oxygen in liquid bismuth was derived as a function of temperature and is given by the following expressions:lg(S/at%O)(+/-0.05)=-4476/TK{sup -1}+4.05(753oxygen in liquid bismuth is compared with the literature data.

  12. Conductor of high electrical current at high temperature in oxygen and liquid metal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, IV, Adam Clayton; Pati, Soobhankar; Derezinski, Stephen Joseph; Lau, Garrett; Pal, Uday B.; Guan, Xiaofei; Gopalan, Srikanth

    2016-01-12

    In one aspect, the present invention is directed to apparatuses for and methods of conducting electrical current in an oxygen and liquid metal environment. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for production of metals from their oxides comprising providing a cathode in electrical contact with a molten electrolyte, providing a liquid metal anode separated from the cathode and the molten electrolyte by a solid oxygen ion conducting membrane, providing a current collector at the anode, and establishing a potential between the cathode and the anode.

  13. Design and Real Time Implementation of CDM-PI Control System in a Conical Tank Liquid Level Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Bhaba

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The work focuses on the design and real time implementation of Coefficient Diagram Method (CDM based PI (CDM-PI control system for a Conical Tank Liquid Level Process (CTLLP which exhibits severe static non-linear characteristics. By taking this static non-linearity into account, a Wiener Model (WM based CDM-PI control system is developed and implemented in real time operations. The performance of this control system for set point tracking and load disturbance rejection is studied. In addition, the performance is compared with other WM based PI controllers. Real time results clearly show that WM based CDM-PI control system outperforms over the others.

  14. Liquid-core nanocellulose-shell capsules with tunable oxygen permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svagan, A J; Bender Koch, C; Hedenqvist, M S; Nilsson, F; Glasser, G; Baluschev, S; Andersen, M L

    2016-01-20

    Encapsulation of oxygen sensitive components is important in several areas, including those in the food and pharmaceutical sectors, in order to improve shelf-life (oxidation resistance). Neat nanocellulose films demonstrate outstanding oxygen barrier properties, and thus nanocellulose-based capsules are interesting from the perspective of enhanced protection from oxygen. Herein, two types of nanocellulose-based capsules with liquid hexadecane cores were successfully prepared; a primary nanocellulose polyurea-urethane capsule (diameter: 1.66 μm) and a bigger aggregate capsule (diameter: 8.3 μm) containing several primary capsules in a nanocellulose matrix. To quantify oxygen permeation through the capsule walls, an oxygen-sensitive spin probe was dissolved within the liquid hexadecane core, allowing non-invasive measurements (spin-probe oximetry, electron spin resonance, ESR) of the oxygen concentration within the core. It was observed that the oxygen uptake rate was significantly reduced for both capsule types compared to a neat hexadecane solution containing the spin-probe, i.e. the slope of the non-steady state part of the ESR-curve was approximately one-third and one-ninth for the primary nanocellulose capsule and aggregated capsule, respectively, compared to that for the hexadecane sample. The transport of oxygen was modeled mathematically and by fitting to the experimental data, the oxygen diffusion coefficients of the capsule wall was determined. These values were, however, lower than expected and one plausible reason for this was that the ESR-technique underestimate the true oxygen uptake rate in the present systems at non-steady conditions, when the overall diffusion of oxygen was very slow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. NON-LINEAR TRANSIENT HEAT CONDUCTION ANALYSIS OF INSULATION WALL OF TANK FOR TRANSPORTATION OF LIQUID ALUMINUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav M Živković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with transient nonlinear heat conduction through the insulation wall of the tank for transportation of liquid aluminum. Tanks designed for this purpose must satisfy certain requirements regarding temperature of loading and unloading, during transport. Basic theoretical equations are presented, which describe the problem of heat conduction finite element (FE analysis, starting from the differential equation of energy balance, taking into account the initial and boundary conditions of the problem. General 3D problem for heat conduction is considered, from which solutions for two- and one-dimensional heat conduction can be obtained, as special cases. Forming of the finite element matrices using Galerkin method is briefly described. The procedure for solving equations of energy balance is discussed, by methods of resolving iterative processes of nonlinear transient heat conduction. Solution of this problem illustrates possibilities of PAK-T software package, such as materials properties, given as tabular data, or analytical functions. Software also offers the possibility to solve nonlinear and transient problems with incremental methods. Obtained results for different thicknesses of the tank wall insulation materials enable its comparison in regards to given conditions

  16. External Tank Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Prepress Regression Analysis Independent Review Technical Consultation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Vickie s.

    2009-01-01

    The request to conduct an independent review of regression models, developed for determining the expected Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) External Tank (ET)-04 cycle count for the Space Shuttle ET tanking process, was submitted to the NASA Engineering and Safety Center NESC on September 20, 2005. The NESC team performed an independent review of regression models documented in Prepress Regression Analysis, Tom Clark and Angela Krenn, 10/27/05. This consultation consisted of a peer review by statistical experts of the proposed regression models provided in the Prepress Regression Analysis. This document is the consultation's final report.

  17. Reactions of oxygen and hydrogen with liquid sodium - a critical survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, H.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamentals of solvation chemistry are presented with appropriate components formulated. Methods of investigation and kinetics of the reactions are described. The hydrogen equilibrium pressure and saturation solubilities are described. The chemical equilibrium between O and H in solution is presented with detailed tabulation of the saturation solutions of oxygen, hydrogen and hydroxide in liquid sodium. Agreements and differences with the literature are presented

  18. Compatibility of Polyvinyl Alcohol with the 241-F/H Tank Farm Liquid Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oji, L.N.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes results from laboratory-scale oxidative mineralization of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and the evaluation of the F/H Tank Farms as a storage/disposal option for PVA waste solution generated in the Canyons and B-line decontamination operations

  19. Compatibility of Polyvinyl Alcohol with the 241-F/H Tank Farm Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L.N.

    1998-11-25

    This report describes results from laboratory-scale oxidative mineralization of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and the evaluation of the F/H Tank Farms as a storage/disposal option for PVA waste solution generated in the Canyons and B-line decontamination operations.

  20. Radioactive liquid waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Tetsuya; Kuramitsu, Kiminori; Ishii, Tomoharu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a system for processing radioactive liquid wastes containing laundry liquid wastes, shower drains or radioactive liquid wastes containing chemical oxygen demand (COD) ingredients and oil content generated from a nuclear power plant. Namely, a collecting tank collects radioactive liquid wastes. A filtering device is connected to the exit of the collective tank. A sump tank is connected to the exit of the filtering device. A powdery active carbon supplying device is connected to the collecting tank. A chemical fluid tank is connected to the collecting tank and the filtering device by way of chemical fluid injection lines. Backwarding pipelines connect a filtered water flowing exit of the filtering device and the collecting tank. The chemical solution is stored in the chemical solution tank. Then, radioactive materials in radioactive liquid wastes generated from a nuclear power plant are removed by the filtering device. The water quality standard specified in environmental influence reports can be satisfied. In the filtering device, when the filtering flow rate is reduced, the chemical fluid is supplied from the chemical fluid tank to the filtering device to recover the filtering flow rate. (I.S.)

  1. Completion report for the Inactive Liquid Low-Level Waste Tank Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Inactive Liquid Low-Level Waste Tank Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work performed is compared with that proposed in the statement of work and the service contract specification for the maintenance action to remediate tanks 3013, 3004-B, T-30, and 3001-B. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) among the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires that all tanks, which have been removed from service and are designated in the FFA as Category D, must be remediated in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements. The Environmental Restoration Program's inactive tank removal program strategy and plans for remediating the inactive LLLW tanks were documented in a report issued in January 1995 (Inactive Tanks Remediation Program Strategy and Plans for Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ORNL/ER-297). The inactive (Category D) tanks were initially screened for remediation according to risk, remediation technology required, level of instrumentation available, interferences with other piping and equipment, location, and available sludge removal techniques and storage requirements. On the basis of this preliminary screening, the tanks were assigned to one of five batches (I through V) for consideration of remedial action alternatives, and these batches were tentatively scheduled for remedial actions. The eight links tentatively assigned to Batch I were divided into two groups (Series I and Series II)

  2. Vibration analysis of elastic tanks partially filled with incompressible liquids in presence of a gravity field; Analyse vibratoire de reservoirs elastiques partiellement remplis de liquides incompressibles en presence d'un champ de gravite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schotte, J.S. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 92 - Chatillon (France); Ohayon, R. [Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), Structural Dynamics and Coupled Systems Dept., 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-07-01

    In order to control the trajectory of liquid propelled launch vehicles, optimum command systems need a realistic model for fluid-structure interactions in tanks partially filled with propellant under apparent gravity. Up to now, the interactions between an elastic tank of arbitrary shape and an internal incompressible homogeneous inviscid liquid with a free surface have been computed with the standard added mass method by omitting the gravity effects. The originality of the present work is to analyze the contributions of all terms depending on this constant acceleration and to show that the gravity effects can be considered as pre-stresses in structure and liquid. (authors)

  3. The temperature dependence of intermediate range oxygen-oxygen correlations in liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Wikfeldt, K. Thor; Skinner, Lawrie B.; Benmore, Chris J.; Nilsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the recent temperature dependent oxygen-oxygen pair-distribution functions from experimental high-precision x-ray diffraction data of bulk water by Skinner et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214507 (2014)] with particular focus on the intermediate range where small, but significant, correlations are found out to 17 Å. The second peak in the pair-distribution function at 4.5 Å is connected to tetrahedral coordination and was shown by Skinner et al. to change behavior with temperature below the temperature of minimum isothermal compressibility. Here we show that this is associated also with a peak growing at 11 Å which strongly indicates a collective character of fluctuations leading to the enhanced compressibility at lower temperatures. We note that the peak at ∼13.2 Å exhibits a temperature dependence similar to that of the density with a maximum close to 277 K or 4 °C. We analyze simulations of the TIP4P/2005 water model in the same manner and find excellent agreement between simulations and experiment albeit with a temperature shift of ∼20 K.

  4. The temperature dependence of intermediate range oxygen-oxygen correlations in liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Pettersson, Lars G. M., E-mail: Lars.Pettersson@fysik.su.se [Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Wikfeldt, K. Thor [Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Science Institute, University of Iceland, VR-III, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Skinner, Lawrie B.; Benmore, Chris J. [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Nilsson, Anders [Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-08-28

    We analyze the recent temperature dependent oxygen-oxygen pair-distribution functions from experimental high-precision x-ray diffraction data of bulk water by Skinner et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214507 (2014)] with particular focus on the intermediate range where small, but significant, correlations are found out to 17 Å. The second peak in the pair-distribution function at 4.5 Å is connected to tetrahedral coordination and was shown by Skinner et al. to change behavior with temperature below the temperature of minimum isothermal compressibility. Here we show that this is associated also with a peak growing at 11 Å which strongly indicates a collective character of fluctuations leading to the enhanced compressibility at lower temperatures. We note that the peak at ∼13.2 Å exhibits a temperature dependence similar to that of the density with a maximum close to 277 K or 4 °C. We analyze simulations of the TIP4P/2005 water model in the same manner and find excellent agreement between simulations and experiment albeit with a temperature shift of ∼20 K.

  5. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS IN SUPPORT OF INCREASED LIQUID LEVEL IN 241-AP TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TC MACKEY; FG ABATT; MW RINKER

    2009-01-14

    The essential difference between Revision 1 and the original issue of this report is in the spring constants used to model the anchor bolt response for the anchor bolts that tie the steel dome of the primary tank to the concrete tank dome. Consequently, focus was placed on the changes in the anchor bolt responses, and a full reevaluation of all tank components was judged to be unnecessary. To confirm this judgement, primary tank stresses from the revised analysis of the BES-BEC case are compared to the original analysis and it was verified that the changes are small, as expected.

  6. 49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.500 Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. ...

  7. Saturn V First Stage S-1C LOX Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-01-01

    This photograph shows the Saturn V assembled LOX (Liquid Oxygen) and fuel tanks ready for transport from the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The tanks were then shipped to the launch site at Kennedy Space Center for a flight. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  8. Oxygen reduction by decamethylferrocene at liquid/liquid interfaces catalyzed by dodecylaniline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Su, B.; Hatay, I.; Li, F.; Partovi-Nia, R.; Samec, Zdeněk; Ersöz, M.; Girault, H. H.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 639, 1-2 (2010), s. 102-108 ISSN 1572-6657 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/07/1257; GA MŠk OC 177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : oxygen reduction * proton reduction * voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.732, year: 2010

  9. Waste characterization data manual for the inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    This Waste Characterization Data Manual contains the results of an analysis of the contents of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service in accordance with the requirements of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), Sect. IX.G.1. This manual contains the results of sampling activities that were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1988. Thirty-three tanks were sampled and analyzed at that time. Sampling of the remaining inactive tanks is currently underway, and data from these tanks will be added to this manual as they become available. Data are presented from analysis of volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, radiochemical compounds, and inorganic compounds

  10. Waste characterization data manual for the inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    This Waste Characterization Data Manual contains the results of an analysis of the contents of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service in accordance with the requirements of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), Sect. IX.G.1. This manual contains the results of sampling activities that were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1988. Thirty-three tanks were sampled and analyzed at that time. Sampling of the remaining inactive tanks is currently underway, and data from these tanks will be added to this manual as they become available. Data are presented from analysis of volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, radiochemical compounds, and inorganic compounds.

  11. Waste characterization data manual for the inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    This Waste Characterization Data Manual contains the results of an analysis of the contents of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service in accordance with the requirements of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), Sect. IX.G.1. This manual contains the results of sampling activities that were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1988. Thirty-three tanks were sampled and analyzed at that time. Sampling of the remaining inactive tanks is currently underway, and data from these tanks will be added to this manual as they become available. Data are presented from analysis of volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, radiochemical compounds, and inorganic compounds.

  12. Summary review of the chemical characterization of liquid and sludge contained in the Old Hydrofracture tanks, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, C.W.; Herbes, S.E.

    1997-02-01

    This report presents analytical data developed from samples collected from the five inactive tanks located at the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The samples were collected during December 1995 and January 1996. The purpose of the sampling and analysis project was (1) to determine whether the tank contents meet ORNL waste acceptance criteria, as specified in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Liquid Waste Treatment Systems, Waste Evaluation Criteria; (2) to determine various physical properties of the tank contents that would affect the design of a sludge mobilization system; and (3) to gather information to support a baseline risk assessment. The report focuses on the analytical results used to evaluate the tank contents with regard to nuclear criticality safety requirements and to regulatory waste characterization

  13. Storage tank catchbasins at the Esso (S. A. F. ) Refinery in Fos-sur-Mer were made liquid-tight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteur, M; Magne, R

    1978-12-01

    The storage tank catch basins at the Esso (S.A.F.) Refinery in Fos-sur-Mer were made liquid-tight to prevent potential ground water pollution by leakage of petroleum product tanks, such as had occurred at this plant in Nov. 1976. Economic and technological studies showed that the sealing of a dike could best be achieved by incorporating, via injection and compaction by vibration, a thin, vertical, compliant, continuous clay-cement shield along the axis of the dike rather than by lining it with concrete, asphalt, or plastic sheets. About 13 km of dikes were treated by this technique, and a grout shield with an average depth of 3.5 m and a vertical surface of 45,000 sq m was constructed in just six months (Feb.-Aug. 1978). Tests showed that the permeability coefficient, relative to water and gasoline, of this grout shield did not exceed 0.00001 cm/sec or 1Vertical Bar3< of the value for peat. This method can also be used to seal off the subsoil of an entire refinery or other industrial plant from its surroundings.

  14. Influence of wall ribs on the thermal stratification and self-pressurization in a cryogenic liquid tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Juan; Sunden, Bengt; Chen, Xiaoqian

    2014-01-01

    Self-pressurization in a cylindrical ribbed tank which is partially filled with liquid hydrogen is investigated numerically under different rib spacing-to-height ratios. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) method is employed as well as a phase change model. Appropriate models are incorporated into the Ansys Fluent by the user-defined functions to carry out the computations. The ribbed surface is modeled as a finned surface and a conjugate transient heat transfer problem is formulated for predicting fluid flow currents and heat transfer. The effect of rib material and shapes is also studied. Numerical results indicate that the pressure rise can be reduced by ribs mounted on the tank wall. This phenomenon is more pronounced as the rib spacing-to-height ratio is reduced. A vortex is observed in the downstream region of each rib when the spacing-to-height has a relatively high value. Evaporation occurs as time elapses due to heat accumulation at the rib surfaces. Pressure starts to rise later with high thermal conductivity ribs and becomes higher with low thermal conductivity ribs when the ribs are of identical configuration in geometry. The final pressure rise seems to be monotonically versus increasing time. The semicircular ribs perform better than rectangular ones in control of the pressure rise and thermal stratification for identical cross sectional area and if the locations are kept the same

  15. A Combined Algorithm for Optimization: Application for Optimization of the Transition Gas-Liquid in Stirred Tank Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitko Petrov

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A combined algorithm for static optimization is developed. The algorithm includes a method for random search of optimal an initial point and a method based on fuzzy sets theory, combined in order to be found for the best solution of the optimization problem. The application of the combined algorithm eliminates the main disadvantage of the used fuzzy optimization method, namely decreases the number of discrete values of control variables. In this way, the algorithm allows problems with larger scale to be solved. The combined algorithm is used for optimization of gas-liquid transition in dependence on some constructive and regime parameters of a laboratory scale stirred tank bioreactor. After the application of developed optimization algorithm significant increase of mass-transfer effectiveness, aeration and mixing processes in the bioreactor are observed.

  16. Potential tank waste material anomalies located near the liquid observation wells: Model predicted responses of a neutron moisture detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finfrock, S.H.; Toffer, H.; Watson, W.T.

    1994-09-01

    Extensive analyses have been completed to demonstrate that a neutron moisture probe can be used to recognize anomalies in materials and geometry surrounding the liquid observation wells (LOWs). Furthermore, techniques can be developed that will permit the interpretation of detector readings, perturbed by the presence of anomalies, as more accurate moisture concentrations. This analysis effort extends the usefulness of a neutron moisture probe system significantly, especially in the complicated geometries and material conditions that may be encountered in the waste tanks. Both static-source and pulsed-source neutron probes were considered in the analyses. Four different detector configurations were investigated: Thermal and epithermal neutron detectors located in both the near and far field

  17. Measuring probe and method for determining the oxygen content in gases, vapors, and liquids, especially in liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundermann, H.; Andrae, U.

    1978-01-01

    The invention is concerned with the improvement of the measuring probe described in the main patent no. 1798002 with which the oxygen content in liquid metals, e.g. Na, is to be determined. In order to avoid the glass stopper shutting off the reference space having to be ground out it is proposed to connect the solid electrolyte firmly and hermetically with a metallic mounting support (e.g. Fe-Co-Ni alloy), having got the same thermal coefficient of expansion as the solid electrolyte (e.g. zirconium dioxide stabilized with ythium oxide or thorium dioxide). Further details of the design are very explicitly described. (HP) [de

  18. Computer simulation of mobilization and mixing of kaolin with submerged liquid jets in 25,000-gallon horizontal cylindrical tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyler, L.L.; Mahoney, L.A.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents and analyzes results of computer model simulation of mobilization and mixing of kaolin using the TEMPEST code. The simulations are conducted in a horizontal cylindrical geometry replicating a 95 m 3 (25,000 gal) test tank at ORNL, which is scaled to approximate Melton Valley Storage tanks, which are 190 m 3 (50,000 gal). Mobilization and mixing is accomplished by two submerged liquid jets. Two configurations are simulated, one with the jets located at the center of the tank lengthwise and one with the jets located 1/4 tank length from one end. Computer simulations of both jet and suction configurations are performed. Total flow rates of 50, 100, and 200 gpm are modeled, corresponding to jet velocities of 1.52, 3.05, 6.10 m/s (5, 10, 20 ft/s). Calculations were performed to a time of 2 h for the center jet location and to a little over 1 h for the quarter jet location. This report presents computer and fluid properties model basis, preliminary numerical testing, and results. The results are presented in form of flow field and sludge layer contours. Degree of mobilization is presented as fraction of initial sludge layer remaining as a function of time. For the center jet location at 200 gpm, the sludge layer is completely mobilized in just over 1 h. For 100 gpm flow, about 5% of the sludge layer remains after 2 h. For 50 gpm flow, nearly 40% of the initial sludge layer remains after 2 h. For the quarter jets at 200 gpm, about 10% of the initial sludge layer remains after 1 h. For 100 gpm, about 40% of the sludge layer remains after 1 h. The boundary of the sludge layer is defined as 98% max packing for the particles. Mixing time estimates for these cases range from between 9.4 h and 16.2 h. A more critical evaluation and comparison of predictions and the test results is needed

  19. Testing and performance of electrolytic oxygen meters for use in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.; Thompson, R.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of yttria-doped thoria ceramic electrochemical oxygen meters in liquid sodium is described. Tests were carried out using laboratory loops. Temperature coefficients of the oxygen meters have been measured between 380 0 C and 480 0 C, and the response to changes in oxygen level using cold-trap temperatures from 125 0 C to 250 0 C was determined. The ceramic has been shown to give good performance over lifetimes exceeding 400 days in some cases. The temperature coefficients and response to oxygen level changes are in good agreement with thermodynamic predictions. The effect of running the meters in high-oxygen sodium has been studied and a general mode of failure has been shown to be grain-boundary attack by oxygen/sodium solutions. The effect of #betta#-radiation on the meters has been studied. The meters with a metal/metal oxide reference electrode were unaffected by dose rates up to 52860 mGy h - 1 . Meters with an air reference electrode do show an effect as a voltage reduction at levels down to 2420 mGy h - 1 . This effect was temperature-dependent and was insignificant at 500 0 C. (orig.)

  20. An effective device for gas-liquid oxygen removal in enclosed microalgae culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhenfeng; Kang, Ruijuan; Shi, Shaoyuan; Cong, Wei; Cai, Zhaoling

    2010-01-01

    A high-performance gas-liquid transmission device (HPTD) was described in this paper. To investigate the HPTD mass transfer characteristics, the overall volumetric mass transfer coefficients, K(A)(La,CO(2)) for the absorption of gaseous CO(2) and K(A)(La,O(2)) for the desorption of dissolved O(2) were determined, respectively, by titration and dissolved oxygen electrode. The mass transfer capability of carbon dioxide was compared with that of dissolved oxygen in the device, and the operating conditions were optimized to suit for the large-scale enclosed micro-algae cultivation. Based on the effectiveness evaluation of the HPTD applied in one enclosed flat plate Spirulina culture system, it was confirmed that the HPTD can satisfy the demand of the enclosed system for carbon supplement and excessive oxygen removal.

  1. Non-Fermi Liquids as Highly Active Oxygen Evolution Reaction Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Shigeto; Yagi, Shunsuke; Chen, Wei-Tin; Chou, Fang-Cheng; Okazaki, Noriyasu; Ohno, Tomoya; Suzuki, Hisao; Matsuda, Takeshi

    2017-10-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) plays a key role in emerging energy conversion technologies such as rechargeable metal-air batteries, and direct solar water splitting. Herein, a remarkably low overpotential of ≈150 mV at 10 mA cm -2 disk in alkaline solutions using one of the non-Fermi liquids, Hg 2 Ru 2 O 7 , is reported. Hg 2 Ru 2 O 7 displays a rapid increase in current density and excellent durability as an OER catalyst. This outstanding catalytic performance is realized through the coexistence of localized d-bands with the metallic state that is unique to non-Fermi liquids. The findings indicate that non-Fermi liquids could greatly improve the design of highly active OER catalysts.

  2. Oxygen sensors for Heavy Liquid Metal coolants: Calibration and assessment of the minimum reading temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassini, S., E-mail: serena.bassini@enea.it; Antonelli, A.; Di Piazza, I.; Tarantino, M.

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen sensors for Heavy Liquid Metals (HLMs) such as lead and LBE (lead-bismuth eutectic) will be essential devices in future Lead Fast Reactor (LFR) and Accelerator Driven System (ADS). Potentiometric sensors based on solid electrolytes were developed in recent years to this purpose. Internal reference electrodes such as Pt-air and Bi/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} liquid metal/metal-oxide are among the most used but they both have a weak point: Pt-air sensor has a high minimum reading temperature around 400 °C whereas Bi/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} suffers from internal stresses induced by Bi volume variations with temperature, which may lead to the sensor failure in the long-term. The present work describes the performance of standard Pt-air and Bi/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} sensors and compares them with recent Cu/Cu{sub 2}O sensor. Sensors with Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia (YPSZ) electrolyte were calibrated in oxygen-saturated HLM between 160 and 550 °C and the electric potential compared to the theoretical one to define the accuracy and the minimum reading temperature. Standard Pt-air sensor were also tested using Yttria Totally Stabilized Zirconia (YTSZ) to assess the effect of a different electrolyte on the minimum reading temperature. The performance of Pt-air and Cu/Cu{sub 2}O sensors with YPSZ electrolyte were then tested together in low-oxygen HLM between 200 and 450 °C. The results showed that Pt-air, Bi/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cu/Cu{sub 2}O sensors with YPSZ measured oxygen in HLMs down to 400 °C, 290 °C and 200 °C respectively. When the YTSZ electrolyte was used in place of the YPSZ, the Pt-air sensor measured correctly down to at least 350 °C thanks to the superior ionic conductivity of the YTSZ. When Cu/Cu{sub 2}O and Pt-air sensors were tested together in the same low-oxygen HLM between 200 and 450 °C, Cu/Cu{sub 2}O sensor worked predictably in the whole temperature range whereas Pt-air sensor exhibited a correct output only above 400 °C. - Highlights: •Oxygen

  3. Implementation plan for liquid low-level radioactive waste tank systems for fiscal year 1995 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Federal Facility Agreement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This document is the third annual revision of the plans and schedules for implementing the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) compliance program, originally submitted in 1992 as ES/ER-17 ampersand D1, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This document summarizes the progress that has been made to date in implementing the plans and schedules for meeting the FFA commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Information presented in this document provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present plans and schedules associated with remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service. ORNL has a comprehensive program underway to upgrade the LLLW System as necessary to meet the FFA requirements. The tank systems that are removed from service are being investigated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Waste and risk characterizations have been submitted. Additional data will be prepared and submitted to EPA/TDEC as tanks are taken out of service and as required by the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. Chapter 1 provides general background information and philosophies that led to the plans and schedules that appear in Chaps. 2 through 5

  4. Implementation plan for liquid low-level radioactive waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Federal Facility Agreement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This document is an annual revision of the plans and schedules for implementing the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) compliance program, originally submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand D1, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This document summarizes the progress that has been made to date in implementing the plans and schedules for meeting the FFA commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Information presented in this document provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present plans and schedules associated with remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service. ORNL has a comprehensive program underway to upgrade the LLLW system as necessary to meet the FFA requirements. The tank systems that are removed from service are being investigated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Waste and risk characterizations have been submitted. Additional data will be prepared and submitted to EPA/TDEC as tanks are taken out of service and as required by the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. Chapter 1 provides general background information and philosophies that lead to the plans and schedules that appear in Chapters 2 through 5

  5. Federal Facility Agreement plans and schedules for liquid low-level radioactive waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    Although the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) addresses the entire Oak Ridge Reservation, specific requirements are set forth for the liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) storage tanks and their associated piping and equipment, tank systems, at ORNL. The stated objected of the FFA as it relates to these tank systems is to ensure that structural integrity, containment and detection of releases, and source control are maintained pending final remedial action at the site. The FFA requires that leaking LLLW tank systems be immediately removed from service. It also requires the LLLW tank systems that do not meet the design and performance requirements established for secondary containment and leak detection be either upgraded or replaced. The FFA establishes a procedural framework for implementing the environmental laws. For the LLLW tank systems, this framework requires the specified plans and schedules be submitted to EPA and TDEC for approval within 60 days, or in some cases, within 90 days, of the effective date of the agreement

  6. Implementation Plan for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Federal Facility Agreement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document summarizes the progress that has been made to date in implementing the plans and schedules for meeting the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These commitments were initially submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand Dl, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Information presented in this document provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present plans and schedules associated with remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service. ORNL has a comprehensive program underway to upgrade the LLLW system as necessary to meet the FFA requirements. The tank systems that are removed from service are being investigated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Waste and risk characterizations have been submitted. Additional data will be prepared and submitted to EPA/TDEC as tanks are taken out of service and as required by the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. The plans and schedules for implementing the FFA compliance program that were submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand Dl, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste tanks Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, are updated in this document. Chapter 1 provides general background information and philosophies that lead to the plans and schedules that appear in Chaps. 2 through 5

  7. Implementation plan for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Federal Facility Agreement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    Plans and schedules for meeting the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were initially submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand D1, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The information presented in the current document summarizes the progress that has been made to date and provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present the plans and schedules associated with the remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service. A comprehensive program is under way at ORNL to upgrade the LLLW system as necessary to meet the FFA requirements. The tank systems that are removed from service are being investigated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Waste and risk characterizations have been submitted. Additional data will be submitted to the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (EPA/TDEC) as tanks are taken out of service and as required by the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. The plans and schedules for implementing the FFA compliance program that were originally submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand D 1, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste tanks Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, are updated in the present document. Chapter I provides general background information and philosophies that lead to the plans and schedules that appear in Chaps. 2 through 5

  8. Testing of a Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Reaction Control Thruster in a New Altitude Rocket Engine Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Marshall, William M.

    2012-01-01

    A relocated rocket engine test facility, the Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS), was activated in 2009 at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This facility has the capability to test with a variety of propellants and up to a thrust level of 2000 lbf (8.9 kN) with precise measurement of propellant conditions, propellant flow rates, thrust and altitude conditions. These measurements enable accurate determination of a thruster and/or nozzle s altitude performance for both technology development and flight qualification purposes. In addition the facility was designed to enable efficient test operations to control costs for technology and advanced development projects. A liquid oxygen-liquid methane technology development test program was conducted in the ACS from the fall of 2009 to the fall of 2010. Three test phases were conducted investigating different operational modes and in addition, the project required the complexity of controlling propellant inlet temperatures over an extremely wide range. Despite the challenges of a unique propellant (liquid methane) and wide operating conditions, the facility performed well and delivered up to 24 hot fire tests in a single test day. The resulting data validated the feasibility of utilizing this propellant combination for future deep space applications.

  9. Real-Time, Non-Intrusive Detection of Liquid Nitrogen in Liquid Oxygen at High Pressure and High Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jagdish P.; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Kalluru, Rajamohan R.; Harrison, Louie

    2012-01-01

    An integrated fiber-optic Raman sensor has been designed for real-time, nonintrusive detection of liquid nitrogen in liquid oxygen (LOX) at high pressures and high flow rates in order to monitor the quality of LOX used during rocket engine ground testing. The integrated sensor employs a high-power (3-W) Melles Griot diode-pumped, solid-state (DPSS), frequency-doubled Nd:YAG 532- nm laser; a modified Raman probe that has built-in Raman signal filter optics; two high-resolution spectrometers; and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with selected bandpass filters to collect both N2 and O2 Raman signals. The PMT detection units are interfaced with National Instruments Lab- VIEW for fast data acquisition. Studies of sensor performance with different detection systems (i.e., spectrometer and PMT) were carried out. The concentration ratio of N2 and O2 can be inferred by comparing the intensities of the N2 and O2 Raman signals. The final system was fabricated to measure N2 and O2 gas mixtures as well as mixtures of liquid N2 and LOX

  10. The Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding Process: Its Application to the Space Shuttle External Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Wilson, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes progress in the implementation of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process at the External Tank (ET) assembly facility. Design allowable data has been developed for thicknesses up to 1.00 in. More than 24,000 in. of welding on liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen cylinders has been made without an internal defect.

  11. Plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive as an ecologically beneficial component for liquid motor fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siryk, Yury Paul; Balytski, Ivan Peter; Korolyov, Volodymyr George; Klishyn, Olexiy Nick; Lnianiy, Vitaly Nick; Lyakh, Yury Alex; Rogulin, Victor Valery

    2013-04-30

    A plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive for liquid motor fuels comprises an anaerobic fermentation vessel, a gasholder, a system for removal of sulphuretted hydrogen, and a hotwell. The plant further comprises an aerobic fermentation vessel, a device for liquid substance pumping, a device for liquid aeration with an oxygen-containing gas, a removal system of solid mass residue after fermentation, a gas distribution device; a device for heavy gases utilization; a device for ammonia adsorption by water; a liquid-gas mixer; a cavity mixer, a system that serves superficial active and dispersant matters and a cooler; all of these being connected to each other by pipelines. The technical result being the implementation of a process for producing an oxygen containing additive, which after being added to liquid motor fuels, provides an ecologically beneficial component for motor fuels by ensuring the stability of composition fuel properties during long-term storage.

  12. Elaboration and characterization of solid electrolytes for electrochemical oxygen sensors in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabard, M.

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis was prepared within the framework of the research program on 'Generation IV' nuclear reactors with sodium as coolant. One of the main technological problem concerns the control of the corrosion processes of the materials (structural materials, fuel claddings, etc.) by liquid sodium. A key parameter is the dissolved oxygen content in the coolant. This thesis focuses on the development and characterization of ceramic materials based on ThO 2 doped with Y 2 O 3 for making potentiometric oxygen sensor used in liquid sodium. Work has been carried out and probes were tested in the past, however, the probes had at the time, a lack of reliability. The objective of this thesis is to develop and characterize electrolytes based on thorium oxide doped with yttrium oxide using specific synthesis techniques to control purity, grain size, compactness, etc. To develop experimental protocols a ceramic model has been chosen, i.e., yttria-doped ceria. Transport processes were studied using the impedance spectroscopy technique. An interpretation of the blocking phenomena of the ionic conduction in both ceramics as a function of the oxygen partial pressure has been given. (author) [fr

  13. Attitude dynamics and control of spacecraft with a partially filled liquid tank and flexible panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Yue, Baozeng; Zhao, Liangyu

    2018-02-01

    A liquid-filled flexible spacecraft is essentially a time-variant fully-coupled system, whose dynamics characteristics are closely associated with its motion features. This paper focuses on the mathematical modelling and attitude control of the spacecraft coupled with fuel sloshing dynamics and flexible solar panels vibration. The slosh motion is represented by a spherical pendulum, whose motion description method is improved by using split variable operation. Benefiting from this improvement, the nonlinear lateral sloshing and the rotary sloshing as well as the rigid motion of a liquid respect to the spacecraft can be approximately described. The assumed modes discretization method has been adopted to approximate the elastic displacements of the attached panels, and the coupled dynamics is derived by using the Lagrangian formulation. A variable substitution method is proposed to obtain the apparently-uncoupled mathematical model of the rigid-flexible-liquid spacecraft. After linearization, this model can be directly used for designing Lyapunov output-feedback attitude controller (OFAC). With only torque actuators, and attitude and rate sensors installed, this kind of attitude controller, as simulation results show, is capable of not only bringing the spacecraft to the desired orientation, but also suppressing the effect of flex and slosh on the attitude motion of the spacecraft.

  14. Effect of the oxygen balance on ignition and detonation properties of liquid explosive mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetier, M; Osmont, A; Baudin, G

    2014-01-01

    The objective is to compare the ignition and detonation properties of various liquid high explosives having negative up to positive oxygen balance (OB): nitromethane (OB < 0), saccharose and hydrogen peroxide based mixture (quasi nil OB), hydrogen peroxide with more than 90% purity (OB > 0). The decomposition kinetic rates and the equations of state (EOS) for the liquid mixtures and detonation products (DP) are the input data for a detonation model. EOS are theoretically determined using the Woolfolk et al. universal liquid polar shock law and thermochemical computations for DP. The decomposition kinetic rate laws are determined to reproduce the shock to detonation transition for the mixtures submitted to planar plate impacts. Such a model is not sufficient to compute open field explosions. The aerial overpressure is well reproduced in the first few microseconds, however, after it becomes worse at large expansion of the fireball and the impulse is underestimated. The problem of the DP EOS alone is that it takes only the detonation into account, the secondary combustion DP – air is not considered. To solve this problem a secondary combustion model has been developed to take the OB effect into account. The detonation model has been validated on planar plate impact experiments. The secondary combustion parameters were deduced from thermochemical computations. The whole model has been used to predict the effects of the oxygen balance on open air blast effects of spherical charges.

  15. Risk characterization data manual for Category D inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    This manual reports the results of a risk characterization of Category D inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The risk characterization is required by the Federal Facility Agreement between the Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office, the Environmental Protection Agency-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The intent of the risk characterization is to determine relative priorities for assessment and remediation. When the scores for all tanks had been weighted and summed, the tanks were ranked in descending order on the basis of their total scores. The highest possible score for a tank is 30. The descending order represents the recommended priorities for evaluation: the higher the score, the higher the priority for evaluation

  16. Water Flow Performance of a Superscale Model of the Fastrac Liquid Oxygen Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Stephen; Zoladz, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    As part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's ongoing effort to lower the cost of access to space, the Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a rocket engine with 60,000 pounds of thrust for use on the Reusable Launch Vehicle technology demonstrator slated for launch in 2000. This gas generator cycle engine, known as the Fastrac engine, uses liquid oxygen and RP-1 for propellants and includes single stage liquid oxygen and RP-1 pumps and a single stage supersonic turbine on a common shaft. The turbopump design effort included the first use and application of new suction capability prediction codes and three-dimensional blade generation codes in an attempt to reduce the turbomachinery design and certification costs typically associated with rocket engine development. To verify the pump's predicted cavitation performance, a water flow test of a superscale model of the Fastrac liquid oxygen pump was conducted to experimentally evaluate the liquid oxygen pump's performance at and around the design point. The water flow test article replicated the flow path of the Fastrac liquid oxygen pump in a 1.582x scale model, including scaled seal clearances for correct leakage flow at a model operating speed of 5000 revolutions per minute. Flow entered the 3-blade axial-flow inducer, transitioned to a shrouded, 6- blade radial impeller, and discharged into a vaneless radial diffuser and collection volute. The test article included approximately 50 total and static pressure measurement locations as well as flush-mounted, high frequency pressure transducers for complete mapping of the pressure environment. The primary objectives of the water flow test were to measure the steady-state and dynamic pressure environment of the liquid oxygen pump versus flow coefficient, suction specific speed, and back face leakage flow rate. Initial results showed acceptable correlation between the predicted and experimentally measured pump head rise at low suction specific speeds

  17. Microbial Challenge Testing of Single Liquid Cathode Feed Water Electrolysis Cells for the International Space Station (ISS) Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Robert J.; Wilson, Mark E.; Diderich, Greg S.; Steele, John W.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA) operational performance may be adversely impacted by microbiological growth and biofilm formation over the electrolysis cell membranes. Biofilms could hinder the transport of water from the bulk fluid stream to the membranes and increase the cell concentration overpotential resulting in higher cell voltages and a shorter cell life. A microbial challenge test was performed on duplicate single liquid-cathode feed water electrolysis cells to evaluate operational performance with increasing levels of a mixture of five bacteria isolated from ISS and Space Shuttle potable water systems. Baseline performance of the single water electrolysis cells was determined for approximately one month with deionized water. Monthly performance was also determined following each inoculation of the feed tank with 100, 1000, 10,000 and 100,000 cells/ml of the mixed suspension of test bacteria. Water samples from the feed tank and recirculating water loops for each cell were periodically analyzed for enumeration and speciation of bacteria and total organic carbon. While initially a concern, this test program has demonstrated that the performance of the electrolysis cell is not adversely impacted by feed water containing the five species of bacteria tested at a concentration measured as high as 1,000,000 colony forming units (CFU)/ml. This paper presents the methodologies used in the conduct of this test program along with the performance test results at each level of bacteria concentration.

  18. Receipt and processing of RBOF/RRF liquid waste in H-Tank Farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Receiving Basin for Off-Site Fuels/Resin Regeneration Facility (RBOF/RRF) currently generates approximately 50,000 gallons of wastewater per month. This waste is sent to the 211-H General Purpose (GP) evaporator and/or the 241-H Tank Farm (HTF). The primary criteria for selecting the destination of the waste are solids content and radioactively.The waste is typically sent to the GP evaporator if it has low solids content and low activity. Currently, approximately 70% of the waste water produced at RBOF/RRF meets the criteria for acceptance by the GP evaporator. In June 1993, High Level Waste Engineering opened a Technical Issue (TI) related to processing of RBOF/RRF directly through the 1H Cesium Removal Column (CRC) to the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). In March 1994, additional emphasis was placed on this effort after it was determined that the 1H evaporator had a failed tube bundle. As a result, The TI was expanded to include evaluations of methods to increase the acceptance rate of wastewater at the GP (i.e., to ensure that the 70% of RBOF/RRF wastewater that currently meets the GP acceptance criteria is actually processed at the GP). Since March 1994, waste receipts from RBOF/RRF have averaged less than the 30,000 gallons/month allotted in the HLW System Plan. In addition, the RBOF/RRF waste sent to HTF has successfully been processed through the 2H evaporator. Based on this progress, no additional effort should be expended to reduce the amount of RBOF/RRF sent to HTF, either by increasing the criteria for acceptance of RBOF/RRF waste at the GP evaporator or by evaluating alternate treatment options (such as processing through the 1H CRC or installing treatment equipment in the RBOF/RRF)

  19. Theoretical Rocket Performance of Liquid Methane with Several Fluorine-Oxygen Mixtures Assuming Frozen Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sanford; Kastner, Michael E

    1958-01-01

    Theoretical rocket performance for frozen composition during expansion was calculated for liquid methane with several fluorine-oxygen mixtures for a range of pressure ratios and oxidant-fuel ratios. The parameters included are specific impulse, combustion-chamber temperature, nozzle-exit temperature molecular weight, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust, ratio of nozzle-exit area to throat area, specific heat at constant pressure, isentropic exponent, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. The maximum calculated value of specific impulse for a chamber pressure of 600 pounds per square inch absolute (40.827atm) and an exit pressure of 1 atmosphere is 315.3 for 79.67 percent fluorine in the oxidant.

  20. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS IN SUPPORT OF INCREASED LIQUID LEVEL IN 241-AP TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; ABBOTT FG; CARPENTER BG; RINKER MW

    2007-02-16

    The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford. The "Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Project" is in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14.

  1. Bench-scale feasibility testing of pulsed-air technology for in-tank mixing of dry cementitious solids with tank liquids and settled solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyatt, G.A.; Hymas, C.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report documents the results of testing performed to determine the feasibility of using a pulsed-air mixing technology (equipment developed by Pulsair Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA) to mix cementitious dry solids with supernatant and settled solids within a horizontal tank. The mixing technology is being considered to provide in situ stabilization of the open-quotes Vclose quotes tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The testing was performed in a vessel roughly 1/6 the scale of the INEEL tanks. The tests used a fine soil to simulate settled solids and water to simulate tank supernatants. The cementitious dry materials consisted of Portland cement and Aquaset-2H (a product of Fluid Tech Inc. consisting of clay and Portland cement). Two scoping tests were conducted to allow suitable mixing parameters to be selected. The scoping tests used only visual observations during grout disassembly to assess mixing performance. After the scoping tests indicated the approach may be feasible, an additional two mixing tests were conducted. In addition to visual observations during disassembly of the solidified grout, these tests included addition of chemical tracers and chemical analysis of samples to determine the degree of mixing uniformity achieved. The final two mixing tests demonstrated that the pulsed-air mixing technique is capable of producing slurries containing substantially more cementitious dry solids than indicated by the formulations suggested by INEEL staff. Including additional cement in the formulation may have benefits in terms of increasing mobilization of solids, reducing water separation during curing, and increasing the strength of the solidified product. During addition to the tank, the cementitious solids had a tendency to form clumps which broke down with continued mixing

  2. Diffusivity, activity and solubility of oxygen in liquid lead and lead-bismuth eutectic alloy by electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, Rajesh; Gnanasekaran, T.; Srinivasa, Raman S.

    2006-01-01

    The diffusivity of oxygen in liquid lead and lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) alloy was measured by a potentiostatic method and is given by log(D O Pb /cm 2 s -1 )=-2.554-2384/T(+/-0.070), 818-1061K, and log(D O LBE /cm 2 s -1 )=-0.813-3612/T(+/-0.091), 811-980K. The activity of oxygen in lead and LBE was determined by coulometric titration experiments. Using the measured data, the standard free energy of dissolution of oxygen in liquid lead and LBE was derived and is given byG O(Pb) xs =-121349+16.906T(+/-560)J(gatomO) -1 ,815-1090K,G O(LBE) xs = -127398+27.938T(+/-717)J(gatomO) -1 ,812-1012K.Using the above data, the Gibbs energy of formation of PbO(s) and equilibrium oxygen pressures measured over the oxygen-saturated LBE alloy, the solubility of oxygen in liquid lead and LBE were derived. The solubility of oxygen in liquid lead and LBE are given by log(S/at.%O)=-5100/T+4.32 (+/-0.04), 815-1090K and log(S/at.%O)=-4287/T+3.53 (+/-0.06), 812-1012K respectively.

  3. Investigations of the Gas-Liquid Multiphase System Involving Macro-Instability in a Baffled Stirred Tank Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubble Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD in gas-liquid multiphase system is of particular interest and the quantification of gas characteristics is still a challenge today. In this contribution, multiphase Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD simulations are combined with Population Balance Model (PBM to investigate the bubble SMD in baffled stirred tank reactor (STR. Hereby, special attention is given to the phenomenon known as the fluid macro-instability (MI, which is a large-scale low-frequency fluid velocity variation in baffled STRs, since the fluid MIs have a dominating influence on the bubble breakage and coalescence processes. The simulations, regarding the fluid velocity, are validated with Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA experiments, in which the instant radial velocity is analyzed through Fast Fourier Transform (FFT spectrum. The frequency peaks of the fluid MIs are found both in the simulation and in the experiment with a high degree of accuracy. After the validation, quantitative predictions of overall bubble SMD with and without MIs are carried out. Due to the accurate prediction of the fluid field, the influence of the fluid MI to bubble SMD is presented. This result provides more adequate information for engineers working in the field of estimating bubble SMDs in baffled STRs.

  4. Corrosion behavior of steels in liquid lead bismuth with low oxygen concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Yuji; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Saito, Shigeru

    2008-02-01

    Corrosion tests in pots were conducted to elucidate corrosion behavior of various steels in liquid lead-bismuth for 3000 h under the condition of an oxygen concentration of 5 × 10 -8 wt% at 450 °C and an oxygen concentration of 3 × 10 -9 wt% at 550 °C, respectively. Significant corrosion was not observed at 450 °C for ferritic/martensitic steels, F82H, Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, 410SS, 430SS except 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. Pb-Bi penetration into steels and dissolution of elements into Pb-Bi were severe at 550 °C even for ferritic/martensitic steels. Typical dissolution attack occurred for pure iron both at 550 °C without surface Fe 3O 4 and at 450 °C with a thin Fe 3O 4 film. Ferritization due to dissolution of Ni and Cr, and Pb-Bi penetration were recognized for austenitic stainless steels, 316SS and 14Cr-16Ni-2Mo steel at both temperatures of 450 °C and 550 °C. The phenomena were mitigated for 18Cr-20Ni-5Si steel. In some cases oxide films could not be a corrosion barrier in liquid lead-bismuth.

  5. [Ambient air interference in oxygen intake measurements in liquid incubating media with the use of open polarographic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniaev, M V; Voronchikhina, L I

    2007-01-01

    A model of oxygen intake by aerobic bio-objects in liquid incubating media was applied to investigate the influence air-media interface area on accuracy of measuring the oxygen intake and error value. It was shown that intrusion of air oxygen increases the relative error to 24% in open polarographic cells and to 13% in cells with a reduced interface area. Results of modeling passive media oxygenation laid a basis for proposing a method to reduce relative error by 66% for open cells and by 15% for cells with a reduced interface area.

  6. Evaluation of parallel milliliter-scale stirred-tank bioreactors for the study of biphasic whole-cell biocatalysis with ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennewald, Danielle; Hortsch, Ralf; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    As clear structure-activity relationships are still rare for ionic liquids, preliminary experiments are necessary for the process development of biphasic whole-cell processes involving these solvents. To reduce the time investment and the material costs, the process development of such biphasic reaction systems would profit from a small-scale high-throughput platform. Exemplarily, the reduction of 2-octanone to (R)-2-octanol by a recombinant Escherichia coli in a biphasic ionic liquid/water system was studied in a miniaturized stirred-tank bioreactor system allowing the parallel operation of up to 48 reactors at the mL-scale. The results were compared to those obtained in a 20-fold larger stirred-tank reactor. The maximum local energy dissipation was evaluated at the larger scale and compared to the data available for the small-scale reactors, to verify if similar mass transfer could be obtained at both scales. Thereafter, the reaction kinetics and final conversions reached in different reactions setups were analysed. The results were in good agreement between both scales for varying ionic liquids and for ionic liquid volume fractions up to 40%. The parallel bioreactor system can thus be used for the process development of the majority of biphasic reaction systems involving ionic liquids, reducing the time and resource investment during the process development of this type of applications. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. The Mechanical of the Small Axisymmetric Oscillations of the Liquid with the Surface Tension Forces in Elastic Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Goncharov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate small axisymmetric oscillations of a liquid in an elastic tank. We also take into account the influence of surface tension forces. For this, we turn to the mechanical analogue of the considered mechanical system. To realize the transition to mechanical analogue we use the energy method: postulating the equality of kinetic and potential energy for the investigated mechanical system and the mechanical system analog. Due to this transition we can further investigate the oscillations of a mechanical analogue. As a mechanical analogue, we consider the oscillator in the spring. The mass of the oscillator is calculated as the weight of the fluid to make oscillations. The oscillator spring constant is calculated using the identity of equations, namely, equation of free small oscillations of the oscillator and equation of free small oscillations of the system under investigation: the fluid in the elastic tank. The identity of equations allows us to draw conclusion about the identity of the natural frequencies for the source mechanical system and the system of a mechanical analogue. Next, we take into consideration the action of the surface tension. We record the Laplace condition for excess pressure because of the forces of surface tension. Then we compile the expression for the generalized force, taking into account the phenomenon of the surface tension. Next, we write the equation of oscillations of a mechanical analogue. The surface tension, due to the introduction of the generalized force in the equation for small oscillations of the mechanical analogue will change the natural frequency of the mechanical analogue. The paper presents the appropriate dependencies. The abovementioned allows us to investigate the stability of small motions of fluid in microgravity or low gravity by studying the stability of small motions of mechanical analogue. The latter is especially important due to the design and development of advanced

  8. Underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental contamination from leaking underground storage tanks poses a significant threat to human health and the environment. An estimated five to six million underground storage tanks containing hazardous substances or petroleum products are in use in the US. Originally placed underground as a fire prevention measure, these tanks have substantially reduced the damages from stored flammable liquids. However, an estimated 400,000 underground tanks are thought to be leaking now, and many more will begin to leak in the near future. Products released from these leaking tanks can threaten groundwater supplies, damage sewer lines and buried cables, poison crops, and lead to fires and explosions. As required by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA), the EPA has been developing a comprehensive regulatory program for underground storage tanks. The EPA proposed three sets of regulations pertaining to underground tanks. The first addressed technical requirements for petroleum and hazardous substance tanks, including new tank performance standards, release detection, release reporting and investigation, corrective action, and tank closure. The second proposed regulation addresses financial responsibility requirements for underground petroleum tanks. The third addressed standards for approval of state tank programs

  9. Tank Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    For NASA's Apollo program, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, Huntington Beach, California, developed and built the S-IVB, uppermost stage of the three-stage Saturn V moonbooster. An important part of the development task was fabrication of a tank to contain liquid hydrogen fuel for the stage's rocket engine. The liquid hydrogen had to be contained at the supercold temperature of 423 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The tank had to be perfectly insulated to keep engine or solar heat from reaching the fuel; if the hydrogen were permitted to warm up, it would have boiled off, or converted to gaseous form, reducing the amount of fuel available to the engine. McDonnell Douglas' answer was a supereffective insulation called 3D, which consisted of a one-inch thickness of polyurethane foam reinforced in three dimensions with fiberglass threads. Over a 13-year development and construction period, the company built 30 tanks and never experienced a failure. Now, after years of additional development, an advanced version of 3D is finding application as part of a containment system for transporting Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by ship.

  10. Experimental data and analysis to support the design of an ion-exchange process for the treatment of Hanford tank waste supernatant liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurath, D.E.; Bray, L.A.; Brooks, K.P.; Brown, G.N.; Bryan, S.A.; Carlson, C.D.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.; Kim, A.Y.

    1994-12-01

    Hanford's 177 underground storage tanks contain a mixture of sludge, salt cake, and alkaline supernatant liquids. Disposal options for these wastes are high-level waste (HLW) glass for disposal in a repository or low-level waste (LLW) glass for onsite disposal. Systems-engineering studies show that economic and environmental considerations preclude disposal of these wastes without further treatment. Difficulties inherent in transportation and disposal of relatively large volumes of HLW make it impossible to vitrify all of the tank waste as HLW. Potential environmental impacts make direct disposal of all of the tank waste as LLW glass unacceptable. Although the pretreatment and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include retrieval of the aqueous liquids, dissolution of the salt cakes, and washing of the sludges to remove soluble components. Most of the cesium is expected to be in the aqueous liquids, which are the focus of this report on cesium removal by ion exchange. The main objectives of the ion-exchange process are removing cesium from the bulk of the tank waste (i.e., decontamination) and concentrating the separated cesium for vitrification. Because exact requirements for removal of 137 Cs have not yet been defined, a range of removal requirements will be considered. This study addresses requirements to achieve 137 Cs levels in LLW glass between (1) the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Class C (10 CFR 61) limit of 4600 Ci/m 3 and (2) 1/10th of the NRC Class A limit of 1 Ci/m 3 i.e., 0.1/m 3 . The required degrees of separation of cesium from other waste components is a complex function involving interactions between the design of the vitrification process, waste form considerations, and other HLW stream components that are to be vitrified

  11. Synergistic effects of liquid and gas phase discharges using pulsed high voltage for dyes degradation in the presence of oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Zhou, Minghua; Lei, Lecheng

    2005-07-01

    The technology of combined liquid and gas phase discharges (LGD) using pulsed high voltage for dyes degradation was developed in this study. Apparent synergistic effects for Acid orange II (AO) degradation in the presence of oxygen were observed. The enhancement of AO degradation rate was around 302%. Furthermore, higher energy efficiency was obtained comparing with individual liquid phase discharge (LD) or gas phase discharge process (GD). The AO degradation in the presence of oxygen by LGD proceeded through the direct ozone oxidation and the ozone decomposition induced by LD. Important operating parameters such as electrode distance, applied voltage, pulse repetition rate, and types of dyes were further investigated.

  12. Catalytic Hydrotreatment of Light Distillates Obtained from Bio-Oil for Use in Oxygenated Liquid Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianwei Zheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bio-oil can be fractionated into three parts according to their boiling points. This research reported that light distillates could be converted into oxygenated liquid fuels through a two-stage hydrotreatment approach, using a Pd/C catalyst. The main goal of the first hydrotreatment stage was to stabilize the high active components, which contained carbon–carbon double bonds and aldehyde groups. The second hydrotreatment stage aimed to saturate the components with benzene rings and keto groups, resulting in saturated oxygenated compounds. The H/Ceff ratio was improved greatly after the two-stage hydrotreatment, increasing from 0.51 (in the reactant to 1.67 (in the final products. The high heating value of the final products was 31.63 MJ/kg. After the two-stage hydrotreatment, the main products were C5–C9 alcohols, which were tested via gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. The products could be blended with gasoline directly. Based on the experiments regarding the hydrogenated model compounds, a reaction schematic for the two-stage hydrotreatment was created. Moreover, the bio-oil hydrotreatment kinetics were investigated. The order of the hydrotreatment reaction was 2.0, and the apparent activation energy (Ea was 57.29 KJ/mol.

  13. Evaluation of adherence to ambulatory liquid oxygen treatment: are commercialized dual-pressure transducers helpful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zeller, Mafalda; Eusébio, Ermelinda; Almeida, João; Winck, João Carlos

    2014-09-01

    Treatment adherence is widely recognized as a critical problem in long-term oxygen therapy, particularly in ambulatory liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Adherence-monitoring strategies may be helpful in managing patients. We evaluated subjects' adherence to LOX using VisionOx and compared these results with the subjects' own adherence diaries and self-reported perceptions of use. Patients using LOX were recruited for a clinical interview; the number of days/week and the mean time of use according to subjects' perceptions were recorded. A 14-day diary was provided for every subject while VisionOx was attached to the LOX. VisionOx is a small device that uses pressure transducers to detect oxygen flow and the subject's breathing frequency. Information is stored and downloaded using dedicated software. Nineteen subjects were included (57.9% male with a median age of 63 years). When asked about the perception of LOX use, subjects self-reported using the device for a median of 100.0% of days (78.9% reported to have used it every day) for a median time of 180 min/day. According to data from VisionOx and subjects' diaries during the 14-day evaluation period, the median use was 92.8% of days for 210 min/day. No difference was found between the diaries and VisionOx data. Regarding subjects' perceptions of use, the declared use of LOX percent was significantly higher than reported in the diaries (P = .045) and VisionOx monitoring (P = .045) even though both underestimated the median use per day. Subjects overestimated adherence to LOX therapy (when measuring percent of days of use) compared to adherence diary and objective adherence monitoring. Because no significant difference was found comparing the diaries and VisionOx use, either may be helpful in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  14. Laser Spectroscopic Analysis of Liquid Water Samples for Stable Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are tracers of choice for water cycle processes in hydrological, atmospheric and ecological studies. The use of isotopes has been limited to some extent because of the relatively high cost of isotope ratio mass spectrometers and the need for specialized operational skills. Here, the results of performance testing of a recently developed laser spectroscopic instrument for measuring stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of water samples are described, along with a procedure for instrument installation and operation. Over the last four years, the IAEA Water Resources Programme conducted prototype and production model testing of these instruments and this publication is the outcome of those efforts. One of the main missions of the IAEA is to promote the use of peaceful applications of isotope and nuclear methods in Member States and this publication is intended to facilitate the use of laser absorption based instruments for hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope analyses of liquid water samples for hydrological and other studies. The instrument uses off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy to measure absolute abundances of 2 HHO, HH 18 O, and HHO via laser absorption. Test results using a number of natural and synthetic water standards and samples with a large range of isotope values demonstrate adequate precision and accuracy (e.g. precisions of 1 per mille for δ 2 H and 0.2 per mille for δ 18 O). The laser instrument has much lower initial and maintenance costs than mass spectrometers and is substantially easier to operate. Thus, these instruments have the potential to bring about a paradigm shift in isotope applications by enabling researchers in all fields to measure isotope ratios by themselves. The appendix contains a detailed procedure for the installation and operation of the instrument. Using the procedure, new users should be able to install the instrument in less than two hours. It also provides step

  15. Fault Detection, Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) Portable Liquid Oxygen Hardware Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostdyk, Rebecca L.; Perotti, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    The Fault Detection, Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) hardware demonstration will highlight the effort being conducted by Constellation's Ground Operations (GO) to provide the Launch Control System (LCS) with system-level health management during vehicle processing and countdown activities. A proof-of-concept demonstration of the FDIR prototype established the capability of the software to provide real-time fault detection and isolation using generated Liquid Hydrogen data. The FDIR portable testbed unit (presented here) aims to enhance FDIR by providing a dynamic simulation of Constellation subsystems that feed the FDIR software live data based on Liquid Oxygen system properties. The LO2 cryogenic ground system has key properties that are analogous to the properties of an electronic circuit. The LO2 system is modeled using electrical components and an equivalent circuit is designed on a printed circuit board to simulate the live data. The portable testbed is also be equipped with data acquisition and communication hardware to relay the measurements to the FDIR application running on a PC. This portable testbed is an ideal capability to perform FDIR software testing, troubleshooting, training among others.

  16. Review of Current State of the Art and Key Design Issues With Potential Solutions for Liquid Hydrogen Cryogenic Storage Tank Structures for Aircraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Arnold, Steven M.; Sullivan, Roy M.; Manderscheid, Jane M.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2006-01-01

    Due to its high specific energy content, liquid hydrogen (LH2) is emerging as an alternative fuel for future aircraft. As a result, there is a need for hydrogen tank storage systems, for these aircraft applications, that are expected to provide sufficient capacity for flight durations ranging from a few minutes to several days. It is understood that the development of a large, lightweight, reusable cryogenic liquid storage tank is crucial to meet the goals of and supply power to hydrogen-fueled aircraft, especially for long flight durations. This report provides an annotated review (including the results of an extensive literature review) of the current state of the art of cryogenic tank materials, structural designs, and insulation systems along with the identification of key challenges with the intent of developing a lightweight and long-term storage system for LH2. The broad classes of insulation systems reviewed include foams (including advanced aerogels) and multilayer insulation (MLI) systems with vacuum. The MLI systems show promise for long-term applications. Structural configurations evaluated include single- and double-wall constructions, including sandwich construction. Potential wall material candidates are monolithic metals as well as polymer matrix composites and discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. For short-duration flight applications, simple tank designs may suffice. Alternatively, for longer duration flight applications, a double-wall construction with a vacuum-based insulation system appears to be the most optimum design. The current trends in liner material development are reviewed in the case that a liner is required to minimize or eliminate the loss of hydrogen fuel through permeation.

  17. Non-invasive transdermal two-dimensional mapping of cutaneous oxygenation with a rapid-drying liquid bandage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongxi; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Koolen, Pieter G L; Ibrahim, Ahmed M S; Kim, Kuylhee; Rose, Lloyd F; Wu, Jesse; Nichols, Alexander J; Baek, Yunjung; Birngruber, Reginald; Apiou-Sbirlea, Gabriela; Matyal, Robina; Huang, Thomas; Chan, Rodney; Lin, Samuel J; Evans, Conor L

    2014-11-01

    Oxygen plays an important role in wound healing, as it is essential to biological functions such as cell proliferation, immune responses and collagen synthesis. Poor oxygenation is directly associated with the development of chronic ischemic wounds, which affect more than 6 million people each year in the United States alone at an estimated cost of $25 billion. Knowledge of oxygenation status is also important in the management of burns and skin grafts, as well as in a wide range of skin conditions. Despite the importance of the clinical determination of tissue oxygenation, there is a lack of rapid, user-friendly and quantitative diagnostic tools that allow for non-disruptive, continuous monitoring of oxygen content across large areas of skin and wounds to guide care and therapeutic decisions. In this work, we describe a sensitive, colorimetric, oxygen-sensing paint-on bandage for two-dimensional mapping of tissue oxygenation in skin, burns, and skin grafts. By embedding both an oxygen-sensing porphyrin-dendrimer phosphor and a reference dye in a liquid bandage matrix, we have created a liquid bandage that can be painted onto the skin surface and dries into a thin film that adheres tightly to the skin or wound topology. When captured by a camera-based imaging device, the oxygen-dependent phosphorescence emission of the bandage can be used to quantify and map both the pO2 and oxygen consumption of the underlying tissue. In this proof-of-principle study, we first demonstrate our system on a rat ischemic limb model to show its capabilities in sensing tissue ischemia. It is then tested on both ex vivo and in vivo porcine burn models to monitor the progression of burn injuries. Lastly, the bandage is applied to an in vivo porcine graft model for monitoring the integration of full- and partial-thickness skin grafts.

  18. Extended tank use analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFigh-Price, C.; Green, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site were originally designed for open-quotes temporaryclose quotes use. The newer double-shell tanks were designed for 50 years of use. A number of single-shell tanks failed their original design criteria to contain liquid waste soon after they were constructed. These single-shell and double-shell tanks now will be required to contain semi-solid high-activity waste well beyond their design lives. It must be determined that the waste contained in these tanks will remain stable for up to an additional 30 years of storage. This paper describes the challenge of demonstrating that the tanks that have exceeded or will exceed their design lifetime can safely store high-level waste until planned disposal actions are taken. Considerations will include structural and chemical analyses

  19. Nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand removal from septic tank wastewater in subsurface flow constructed wetlands: substrate (cation exchange capacity) effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Robert S; Grismer, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    The current article focuses on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen (ammonium and nitrate) removal performance from synthetic human wastewater as affected by different substrate rocks having a range of porosities and cation exchange capacities (CECs). The aggregates included lava rock, lightweight expanded shale, meta-basalt (control), and zeolite. The first three had CECs of 1 to 4 mequiv/100 gm, whereas the zeolite CEC was much greater (-80 mequiv/100 gm). Synthetic wastewater was gravity fed to each constructed wetland system, resulting in a 4-day retention time. Effluent samples were collected, and COD and nitrogen species concentrations measured regularly during four time periods from November 2008 through June 2009. Chemical oxygen demand and nitrogen removal fractions were not significantly different between the field and laboratory constructed wetland systems when corrected for temperature. Similarly, overall COD and nitrogen removal fractions were practically the same for the aggregate substrates. The important difference between aggregate effects was the zeolite's ammonia removal process, which was primarily by adsorption. The resulting single-stage nitrogen removal process may be an alternative to nitrification and denitrification that may realize significant cost savings in practice.

  20. Information content of OCO-2 oxygen A-band channels for retrieving marine liquid cloud properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mark; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2018-03-01

    Information content analysis is used to select channels for a marine liquid cloud retrieval using the high-spectral-resolution oxygen A-band instrument on NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2). Desired retrieval properties are cloud optical depth, cloud-top pressure and cloud pressure thickness, which is the geometric thickness expressed in hectopascals. Based on information content criteria we select a micro-window of 75 of the 853 functioning OCO-2 channels spanning 763.5-764.6 nm and perform a series of synthetic retrievals with perturbed initial conditions. We estimate posterior errors from the sample standard deviations and obtain ±0.75 in optical depth and ±12.9 hPa in both cloud-top pressure and cloud pressure thickness, although removing the 10 % of samples with the highest χ2 reduces posterior error in cloud-top pressure to ±2.9 hPa and cloud pressure thickness to ±2.5 hPa. The application of this retrieval to real OCO-2 measurements is briefly discussed, along with limitations and the greatest caution is urged regarding the assumption of a single homogeneous cloud layer, which is often, but not always, a reasonable approximation for marine boundary layer clouds.

  1. Thermographic Methods of Detecting Insulation Voids in Large Cryogenic Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Ellen; Nurge, Mark; Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    Four very large (900Kgal) cryogenic liquid hydrogen and oxygen storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center's LC-39 launch pads were constructed in 1965 to support the Apollo/Saturn V Program and continue to support the Space Shuttle Program. These double-walled spherical tanks with powdered insulation in the annular region, have received minimal refurbishment or even inspection over the years. Intrusively inspecting these tanks would mean a significant down time to the program as the cryogenic liquid and the perlite insulation would have to be removed which would be a significant task and long-term schedule disruption. A study of the tanks was performed to determine the extent to which performance and structural information could be revealed without intrusive inspection. Thermal images of the tanks were taken over a variety of environmental conditions to determine the best conditions under which to compare and use thermography as a health monitoring technique as the tanks continue to age. The settling and subsequent compaction of insulation is a serious concern for cryogenic tanks. Comparison of images from the tanks reveals significant variations in the insulation in the annual regions and point to the use of thermography as a way to monitor for insulation migration and possible compaction. These measurements, when combined with mathematical models of historical boil-off data provide key insight to the condition of the vessels. Acceptance testing methods for new tanks, before they are filled with cryogenic commodity (and thereby thermally cycled), are needed and we explore how thermography can be used to accomplish this.

  2. 49 CFR 178.275 - Specification for UN Portable Tanks intended for the transportation of liquid and solid hazardous...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION... device. A pressure gauge or suitable tell-tale indicator for the detection of disc rupture, pin-holing or... the portable tank operator to check to determine if the disc is leak free. The frangible disc must...

  3. Effect of temperature, of oxygen content and the downstream effect on corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilincev, G.

    1988-01-01

    The effects were experimentally tested of temperature and of oxygen content on the corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium and on reducing the corrosion rate down the sodium stream. The results of the experiments are shown in graphs and tables and are discussed in detail. The duration of all tests was standard 1,000 hours. The test parameters were set such as to determine the effect of temperature on corrosion of a quantity of various materials in sodium with a low oxygen content (1.2 to 2 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 800 degC and in sodium with a high oxygen content (345 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 700 degC. More experiments served the determination of the effect of a different oxygen content varying between 1.2 and 2 ppm at a constant temperature of 600 degC. The materials being tested included main structural materials used for fast reactor construction and materials allowing to establish the effect of main alloying elements on their corrosion in liquid sodium of different temperatures and purity grades. The relationships showing the effects of temperature and oxygen content in sodium on the rate of corrosion of various structural materials in hot parts of the installation and on the reduction in the rate of corrosion downstream due to sodium saturation with corrosion products were constructed using the experimental results. (Z.M.). 15 figs., 2 tabs., 7 refs

  4. 30 CFR 56.4401 - Storage tank foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... tanks settling. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Storage tank foundations. 56.4401 Section 56... Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 56.4401 Storage tank foundations. Fixed, unburied...

  5. Tank characterization reference guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Lorenzo, D.S.; DiCenso, A.T.; Hiller, D.B.; Johnson, K.W.; Rutherford, J.H.; Smith, D.J.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Characterization of the Hanford Site high-level waste storage tanks supports safety issue resolution; operations and maintenance requirements; and retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and disposal technology development. Technical, historical, and programmatic information about the waste tanks is often scattered among many sources, if it is documented at all. This Tank Characterization Reference Guide, therefore, serves as a common location for much of the generic tank information that is otherwise contained in many documents. The report is intended to be an introduction to the issues and history surrounding the generation, storage, and management of the liquid process wastes, and a presentation of the sampling, analysis, and modeling activities that support the current waste characterization. This report should provide a basis upon which those unfamiliar with the Hanford Site tank farms can start their research

  6. Human Factors Process Task Analysis: Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure at the Advanced Technology Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA). HF PFMEA includes the following 10 steps: Describe mission; Define System; Identify human-machine; List human actions; Identify potential errors; Identify factors that effect error; Determine likelihood of error; Determine potential effects of errors; Evaluate risk; Generate solutions (manage error). The presentation also describes how this analysis was applied to a liquid oxygen pump acceptance test.

  7. A single launch lunar habitat derived from an NSTS external tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Charles B.; Butterfield, Ansel J.; Hypes, Warren D.; Nealy, John E.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    1990-01-01

    A concept for using a spent External Tank from the National Space Transportation System (Shuttle) to derive a Lunar habitat is described. The concept is that the External Tank is carried into Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) where the oxygen tank-intertank subassembly is separated from the hydrogen tank, berthed to Space Station Freedom and the subassembly outfitted as a 12-person Lunar habitat using extravehicular activity (EVA) and intravehicular activity (IVA). A single launch of the NSTS Orbiter can place the External Tank in LEO, provide orbiter astronauts for disassembly of the External Tank, and transport the required subsystem hardware for outfitting the Lunar habitat. An estimate of the astronauts' EVA and IVA is provided. The liquid oxygen tank-intertank modifications utilize existing structures and openings for human access without compromising the structural integrity of the tank. The modification includes installation of living quarters, instrumentation, and an air lock. Feasibility studies of the following additional systems include micrometeoroid and radiation protection, thermal-control, environmental-control and life-support, and propulsion. The converted Lunar habitat is designed for unmanned transport and autonomous soft landing on the Lunar surface without need for site preparation. Lunar regolith is used to fill the micrometeoroid shield volume for radiation protection using a conveyor. The Lunar habitat concept is considered to be feasible by the year 2000 with the concurrent development of a space transfer vehicle and a Lunar lander for crew changeover and resupply.

  8. Flow pattern and cleaning performance of a stationary liquid jet operating at conditions relevant for industrial tank cleaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldung Damkjær, N.; Adler-Nissen, Jens; Jensen, B. B. B.

    2017-01-01

    jet was studied using a 19m3 tank and settings applicable to industrial operations; nozzle internal diameters, dN, of 2–5.5mm, cleaning distances, L, of 80–2490mm, and flow rates, Q, of 0.05–3.0m3h−1. Experimental data and model predictions of the behaviour of the jet when striking an unsoiled surface...

  9. Characterization of an acidification and equalization tank (AET operating as a primary treatment of swine liquid effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Motteran

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the potential of the acidification equalization tank (AET used as a primary treatment unit, treating the hog farming wastewater. The treatment system consisted of a degritter with a triangular-notch weir, for measuring the flow, a static sieve, and an acidification and equalization tank (AET, an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR, an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor, a settling tank, a greenhouse for fertirrigation and two infiltration ponds. The AET had a net capacity of 8,000 liters, internally covered with asphalt blanket, worked based on surface loading rates application. The unit operated continuously, with its flow varying from 0.1 to 10 L s-1. To determine the efficiency, the following parameters were measured: pH; COD; BOD; volatile and fixed solids; settleable solids; total, intermediate and partial alkalinity and total acidity. The COD removal varied from 5 to 20%. The average pH was 7.3 and the total, intermediate and partial alkalinity in the effluent, were 1919, 846, 1197 mg L-1, respectively. The total acidity in the effluent was 34 mg L-1. The influent and effluent total BOD and oil & grease concentrations were 3436 and 3443 mg L-1, and 415 and 668 mg L-1, respectively. It was found that the AET worked properly concerning the acidification, equalization and sedimentation processes, confirming low cost of implementation and easy operation, when compared to other traditional decanters.

  10. Electrical conductivity and equation of state of liquid nitrogen, oxygen, benzene, and 1-butene shocked to 60 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements are reported for the electrical conductivity of liquid nitrogen (N 2 ), oxygen (O 2 ) and benzene (C 6 H 6 ), and Hugoniot equation of state of liquid 1-butene (C 4 H 8 ) under shock compressed conditions. The conductivity data span 7 x 10 -4 to 7 x 10 1 Ω -1 cm -1 over a dynamic pressure range 18.1 to 61.5 GPa and are discussed in terms of amorphous semiconduction models which include such transport phenomena as hopping, percolation, pseudogaps, and metallization. Excellent agreement is found between the equation-of-state measurements, which span a dynamic pressure range 12.3 to 53.8 GPa, and Ree's calculated values which assume a 2-phase mixture consisting of molecular hydrogen and carbon in a dense diamond-like phase. There is a 2-1/2 fold increase in the thermal pressure contribution over a less dense, stoichiometrically equivalent liquid. 90 refs., 48 figs., 8 tabs

  11. Influence of oxygen gas on characteristics of self-organized luminous pattern formation observed in an atmospheric dc glow discharge using a liquid electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Naoki; Uchida, Satoshi; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Self-organized luminous pattern formation is observed in the liquid surface of an atmospheric dc glow discharge using a liquid electrode with a miniature helium flow. The factors affecting pattern formation are the gap length, discharge current, helium mass flow rate and polarity. The pattern shape depends on the conductivity and temperature of the liquid electrode. A variety of patterns were observed by changing the conductivity and temperature of the liquid. We clarified that the self-organized pattern formation depends on the amount of electronegative gas, such as oxygen, in the gas in the electrode gap. When an oxygen gas flow was fed to the liquid surface from the outside in an obliquely downward direction, namely, the amount of oxygen gas on the liquid surface was increased locally, self-organized pattern formation was observed in the region with the increased amount of oxygen gas. When the amount of oxygen in the gas in the gap was changed by using a sheath flow system, the appearance of the pattern changed. The presence of oxygen gas strongly affected the self-organized pattern formation of the atmospheric dc discharge using a liquid anode. (paper)

  12. Tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented for the purpose of resolving the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. This document is restricted to issues regarding the flammability of gases, vapors, and an aerosol that may exist in the headspace of tank 241-C-103. While discussing certain information about the organic liquid present in tank 241-C-103, this document addresses neither the potential for, nor consequences of, a pool fire involving this organic liquid; they will be discussed in a separate report

  13. Tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented for the purpose of resolving the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. This document is restricted to issues regarding the flammability of gases, vapors, and an aerosol that may exist in the headspace of tank 241-C-103. While discussing certain information about the organic liquid present in tank 241-C-103, this document addresses neither the potential for, nor consequences of, a pool fire involving this organic liquid; they will be discussed in a separate report.

  14. Feasibility study on the solidification of liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trussell, S.

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to help determine the feasibility of solidifying a liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this report is to facilitate a decision on the disposition of these wastes by identifying any waste constituents that might (1) compromise the strength or stability of the waste form or (2) be highly leachable. Furthermore, its goal is to identify ways to circumvent interferences and to decrease the leachability of the waste constituents. This study has sought to provide an understanding of inhibition of cement set by identifying the fundamental chemical mechanisms by which this inhibition takes place. From this fundamental information, it is possible to draw some conclusions about the potential effects of waste constituents, even in the absence of particular studies on specific compounds

  15. On The Possible Leakage of ET-RR1 Liquid Waste Tank: Hydrological and Migration Modes Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Mahmoud

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The first Egyptian (ET-RR1 research reactor has been in operation since 1961 at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA Inshas site. Therefore, at present, it faces a serious problem due to aging equipment, especially those directly in contact with the environment such as the underground settling tanks of nuclear and radioactive waste. The possible leakage of radionuclides from these aging tanks and their migration to the aquifer was studied using instantaneous release.This study was done based on the geological and hydrological characteristics of the site, which were obtained from the hydrogeological data of 25 wells previously drilled at the site of the reactor[1]. These data were used to calculate the trend of water levels, hydraulic gradient, and formulation of water table maps from 1993–2002. This information was utilized to determine water velocity in the unsaturated zone.Radionuclides released from the settling tank to the aquifer were screened according to the radionuclides that have high migration ability and high activity. The amount of fission and activation products of the burned fuels that contaminated the water content of the reactor pool were considered as 10% of the original spent fuel. The radionuclides considered in this case were H-3, Sr-90, Zr-93, Tc-99, Cd-113, Cs-135, Cs-137, Sm-151, Pu-238, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Am-241.The instantaneous release was analyzed by theoretical calculations, taking into consideration the migration mechanism of the various radionuclides through the soil space between the tank bottom and the aquifer. The migration mechanism through the unsaturated zone was considered depending on soil type, thickness of the unsaturated zone, water velocity, and other factors that are specific for each radionuclide, namely retardation factor, which is the function of the specific distribution coefficient of each radionuclide. This was considered collectively as delay time. Meanwhile, the mechanism of

  16. Biodegradation of the herbicide Diuron in a packed bed channel and a double biobarrier with distribution of oxygenated liquid by airlift devices: influence of oxygen limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañón-González, J Humberto; Galíndez-Mayer, Juvencio; Ruiz-Ordaz, Nora; Rocha-Martínez, Lizeth; Peña-Partida, José Carlos; Marrón-Montiel, Erick; Santoyo-Tepole, Fortunata

    2016-01-25

    From agricultural soils, where the herbicide Diuron has been frequently applied, a microbial community capable of degrading Diuron and 3,4-dichloroaniline was obtained. The volumetric rates and degradation efficiencies of Diuron and 3,4-DCA were evaluated in two distinct biofilm reactors, which differ in their operating conditions. One is a horizontal fixed bed reactor; plug-flow operated (PF-PBC) with severe limitation of oxygen. In this reactor, the air was supplied to an equalizer reservoir at the start of the PF-PBC reactor. The other is a compartmentalized aerobic biobarrier with internal recirculation of liquid aerated through airlift devices (ALB), continuously or intermittently operated. Both reactors were inoculated with a microbial community capable of degrading Diuron, isolated from a sugarcane field. In the oxygen-limited PF-PBC reactor, 3,4-DCA accumulation was detected, mainly in the middle zone of the packed channel. On the contrary, in the fully aerobic ALB reactor, minimal accumulation of catabolic byproducts was detected, and high Diuron removal efficiencies and removal rates were obtained when it was continuously operated in steady-state conditions. Additionally, the influence of oxygen limitation on the kinetic behavior of the PF-PBC reactor was determined, and a method to estimate the local removal rates of Diuron RV,CD along the plug-flow channel is described. It was observed that the local values of the instantaneous removal rate of Diuron dCD/dt are high in the aerobic region of the PF-PBC reactor; but, suddenly decay in the reactor zones limited by dissolved oxygen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Completion report for the isolation and remediation of inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste tanks WC-5, WC-6, WC-8, WC-19, 3002-A, 7560, and 7562 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires that all liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory removed from service, designated in the FFA as Category D, be remediated in accordance with Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements. A human health risk screening assessment was conducted for inactive Tanks WC-5, WC-6, WC-8, WC-19, 3002-A, 7560, and 7562 as part of an evaluation to determine the method of remediation necessary to safely and permanently isolate and remediate the tanks. Risk screening assessment results indicated that the health risks associated with these tanks were within or below the EPA range of concern of 1 x 10 -4 to 1 x 10 -6 . On the basis of these results and with regulators concurrence, it was determined that either no action or in-place stabilization of the tanks would satisfy risk-based remediation goals. Therefore, decisions were made and approved by DOE to remediate these tanks in-place as maintenance actions rather than actions under the CERCLA process. Letters documenting these decisions were approved by DOE and subsequently submitted to TDEC and EPA, who concurred with the maintenance actions. Tanks WC-5, WC-6, WC-8, WC-19, 3002-A, 7560, and 7562 were isolated from associated piping, electrical systems, and instrumentation and were grouted in-place. Tank 7562 was originally isolated from associated piping and instrumentation and left in-place empty for future remedial consideration. Upon further consideration, the decision was made by DOE, with concurrence by the regulators, to complete the maintenance action of Tank 7562 by grouting it in-place in March 1997

  18. Isopropyl alcohol tank installed at A-3 Test Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    An isopropyl alcohol (IPA) tank is lifted into place at the A-3 Test Stand being built at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. Fourteen IPA, water and liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks are being installed to support the chemical steam generators to be used on the A-3 Test Stand. The IPA and LOX tanks will provide fuel for the generators. The water will allow the generators to produce steam that will be used to reduce pressure inside the stand's test cell diffuser, enabling operators to simulate altitudes up to 100,000 feet. In that way, operators can perform the tests needed on rocket engines being built to carry humans back to the moon and possibly beyond. The A-3 Test Stand is set for completion and activation in 2011.

  19. Extending the basic function of lattice oxygen in lepidocrocite titanate - The conversion of intercalated fatty acid to liquid hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluangnont, Tosapol; Arsa, Pornanan; Sooknoi, Tawan

    2017-12-01

    We report herein the basicity of the external and internal lattice oxygen (OL) in lepidocrocite titanates with respect to CO2 and palmitic acid, respectively. Several compositions have been tested with different types of the metal M aliovalently (co)substituted for Ti, K0.8[MyTi2-y]O4 (M = Li, Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cu/Ni and Cu/Zn). The low CO2 desorption peak temperature (70-100 °C) suggests that the external OL sites are weakly basic similar to TiO2. However, the internal OL sites are sufficiently basic to deprotonate palmitic acid, forming the intercalated potassium palmitate at the interlayer spaces. The latter serves as a two-dimensional (2D) molecular reactor for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels via deoxygenation under atmospheric N2. A relationship has been observed between the yield of the liquid products vs the partial charge of the lattice oxygen (δO). Since the deoxygenation pathway is highly dependent on the metal substitution, the redox-active sites might also play some roles. The co-substituted K0.8[Cu0.2Ni0.2]Ti1.6O4 produced 68.0% yield of the liquid products, with 51% saturated and 15% unsaturated C15 hydrocarbons at 350 °C.

  20. Robust Exploration and Commercial Missions to the Moon Using Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion and Lunar Liquid Oxygen Derived from FeO-Rich Pyroclasitc Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Ryan, Stephen W.; Burke, Laura M.; McCurdy, David R.; Fittje, James E.; Joyner, Claude R.

    2018-01-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) has frequently been identified as a key space asset required for the human exploration of Mars. This proven technology can also provide the affordable access through cislunar space necessary for commercial development and sustained human presence on the Moon. It is a demonstrated technology capable of generating both high thrust and high specific impulse (I(sub sp) approx. 900 s) twice that of today's best chemical rockets. Nuclear lunar transfer vehicles-consisting of a propulsion stage using three approx. 16.5-klb(sub f) small nuclear rocket engines (SNREs), an in-line propellant tank, plus the payload-are reusable, enabling a variety of lunar missions. These include cargo delivery and crewed lunar landing missions. Even weeklong ''tourism'' missions carrying passengers into lunar orbit for a day of sightseeing and picture taking are possible. The NTR can play an important role in the next phase of lunar exploration and development by providing a robust in-space lunar transportation system (LTS) that can allow initial outposts to evolve into settlements supported by a variety of commercial activities such as in-situ propellant production used to supply strategically located propellant depots and transportation nodes. The use of lunar liquid oxygen (LLO2) derived from iron oxide (FeO)-rich volcanic glass beads, found in numerous pyroclastic deposits on the Moon, can significantly reduce the launch mass requirements from Earth by enabling reusable, surface-based lunar landing vehicles (LLVs)that use liquid oxygen and hydrogen (LO2/LH2) chemical rocket engines. Afterwards, a LO2/LH2 propellant depot can be established in lunar equatorial orbit to supply the LTS. At this point a modified version of the conventional NTR-called the LO2-augmented NTR, or LANTR-is introduced into the LTS allowing bipropellant operation and leveraging the mission benefits of refueling with lunar-derived propellants for Earth return. The bipropellant LANTR

  1. Robust Exploration and Commercial Missions to the Moon Using LANTR Propulsion and Lunar Liquid Oxygen Derived from FeO-Rich Pyroclastic Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Ryan, Stephen W.; Burke, Laura M.; McCurdy, David R.; Fittje, James E.; Joyner, Claude R.

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) has frequently been identified as a key space asset required for the human exploration of Mars. This proven technology can also provide the affordable access through cislunar space necessary for commercial development and sustained human presence on the Moon. It is a demonstrated technology capable of generating both high thrust and high specific impulse (Isp approx.900 s) twice that of todays best chemical rockets. Nuclear lunar transfer vehicles consisting of a propulsion stage using three approx.16.5 klbf Small Nuclear Rocket Engines (SNREs), an in-line propellant tank, plus the payload can enable a variety of reusable lunar missions. These include cargo delivery and crewed lunar landing missions. Even weeklong tourism missions carrying passengers into lunar orbit for a day of sightseeing and picture taking are possible. The NTR can play an important role in the next phase of lunar exploration and development by providing a robust in-space lunar transportation system (LTS) that can allow initial outposts to evolve into settlements supported by a variety of commercial activities such as in-situ propellant production used to supply strategically located propellant depots and transportation nodes. The use of lunar liquid oxygen (LLO2) derived from iron oxide (FeO)-rich volcanic glass beads, found in numerous pyroclastic deposits on the Moon, can significantly reduce the launch mass requirements from Earth by enabling reusable, surface-based lunar landing vehicles (LLVs) using liquid oxygen/hydrogen (LO2/H2) chemical rocket engines. Afterwards, a LO2/H2 propellant depot can be established in lunar equatorial orbit to supply the LTS. At this point a modified version of the conventional NTR called the LOX-augmented NTR, or LANTR is introduced into the LTS allowing bipropellant operation and leveraging the mission benefits of refueling with lunar-derived propellants for Earth return. The bipropellant LANTR engine utilizes the large

  2. Detection of different oxidation states of individual manganese porphyrins during their reaction with oxygen at a solid/liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Boer, Duncan; Li, Min; Habets, Thomas; Iavicoli, Patrizia; Rowan, Alan E; Nolte, Roeland J M; Speller, Sylvia; Amabilino, David B; De Feyter, Steven; Elemans, Johannes A A W

    2013-07-01

    Manganese porphyrins have been extensively investigated as model systems for the natural enzyme cytochrome P450 and as synthetic oxidation catalysts. Here, we report single-molecule studies of the multistep reaction of manganese porphyrins with molecular oxygen at a solid/liquid interface, using a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) under environmental control. The high lateral resolution of the STM, in combination with its sensitivity to subtle differences in the electronic properties of molecules, allowed the detection of at least four distinct reaction species. Real-space and real-time imaging of reaction dynamics enabled the observation of active sites, immobile on the experimental timescale. Conversions between the different species could be tuned by the composition of the atmosphere (argon, air or oxygen) and the surface bias voltage. By means of extensive comparison of the results to those obtained by analogous solution-based chemistry, we assigned the observed species to the starting compound, reaction intermediates and products.

  3. Hydrolysis-acidogenesis of food waste in solid-liquid-separating continuous stirred tank reactor (SLS-CSTR) for volatile organic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Obulisamy Parthiba; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2016-01-01

    The use of conventional continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) can affect the methane (CH4) recovery in a two-stage anaerobic digestion of food waste (FW) due to carbon short circuiting in the hydrolysis-acidogenesis (Hy-Aci) stage. In this research, we have designed and tested a solid-liquid-separating CSTR (SLS-CSTR) for effective Hy-Aci of FW. The working conditions were pH 6 and 9 (SLS-CSTR-1 and -2, respectively); temperature-37°C; agitation-300rpm; and organic loading rate (OLR)-2gVSL(-1)day(-1). The volatile fatty acids (VFA), enzyme activities and bacterial population (by qPCR) were determined as test parameters. Results showed that the Hy-Aci of FW at pH 9 produced ∼35% excess VFA as compared to that at pH 6, with acetic and butyric acids as major precursors, which correlated with the high enzyme activities and low lactic acid bacteria. The design provided efficient solid-liquid separation there by improved the organic acid yields from FW. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Solubility of oxygen in liquid sodium: effect on interpretation of corrosion data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claxton, K.T.

    1976-01-01

    No solubility correlation relating the equilibrium oxygen concentration with the sodium saturation temperature has yet been derived which has gained general acceptance. A statistical analysis of all the available data which directly or indirectly may be taken as representing a measurement of solubility has been made. The results indicate that a real and seemingly permanent difference is apparent between the assumed equilibrium levels of oxygen measured at different saturation temperatures as reported by UK and US workers. Data analysis procedures producing sub-sets of culled data which are then used to derive a compromise solubility function are considered less than adequate. It is considered preferable and more realistic to distinguish data sub-sets by the analytical technique employed. The established vacuum distillation method is shown to yield results differing among themselves by up to a factor of four at cold trap temperatures of relevance to fast reactor operation. The vanadium wire and electrochemical cell techniques are shown to give the lowest solubility values. Appropriate factors relating UK oxygen levels to values derived from alternative methods are presented. The divergent positions prevailing for oxygen-in-sodium analysis can lead to apparent anomalies when comparisons of corrosion rates from different sources have to be made. It is shown that this situation is, in part, apparently resolved by effecting comparisons at the equivalent cold trap temperature instead of the equivalent oxygen level. It is recognised that the approach presumes equilibrium of the oxygen in the sodium with the cold trap and reference is made to alternative ''sinks'' for oxygen. It is demonstrated, by comparison of a number of recommended and observed corrosion rates from US and European sources, that, in spite of the above and other qualifications, the approach is reasonable

  5. TANK FARM ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TIFFT, S.R.

    2003-01-01

    Through regulations, permitting or binding negotiations, Regulators establish requirements, limits, permit conditions and Notice of Construction (NOC) conditions with which the Office of River Protection (ORP) and the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) must comply. Operating Specifications are technical limits which are set on a process to prevent injury to personnel, or damage to the facility or environment, The main purpose of this document is to provide specification limits and recovery actions for the TFC Environmental Surveillance Program at the Hanford Site. Specification limits are given for monitoring frequencies and permissible variation of readings from an established baseline or previous reading. The requirements in this document are driven by environmental considerations and data analysis issues, rather than facility design or personnel safety issues. This document is applicable to all single-shell tank (SST) and double-shell tank (DST) waste tanks, and the associated catch tanks and receiver tanks, and transfer systems. This Tank Farm Environmental Specifications Document (ESD) implements environmental-regulatory limits on the configuration and operation of the Hanford Tank Farms facility that have been established by Regulators. This ESD contains specific field operational limits and recovery actions for compliance with airborne effluent regulations and agreements, liquid effluents regulations and agreements, and environmental tank system requirements. The scope of this ESD is limited to conditions that have direct impact on Operations/Projects or that Operations Projects have direct impact upon. This document does not supercede or replace any Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, regulatory permits, notices of construction, or Regulatory agency agreements binding on the ORP or the TFC. Refer to the appropriate regulation, permit, or Notice of Construction for an inclusive listing of requirements

  6. Radiological risk curves for the liquid radioactive waste transfer from Angra 1 to Angra 2 nuclear power plants by a container tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, A.S.M.; Passos, E.M. dos; Duarte, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Eletrobras Termonuclear has a radiowaste management program focused on reducing the produced volumes, for which it has considered to transfer Angra 1 liquid radioactive waste by a container tank to be processed and packed in Angra 2. This paper presents a radiological risk study for providing the necessary technical foundations to obtain the license from the regulatory agency for implementing this transfer operation. Out of the 92 accident scenarios identified with the help of a preliminary hazard analysis, the greatest risk of fatal cancer for members of the public was equal to 6.9 x 10 -13 fatalities/yr, which refers to the accident scenario involving intrinsic failures of valves, hoses, flanges, seals, gaskets and instrumentation lines, while filling the container tank at Angra 1 filling station. This risk figure is about ten million times less than the one adopted by Eletronuclear for such a waste transfer. The highest frequency was also associated with this type of scenario, and its value was equal to 1.4 x 10 -6 yr -1 . This paper also presents and discusses the radiological risk curves for the three possible in-plant transfer routes, the Angra 1 filling station and Angra 2 discharging station and the overall risk curve in order to allow for a broader perspective of the results obtained. These risk curves display the accident scenarios frequencies against radiation doses by considering relevant in-plant and surroundings release paths. In these curves, the extreme scenarios mentioned earlier can be clearly identified in terms of occurrence frequencies and radiation doses. (author)

  7. Role of Oxygen in Ionic Liquid Gating on Two-Dimensional Cr2Ge2Te6: A Non-oxide Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangyang; Xing, Wenyu; Wang, Xirui; Shen, Bowen; Yuan, Wei; Su, Tang; Ma, Yang; Yao, Yunyan; Zhong, Jiangnan; Yun, Yu; Xie, X C; Jia, Shuang; Han, Wei

    2018-01-10

    Ionic liquid gating can markedly modulate a material's carrier density so as to induce metallization, superconductivity, and quantum phase transitions. One of the main issues is whether the mechanism of ionic liquid gating is an electrostatic field effect or an electrochemical effect, especially for oxide materials. Recent observation of the suppression of the ionic liquid gate-induced metallization in the presence of oxygen for oxide materials suggests the electrochemical effect. However, in more general scenarios, the role of oxygen in the ionic liquid gating effect is still unclear. Here, we perform ionic liquid gating experiments on a non-oxide material: two-dimensional ferromagnetic Cr 2 Ge 2 Te 6 . Our results demonstrate that despite the large increase of the gate leakage current in the presence of oxygen, the oxygen does not affect the ionic liquid gating effect on  the channel resistance of Cr 2 Ge 2 Te 6 devices (ionic liquid gating is more effective on the modulation of the channel resistances compared to the back gating across the 300 nm thick SiO 2 .

  8. A new immersion sensor for rapid electrochemical determination of dissolved oxygen in liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janke, D.; Schwerdtfeger, K.

    1978-01-01

    Development of a new solid electrolyte 'needle sensor' with ZrO 2 or ThO 2 electrolyte and metal-metal oxide reference mixture for the rapid determination of oxygen in steel melts. Details of the manufacture of the layer-structured, miniaturized probe. Test results of simultaneous measurements performed with the newly developed ZrO 2 needle sensor and the hitherto usual tubular sensor in iron melts at oxygen activities between 0.00005 and 0.030. (orig.) [de

  9. Tank design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that aboveground tanks can be designed with innovative changes to complement the environment. Tanks can be constructed to eliminate the vapor and odor emanating from their contents. Aboveground tanks are sometimes considered eyesores, and in some areas the landscaping has to be improved before they are tolerated. A more universal concern, however, is the vapor or odor that emanates from the tanks as a result of the materials being sorted. The assertive posture some segments of the public now take may eventually force legislatures to classify certain vapors as hazardous pollutants or simply health risks. In any case, responsibility will be leveled at the corporation and subsequent remedy could increase cost beyond preventive measures. The new approach to design and construction of aboveground tanks will forestall any panic which might be induced or perceived by environmentalists. Recently, actions by local authorities and complaining residents were sufficient to cause a corporation to curtail odorous emissions through a change in tank design. The tank design change eliminated the odor from fuel oil vapor thus removing the threat to the environment that the residents perceived. The design includes reinforcement to the tank structure and the addition of an adsorption section. This section allows the tanks to function without any limitation and their contents do not foul the environment. The vapor and odor control was completed successfully on 6,000,000 gallon capacity tanks

  10. The equilibrium hydrogen pressure-temperature diagram for the liquid sodium-hydrogen-oxygen system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knights, C.F.; Whittingham, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    The underlying equilibria in the sodium-hydrogen-oxygen system are presented in the form of a completmentary hydrogen equilibrium pressure-temperature diagram, constructed by using published data and supplemented by experimental measurements of hydrogen equilibrium pressures over condensed phases in the system. Possible applications of the equilibrium pressure-temperature phase diagram limitations regarding its use are outlined

  11. Absolute measurement of ν/sub p/-bar for 252Cf by the large liquid scintillator tank technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, R.R.

    1979-01-01

    A vigorous effect to dispel the scandal of the approx. 2% dispersion in reported experimental values of 252 Cf ν-bar, the average number of neutrons emitted in spontaneous fission, has been underway over the past 5 years. The goal is to reduce the uncertainty in this fundamental parameter to the +- 0.25% level needed for reactor physics applications. Both new measurements and revaluation of older measurements are involved. At ORNL a new measurement is being carried out using the leage liquid scintillator neutron detector. Findings of the most recent experiment, incorporating improvements suggested in a preliminary study are discussed. 6 figures, 2 tables

  12. CECE: Expanding the Envelope of Deep Throttling Technology in Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Hydrogen Rocket Engines for NASA Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Victor J.; Leonard, Timothy G.; Lyda, Randy T.; Kim, Tony S.

    2010-01-01

    As one of the first technology development programs awarded by NASA under the Vision for Space Exploration, the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) Deep Throttling, Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) program was selected by NASA in November 2004 to begin technology development and demonstration toward a deep throttling, cryogenic engine supporting ongoing trade studies for NASA s Lunar Lander descent stage. The CECE program leverages the maturity and previous investment of a flight-proven hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle engine, the PWR RL10, to develop and demonstrate an unprecedented combination of reliability, safety, durability, throttlability, and restart capabilities in high-energy, cryogenic, in-space propulsion. The testbed selected for the deep throttling demonstration phases of this program was a minimally modified RL10 engine, allowing for maximum current production engine commonality and extensibility with minimum program cost. Four series of demonstrator engine tests have been successfully completed between April 2006 and April 2010, accumulating 7,436 seconds of hot fire time over 47 separate tests. While the first two test series explored low power combustion (chug) and system instabilities, the third test series investigated and was ultimately successful in demonstrating several mitigating technologies for these instabilities and achieved a stable throttling ratio of 13:1. The fourth test series significantly expanded the engine s operability envelope by successfully demonstrating a closed-loop control system and extensive transient modeling to enable lower power engine starting, faster throttle ramp rates, and mission-specific ignition testing. The final hot fire test demonstrated a chug-free, minimum power level of 5.9%, corresponding to an overall 17.6:1 throttling ratio achieved. In total, these tests have provided an early technology demonstration of an enabling cryogenic propulsion concept with invaluable system-level technology data

  13. Electrical conductivity and equation of state of liquid nitrogen, oxygen, benzene, and 1-butene shocked to 60 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, D.C.

    1986-10-08

    Measurements are reported for the electrical conductivity of liquid nitrogen (N/sub 2/), oxygen (O/sub 2/) and benzene (C/sub 6/H/sub 6/), and Hugoniot equation of state of liquid 1-butene (C/sub 4/H/sub 8/) under shock compressed conditions. The conductivity data span 7 x 10/sup -4/ to 7 x 10/sup 1/ ..cap omega../sup -1/cm/sup -1/ over a dynamic pressure range 18.1 to 61.5 GPa and are discussed in terms of amorphous semiconduction models which include such transport phenomena as hopping, percolation, pseudogaps, and metallization. Excellent agreement is found between the equation-of-state measurements, which span a dynamic pressure range 12.3 to 53.8 GPa, and Ree's calculated values which assume a 2-phase mixture consisting of molecular hydrogen and carbon in a dense diamond-like phase. There is a 2-1/2 fold increase in the thermal pressure contribution over a less dense, stoichiometrically equivalent liquid. 90 refs., 48 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Septic tank additive impacts on microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, S; Hoover, M T; Clark, G H; Gumpertz, M; Wollum, A G; Cobb, C; Strock, J

    2008-01-01

    Environmental health specialists, other onsite wastewater professionals, scientists, and homeowners have questioned the effectiveness of septic tank additives. This paper describes an independent, third-party, field scale, research study of the effects of three liquid bacterial septic tank additives and a control (no additive) on septic tank microbial populations. Microbial populations were measured quarterly in a field study for 12 months in 48 full-size, functioning septic tanks. Bacterial populations in the 48 septic tanks were statistically analyzed with a mixed linear model. Additive effects were assessed for three septic tank maintenance levels (low, intermediate, and high). Dunnett's t-test for tank bacteria (alpha = .05) indicated that none of the treatments were significantly different, overall, from the control at the statistical level tested. In addition, the additives had no significant effects on septic tank bacterial populations at any of the septic tank maintenance levels. Additional controlled, field-based research iswarranted, however, to address additional additives and experimental conditions.

  15. Oxygen influence on ceramics wettability by liquid metals: Ag/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muolo, M.L.; Valenza, F. [Institute for Energetics and Interphases - IENI CNR, via de Marini 6, 16149 Genova (Italy); Passerone, A. [Institute for Energetics and Interphases - IENI CNR, via de Marini 6, 16149 Genova (Italy)], E-mail: a.passerone@ge.ieni.cnr.it; Passerone, D. [Swiss Federal Lab. for Mater. Testing and Res. (EMPA) - Uberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2008-11-15

    A renewed interest in the effects of oxygen on the wetting of solid oxides has recently risen in connection to the development of the technique of 'air brazing' which makes use of the strong effect of oxygen to increase the wettability of oxides by means of processes running in air or in atmospheres with high oxygen content. Adsorption of oxygen not only at the liquid-vapour surface but also at the solid-liquid interface has been postulated by many previous researches, mainly on the basis of thermodynamic considerations. Along the same line, new results of the wetting behaviour in the system Ag/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a function of oxygen partial pressure are presented, with the simultaneous measurement of the liquid surface tension. These results are compared with the existing ones, and discussed on the basis of thermodynamic principles. The resulting work of adhesion is compared with the 'work of separation' computed by the density functional theory (DFT) approach. DFT calculations are also employed, at variance with previous models, to investigate the structures that are formed at the interface upon addition of oxygen in different sites energetics, atomic and electronic properties of this oxygen-rich interface are discussed together with the connection with experiments.

  16. Hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived oxygenates to liquid alkanes for transportation fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohui Sun

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An attractive approach for the production of transportation fuels from renewable biomass resources is to convert oxygenates into alkanes. In this paper, C5–C20 alkanes formed via the hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of the oligomers of furfuryl alcohol(FA can be used as gasoline, diesel and jet fuel fraction. The first step of the process is the oligomers of FA convert into hydrogenated products over Raney Ni catalyst in a batch reactor. The second step of the process converts hydrogenated products to alkanes via hydrodeoxygenation over different bi-functional catalysts include hydrogenation and acidic deoxidization active sites. After this process, the oxygen content decreased from 22.1 wt% in the oligomers of FA to 0.58 wt% in the hydrodeoxygenation products.

  17. Hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived oxygenates to liquid alkanes for transportation fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shaohui; Yang, Ruishu; Wang, Xin; Yan, Shaokang

    2018-04-01

    An attractive approach for the production of transportation fuels from renewable biomass resources is to convert oxygenates into alkanes. In this paper, C 5 -C 20 alkanes formed via the hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of the oligomers of furfuryl alcohol(FA) can be used as gasoline, diesel and jet fuel fraction. The first step of the process is the oligomers of FA convert into hydrogenated products over Raney Ni catalyst in a batch reactor. The second step of the process converts hydrogenated products to alkanes via hydrodeoxygenation over different bi-functional catalysts include hydrogenation and acidic deoxidization active sites. After this process, the oxygen content decreased from 22.1 wt% in the oligomers of FA to 0.58 wt% in the hydrodeoxygenation products.

  18. Experience at JEN with electrochemical cells for measurement of oxygen activity in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Torre, M.; Lapena, J.; Couchoud, M.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents the experience gained at the JEN with Oxygen Meters since 1974 till 1980. Thirteen O.H. were tested. Eight with Cu/Cu 2 O reference electrode and the rest with Sn/SnO 2 , and two types of electrolyte tube produced by Zircon under specifications development by UNC and HEDL. The cells equipped with Cu/Cu 2 O showed an anomalous performance giving an e.m.f. higher than the theoretical value, and one of them was in close agreement cells using air as reference electrode. An explanation is given. The performance of the cells with Sn/SnO 2 is in good agreement with those obtained in others laboratories. To calculate the theoretical value, it has derived a correlation solubility for oxygen with 262 data obtained by the vacuum distillation on method. Various recommendations are pointed out on the future development of the O.H. to improve its performance. (Author) 25 refs

  19. STS-133/ET-137 Tanking Test Photogrammetry Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stanley T.

    2012-01-01

    Following the launch scrub of Space Shuttle mission STS-133 on November 5, 2010, an anomalous condition of cracked and raised thermal protection system (TPS) foam was observed on the External Tank (ET). Subsequent dissection of the affected TPS region revealed cracks in the feet of two Intertank (IT) metallic stringers. An extensive investigation into the cause(s) and corrective action(s) for the cracked stringers was initiated, involving a wide array of material and structural tests and nondestructive evaluations, with the intent to culminate into the development of flight rational. One such structural test was the instrumented tanking test performed on December 17, 2010. The tanking test incorporated two three-dimensional optical displacement measurement systems to measure full-field outer surface displacements of the TPS surrounding the affected region that contained the stringer cracks. The results showed that the radial displacement and rotation of the liquid oxygen (LO2) tank flange changed significantly as the fluid level of the LO2 approached and passed the LO2 tank flange.

  20. Nonlinear Analysis of the Space Shuttle Superlightweight External Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Britt, Vicki O.; Collins, Timothy J.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Results of buckling and nonlinear analyses of the Space Shuttle external tank superlightweight liquid-oxygen (LO2) tank are presented. Modeling details and results are presented for two prelaunch loading conditions and for two full-scale structural tests that were conducted on the original external tank. The results illustrate three distinctly different types of nonlinear response for thin-walled shells subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads. The nonlinear response phenomena consist of bifurcation-type buckling, short-wavelength nonlinear bending, and nonlinear collapse associated with a limit point. For each case, the results show that accurate predictions of non- linear behavior generally require a large-scale, high-fidelity finite-element model. Results are also presented that show that a fluid-filled launch-vehicle shell can be highly sensitive to initial geometric imperfections. In addition, results presented for two full-scale structural tests of the original standard-weight external tank suggest that the finite-element modeling approach used in the present study is sufficient for representing the nonlinear behavior of the superlightweight LO2 tank.

  1. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AN-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AN-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  2. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AY-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C H; Stroup, J L; Funk, J. W.

    1997-03-12

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AY-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  3. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AW-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H., Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AW-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  4. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for the S-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-25

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on S-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southwest Quadrant of the Hanford 200 West Area.

  5. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AP-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AP-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  6. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for the SX-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-25

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on SX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southwest Quadrant of the Hanford 200 West Area.

  7. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for BY-Tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1996-06-28

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on BY-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

  8. Supporting document for the SW Quadrant Historical Tank Content Estimate for U-Tank Farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Johnson, E.D.

    1994-06-01

    This Supporting Document provides historical characterization information gathered on U-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature data, sampling data, and drywell and liquid observation well data for Historical Tank Content Estimate of the SW Quadrant at the Hanford 200 West Area

  9. Supporting Document for the SW Quadrant Historical Tank Content Estimate for SX-Tank Farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Johnson, E.D.

    1994-06-01

    This Supporting Document provides historical characterization information gathered on SX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature data, sampling data, and drywell and liquid observation well data for Historical Tank Content Estimate of the SW Quadrant at the Hanford 200 West Area

  10. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for BY-Tank farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Newell, R.L.; Funk, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on BY-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area

  11. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AP-tank farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AP-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas

  12. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for BX-tank farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on BX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area

  13. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for A-Tank farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Newell, R.L.; Funk, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on A-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area

  14. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AW-tank farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AW-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas

  15. Volatile liquid storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverman, R.J.; Winters, P.J.; Rinehart, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of collecting and abating emission from a volatile liquid in an above ground storage tank. It comprises the liquid storage tank having a bottom, a vertical cylindrical circular wall having a lower edge portion joined to the bottom, and an external fixed roof, the tank having an internal floating roof floating on a volatile liquid stored in the tank, and air vent means in the tank in communication with a vapor space in the tank constituting at least the space above the floating roof when the floating roof floats on a predetermined maximum volume of volatile liquid in the tank; permitting ambient air; pumping emission laden air from the tank vapor space above the floating roof; and by means of the emissions abatement apparatus eliminating most of the emission from the emissions laden air with formation of a gaseous effluent and then discharging the resulting gaseous effluent to the atmosphere

  16. Decay tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Seiichi; Tagishi, Akinori; Sakata, Yuji; Kontani, Koji; Sudo, Yukio; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kameyama, Iwao; Ando, Koei; Ishiki, Masahiko.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns an decay tank for decaying a radioactivity concentration of a fluid containing radioactive material. The inside of an decay tank body is partitioned by partitioning plates to form a flow channel. A porous plate is attached at the portion above the end of the partitioning plate, that is, a portion where the flow is just turned. A part of the porous plate has a slit-like opening on the side close to the partitioning plate, that is, the inner side of the flow at the turning portion thereof. Accordingly, the primary coolants passed through the pool type nuclear reactor and flown into the decay tank are flow caused to uniformly over the entire part of the tank without causing swirling. Since a distribution in a staying time is thus decreased, the effect of decaying 16 N as radioactive nuclides in the primary coolants is increased even in a limited volume of the tank. (I.N.)

  17. Spray-On Foam Insulations for Launch Vehicle Cryogenic Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Cofman, B. E.; Menghelli, B. J.; Heckle, K. W.

    2011-01-01

    Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) has been developed for use on the cryogenic tanks of space launch vehicles beginning in the 1960s with the Apollo program. The use of SOFI was further developed for the Space Shuttle program. The External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle, consisting of a forward liquid oxygen tank in line with an aft liquid hydrogen tank, requires thermal insulation over its outer surface to prevent ice formation and avoid in-flight damage to the ceramic tile thermal protection system on the adjacent Orbiter. The insulation also provides system control and stability with throughout the lengthy process of cooldown, loading, and replenishing the tank. There are two main types of SOFI used on the ET: acreage (with the rind) and closeout (machined surface). The thermal performance of the seemingly simple SOFI system is a complex of many variables starting with the large temperature difference of from 200 to 260 K through the typical 25-mm thickness. Environmental factors include air temperature and humidity, wind speed, solar exposure, and aging or weathering history. Additional factors include manufacturing details, launch processing operations, and number of cryogenic thermal cycles. The study of the cryogenic thermal performance of SOFI under large temperature differentials is the subject of this article. The amount of moisture taken into the foam during the cold soak phase, termed Cryogenic Moisture Uptake, must also be considered. The heat leakage rates through these foams were measured under representative conditions using laboratory standard liquid nitrogen boiloff apparatus. Test articles included baseline, aged, and weathered specimens. Testing was performed over the entire pressure range from high vacuum to ambient pressure. Values for apparent thermal conductivity and heat flux were calculated and compared with prior data. As the prior data of record was obtained for small temperature differentials on non-weathered foams, analysis of the

  18. Spray-on foam insulations for launch vehicle cryogenic tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Coffman, B. E.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Heckle, K. W.

    2012-04-01

    Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) has been developed for use on the cryogenic tanks of space launch vehicles beginning in the 1960s with the Apollo program. The use of SOFI was further developed for the Space Shuttle program. The External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle, consisting of a forward liquid oxygen tank in line with an aft liquid hydrogen tank, requires thermal insulation over its outer surface to prevent ice formation and avoid in-flight damage to the ceramic tile thermal protection system on the adjacent Orbiter. The insulation also provides system control and stability throughout the lengthy process of cooldown, loading, and replenishing the tank. There are two main types of SOFI used on the ET: acreage (with the rind) and closeout (machined surface). The thermal performance of the seemingly simple SOFI system is a complex array of many variables starting with the large temperature difference of 200-260 K through the typical 25-mm thickness. Environmental factors include air temperature and humidity, wind speed, solar exposure, and aging or weathering history. Additional factors include manufacturing details, launch processing operations, and number of cryogenic thermal cycles. The study of the cryogenic thermal performance of SOFI under large temperature differentials is the subject of this article. The amount of moisture taken into the foam during the cold soak phase, termed Cryogenic Moisture Uptake, must also be considered. The heat leakage rates through these foams were measured under representative conditions using laboratory standard liquid nitrogen boiloff apparatus. Test articles included baseline, aged, and weathered specimens. Testing was performed over the entire pressure range from high vacuum to ambient pressure. Values for apparent thermal conductivity and heat flux were calculated and compared with prior data. As the prior data of record was obtained for small temperature differentials on non-weathered foams, analysis of the different

  19. Contribution to the study of hydrogenated and oxygenated impurities in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naud, G.

    1964-07-01

    This study is made up essentially of two parts. The first is devoted to the development of dosage methods for selectively determining the oxygenated and hydrogenated impurities present in sodium, that is the oxide, the hydride and the hydroxide. The second makes use of these methods for a study of the Na-H 2 -O 2 system, as well as of the related problem of the attack of pyrex glass by molten sodium. The conventional method for dosing oxygen by amalgamation was first adapted to the simultaneous measurement of the hydride. We then developed a method for dosing the total hydrogen by measuring successively the concentrations of gas present in the hydride and hydroxide form. This method is based on the thermal decomposition of the hydride and the reaction between sodium and the hydroxide. Our contribution to the study of the Na-H 2 -O 2 System consists first of all in the study of the reaction between hydrogen and sodium in the temperature range from 150 to 250 deg C and at a pressure of about 150 mm of mercury. The study of the thermal decomposition of the hydride in sodium was then studied. It was possible to make some qualitative observations concerning the reaction between sodium and sodium hydroxide. Finally some complementary tests made it possible to define the nature of the phenomena occurring during the attack of pyrex glass by sodium. (author) [fr

  20. Effect of Ce2O3, La2O3 and ZnO additives on the oxygenates conversion into liquid hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachalov, V. V.; Lavrenov, V. A.; Lishchiner, I. I.; Malova, O. V.; Tarasov, A. L.; Zaichenko, V. M.

    2018-01-01

    A selective modifying effect of cerium, magnesium and zinc oxide additives on the activity and the selectivity of a pentasil group zeolite catalyst in the reaction of conversion of oxygenates (methanol and dimethyl ether) to liquid hydrocarbons was found. It was found that zinc oxide contributes to the stable operation of the zeolite catalyst in the conversion of oxygenates in the synthesis gas stream and leads to the production of gasolines with low durene content (not more than 6.1 wt%). The obtained results demonstrate the rationale for producing hydrocarbons from synthesis gas without the stage of oxygenate separation with their subsequent conversion to synthetic gasoline.

  1. A flowing liquid test system for assessing the linearity and time-response of rapid fibre optic oxygen partial pressure sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R; Hahn, C E W; Farmery, A D

    2012-08-15

    The development of a methodology for testing the time response, linearity and performance characteristics of ultra fast fibre optic oxygen sensors in the liquid phase is presented. Two standard medical paediatric oxygenators are arranged to provide two independent extracorporeal circuits. Flow from either circuit can be diverted over the sensor under test by means of a system of rapid cross-over solenoid valves exposing the sensor to an abrupt change in oxygen partial pressure, P O2. The system is also capable of testing the oxygen sensor responses to changes in temperature, carbon dioxide partial pressure P CO2 and pH in situ. Results are presented for a miniature fibre optic oxygen sensor constructed in-house with a response time ≈ 50 ms and a commercial fibre optic sensor (Ocean Optics Foxy), when tested in flowing saline and stored blood. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Remote inspection of underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griebenow, B.L.; Martinson, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy. The ICPP's mission is to process government-owned spent nuclear fuel. The process involves dissolving the fuel, extracting off uranium, and calcining the waste to a solid form for storage, Prior to calcining, WINCO temporarily stores the liquid waste from this process in eleven 1,135,600-l(300,000-gal), 15,2-m (50-ft)-diam, high-level liquid waste tanks. Each of these stainless steel tanks is contained within an underground concrete vault. The only access to the interior of the tanks is through risers that extend from ground level to the dome of the tanks. WINCO is replacing these tanks because of their age and the fact that they do not meet all of the current design requirements. The tanks will be replaced in two phases. WINCO is now in the Title I design stage for four new tank and vault systems to replace five of the existing systems. The integrity of the six remaining tanks must be verified to continue their use until they can be replaced in the second phase. To perform any integrity analysis, the inner surface of the tanks must be inspected. The remote tank inspection (RTI) robotic system, designed by RedZone Robotics of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was developed to access the interior of the tanks and position various end effectors required to perform tank wall inspections

  3. Validation of a Computational Model for the SLS Core Stage Oxygen Tank Diffuser Concept and the Low Profile Diffuser - An Advanced Development Design for the SLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodnick, Jacob; Richardson, Brian; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    The Low Profile Diffuser (LPD) project originated as an award from the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Development (ADO) office to the Main Propulsion Systems Branch (ER22). The task was created to develop and test an LPD concept that could produce comparable performance to a larger, traditionally designed, ullage gas diffuser while occupying a smaller volume envelope. Historically, ullage gas diffusers have been large, bulky devices that occupy a significant portion of the propellant tank, decreasing the tank volume available for propellant. Ullage pressurization of spacecraft propellant tanks is required to prevent boil-off of cryogenic propellants and to provide a positive pressure for propellant extraction. To achieve this, ullage gas diffusers must slow hot, high-pressure gas entering a propellant tank from supersonic speeds to only a few meters per second. Decreasing the incoming gas velocity is typically accomplished through expansion to larger areas within the diffuser which has traditionally led to large diffuser lengths. The Fluid Dynamics Branch (ER42) developed and applied advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis methods in order to mature the LPD design from and initial concept to an optimized test prototype and to provide extremely accurate pre-test predictions of diffuser performance. Additionally, the diffuser concept for the Core Stage of the Space Launch System (SLS) was analyzed in a short amount of time to guide test data collection efforts of the qualification of the device. CFD analysis of the SLS diffuser design provided new insights into the functioning of the device and was qualitatively validated against hot wire anemometry of the exterior flow field. Rigorous data analysis of the measurements was performed on static and dynamic pressure data, data from two microphones, accelerometers and hot wire anemometry with automated traverse. Feasibility of the LPD concept and validation of the computational model were

  4. Liquid Nitrogen Zero Boiloff Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, David; Feller, Jeffrey; Johnson, Wesley; Robinson, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASAs future space exploration due to their high specific impulse for rocket motors of upper stages suitable for transporting 10s to 100s of metric tons of payload mass to destinations outside of low earth orbit and for their return. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for missions with durations greater than several months. These losses can be eliminated by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and modulating the cryocooler to control tank pressure. The active thermal control technology being developed by NASA is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler and its integration to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling tubing network coupled to the tank wall. This configuration was recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center, in a vacuum chamber and cryo-shroud that simulated the essential thermal aspects of low Earth orbit, its vacuum and temperature. Testing consisted of three passive tests with the active cryo-cooler system off, and 7 active tests, with the cryocooler powered up. The test matrix included zero boil-off tests performed at 90 full and 25 full, and several demonstrations at excess cooling capacity and reduced cooling capacity. From this, the tank pressure response with varied cryocooler power inputs was determined. This test series established that the active cooling system integrated with the propellant tank eliminated boil-off and robustly controlled tank pressure.

  5. Federal Facility Agreement plans and schedules for liquid low-level radioactive waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA was January 1, 1992. Section 9 and Appendix F of the agreement impose design and operating requirements on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) tank systems and identify several plans, schedules, and assessments that must be submitted to EPA/TDEC for review or approval. The initial issue of this document in March 1992 transmitted to EPA/TDEC those plans and schedules that were required within 60 to 90 days of the FFA effective date. The current revision of this document updates the plans, schedules, and strategy for achieving compliance with the FFA, and it summarizes the progress that has been made over the past year. Chapter 1 describes the history and operation of the ORNL LLLW System, the objectives of the FFA, the organization that has been established to bring the system into compliance, and the plans for achieving compliance. Chapters 2 through 7 of this report contain the updated plans and schedules for meeting FFA requirements. This document will continue to be periodically reassessed and refined to reflect newly developed information and progress

  6. Nitrogen tank

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Wanted The technical file about the pressure vessel RP-270 It concerns the Nitrogen tank, 60m3, 22 bars, built in 1979, and installed at Point-2 for the former L3 experiment. If you are in possession of this file, or have any files about an equivalent tank (probably between registered No. RP-260 and -272), please contact Marc Tavlet, the ALICE Glimos.

  7. Thermodynamic models for vapor-liquid equilibria of nitrogen + oxygen + carbon dioxide at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrabec, Jadran; Kedia, Gaurav Kumar; Buchhauser, Ulrich; Meyer-Pittroff, Roland; Hasse, Hans

    2009-02-01

    For the design and optimization of CO 2 recovery from alcoholic fermentation processes by distillation, models for vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) are needed. Two such thermodynamic models, the Peng-Robinson equation of state (EOS) and a model based on Henry's law constants, are proposed for the ternary mixture N 2 + O 2 + CO 2. Pure substance parameters of the Peng-Robinson EOS are taken from the literature, whereas the binary parameters of the Van der Waals one-fluid mixing rule are adjusted to experimental binary VLE data. The Peng-Robinson EOS describes both binary and ternary experimental data well, except at high pressures approaching the critical region. A molecular model is validated by simulation using binary and ternary experimental VLE data. On the basis of this model, the Henry's law constants of N 2 and O 2 in CO 2 are predicted by molecular simulation. An easy-to-use thermodynamic model, based on those Henry's law constants, is developed to reliably describe the VLE in the CO 2-rich region.

  8. CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS IN THE F-TANK FARM CLOSURE OPERATIONAL DOCUMENTATION REGARDING WASTE TANK INTERNAL CONFIGURATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hommel, S.; Fountain, D.

    2012-03-28

    The intent of this document is to provide clarification of critical assumptions regarding the internal configurations of liquid waste tanks at operational closure, with respect to F-Tank Farm (FTF) closure documentation. For the purposes of this document, FTF closure documentation includes: (1) Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the FTF PA) (SRS-REG-2007-00002), (2) Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (DOE/SRS-WD-2012-001), (3) Tier 1 Closure Plan for the F-Area Waste Tank Systems at the Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2010-00147), (4) F-Tank Farm Tanks 18 and 19 DOE Manual 435.1-1 Tier 2 Closure Plan Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2011-00015), (5) Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for the Liquid Waste Tanks 18 and 19 (SRRCWDA-2010-00003), and (6) Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis) (SRR-CWDA-2010-00124). Note that the first three FTF closure documents listed apply to the entire FTF, whereas the last three FTF closure documents listed are specific to Tanks 18 and 19. These two waste tanks are expected to be the first two tanks to be grouted and operationally closed under the current suite of FTF closure documents and many of the assumptions and approaches that apply to these two tanks are also applicable to the other FTF waste tanks and operational closure processes.

  9. Computer modeling of ORNL storage tank sludge mobilization and mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrones, G.; Eyler, L.L.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents and analyzes the results of the computer modeling of mixing and mobilization of sludge in horizontal, cylindrical storage tanks using submerged liquid jets. The computer modeling uses the TEMPEST computational fluid dynamics computer program. The horizontal, cylindrical storage tank configuration is similar to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) at Oak Ridge National (ORNL). The MVST tank contents exhibit non-homogeneous, non-Newtonian rheology characteristics. The eventual goals of the simulations are to determine under what conditions sludge mobilization using submerged liquid jets is feasible in tanks of this configuration, and to estimate mixing times required to approach homogeneity of the contents of the tanks

  10. Comparison of oxygen liquefaction methods for use on the Martian surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Hauser, D. M.; Plachta, D. W.; Wang, X.-Y. J.; Banker, B. F.; Desai, P. S.; Stephens, J. R.; Swanger, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    In order to use oxygen that is produced on the surface of Mars from In-Situ production processes in a chemical propulsion system, the oxygen must first be converted from vapor phase to liquid phase and then stored within the propellant tanks of the propulsions system. There are multiple ways that this can be accomplished, from simply attaching a liquefaction system onto the propellant tanks to carrying separate tanks for liquefaction and storage of the propellant and loading just prior to launch (the way that traditional rocket launches occur on Earth). A study was done into these various methods by which the oxygen (and methane) could be liquefied and stored on the Martian surface. Five different architectures or cycles were considered: Tube-on-Tank (also known as Broad Area Cooling or Distributed Refrigeration), Tube-in-Tank (also known as Integrated Refrigeration and Storage), a modified Linde open liquefaction/refrigeration cycle, the direct mounting of a pulse tube cryocooler onto the tank, and an in-line liquefier at ambient pressure. Models of each architecture were developed to give insight into the performance and losses of each of the options. The results were then compared across eight categories: Mass, Power (both input and heat rejection), Operability, Cost, Manufacturability, Reliability, Volume-ility, and Scalability. The result was that Tube-on-Tank and Tube-in-Tank architectures were the most attractive solutions, with NASA's engineering management choosing to pursue tube on tank development rather than further differentiate the two. As a result NASA is focusing its Martian surface liquefaction activities and technology development on Tube-on-Tank liquefaction cycles.

  11. Interdependences between flow patterns and oxygen entry in aeration tanks of wastewater treatment plants; Der Zusammenhang von Stroemungsstrukturen und Sauerstoffeintrag bei druckbeluefteten Belebungsbecken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiersch, B.

    2001-07-01

    The flow field, turbulence intensities and the distribution of the relative gas-holdup of aeration tanks of operating wastewater treatment plants were investigated experimentally with Acoustic-Doppler-Velocimeter probes. Based on the experimental results a hydrodynamical model in Euler-Euler-Formulation was developed and numerical studies of different tank and diffuser arrangements were performed. It was found that the flow pattern is mainly influenced by the gas sparger arrangement and the tank aspect-ratio. Combining the experimental and numerical results reasons for different aeration efficiencies were identified. Increasing the diffuser density changed the flow field from the spiral type to the cellular pattern with instable and dynamical structures. These flow patterns improved the aeration efficiency by increasing the residence time of the bubbles and the recirculating flows. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit werden grundlegende Stroemungsstrukturen von druckbeluefteten Belebungsbecken anhand messtechnischer Untersuchungen der Geschwindigkeitsverteilungen, Turbulenzgroessen und relativer Gasgehaltsverteilungen von Belebungsbecken im Betriebszustand aufgezeigt. Vorab wird die Einsatzfaehigkeit von Akkustik-Doppler-Sonden in dispersen Zweiphasenstroemungen detailliert ueberprueft. Aufbauend auf den Messergebnissen wird ein numerisches Simulationsprogramm zur dynamischen Berechnung unterschiedlicher Beckenkonfigurationen entwickelt. Aus den experimentellen Ergebnissen in Verbindung mit den Berechnungsergebnissen sowie den Auswertungen frueherer Untersuchungen konnten hydromechanische Ursachen der unterschiedlichen Sauerstoffeintragseffizienz bei verschiedenen Beckenkonzeptionen abgeleitet werden. Dabei stellen die Anordnung sowie Gleichverteilung der Belueftungselemente sowie das Querschnittsverhaeltnis der Belebungsbecken die wesentlichen Einflussgroessen auf die Ausbildung der Stroemungsstrukturen dar. Mit zunehmender Belegungsdichte und

  12. ICPP Tank Farm planning through 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, W.B.; Millet, C.B.; Staiger, M.D.; Ward, F.S.

    1998-01-01

    Historically, liquid high-level waste (HLW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant has been stored in the Tank Farm after which it is calcined with the calcine being stored in stainless steel bins. Following the curtailment of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing in 1992, the HLW treatment methods were re-evaluated to establish a path forward for producing a final waste form from the liquid sodium bearing wastes (SBW) and the HLW calcine. Projections for significant improvements in waste generation, waste blending and evaporation, and calcination were incorporated into the Tank Farm modeling. This optimized modeling shows that all of the SBW can be calcined by the end of 2012 as required by the Idaho Settlement Agreement. This Tank Farm plan discusses the use of each of the eleven HLW tanks and shows that two tanks can be emptied, allowing them to be Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closed by 2006. In addition, it describes the construction of each tank and vault, gives the chemical concentrations of the contents of each tank, based on historical input and some sampling, and discusses the regulatory drivers important to Tank Farm operation. It also discusses new waste generation, the computer model used for the Tank Farm planning, the operating schedule for each tank, and the schedule for when each tank will be empty and closed

  13. Screen-Printed Graphite Electrodes as Low-Cost Devices for Oxygen Gas Detection in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junqiao; Hussain, Ghulam; Banks, Craig E; Silvester, Debbie S

    2017-11-26

    Screen-printed graphite electrodes (SPGEs) have been used for the first time as platforms to detect oxygen gas in room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). Up until now, carbon-based SPEs have shown inferior behaviour compared to platinum and gold SPEs for gas sensing with RTIL solvents. The electrochemical reduction of oxygen (O₂) in a range of RTILs has therefore been explored on home-made SPGEs, and is compared to the behaviour on commercially-available carbon SPEs (C-SPEs). Six common RTILs are initially employed for O₂ detection using cyclic voltammetry (CV), and two RTILs ([C₂mim][NTf₂] and [C₄mim][PF₆]) chosen for further detailed analytical studies. Long-term chronoamperometry (LTCA) was also performed to test the ability of the sensor surface for real-time gas monitoring. Both CV and LTCA gave linear calibration graphs-for CV in the 10-100% vol. range, and for LTCA in the 0.1-20% vol. range-on the SPGE. The responses on the SPGE were far superior to the commercial C-SPEs; more instability in the electrochemical responses were observed on the C-SPEs, together with some breaking-up or dissolution of the electrode surface materials. This study highlights that not all screen-printed ink formulations are compatible with RTIL solvents for longer-term electrochemical experiments, and that the choice of RTIL is also important. Overall, the low-cost SPGEs appear to be promising platforms for the detection of O₂, particularly in [C₄mim][PF₆].

  14. Screen-Printed Graphite Electrodes as Low-Cost Devices for Oxygen Gas Detection in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqiao Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Screen-printed graphite electrodes (SPGEs have been used for the first time as platforms to detect oxygen gas in room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs. Up until now, carbon-based SPEs have shown inferior behaviour compared to platinum and gold SPEs for gas sensing with RTIL solvents. The electrochemical reduction of oxygen (O2 in a range of RTILs has therefore been explored on home-made SPGEs, and is compared to the behaviour on commercially-available carbon SPEs (C-SPEs. Six common RTILs are initially employed for O2 detection using cyclic voltammetry (CV, and two RTILs ([C2mim][NTf2] and [C4mim][PF6] chosen for further detailed analytical studies. Long-term chronoamperometry (LTCA was also performed to test the ability of the sensor surface for real-time gas monitoring. Both CV and LTCA gave linear calibration graphs—for CV in the 10–100% vol. range, and for LTCA in the 0.1–20% vol. range—on the SPGE. The responses on the SPGE were far superior to the commercial C-SPEs; more instability in the electrochemical responses were observed on the C-SPEs, together with some breaking-up or dissolution of the electrode surface materials. This study highlights that not all screen-printed ink formulations are compatible with RTIL solvents for longer-term electrochemical experiments, and that the choice of RTIL is also important. Overall, the low-cost SPGEs appear to be promising platforms for the detection of O2, particularly in [C4mim][PF6].

  15. Coil-On-Plug Ignition for Oxygen/Methane Liquid Rocket Engines in Thermal-Vacuum Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, John C.; Atwell, Matthew J.; Morehead, Robert L.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Bugarin, Luz; Chaidez, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    A coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed and tested for Liquid Oxygen (LOX)/liquid methane (LCH4) rocket engines operating in thermal vacuum conditions. The igniters were developed and tested as part of the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA), previously tested as part of the Project Morpheus test vehicle. The ICPTA uses an integrated, pressure-fed, cryogenic LOX/LCH4 propulsion system including a reaction control system (RCS) and a main engine. The ICPTA was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) under vacuum and thermal vacuum conditions. A coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed to successfully demonstrate ignition reliability at these conditions while preventing corona discharge issues. The ICPTA uses spark plug ignition for both the main engine igniter and the RCS. The coil-on-plug configuration eliminates the conventional high-voltage spark plug cable by combining the coil and the spark plug into a single component. Prior to ICPTA testing at Plum Brook, component-level reaction control engine (RCE) and main engine igniter testing was conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), which demonstrated successful hot-fire ignition using the coil-on-plug from sea-level ambient conditions down to 10(exp -2) torr. Integrated vehicle hot-fire testing at JSC demonstrated electrical and command/data system performance. Lastly, hot-fire testing at Plum Brook demonstrated successful ignitions at simulated altitude conditions at 30 torr and cold thermal-vacuum conditions at 6 torr. The test campaign successfully proved that coil-on-plug technology will enable integrated LOX/LCH4 propulsion systems in future spacecraft.

  16. Tank waste concentration mechanism study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, L.C.; Johnson, L.J.

    1994-09-01

    This study determines whether the existing 242-A Evaporator should continue to be used to concentrate the Hanford Site radioactive liquid tank wastes or be replaced by an alternative waste concentration process. Using the same philosophy, the study also determines what the waste concentration mechanism should be for the future TWRS program. Excess water from liquid DST waste should be removed to reduce the volume of waste feed for pretreatment, immobilization, and to free up storage capacity in existing tanks to support interim stabilization of SSTS, terminal cleanout of excess facilities, and other site remediation activities

  17. LH2 fuel tank design for SSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoff

    1994-01-01

    This report will discuss the design of a liquid hydrogen fuel tank constructed from composite materials. The focus of this report is to recommend a design for a fuel tank which will be able to withstand all static and dynamic forces during manned flight. Areas of study for the design include material selection, material structural analysis, heat transfer, thermal expansion, and liquid hydrogen diffusion. A structural analysis FORTRAN program was developed for analyzing the buckling and yield characteristics of the tank. A thermal analysis Excel spreadsheet was created to determine a specific material thickness which will minimize heat transfer through the wall of the tank. The total mass of the tank was determined by the combination of both structural and thermal analyses. The report concludes with the recommendation of a layered material tank construction. The designed system will include exterior insulation, combination of metal and organize composite matrices and honeycomb.

  18. Perfecting on floating roof tanks, especially to storage tanks in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquet, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this invention, the liquid reservoir has a floating roof with a tight connection to its wall by a flexible membrane, forming a space for counterbalancing liquid, and a pressure relief valve for the liquid within the reservoir opening above the counterbalancing liquid. Application for tanks used in nuclear power plant [fr

  19. Criteria: waste tank isolation and stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, W.P.; Ogren, W.E.

    1976-09-01

    The crystallized Hanford high-level wastes stored in single-shell underground tanks consist of sludges and salt cakes covered with supernatural liquor. Purpose of stabilization and isolation is to reduce the releases and losses as a result of a loss of tank integrity. The tanks will be modified so that no inadvertent liquid additions can be made. Criteria for the isolation and stabilization are given and discussed briefly

  20. Criteria: waste tank isolation and stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, W.P.; Ogren, W.E.

    1976-09-01

    The crystallized Hanford high-level wastes stored in single-shell underground tanks consist of sludges and salt cakes covered with supernatural liquor. Purpose of stabilization and isolation is to reduce the releases and losses as a result of a loss of tank integrity. The tanks will be modified so that no inadvertent liquid additions can be made. Criteria for the isolation and stabilization are given and discussed briefly. (DLC)

  1. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS OF TAILING UNDERWATER SEDIMENTS AND LIQUID INDUSTRIAL WASTES IN STORAGE TANK ON THE BASIS OF ECHOLOCATION AND GPS-SYSTEMS AT JSC “BELARUSKALI”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Mikhailov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new approach to calculate volume of tailing underwater sediments and liquid industrial wastes on the basis of innovative technologies. Two theodolites which are set at various points and a boat with a load for measuring water depth have been traditionally used for topographic survey of slime storage bottom. Horizontal directions have been simultaneously measured on the boat marker while using theodolites. Water depth has been determined while using  a 2-kg circular load which was descended into brine solution with the help of rope. In addition to rather large time and labour costs such technology has required synchronization in actions on three participants involved in the work: operators of two theodolites and boat team in every depth measuring point. Methodology has been proposed for more efficient solution of the problem. It presupposes the use of echolocation together with space localization systems (GPS-systems which can be set on a boat with the purpose to measure depth of a storage tank bed. An echolocation transducer has been installed under the boat bottom at the depth of 10 cm from the brine solution level in the slime storage.  An aerial of GPS-receiver has been fixed over the echo-sounder transducer. Horizontal positioning of bottom depth measuring points have been carried out in the local coordinate system. Formation of digital model for slime storage bottom has been executed after data input of the coordinate positioning that corresponded to corrected depths in the software package LISCAD Plus SEE. The formation has been made on the basis of a strict triangulation method.  Creation of the digital model makes it rather easy to calculate a volume between a storage bottom and a selected level (height of filling material. In this context it is possible to determine a volume and an area not only above but also lower of the datum surface. For this purpose it is recommended to use digital models which are developed

  2. History of Tank 23, 1962 through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1979-04-01

    Tank 23 was placed in service in April 1964 receiving contaminated water from Buildings 244-H, the Receiving Basin for Off-Site Fuel (RBOF), and 245-H, the Resin Regeneration Facility (RRF). Tank 23 also provided emergency storage space for 500,000 gallons in the event of a severe contamination incident in Building 244-H. The tank has remained in this service since that time. The Tank 23 waste was processed initially by the 242-H evaporator, but since mid-1966 the waste has been processed through a zeolite bed to remove 137 C and other radioisotopes by ion exchange, and discarded to seepage basins. Inspections of the tank interior were made by using a 40-ft optical periscope and the thickness of the steel bottom of the tank was measured ultrasonically. Samples of the waste in the tank and liquid collected in the side wall and bottom sumps were analyzed. Several equipment modifications and repairs were made

  3. Degradation mechanisms of 4-chlorophenol in a novel gas-liquid hybrid discharge reactor by pulsed high voltage system with oxygen or nitrogen bubbling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Minghua; Hao, Xiaolong; Lei, Lecheng

    2007-03-01

    The effect of gas bubbling on the removal efficiency of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) in aqueous solution has been investigated using a novel pulsed high voltage gas-liquid hybrid discharge reactor, which generates gas-phase discharge above the water surface simultaneously with the spark discharge directly in the liquid. The time for 100% of 4-CP degradation in the case of oxygen bubbling (7 min) was much shorter than that in the case of nitrogen bubbling (25 min) as plenty of hydrogen peroxide and ozone formed in oxygen atmosphere enhanced the removal efficiency of 4-CP. Except for the main similar intermediates (4-chlorocatechol, hydroquinone and 1,4-benzoquinone) produced in the both cases of oxygen and nitrogen bubbling, special intermediates (5-chloro-3-nitropyrocatechol, 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol, nitrate and nitrite ions) were produced in nitrogen atmosphere. The reaction pathway of 4-CP in the case of oxygen bubbling was oxygen/ozone attack on the radical hydroxylated derivatives of 4-CP. However, in the case of nitrogen bubbling, hydroxylation was the main reaction pathway with effect of N atom on degradation of 4-CP.

  4. Assessment of concentration mechanisms for organic wastes in underground storage tanks at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, M.A.; Burger, L.L.; Nelson, D.A.; Ryan, J.L.; Zollars, R.L.

    1992-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted an initial conservative evaluation of physical and chemical processes that could lead to significant localized concentrations of organic waste constituents in the Hanford underground storage tanks (USTs). This evaluation was part of ongoing studies at Hanford to assess potential safety risks associated with USTs containing organics. Organics in the tanks could pose a potential problem if localized concentrations are high enough to propagate combustion and are in sufficient quantity to produce a large heat and/or gas release if in contact with a suitable oxidant. The major sources of oxidants are oxygen in the overhead gas space of the tanks and sodium nitrate and nitrite either as salt cake solids or dissolved in the supernatant and interstitial liquids

  5. Assessment of concentration mechanisms for organic wastes in underground storage tanks at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.A.; Burger, L.L.; Nelson, D.A.; Ryan, J.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Zollars, R.L. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted an initial conservative evaluation of physical and chemical processes that could lead to significant localized concentrations of organic waste constituents in the Hanford underground storage tanks (USTs). This evaluation was part of ongoing studies at Hanford to assess potential safety risks associated with USTs containing organics. Organics in the tanks could pose a potential problem if localized concentrations are high enough to propagate combustion and are in sufficient quantity to produce a large heat and/or gas release if in contact with a suitable oxidant. The major sources of oxidants are oxygen in the overhead gas space of the tanks and sodium nitrate and nitrite either as salt cake solids or dissolved in the supernatant and interstitial liquids.

  6. Underground Storage Tanks - Storage Tank Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Storage Tank Location is a DEP primary facility type, and its sole sub-facility is the storage tank itself. Storage tanks are aboveground or underground, and are...

  7. Flow in sodium loop surge tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matal, O.; Martoch, J.

    1977-01-01

    The alternate liquid flow, the condition of vortex formation, gas entrainment in the discharge and the liquid level characteristics are studied using the models of the vertical and horizontal surge tanks of a sodium circuit with pump and heat exchangers. The conditions for vortex formation are more favourable in the vertical cylindrical tank than in the horizontal tank. The size of the vortex produced in the tank is affected by the initial speed circulation, due as a rule to an unsuitable inlet design. The proposed design considers an inlet below the sodium level using capped perforated pipes. Vortex formation, gas transport to the discharge pipe and turbulences of the liquid in the tank may be prevented by dividing the tank to the discharge and the inlet areas using perforated partitions, and by inserting the discharge cylinder above the discharge pipe outflow. The liquid level in the tank may be calmed by screens or by perforated plates. The adaptation of the surge tank of the sodium circuit will probably eliminate vortex formation and the entrainment of cover gas into the discharge piping and the sodium circuit under nominal conditions. (J.B.)

  8. Dual Tank Fuel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  9. Annual status report on Federal Facility Agreement compliance for the Liquid Low-Level Waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This annual report summarizes the status of Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) compliance activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and describes the progress made over the past fiscal year. In fiscal 1994, ORNL issued the final submittal of the risk characterization data for the inactive tanks, the secondary containment design demonstration report for Category B piping, and the FFA Implementation Plan. In addition, two new LLLW tanks serving Building 2026 and the Transported Waste Receiving Facility were installed; leak testing was initiated for all active, singly contained tanks and piping; sources of inflow to inactive tanks were investigated and diversion to process waste was begun; and the W-12 tank system was repaired and a request to allow its temporary use was approved by EPA/TDEC. Programmatic improvements were also made during the year: a system for improved communication of FFA plans and activities was implemented in October 1993, a survey was conducted to ensure that all inactive drains are identified and sealed, and two meetings of the ORNL FFA Technical Advisory Group were held

  10. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It...

  11. Evaporation analysis for Tank SX-104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrington, C.A.

    1994-10-01

    Decreases in historical interstitial liquid level measurements in tank SX-104 were compared to predictions of a numerical model based upon diffusion of water through a porous crust. The analysis showed that observed level decreases could be explained by evaporation

  12. Tank 24-C-103 headspace flammability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented and interpreted to help resolve the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. Concern that the headspace of tank 241-C-103 may contain a flammable mixture of organic vapors and an aerosol of combustible organic liquid droplets arises from the presence of a layer of organic liquid in the tank. This organic liquid is believed to have originated in the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) process, having been stored initially in tank 241-C-102 and apparently transferred to tank 241-C-103 in 1975 (Carothers 1988). Analyses of samples of the organic liquid collected in 1991 and 1993 indicate that the primary constituents are tributyl phosphate (TBP) and several semivolatile hydrocarbons (Prentice 1991, Pool and Bean 1994). This is consistent with the premise that the organic waste came from the PUREX process, because the PUREX process used a solution of TBP in a diluent composed of the n-C 11 H 24 to n-C 15 H 32 normal paraffinic hydrocarbons (NPH)

  13. Low-Flammability PTFE for High-Oxygen Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walle, E.; Fallon, B.; Sheppard, A.

    1986-01-01

    Modified forming process removes volatile combustible materials. Flammability of cable-wrapping tape reduced by altering tape-manufacturing process. In new manufacturing process, tape formed by proprietary process of screw extrusion, followed by washing in solvent and drying. Tape then wrapped as before. Spectrogram taken after extrusion, washing, and drying shows lower hydrocarbon content. PTFE formed by new process suited to oxygen-rich environments. Safe in liquid oxygen of Space Shuttle tank and in medical uses; thin-wall shrinkable tubing in hospital test equipment, surgical instruments, and implants.

  14. Oxygen reduction reaction properties of nitrogen-incorporated nanographenes synthesized using in-liquid plasma from mixture of ethanol and iron phthalocyanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tomoki; Kondo, Hiroki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2018-04-01

    Nanographenes were synthesized using in-liquid plasma from a mixture of iron phthalocyanine and ethanol. In a previous study, micrometer-scale flakes with nitrogen incorporation were obtained. A nonprecious metal catalytic activity was observed with 3.13 electrons in an oxygen reduction reaction under an acidic solute condition. Large-surface-area, high-graphene-crystallinity, and iron-carbon-bonding sites were found owing to a high catalytic activity in Fe-N/nanographene.

  15. ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaulding, B.C.; Gavalya, R.A.; Dahlmeir, M.M. [and others

    1998-02-01

    The disposition of INEEL radioactive wastes is now under a Settlement Agreement between the DOE and the State of Idaho. The Settlement Agreement requires that existing liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW), and other liquid waste inventories be treated by December 31, 2012. This agreement also requires that all HLW, including calcined waste, be disposed or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. Sodium bearing waste (SBW) is produced from decontamination operations and HLW from reprocessing of SNF. SBW and HLW are radioactive and hazardous mixed waste; the radioactive constituents are regulated by DOE and the hazardous constituents are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Calcined waste, a dry granular material, is produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF). Two primary waste tank storage locations exist at the ICPP: Tank Farm Facility (TFF) and the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). The TFF has the following underground storage tanks: four 18,400-gallon tanks (WM 100-102, WL 101); four 30,000-gallon tanks (WM 103-106); and eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. This includes nine 300,000-gallon tanks (WM 182-190) and two 318,000 gallon tanks (WM 180-181). This study analyzes the closure and subsequent use of the eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. The 18,400 and 30,000-gallon tanks were not included in the work scope and will be closed as a separate activity. This study was conducted to support the HLW Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) waste separations options and addresses closure of the 300,000-gallon liquid waste storage tanks and subsequent tank void uses. A figure provides a diagram estimating how the TFF could be used as part of the separations options. Other possible TFF uses are also discussed in this study.

  16. ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaulding, B.C.; Gavalya, R.A.; Dahlmeir, M.M.

    1998-02-01

    The disposition of INEEL radioactive wastes is now under a Settlement Agreement between the DOE and the State of Idaho. The Settlement Agreement requires that existing liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW), and other liquid waste inventories be treated by December 31, 2012. This agreement also requires that all HLW, including calcined waste, be disposed or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. Sodium bearing waste (SBW) is produced from decontamination operations and HLW from reprocessing of SNF. SBW and HLW are radioactive and hazardous mixed waste; the radioactive constituents are regulated by DOE and the hazardous constituents are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Calcined waste, a dry granular material, is produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF). Two primary waste tank storage locations exist at the ICPP: Tank Farm Facility (TFF) and the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). The TFF has the following underground storage tanks: four 18,400-gallon tanks (WM 100-102, WL 101); four 30,000-gallon tanks (WM 103-106); and eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. This includes nine 300,000-gallon tanks (WM 182-190) and two 318,000 gallon tanks (WM 180-181). This study analyzes the closure and subsequent use of the eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. The 18,400 and 30,000-gallon tanks were not included in the work scope and will be closed as a separate activity. This study was conducted to support the HLW Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) waste separations options and addresses closure of the 300,000-gallon liquid waste storage tanks and subsequent tank void uses. A figure provides a diagram estimating how the TFF could be used as part of the separations options. Other possible TFF uses are also discussed in this study

  17. Human Factors Process Task Analysis Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure for the Advanced Technology Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    A process task analysis effort was undertaken by Dynacs Inc. commencing in June 2002 under contract from NASA YA-D6. Funding was provided through NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC), Code M/HQ, and Industrial Engineering and Safety (IES). The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Engineering Development Contract (EDC) Task Order was 5SMA768. The scope of the effort was to conduct a Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) of a hazardous activity and provide recommendations to eliminate or reduce the effects of errors caused by human factors. The Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Pump Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was selected for this analysis. The HF PFMEA table (see appendix A) provides an analysis of six major categories evaluated for this study. These categories include Personnel Certification, Test Procedure Format, Test Procedure Safety Controls, Test Article Data, Instrumentation, and Voice Communication. For each specific requirement listed in appendix A, the following topics were addressed: Requirement, Potential Human Error, Performance-Shaping Factors, Potential Effects of the Error, Barriers and Controls, Risk Priority Numbers, and Recommended Actions. This report summarizes findings and gives recommendations as determined by the data contained in appendix A. It also includes a discussion of technology barriers and challenges to performing task analyses, as well as lessons learned. The HF PFMEA table in appendix A recommends the use of accepted and required safety criteria in order to reduce the risk of human error. The items with the highest risk priority numbers should receive the greatest amount of consideration. Implementation of the recommendations will result in a safer operation for all personnel.

  18. Liquid Oxygen Rotating Friction Ignition Testing of Aluminum and Titanium with Monel and Inconel for Rocket Engine Propulsion System Contamination Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, S.; Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    Metallic contaminant was found in the liquid oxygen (LOX) pre-valve screen of the shuttle main engine propulsion system on two orbiter vehicles. To investigate the potential for an ignition, NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility performed (modified) rotating friction ignition testing in LOX. This testing simulated a contaminant particle in the low-pressure oxygen turbo pump (LPOTP) and the high-pressure oxygen turbo pump (HPOTP) of the shuttle main propulsion system. Monel(R) K-500 and Inconel(R) 718 samples represented the LPOTP and HPOTP materials. Aluminum foil tape and titanium foil represented the contaminant particles. In both the Monel(R) and Inconel(R) material configurations, the aluminum foil tape samples did not ignite after 30 s of rubbing. In contrast, all of the titanium foil samples ignited regardless of the rubbing duration or material configuration. However, the titanium foil ignitions did not propagate to the Monel and Inconel materials.

  19. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of niobium oxides by solid/liquid state oxygen source and lithium assisted metal-halide chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellekamp, M. Brooks; Greenlee, Jordan D.; Shank, Joshua C.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2015-09-01

    In order to consistently grow high quality niobium oxides and lithium niobium oxides, a novel solid/liquid state oxygen source, LiClO4, has been implemented in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system. LiClO4 is shown to decompose into both molecular and atomic oxygen upon heating. This allows oxidation rates similar to that of molecular oxygen but at a reduced overall beam flux, quantified by in situ Auger analysis. LiClO4 operation is decomposition limited to less than 400 °C, and other material limitations are identified. The design of a custom near-ambient NbCl5 effusion cell is presented, which improves both short and long term stability. Films of Nb oxidation state +2, +3, and +5 are grown using these new tools, including the multi-functional sub-oxide LiNbO2.

  20. 30 CFR 57.4401 - Storage tank foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... leaks caused by tanks settling. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Storage tank foundations. 57.4401 Section 57... and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4401 Storage tank foundations. Fixed...

  1. Newly developed EMF cell with zirconia solid electrolyte for measurement of low oxygen potentials in liquid Cu-Cr and Cu-Zr alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayama I.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to measure the very low oxygen potential by use of stabilized zirconia solid electrolyte emf method, a new cell construction was devised. The idea was based on Janke but a zirconia rod was used instead of the zirconia crucible which contacts liquid alloy electrode. The cell was used for determination of the oxygen potentials in liquid dilute Cu-Cr and Cu-Zr alloys. The reference electrode was Cr,Cr2O3. Emf measurements were performed in the temperature range of 1400-1580K and composition range of 0.198-3.10at%Cr-Cu alloys, and 1380-1465K, 0.085-0.761at%Zr-Cu alloys. The composition of liquid alloys were determined by picking up from the liquid alloys and ICP analysis. By use of the newly devised cell construction in this study, stable emf values were obtained at each temperature and alloy composition. Emf values were corrected by using the parameter for electronic contribution of the YSZ. Activity of Cr obeys Henry’s law and activity coefficient at infinitely dilute alloys of Cr in Cu-Cr alloys are: lng0 Cr =(3.80 at 1423K, (3.57 at 1473K, (3.38 at 1523K and (3.20 at 1573K. At 1423 K activity coefficient of Zr at infinitely diluted alloy is lnγo Zr = -4.0.

  2. 46 CFR 32.60-20 - Pumprooms on tank vessels carrying Grade A, B, C, D and/or E liquid cargo-TB/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Ventilation from the weather deck shall be provided. Power supply ventilation may be fitted in lieu of natural... not exceed 500 °F. (b) Ventilation for pumprooms on tank vessels the construction or conversion of... with power ventilation. Pumprooms equipped with power ventilation shall have the ventilation outlets...

  3. Supporting document for the north east quadrant historical tank content estimate report for AX-tank farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information gathered in AX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature data, sampling data, and drywell and liquid observation well data for Historical Tank Content Estimate Report of the NE Quadrant and the Hanford 200 East Areas

  4. Supporting document for the north east quadrant historical tank content estimate report for C-Tank Farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information gathered on C-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature data, sampling data, and drywell and liquid observation well data for Historical Tank Content Estimate Report of the NE Quadrant and the Hanford 200 East Areas

  5. Tank 4 Characterization, Settling, And Washing Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannochie, C.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.; Zamecnik, J.

    2009-01-01

    A sample of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 was characterized, and subsequently combined with a Tank 51 sample (Tank 51-E1) received following Al dissolution, but prior to a supernate decant by the Tank Farm, to perform a settling and washing study to support Sludge Batch 6 preparation. The sludge source for the majority of the Tank 51-E1 sample is Tank 12 HM sludge. The Tank 51-E1 sample was decanted by SRNL prior to use in the settling and washing study. The Tank 4 sample was analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals. The characterization of the Tank 51-E1 sample, used here in combination with the Tank 4 sample, was reported previously. SRNL analyses on Tank 4 were requested by Liquid Waste Engineering (LWE) via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLE-TTR-2009-103. The sample preparation work is governed by Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were controlled by an Analytical Study Plan and modifications received via customer communications. Additional scope included a request for a settling study of decanted Tank 51-E1 and a blend of decanted Tank 51-E1 and Tank 4, as well as a washing study to look into the fate of undissolved sulfur observed during the Tank 4 characterization. The chemistry of the Tank 4 sample was modeled with OLI Systems, Inc. StreamAnalyzer to determine the likelihood that sulfate could exist in this sample as insoluble Burkeite (2Na 2 SO 4 · Na 2 CO 3 ). The OLI model was also used to predict the composition of the blended tank materials for the washing study. The following conclusions were drawn from the Tank 4 analytical results reported here: (1) Any projected blend of Tank 4 and the current Tank 51 contents will produce a SB6 composition that is lower in Ca and U than the current SB5 composition being processed by DWPF. (2) Unwashed Tank 4 has a relatively large initial S concentration of 3.68 wt% on a total solids basis, and approximately 10% of the total S is present as an insoluble or undissolved form

  6. Screening for organic solvents in Hanford waste tanks using organic vapor concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Sklarew, D.S.

    1997-09-01

    The potential ignition of organic liquids stored in the Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks has been identified as a safety issue because expanding gases could potentially affect tank dome integrity. Organic liquid waste has been found in some of the waste tanks, but most are thought to contain only trace amounts. Due to the inhomogeneity of the waste, direct sampling of the tank waste to locate organic liquids may not conclusively demonstrate that a given tank is free of risk. However, organic vapors present above the organic liquid waste can be detected with a high degree of confidence and can be used to identify problem tanks. This report presents the results of a screening test that has been applied to 82 passively ventilated high-level radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford Site to identify those that might contain a significant amount of organic liquid waste. It includes seven tanks not addressed in the previous version of this report, Screening for Organic Solvents in Hanford Waste Tanks Using Total Non-Methane Organic Compound Vapor Concentrations. The screening test is based on a simple model of the tank headspace that estimates the effective surface area of semivolatile organic liquid waste in a tank. Analyses indicate that damage to the tank dome is credible only if the organic liquid burn rate is above a threshold value, and this can occur only if the surface area of organic liquid in a tank is above a corresponding threshold value of about one square meter. Thirteen tanks were identified as potentially containing at least that amount of semivolatile organic liquid based on conservative estimates. Most of the tanks identified as containing potentially significant quantities of organic liquid waste are in the 241-BY and 241-C tank farms, which agrees qualitatively with the fact that these tank farms received the majority of the PUREX process organic wash waste and waste organic liquids

  7. Feed tank transfer requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented

  8. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  9. Analysis of Organic Samples from the 5-H and 3-F Pump Tanks and Waste Tank 38H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swingle, R.F. II

    1999-01-01

    Analyses for organic materials in aqueous and surface floating samples taken from the 5-H Pump Tank and Waste Tank 38H and in vapor samples taken from the 5-H and 3-F Pump Tanks have been completed. The results indicate that the concentration of organic materials is extremely low in all samples. This report documents the development of sampling and analysis techniques for this sampling as well as the results of the analyses of vapor samples pulled from Pump Tanks 5-H and 3-F and liquid samples pulled from Waste Tank 38H and Pump Tank 5-H

  10. Cordyceps sinensis Oral Liquid Inhibits Damage Induced by Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ying-Xin; Liu, Yu-Xiang; Ruan, Ming-Hua; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Jia-Chun; Chu, Zhi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. It has been demonstrated to have a variety of biological activities, and an extract of it has been demonstrated to possess a protective effect in occlusion-induced focal cerebral ischemia of the middle cerebral artery in rats. It could be explored as an agent for treatment of ischemic stroke, and the mechanisms need to be studied further. The study intended to investigate the protective effects of the Cordyceps sinensis oral liquid (CSOL) against damage induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in SH-SY5Y cells. DESIGN • The research team designed an in vitro study. The study occurred at the Naval Medical Research Institute in Shanghai, China. SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to CSOL in doses of 0.01, 0.03, 0.10, 0.30, and 1.00 mg/mL, creating 5 intervention groups. The OGD condition was induced by transfer of the cells from high-glucose Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) in a box gassed with air containing 5% CO2 to glucose-free DMEM in a box gassed with 94% N2, 5% CO2, and 1% O2. Like the cells for the interventions groups, the cells for a model group were cultured with high-glucose DMEM and were transferred to the OGD, but they received no dose of COSL. Cells in a control group were cultured with high-glucose DMEM, were not transferred to the OGD condition, and did not receive any dose of COSL. Cell viability was assayed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. The apoptosis and the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were detected by flow cytometry, and the protein expression of caspase-3 was observed by western blot. After exposure to OGD, the cell viability of cells treated with 0.01, 0.03, 0.10, 0.30, and 1.00 mg/mL of CSOL increased in a dose-effect relationship. Compared with the cells in the model group, the treatment of CSOL at all the experimental concentrations significantly inhibited both the cell apoptosis

  11. Vandose Zone Characterization Project at the Hanford Tank Farms: SX Tank Farm Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodeur, J.R.; Koizumi, C.J.; Bertsch, J.F.

    1996-09-01

    The SX Tank Farm is located in the southwest portion of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This tank farm consists of 15 single-shell tanks (SSTs), each with an individual capacity of 1 million gallons (gal). These tanks currently store high-level nuclear waste that was primarily generated from what was called the oxidation-reduction or open-quotes REDOXclose quotes process at the S-Plant facility. Ten of the 15 tanks are listed in Hanlon as open-quotes assumed leakersclose quotes and are known to have leaked various amounts of high-level radioactive liquid to the vadose zone sediment. The current liquid content of each tank varies, but the liquid from known leaking tanks has been removed to the extent possible. In 1994, the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Office (DOE-RL) requested the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO), Grand Junction, Colorado, to perform a baseline characterization of contamination in the vadose zone at all the SST farms with spectral gamma-ray logging of boreholes surrounding the tanks. The SX Tank Farm geophysical logging was completed, and the results of this baseline characterization are presented in this report

  12. Evaluation of carbon fiber composites fabricated using ionic liquid based epoxies for cryogenic fluid applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.N. Grugel

    Full Text Available Utilizing tanks fabricated from fiber reinforced polymeric composites for storing cryogenic fluids such as liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen is of great interest to NASA as considerable weight savings can be gained. Unfortunately such composites, especially at cryogenic temperatures, develop a mismatch that initiates detrimental delamination and crack growth, which promotes leaking. On-going work with ionic liquid-based epoxies appears promising in mitigating these detrimental effects. Some recent results are presented and discussed. Keywords: Ionic liquid, Carbon fiber, Epoxy, COPV, Cryogenic fluids

  13. Simple test for physical stability of cryogenic tank insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossello, D.

    1968-01-01

    Qualitative test determines the ability of insulation liners used on liquid hydrogen tanks to withstand stresses produced by the thermal shocks imparted to the insulation during tank filling and drainage. Test specimens are bonded to metal plates with a low thermal expansion coefficient and are immersed in liquid hydrogen.

  14. X-33 LH2 Tank Failure Investigation Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeyer, Melinda

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the composite sandwich-honeycomb structure of the liquid hydrogen tank of the X-33 reusable launch vehicle, and describes why the the first pressure test to determine the tank's structural integrity failed. The presentation includes images of the tank before and after the failed test, including photomicrographs. It then reaches conclusions on the nature of the microcracks which caused the liquid hydrogen leakage.

  15. first tank of Linac 1

    CERN Multimedia

    This was the first tank of the linear accelerator Linac1, the injection system for the Proton Synchrotron, It ran for 34 years (1958 - 1992). Protons entered at the far end and were accelerated between the copper drift tubes by an oscillating electromagnetic field. The field flipped 200 million times a second (200 MHz) so the protons spent 5 nanoseconds crossing a drift tube and a gap. Moving down the tank, the tubes and gaps had to get longer as the protons gained speed. The tank accelerated protons from 500 KeV to 10 MeV. Linac1 was also used to accelerate deutrons and alpha particles for the Intersecting Storage Rings and oxygen and sulpher ions for the Super Proton Synchrotron heavy ion programme.

  16. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each person...

  17. Nonlinear Analysis of the Space Shuttle Super-Lightweight External Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Britt, Vicki O.; Collins, Timothy J.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The results of buckling and nonlinear analyses of the Space Shuttle External Tank super-lightweight liquid oxygen (LOX) tank are presented. Modeling details and results are presented for two prelaunch loading conditions and for two full-scale structural tests conducted on the original external tank. These results illustrate three distinctly different types of nonlinear responses for thin-walled shells subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads. These nonlinear response phenomena consist of bifurcation-type buckling, short-wavelength nonlinear bending, and nonlinear collapse associated with a limit point. For each case, the results show that accurate predictions of nonlinear behavior generally require a large scale high-fidelity finite element model. Results are also presented that show that a fluid filled launch vehicle shell can be highly sensitive to initial geometric imperfections. In addition, results presented for two full scale structural tests of the original standard weight external tank suggest that the finite element modeling approach used in the present study is sufficient for representing the nonlinear behavior of the super lightweight LOX tank.

  18. Solubility of Oxygen in Liquid Sodium and the Interpretation of Predictions for the Corrosion Rate of Stainless Steels in Liquid Sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claxton, K. T.

    1979-01-01

    A statistical analysis of all oxygen in sodium solubility data has been made. The results indicate a real difference. between levels of oxygen reported by UK und US workers. Analysis using sub-sets of culled data to derive a compromise solubility function are considered less than adequate. It is considered preferable and more realistic to distinguish data sub-sets by the analytical technique employed. The vacuum distillation method yields results differing amongst them selves by up to a factor of five at cold trap temperatures of relevance to fast reactor operation. The vanadium wire and electrochemical cell techniques give the lowest solubility values. (Author) 51 refs

  19. Corrosion behavior of austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi eutectic at 450circC and 550circC

    OpenAIRE

    倉田 有司; 二川 正敏; 斎藤 滋

    2005-01-01

    Static corrosion tests of various austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels were conducted in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi at 450circC and 550circC for 3000h to study the effects of temperature and alloying elements on corrosion behavior. Oxidation, grain boundary corrosion, dissolution and penetration were observed. The corrosion depth decreases at 450circC with increasing Cr content in steels regardless of ferritic/martensitic or austenitic steels. Appreciable dissolution of Ni and Cr doe...

  20. Dicationic ionic liquid mediated fabrication of Au@Pt nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxide with highly catalytic activity for oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ya-Cheng; Chen, Sai-Sai; Feng, Jiu-Ju; Lin, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Weiping; Wang, Ai-Jun

    2018-05-01

    Ionic liquids as templates or directing agents have attracted great attention for shaping-modulated synthesis of advanced nanomaterials. In this work, reduced graphene oxide supported uniform core-shell Au@Pt nanoparticles (Au@Pt NPs/rGO) were fabricated by a simple one-pot aqueous approach, using N-methylimidazolium-based dicationic ionic liquid (1,1-bis(3-methylimadazoilum-1-yl)butylene bromide, [C4(Mim)2]2Br) as the shape-directing agent. The morphology evolution, structural information and formation mechanism of Au@Pt NPs anchored on rGO were investigated by a series of characterization techniques. The obtained nanocomposites displayed superior electrocatalytic features toward hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst. This approach provides a novel route for facile synthesis of nanocatalysts in fuel cells.

  1. Screening the Hanford tanks for trapped gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, P.

    1995-10-01

    The Hanford Site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Hydrogen gas is generated within the waste in these tanks. This document presents the results of a screening of Hanford's nuclear waste storage tanks for the presence of gas trapped in the waste. The method used for the screening is to look for an inverse correlation between waste level measurements and ambient atmospheric pressure. If the waste level in a tank decreases with an increase in ambient atmospheric pressure, then the compressibility may be attributed to gas trapped within the waste. In this report, this methodology is not used to estimate the volume of gas trapped in the waste. The waste level measurements used in this study were made primarily to monitor the tanks for leaks and intrusions. Four measurement devices are widely used in these tanks. Three of these measure the level of the waste surface. The remaining device measures from within a well embedded in the waste, thereby monitoring the liquid level even if the liquid level is below a dry waste crust. In the past, a steady rise in waste level has been taken as an indicator of trapped gas. This indicator is not part of the screening calculation described in this report; however, a possible explanation for the rise is given by the mathematical relation between atmospheric pressure and waste level used to support the screening calculation. The screening was applied to data from each measurement device in each tank. If any of these data for a single tank indicated trapped gas, that tank was flagged by this screening process. A total of 58 of the 177 Hanford tanks were flagged as containing trapped gas, including 21 of the 25 tanks currently on the flammable gas watch list

  2. Out-of-tank evaporator demonstration: Tanks focus area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    Approximately 100 million gal of liquid waste is stored in underground storage tanks (UST)s at the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Savannah River Site (SRS), and Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). This waste is radioactive with a high salt content. The US Department of Energy (DOE) wants to minimize the volume of radioactive liquid waste in USTs by removing the excess water. This procedure conserves tank space; lowers the cost of storage; and reduces the volume of wastes subsequently requiring separation, immobilization, and disposal. The Out-of-Tank Evaporator Demonstration (OTED) was initiated to test a modular, skid-mounted evaporator. A mobile evaporator system manufactured by Delta Thermal Inc. was selected. The evaporator design was routinely used in commercial applications such as concentrating metal-plating wastes for recycle and concentrating ethylene glycol solutions. In FY 1995, the skid-mounted evaporator system was procured and installed in an existing ORNL facility (Building 7877) with temporary shielding and remote controls. The evaporator system was operational in January 1996. The system operated 24 h/day and processed 22,000 gal of Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernatant. The distillate contained essentially no salts or radionuclides. Upon completion of the demonstration, the evaporator underwent decontamination testing to illustrate the feasibility of hands-on maintenance and potential transport to another DOE facility. This report describes the process and the evaporator, its performance at ORNL, future plans, applications of this technology, cost estimates, regulatory and policy considerations, and lessons learned

  3. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew John; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Boschee, Jacob; Foygel, Michael Gregory

    2013-01-01

    A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It accounts for cryogenic propellant loading, storage, and unloading in the conditions of normal, increased, and micro- gravity. The model involves multiple horizontal control volumes in both liquid and ullage spaces. Temperature and velocity boundary layers at the tank walls are taken into account by using correlation relations. Heat exchange involving the tank wall is considered by means of the lumped-parameter method. By employing basic conservation laws, the model takes into consideration the major multi-phase mass and energy exchange processes involved, such as condensation-evaporation of the hydrogen, as well as flows of hydrogen liquid and vapor in the presence of pressurizing helium gas. The model involves a liquid hydrogen feed line and a tank ullage vent valve for pressure control. The temperature stratification effects are investigated, including in the presence of vent valve oscillations. A simulation of temperature stratification effects in a generic cryogenic tank has been implemented in Matlab and results are presented for various tank conditions.

  4. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  5. Tank 241-U-203: Tank Characterization Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayana, P.

    1995-01-01

    The revised Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order states that a tank characterization plan will be developed for each double-shell tank and single-shell tank using the data quality objective process. The plans are intended to allow users and regulators to ensure their needs will be met and resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-U-203 sampling activities

  6. History of waste tank 16, 1959 through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, T.L.; Tharin, D.W.; Jones, D.W.; Lohr, D.R.

    1977-07-01

    Tank 16 was placed in service as a receiver of fresh high heat waste (HW) on May 9, 1959, and was filled to capacity in May 1960. Approximately half the tank contents were transferred to tanks 14 and 15 during September and October 1960 because of leakage into the annulus. Use of tank 16 was resumed in October 1967 when authorization (TA 2-603) was obtained to receive LW, and the tank was filled to capacity by June 1968. Subsequently, supernate was removed from the tank, and a blend of fresh LW and evaporator bottoms was added. In March 1972, the supernate was transferred to tank 13 because leakage had resumed. The sludge was left in the tank bottom and the use of tank 16 for any additional waste storage was discontinued. In September 1960 liquid waste overflowed the annulus pan. Leakage essentially stopped after the tank liquid level was lowered below the middle horizontal weld. After exhaustive study, tank cracking and resultant leakage was concluded to have been caused by stress corrosion due to the action of NaOH or NaNO 3 on areas of high local stress in the steel plate such as welds. Samples of sludge, supernate, tank vapors, and leaked material in the annulus were analyzed, and tank temperature and radiation profiles were taken. Two disk samples were cut from the primary tank wall for metallurgical examination. Test coupons of various metals were exposed to tank 16 waste to aid new tank design and to study stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. In addition, samples of SRP bedrock were placed in tank 16 to study reactions between bedrock and HW. 18 figures, 2 tables

  7. History of waste tank 22, 1965--1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1979-04-01

    Tank 22 (a 1,300,000-gallon Type IV tank) was placed in service June 6, 1965, receiving HW from tank 21. The HW was transferred back into tank 21 in September 1965 and fed to the Building 242-H evaporator. This recycled concentrate and concentrate from other waste was then received in tank 22 until the tank was filled. The HW concentrate and salt remained in the tank until November 1971 when removal was begun. The concentrated supernate was transferred from the tank followed by dissolution and removal of salt from the tank walls and bottom. The salt removal was completed in May 1974 and since that time tank 22 has served as a receiver of LW from Building 221-H. Inspections of the tank interior were made using a 40-ft optical periscope and the steel thickness of the tank bottom was measured ultrasonically. Samples of the tank vapors and liquid collected in the sidewall and bottom sumps were analyzed. Temperature and specific gravity measurements were made of waste stored in the tank. Several equipment modifications and repairs were made

  8. Tank 241-BY-108 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQOs identity information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for tank BY-108 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given. Single-shell tank BY-108 is classified as a Ferrocyanide Watch List tank. The tank was declared an assumed leaker and removed from service in 1972; interim stabilized was completed in February 1985. Although not officially an Organic Watch List tank, restrictions have been placed on intrusive operations by Standing Order number-sign 94-16 (dated 09/08/94) since the tank is suspected to contain or to have contained a floating organic layer

  9. Screening for organic solvents in Hanford waste tanks using total non- methane organic compound vapor concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Glissmeyer, J.A.; Sklarew, D.S.

    1997-02-01

    The potential ignition of organic liquids stored in the Hanford high-level radioactive waste tanks is a safety issue because expanding gases could affect tank dome integrity. This report presents results of a screening test that was applied to 75 passively ventilated waste tanks at Hanford to determine those that might contain a significant amount of organic liquid waste. The screening test is based on a simple model of tank headspace, headspace organic vapor concentrations, and certain tank physical parameters. Analyses indicate that damage to the tank dome is credible only if the organic liquid burn rate is above a threshold value, and this can occur only if the surface area of organic liquid in a tank is above a corresponding threshold value of about one square meter. Twelve tanks were identified as potentially containing at least that amount of semivolatile organic liquid based on conservative estimates. Tank head space organic vapor concentrations and physical parameters required by the screening test have been compiled and are presented for each of the tanks studied. Estimates of the ventilation rates of the waste tanks were revised to reflect recent information obtained from hydrogen monitoring data. A simple analysis of the uncertainty in the test results suggests that the largest current uncertainty in the estimation of organic liquid surface area is that associated with knowledge of the tank ventilation rate. The uncertainty analysis is applied to determine 95% confidence limits for the estimated organic waste surface area in each tank

  10. Joint dissolution and oxidation behaviour of 316LN steel at 550 C. in liquid sodium containing low concentration of oxygen - 15417

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courouau, J.L.; Rivollier, M.; Lorentz, V.; Tabarant, M.

    2015-01-01

    The sodium cooled fast reactor is selected in France as the 4. generation of nuclear power plant. 4. generation's reactor vessel, primary loop structures and heat exchangers will be made of austenitic stainless steels (316LN). To assess reactor service life time, corrosion of austenitic stainless steel by liquid sodium is studied in normal operating conditions as well as in transient conditions either expected or not. Oxygen, one of the main impurities, but present in trace amounts (1 to 10 μg/g or ppm weight), plays a major role on corrosion phenomena of the steel, although not totally understood yet. Literature reports an increased dissolution rate of steel or even of pure iron with increasing oxygen content although no thermodynamically stable iron oxide exists at low oxygen content. Oxygen is only known to form sodium chromite scale (NaCrO 2 ), those behaviour is, however, little documented. Based on corrosion tests performed in the static sodium test device (CorroNa) at 550 C. degrees for an oxygen content initially of about 1 ppm in weight or lower, and about 5-10 ppm after 4600 h of test, either a really small dissolution rate or small sodium chromite scale formation (NaCrO 2 ) are observed. Dissolution and carburation are observed for specimen immersed since the beginning of the test, while oxidation is the main feature observed for the specimen immersed during the last periods of the test. Some aspects of the morphologies of this oxide scale obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) or transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as by Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GD-OES) are presented. Discussions and explanations of these apparently opposing results are given based on thermodynamic analysis, as well as their possible consequences for reactor operation. (authors)

  11. Determination of oxygen and nitrogen derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions of asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-12-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was used for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon derivatives, the oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, formed in asphalt fractions. Two different methods have been developed for the determination of five oxygenated and seven nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings and present mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all compounds. The detection limits of the methods ranged from 0.1 to 57.3 μg/L for nitrated and from 0.1 to 6.6 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The limits of quantification were in the range of 4.6-191 μg/L for nitrated and 0.3-8.9 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The methods were validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (National Institute of Standards and Technology SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations (two nitrated derivatives) agreed with the certified values. The methods were applied in the analysis of asphalt samples after their fractionation into asphaltenes and maltenes, according to American Society for Testing and Material D4124, where the maltenic fraction was further separated into its basic, acidic, and neutral parts following the method of Green. Only two nitrated derivatives were found in the asphalt sample, quinoline and 2-nitrofluorene, with concentrations of 9.26 and 2146 mg/kg, respectively, whereas no oxygenated derivatives were detected. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Tank 10H Saltcake Core Sample Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARTINO, CHRISTOPHERJ

    2004-01-01

    In support of Low-Curie Salt (LCS) process validation at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Liquid Waste Disposition (LWD) has undertaken a program of tank characterization, including salt sampling. As part of this initiative, they sampled the surface and subsurface of Tank 10H saltcake using a series of three 12-inch long sample tubes. These tubes each contain 1-foot long segments of the saltcake from one location, representing the top three feet of saltcake. The primary objective of the characterization that will be useful to the selection and processing of the next waste tanks. Most important is the determination of the Cs-137 concentration and liquid retention properties of Tank 10H saltcake to confirm acceptability of processing. Additional chemical analyses are performed to provide information on salt elemental, ionic, and radiological composition to aid in assessment of the suitability of processing drained and dissolved material and in refining the information in the waste characterization system (WCS)

  13. Toxic chemical considerations for tank farm releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Keuren, J.C.; Davis, J.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This topical report contains technical information used to determine the accident consequences of releases of toxic chemical and gases for the Tank Farm Final Safety Analysis report (FSAR).It does not provide results for specific accident scenarios but does provide information for use in those calculations including chemicals to be considered, chemical concentrations, chemical limits and a method of summing the fractional contributions of each chemical. Tank farm composites evaluated were liquids and solids for double shell tanks, single shell tanks, all solids,all liquids, headspace gases, and 241-C-106 solids. Emergency response planning guidelines (ERPGs) were used as the limits.Where ERPGs were not available for the chemicals of interest, surrogate ERPGs were developed. Revision 2 includes updated sample data, an executive summary, and some editorial revisions.

  14. Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    EM's Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form

  15. Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

  16. Hanford Site Tank 241-SY-101, damaged equipment removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titzler, P.A.; Legare, D.E.; Barrus, H.G.

    1993-11-01

    Hanford Site Tank 241-SY-101 has a history of generating hydrogen-nitrous oxide gases. The gases are generated and trapped in the non-convective waste layer near the bottom of the 23-m- (75-ft-) diameter underground tank. Approximately every three months the pressure in the tank is relieved as the trapped gases are released through or around the surface crust into the tank dome. This process moves large amounts of liquid waste and crust material around in the tank. The moving waste displaced air lances and thermocouple assemblies (2-in. schedule-40 pipe) installed in four tank risers and permanently bent them to a maximum angle of 40 degrees. The bends were so severe that assemblies could not be removed from the tank using the originally designed hardware. Just after the tank releases the trapped gas, a 20-to-30-day work ''window'' opens

  17. Liquid oxygen LOX compatibility evaluations of aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloys: Investigation of the Alcoa 2090 and MMC weldalite 049 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of liquid oxygen (LOX) compatibility of aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloys is investigated. Alloy systems of Alcoa 2090, vintages 1 to 3, and of Martin Marietta Corporation (MMC) Weldalite 049 were evaluated for their behavior related to the LOX compatibility employing liquid oxygen impact test conditions under ambient pressures and up to 1000 psi. The developments of these aluminum lithium alloys are of critical and significant interest because of their lower densities and higher specific strengths and improved mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures. Of the different LOX impact tests carried out at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), it is seen that in certain test conditions at higher pressures, not all Al-Li alloys are LOX compatible. In case of any reactivity, it appears that lithium makes the material more sensitive at grain boundaries due to microstructural inhomogeneities and associated precipitate free zones (PFZ). The objectives were to identify and rationalize the microstructural mechanisms that could be relaxed to LOX compatibility behavior of the alloy system in consideration. The LOX compatibility behavior of Al-Li 2090 and Weldalite 049 is analyzed in detail using microstructural characterization techniques with light optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis, and surface studies using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), electron spectroscopy in chemical analysis (ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Differences in the behavior of these aluminum lithium alloys are assessed and related to their chemistry, heat treatment conditions, and microstructural effects.

  18. Determining the effect of solid and liquid vectors on the gaseous interfacial area and oxygen transfer rates in two-phase partitioning bioreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quijano, Guillermo; Rocha-Rios, Jose; Hernandez, Maria; Villaverde, Santiago; Revah, Sergio; Munoz, Raul; Thalasso, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    The effect of liquid and solid transfer vectors (silicone oil and Desmopan, respectively) on the gaseous interfacial area (a g ) was evaluated in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) using fresh mineral salt medium and the cultivation broth of a toluene degradation culture (Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E cultures continuously cultivated with and without silicone oil at low toluene loading rates). Higher values of a g were recorded in the presence of both silicone oil and Desmopan compared to the values obtained in the absence of a vector, regardless of the aqueous medium tested (1.6 and 3 times higher, respectively, using fresh mineral salt medium). These improvements in a g were well correlated to the oxygen mass transfer enhancements supported by the vectors (1.3 and 2.5 for liquid and solid vectors, respectively, using fresh medium). In this context, oxygen transfer rates of 2.5 g O 2 L -1 h -1 and 1.3 g O 2 L -1 h -1 were recorded in the presence of Desmopan and silicone oil, respectively, which are in agreement with previously reported values in literature. These results suggest that mass transfer enhancements in TPPBs might correspond to an increase in a g rather than to the establishment of a high-performance gas/vector/water transfer pathway.

  19. Degradation modes of austenitic and ferritic–martensitic stainless steels in He–CO–CO2 and liquid sodium environments of equivalent oxygen and carbon chemical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulsoy, G.; Was, G.S.; Pawel, S.J.; Busby, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to explore possible thermodynamic correlations between the degradation modes of austenitic and ferritic–martensitic alloys observed in high temperature He–CO–CO 2 environments with oxygen and carbon chemical potentials equivalent to that in a liquid sodium environment containing 2–5 molppm oxygen and 0.02–0.2 molppm carbon at temperatures 500–700 °C. Two He–CO–CO 2 environments (Pco/Pco 2 = 1320, Pco = 1980 molppm, and Pco/Pco 2 = 9, Pco = 13.5 molppm) were selected to test alloys NF616 and 316L at 700 and 850 °C. Upon exposure to He environments at 850 °C, 316L samples exhibited thick surface Cr 2 O 3 scales and substantial internal oxidation; however at 700 °C no significant internal oxidation was observed. NF616 samples exhibited relatively thinner surface Cr 2 O 3 scales compared to 316L samples at both temperatures. NF616 samples exposed to liquid sodium at 700 °C and He–Pco/Pco 2 = 9 at 850 °C showed decarburization. No surface oxide formation was observed on the sample exposed to the Na environment. Results obtained from He exposure experiments provide insight into what may occur during long exposure times in a sodium environment

  20. Determining the effect of solid and liquid vectors on the gaseous interfacial area and oxygen transfer rates in two-phase partitioning bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quijano, Guillermo [Departmento de Ingenieria Quimica y Tecnologia del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Prado de la Magdalena, s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Departamento de Biotecnologia y Bioingenieria, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios, Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav), Apdo. Postal 14-740, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rocha-Rios, Jose [Departmento de Ingenieria Quimica y Tecnologia del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Prado de la Magdalena, s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica (IPH), Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Hernandez, Maria; Villaverde, Santiago [Departmento de Ingenieria Quimica y Tecnologia del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Prado de la Magdalena, s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Revah, Sergio [Departamento de Procesos y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, c/o IPH, UAM-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Munoz, Raul, E-mail: mutora@iq.uva.es [Departmento de Ingenieria Quimica y Tecnologia del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Prado de la Magdalena, s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Thalasso, Frederic [Departamento de Biotecnologia y Bioingenieria, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios, Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav), Apdo. Postal 14-740, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-03-15

    The effect of liquid and solid transfer vectors (silicone oil and Desmopan, respectively) on the gaseous interfacial area (a{sub g}) was evaluated in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) using fresh mineral salt medium and the cultivation broth of a toluene degradation culture (Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E cultures continuously cultivated with and without silicone oil at low toluene loading rates). Higher values of a{sub g} were recorded in the presence of both silicone oil and Desmopan compared to the values obtained in the absence of a vector, regardless of the aqueous medium tested (1.6 and 3 times higher, respectively, using fresh mineral salt medium). These improvements in a{sub g} were well correlated to the oxygen mass transfer enhancements supported by the vectors (1.3 and 2.5 for liquid and solid vectors, respectively, using fresh medium). In this context, oxygen transfer rates of 2.5 g O{sub 2} L{sup -1} h{sup -1} and 1.3 g O{sub 2} L{sup -1} h{sup -1} were recorded in the presence of Desmopan and silicone oil, respectively, which are in agreement with previously reported values in literature. These results suggest that mass transfer enhancements in TPPBs might correspond to an increase in a{sub g} rather than to the establishment of a high-performance gas/vector/water transfer pathway.

  1. Degradation modes of austenitic and ferritic–martensitic stainless steels in He–CO–CO{sub 2} and liquid sodium environments of equivalent oxygen and carbon chemical potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulsoy, G., E-mail: gulsoy@umich.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Was, G.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Pawel, S.J.; Busby, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The objective of this work is to explore possible thermodynamic correlations between the degradation modes of austenitic and ferritic–martensitic alloys observed in high temperature He–CO–CO{sub 2} environments with oxygen and carbon chemical potentials equivalent to that in a liquid sodium environment containing 2–5 molppm oxygen and 0.02–0.2 molppm carbon at temperatures 500–700 °C. Two He–CO–CO{sub 2} environments (Pco/Pco{sub 2} = 1320, Pco = 1980 molppm, and Pco/Pco{sub 2} = 9, Pco = 13.5 molppm) were selected to test alloys NF616 and 316L at 700 and 850 °C. Upon exposure to He environments at 850 °C, 316L samples exhibited thick surface Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales and substantial internal oxidation; however at 700 °C no significant internal oxidation was observed. NF616 samples exhibited relatively thinner surface Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales compared to 316L samples at both temperatures. NF616 samples exposed to liquid sodium at 700 °C and He–Pco/Pco{sub 2} = 9 at 850 °C showed decarburization. No surface oxide formation was observed on the sample exposed to the Na environment. Results obtained from He exposure experiments provide insight into what may occur during long exposure times in a sodium environment.

  2. 49 CFR 172.330 - Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.330..., TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.330 Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a... material— (1) In a tank car unless the following conditions are met: (i) The tank car must be marked on...

  3. Tank 241-BY-111 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQO's identify information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for Tank BY-111 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given

  4. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft 3 of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms

  5. Tank vent processing system having a corrosion preventive device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Shoichi; Sato, Hirofumi

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent corrosion of a tank vent processing device by injecting an oxygen gas. Constitution: Oxygen gas and phosphorous at high temperature are poured into a tank vent processing device and amorphous oxide layers optimum to the prevention of external corrosion are formed to the inner surface of the device. Since the corrosion preventive device using the oxygen gas injection can be constituted as a relatively simple device, it is more economical than constituting a relatively large tank vent processing device with corrosion resistant stainless steels. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Mathematical Modeling of the Thermal Shell State of the Cylindrical Cryogenic Tank During Filling and Emptying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid hydrogen and oxygen are used as the oxidizer and fuel for liquid rocket engines. Liquefied natural gas, which is based on methane, is seen as a promising motor fuel for internal combustion engines. One of the technical problems arising from the use of said cryogenic liquid is to provide containers for storage, transport and use in the propulsion system. In the design and operation of such vessels it is necessary to have reliable information about their temperature condition, on which depend the loss of cryogenic fluids due to evaporation and the stress-strain state of the structural elements of the containers.Uneven temperature distribution along the generatrix of the cylindrical thin-walled shell of rocket cryogenic tanks, in a localized zone of cryogenic liquid level leads to a curvature of the shell and reduce the permissible axle load in a hazard shell buckling in the preparation for the start of the missile in flight with an increasing acceleration. Moving the level of the cryogenic liquid during filling or emptying the tank at a certain combination of parameters results in an increase of the local temperature distribution nonuniformity.Along with experimental study of the shell temperature state of the cryogenic container, methods of mathematical modeling allow to have information needed for designing and testing the construction of cryogenic tanks. In this study a mathematical model is built taking into account features of heat transfer in a cryogenic container, including the boiling cryogenic liquid in the inner surface of the container. This mathematical model describes the temperature state of the thin-walled shell of cylindrical cryogenic tank during filling and emptying. The work also presents a quantitative analysis of this model in case of fixed liquid level, its movement at a constant speed, and harmonic oscillations relative to a middle position. The quantitative analysis of this model has allowed to find the limit options

  7. Acoustic imaging of underground storage tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mech, S.J.

    1995-09-01

    Acoustics is a potential tool to determine the properties of high level wastes stored in Underground Storage Tanks. Some acoustic properties were successfully measured by a limited demonstration conducted in 114-TX. This accomplishment provides the basis for expanded efforts to qualify techniques which depend on the acoustic properties of tank wastes. This work is being sponsored by the Department of Energy under the Office of Science and Technology. In FY-1994, limited Tank Waste Remediation Systems EM-30 support was available at Hanford and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Earth Resources Laboratory (ERL) were engaged for analysis support, and Elohi Geophysics, Inc. for seismic testing services. Westinghouse-Hanford Company provided the testing and training, supplied the special engineering and safety analysis equipment and procedures, and provided the trained operators for the actual tank operations. On 11/9/94, limited in-tank tests were successfully conducted in tank 114-TX. This stabilized Single Shell Tank was reported as containing 16.8 feet of waste, the lower 6.28 feet of which contained interstitial liquid. Testing was conducted over the lower 12 feet, between two Liquid Observation Wells thirty feet apart. The ''quick-look'' data was reviewed on-site by MIT and Elohi

  8. Liquid Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qutaiba A. Tawfic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammals have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases, as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen, as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of theoretical advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. The potential for multiple clinical applications for liquid-assisted ventilation will be clarified and optimized in future. Keywords: Liquid ventilation; perfluorochemicals; perfluorocarbon; respiratory distress; surfactant.

  9. The modified swirl sedimentation tanks for water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochowiak, Marek; Matuszak, Magdalena; Włodarczak, Sylwia; Ancukiewicz, Małgorzata; Krupińska, Andżelika

    2017-03-15

    This paper discusses design, evaluation, and application for the use of swirl/vortex technologies as liquid purification system. A study was performed using modified swirl sedimentation tanks. The vortex separators (OW, OWK, OWR and OWKR) have been studied under laboratory conditions at liquid flow rate from 2.8⋅10 -5 to 5.1⋅10 -4 [m 3 /s]. The pressure drop and the efficiency of purification of liquid stream were analyzed. The suspended particles of different diameters were successfully removed from liquid with the application of swirl chambers of proposed constructions. It was found that damming of liquid in the tank increases alongside liquid stream at the inlet and depends on the tank construction. The efficiency of the sedimentation tanks increases alongside the diameters of solid particles and decrease in the liquid flow rate. The best construction proved to be the OWR sedimentation tank due to smallest liquid damming, even at high flow rates, and the highest efficiency of the purification liquid stream for solid particles of the smallest diameter. The proposed solution is an alternative to the classical constructions of sedimentation tanks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hanford Tank Cleanup Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berriochoa, M.V.

    2011-01-01

    Access to Hanford's single-shell radioactive waste storage tank C-107 was significantly improved when workers completed the cut of a 55-inch diameter hole in the top of the tank. The core and its associated cutting equipment were removed from the tank and encased in a plastic sleeve to prevent any potential spread of contamination. The larger tank opening allows use of a new more efficient robotic arm to complete tank retrieval.

  11. Tank 241-C-103 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify the sampling analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. A Tank Characterization Plant (TCP) will be developed for each double shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process. There are four Watch list tank classifications (ferrocyanide, organic salts, hydrogen/flammable gas, and high heat load). These classifications cover the six safety issues related to public and worker health that have been associated with the Hanford Site underground storage tanks. These safety issues are as follows: ferrocyanide, flammable gas, organic, criticality, high heat, and vapor safety issues. Tank C-103 is one of the twenty tanks currently on the Organic Salts Watch List. This TCP will identify characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, hot cell sample isolation, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements in accordance with the appropriate DQO documents. In addition, the current contents and status of the tank are projected from historical information. The relevant safety issues that are of concern for tanks on the Organic Salts Watch List are: the potential for an exothermic reaction occurring from the flammable mixture of organic materials and nitrate/nitrite salts that could result in a release of radioactive material and the possibility that other safety issues may exist for the tank

  12. Tank 241-AW-101 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayana, P.

    1994-01-01

    The first section gives a summary of the available information for Tank AW-101. Included in the discussion are the process history and recent sampling events for the tank, as well as general information about the tank such as its age and the risers to be used for sampling. Tank 241-AW-101 is one of the 25 tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List. To resolve the Flammable Gas safety issue, characterization of the tanks, including intrusive tank sampling, must be performed. Prior to sampling, however, the potential for the following scenarios must be evaluated: the potential for ignition of flammable gases such as hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen-nitrous oxide; and the potential for secondary ignition of organic-nitrate/nitrate mixtures in crust layer initiated by the burning of flammable gases or by a mechanical in-tank energy source. The characterization effort applicable to this Tank Characterization Plan is focused on the resolution of the crust burn flammable gas safety issue of Tank AW-101. To evaluate the potential for a crust burn of the waste material, calorimetry tests will be performed on the waste. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) will be used to determine whether an exothermic reaction exists

  13. Seismic response of flexible cylindrical tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, T A; Boley, B A [comps.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study of the seismic behavior of thin shell circular cylindrical liquid storage tanks is described. The investigation was planned to evaluate the adequacy of present methods of tank design, and was conducted using the Earthquake Simulator Facility of the University of California, Berkeley. The model tank considered in this paper was 6 ft high by 12 ft in diameter, and was welded from thin sheet aluminum to simulate a steel tank 36 feet in diameter. During testing the tank had an open top, held 60 inches of water, and was subjected to a time scaled El Centro (1940) earthquake, amplified to a peak acceleration of 0.5 g. Both base free and base fixed conditions were studied. Results of the experiments demonstrate that fluid pressures included both impulsive and convective components, and that the wave sloshing followed basic theory quite closely. But it also was apparent that the tank flexibility influenced the hydrodynamic pressures, as indicated by pressure amplification in the clamped tank, and by a total change of pressure history in the unclamped case. Significant out of round distortions of the tank were developed, of a three lobe form or the free base case and with four lobes in the fixed base case. Uplift of the tank base was closely related to the out-of-round deformation of the unanchored tank, whereas initial eccentricities apparently caused the section distortions in the anchored system. Stresses in the tank wall do not follow the expected pattern of response to overturning moment; instead they seem to be mainly associated with the section distortions. At present there is no analytical procedure for predicting these distortions .

  14. Tanks Focus Area annual report FY2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation effort with tanks containing hazardous and radioactive waste resulting from the production of nuclear materials. With some 90 million gallons of waste in the form of solid, sludge, liquid, and gas stored in 287 tanks across the DOE complex, containing approximately 650 million curies, radioactive waste storage tank remediation is the nation's highest cleanup priority. Differing waste types and unique technical issues require specialized science and technology to achieve tank cleanup in an environmentally acceptable manner. Some of the waste has been stored for over 50 years in tanks that have exceeded their design lives. The challenge is to characterize and maintain these contents in a safe condition and continue to remediate and close each tank to minimize the risks of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. In 1994, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) created a group of integrated, multiorganizational teams focusing on specific areas of the EM cleanup mission. These teams have evolved into five focus areas managed within EM's Office of Science and Technology (OST): Tanks Focus Area (TFA); Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area; Nuclear Materials Focus Area; Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area; and Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area

  15. Tanks Focus Area annual report FY2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation effort with tanks containing hazardous and radioactive waste resulting from the production of nuclear materials. With some 90 million gallons of waste in the form of solid, sludge, liquid, and gas stored in 287 tanks across the DOE complex, containing approximately 650 million curies, radioactive waste storage tank remediation is the nation's highest cleanup priority. Differing waste types and unique technical issues require specialized science and technology to achieve tank cleanup in an environmentally acceptable manner. Some of the waste has been stored for over 50 years in tanks that have exceeded their design lives. The challenge is to characterize and maintain these contents in a safe condition and continue to remediate and close each tank to minimize the risks of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. In 1994, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) created a group of integrated, multiorganizational teams focusing on specific areas of the EM cleanup mission. These teams have evolved into five focus areas managed within EM's Office of Science and Technology (OST): Tanks Focus Area (TFA); Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area; Nuclear Materials Focus Area; Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area; and Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area.

  16. Tank characterization report for single-shell Tank 241-B-110

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, L.C.; De Lorenzo, D.S.; DiCenso, A.T.; Rutherford, J.H.; Stephens, R.H.; Heasler, P.G.; Brown, T.M.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-08-01

    Single-shell Tank 241-B-110 is an underground storage tank containing radioactive waste. The tank was sampled at various times between August and November of 1989 and later in April of 1990. The analytical data gathered from these sampling efforts were used to generate this Tank Characterization Report. Tank 241-B-110, located in the 200 East Area B Tank Farm, was constructed in 1943 and 1944, and went into service in 1945 by receiving second cycle decontamination waste from the B and T Plants. During the service life of the tank, other wastes were added including B Plant flush waste, B Plant fission product waste, B Plant ion exchange waste, PUREX Plant coating waste, and waste from Tank 241-B-105. The tank currently contains 246,000 gallons of non-complexed waste, existing primarily as sludge. Approximately 22,000 gallons of drainable interstitial liquid and 1,000 gallons of supernate remain. The solid phase of the waste is heterogeneous, for the top layer and subsequent layers have significantly different chemical compositions and are visually distinct. A complete analysis of the top layer has not been done, and auger sampling of the top layer is recommended to fully characterize the waste in Tank 241-B-110. The tank is not classified as a Watch List tank; however, it is a Confirmed Leaker, having lost nearly 10,000 gallons of waste. The waste in Tank 241-B-110 is primarily precipitated salts, some of which are composed of radioactive isotopes. The most prevalent analytes include water, bismuth, iron, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, silicon, sodium, and sulfate. The major radionuclide constituents are 137 Cs and 90 Sr

  17. Non-invasive Transdermal Two-dimensional Mapping of Cutaneous Oxygenation with Rapid-drying Liquid Bandage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    azatetrabenzoporphyrins-new red laser diode -compatible indicators for optical oxygen sensing,” ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2(2), 366–374 (2010). 17. C. S...Detachment, U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research, 3698 Chambers Pass, Suite B, JBSA –Fort Sam Houston, Texas 78234-7767, USA 4Harvard University...NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) United States Army Institute of Surgical Research, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, TX 8

  18. Combustion Dynamics and Stability Modeling of a Liquid Oxygen/RP-2 Oxygen-Rich Staged Combustion Preburner and Thrust Chamber Assembly with Gas-Centered Swirl Coaxial Injector Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiano, M. J.; Kenny, R. J.; Protz, C. S.; Garcia, C. P.; Simpson, S. P.; Elmore, J. L.; Fischbach, S. R.; Giacomoni, C. B.; Hulka, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Combustion Stability Tool Development (CSTD) project, funded by the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center, began in March 2015 supporting a renewed interest in the development of a liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon, oxygen-rich combustion engine. The project encompasses the design, assembly, and hot-fire testing of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center 40-klbf Integrated Test Rig (MITR). The test rig models a staged-combustion configuration by combining an oxygen-rich preburner (ORPB), to generate hot gas, with a thrust chamber assembly (TCA) using gas-centered swirl coaxial injector elements. There are five separately designed interchangeable injectors in the TCA that each contain 19- or 27- injector elements. A companion paper in this JANNAF conference describes the design characteristics, rationale, and fabrication issues for all the injectors. The data acquired from a heavily instrumented rig encompasses several injectors, several operating points, and stability bomb tests. Another companion paper in this JANNAF conference describes this test program in detail. In this paper, dynamic data from the hot-fire testing is characterized and used to identify the responses in the ORPB and TCA. A brief review of damping metrics are discussed and applied as a measure of stability margin for damped acoustic modes. Chug and longitudinal combustion stability models and predictions are described which includes new dynamic models for compressible flow through an orifice and a modification to incorporate a third feed line for inclusion of the fuel-film coolant. Flow-acoustics finite element modeling is used to investigate the anticipated TCA acoustics, the effects of injector element length on stability margin, and the potential use of an ORPB orifice trip ring for improving longitudinal stability margin.

  19. Tank Closure Progress at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Tank Farm Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, St.W.; Shaw, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    Significant progress continued at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with the completion of the closure process to empty, clean and close radioactive liquid waste storage tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility (TFF). The TFF includes eleven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) underground stainless steel storage tanks and four smaller, 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) stainless steel tanks, along with tank vaults, interconnecting piping, and ancillary equipment. The TFF tanks had historically been used to store a variety of radioactive liquid waste, including wastes associated with past spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Four of the large storage tanks remain in use for waste storage while the other seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks and the four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks have been emptied of waste, cleaned and filled with grout. Recent issuance of an Amended Record of Decision (ROD) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, and a Waste Determination complying with Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, allowed commencement of grouting activities on the cleaned tanks. The first three 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks were grouted in the Fall of 2006 and the fourth tank and the seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks were filled with grout in 2007 to provide long-term stability. During 2008 over seven miles of underground process piping along with associated tank valve boxes and secondary containment systems was stabilized with grout. Lessons learned were compiled and implemented during the closure process and will be utilized on the remaining four 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) underground stainless steel storage tanks. Significant progress has been made to clean and close emptied tanks at the INTEC TFF. Between 2002 and 2005, seven of the eleven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks and all four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks were cleaned and prepared

  20. Nuclear fuel technology - Tank calibration and volume determination for nuclear materials accountancy - Part 2: Data standardization for tank calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of the volume and height of liquid in a process accountancy tank are often made in order to estimate or verify the tank's calibration or volume measurement equation. The calibration equation relates the response of the tank's measurement system to some independent measure of tank volume. The ultimate purpose of the calibration exercise is to estimate the tank's volume measurement equation (the inverse of the calibration equation), which relates tank volume to measurement system response. In this part of ISO 18213, it is assumed that the primary measurement-system response variable is liquid height and that the primary measure of liquid content is volume. This part of ISO 18213 presents procedures for standardizing a set of calibration data to a fixed set of reference conditions so as to minimize the effect of variations in ambient conditions that occur during the measurement process. The procedures presented herein apply generally to measurements of liquid height and volume obtained for the purpose of calibrating a tank (i.e. calibrating a tank's measurement system). When used in connection with other parts of ISO 18213, these procedures apply specifically to tanks equipped with bubbler probe systems for measuring liquid content. The standardization algorithms presented herein can be profitably applied when only estimates of ambient conditions, such as temperature, are available. However, the most reliable results are obtained when relevant ambient conditions are measured for each measurement of volume and liquid height in a set of calibration data. Information is provided on scope, physical principles, data required, calibration data, dimensional changes in the tank, multiple calibration runs and results on standardized calibration data. Four annexes inform about density of water, buoyancy corrections for mass determination, determination of tank heel volume and statistical method for aligning data from several calibration runs. A bibliography is

  1. Liquid metal level measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, J.C.; Leyland, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    A liquid metal level indicator is described which can be used to measure, in a stainless steel tank, the level of a nuclear reactor coolant such as sodium. The instrument, which is based on the eddy current induction effect, gives readings over substantially the full depth of the tank and indicates the sense of change of level. (U.K.)

  2. Performances in Tank Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanel-Viorel Panaitescu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There are several operations which must do to maximize the performance of tank cleaning. The new advanced technologies in tank cleaning have raised the standards in marine areas. There are many ways to realise optimal cleaning efficiency for different tanks. The evaluation of tank cleaning options means to start with audit of operations: how many tanks require cleaning, are there obstructions in tanks (e.g. agitators, mixers, what residue needs to be removed, are cleaning agents required or is water sufficient, what methods can used for tank cleaning. After these steps, must be verify the results and ensure that the best cleaning values can be achieved in terms of accuracy and reliability. Technology advancements have made it easier to remove stubborn residues, shorten cleaning cycle times and achieve higher levels of automation. In this paper are presented the performances in tank cleaning in accordance with legislation in force. If tank cleaning technologies are effective, then operating costs are minimal.

  3. HANFORD TANK CLEANUP UPDATE MAY 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, J.N.

    2009-01-01

    Retrieval of waste from single-shell tank C-110 resumed in January making it the first waste retrieval operation for WRPS since taking over Hanford's Tank Operations Contract last October. Now, with approximately 90 percent of the waste removed, WRPS believes that modified sluicing has reached the limits of the technology to remove any further waste and is preparing documentation for use in decision making about any future retrieval actions. Tank C-110 is located in C Fann near the center of the Hanford Site. It is a 530,000 gallon tank, built in 1946, and held approximately 126,000 gallons of sludge and other radioactive and chemical waste materials when retrieval resumed. Modified sluicing technology uses liquid waste from a nearby double-shell tank to break up, dissolve and mobilize the solid material so it can be pumped. Because of the variety of waste fon11S, sluicing is often not able to remove all of the waste. The remaining waste will next be sampled for analysis, and results will be used to guide decisions regarding future actions. Work is moving rapidly in preparation to retrieve waste from a second single-shell tank this summer and transfer it to safer double-shell tank storage. Construction activities necessary to retrieve waste from Tank C-104, a 530,000 gallon tank built in 1943, are approximately 60 percent complete as WRPS maintains its focus on reducing the risk posed by Hanford's aging single-shell waste tanks. C-104 is one of Hanford's oldest radioactive and chemical waste storage tanks, containing approximately 263,000 gallons of wet sludge with a top layer that is dry and powdery. This will be the largest sludge volume retrieval ever attempted using modified sluicing technology. Modified sluicing uses high pressure water or liquid radioactive waste sprayed from nozzles above the waste. The liquid dissolves and/or mobilizes the waste so it can be pumped. In addition to other challenges, tank C-104 contains a significant amount of plutonium and

  4. Tank 244A tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Double-Shell Tank (DST) System currently receives waste from the Single-Shell Tank (SST) System in support of SST stabilization efforts or from other on-site facilities which generate or store waste. Waste is also transferred between individual DSTs. The mixing or commingling of potentially incompatible waste types at the Hanford Site must be addressed prior to any waste transfers into the DSTs. The primary goal of the Waste Compatibility Program is to prevent the formation of an Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) as a result of improper waste management. Tank 244A is a Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) which serves as any overflow tank for the East Area Farms. Waste material is able to flow freely between the underground storage tanks and tank 244A. Therefore, it is necessary to test the waste in tank 244A for compatibility purposes. Two issues related to the overall problem of waste compatibility must be evaluated: Assurance of continued operability during waste transfer and waste concentration and Assurance that safety problems are not created as a result of commingling wastes under interim storage. The results of the grab sampling activity prescribed by this Tank Characterization Plan shall help determine the potential for four kinds of safety problems: criticality, flammable gas accumulation, energetics, and corrosion and leakage

  5. Contribution to the study of hydrogenated and oxygenated impurities in liquid sodium; Contribution a l'etude des impuretees hydrogenees et oxygenees dans le sodium liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naud, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-15

    This study is made up essentially of two parts. The first is devoted to the development of dosage methods for selectively determining the oxygenated and hydrogenated impurities present in sodium, that is the oxide, the hydride and the hydroxide. The second makes use of these methods for a study of the Na-H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} system, as well as of the related problem of the attack of pyrex glass by molten sodium. The conventional method for dosing oxygen by amalgamation was first adapted to the simultaneous measurement of the hydride. We then developed a method for dosing the total hydrogen by measuring successively the concentrations of gas present in the hydride and hydroxide form. This method is based on the thermal decomposition of the hydride and the reaction between sodium and the hydroxide. Our contribution to the study of the Na-H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} System consists first of all in the study of the reaction between hydrogen and sodium in the temperature range from 150 to 250 deg C and at a pressure of about 150 mm of mercury. The study of the thermal decomposition of the hydride in sodium was then studied. It was possible to make some qualitative observations concerning the reaction between sodium and sodium hydroxide. Finally some complementary tests made it possible to define the nature of the phenomena occurring during the attack of pyrex glass by sodium. (author) [French] Cette etude comporte essentiellement deux parties. La premiere est consacree a la mise au point de methodes de dosages permettant de determiner selectivement les impuretes oxygenees et hydrogenees presentes dans le sodium, a savoir l'oxyde, l'hydrure et l'hydroxyde. La seconde met a profit ces methodes en vue de l'etude du systeme Na-H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}. ainsi que du phenomene connexe d'attaque du verre pyrex par le sodium fondu. La methode classique de dosage de l'oxygene par amalgamation a d'abord ete adaptee au dosage simultane de l'hydrure. Nous avons ensuite mis au point le dosage de l

  6. Theoretical comparison between solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank solar combisystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Furbo, Simon; Bales, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical investigations have shown that solar combisystems based on bikini tanks for low energy houses perform better than solar domestic hot water systems based on mantle tanks. Tank-in-tank solar combisystems are also attractive from a thermal performance point of view. In this paper......, theoretical comparisons between solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank solar combisystems are presented....

  7. Spectroscopic studies of ozone in cryosolutions: FT-IR spectra of 16O3 in liquid nitrogen, oxygen, argon and krypton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanin, Kirill M.; Bulanin, Michael O.; Rudakova, Aida V.; Kolomijtsova, Tatiana D.; Shchepkin, Dmitrij N.

    2018-03-01

    We have measured and interpreted the IR spectra of ozone dissolved in liquid nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and krypton in the 650-4700 cm-1 spectral region at 79-117 K. Frequency shifts, band intensities and bandshapes of 22 spectral features of soluted ozone were analyzed. The bands of the A1 symmetry have a complex contour and possess an excess intensity with respect to the value of the purely vibrational transition moment. It was found that this effect is related to the manifestation of the Coriolis interaction. The bandshape distortion manifests itself as an additional intensity from the side of the B1 symmetry band being an intensity source in the case of the Coriolis interaction.

  8. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonowski, H.; Hammer, M. U.; Reuter, S. [Center for Innovation Competence plasmatis, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, INP Greifswald e.V. Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Bussiahn, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. von [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, INP Greifswald e.V. Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100–400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10–200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH{sub 2}O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup •−}) and hydroxyl radicals ({sup •}OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  9. Tank 21 and Tank 24 Blend and Feed Study: Blending Times, Settling Times, and Transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where salt solutions of up to 1.2 million gallons will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. In particular, Tanks 21 and 24 are planned to be used for blending and transferring to the SDI feed tank. These tanks were evaluated here to determine blending times, to determine a range of settling times for disturbed sludge, and to determine that the SWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria that less than 1200 mg/liter of solids will be entrained in salt solutions during transfers from the Tank 21 and Tank 24 will be met. Overall conclusions for Tank 21 and Tank 24 operations include: (1) Experimental correction factors were applied to CFD (computational fluid dynamics) models to establish blending times between approximately two and five hours. As shown in Phase 2 research, blending times may be as much as ten times greater, or more, if lighter fluids are added to heavier fluids (i.e., water added to salt solution). As the densities of two salt solutions converge this effect may be minimized, but additional confirmatory research was not performed. (2) At the current sludge levels and the presently planned operating heights of the transfer pumps, solids entrainment will be less than 1200 mg/liter, assuming a conservative, slow settling sludge simulant. (3) Based on theoretical calculations, particles in the density range of 2.5 to 5.0 g/mL must be greater than 2-4 (micro)m in diameter to ensure they settle adequately in 30-60 days to meet the SWPF feed criterion ( 60 days) settling times in Tank 21.

  10. Sloshing analysis of tanks containing multiple fluid layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uras, R.A.; Tang, Yu.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of liquid density changes in high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks is studied. The density variations with the liquid depth is modeled by layers of piece wise constant densities. A computational formulation based on the finite element method is presented. The computer code FLUSTR-ANL has been modified for the analysis of the sloshing response under seismic excitation

  11. Inkjet printing of nanoporous gold electrode arrays on cellulose membranes for high-sensitive paper-like electrochemical oxygen sensors using ionic liquid electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengguo; Bai, Xiaoyun; Wang, Yingkai; Jin, Wei; Zhang, Xuan; Hu, Shengshui

    2012-04-17

    A simple approach to the mass production of nanoporous gold electrode arrays on cellulose membranes for electrochemical sensing of oxygen using ionic liquid (IL) electrolytes was established. The approach, combining the inkjet printing of gold nanoparticle (GNP) patterns with the self-catalytic growth of these patterns into conducting layers, can fabricate hundreds of self-designed gold arrays on cellulose membranes within several hours using an inexpensive inkjet printer. The resulting paper-based gold electrode arrays (PGEAs) had several unique properties as thin-film sensor platforms, including good conductivity, excellent flexibility, high integration, and low cost. The porous nature of PGEAs also allowed the addition of electrolytes from the back cellulose membrane side and controllably produced large three-phase electrolyte/electrode/gas interfaces at the front electrode side. A novel paper-based solid-state electrochemical oxygen (O(2)) sensor was therefore developed using an IL electrolyte, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIMPF(6)). The sensor looked like a piece of paper but possessed high sensitivity for O(2) in a linear range from 0.054 to 0.177 v/v %, along with a low detection limit of 0.0075% and a short response time of less than 10 s, foreseeing its promising applications in developing cost-effective and environment-friendly paper-based electrochemical gas sensors.

  12. Functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with iron phthalocyanine via a liquid chemical reaction for oxygen reduction in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaomei; Xu, Xiao; Liu, Qin; Guo, Jia; Kang, Longtian; Yao, Jiannian

    2018-06-01

    Iron single-atom catalyst in form of iron-nitrogen-carbon structure possesses the excellent catalytic activity in various chemical reactions. However, exploring a sustainable and stable single-atom metal catalyst still faces a great challenge due to low yield and complicated synthesis. Here, we report a functional multi-wall carbon nanotubes modified with iron phthalocyanine molecules via a liquid chemical reaction and realize the performance of similar single-atom catalysis for oxygen reduction reaction. A serial of characterizations strongly imply the structure change of iron phthalocyanine molecule and its close recombination with multi-wall carbon nanotubes, which are in favor of ORR catalysis. Compared to commercial platinum-carbon catalyst, composites exhibit superior activity for oxygen reduction reaction with higher half-wave potential (0.86 V), lower Tafel slope (38 mV dec-1), higher limiting current density and excellent electrochemical stability. The corresponding Zinc-air battery also presents higher maximum power density and discharge stability. Therefore, these findings provide a facile route to synthesize a highly efficient non-precious metal carbon-based catalyst.

  13. Analysis of ICPP tank farm infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, B.T.

    1993-10-01

    This report addresses water seeping into underground vaults which contain high-level liquid waste (HLLW) storage tanks at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Each of the vaults contains from one to three sumps. The original purpose of the sumps was to serve as a backup leak detection system for release of HLLW from the storage tanks. However, water seeps into most of the vaults, filling the sumps, and defeating their purpose as a leak detection system. Leak detection for the HLLW storage tanks is based on measuring the level of liquid inside the tank. The source of water leaking into the vaults was raised as a concern by the State of Idaho INEL Oversight Group because this source could also be leaching contaminants released to soil in the vicinity of the tank farm and transporting contaminants to the aquifer. This report evaluates information concerning patterns of seepage into vault sumps, the chemistry of water in sumps, and water balances for the tank farm to determine the sources of water seeping into the vaults

  14. Tank 241-U-111 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-111

  15. Tank 241-T-111 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-111

  16. Tank 241-U-103 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-103

  17. Tank 241-TX-118 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TX-118

  18. Tank 241-BX-104 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-BX-104

  19. Tank 241-TY-101 Tank Characterization Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TY-101

  20. Tank 241-T-107 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-107

  1. Tank 241-TX-105 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TX-105

  2. 49 CFR 179.400-17 - Inner tank piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... connected to this line to operate at their design capacity without excessive pressure build-up in the tank... housing and must be directed upward and away from operating personnel. (b) Any pressure building system...-17 Inner tank piping. (a) Product lines. The piping system for vapor and liquid phase transfer and...

  3. Dynamic Response of Ground Supported Rectangular Water Tanks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    Hence, there is a need to understand the behavior of liquid retaining tanks and to ... reduction factor for the mass of the tank wall in order to compensate for the conservatism in ... to lack of uniform stress distribution that leads to local failure.

  4. Cross flow filtration of aqueous radioactive tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, D.J.; Reynolds, B.A.; Todd, T.A.; Wilson, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    The Tank Focus Area (TFA) of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology addresses remediation of radioactive waste currently stored in underground tanks. Baseline technologies for treatment of tank waste can be categorized into three types of solid liquid separation: (a) removal of radioactive species that have been absorbed or precipitated, (b) pretreatment, and (c) volume reduction of sludge and wash water. Solids formed from precipitation or absorption of radioactive ions require separation from the liquid phase to permit treatment of the liquid as Low Level Waste. This basic process is used for decontamination of tank waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Ion exchange of radioactive ions has been proposed for other tank wastes, requiring removal of insoluble solids to prevent bed fouling and downstream contamination. Additionally, volume reduction of washed sludge solids would reduce the tank space required for interim storage of High Level Wastes. The scope of this multi-site task is to evaluate the solid/liquid separations needed to permit treatment of tank wastes to accomplish these goals. Testing has emphasized cross now filtration with metal filters to pretreat tank wastes, due to tolerance of radiation and caustic

  5. Tank car leaks gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    On January 27, 1994, a Canadian National (CN) tank car loaded with gasoline began to leak from a crack in the tank shell on the end of the car near the stub sill. The tank car had been damaged from impact switching. A part of the tank car was sent for laboratory analysis which concluded that: (1) the fracture originated in two locations in welds, (2) the cracks propagated in a symmetrical manner and progressed into the tank plate, (3) the fracture surface revealed inadequate weld fusion. A stress analysis of the tank car was conducted to determine the coupling force necessary to cause the crack. It was noted that over the last decade several problems have occurred pertaining to stub sill areas of tank cars that have resulted in hazardous material spills. An advisory was sent to Transport Canada outlining many examples where tank cars containing serious defects had passed CN inspections that were specifically designed to identify such defects. 4 figs

  6. Production and correlation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in gas- and liquid-phase generated by helium plasma jets under different pulse widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijie; Zhou, Chunxi; Liu, Dingxin; Xu, Dehui; Xia, Wenjie; Cui, Qingjie; Wang, Bingchuan; Kong, Michael G.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present the effects of the pulse width (PW) on the plasma jet's discharge characteristics, particularly focusing on the production and correlation of the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in gas- and liquid-phase. It is found that the length of plasma jet plume first increases before the PW of 10 μs, then gradually decreases and finally almost remains unchanged beyond 150 μs. The plasma bullet disappears after the falling edge of the voltage pulse at low PW, while it terminates far ahead of the falling edge of voltage pulse at high PW. This is mainly attributed to accumulation of space charges that lead to weakening of the reduced electric field with an increase of PW from low to high. More important, it is found that the excited reactive species, the positive and negative ions from plasma jet, and the concentrations of NO2- and NO3- in deionized water exposed to plasma jet also display the first increasing and then decreasing change trend with increase of PW, while the concentration of H2O2 in water almost displays the linearly increasing trend. This mainly results from the formation of the H3O+ and HO2-, as well as their ion water clusters that can produce more OH radicals to be converted into H2O2, while the NO2- and NO3- in gas phase can transport into water and exist most stably in water. The water cluster formation at gas-liquid interface is an important key process that can affect the chemical nature and dose of aqueous RONS in water; this is beneficial for understanding how the RONS are formed in liquid-phase.

  7. Hot-Fire Test Results of Liquid Oxygen/RP-2 Multi-Element Oxidizer-Rich Preburners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protz, C. S.; Garcia, C. P.; Casiano, M. J.; Parton, J. A.; Hulka, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Combustion Stability Tool Development project funded by the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was contracted to assemble and hot-fire test a multi-element integrated test article demonstrating combustion characteristics of an oxygen/hydrocarbon propellant oxidizer-rich staged-combustion engine thrust chamber. Such a test article simulates flow through the main injectors of oxygen/kerosene oxidizer-rich staged combustion engines such as the Russian RD-180 or NK-33 engines, or future U.S.-built engine systems such as the Aerojet-Rocketdyne AR-1 engine or the Hydrocarbon Boost program demonstration engine. To supply the oxidizer-rich combustion products to the main injector of the integrated test article, existing subscale preburner injectors from a previous NASA-funded oxidizer-rich staged combustion engine development program were utilized. For the integrated test article, existing and newly designed and fabricated inter-connecting hot gas duct hardware were used to supply the oxidizer-rich combustion products to the oxidizer circuit of the main injector of the thrust chamber. However, before one of the preburners was used in the integrated test article, it was first hot-fire tested at length to prove it could provide the hot exhaust gas mean temperature, thermal uniformity and combustion stability necessary to perform in the integrated test article experiment. This paper presents results from hot-fire testing of several preburner injectors in a representative combustion chamber with a sonic throat. Hydraulic, combustion performance, exhaust gas thermal uniformity, and combustion stability data are presented. Results from combustion stability modeling of these test results are described in a companion paper at this JANNAF conference, while hot-fire test results of the preburner injector in the integrated test article are described in another companion paper.

  8. Tank Focus Area pretreatment activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, C.P.; Welch, T.D.; Manke, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    Plans call for the high-level wastes to be retrieved from the tanks and immobilized in a stable waste form suitable for long-term isolation. Chemistry and chemical engineering operations are required to retrieve the wastes, to condition the wastes for subsequent steps, and to reduce the costs of the waste management enterprise. Pretreatment includes those processes between retrieval and immobilization, and includes preparation of suitable feed material for immobilization and separations to partition the waste into streams that yield lower life-cycle costs. Some of the technologies being developed by the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to process these wastes are described. These technologies fall roughly into three areas: (1) solid/liquid separation (SLS), (2) sludge pretreatment, and (3) supernate pretreatment

  9. Safety analysis report for the North Tank Farm, Tank W-11, and the Gunite and Associated Tanks -- Treatability Study, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platfoot, J.H.

    1997-02-01

    The North Tank Farm (NTF) tanks consist of eight underground storage tanks which have been removed from service because of age and changes in liquid waste system needs and requirements. Tank W-11, which was constructed in 1943, has been removed from service, and contains several hundred gallons of liquid low-level waste (LLLW). The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Treatability Study involves the demonstration of sludge removal techniques and equipment for use in other waste storage tanks throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The hazards associated with the NTF, Tank W-11, and the Treatability Study are identified in hazard identification table in Appendixes A, B, and C. The hazards identified for the NTF, Tank W-11, and the Treatability Study were analyzed in the preliminary hazards analyses (PHA) included as Appendices D and E. The PHA identifies potential accident scenarios and qualitatively estimates the consequences. Because of the limited quantities of materials present in the tanks and the types of energy sources that may result in release of the materials, none of the accidents identified are anticipated to result in significant adverse health effects to on-site or off-site personnel

  10. Anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure in a single continuously stirred tank reactor process: Limits in co-substrate ratios and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Carlos; Muñoz, Noelia; Rico, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure was investigated with the aim of determining the treatment limits in terms of the cheese whey fraction in feed and the organic loading rate. The results of a continuous stirred tank reactor that was operated with a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 days showed that the co-digestion process was possible with a cheese whey fraction as high as 85% in the feed. The efficiency of the process was similar within the range of the 15-85% cheese whey fraction. To study the effect of the increasing loading rate, the HRT was progressively shortened with the 65% cheese whey fraction in the feed. The reactor efficiency dropped as the HRT decreased but enabled a stable operation over 8.7 days of HRT. At these operating conditions, a volumetric methane production rate of 1.37 m(3) CH4 m(-3) d(-1) was achieved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Tank 241-AZ-101 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, A revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process. Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information''. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-AZ-101 (AZ-101) sampling activities. Tank AZ-101 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The contents of Tank AZ-101, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,630 kL (960 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-101 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 132 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,500 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.87 meters

  12. Tank 241-AZ-102 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process ... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information''. This document satisfies that requirement for tank 241-AZ-102 (AZ-102) sampling activities. Tank AZ-102 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The current contents of Tank AZ-102, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,600 kL (950 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-102 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 360 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,240 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.9 meters

  13. Inactive tanks remediation program strategy and plans for Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This report presents plans and strategies for remediation of the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service (also known as inactive tanks) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These plans and strategies will be carried out by the Environmental Restoration Program's Inactive LLLW Tank Program at ORNL. These tanks are defined as Category D tanks because they are existing tank systems without secondary containment that are removed from service. The approach to remediation of each tank or tank farm must be adapted in response to the specific circumstances of individual tank sites. The approach will be tailored to accommodate feedback on lessons learned from previous tank remediation activities and will not be a rigid step-by-step approach that must be conducted identically for every tank system. However, the approach will follow a multistep decision process. The overall objective of the Inactive Tank Program is to remediate all LLLW tanks that have been removed from service to the extent practicable in accordance with the FFA requirements. The Inactive Tank Program will focus on the remediation of the tank residues (i.e., contents after tank has been emptied) and tank shell. This strategy is discussed in detail in this report

  14. Evaluation and monitoring plan for consolidation tanks: Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit, Waste Area Grouping 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of an integrity evaluation of Tanks W-8 and W-9, part of the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT), in the South Tank Farm at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), together with a plan for monitoring those tanks for potential releases during the GAAT CERCLA treatability study and waste removal activities. This work was done in support of an ORNL plan to use W-8 and W-9 as consolidation tanks during remediation of the other tanks in the North and South Tank Farms. The analysis portion of the report draws upon both tank-internal measurements of liquid volume change and tank-external measurements of the change in electrical conductivity of the groundwater in the dry wells adjacent to each tank. The results of the analysis show that both W-8 and W-9 are liquid-tight and are suitable for use as consolidation tanks. The recommended monitoring plan will utilize the dry well conductivity monitoring method as the primary release detection tool during the CERCLA activities. This method is expected to be able to detect releases of less than 0.5 gal/h with a 95% probability of detection, most of the time. The results described here validate three prior independent efforts: a liquid integrity assessment made in 1995, a structural integrity assessment made in 1995 by experts in the field of gunite tanks, and a structural integrity assessment made in 1994 using a three-dimensional, finite-element computer model. This work, along with the three prior efforts, shows that Tanks W-8 and W-9 are structurally sound and liquid-tight. Based upon this work it is concluded that these tanks are suitable for use as consolidation tanks during the GAAT CERCLA treatability study and waste removal actions and it is recommended that the tanks be monitored for potential releases during this period using the methods described in this report

  15. Study of thermodynamic properties of binary and ternary liquid alloys of aluminium with the elements iron, cobalt, nickel and oxygen; Etude des proprietes thermodynamiques des alliages liquides binaires et ternaires de l'aluminium avec les elements fer, cobalt, nickel et l'oxygene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vachet, F [CEA Vallee du Rhone, 26-Pierrelatte (France)

    1966-07-01

    The present work deals with the thermodynamic study of aluminium liquid alloys with the metals iron, cobalt and nickel. The experiments carried out lead to the activity, at 1600 deg C, of aluminium in the (Al, Fe), (Al, Co), (Al, Ni) liquid alloys. The experimental method used consists in studying the partition of aluminium between the liquid immiscible phases made up with the pairs of metals (Fe, Ag), (Co, Ag), (Ni, Ag). The informations so obtained are used for drawing the isothermal equilibrium phases diagrams sections of (Al, Fe, Ag), (Al, Co, Ag), (Al, Ni, Ag) systems. The study of the partition of silver between lead and aluminium joined with the determinations of several authors allows us to determine the aluminium activity, analytically presented, in the metal M (iron cobalt and nickel). The Wagner's interaction parameters of aluminium in metal M are determined. The results obtained as the equilibrium phases diagrams of (Al, M) systems allow to compare the thermodynamic properties of the Al Fe system in liquid and solid states and to estimate the enthalpies of melting of the AlCo and AlNi intermetallic compounds. The activity, at 1600 deg C, of aluminium in (Al, Fe, Co), (Al, Fe, Ni), (Al, Co, Ni) liquid alloys is estimated through thermodynamic properties of binary components systems by application of several methods leading to results in good agreement. The study of aluminium-oxygen interactions in the liquid metallic solvants M allows us to propose an explanation for the shape of the deoxidation equilibrium line of iron, cobalt and nickel by aluminium and to compare the de-oxidizing power of aluminium toward iron, cobalt and nickel oxides. (author) [French] Le travail presente se rapporte a l'etude thermodynamique des alliages liquides de l'aluminium avec les metaux fer, cobalt et nickel. Les experiences effectuees ont pour but de determiner l'activite, a 1600 C, de l'aluminium dans les alliages liquides (Al, Fe), (Al, Co), (Al, Ni). La methode

  16. Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    in their national contexts. Questions regarding patterns and differences in think tank organisations and functions across countries have largely been left unanswered. This paper advances a definition and research design that uses different expert roles to categorise think tanks. A sample of 34 think tanks from...

  17. Feed tank transfer requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B

  18. Leak testing plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste systems (active tanks): Revision 2. Volume 1: Regulatory background and plan approach; Volume 2: Methods, protocols, and schedules; Volume 3: Evaluation of the ORNL/LT-823DP differential pressure leak detection method; Appendix to Revision 2: DOE/EPA/TDEC correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, D.G.; Wise, R.F.; Starr, J.W.; Maresca, J.W. Jr. [Vista Research, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    This document, the Leak Testing Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Low-Level Waste System (Active Tanks), comprises three volumes. The first two volumes address the component-based leak testing plan for the liquid low-level waste system at Oak Ridge, while the third volume describes the performance evaluation of the leak detection method that will be used to test this system. Volume 1, describes that portion of the liquid low-level waste system at that will be tested; it provides the regulatory background, especially in terms of the requirements stipulated in the Federal Facilities Agreement, upon which the leak testing plan is based. Volume 1 also describes the foundation of the plan, portions of which were abstracted from existing federal documents that regulate the petroleum and hazardous chemicals industries. Finally, Volume 1 gives an overview the plan, describing the methods that will be used to test the four classes of components in the liquid low-level waste system. Volume 2 takes the general information on component classes and leak detection methods presented in Volume 1 and shows how it applies particularly to each of the individual components. A complete test plan for each of the components is presented, with emphasis placed on the methods designated for testing tanks. The protocol for testing tank systems is described, and general leak testing schedules are presented. Volume 3 describes the results of a performance evaluation completed for the leak testing method that will be used to test the small tanks at the facility (those less than 3,000 gal in capacity). Some of the details described in Volumes 1 and 2 are expected to change as additional information is obtained, as the viability of candidate release detection methods is proven in the Oak Ridge environment, and as the testing program evolves.

  19. Leak testing plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste systems (active tanks): Revision 2. Volume 1: Regulatory background and plan approach; Volume 2: Methods, protocols, and schedules; Volume 3: Evaluation of the ORNL/LT-823DP differential pressure leak detection method; Appendix to Revision 2: DOE/EPA/TDEC correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, D.G.; Wise, R.F.; Starr, J.W.; Maresca, J.W. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    This document, the Leak Testing Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Low-Level Waste System (Active Tanks), comprises three volumes. The first two volumes address the component-based leak testing plan for the liquid low-level waste system at Oak Ridge, while the third volume describes the performance evaluation of the leak detection method that will be used to test this system. Volume 1, describes that portion of the liquid low-level waste system at that will be tested; it provides the regulatory background, especially in terms of the requirements stipulated in the Federal Facilities Agreement, upon which the leak testing plan is based. Volume 1 also describes the foundation of the plan, portions of which were abstracted from existing federal documents that regulate the petroleum and hazardous chemicals industries. Finally, Volume 1 gives an overview the plan, describing the methods that will be used to test the four classes of components in the liquid low-level waste system. Volume 2 takes the general information on component classes and leak detection methods presented in Volume 1 and shows how it applies particularly to each of the individual components. A complete test plan for each of the components is presented, with emphasis placed on the methods designated for testing tanks. The protocol for testing tank systems is described, and general leak testing schedules are presented. Volume 3 describes the results of a performance evaluation completed for the leak testing method that will be used to test the small tanks at the facility (those less than 3,000 gal in capacity). Some of the details described in Volumes 1 and 2 are expected to change as additional information is obtained, as the viability of candidate release detection methods is proven in the Oak Ridge environment, and as the testing program evolves

  20. A summary description of the flammable gas tank safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.; Sherwood, D.J.

    1994-10-01

    Radioactive liquid waste may produce hydrogen as result of the interaction of gamma radiation and water. If the waste contains organic chelating agents, additional hydrogen as well as nitrous oxide and ammonia may be produced by thermal and radiolytic decomposition of these organics. Several high-level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks, located underground at the Hanford Site in Washington State, are on a Flammable Gas Watch List. Some contain waste that produces and retains gases until large quantities of gas are released rapidly to the tank vapor space. Tanks nearly-filled to capacity have relatively little vapor space; therefore if the waste suddenly releases a large amount of hydrogen and nitrous oxide, a flammable gas mixture could result. The most notable example of a Hanford waste tank with a flammable gas problem is tank 241-SY-101. Upon occasion waste stored in this tank has released enough flammable gas to burn if an ignition source had been present inside of the tank. Several, other Hanford waste tanks exhibit similar behavior although to a lesser magnitude. Because this behavior was hot adequately-addressed in safety analysis reports for the Hanford Tank Farms, an unreviewed safety question was declared, and in 1990 the Flammable Gas Tank Safety Program was established to address this problem. The purposes of the program are a follows: (1) Provide safety documents to fill gaps in the safety analysis reports, and (2) Resolve the safety issue by acquiring knowledge about gas retention and release from radioactive liquid waste and developing mitigation technology. This document provides the general logic and work activities required to resolve the unreviewed safety question and the safety issue of flammable gas mixtures in radioactive liquid waste storage tanks

  1. Tank 241-B-103 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has advised the US Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify sampling and analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.'' This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-B-103 (B-103) sampling activities. Tank B-103 was placed on the Organic Watch List in January 1991 due to review of TRAC data that predicts a TOC content of 3.3 dry weight percent. The tank was classified as an assumed leaker of approximately 30,280 liters (8,000 gallons) in 1978 and declared inactive. Tank B-103 is passively ventilated with interim stabilization and intrusion prevention measures completed in 1985

  2. Fuel storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peehs, M.; Stehle, H.; Weidinger, H.

    1979-01-01

    The stationary fuel storage tank is immersed below the water level in the spent fuel storage pool. In it there is placed a fuel assembly within a cage. Moreover, the storage tank has got a water filling and a gas buffer. The water in the storage tank is connected with the pool water by means of a filter, a surge tank and a water purification facility, temperature and pressure monitoring being performed. In the buffer compartment there are arranged catalysts a glow plugs for recombination of radiolysis products into water. The supply of water into the storage tank is performed through the gas buffer compartment. (DG) [de

  3. Tank 241-A-104 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of auger samples from tank 241-A-104. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, hot cell sample isolation, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements in addition to reporting the current contents and status of the tank as projected from historical information

  4. Effects of irradiation distance on supply of reactive oxygen species to the bottom of a Petri dish filled with liquid by an atmospheric O{sub 2}/He plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki, E-mail: kawasaki@nbu.ac.jp; Kusumegi, Shota; Kudo, Akihiro; Sakanoshita, Tomohiro; Tsurumaru, Takuya; Sato, Akihiro [Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nippon Bunri University, Oita, Oita 870-0397 (Japan); Uchida, Giichiro [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu [Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2016-05-07

    The impact of irradiation distances on plasma jet-induced specific effects on the supply of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to the bottom of a Petri dish filled with liquid was investigated using a KI-starch gel reagent that can be employed as a ROS indicator even in water. O{sub 3} exposure experiments without plasma irradiation were also performed to elucidate the specific effects of the plasma jet. Relative concentrations of ROS transported to the bottom were evaluated using absorbance measurements. The results indicated that ROS supply to the bottom is markedly enhanced by the plasma jet irradiation at shorter irradiation distances, whereas similar results could not be obtained for the O{sub 3} exposure. In these cases, the liquid mixing in the depth direction was also enhanced by the plasma jet irradiation only, and the supply of reactive atomic oxygen to the liquid surface was markedly increased as well.

  5. WWTP Process Tank Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jesper

    The present thesis considers numerical modeling of activated sludge tanks on municipal wastewater treatment plants. Focus is aimed at integrated modeling where the detailed microbiological model the Activated Sludge Model 3 (ASM3) is combined with a detailed hydrodynamic model based on a numerical...... solution of the Navier-Stokes equations in a multiphase scheme. After a general introduction to the activated sludge tank as a system, the activated sludge tank model is gradually setup in separate stages. The individual sub-processes that are often occurring in activated sludge tanks are initially...... hydrofoil shaped propellers. These two sub-processes deliver the main part of the supplied energy to the activated sludge tank, and for this reason they are important for the mixing conditions in the tank. For other important processes occurring in the activated sludge tank, existing models and measurements...

  6. 46 CFR 128.450 - Liquid-mud systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquid-mud systems. 128.450 Section 128.450 Shipping...: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Design Requirements for Specific Systems § 128.450 Liquid-mud systems. (a) Liquid-mud... this chapter. (b) Tanks for oil-based liquid mud must be fitted with tank vents equipped with flame...

  7. Medical Oxygen Concentrator for Microgravity Operation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have all seen people carrying portable oxygen tanks or concentrators to provide critical life support respiratory oxygen. Heavy, bulky, and for O2 concentrators,...

  8. Tank 241-AP-104 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-11-01

    This document is a plan that identifies the information needed to address relevant issues concerning short-term and long-term safe storage and long-term management of Double-Shell Tank (DST) 241-AP-104

  9. Hanford double shell tank corrosion monitoring instrument tree prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.; Edgemon, G.L.; Ohl, P.C.

    1995-11-01

    High-level nuclear wastes at the Hanford site are stored underground in carbon steel double-shell and single-shell tanks (DSTs and SSTs). The installation of a prototype corrosion monitoring instrument tree into DST 241-A-101 was completed in December 1995. The instrument tree has the ability to detect and discriminate between uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) through the use of electrochemical noise measurements and a unique stressed element, three-electrode probe. The tree itself is constructed of AISI 304L stainless steel (UNS S30403), with probes in the vapor space, vapor/liquid interface and liquid. Successful development of these trees will allow their application to single shell tanks and the transfer of technology to other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Keywords: Hanford, radioactive waste, high-level waste tanks, electrochemical noise, probes, double-shell tanks, single-shell tanks, corrosion

  10. Tank 241-C-107 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has advised the US Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify sampling and analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.'' This document satisfies that requirement for the Tank 241-C-107 (C-107) sampling activities. Currently tank C-107 is categorized as a sound, low-heat load tank with partial isolation completed in December 1982. The tank is awaiting stabilization. Tank C-107 is expected to contain three primary layers of waste. The bottom layer should contain a mixture of the following wastes: ion exchange, concentrated phosphate waste from N-Reactor, Hanford Lab Operations, strontium semi-works, Battelle Northwest, 1C, TBP waste, cladding waste, and the hot semi-works. The middle layer should contain strontium recovery supernate. The upper layer should consist of non-complexed waste

  11. Tank 241-Z-361 process and characterization history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.A.

    1998-01-01

    An Unreviewed Safety Question (Wagoner, 1997) was declared based on lack of adequate authorization basis for Tank 241-Z-361 in the 200W Area at Hanford. This document is a summary of the history of Tank 241-Z-361 through December 1997. Documents reviewed include engineering files, laboratory notebooks from characterization efforts, waste facility process procedures, supporting documents and interviews of people's recollections of over twenty years ago. Records of transfers into the tank, past characterization efforts, and speculation were used to estimate the current condition of Tank 241-Z-361 and its contents. Information about the overall waste system as related to the settling tank was included to help in understanding the numbering system and process relationships. The Plutonium Finishing Plant was built in 1948 and began processing plutonium in mid-1949. The Incinerator (232-Z) operated from December 1961 until May 1973. The Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF, 236-Z) began operation in May 1964. The Waste Treatment Facility (242-Z) operated from August 1964 until August 1976. Waste from some processes went through transfer lines to 241-Z sump tanks. High salt and organic waste under normal operation were sent to Z-9 or Z-18 cribs. Water from the retention basin may have also passed through this tank. The transfer lines to 241-Z were numbered D-4 to D-6. The 241-Z sump tanks were numbered D-4 through D-8. The D-4, 5, and 8 drains went to the D-6 sump tank. When D-6 tank was full it was transferred to D-7 tank. Prior to transfer to cribs, the D-7 tank contents was sampled. If the plutonium content was analyzed to be more than 10 g per batch, the material was (generally) reprocessed. Below the discard limit, caustic was added and the material was sent to the cribs via the 241-Z-361 settling tank where solids settled out and the liquid overflowed by gravity to the cribs. Waste liquids that passed through the 241-Z-361 settling tank flowed from PFP to ground in

  12. Chemical Equilibrium of Aluminate in Hanford Tank Waste Originating from Tanks 241-AN-105 and 241-AP-108

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoskey, Jacob K. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Cooke, Gary A. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Herting, Daniel L. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-23

    The purposes of the study described in this document follow; Determine or estimate the thermodynamic equilibrium of gibbsite in contact with two real tank waste supernatant liquids through both dissolution of gibbsite (bottom-up approach) and precipitation of aluminum-bearing solids (top-down approach); determine or estimate the thermodynamic equilibrium of a mixture of gibbsite and real tank waste saltcake in contact with real tank waste supernatant liquid through both dissolution of gibbsite and precipitation of aluminum-bearing solids; and characterize the solids present after equilibrium and precipitation of aluminum-bearing solids.

  13. Mobilization and mixing of settled solids in horizontal storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    Studies were conducted using submerged jets for the mobilization and mixing of settled solids to form a suspension that can easily be removed from storage tanks. These studies focus on the specific problems relating to horizontal, cylindrical storage tanks. Of primary consideration are the storage tanks located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory which are used for the collection of remote-handled, radioactive liquid wastes. These wastes are in two phases. A layer of undissolved, settled solids varying from 2 to 4 feet in depth under a layer of supernate. Using a surrogate of the tank contents and an approximate 2/3 dimensional scale tank, tests were performed to determine the optimum design and location of suction and discharge nozzles as well as the minimum discharge velocity required to achieve complete mobilization of the solids in the tank

  14. Composite-Material Tanks with Chemically Resistant Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas K.

    2004-01-01

    Lightweight composite-material tanks with chemically resistant liners have been developed for storage of chemically reactive and/or unstable fluids . especially hydrogen peroxide. These tanks are similar, in some respects, to the ones described in gLightweight Composite-Material Tanks for Cryogenic Liquids h (MFS-31379), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 58; however, the present tanks are fabricated by a different procedure and they do not incorporate insulation that would be needed to prevent boil-off of cryogenic fluids. The manufacture of a tank of this type begins with the fabrication of a reusable multisegmented aluminum mandrel in the shape and size of the desired interior volume. One or more segments of the mandrel can be aluminum bosses that will be incorporated into the tank as end fittings. The mandrel is coated with a mold-release material. The mandrel is then heated to a temperature of about 400 F (approximately equal to 200 C) and coated with a thermoplastic liner material to the desired thickness [typically approxiamtely equal to 15 mils (approximately equal to 0.38 mm)] by thermal spraying. In the thermal-spraying process, the liner material in powder form is sprayed and heated to the melting temperature by a propane torch and the molten particles land on the mandrel. The sprayed liner and mandrel are allowed to cool, then the outer surface of the liner is chemically and/or mechanically etched to enhance bonding of a composite overwrap. The etched liner is wrapped with multiple layers of an epoxy resin reinforced with graphite fibers; the wrapping can be done either by manual application of epoxy-impregnated graphite cloth or by winding of epoxy-impregnated filaments. The entire assembly is heated in an autoclave to cure the epoxy. After the curing process, the multisegmented mandrel is disassembled and removed from inside, leaving the finished tank. If the tank is to be used for storing hydrogen peroxide, then the liner material

  15. Measuring a 10,000-fold enhancement of singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*) concentration on illuminated ice relative to the corresponding liquid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Jonathan P.; Anastasio, Cort

    2013-08-01

    Much attention has focused on the highly reactive hydroxyl radical in the oxidation of trace organic compounds on snow and ice (and subsequent release of volatile organics to the atmospheric boundary layer) but other oxidants are likely also important in this processing. Here we examine the ice chemistry of singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*), which can be significant in atmospheric water drops but has not been examined in ice or snow. To examine 1O2* on ice we illuminate laboratory ices containing Rose Bengal (RB) as the source of 1O2*, furfuryl alcohol (FFA) as the probe, and Na2SO4 to control the total solute concentration. We find that the 1O2*-mediated loss of FFA (and, thus, the 1O2* concentration) is up to 11,000 times greater on ice than in the equivalent liquid sample at the same photon flux. We attribute this large increase in the 1O2* steady-state concentration to the freeze-concentration of solutes into liquid-like regions (LLRs) in/on ice: compared to the initial solution, in the LLRs of ice the sources for 1O2* are highly concentrated, while the concentration of the dominant sink for 1O2* (i.e., water) remains largely unchanged. Similar to results expected in liquid solution, rates of FFA loss in ice depend on both the initial sensitizer concentration and temperature, providing evidence that these reactions occur in LLRs. However, we find that the enhancement in 1O2* concentrations on ice does not follow predictions from freezing-point depression, likely because experiments were conducted below the eutectic temperature for sodium sulfate, where all of the salt should have precipitated. We also explore a method for separating 1O2* and rad OH contributions to FFA oxidation in laboratory ices and show its application to two natural snow samples. We find that 1O2* concentrations in these snows are approximately 100 times higher than observed in polluted, mid-latitude fog waters, showing that the enhancement of 1O2* on ice is environmentally relevant and that

  16. Tank waste remediation system: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alumkal, W.T.; Babad, H.; Dunford, G.L.; Honeyman, J.O.; Wodrich, D.D.

    1995-02-01

    The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, contains the largest amount and the most diverse collection of highly radioactive waste in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored at the Hanford Site in large, underground tanks since 1944. Approximately 217,000 M 3 (57 Mgal) of caustic liquids, slurries, saltcakes, and sludges have accumulated in 177 tanks. In addition, significant amounts of 90 Sr and 137 Cs were removed from the tank waste, converted to salts, doubly encapsulated in metal containers, and stored in water basins. The Tank Waste Remediation System Program was established by the US Department of Energy in 1991 to safely manage and immobilize these wastes in anticipation of permanent disposal of the high-level waste fraction in a geologic repository. Since 1991, significant progress has been made in resolving waste tank safety issues, upgrading Tank Farm facilities and operations, and developing a new strategy for retrieving, treating, and immobilizing the waste for disposal

  17. Cryogenic Fuel Tank Draining Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Donald

    1999-01-01

    One of the technological challenges in designing advanced hypersonic aircraft and the next generation of spacecraft is developing reusable flight-weight cryogenic fuel tanks. As an aid in the design and analysis of these cryogenic tanks, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed specifically for the analysis of flow in a cryogenic fuel tank. This model employs the full set of Navier-Stokes equations, except that viscous dissipation is neglected in the energy equation. An explicit finite difference technique in two-dimensional generalized coordinates, approximated to second-order accuracy in both space and time is used. The stiffness resulting from the low Mach number is resolved by using artificial compressibility. The model simulates the transient, two-dimensional draining of a fuel tank cross section. To calculate the slosh wave dynamics the interface between the ullage gas and liquid fuel is modeled as a free surface. Then, experimental data for free convection inside a horizontal cylinder are compared with model results. Finally, cryogenic tank draining calculations are performed with three different wall heat fluxes to demonstrate the effect of wall heat flux on the internal tank flow field.

  18. DECOUPLER DESIGN FOR AN INTERACTING TANKS SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraid F. Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model forthe two interacting tanks system was derived and the dynamic behavior of thissystem was studied by introducing a step change in inlet flow rate. In thispaper, the analysis of the interaction loops between the controlled variable(liquid level and manipulated variable (inlet flow rate was carried out usingthe relative gain array. Also decoupling technique is applied to eliminate theeffect this interaction by design suitable decouplers for the system. Theresults show that the gain of each loop is cut in half when the opposite loopis closed and the gain of other loop changes sign when the opposite loop isclosed. The decoupling method show that the liquid level of tank one isconstant when the second inlet flow changes and to keep the liquid level oftank two constant the first inlet flow must be changed.

  19. Safety analysis report for the gunite and associated tanks project remediation of the South Tank Farm, facility 3507, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platfoot, J.H.

    1998-02-01

    The South Tank Farm (STF) is a series of six, 170,000-gal underground, domed storage tanks, which were placed into service in 1943. The tanks were constructed of a concrete mixture known as gunite. They were used as a portion of the Liquid Low-Level Waste System for the collection, neutralization, storage, and transfer of the aqueous portion of the radioactive and/or hazardous chemical wastes produced as part of normal facility operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The last of the tanks was taken out of service in 1986, but the tanks have been shown by structural analysis to continue to be structurally sound. An attempt was made in 1983 to empty the tanks; however, removal of all the sludge from the tanks was not possible with the equipment and schedule available. Since removal of the liquid waste in 1983, liquid continues to accumulate within the tanks. The in-leakage is believed to be the result of groundwater dripping into the tanks around penetrations in the domes. The tanks are currently being maintained under a Surveillance and Maintenance Program that includes activities such as level monitoring, vegetation control, High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter leakage requirement testing/replacement, sign erection/repair, pump-out of excessive liquids, and instrument calibration/maintenance. These activities are addressed in ORNL/ER-275

  20. Turbulência induzida por jatos bifásicos do tipo gás-líquido em tanques de aeração Turbulence induced by two-phase gas-liquid jets in aeration tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iran Eduardo Lima Neto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jatos bifásicos do tipo gás-líquido são bastante usados nas engenharias sanitária e ambiental para fins de aeração artificial e mistura turbulenta. O presente trabalho investiga a turbulência gerada por meio desses jatos em um tanque de água, utilizando velocimetria por imagem de partículas. As condições experimentais incluíram jatos bifásicos com frações volumétricas de ar de até 70% e números de Reynolds variando entre 10.600 e 17.700. Os resultados dos ensaios indicaram que a fração volumétrica de ar afeta consideravelmente as propriedades turbulentas da fase líquida, enquanto o número de Reynolds apresenta efeito secundário. Correlações adimensionais foram então obtidas para expressar a energia cinética turbulenta e a taxa de dissipação de energia em função desses dois parâmetros. Finalmente, são apresentadas possíveis aplicações dos resultados deste trabalho.Two-phase gas-liquid jets are widely used in the sanitary and environmental engineering field for artificial aeration and turbulent mixing. The present work investigates the turbulence generated by these jets in a water tank, using particle image velocimetry. The experimental conditions included two-phase jets with gas volume fractions of up to 70% and Reynolds numbers ranging from 10,600 to 17,700. The results indicated that the gas volume fraction affects significantly the turbulent properties of the liquid phase, while the Reynolds number presents a secondary effect. Dimensionless correlations were then obtained to express the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate as a function of these two parameters. Finally, possible applications of the results obtained in this work are presented.

  1. Think tanks in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blach-Ørsten, Mark; Kristensen, Nete Nørgaard

    2016-01-01

    outside the media. The study shows that the two largest and oldest think tanks in Denmark, the liberal think tank CEPOS and the social democratic think tank ECLM, are very active and observable in the media; that the media’s distribution of attention to these think tanks, to some extent, confirms a re......-politicization of Danish newspapers; but also that the news media as an arena of influence is only one part of the equation, since some of the corporatist political networks are still intact and working outside the media...... half of the 2010s, because in this national setting think tanks are still a relatively new phenomenon. Based on theories of mediatization and de-corporatization, we present 1) an analysis of the visibility of selected Danish think tanks in the media and 2) an analysis of their political networks...

  2. Effect of cation structure on the oxygen solubility and diffusivity in a range of bis{(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl}imide anion based ionic liquids for lithium-air battery electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Alex R; Li, Peilin; Jacquemin, Johan; Goodrich, Peter; Ball, Sarah C; Compton, Richard G; Hardacre, Christopher

    2016-04-28

    This paper reports on the solubility and diffusivity of dissolved oxygen in a series of ionic liquids (ILs) based on the bis{(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl}imide anion with a range of related alkyl and ether functionalised cyclic alkylammonium cations. Cyclic voltammetry has been used to observe the reduction of oxygen in ILs at a microdisk electrode and chronoamperometric measurements have then been applied to simultaneously determine both the concentration and the diffusion coefficient of oxygen in different ILs. The viscosity of the ILs and the calculated molar volume and free volume are also reported. It is found that, within this class of ILs, the oxygen diffusivity generally increases with decreasing viscosity of the neat IL. An inverse relationship between oxygen solubility and IL free volume is reported for the two IL families implying that oxygen is not simply occupying the available empty space. In addition, it is reported that the introduction of an ether-group into the IL cation structure promotes the diffusivity of dissolved oxygen but reduces the solubility of the gas.

  3. History of waste tank 11, 1955 through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, T.L.; Tharin, D.W.; Lohr, D.R.

    1978-10-01

    Tank 11 was placed in service as a receiver of low heat waste (LW) in July 1955. In November 1961, the supernate was decanted from the sludge to prepare tank 11 for receipt of frame waste. In July 1962, the supernate was again decanted and tank 11 was used to receive fresh high heat waste (HW) from the enriched uranium process in Building 221-H. Again, the supernate was decanted in June 1965 and July 1967 to allow the tank to be reused for waste receipt. In order to use tank 11 for solid salt storage, a sludge removal operation was conducted in October 1969. The operation was unsuccessful. Tank 11 consequently received hot concentrated supernate from tank 10 blended with dilute waste and was later returned to service as a receiver of HW. A small, apparently inactive leak site was found in April 1974. Inspections have been made of the annulus and the interior of the tank both visually and with an optical periscope. Samples of the sludge, supernate, and tank vapor have been analyzed. Top-to-bottom profiles of radiation and temperature in the tank have been taken and measurements were made of deflections in the bottom knuckle plate due to changing liquid level. One horizontal and seventeen vertical cooling coils have failed, all within one month following the sludge removal operation. Several equipment modifications and various equipment repairs were made. 14 figures, 3 tables

  4. Design demonstrations for category B tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    This document presents design demonstrations conducted of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) storage tank systems located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Demonstration of the design of these tank systems has been stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV; the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC); and the DOE. The FFA establishes four categories of tanks. These are: Category A -- New or replacement tank systems with secondary containment; Category B -- Existing tank systems with secondary containment; Category C -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment; Category D -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment that are removed from service. This document provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 11 tank systems listed in the FFA as Category B. The design demonstration for each tank is presented.

  5. Large underground radioactive waste storage tanks successfully cleaned at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billingsley, K.; Burks, B.L.; Johnson, M.; Mims, C.; Powell, J.; Hoesen, D. van

    1998-05-01

    Waste retrieval operations were successfully completed in two large underground radioactive waste storage tanks in 1997. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Gunite Tanks Team worked cooperatively during two 10-week waste removal campaigns and removed approximately 58,300 gallons of waste from the tanks. About 100 gallons of a sludge and liquid heel remain in each of the 42,500 gallon tanks. These tanks are 25 ft. in diameter and 11 ft. deep, and are located in the North Tank Farm in the center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Less than 2% of the radioactive contaminants remain in the tanks, proving the effectiveness of the Radioactive Tank Cleaning System, and accomplishing the first field-scale cleaning of contaminated underground storage tanks with a robotic system in the DOE complex

  6. Design demonstrations for category B tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This document presents design demonstrations conducted of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) storage tank systems located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Demonstration of the design of these tank systems has been stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV; the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC); and the DOE. The FFA establishes four categories of tanks. These are: Category A -- New or replacement tank systems with secondary containment; Category B -- Existing tank systems with secondary containment; Category C -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment; Category D -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment that are removed from service. This document provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 11 tank systems listed in the FFA as Category B. The design demonstration for each tank is presented

  7. Acceptance criteria for non-destructive examination of double-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, C.E.

    1995-09-01

    This supporting document provides requirements for acceptance of relevant indications found during non-destructive examination of double-shell tanks (DSTs) at Hanford 200 areas. Requirements for evaluation of relevant indications are provided to determine acceptability of continued safe operation of the DSTs. Areas of the DSTs considered include the tank wall vapor space, liquid-vapor interface, wetted tank wall, sludge-liquid interface, and the knuckle region

  8. TANK 21 AND TANK 24 BLEND AND FEED STUDY: BLENDING TIMES, SETTLING TIMES, AND TRANSFERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.; Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.

    2012-05-31

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where salt solutions of up to 1.2 million gallons will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. In particular, Tanks 21 and 24 are planned to be used for blending and transferring to the SDI feed tank. These tanks were evaluated here to determine blending times, to determine a range of settling times for disturbed sludge, and to determine that the SWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria that less than 1200 mg/liter of solids will be entrained in salt solutions during transfers from the Tank 21 and Tank 24 will be met. Overall conclusions for Tank 21 and Tank 24 operations include: (1) Experimental correction factors were applied to CFD (computational fluid dynamics) models to establish blending times between approximately two and five hours. As shown in Phase 2 research, blending times may be as much as ten times greater, or more, if lighter fluids are added to heavier fluids (i.e., water added to salt solution). As the densities of two salt solutions converge this effect may be minimized, but additional confirmatory research was not performed. (2) At the current sludge levels and the presently planned operating heights of the transfer pumps, solids entrainment will be less than 1200 mg/liter, assuming a conservative, slow settling sludge simulant. (3) Based on theoretical calculations, particles in the density range of 2.5 to 5.0 g/mL must be greater than 2-4 {micro}m in diameter to ensure they settle adequately in 30-60 days to meet the SWPF feed criterion (<1200 mg/l). (4) Experimental tests with sludge batch 6 simulant and field turbidity data from a recent Tank 21 mixing evolution suggest the solid

  9. History of waste tank 9 , 1955--1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tharin, D.W.; Lohr, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    Tank 9 was placed in service as a receiver for Purex HLW on July 19, 1955. Filling was essentially completed in December 1955, and this original complement of waste remained in the tank until December 1965, when most of the liquid was decanted to allow refilling. In July 1966, the remaining liquid and approximately 15 inches of sludge were removed using 3000 to 3500 psi water introduced through nozzles to mobilize the sludge. The tank was then used as a receiver and cooler for aged HLW solution concentrated by the tank farm evaporator; the resulting crystallized salt, covered with saturated solution, is now stored in this tank. Inspections have been made of the tank interior and annulus by direct observation and with a 40-ft optical periscope. Analytical samples have been taken of the sludge, supernate, vapor, and leaked material in the annulus. Top-to-bottom profiles of radiation and temperature have been obtained in the annulus and tank, respectively, and measurements have been made of roof deflection caused by salt adhering to roof-supported cooling coils. Leaked waste was discovered in the annulus pan in October 1957. During 1958-59, the annulus pan was flushed nine times with water in 2000-gallon batches, jetting the waste and flush water into the primary tank. However, waste leakage into the annulus continued. The maximum liquid depth reached in the annulus was about 12 inches. This was jetted out in 1961., but some leakage continued theeeafter as indicated by roddings. The roddings showed no standing liquid by August 1964, but some liquid may have been present undera salt crust. In March 1972, salt depth in the annulus was measured to be 8 to 10 in., and the bottom 3 in. was quite wet. The salt remains although most of the liquid has been removed

  10. Hanford tanks initiative plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, K.E.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract: The Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) is a five-year project resulting from the technical and financial partnership of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Waste Management (EM-30) and Office of Science and Technology Development (EM-50). The HTI project accelerates activities to gain key technical, cost performance, and regulatory information on two high-level waste tanks. The HTI will provide a basis for design and regulatory decisions affecting the remainder of the Tank Waste Remediation System's tank waste retrieval Program

  11. Investigation of cooling coil corrosion in storage tanks for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    The high frequency of cooling coil leaks observed in high-heat waste storage tanks soon after sludge removal operations is attributed to pitting, according to laboratory corrosion studies. Experiments show that the most likely series of events leading to coil leakage is (1) excessive dilution of basic nitrite in the supernate, (2) initiation of attack in crevices due to oxygen depletion cells, and (3) acceleration of the attack by sulfate dissolved from the sludge. When sludge was slurried with water, the interstitial liquid was diluted. Nitrite, the anodic inhibitor that prevented attack on coils and tanks in normal operation when its concentration was 0.5 to 3.0M, could accelerate attack when diluted to 10 -4 to 10 -3 M. Attack was presumably initiated at oxygen depletion cells. The presence of sulfate, leached from the sludge, produced a conductive solution that could produce high current densities at the corroding steel surface. The proposed series of events leading to coil leakage agrees with the observations previously made on one leaking coil removed from Tank 2F after sludge removal in 1967. Examination revealed pitting that had originated on the outside of the coils. This pitting was attributed to oxygen depletion cells in coil crevices. To prevent recurrence of pitting attack on cooling coils during future sludge removal operations, the sludge should be slurried (1) with waste diluted less than one hundredfold with water, or (2) with a 500-ppm nitrite-H 2 O solution at pH 12. Either method should preclude pitting damage to the coils

  12. Fuel tank integrity research : fuel tank analyses and test plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research : and Development is conducting research into fuel tank : crashworthiness. Fuel tank research is being performed to : determine strategies for increasing the fuel tank impact : resistance to ...

  13. WVNS Tank Farm Process Support: Experimental evaluation of an inert gas (nitrogen) to mitigate external corrosion of high-level waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, M.R.

    1996-02-01

    Corrosion of the carbon steel waste storage tanks at West Valley Nuclear Services continues to be of concern, especially as the planned duration of waste storage time increases and sludge washing operations are conducted. The external surfaces of Tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2 have been exposed for more than 10 years to water that has intruded into the tank vaults. Visual inspection of the external tank surfaces using a remote video camera has shown indications of heavy corrosion in localized areas on the tank walls. Tests on mild steel specimens under simulated tank vault conditions showed that corrosion is related to the availability of oxygen for the corrosion reactions; consequently, removing oxygen as one of the reactants should effectively eliminate corrosion. In terms of the waste tanks, excluding oxygen from the annular vault space, such as by continuous flushing with an inert gas, should substantially decrease corrosion of the external surfaces of the mild steel tanks (100% exclusion of oxygen is probably not practicable). Laboratory corrosion testing was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to give a preliminary assessment of the ability of nitrogen-inerting to reduce steel corrosion. This report summarizes test results obtained after 18-month corrosion tests comparing open-quotes nitrogen-inertedclose quotes corrosion with open-quotes air-equilibratedclose quotes corrosion under simulated tank vault conditions

  14. Corrosion Evaluation of INTEC Waste Storage Tank WM-182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirk, W. J.; Anderson, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel has been stored and reprocessed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory since 1953 using facilities located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). This reprocessing produced radioactive liquid waste which was stored in the Tank Farm. The INTEC Tank Farm consists of eleven vaulted 300,000-gallon underground tanks including Tank WM-182. Tank WM-182 was put into service in 1955, has been filled four times, and has contained aluminum and zirconium fuel reprocessing wastes as well as sodium bearing waste. A program to monitor corrosion in the waste tanks was initiated in 1953 when the first of the eleven Tank Farm tanks was placed in service. Austenitic stainless steel coupons representative of the materials of construction of the tanks are used to monitor internal tank corrosion. This report documents the final inspection of the WM-182 corrosion coupons. Physical examination of the welded corrosion test coupons exposed to the tank bottom conditions of Tank WM-182 revealed very light uniform corrosion. Examination of the external surfaces of the extruded pipe samples showed very light uniform corrosion with slight indications of preferential attack parallel to extrusion marks and start of end grain attack of the cut edges. These indications were only evident when examined under stereo microscope at magnifications of 20X and above. There were no definite indications of localized corrosion, such as cracking, pitting, preferential weld attack, or weld heat affected zone attack on either the welded or extruded coupons. Visual examination of the coupon support cables, where they were not encased in plastic, failed to reveal any indication of liquid-liquid interface attack of any crevice corrosion. Based on the WM-182 coupon evaluations, which have occurred throughout the life of the tank, the metal loss from the tank wall due to uniform corrosion is not expected to exceed 5.5 x 10-1 mil (0.00 055 inch

  15. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Sloshing in Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solaas, F

    1996-12-31

    For oil cargo ship tanks and liquid natural gas carriers, the dimensions of the tanks are often such that the highest resonant sloshing periods and the ship motions are in the same period range, which may cause violent resonant sloshing of the liquid. In this doctoral thesis, linear and non-linear analytical potential theory solutions of the sloshing problem are studied for a two-dimensional rectangular tank and a vertical circular cylindrical tank, using perturbation technique for the non-linear case. The tank is forced to oscillate harmonically with small amplitudes of sway with frequency in the vicinity of the lowest natural frequency of the fluid inside the tank. The method is extended to other tank shapes using a combined analytical and numerical method. A boundary element numerical method is used to determine the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the problem. These are used in the non-linear analytical free surface conditions, and the velocity potential and free surface elevation for each boundary value problem in the perturbation scheme are determined by the boundary element method. Both the analytical method and the combined analytical and numerical method are restricted to tanks with vertical walls in the free surface. The suitability of a commercial programme, FLOW-3D, to estimate sloshing is studied. It solves the Navier-Stokes equations by the finite difference method. The free surface as function of time is traced using the fractional volume of fluid method. 59 refs., 54 figs., 37 tabs.

  16. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Sloshing in Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solaas, F.

    1995-12-31

    For oil cargo ship tanks and liquid natural gas carriers, the dimensions of the tanks are often such that the highest resonant sloshing periods and the ship motions are in the same period range, which may cause violent resonant sloshing of the liquid. In this doctoral thesis, linear and non-linear analytical potential theory solutions of the sloshing problem are studied for a two-dimensional rectangular tank and a vertical circular cylindrical tank, using perturbation technique for the non-linear case. The tank is forced to oscillate harmonically with small amplitudes of sway with frequency in the vicinity of the lowest natural frequency of the fluid inside the tank. The method is extended to other tank shapes using a combined analytical and numerical method. A boundary element numerical method is used to determine the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the problem. These are used in the non-linear analytical free surface conditions, and the velocity potential and free surface elevation for each boundary value problem in the perturbation scheme are determined by the boundary element method. Both the analytical method and the combined analytical and numerical method are restricted to tanks with vertical walls in the free surface. The suitability of a commercial programme, FLOW-3D, to estimate sloshing is studied. It solves the Navier-Stokes equations by the finite difference method. The free surface as function of time is traced using the fractional volume of fluid method. 59 refs., 54 figs., 37 tabs.

  17. Heated Aluminum Tanks Resist Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. E.

    1983-01-01

    Simple expedient of heating foam-insulated aluminum alloy tanks prevents corrosion by salt-laden moisture. Relatively-small temperature difference between such tank and surrounding air will ensure life of tank is extended by many years.

  18. Liquid ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Suman; Paswan, Anil; Prakas, S

    2014-01-01

    Human have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids like fish. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV) is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. It is well-known that respiratory diseases are one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in intensive care unit. During the past few years several new modalities of treatment have been introduced. One of them and probably the most fascinating, is of LV. Partial LV, on which much of the existing research has concentrated, requires partial filling of lungs with perfluorocarbons (PFC's) and ventilation with gas tidal volumes using conventional mechanical ventilators. Various physico-chemical properties of PFC's make them the ideal media. It results in a dramatic improvement in lung compliance and oxygenation and decline in mean airway pressure and oxygen requirements. No long-term side-effect reported.

  19. SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

    2012-01-25

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-9IF Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal I-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and drywells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to

  20. Single-Shell Tanks Leak Integrity Elements/ SX Farm Leak Causes and Locations - 12127

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girardot, Crystal [URS- Safety Management Solutions, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Harlow, Don [ELR Consulting Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Venetz, Theodore; Washenfelder, Dennis [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Johnson, Jeremy [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-91F Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal 1-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX- 111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and dry-wells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to