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Sample records for liquid metallic hydrogen

  1. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen: A Building Block for the Liquid Sun

    OpenAIRE

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-01-01

    Liquid metallic hydrogen provides a compelling material for constructing a condensed matter model of the Sun and the photosphere. Like diamond, metallic hydrogen might have the potential to be a metastable substance requiring high pressures for forma- tion. Once created, it would remain stable even at lower pressures. The metallic form of hydrogen was initially conceived in 1935 by Eugene Wigner and Hillard B. Huntington who indirectly anticipated its elevated critical temper...

  2. Critical fields of liquid superconducting metallic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1983-01-01

    Liquid metallic hydrogen, in a fully dissociated state, is predicted at certain densities to pass from dirty to clean and from type II to type I superconducting behavior as temperature is lowered. Previously announced in STAR as N82-29374

  3. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen: A Building Block for the Liquid Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Liquid metallic hydrogen provides a compelling material for constructing a condensed matter model of the Sun and the photosphere. Like diamond, metallic hydrogen might have the potential to be a metastable substance requiring high pressures for forma- tion. Once created, it would remain stable even at lower pressures. The metallic form of hydrogen was initially conceived in 1935 by Eugene Wigner and Hillard B. Huntington who indirectly anticipated its elevated critical temperature for liquefaction (Wigner E. and Huntington H.B. On the possibility of a metallic modification of hydro- gen. J. Chem. Phys. , 1935, v.3, 764–770. At that time, solid metallic hydrogen was hypothesized to exist as a body centered cubic, although a more energetically accessible layered graphite-like lattice was also envisioned. Relative to solar emission, this struc- tural resemblance between graphite and layered metallic hydrogen should not be easily dismissed. In the laboratory, metallic hydrogen remains an elusive material. However, given the extensive observational evidence for a condensed Sun composed primarily of hydrogen, it is appropriate to consider metallic hydrogen as a solar building block. It is anticipated that solar liquid metallic hydrogen should possess at least some layered order. Since layered liquid metallic hydrogen would be essentially incompressible, its invocation as a solar constituent brings into question much of current stellar physics. The central proof of a liquid state remains the thermal spectrum of the Sun itself. Its proper understanding brings together all the great forces which shaped modern physics. Although other proofs exist for a liquid photosphere, our focus remains solidly on the generation of this light.

  4. Ordered pairing in liquid metallic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, A. E.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1983-01-01

    We study two possible types of pairing involving the protons of a proposed low-temperature liquid phase metallic hydrogen. Electron-proton pairing, which can result in an insulating phase, is investigated by using an approximate solution of an Eliashberg-type equation for the anomalous self-energy. A very low estimate of the transition temperature is obtained by including proton correlations in the effective interaction. For proton-proton pairing, we derive a new proton pair potential based on the Abrikosov wave function. This potential includes the electron-proton interaction to all orders and has a much larger well depth than is obtained with linear screening methods. This suggests the possibility of either a superfluid paired phase analogous to that in He-3, or alternatively a phase with true molecular pairing.

  5. A superconductor to superfluid phase transition in liquid metallic hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaev, Egor; Sudbø, Asle; Ashcroft, N W

    2004-10-07

    Although hydrogen is the simplest of atoms, it does not form the simplest of solids or liquids. Quantum effects in these phases are considerable (a consequence of the light proton mass) and they have a demonstrable and often puzzling influence on many physical properties, including spatial order. To date, the structure of dense hydrogen remains experimentally elusive. Recent studies of the melting curve of hydrogen indicate that at high (but experimentally accessible) pressures, compressed hydrogen will adopt a liquid state, even at low temperatures. In reaching this phase, hydrogen is also projected to pass through an insulator-to-metal transition. This raises the possibility of new state of matter: a near ground-state liquid metal, and its ordered states in the quantum domain. Ordered quantum fluids are traditionally categorized as superconductors or superfluids; these respective systems feature dissipationless electrical currents or mass flow. Here we report a topological analysis of the projected phase of liquid metallic hydrogen, finding that it may represent a new type of ordered quantum fluid. Specifically, we show that liquid metallic hydrogen cannot be categorized exclusively as a superconductor or superfluid. We predict that, in the presence of a magnetic field, liquid metallic hydrogen will exhibit several phase transitions to ordered states, ranging from superconductors to superfluids.

  6. Quantum simulation of low-temperature metallic liquid hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji; Li, Xin-Zheng; Zhang, Qianfan; Probert, Matthew I J; Pickard, Chris J; Needs, Richard J; Michaelides, Angelos; Wang, Enge

    2013-01-01

    The melting temperature of solid hydrogen drops with pressure above ~65 GPa, suggesting that a liquid state might exist at low temperatures. It has also been suggested that this low-temperature liquid state might be non-molecular and metallic, although evidence for such behaviour is lacking. Here we report results for hydrogen at high pressures using ab initio methods, which include a description of the quantum motion of the protons. We determine the melting temperature as a function of pressure and find an atomic solid phase from 500 to 800 GPa, which melts at metallic atomic liquid is stable at temperatures as low as 50 K. The quantum motion of the protons is critical to the low melting temperature reported, as simulations with classical nuclei lead to considerably higher melting temperatures of ~300 K across the entire pressure range considered.

  7. Two-component Fermi-liquid theory - Equilibrium properties of liquid metallic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    It is reported that the transition of condensed hydrogen from an insulating molecular crystal phase to a metallic liquid phase, at zero temperature and high pressure, appears possible. Liquid metallic hydrogen (LMH), comprising interpenetrating proton and electron fluids, would constitute a two-component Fermi liquid with both a very high component-mass ratio and long-range, species-dependent bare interactions. The low-temperature equilibrium properties of LMH are examined by means of a generalization to the case of two components of the phenomenological Landau Fermi-liquid theory, and the low-temperature specific heat, compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient and spin susceptibility are given. It is found that the specific heat and the thermal expansion coefficient are vastly greater in the liquid than in the corresponding solid, due to the presence of proton quasiparticle excitations in the liquid.

  8. Two-component Fermi-liquid theory - Equilibrium properties of liquid metallic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    It is reported that the transition of condensed hydrogen from an insulating molecular crystal phase to a metallic liquid phase, at zero temperature and high pressure, appears possible. Liquid metallic hydrogen (LMH), comprising interpenetrating proton and electron fluids, would constitute a two-component Fermi liquid with both a very high component-mass ratio and long-range, species-dependent bare interactions. The low-temperature equilibrium properties of LMH are examined by means of a generalization to the case of two components of the phenomenological Landau Fermi-liquid theory, and the low-temperature specific heat, compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient and spin susceptibility are given. It is found that the specific heat and the thermal expansion coefficient are vastly greater in the liquid than in the corresponding solid, due to the presence of proton quasiparticle excitations in the liquid.

  9. Capture of liquid hydrogen boiloff with metal hydride absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, M. J.; Golben, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure which uses metal hydrides to capture some of this low pressure (,1 psig) hydrogen for subsequent reliquefaction is described. Of the five normally occurring sources of boil-off vapor the stream associated with the off-loading of liquid tankers during dewar refill was identified as the most cost effective and readily recoverable. The design, fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept capture device, operating at a rate that is commensurate with the evolution of vapor by the target stream, is described. Liberation of the captured hydrogen gas at pressure .15 psig at normal temperatures (typical liquefier compressor suction pressure) are also demonstrated. A payback time of less than three years is projected.

  10. Transport properties of liquid metal hydrogen under high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. C.; March, N. H.

    1972-01-01

    A theory is developed for the compressibility and transport properties of liquid metallic hydrogen, near to its melting point and under high pressure. The interionic force law is assumed to be of the screened Coulomb type, because hydrogen has no core electrons. The random phase approximation is used to obtain the structure factor S(k) of the system in terms of the Fourier transform of this force law. The long wavelenth limit of the structure factor S(o) is related to the compressibility, which is much lower than that of alkali metals at their melting points. The diffusion constant at the melting point is obtained in terms of the Debye frequency, using a frequency spectrum analogous with the phonon spectrum of a solid. A similar argument is used to obtain the combined shear and bulk viscosities, but these depend also on S(o). The transport coefficients are found to be about the same size as those of alkali metals at their melting points.

  11. Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  12. Commentary on the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun III. Insight into Solar Lithium Abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The apparent depletion of lithium represents one of the grea test challenges to modern gaseous solar models. As a result, lithium has been hypothes ized to undergo nuclear burning deep within the Sun. Conversely, extremely low lith ium abundances can be easily accounted for within the liquid metallic hydrogen mo del, as lithium has been hypothesized to greatly stabilize the formation of metalli c hydrogen (E. Zurek et al. A little bit of lithium does a lot for hydrogen. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA , 2009, v. 106, no. 42, 17640–17643. Hence, the abundances of lithium on th e solar surface can be explained, not by requiring the nuclear burning of this elem ent, but rather, by suggesting that the Sun is retaining lithium within the solar body in ord er to help stabilize its liquid metallic hydrogen lattice. Unlike lithium, many of t he other elements synthesized within the Sun should experience powerful lattice exclusio nary forces as they are driven out of the intercalate regions between the layered liquid me tallic hydrogen hexagonal planes (Robitaille J.C. and Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metalli c Hydrogen III. Intercalation and Lattice Exclusion Versus Gravitational Settling and Th eir Consequences Relative to Internal Structure, Surface Activity, and Solar Winds in the Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, in press. As for lithium, its stabilizing role within t he solar interior helps to account for the lack of this element on the surface of the Sun.

  13. Thermochemical Energy Storage through De/Hydrogenation of Organic Liquids: Reactions of Organic Liquids on Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Ulrich; Cholewa, Martin; Diemant, Thomas; Bonatto Minella, Christian; Dittmeyer, Roland; Behm, R Jürgen; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2016-06-08

    A study of the reactions of liquid acetone and toluene on transition metal hydrides, which can be used in thermal energy or hydrogen storage applications, is presented. Hydrogen is confined in TiFe, Ti0.95Zr0.05Mn1.49V0.45Fe0.06 ("Hydralloy C5"), and V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 after contact with acetone. Toluene passivates V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 completely for hydrogen desorption while TiFe is only mildly deactivated and desorption is not blocked at all in the case of Hydralloy C5. LaNi5 is inert toward both organic liquids. Gas chromatography (GC) investigations reveal that CO, propane, and propene are formed during hydrogen desorption from V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 in liquid acetone, and methylcyclohexane is formed in the case of liquid toluene. These reactions do not occur if dehydrogenated samples are used, which indicates an enhanced surface reactivity during hydrogen desorption. Significant amounts of carbon-containing species are detected at the surface and subsurface of acetone- and toluene-treated V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The modification of the surface and subsurface chemistry and the resulting blocking of catalytic sites is believed to be responsible for the containment of hydrogen in the bulk. The surface passivation reactions occur only during hydrogen desorption of the samples.

  14. Low-temperature metallic liquid hydrogen: an ab-initio path-integral molecular dynamics perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji; Li, Xin-Zheng; Zhang, Qianfan; Probert, Matthew; Pickard, Chris; Needs, Richard; Michaelides, Angelos; Wang, Enge

    2013-03-01

    Experiments and computer simulations have shown that the melting temperature of solid hydrogen drops with pressure above about 65 GPa, suggesting that a low temperature liquid state might exist. It has also been suggested that this liquid state might be non-molecular and metallic, although evidence for such behaviour is lacking. Using a combination of ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics and the two-phase methods, we have simulated the melting of solid hydrogen under finite temperatures. We found an atomic solid phase from 500 to 800 GPa which melts at < 200 K. Beyond this and up to pressures of 1,200 GPa a metallic atomic liquid is stable at temperatures as low as 50 K. The quantum motion of the protons is critical to the low melting temperature in this system as ab initio simulations with classical nuclei lead to a considerably higher melting temperature of ~300 K across the entire pressure range considered.

  15. Application of Proton Conductors to Hydrogen Monitoring for Liquid Metal and Molten Salt Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Masatoshi; Muroga, Takeo; Katahira, Koji; Oshima, Tomoko

    The chemical control of impurity such as hydrogen and oxygen in coolants is one of the critical issues for the development of liquid metal cooled fast reactors and self-cooled liquid breeder blankets for fusion reactors. Especially, hydrogen (isotopes) level is the key parameter for corrosion and mechanical properties of the in-reactor components. For fission reactors, the monitor of hydrogen level in the melt is important for safety operation. The control of tritium is essential for the tritium breeding performance of the fusion reactors. Therefore, on-line hydrogen sensing is a key technology for these systems. In the present study, conceptual design for the on-line hydrogen sensor to be used in liquid sodium (Na), lead (Pb), lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi), lithium (Li), lead-lithium (Pb-17Li) and molten salt LiF-BeF2 (Flibe) was performed. The cell of hydrogen sensor is made of a solid electrolyte. The solid electrolyte proposed in this study is the CaZrO3-based ceramics, which is well-known as proton conducting ceramics. In this concept, the cell is immersed into the melt which is containing the hydrogen at the activity of PH1 of ambient atmosphere. Then, the cell is filled with Ar-H2 mixture gas at regulated hydrogen activity of PH2. The electromotive force (EMF) is obtained by the proton conduction in the electro chemical system expressed as Pt, Melt(PH1) | Proton conductor | PH2, Pt. The Nernst equation is used for the evaluation of the hydrogen activity from the obtained EMF. The evaluations of expected performance of the sensor in liquid Na, Pb, Pb-Bi, Pb-17Li, Li and Flibe were carried out by means of the measurement test in gas atmosphere at hydrogen activities equivalent to those for the melts in the reactor conditions. In the test, the hydrogen activity in the gas varied from 2.2x10-14 to 1. The sensor exhibited good response, stability and reproducibility.

  16. Commentary on the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun: Insight Relative to Coronal Holes, Sunspots, and Solar Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available While mankind will always remain unable to sample the interior of the Sun, the presence of sunspots and coronal holes can provide clues as to its subsurface structure. Insight relative to the solar body can also be gained by recognizing that the Sun must exist in the condensed state and support a discrete lattice structure, as required for the production of its continuous spectrum. In this regard, the layered liquid metallic hydrogen lattice advanced as a condensed model of the Sun (Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen: A Building Block for the Liquid Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2011, v. 3, 60–74; Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II: A Critical Assessment of Current and Primordial Helium Levels in Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, 35–47; Robitaille J.C. and Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen III. Intercalation and Lattice Exclusion Versus Gravitational Settling and Their Consequences Relative to Internal Structure, Surface Activity, and Solar Winds in the Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, in press provides the ability to add structure to the solar interior. This constitutes a significant advantage over the gaseous solar models. In fact, a layered liquid metallic hydrogen lattice and the associated intercalation of non-hydrogen elements can help to account for the position of sunspots and coronal holes. At the same time, this model provides a greater understanding of the mechanisms which drive solar winds and activity.

  17. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II. A Critical Assessment of Current and Primordial Helium Levels in the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Before a solar model becomes viable in astrophysics, one mus t consider how the ele- mental constitution of the Sun was ascertained, especially relative to its principle com- ponents: hydrogen and helium. Liquid metallic hydrogen has been proposed as a solar structural material for models based on condensed matter (e .g. Robitaille P.-M. Liq- uid Metallic Hydrogen: A Building Block for the Liquid Sun. Progr. Phys. , 2011, v. 3, 60–74. There can be little doubt that hydrogen plays a d ominant role in the uni- verse and in the stars; the massive abundance of hydrogen in t he Sun was established long ago. Today, it can be demonstrated that the near isointe nse nature of the Sun’s Balmer lines provides strong confirmatory evidence for a dis tinct solar surface. The situation relative to helium remains less conclusive. Stil l, helium occupies a prominent role in astronomy, both as an element associated with cosmol ogy and as a byproduct of nuclear energy generation, though its abundances within the Sun cannot be reliably estimated using theoretical approaches. With respect to th e determination of helium lev- els, the element remains spectroscopically silent at the le vel of the photosphere. While helium can be monitored with ease in the chromosphere and the prominences of the corona using spectroscopic methods, these measures are hig hly variable and responsive to elevated solar activity and nuclear fragmentation. Dire ct assays of the solar winds are currently viewed as incapable of providing definitive in formation regarding solar helium abundances. As a result, insight relative to helium r emains strictly based on the- oretical estimates which couple helioseismological appro aches to metrics derived from solar models. Despite their “state of the art” nature, heliu m estimates based on solar models and helioseismology are suspect on several fronts, i ncluding their reliance on solar opacities. The best knowledge can only come from the so

  18. Discovery of New Type of Exoplanets Made of Liquid Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor Torres, L. M.; Coziol, R.; Schröeder, K.-P.; Caretta, C. A.

    2017-07-01

    The study of exoplanets does not only consist in finding them, but also in establishing and understanding their physical characteristics. One of the most important results so far is that many exoplanets might possess internal structures than differ significantly from what is observable in the solar system, like, for example, Hot Jupiters and Super-Earths. In our study, we have created a new diagnostic diagram, the BGP diagram that allows to separate exoplanets according to their possible physical structures. We have also introduced a different physical boundary that allows us to identified a new type of massive exoplanets that are Self-Gravitating (SG). By comparing their mass-radius relation (MRR) with those of other exoplanets, and with low-mass stars like Brown Dwarf, we have discovered that the SG exoplanets may have a structure that is different from any other exoplanet observed so far. Comparison with structure model suggests the SG exoplanets would be formed of liquid metallic hydrogen.

  19. Metal nanoparticle/ionic liquid/cellulose: new catalytically active membrane materials for hydrogenation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelesky, Marcos A; Scheeren, Carla W; Foppa, Lucas; Pavan, Flavio A; Dias, Silvio L P; Dupont, Jairton

    2009-07-13

    Transition metal-containing membrane films of 10, 20, and 40 μm thickness were obtained by the combination of irregularly shaped nanoparticles with monomodal size distributions of 4.8 ± 1.1 nm (Rh(0)) and 3.0 ± 0.4 nm (Pt(0)) dispersed in the ionic liquid (IL) 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (BMI·(NTf)(2)) with a syrup of cellulose acetate (CA) in acetone. The Rh(0) and Pt(0) metal concentration increased proportionally with increases in film thickness up to 20 μm, and then the material became metal saturated. The presence of small and stable Rh(0) or Pt(0) nanoparticles induced an augmentation in the CA/IL film surface areas. The augmentation of the IL content resulted in an increase of elasticity and decrease in tenacity and toughness, whereas the stress at break was not influenced. The introduction of IL probably causes an increase in the separation between the cellulose macromolecules that results in a higher flexibility, lower viscosity, and better formability of the cellulose material. The nanoparticle/IL/CA combinations exhibit an excellent synergistic effect that enhances the activity and durability of the catalyst for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene. The nanoparticle/IL/cellulose acetate film membranes display higher catalytic activity (up to 7353 h(-1) for the 20 μm film of CA/IL/Pt(0)) and stability than the nanoparticles dispersed only in the IL.

  20. The effect of a micro bubble dispersed gas phase on hydrogen isotope transport in liquid metals under nuclear irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fradera, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The present work intend to be a first step towards the understanding and quantification of the hydrogen isotope complex phenomena in liquid metals for nuclear technology. Liquid metals under nuclear irradiation in,e.g., breeding blankets of a nuclear fusion reactor would generate tritium which is to be extracted and recirculated as fuel. At the same time that tritium is bred, helium is also generated and may precipitate in the form of nano bubbles. Other liquid metal systems of a nuclear reactor involve hydrogen isotope absorption processes, e.g., tritium extraction system. Hence, hydrogen isotope absorption into gas bubbles modelling and control may have a capital importance regarding design, operation and safety. Here general models for hydrogen isotopes transport in liquid metal and absorption into gas phase, that do not depend on the mass transfer limiting regime, are exposed and implemented in OpenFOAMR CFD tool for 0D to 3D simulations. Results for a 0D case show the impact of a He dispersed phase of na...

  1. Liquid hydrogen in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumi, S. [Iwatani Corp., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Overseas Business Development

    2009-07-01

    Japan's Iwatani Corporation has focused its attention on hydrogen as the ultimate energy source in future. Unlike the United States, hydrogen use and delivery in liquid form is extremely limited in the European Union and in Japan. Iwatani Corporation broke through industry stereotypes by creating and building Hydro Edge Co. Ltd., Japan's largest liquid hydrogen plant. It was established in 2006 as a joint venture between Iwatani and Kansai Electric Power Group in Osaka. Hydro Edge is Japan's first combined liquid hydrogen and ASU plant, and is fully operational. Liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen and liquid argon are separated from air using the cryogenic energy of liquefied natural gas fuel that is used for power generation. Liquid hydrogen is produced efficiently and simultaneously using liquid nitrogen. Approximately 12 times as much hydrogen in liquid form can be transported and supplied as pressurized hydrogen gas. This technology is a significant step forward in the dissemination and expansion of hydrogen in a hydrogen-based economy.

  2. Metallic hydrogen research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, T.J.; Hawke, R.S.

    1978-11-16

    Theoretical studies predict that molecular hydrogen can be converted to the metallic phase at very high density and pressure. These conditions were achieved by subjecting liquid hydrogen to isentropic compression in a magnetic-flux compression device. Hydrogen became electrically conducting at a density of about 1.06 g/cm/sup 3/ and a calculated pressure of about 2 Mbar. In the experimental device, a cylindrical liner, on implosion by high explosive, compresses a magnetic flux which in turn isentropically compresses a hydrogen sample; coaxial conical anvils prevent escape of the sample during compression. One anvil contains a coaxial cable that uses alumina ceramic as an insulator; this probe allows continuous measurement of the electrical conductivity of the hydrogen. A flash x-ray radiograph exposed during the experiment records the location of the sample-tube boundaries and permits calculation of the sample density. The theoretical underpinnings of the metallic transition of hydrogen are briefly summarized, and the experimental apparatus and technique, analytical methods, and results are described. 9 figures.

  3. Metal nanoparticles/ionic liquid/cellulose: polymeric membrane for hydrogenation reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Alexandre Gelesky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodium and platinum nanoparticles were supported in polymeric membranes with 10, 20 and 40 µm thickness. The polymeric membranes were prepared combining cellulose acetate and the ionic liquid (IL 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonylimide (BMI.(NTf2. The presence of metal nanoparticles induced an increase in the polymeric membrane surface areas. The increase of the IL content resulted in an improvement of elasticity and decrease in tenacity and toughness, whereas the stress at break was not affected. The presence of IL probably causes an increase in the separation between the cellulose molecules that result in a higher flexibility and processability of the polymeric membrane. The CA/IL/M(0 combinations exhibit an excellent synergistic effect that enhances the activity and durability of the catalyst for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene. The CA/IL/M(0 polymeric membrane displays higher catalytic activity (up to 7.353 h-1 for the 20 mm of CA/IL/Pt(0 and stability than the nanoparticles dispersed only in the IL.

  4. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VII. Further Insights into the Chromosphere and Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the liquid metallic hydrogen model of the Sun, the chromosphere is responsible for the capture of atomic hydrogen in the solar atmosphere and its eventual re-entry onto the photospheric surface (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere. Prog. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L15–L21. As for the corona, it represents a diffuse region containing both gaseous plasma and condensed matter with elevated electron affinity (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere V. On the Nature of the Corona. Prog. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L22–L25. Metallic hydrogen in the corona is thought to enable the continual harvest of electrons from the outer reaches of the Sun, thereby preserving the neutrality of the solar body. The rigid rotation of the corona is offered as the thirty-third line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter. Within the context of the gaseous models of the Sun, a 100 km thick transition zone has been hypothesized to exist wherein temperatures increase dramatically from 104–106 K. Such extreme transitional temperatures are not reasonable given the trivial physical scale of the proposed transition zone, a region adopted to account for the ultra-violet emission lines of ions such as C IV, O IV, and Si IV. In this work, it will be argued that the transition zone does not exist. Rather, the intermediate ionization states observed in the solar atmosphere should be viewed as the result of the simultaneous transfer of protons and electrons onto condensed hydrogen structures, CHS. Line emissions from ions such as C IV, O IV, and Si IV are likely to be the result of condensation reactions, manifesting the involvement of species such as CH4, SiH4, H3O+ in the synthesis of CHS in the chromosphere. In addition, given the presence of a true solar surface at the level of the photosphere in the liquid metallic hydrogen model

  5. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available of hydrogen in metals processing and treatment identified, and mechanisms for hydrogen entry into a ferritic surface are discussed. The differences between hydrogen attack of ferritic steels and copper alloys are contrasted, and an unusual case study...

  6. Gas-Liquid Precipitation of Water Dissolved Heavy Metal Ions Using Hydrogen Sulfide Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Tarazi, Mousa

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation of solids promoted by gas-liquid reactions is applied in many industrial processes such as the production of ammonium phosphate, ammonium sulphate, barium carbonate, calcium carbonate, calcium fluoride, ypsum (calcium sulphate), goethite, sodium bicarbonate, strontium carbonate and terephthalic acid. In ddition gas-liquid precipitation can be applied in gas cleaning, heavy metal removal and in biotechnology. Despite the importance of this subject no extensive studies have yet be...

  7. Solution behavior of hydrogen isotopes and other non-metallic elements in liquid lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroni, V.A.; Calaway, W.F.; Veleckis, E.; Yonco, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    Results of experimental studies to measure selected thermodynamic properties for systems of lithium with non-metallic elements are reported. Investigations of the Li-H, Li-D, and Li-T systems have led to the elucidation of the dilute solution behavior and the H/D/T isotope effects. In the case of the Li-H and Li-D systems, the principal features of the respective phase diagrams have been delineated. The solubility of Li-D in liquid lithium has been measured down to 200/sup 0/C. The solubility of Li/sub 3/N in liquid lithium and the thermal decomposition of Li/sub 3/N have also been studied. From these data, the free energy of formation of Li/sub 3/N and the Sieverts' constant for dissolution of nitrogen in lithium have been determined. Based on studies of the distribution of non-metallic elements between liquid lithium and selected molten salts, it appears that molten salt extraction offers promise as a means of removing these impurity elements (e.g., H, D, T, O, N, C) from liquid lithium.

  8. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen III. Intercalation and Lattice Exclusion Versus Gravitational Settling and Their Consequences Relative to Internal Structure, Surface Activity, and Solar Winds in the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Invocation of a liquid metallic hydrogen model (Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydro- gen: A Building Block for the Liquid Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2011, v. 3, 60–74; Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II: A Critical Assessment of Current and Primordial He- lium Levels in Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, 35–47 brings with it a set of advantages for understanding solar physics which will always remain unavailable to the gaseous models. Liquids characteristically act as solvents and incorporate solutes within their often fleeting structural matrix. They possess widely varying solubility products and often reject the solute altogether. In that case, the solute becomes immiscible. “Lattice exclusion” can be invoked for atoms which attempt to incorporate themselves into liquid metallic hydrogen. In order to conserve the integrity of its conduction bands, it is antic- ipated that a graphite-like metallic hydrogen lattice should not permit incorporation of other elements into its in-plane hexagonal hydrogen framework. Based on the physics observed in the intercalation compounds of graphite, non-hydrogen atoms within liq- uid metallic hydrogen could reside between adjacent hexagonal proton planes. Conse- quently, the forces associated with solubility products and associated lattice exclusion envisioned in liquid metallic hydrogen for solutes would restrict gravitational settling. The hexagonal metallic hydrogen layered lattice could provide a powerful driving force for excluding heavier elements from the solar body. Herein lies a new exfoliative force to drive both surface activity (flares, coronal mass ejections, prominences and solar winds with serious consequences relative to the p–p reaction and CNO cycle in the Sun. At the same time, the idea that non-hydrogen atomic nuclei can exist between layers of metallic hydrogen leads to a fascinating array of possibilities with respect to nucleosyn- thesis. Powerful parallels can be drawn to the

  9. On the ground state of metallic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, S.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1978-01-01

    A proposed liquid ground state of metallic hydrogen at zero temperature is explored and a variational upper bound to the ground state energy is calculated. The possibility that the metallic hydrogen is a liquid around the metastable point (rs = 1.64) cannot be ruled out. This conclusion crucially hinges on the contribution to the energy arising from the third order in the electron-proton interaction which is shown here to be more significant in the liquid phase than in crystals.

  10. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VI. Helium in the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen and hydrides have recently been advanced as vital agents in the generation of emission spectra in the chromosphere. This is a result of the role they play in the formation of condensed hydrogen structures (CHS within the chromosphere (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 3, 15–21. Next to hydrogen, helium is perhaps the most intriguing component in this region of the Sun. Much like other elements, which combine with hydrogen to produce hydrides, helium can form the well-known helium hydride molecular ion, HeH+, and the excited neutral helium hydride molecule, HeH∗. While HeH+ is hypothesized to be a key cosmologicalmolecule, its possible presence in the Sun, and that of its excited neutral counterpart, has not been considered. Still, these hydrides are likely to play a role in the synthesis of CHS, as the He I and He II emission lines strongly suggest. In this regard, the study of helium emission spectra can provide insight into the condensed nature of the Sun, especially when considering the 10830 Å line associated with the 23P→2 3S triplet state transition. This line is strong in solar prominences and can be seen clearly on the disk. The excessive population of helium triplet states cannot be adequately explained using the gaseous models, since these states should be depopulated by collisional processes. Conversely, when He-based molecules are used to build CHS in a liquid metallic hydrogen model, an ever increasing population of the 23S and 23P states might be expected. The overpopulation of these triplet states leads to the conclusion that these emission lines are unlikely to be produced through random collisional or photon excitation, as required by the gaseous models. This provides a significant hurdle for these models. Thus, the strong 23P→2 3S lines and the overpopulation of the helium triplet

  11. Novel developments in hydrogen storage, hydrogen activation and ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroodian, Amir

    2010-12-03

    This dissertation is divided into three chapters. Recently, metal-free hydrogen activation using phosphorous compounds has been reported in science magazine. We have investigated the interaction between hydrogen and phosphorous compounds in presence of strong Lewis acids (chapter one). A new generation of metal-free hydrogen activation, using amines and strong Lewis acids with sterically demanding nature, was already developed in our group. Shortage of high storage capacity using large substitution to improve sterical effect led us to explore the amine borane derivatives, which are explained in chapter two. Due to the high storage capacity of hydrogen in aminoborane derivatives, we have explored these materials to extend hydrogen release. These compounds store hydrogen as proton and hydride on adjacent atoms or ions. These investigations resulted in developing hydrogen storage based on ionic liquids containing methyl guanidinium cation. Then we have continued to develop ionic liquids based on methyl guanidinium cation with different anions, such as tetrafluoro borate (chapter three). We have replaced these anions with transition metal anions to investigate hydrogen bonding and catalytic activity of ionic liquids. This chapter illustrates the world of ionic liquid as a green solvent for organic, inorganic and catalytic reactions and combines the concept of catalysts and solvents based on ionic liquids. The catalytic activity is investigated particularly with respect to the interaction with CO{sub 2}. (orig.)

  12. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The chromosphere is the site of weak emission lines characterizing the flash spectrum observed for a few seconds during a total eclipse. This layer of the solar atmosphere is known to possess an opaque Hα emission and a great number of spicules, which can extend well above the photosphere. A stunning variety of hydrogen emission lines have been observed in this region. The production of these lines has provided the seventeenth line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter (Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II: A critical assessment of current and primordial helium levels in Sun. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 2, 35–47. Contrary to the gaseous solar models, the simplest mechanism for the production of emission lines is the evaporation of excited atoms from condensed surfaces existing within the chromosphere, as found in spicules. This is reminiscent of the chemiluminescence which occurs during the condensation of silver clusters (Konig L., Rabin I., Schultze W., and Ertl G. Chemiluminescence in the Agglomeration of Metal Clusters. Science, v. 274, no. 5291, 1353–1355. The process associated with spicule formation is an exothermic one, requiring the transport of energy away from the site of condensation. As atoms leave localized surfaces, their electrons can occupy any energy level and, hence, a wide variety of emission lines are produced. In this regard, it is hypothesized that the presence of hydrides on the Sun can also facilitate hydrogen condensation in the chromosphere. The associated line emission from main group and transition elements constitutes the thirtieth line of evidence that the Sun is condensed matter. Condensation processes also help to explain why spicules manifest an apparently constant temperature over their entire length. Since the corona supports magnetic field lines, the random orientations associated with spicule formation suggests that the hydrogen condensates in the chromosphere are not metallic in

  13. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere V. On the Nature of the Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The E-corona is the site of numerous emission lines associated with high ionization states (i.e. FeXIV-FeXXV. Modern gaseous models of the Sun require that these states are produced by atomic irradiation, requiring the sequential removal of electrons to infinity, without an associated electron acceptor. This can lead to computed temperatures in the corona which are unrealistic (i.e. ∼30–100 MK contrasted to solar core values of ∼16 MK. In order to understand the emission lines of the E-corona, it is vital to recognize that they are superimposed upon the K-corona, which produces a continuous spectrum, devoid of Fraunhofer lines, arising from this same region of the Sun. It has been advanced that the K-corona harbors self-luminous condensed matter (Robitaille P.M. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere II. Continuous Emission and Condensed Matter Within the Corona. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L8–L10; Robitaille P.M. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere III. Importance of Continuous Emission Spectra from Flares, Coronal Mass Ejections, Prominences, and Other Coronal Structures. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L11–L14. Condensed matter can possess elevated electron affinities which may strip nearby atoms of their electrons. Such a scenario accounts for the high ionization states observed in the corona: condensed matter acts to harness electrons, ensuring the electrical neutrality of the Sun, despite the flow of electrons and ions in the solar winds. Elevated ionization states reflect the presence of materials with high electron affinities in the corona, which is likely to be a form of metallic hydrogen, and does not translate into elevated temperatures in this region of the solar atmosphere. As a result, the many mechanisms advanced to account for coronal heating in the gaseous models of the Sun

  14. Kinetics of Liquid-Phase Hydrogenation of Benzene in a Metal Hydride Slurry System Formed by M1Ni5 and Benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代世耀; 徐国华; 安越; 陈长聘; 陈立新; 王启东

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of liquid-phase hydrogenation of benzene in misch metal nickel-five (M1Ni5) and benzene slurry system was studied by investigating the influences of the reaction temperature, pressure, alloy concentration and stirring speed on the mass transfer-reaction processes inside the slurry. The results show that the whole process is controlled by the reaction at the surface of the catalyst. The mass transfer resistance at gas-liquid interface and that from the bulk liquid phase to the surface of the catalyst particles are negligible. The apparent reaction rate is zero order for benzene concentration and first order for hydrogen concentration in the liquid phase. The kinetic model obtained fits the experimental data very well. The apparent activation energy of the hydrogen absorption reaction of M1Ni5-C6H6 slurry system is 42.16 kJ·mo1-1.

  15. Microwave irradiation for the facile synthesis of transition-metal nanoparticles (NPs) in ionic liquids (ILs) from metal-carbonyl precursors and Ru-, Rh-, and Ir-NP/IL dispersions as biphasic liquid-liquid hydrogenation nanocatalysts for cyclohexene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Christian; Redel, Engelbert; Abu-Shandi, Khalid; Thomann, Ralf; Manyar, Haresh; Hardacre, Christopher; Janiak, Christoph

    2010-03-22

    Stable chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, manganese, rhenium, ruthenium, osmium, cobalt, rhodium, and iridium metal nanoparticles (M-NPs) have been reproducibly obtained by facile, rapid (3 min), and energy-saving 10 W microwave irradiation (MWI) under an argon atmosphere from their metal-carbonyl precursors [M(x)(CO)(y)] in the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIm][BF(4)]). This MWI synthesis is compared to UV-photolytic (1000 W, 15 min) or conventional thermal decomposition (180-250 degrees C, 6-12 h) of [M(x)(CO)(y)] in ILs. The MWI-obtained nanoparticles have a very small (IL dispersions (characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), transmission electron diffraction (TED), and dynamic light scattering (DLS)). The ruthenium, rhodium, or iridium nanoparticle/IL dispersions are highly active and easily recyclable catalysts for the biphasic liquid-liquid hydrogenation of cyclohexene to cyclohexane with activities of up to 522 (mol product) (mol Ru)(-1) h(-1) and 884 (mol product) (mol Rh)(-1) h(-1) and give almost quantitative conversion within 2 h at 10 bar H(2) and 90 degrees C. Catalyst poisoning experiments with CS(2) (0.05 equiv per Ru) suggest a heterogeneous surface catalysis of Ru-NPs.

  16. Gas-Liquid Precipitation of water dissolved heavy metal ions using hydrogen sulfide gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Tarazi, M.Y.M.

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation of solids promoted by gas-liquid reactions is applied in many industrial processes such as the production of ammonium phosphate, ammonium sulphate, barium carbonate, calcium carbonate, calcium fluoride, ypsum (calcium sulphate), goethite, sodium bicarbonate, strontium carbonate and

  17. Gas-Liquid Precipitation of Water Dissolved Heavy Metal Ions Using Hydrogen Sulfide Gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Tarazi, Mousa

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation of solids promoted by gas-liquid reactions is applied in many industrial processes such as the production of ammonium phosphate, ammonium sulphate, barium carbonate, calcium carbonate, calcium fluoride, ypsum (calcium sulphate), goethite, sodium bicarbonate, strontium carbonate and te

  18. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VIII. "Futile" Processes in the Chromosphere (Letters to Progress in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the liquid metallic hydrogen solar model (LMHSM, the chr omosphere is the site of hydrogen condensation (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metall ic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosp here. Progr. Phys. , 2013, v. 3, L15–L21. Line emission is associated with the di ssipation of energy from condensed hydrogen structures, CHS. Previously considere d reactions resulted in hy- drogen atom or cluster addition to the site of condensation. In this work, an additional mechanism is presented, wherein atomic or molecular specie s interact with CHS, but do not deposit hydrogen. These reactions channel heat away f rom CHS, enabling them to cool even more rapidly. As a result, this new class of proce sses could complement true hydrogen condensation reactions by providing an auxil iary mechanism for the re- moval of heat. Such ‘futile’ reactions lead to the formation of activated atoms, ions, or molecules and might contribute to line emission from such sp ecies. Evidence that com- plimentary ‘futile’ reactions might be important in the chr omosphere can be extracted from lineshape analysis.

  19. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  20. Liquid Phase Hydrogenation of Benzalacetophenone:Effect of Solvent,Catalyst Support,Catalytic Metal and Reaction Conditions%Liquid Phase Hydrogenation of Benzalacetophenone: Effect of Solvent, Catalyst Support, Catalytic Metal and Reaction Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Achim STOLLE; Christine SCHMOGER; Bernd ONDRUSCHKA; Werner BONRATH; Thomas F. KELLER; Klaus D. JANDT

    2011-01-01

    Innovative catalysts based on a “porous glass” support material were developed and investigated for the reduction of benzalacetophenone.The easy preparation conditions and possibility to use different metals (e.g.Pd,Pt,Rh) for impregnation gave a broad variety of these catalysts.Hydrogenation experiments with these supported catalysts were carried out under different hydrogen pressures and temperatures.Porous glass catalysts with Pd as the active component gave chemoselective hydrogenation of benzalacetophenone,while Pt- and Rh-catalysts tended to further reduce the carbonyl group,especially at elevated hydrogen pressures and temperatures.Kinetic analysis of the reactions revealed these had zero order kinetics,which was independent of the type of porous glass support and solvent used.

  1. Molecular and Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    interaction between hydroge , molecules. Fortunately, theoretical calculation of the pair potential from first principles at small intermolecular...three- ,’ody effect is a general phenomenon for all highly condensed states of molecular hydroger The effect of t’ ,ree-body contribution to the...parameters of metallic hydroge -. have given more consis- tent results than those for the molecular hydrogen. For example, the r-sults of the earliest

  2. Metallic Hydrogen - Potentially a High Energy Rocket Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, John; Silvera, Ike

    2007-01-01

    Pure metallic hydrogen is predicted to have a specific impulse (Isp) of 1700 seconds, but the reaction temperature is too high for current engine materials. Diluting metallic hydrogen with liquid hydrogen can reduce the reaction temperature to levels compatible with current material limits and still provide an Isp greater than 900 s. Metallic hydrogen has not yet been produced on earth, but experimental techniques exist that may change this situation. This paper will provide a brief description of metallic hydrogen and the status of experiments that may soon produce detectable quantities of this material in the lab. Also provided are some characteristics for diluted metallic hydrogen engines and launch vehicles.

  3. Possibility of obtaining atomic metallic hydrogen by electrochemical method

    OpenAIRE

    Galushkin, Nikolay E.; Yazvinskaya, Nataliya N.; Galushkin, Dmitriy N.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we show, that atomic metallic hydrogen (AMH) is formed inside of sintered oxide-nickel electrodes of nickel-cadmium battery over a long period of electrochemical hydrogenation (more than five years). It was established that density AMH is 12 times higher, than the density of liquid molecular hydrogen, the specific energy of hydrogen recombination is 20 times higher than of liquid hydrogen-oxygen fuel. At the room temperature AMH is a good conductor, but not a superconductor.

  4. Leaching performance of imidazolium based ionic liquids in the presence of hydrogen peroxide for recovery of metals from brass waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelicarslan, A.; Saridede, M. N.

    2016-05-01

    The application of ionic liquids (ILs), 1-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate (HmimHSO{sub 4}), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate (EmimHSO{sub 4}) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BmimCl) as leaching agents was investigated in the leaching of copper and zinc from brass waste in the presence of an oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Factors that affect copper and zinc dissolution rates such as ionic liquid concentration, time and temperature were investigated. The results indicated that zinc was dissolved in leach solutions with EmimHSO{sub 4} and HmimHSO{sub 4}, completely. Temperature had no considerable influence on copper dissolution rate whilst the rate increased with decreasing IL concentration. In the EmimHSO{sub 4} system, higher copper recoveries were achieved with 40% and 60% IL concentrations compared with IL concentrations of 20% and 80% at 40 degree centigrade leaching temperature. Copper dissolution rates decreased with EmimHSO{sub 4} concentration at 60 degree centigrade and 80 degree centigrade in the following order; 40%>20%>60%>80%. On the other hand the leaching system with BmimCl generally resulted in poor extractions of copper and zinc. (Author)

  5. Liquid metal enabled microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhu, Jiu Yang; Schaefer, Samira; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Dickey, Michael D

    2017-03-14

    Several gallium-based liquid metal alloys are liquid at room temperature. As 'liquid', such alloys have a low viscosity and a high surface tension while as 'metal', they have high thermal and electrical conductivities, similar to mercury. However, unlike mercury, these liquid metal alloys have low toxicity and a negligible vapor pressure, rendering them much safer. In comparison to mercury, the distinguishing feature of these alloys is the rapid formation of a self-limiting atomically thin layer of gallium oxide over their surface when exposed to oxygen. This oxide layer changes many physical and chemical properties of gallium alloys, including their interfacial and rheological properties, which can be employed and modulated for various applications in microfluidics. Injecting liquid metal into microfluidic structures has been extensively used to pattern and encapsulate highly deformable and reconfigurable electronic devices including electrodes, sensors, antennas, and interconnects. Likewise, the unique features of liquid metals have been employed for fabricating miniaturized microfluidic components including pumps, valves, heaters, and electrodes. In this review, we discuss liquid metal enabled microfluidic components, and highlight their desirable attributes including simple fabrication, facile integration, stretchability, reconfigurability, and low power consumption, with promising applications for highly integrated microfluidic systems.

  6. Thermodynamics of liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushnirenko, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    The thermodynamics of a liquid metal based on quantum-mechanical models of the crystal, electronic, and nuclear structures of the metal are derived in this paper. The models are based on such formulations as the Bohr radius, the Boltzmann constant, the Planck Law, the Fermi surface, and the Pauli principle.

  7. Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

    2013-04-23

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

  8. Forty Lines of Evidence for Condensed Matter — The Sun on Trial: Liquid Metallic Hydrogen as a Solar Building Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-10-01

    . Collectively, these lines of evidence provide a systematic challenge to the gaseous models of the Sun and expose the many hurdles faced by modern approaches. Observational astronomynand laboratory physics have remained unable to properly justify claims that the solar body must be gaseous. At the same time, clear signs of condensed matter interspersed with gaseous plasma in the chromosphere and corona have been regrettably dismissed. As such, it is hoped that this exposition will serve as an invitation to consider condensed matter, especially metallic hydrogen, when pondering the phase of the Sun. The Sun is a world so different from our own . . . However [relative to understanding its structure], one must not lose heart; over the past few years science has made a lot of progress, and those who come after us will not fail to make even more. Father Angelo Secchi, S.J., 1875 [1, p. 300, V. I]∗ 1 Introduction A long time ago, men like Gustav Kirchhoff, Johann Z¨ollner, William Thomson (Lord Kelvin, and James Jeans viewed the photosphere (or the solar body as existing in the liquid state [2, 3]. Despite their stature, scientists, since the days of Herbert Spencer and Angelo Secchi, slowly drifted towards ∗Translations from French were executed by the author. the concept that the Sun was a ball

  9. Liquid metal embrittlement mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周国辉; 刘晓敏; 万发荣; 乔利杰; 褚武扬; 张文清; 陈难先; 周富信

    1999-01-01

    Liquid metal embrittlement was studied in the following two aspects. First the first principle and ChenNanxian three-dimensional lattice reverse method were employed to obtain the effective potentials for Al-Ga and GaGa. Then with the molecular dynamics simulation, the influence of liquid metal adsorption on dislocation emission was studied. The simulated result shows that after Ga atoms are adsorbed on the crack plane in Al crystal, the critical stress intensity factor decreases, which changes from 0.5 MPam1/2 (without adsorption) to 0.4 MPam1/2 (with adsorption). The reason for the reduction in the critical intensity stress factor is that Ga adsorption reduces the surface energy of the crack plane. Moreover, 7075 Al alloy adsorbing liquid metal (Hg+3atm%Ga) was in-situ studied in TEM by using a special constant deflection device. The experimental result showed that liquid metal adsorption could facilitate emission, multiplication and motion of dislocations. When this process reached a critical

  10. A novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On the basis that endothermic aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons for H2 production and exothermic liquid phase hydrogenation of organic compounds are carried out under extremely close conditions of temperature and pressure over the same type of catalyst, a novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation has been proposed, in which hydrogen produced from aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons is in situ used for liquid phase hydrogenation of organic compounds. The usage of active hydrogen generated from aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons for liquid catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds could lead to increasing the selectivity to H2 in the aqueous-phase reforming due to the prompt removal of hydrogen on the active centers of the catalyst. Meanwhile, this novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation might be a potential method to improve the selectivity to the desired product in liquid phase catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds. On the other hand, for this novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation, some special facilities for H2 generation, storage and transportation in traditional liquid phase hydrogenation industry process are yet not needed. Thus, it would simplify the working process of liquid phase hydrogenation and increase the energy usage and hydrogen productivity.

  11. Metallic hydrogen: The most powerful rocket fuel yet to exist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvera, Isaac F [Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Cole, John W, E-mail: silvera@physics.harvard.ed [NASA MSFC, Huntsville, AL 35801 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Wigner and Huntington first predicted that pressures of order 25 GPa were required for the transition of solid molecular hydrogen to the atomic metallic phase. Later it was predicted that metallic hydrogen might be a metastable material so that it remains metallic when pressure is released. Experimental pressures achieved on hydrogen have been more than an order of magnitude higher than the predicted transition pressure and yet it remains an insulator. We discuss the applications of metastable metallic hydrogen to rocketry. Metastable metallic hydrogen would be a very light-weight, low volume, powerful rocket propellant. One of the characteristics of a propellant is its specific impulse, I{sub sp}. Liquid (molecular) hydrogen-oxygen used in modern rockets has an Isp of {approx}460s; metallic hydrogen has a theoretical I{sub sp} of 1700s. Detailed analysis shows that such a fuel would allow single-stage rockets to enter into orbit or carry economical payloads to the moon. If pure metallic hydrogen is used as a propellant, the reaction chamber temperature is calculated to be greater than 6000 K, too high for currently known rocket engine materials. By diluting metallic hydrogen with liquid hydrogen or water, the reaction temperature can be reduced, yet there is still a significant performance improvement for the diluted mixture.

  12. Use of triphenyl phosphate as risk mitigant for metal amide hydrogen storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2016-04-26

    A process in a resulting product of the process in which a hydrogen storage metal amide is modified by a ball milling process using an additive of TPP. The resulting product provides for a hydrogen storage metal amide having a coating that renders the hydrogen storage metal amide resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while improving useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  13. Leaching performance of imidazolium based ionic liquids in the presence of hydrogen peroxide for recovery of metals from brass waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilicarslan, Ayfer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of ionic liquids (ILs, 1-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate (HmimHSO4, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate (HmimHSO4 and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BmimCl as leaching agents was investigated in the leaching of copper and zinc from brass waste in the presence of an oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Factors that affect copper and zinc dissolution rates such as ionic liquid concentration, time and temperature were investigated. The results indicated that zinc was dissolved in leach solutions with EmimHSO4 and HmimHSO4, completely. Temperature had no considerable influence on copper dissolution rate whilst the rate increased with decreasing IL concentration. In the EmimHSO4 system, higher copper recoveries were achieved with 40% and 60% IL concentrations compared with IL concentrations of 20% and 80% at 40 °C leaching temperature. Copper dissolution rates decreased with EmimHSO4 concentration at 60 °C and 80 °C in the following order; 40% > 20% > 60% > 80%. On the other hand the leaching system with BmimCl generally resulted in poor extractions of copper and zinc.Este trabajo investiga el uso de líquidos iónicos (LIs, hidrogenosulfato de 1-metillimidazolio (HmimHSO4, hidrogenosulfato de 1-etil-3- metilimidazolio (EmimHSO4 y cloruro de 1-butil-1-metilimidazolio (BmimCl, como agentes de lixiviación de cobre y zinc a partir de residuos de latón en presencia de un oxidante, peróxido de hidrógeno (H2O2. Se estudiaron distintos factores que afectan a la velocidad de disolución del cobre y el zinc, como la concentración del líquido iónico, el tiempo y la temperatura. Los resultados indican que el zinc se disuelve completamente en las disoluciones que contienen EmimHSO4 y HmimHSO4. La temperatura no tiene un efecto significativo en la velocidad de disolución del cobre, mientras que dicha velocidad aumenta al disminuir la concentración del líquido iónico. En los sistemas que contienen EmimHSO4, los mejores

  14. High Temperature Equation of State of Metallic Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    V.T.Shvets

    2016-01-01

    The equation of state of liquid metallic hydrogen is solved numerically. Investigations are carried out at temperatures, which correspond both to the experimental conditions under which metallic hydrogen is produced on earth and the conditions in the cores of giant planets of the solar system such as Jupiter and Saturn. It is assumed that hydrogen is in an atomic state and all its electrons are collectivized. Perturbation theory in the electron and proton interaction is applied to determine t...

  15. Comments on liquid hydrogen absorbers for MICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-02-01

    This report describes the heat transfer problems associatedwith a liquid hydrogen absorber for the MICE experiment. This reportdescribes a technique for modeling heat transfer from the outside world,to the abosrber case and in its vacuum vessel, to the hydrogen and theninto helium gas at 14 K. Also presented are the equation for freeconvection cooling of the liquid hydrogen in the absorber.

  16. Polarized Light from the Sun: Unification of the Corona and Analysis of the Second Solar Spectrum — Further Implications of a Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Solar Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to account for the slight polarization of the continuum towards the limb, propo- nents of the Standard Solar Model (SSM must have recourse to electron or hydrogen- based scattering of light, as no other mechanism is possible in a gaseous Sun. Con- versely, acceptance that the solar body is comprised of condensed matter opens up new avenues in the analysis of this problem, even if the photospheric surface itself is viewed as incapable of emitting polarized light. Thus, the increased disk polarization, from the center to the limb, can be explained by invoking the scattering of light by the at- mosphere above the photosphere. The former is reminiscent of mechanisms which are known to account for the polarization of sunlight in the atmosphere of the Earth. Within the context of the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Solar Model (LMHSM, molecules and small particles, not electrons or hydrogen atoms as required by the SSM, would primarily act as scattering agents in regions also partially comprised of condensed hy- drogen structures (CHS. In addition, the well-known polarization which characterizes the K-corona would become a sign of emission polarization from an anisotropic source, without the need for scattering. In the LMHSM, the K, F, and T- coronas can be viewed as emissive and reflective manifestations of a single corona l entity adopting a radially anisotropic structure, while slowly cooling with altitude above the photosphere. The presence of “dust particles”, advanced by proponents of the SSM, would no longer be required to explain the F and T-corona, as a single cooling structure would account for the properties of the K, F, and T coronas. At the same time, the polarized “Second Solar Spectrum”, characterized by the dominance of certain elemental or ionic spectral lines and an abundance of molecular lines, could be explained in the LMHSM, by first invoking interface polarization and coordination of these species with condensed matter

  17. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One Li

  18. Insulator to Metal Transition in Fluid Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, R Q; Galli, G

    2003-06-15

    The authors have investigated the insulator to metal transition (ITM) in fluid hydrogen using first principles simulations. Both density functional and quantum Monte Carlo calculations show that the electronic energy gap of the liquid vanishes at about 9 fold compression and 3000 K. At these conditions the computed conductivity values are characteristic of a poor metal. These findings are consistent with those of recent shock wave experiments but the computed conductivity is larger than the measured value. From the ab-initio results they conclude that the ITM is driven by molecular dissociation rather than disorder and that both temperature and pressure play a key role in determining structural changes in the fluid.

  19. Microscopic structure of liquid hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Zoppi, M

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen makes the simplest molecular liquid. Nonetheless, due to several different reasons, measuring its microscopic structure has been one of the most challenging tasks in neutron diffraction experiments. The recent development of modern pulsed neutron sources triggered a renewed experimental interest which, in turn, led to new knowledge and also to a more effective use of the classic reactor-based experimental data. The contemporary development of quantum mechanical computer simulation techniques, and a critical comparison among the results of different experiments using steady and pulsed neutron sources, resulted in a quantitatively reliable solution of the problem. (topical review)

  20. Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen Storage Capacity Hydride by weight (%) [1) by volume (g/ml) [2] MgH2 7.00 0.101 Mg2NiH4 3.84 0,081 Mg2CuH4 2.04 - - 27 ...Include Security Classification) Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydrides (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) DelaRosa, Mark J. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME...objective of this program was to develop an economical process for pr-ducing a lightweight hydrogen storage medium by the chemical vapor infiltration

  1. Composite Metal-hydrogen Electrodes for Metal-Hydrogen Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruckman, M W; Wiesmann, H; Strongin, M; Young, K; Fetcenko, M

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and conduct a feasibility study of metallic thin films (multilayered and alloy composition) produced by advanced sputtering techniques for use as anodes in Ni-metal hydrogen batteries. The anodes could be incorporated in thin film solid state Ni-metal hydrogen batteries that would be deposited as distinct anode, electrolyte and cathode layers in thin film devices. The materials could also be incorporated in secondary consumer batteries (i.e. type AF(4/3 or 4/5)) which use electrodes in the form of tapes. The project was based on pioneering studies of hydrogen uptake by ultra-thin Pd-capped metal-hydrogen ratios exceeding and fast hydrogen charging and Nb films, these studies suggested that materials with those of commercially available metal hydride materials discharging kinetics could be produced. The project initially concentrated on gas phase and electrochemical studies of Pd-capped niobium films in laboratory-scale NiMH cells. This extended the pioneering work to the wet electrochemical environment of NiMH batteries and exploited advanced synchrotron radiation techniques not available during the earlier work to conduct in-situ studies of such materials during hydrogen charging and discharging. Although batteries with fast charging kinetics and hydrogen-metal ratios approaching unity could be fabricated, it was found that oxidation, cracking and corrosion in aqueous solutions made pure Nb films-and multiiayers poor candidates for battery application. The project emphasis shifted to alloy films based on known elemental materials used for NiMH batteries. Although commercial NiMH anode materials contain many metals, it was found that 0.24 µm thick sputtered Zr-Ni films cycled at least 50 times with charging efficiencies exceeding 95% and [H]/[M] ratios of 0.7-1.0. Multilayered or thicker Zr-Ni films could be candidates for a thin film NiMH battery that may have practical applications as an integrated power source for

  2. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One Li

  3. Liquid Metal Dynamo Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, W. J.; Choi, Y. H.; Hardy, B. S.; Brown, M. R.

    1997-11-01

    Detection of convected magnetic fields in a small-scale liquid metal dynamo is attempted. Initial experiments will focus on the conversion of toroidal to poloidal flux (a version of the ω effect). A precision vector magnetometer will be used to measure the effect of a rotating magnetofluid on a static magnetic field. Water will be used as a control medium and effects will be compared with a conducting medium (liquid sodium or NaK). A small spherical flask (0.16 m diameter) houses 2 liters of fluid, a teflon stirrer creates an asymmetrical flow pattern, and Helmholtz coils generate a constant magnetic field on the order of 10 gauss. The Reynold's number will be of order unity.

  4. Hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bogdanovic, Borislav; Felderhoff, Michael; Streukens, Guido

    2009-01-01

    ...) are solid-state hydrogen-storage materials with high hydrogen capacities. They can be used in combination with fuel cells as a hydrogen source thus enabling longer operation times compared with classical metal hydrides...

  5. Permeation barrier for lightweight liquid hydrogen tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultheiss, D.

    2007-04-16

    For the future usage of hydrogen as an automotive fuel, its on-board storage is crucial. One approach is the storage of liquid hydrogen (LH2, 20 K) in double-walled, vacuum insulated tanks. The introduction of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) as structural material enables a high potential of reducing the weight in comparison to the state-of-the-art stainless steel tanks. The generally high permeability of hydrogen through plastics, however, can lead to long-term degradation of the insulating vacuum. The derived objective of this dissertation was to find and apply an adequate permeation barrier (liner) on CFRP. The investigated liners were either foils adhered on CFRP specimens or coatings deposited on CFRP specimens. The coatings were produced by means of thermal spraying, metal plating or physical vapor deposition (PVD). The materials of the liners included Al, Au, Cu, Ni and Sn as well as stainless steel and diamond-like carbon. The produced liners were tested for their permeation behavior, thermal shock resistance and adherence to the CFRP substrate. Additionally, SEM micrographs were used to characterize and qualify the liners. The foils, although being a good permeation barrier, adhered weakly to the substrate. Furthermore, leak-free joining of foil segments is a challenge still to be solved. The metal plating liners exhibited the best properties. For instance, no permeation could be detected through a 50 {mu}m thick Cu coating within the accuracy of the measuring apparatus. This corresponds to a reduction of the permeation gas flow by more than factor 7400 compared to uncoated CFRP. In addition, the metal platings revealed a high adherence and thermal shock resistance. The coatings produced by means of thermal spraying and PVD did not show a sufficient permeation barrier effect. After having investigated the specimens, a 170 liter CFRP tank was fully coated with 50 {mu}m Cu by means of metal plating. (orig.)

  6. Hydrogen dominant metallic alloys: high temperature superconductors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, N W

    2004-05-07

    The arguments suggesting that metallic hydrogen, either as a monatomic or paired metal, should be a candidate for high temperature superconductivity are shown to apply with comparable weight to alloys of metallic hydrogen where hydrogen is a dominant constituent, for example, in the dense group IVa hydrides. The attainment of metallic states should be well within current capabilities of diamond anvil cells, but at pressures considerably lower than may be necessary for hydrogen.

  7. Metallic Hydrogen and Nano-Tube Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, John W.

    2004-01-01

    When hydrogen is subjected to enough pressure the atoms will be pressed into close enough proximity that each electron is no longer bound to a single proton. The research objectives is to find whether metallic hydrogen can be produced and once produced will the metallic hydrogen be metastable and remain in the metallic form when the pressure is released.

  8. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2012-04-26

    Conventional storage of large amounts of hydrogen in its molecular form is difficult and expensive because it requires employing either extremely high pressure gas or very low temperature liquid. Because of the importance of hydrogen as a fuel, the DOE has set system targets for hydrogen storage of gravimetric (5.5 wt%) and volumetric (40 g L-1) densities to be achieved by 2015. Given that these are system goals, a practical material will need to have higher capacity when the weight of the tank and associated cooling or regeneration system is considered. The size and weight of these components will vary substantially depending on whether the material operates by a chemisorption or physisorption mechanism. In the latter case, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently been identified as promising adsorbents for hydrogen storage, although little data is available for their sorption behavior. This grant was focused on the study of MOFs with these specific objectives. (1) To examine the effects of functionalization, catenation, and variation of the metal oxide and organic linkers on the low-pressure hydrogen adsorption properties of MOFs. (2) To develop a strategy for producing MOFs with high surface area and porosity to reduce the dead space and increase the hydrogen storage capacity per unit volume. (3) To functionalize MOFs by post synthetic functionalization with metals to improve the adsorption enthalpy of hydrogen for the room temperature hydrogen storage. This effort demonstrated the importance of open metal sites to improve the adsorption enthalpy by the systematic study, and this is also the origin of the new strategy, which termed isoreticular functionalization and metalation. However, a large pore volume is still a prerequisite feature. Based on our principle to design highly porous MOFs, guest-free MOFs with ultrahigh porosity have been experimentally synthesized. MOF-210, whose BET surface area is 6240 m2 g-1 (the highest among porous solids), takes up

  9. Method of foaming a liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, A.K.; Johnson, C.E.

    1980-01-15

    The addition of a small quantity of barium to liquid metal NaK or sodium has been found to promote foam formation and improve bubble retention in the liquid metal. A stable liquid metal foam will provide a more homogeneous liquid metal flow through the channel of a two-phase liquid metal MHD power generator to improve operating efficiency.

  10. Method of foaming a liquid metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Albert K.; Johnson, Carl E.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of a small quantity of barium to liquid metal NaK or sodium has been found to promote foam formation and improve bubble retention in the liquid metal. A stable liquid metal foam will provide a more homogeneous liquid metal flow through the channel of a two-phase liquid metal MHD power generator to improve operating efficiency.

  11. High Temperature Equation of State of Metallic Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Shvets, V T

    2016-01-01

    The equation of state of liquid metallic hydrogen is solved numerically. Investigations are carried out at temperatures, which correspond both to the experimental conditions under which metallic hydrogen is produced on earth and the conditions in the cores of giant planets of the solar system such as Jupiter and Saturn. It is assumed that hydrogen is in an atomic state and all its electrons are collectivized. Perturbation theory in the electron and proton interaction is applied to determine the thermodynamic potentials of metallic hydrogen. The electron subsystem is considered in the randomphase approximation with regard to the exchange interaction and the correlation of electrons in the local field approximation. The interproton interaction is taken into account in the hard spheres approximation. The thermodynamic characteristics of metallic hydrogen are calculated with regard to the zero-, second-, and thirdorder perturbation theory terms. The third-order term proves to be rather essential at moderately hig...

  12. Supported Molten Metal Membranes for Hydrogen Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Ravindra; Ma, Yi Hua; Yen, Pei-Shan; Deveau, Nicholas; Fishtik, Ilie; Mardilovich, Ivan

    2013-09-30

    We describe here our results on the feasibility of a novel dense metal membrane for hydrogen separation: Supported Molten Metal Membrane, or SMMM.1 The goal in this work was to develop these new membranes based on supporting thin films of low-melting, non- precious group metals, e.g., tin (Sn), indium (In), gallium (Ga), or their alloys, to provide a flux and selectivity of hydrogen that rivals the conventional but substantially more expensive palladium (Pd) or Pd alloy membranes, which are susceptible to poisoning by the many species in the coal-derived syngas, and further possess inadequate stability and limited operating temperature range. The novelty of the technology presented numerous challenges during the course of this project, however, mainly in the selection of appropriate supports, and in the fabrication of a stable membrane. While the wetting instability of the SMMM remains an issue, we did develop an adequate understanding of the interaction between molten metal films with porous supports that we were able to find appropriate supports. Thus, our preliminary results indicate that the Ga/SiC SMMM at 550 ºC has a permeance that is an order of magnitude higher than that of Pd, and exceeds the 2015 DOE target. To make practical SMM membranes, however, further improving the stability of the molten metal membrane is the next goal. For this, it is important to better understand the change in molten metal surface tension and contact angle as a function of temperature and gas-phase composition. A thermodynamic theory was, thus, developed, that is not only able to explain this change in the liquid-gas surface tension, but also the change in the solid-liquid surface tension as well as the contact angle. This fundamental understanding has allowed us to determine design characteristics to maintain stability in the face of changing gas composition. These designs are being developed. For further progress, it is also important to understand the nature of solution and

  13. The microscopic structure of the hydrogen liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Zoppi, M; Celli, M; Cuello, G J; Formisano, F; Guarini, E; Magli, R; Neumann, M

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the microscopic structure of liquid para-hydrogen by means of a neutron diffraction experiment on the D4C liquids diffractometer at Institute Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France). This is the first direct neutron diffraction measurement of the static structure factor of hydrogen. The present determination of the microscopic structure of hydrogen is consistent with previous experimental determinations carried out on liquid deuterium and with path integral Monte Carlo simulations. The comparison with recent x-ray determinations is also satisfactory.

  14. Hydrogen Storage in Nanostructured Light Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.

    2009-01-01

    The global energy issues can be solved by the abundantly available hydrogen on earth. Light metals are a compact and safe medium for storing hydrogen. This makes them attractive for vehicular use. Unfortunately, hydrogen uptake and release is slow in light metals at practical temperature and pressur

  15. Hydrogen Storage in Nanostructured Light Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.

    2009-01-01

    The global energy issues can be solved by the abundantly available hydrogen on earth. Light metals are a compact and safe medium for storing hydrogen. This makes them attractive for vehicular use. Unfortunately, hydrogen uptake and release is slow in light metals at practical temperature and

  16. Pad B Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Felicia

    2007-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center is home to two liquid hydrogen storage tanks, one at each launch pad of Launch Complex 39. The liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad B has a significantly higher boil off rate that the liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad A. This research looks at various calculations concerning the at Launch Pad B in an attempt to develop a solution to the excess boil off rate. We will look at Perlite levels inside the tank, Boil off rates, conductive heat transfer, and radiant heat transfer through the tank. As a conclusion to the research, we will model the effects of placing an external insulation to the tank in order to reduce the boil off rate and increase the economic efficiency of the liquid hydrogen storage tanks.

  17. Synthesis of Ultra-Small Palladium Nanoparticles Deposited on CdS Nanorods by Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid: Role of Metal Nanocrystal Size in the Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanbit; Reddy, D Amaranatha; Kim, Yujin; Lee, Seunghee; Ma, Rory; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2017-09-21

    It is imperative to suppress the rate of recombination of photogenerated carriers to improve the semiconductor-catalyzed solar-driven production of hydrogen. To this end, photocatalysts comprising active sunlight-harvesting photo-absorbers and stable metal co-catalysts have attracted significant attention. However, the size, clean surface, and highly dispersed nature of the metal co-catalysts are crucial factors affecting catalyst performance and reaction rate. Nevertheless, most of the available metal nanocrystals have been synthesized by complex procedures using harmful organic templates and stabilizers, affording high-purity compounds with difficulty and high cost. To overcome these problems, in this study, the pulsed laser ablation in liquid approach was utilized to generate palladium and bimetallic palladium-platinum nanoparticles with an average size and distribution by adjusting the laser wavelength and fluence. A high rate of evolution of hydrogen of 130.33 mmol g(-1)  h(-1) was obtained by using the optimized CdS-PdPt catalyst under simulated sunlight irradiation. This value is 51.31 times greater than that observed for bare CdS nanostructures. Furthermore, the amount of hydrogen evolved was significantly better than that obtained by using several other noble-metal co-catalysts deposited on CdS. This proposed strategy is thought to open new avenues for the design of advanced photocatalytic materials for efficient solar-driven production of hydrogen. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-12-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem.

  19. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere II. Continuous Emission and Condensed Matter Within the Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The K-corona, a significant portion of the solar atmosphere, displays a continuous spectrum which closely parallels photospheric emission, though without the presence of overlying Fraunhofer lines. The E-corona exists in the same region and is characterized by weak emission lines from highly ionized atoms. For instance, the famous green emission line from coronium (FeXIV is part of the E-corona. The F-corona exists beyond the K/E-corona and, like the photospheric spectrum, is characterized by Fraunhofer lines. The F-corona represents photospheric light scattered by dust particles in the interplanetary medium. Within the gaseous models of the Sun, the K-corona is viewed as photospheric radiation which has been scattered by relativistic electrons. This scattering is thought to broaden the Fraunhofer lines of the solar spectrum such that they can no longer be detected in the K-corona. Thus, the gaseous models of the Sun account for the appearance of the K-corona by distorting photospheric light, since they are unable to have recourse to condensed matter to directly produce such radiation. Conversely, it is now advanced that the continuous emission of the K-corona and associated emission lines from the E-corona must be interpreted as manifestations of the same phenomenon: condensed matter exists in the corona. It is well-known that the Sun expels large amounts of material from its surface in the form of flares and coronal mass ejections. Given a liquid metallic hydrogen model of the Sun, it is logical to assume that such matter, which exists in the condensed state on the solar surface, continues to manifest its nature once expelled into the corona. Therefore, the continuous spectrum of the K-corona provides the twenty-seventh line of evidence that the Sun is composed of condensed matter.

  20. Thermal properties of hydrogenated liquid natural rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Natural rubber (NR) was modified to form liquid natural rubber (LNR) via photooxidative degradation. Hydrogenated liquid natural rubber (HLNR) was synthesized by using diimide as source of hydrogen which the diimide is produced by thermolysis of p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide (TSH). The structure of HLNR was characterized by determining the changes of main peaks in Fourier Transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra after hydrogenation. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the HLNR had higher decomposition temperature compared to LNR and the decomposition temperature is directly proportional to the percentage of conversion.

  1. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-02-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70 % molar yield towards citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide.

  2. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eero eSalminen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs. Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC. The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70 % molar yield towards citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide.

  3. Development of Automotive Liquid Hydrogen Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainz, G.; Bartlok, G.; Bodner, P.; Casapicola, P.; Doeller, Ch.; Hofmeister, F.; Neubacher, E.; Zieger, A.

    2004-06-01

    Liquid hydrogen (LH2) takes up less storage volume than gas but requires cryogenic vessels. State-of-the-art applications for passenger vehicles consist of double-wall cylindrical tanks that hold a hydrogen storage mass of up to 10 kg. The preferred shell material of the tanks is stainless steel, since it is very resistant against hydrogen brittleness and shows negligible hydrogen permeation. Therefore, the weight of the whole tank system including valves and heat exchanger is more than 100 kg. The space between the inner and outer vessel is mainly used for thermal super-insulation purposes. Several layers of insulation foils and high vacuums of 10-3 Pa reduce the heat entry. The support structures, which keep the inner tank in position to the outer tank, are made of materials with low thermal conductivity, e.g. glass or carbon fiber reinforced plastics. The remaining heat in-leak leads to a boil-off rate of 1 to 3 percent per day. Active cooling systems to increase the stand-by time before evaporation losses occur are being studied. Currently, the production of several liquid hydrogen tanks that fulfill the draft of regulations of the European Integrated Hydrogen Project (EIHP) is being prepared. New concepts of lightweight liquid hydrogen storage tanks will be investigated.

  4. Modeling leaks from liquid hydrogen storage systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents a series of models for describing intended and unintended discharges from liquid hydrogen storage systems. Typically these systems store hydrogen in the saturated state at approximately five to ten atmospheres. Some of models discussed here are equilibrium-based models that make use of the NIST thermodynamic models to specify the states of multiphase hydrogen and air-hydrogen mixtures. Two types of discharges are considered: slow leaks where hydrogen enters the ambient at atmospheric pressure and fast leaks where the hydrogen flow is usually choked and expands into the ambient through an underexpanded jet. In order to avoid the complexities of supersonic flow, a single Mach disk model is proposed for fast leaks that are choked. The velocity and state of hydrogen downstream of the Mach disk leads to a more tractable subsonic boundary condition. However, the hydrogen temperature exiting all leaks (fast or slow, from saturated liquid or saturated vapor) is approximately 20.4 K. At these temperatures, any entrained air would likely condense or even freeze leading to an air-hydrogen mixture that cannot be characterized by the REFPROP subroutines. For this reason a plug flow entrainment model is proposed to treat a short zone of initial entrainment and heating. The model predicts the quantity of entrained air required to bring the air-hydrogen mixture to a temperature of approximately 65 K at one atmosphere. At this temperature the mixture can be treated as a mixture of ideal gases and is much more amenable to modeling with Gaussian entrainment models and CFD codes. A Gaussian entrainment model is formulated to predict the trajectory and properties of a cold hydrogen jet leaking into ambient air. The model shows that similarity between two jets depends on the densimetric Froude number, density ratio and initial hydrogen concentration.

  5. Hydrogen-induced crystallization of an amorphous metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Pil-Ryung [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: cprdream@kookmin.ac.kr; Kim, Yu Chan [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki-Bae [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Hyun-Kwang [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Fleury, Eric [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seung-Hee [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The influence of hydrogen on the structural stability of an amorphous nickel has been analyzed by molecular dynamics simulation. We find that the volume of the amorphous metal increases nonlinearly with the hydrogen concentration and that it crystallizes at a certain critical concentration. The crystallization is shown to be caused by hydrogen-induced transition from the amorphous to the supercooled liquid state, and the change of diffusion mechanism from atomic hopping to string-like collective motion is also observed at the transition.

  6. Crash test of a liquid hydrogen automobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finegold, J. G.; Van Vorst, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Details of the conversion of a U.S. Postal Service mail truck to hydrogen-fueled operation are given. Specific reference is made to design safety considerations. A traffic accident is described that caused the mail truck (mounted on a trailer) to turn on its side at approximately 20 mph and to finally slide to a stop and turn upside down. No one was injured, and there was essentially no damage to the liquid hydrogen fuel system. The mail truck was driven away from the scene of the accident. Suggestions to insure the safety of hydrogen-fueled experimental vehicles are made.

  7. Permeation Barrier for Lightweight Liquid Hydrogen Tanks

    OpenAIRE

    Schultheiß, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    For the future usage of hydrogen as an automotive fuel, its on-board storage is crucial. One approach is the storage of liquid hydrogen (LH2, 20 K) in double-walled, vacuum insulated tanks. The introduction of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) as structural material enables a high potential of reducing the weight in comparison to the state-of-the-art stainless steel tanks. The generally high permeability of hydrogen through plastics, however, can lead to long-term degradation of the ins...

  8. Investigation of metal hydride materials as hydrogen reservoirs for metal-hydrogen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONISCHAK

    1976-01-01

    The performance and suitability of various metal hydride materials were examined for use as possible hydrogen storage reservoirs for secondary metal-hydrogen batteries. Lanthanum pentanickel hydride appears as a probable candidate in terms of stable hydrogen supply under feasible thermal conditions. A kinetic model describing the decomposition rate data of the hydride has been developed.

  9. Metal pad instabilities in liquid metal batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2016-11-01

    Strong variations between the electrical conductivities of electrolyte and metal layers in a liquid metal battery indicate the possibility of 'metal pad' instabilities. Deformations of the electrolyte-metal interfaces cause strong perturbations of electric currents, which, hypothetically, can generate Lorentz forces enhancing the deformations. We investigate this possibility using two models: a mechanical analogy and a two-dimensional linearized approximation. It is found that the battery is prone to instabilities of two types. One is similar to the sloshing-wave instability observed in the Hall-Héroult aluminum reduction cells. Another is new and related to the interactions of current perturbations with the azimuthal magnetic field induced by the base current. Financial support was provided by the U.S. National Science Foundation (Grant CBET 1435269).

  10. Liquid hydrogen in protonic chabazite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecchina, Adriano; Bordiga, Silvia; Vitillo, Jenny G; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Lamberti, Carlo; Spoto, Giuseppe; Bjørgen, Morten; Lillerud, Karl Petter

    2005-05-04

    Due to its fully reversible nature, H(2) storage by molecular adsorption could represent an advantage with respect to dissociative processes, where kinetic effects during the charging and discharging processes are present. A drawback of this strategy is represented by the extremely weak interactions that require low temperature and high pressure. High surface area materials hosting polarizing sites can represent a viable way toward more favorable working conditions. Of these, in this contribution, we have studied hydrogen adsorption in a series of zeolites using volumetric techniques and infrared spectroscopy at 15 K. We have found that in H-SSZ-13 zeolite the cooperative role played by high surface area, internal wall topology, and presence of high binding energy sites (protons) allows hydrogen to densify inside the nanopores at favorable temperature and pressure conditions.

  11. Metal pad instabilities in liquid metal batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    A mechanical analogy is used to analyze the interaction between the magnetic field, electric current and deformation of interfaces in liquid metal batteries. It is found that, during charging or discharging, a sufficiently large battery is prone to instabilities of two types. One is similar to the metal pad instability known for aluminum reduction cells. Another type is new. It is related to the destabilizing effect of the Lorentz force formed by the azimuthal magnetic field induced by the base current and the current perturbations caused by the local variations of the thickness of the electrolyte layer.

  12. Hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yun Hang; Zhang, Lei

    2010-05-25

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are highly attractive materials because of their ultra-high surface areas, simple preparation approaches, designable structures, and potential applications. In the past several years, MOFs have attracted worldwide attention in the area of hydrogen energy, particularly for hydrogen storage. In this review, the recent progress of hydrogen storage in MOFs is presented. The relationships between hydrogen capacities and structures of MOFs are evaluated, with emphasis on the roles of surface area and pore size. The interaction mechanism between H(2) and MOFs is discussed. The challenges to obtain a high hydrogen capacity at ambient temperature are explored.

  13. Metal ammine complexes for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink; Johannessen, Tue

    2005-01-01

    The hopes of using hydrogen as an energy carrier are severely dampened by the fact that there is still no safe, high-density method available for storing hydrogen. We investigate the possibility of using metal ammine complexes as a solid form of hydrogen storage. Using Mg(NH3)(6)Cl-2 as the example......, we show that it can store 9.1% hydrogen by weight in the form of ammonia. The storage is completely reversible, and by combining it with an ammonia decomposition catalyst, hydrogen can be delivered at temperatures below 620 K....

  14. Hydrogen production from glucose in ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assenbaum, D.W.; Taccardi, N.; Berger, M.E.M.; Boesmann, A.; Enzenberger, F.; Woelfel, R.; Wasserscheid, P. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer chemische Reaktionstechnik

    2010-07-01

    technologies suffer from the fact that the overall reaction rates are often restricted by mass and heat transport problems. Lastly, there are severe limitations concerning the feedstock selection as for some important substrates, such as e.g. glucose, the process can only be operated in very diluted systems to avoid rapid tar formation [22,23,24]. In this contribution we describe for the first time a catalytic reaction system producing hydrogen from glucose in astonishingly high selectivities using a single reaction step under very mild conditions. The catalytic reaction system is characterized by its homogeneous nature and comprises a Ru-complex catalyst dissolved and stabilized in an ionic liquid medium. Ionic liquids are salts of melting points below 100 C [25]. These liquid materials have attracted much interest in the last decade as solvents for catalytic reactions [26] and separation technologies (extraction, distillation) [27,28,29,30,31,32]. Besides, these liquids have found industrial applications as process fluids for mechanic [33] and electrochemical applications [34]. Finally, from the pioneering work of Rogers and co-workers, it is known that ionic liquids are able to dissolve significant amounts of water-insoluble biopolymers (such as e.g. cellulose and chitin)[35] and even complex biopolymer mixtures, such as e.g. wood, have been completely dissolved in some ionic liquids [36]. In our specific application, the role of the ionic liquid is threefold: a) the ionic liquid dissolves the carbohydrate starting material thus expanding the range of applicable carbohydrate to water insoluble polymers; b) the ionic liquid provides a medium to dissolve and stabilize the catalyst; c) the ionic liquid dissolves hydrogen at a very low level, so inhibiting any possible collateral hydrogen-consuming process (detailed investigation of the hydrogen solubility in ionic liquids have been reported by e.g. Brennecke and coworkers [37]). (orig.)

  15. Forces in Liquid Metal Contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Using rather well known theory about capillary bridges between two electrodes we calculate the tensile force that can be applied to liquid metal contacts in the micrometer regime. Assuming circular symmetry, full wetting of the electrodes, and neglecting gravity, we present a brief review...

  16. Metals Separation by Liquid Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmary, G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    As part of a project focusing on techniques in industrial chemistry, students carry out experiments on separating copper from cobalt in chloride-containing aqueous solution by liquid extraction with triisoctylamine solvent and search the literature on the separation process of these metals. These experiments and the literature research are…

  17. Thermal Analysis of Cryogenic Hydrogen Liquid Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congiardo, Jared F.; Fortier, Craig R. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    During launch for the new Space Launch System (SLS) liquid hydrogen is bleed through the engines during replenish, pre-press, and extended pre-press to condition the engines prior to launch. The predicted bleed flow rates are larger than for the shuttle program. A consequence of the increased flow rates is having liquif hydrogen in the vent system, which the facilities was never designed to handle. To remedy the problem a liquid separator is being designed in the system to accumulated the liquid propellant and protect the facility flare stack (which can only handle gas). The attached document is a presentation of the current thermalfluid analysis performed for the separator and will be presented at the Thermal and Fluid Analysis Workshop (NASA workshop) next week in Cleveland, Ohio.

  18. Hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORISLAV BOGDANOVIĆ

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex metal hydrides such as sodium aluminohydride (NaAlH4 and sodium borohydride (NaBH4 are solid-state hydrogen-storage materials with high hydrogen capacities. They can be used in combination with fuel cells as a hydrogen source thus enabling longer operation times compared with classical metal hydrides. The most important point for a wide application of these materials is the reversibility under moderate technical conditions. At present, only NaAlH4 has favourable thermodynamic properties and can be employed as a thermally reversible means of hydrogen storage. By contrast, NaBH4 is a typical non- -reversible complex metal hydride; it reacts with water to produce hydrogen.

  19. Interaction of hydrogen with metallic nanojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbritter, Andras; Csonka, Szabolcs; Makk, Peter; Mihaly, Gyoergy [Electron Transport Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and Department of Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2007-03-15

    We study the behavior of hydrogen molecules between atomic-sized metallic electrodes using the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We focus on the interaction H{sub 2} with monoatomic gold chains demonstrating the possibility of a hydrogen molecule being incorporated in the chain. We also show that niobium is strongly reactive with hydrogen, which enables molecular transport studies between superconducting electrodes. This opens the possibility for a full characterization of the transmission properties of molecular junctions with superconducting subgap structure measurements.

  20. Hydrogen Permeation Through Multilayer Metallic Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Philip L.

    Hydrogen transport across metal surfaces is pertinent not only to the fueling of a fusion reactor, but also to fusion related technologies such as tritium handling. The rates of these processes and that of hydrogen atoms permeating through the metal bulk were obtained by measuring the steady state permeation rate through polycrystalline metal membranes. The experimental investigation focussed on composite membranes made up of iron, palladium and copper layers. The measurements were made under ultrahigh vacuum conditions using either hydrogen molecules or neutral atoms as the incident species. The mathematical dependence of the steady state permeating flux on the incident flux was used to determine whether hydrogen transport at the vacuum/metal interfaces or within the metal bulk (diffusion) is rate-limiting. The chemical composition of the membrane surfaces, measured by Auger Electron Spectroscopy, was found to have a profound effect on surface-limited permeation. The removal of impurities on an iron surface by Ar ion sputtering was found to increase the magnitude and decrease the temperature dependence of the surface-limited permeation rate constant. Deposition of palladium or iron on sputter-cleaned iron surfaces resulted in a reduction of non-metal surface impurities and a further increase in the rate of surface processes. Application of copper on iron, however, had the opposite effect. This is thought to be due to the slow hydrogen adsorption rates peculiar to group IB metals. A thin copper layer on a palladium membrane had a similar effect: hydrogen transport across that surface was impeded. The results are discussed in terms of practical applications of membranes for pumping or detecting hydrogen. In these schemes it is desired that hydrogen, once dissolved in the metal, preferentially exit on the downstream surface.

  1. Plasmonic hydrogen sensing with nanostructured metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-12-23

    In this review, we discuss the evolution of localized surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensors based on nanostructured metal hydrides, which has accelerated significantly during the past 5 years. We put particular focus on how, conceptually, plasmonic resonances can be used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and at the single-nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes in the quest to develop efficient solid-state hydrogen storage materials with fast response times, reasonable thermodynamics, and acceptable long-term stability. Therefore, a brief introduction to the thermodynamics of metal hydride formation is also given. However, plasmonic hydrogen sensors not only are of academic interest as research tool in materials science but also are predicted to find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well as in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier. Therefore, the wide range of different plasmonic hydrogen sensor designs already available is reviewed together with theoretical efforts to understand their fundamentals and optimize their performance in terms of sensitivity. In this context, we also highlight important challenges to be addressed in the future to take plasmonic hydrogen sensors from the laboratory to real applications in devices, including poisoning/deactivation of the active materials, sensor lifetime, and cross-sensitivity toward other gas species.

  2. Hydrogen axion star: metallic hydrogen bound to a QCD axion BEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Barger, Vernon; Berger, Joshua

    2016-12-01

    As a cold dark matter candidate, the QCD axion may form Bose-Einstein condensates, called axion stars, with masses around 10-11 M ⊙. In this paper, we point out that a brand new astrophysical object, a Hydrogen Axion Star (HAS), may well be formed by ordinary baryonic matter becoming gravitationally bound to an axion star. We study the properties of the HAS and find that the hydrogen cloud has a high pressure and temperature in the center and is likely in the liquid metallic hydrogen state. Because of the high particle number densities for both the axion star and the hydrogen cloud, the feeble interaction between axion and hydrogen can still generate enough internal power, around 1013 W × ( m a /5 meV)4, to make these objects luminous point sources. High resolution ultraviolet, optical and infrared telescopes can discover HAS via black-body radiation.

  3. Hydrogen Axion Star: Metallic Hydrogen Bound to a QCD Axion BEC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Yang; Berger, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    As a cold dark matter candidate, the QCD axion may form Bose-Einstein condensates, called axion stars, with masses around $10^{-11}\\,M_{\\odot}$. In this paper, we point out that a brand new astrophysical object, a Hydrogen Axion Star (HAS), may well be formed by ordinary baryonic matter becoming gravitationally bound to an axion star. We study the properties of the HAS and find that the hydrogen cloud has a high pressure and temperature in the center and is likely in the liquid metallic hydrogen state. Because of the high particle number densities for both the axion star and the hydrogen cloud, the feeble interaction between axion and hydrogen can still generate enough internal power, around $10^{13}~\\mbox{W}\\times(m_a/5~\\mbox{meV})^4$, to make these objects luminous point sources. High resolution ultraviolet, optical and infrared telescopes can discover HAS via black-body radiation.

  4. Levitated liquid hydrogen cryotank for automotive applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bock, J.; Baecker, M.; Brommer, G. [Aventis Research and Technologies, Huerth (DE)] [and others

    2000-07-01

    A critical component for the application of hydrogen technology in automobiles is the storage of liquid hydrogen. Conventional tanks show intolerable evaporation losses. An innovative tank concept based on a superconducting suspension of an inner tank in an outer tank was realized in a functional model. The model shows an evaporation rate lowered by 50% compared to a conventional reference tank. In addition the design of a more compact prototype tank was worked out with a rotational symmetric arrangement. First components for this suspension concept were tested successfully. (author)

  5. Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carriers (LOHCs): Toward a Hydrogen-free Hydrogen Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuster, Patrick; Papp, Christian; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-01-17

    The need to drastically reduce CO2 emissions will lead to the transformation of our current, carbon-based energy system to a more sustainable, renewable-based one. In this process, hydrogen will gain increasing importance as secondary energy vector. Energy storage requirements on the TWh scale (to bridge extended times of low wind and sun harvest) and global logistics of renewable energy equivalents will create additional driving forces toward a future hydrogen economy. However, the nature of hydrogen requires dedicated infrastructures, and this has prevented so far the introduction of elemental hydrogen into the energy sector to a large extent. Recent scientific and technological progress in handling hydrogen in chemically bound form as liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) supports the technological vision that a future hydrogen economy may work without handling large amounts of elemental hydrogen. LOHC systems are composed of pairs of hydrogen-lean and hydrogen-rich organic compounds that store hydrogen by repeated catalytic hydrogenation and dehydrogenation cycles. While hydrogen handling in the form of LOHCs allows for using the existing infrastructure for fuels, it also builds on the existing public confidence in dealing with liquid energy carriers. In contrast to hydrogen storage by hydrogenation of gases, such as CO2 or N2, hydrogen release from LOHC systems produces pure hydrogen after condensation of the high-boiling carrier compounds. This Account highlights the current state-of-the-art in hydrogen storage using LOHC systems. It first introduces fundamental aspects of a future hydrogen economy and derives therefrom requirements for suitable LOHC compounds. Molecular structures that have been successfully applied in the literature are presented, and their property profiles are discussed. Fundamental and applied aspects of the involved hydrogenation and dehydrogenation catalysis are discussed, characteristic differences for the catalytic conversion of

  6. Liquid Hydrogen Target for the COMPASS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, J; Duday-Chanat, L; Geyer, R; Mallot, G K; Pirotte, O; Vullierme, B

    2014-01-01

    A liquid hydrogen target has been developed for the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The target has a diameter of 40 mm and a length of 2.5 meter, creating an active volume of about 3 liter of liquid hydrogen. The cylindrical part of the target wall is formed by a Kapton® foil strip, wound and glued to a thickness of 0.125 mm. The Kapton® foil is used to minimize the energy loss of the particles, scattered or created within the target volume, crossing the target boundary. The two end-caps enclosing the target volume have been fabricated from Mylar®. The system is cooled with a 30 W at 20 K cryocooler, delivering the cooling capacity for the cool-down as well as for the continuous operation of the system.

  7. Prospects for obtaining metallic hydrogen with spherical presses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, I. L.; Ishizaki, K.; Marchello, J. M.; Paauwe, J.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a split-sphere apparatus modified for use at low temperature and affording a possible method for compressing molecular hydrogen to a pressure in excess of 1 Mbar and for converting it to the metallic state. The construction costs of the apparatus are relatively low and the amount of liquid helium required for low-temperature operation is readily obtainable with modern liquefiers.

  8. Metallic Hydrogen: A Game Changing Rocket Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to produce metallic hydrogen in the laboratory using an innovative approach, and to study its metastability properties. Current theoretical and experimental considerations expect that extremely high pressures of order 4-6 megabar are required to transform molecular hydrogen to the metallic phase. When metallic hydrogen is produced in the laboratory it will be extremely important to determine if it is metastable at modest temperatures, i.e. remains metallic when the pressure is released. Then it could be used as the most powerful chemical rocket fuel that exists and revolutionize rocketry, allowing single-stage rockets to enter orbit and chemically fueled rockets to explore our solar system.

  9. Crystalline 'Genes' in Metallic Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Yang; Ye, Zhuo; Fang, Xiaowei; Ding, Zejun; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I; Ott, Ryan T; Kramer, M J; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The underlying structural order that transcends the liquid, glass and crystalline states is identified using an efficient genetic algorithm (GA). GA identifies the most common energetically favorable packing motif in crystalline structures close to the alloy's Al-10 at.% Sm composition. These motifs are in turn compared to the observed packing motifs in the actual liquid structures using a cluster-alignment method which reveals the average topology. Conventional descriptions of the short-range order, such as Voronoi tessellation, are too rigid in their analysis of the configurational poly-types when describing the chemical and topological ordering during transition from undercooled metallic liquids to crystalline phases or glass. Our approach here brings new insight into describing mesoscopic order-disorder transitions in condensed matter physics.

  10. Transition metal catalysed ammonia-borane dehydrogenation in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, William R H; Berkeley, Emily R; Alden, L R; Baker, R Tom; Sneddon, Larry G

    2011-03-21

    Significant advantages result from combining the disparate hydrogen release pathways for ammonia-borane (AB) dehydrogenation using ionic liquids (ILs) and transition metal catalysts. With the RuCl(2)(PMe(3))(4) catalyst precursor, AB dehydrogenation selectivity and extent are maximized in an IL with a moderately coordinating ethylsulfate anion.

  11. Optical hydrogen sensors based on metal-hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaman, M.; Westerwaal, R.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.

    2012-06-01

    For many hydrogen related applications it is preferred to use optical hydrogen sensors above electrical systems. Optical sensors reduce the risk of ignition by spark formation and are less sensitive to electrical interference. Currently palladium and palladium alloys are used for most hydrogen sensors since they are well known for their hydrogen dissociation and absorption properties at relatively low temperatures. The disadvantages of palladium in sensors are the low optical response upon hydrogen loading, the cross sensitivity for oxygen and carbon, the limited detection range and the formation of micro-cracks after some hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles. In contrast to Pd, we find that the use of magnesium or rear earth bases metal-hydrides in optical hydrogen sensors allow tuning of the detection levels over a broad pressure range, while maintaining a high optical response. We demonstrate a stable detection layer for detecting hydrogen below 10% of the lower explosion limit in an oxygen rich environment. This detection layer is deposited at the bare end of a glass fiber as a micro-mirror and is covered with a thin layer of palladium. The palladium layer promotes the hydrogen uptake at room temperature and acts as a hydrogen selective membrane. To protect the sensor for a long time in air a final layer of a hydrophobic fluorine based coating is applied. Such a sensor can be used for example as safety detector in automotive applications. We find that this type of fiber optic hydrogen sensor is also suitable for hydrogen detection in liquids. As example we demonstrate a sensor for detecting a broad range of concentrations in transformer oil. Such a sensor can signal a warning when sparks inside a high voltage power transformer decompose the transformer oil over a long period.

  12. Structural relaxation in viscous metallic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (BFRL), Gaithersburg, MD (United States)]|[Technische Univ. Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Wuttke, J.; Petry, W. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Schober, H. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Randl, O.G. [Manufacture Michelin, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    1999-11-01

    Recently, metallic alloys have been found that exhibit extremely large viscosities in the liquid state. These liquids can be quenched into bulk metallic glasses at relatively modest cooling rates. In contrast to simple metals the structural relaxation of these systems show a two step decay in the liquid state. This behaviour has long been known for molecular or ionic glass formers in their under-cooled liquid state. Applying an analysis previously used for the glass formers (mode-coupling theory) a full quantitative description of the neutron data is obtained for these metallic liquids. (authors) 3 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Ballmilling of metal borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    is to hydrogenate simple compounds such as metalborides and hydrides with the intention of forming a new and more hydrogen rich borohydride. In contrast to mainstream research, the method of synthesis has been based on reactants that are expected to be found in the metal borohydride’s dehydrogenated state....... Specifically, the research undertaken targets CaB6 whose boron is in a octahedral network, or AlB2 whose boron is layered. These compounds were then reactive ball milled with alkali and alkaline earth metal under hydrogen pressure, with the intention of forming metal borohydrides. For CaB6, no clear sign...... Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy, Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Thermal Gravimetry, Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Mass Spectroscopy and lastly In Situ Powder X-ray diffraction measurements at l711 MAXLab....

  14. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102-17 Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17...

  15. Liquid metal Flow Meter - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, C.; Hoogendoom, S.; Hudson, B.; Prince, J.; Teichert, K.; Wood, J.; Chase, K.

    2007-01-30

    Measuring the flow of liquid metal presents serious challenges. Current commercially-available flow meters use ultrasonic, electromagnetic, and other technologies to measure flow, but are inadequate for liquid metal flow measurement because of the high temperatures required by most liquid metals. As a result of the reactivity and high temperatures of most liquid metals, corrosion and leakage become very serious safety concerns. The purpose of this project is to develop a flow meter for Lockheed Martin that measures the flow rate of molten metal in a conduit.

  16. Nanostructures from hydrogen implantation of metals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWatters, Bruce Ray (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2009-09-01

    This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on hydrogen and helium implantations of aluminum, including complementary experimental results and computational modeling of this system. Experimental results show the evolution of the surface morphology as the hydrogen ion fluence increases from 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce porosity on the order of 10 nm. Computational modeling demonstrates the formation of alanes, their desorption, and the resulting etching of aluminum surfaces that likely drives the nanostructures that form in the presence of hydrogen.

  17. Microporous Metal Organic Materials for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. G. Sankar; Jing Li; Karl Johnson

    2008-11-30

    We have examined a number of Metal Organic Framework Materials for their potential in hydrogen storage applications. Results obtained in this study may, in general, be summarized as follows: (1) We have identified a new family of porous metal organic framework materials with the compositions M (bdc) (ted){sub 0.5}, {l_brace}M = Zn or Co, bdc = biphenyl dicarboxylate and ted = triethylene diamine{r_brace} that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen ({approx}4.6 wt%) at 77 K and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atm. The modeling performed on these materials agree reasonably well with the experimental results. (2) In some instances, such as in Y{sub 2}(sdba){sub 3}, even though the modeling predicted the possibility of hydrogen adsorption (although only small quantities, {approx}1.2 wt%, 77 K, 50 atm. hydrogen), our experiments indicate that the sample does not adsorb any hydrogen. This may be related to the fact that the pores are extremely small or may be attributed to the lack of proper activation process. (3) Some samples such as Zn (tbip) (tbip = 5-tert butyl isophthalate) exhibit hysteresis characteristics in hydrogen sorption between adsorption and desorption runs. Modeling studies on this sample show good agreement with the desorption behavior. It is necessary to conduct additional studies to fully understand this behavior. (4) Molecular simulations have demonstrated the need to enhance the solid-fluid potential of interaction in order to achieve much higher adsorption amounts at room temperature. We speculate that this may be accomplished through incorporation of light transition metals, such as titanium and scandium, into the metal organic framework materials.

  18. Screen Channel Liquid Acquisition Device Outflow Tests in Liquid Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; Chato, David J.; McQuillen, J. B.; Vera, J.; Kudlac, M. T.; Quinn, F. D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental design and test results of the recently concluded 1-g inverted vertical outflow testing of two 325x2300 full scale liquid acquisition device (LAD) channels in liquid hydrogen (LH2). One of the channels had a perforated plate and internal cooling from a thermodynamic vent system (TVS) to enhance performance. The LADs were mounted in a tank to simulate 1-g outflow over a wide range of LH2 temperatures (20.3 - 24.2 K), pressures (100 - 350 kPa), and flow rates (0.010 - 0.055 kg/s). Results indicate that the breakdown point is dominated by liquid temperature, with a second order dependence on mass flow rate through the LAD. The best performance is always achieved in the coldest liquid states for both channels, consistent with bubble point theory. Higher flow rates cause the standard channel to break down relatively earlier than the TVS cooled channel. Both the internal TVS heat exchanger and subcooling the liquid in the propellant tank are shown to significantly improve LAD performance.

  19. The thermophysical properties of metallic liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Iida, Takamichi

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of materials science and engineering is to make the best use of all the elements in the periodic table. This leads to the effective use and conservation of natural resources. For this purpose, in any liquid metallic processing operation, accurate data for the thermophysical properties of all metallic liquids (i.e. liquid metals, semimetals, and semiconductors) is needed. However, in addition, a clear understanding of the essence of their thermophysical properties, based on these data, is indispensable. The second volume continues from the first volume to provide explanations for the thermophysical properties of metallic liquids. The two volumes identify new dimensionless parameters, extracted from the velocity of sound. In spite of being simple parameters, they provide useful information on the nature and behaviour of metallic liquids. This volume covers several basic concepts needed to understand the thermophysical properties of metallic liquids and for developing reliable models to accurate...

  20. Liquid hydrogen densitometer utilizes open-ended microwave cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, J.; Wenger, N. C.

    1967-01-01

    Open-ended microwave cavity directly measures the density of flowing liquid, gaseous, or two-phase hydrogen. Its operation is based on derived relations between the cavity resonant frequency and the dielectric constant and density of hydrogen.

  1. Liquid metals fire control engineering handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballif, J.L. (comp.)

    1979-02-01

    This handbook reviews the basic requirements of the use of liquid metals with emphasis on sodium which has the greatest current usage. It delineates the concepts necessary to design facilities both radioactive and nonradioactive for use with liquid metals. It further reviews the state-of-the-art in fire extinguishers and leak detection equipment and comments on their application and sensitivity. It also provides details on some engineering features of value to the designer of liquid metal facilities.

  2. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosero, Richard [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Yeh, Minfang [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  3. Hydrogen Release Studies of Alkali Metal Amidoboranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luedtke, Avery T.; Autrey, Thomas

    2010-04-19

    A series of metal amido boranes LiNH2BH3 (LAB), NaNH2BH3 (SAB), LiNH(Me)BH3 (LMAB), NaNH(Me)BH3 (SMAB), KNH(Me)BH3 (PMAB), and KNH(tBu)BH3 (PBAB) were synthesized, by solution phase methods, and the thermal release of H2 in the solid state was studied. Based on the observed trends in reaction rates of H > Me > tBu and the kinetic isotope effect, the mechanism of hydrogen release from MAB compounds was found to proceed through a bimolecular mechanism involving the intermediacy of a MH (M = Li, Na, or K). The mechanism of hydrogen release from metal amidoboranes, a metal ion assisted hydride transfer, is very different than the mechanism of hydrogen release from the parent compound ammonia borane (AB). The non-volatile products formed from MAB’s are significantly different than the products formed after hydrogen release from AB. The boron containing resulting from the release of one equivalent of hydrogen from the metal amidoboranes were characterized by MAS 11B NMR spectroscopy and found to contain both BH3 and sp2 hybridized BH groups, consistent with a general structural feature MN(R)=BHN(R)MBH3. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy as part of the Chemical Hydrogen Storage CoE at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the U.S. DOE by Battelle. MAS NMR studies were performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at PNNL.

  4. Hydrogen-Bonded Liquid Crystal Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohnikan, Mahdi; Toader, Violeta; Rey, Alejandro; Reven, Linda

    2016-08-23

    Nanoparticle-liquid crystal (NP-LC) composites based on hydrogen bonding were explored using a model system. The ligand shells of 3 nm diameter zirconium dioxide nanoparticles (ZrO2 NPs) were varied to control their interaction with 4-n-hexylbenzoic acid (6BA). The miscibility and effect of the NPs on the nematic order as a function of particle concentration was characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM), fluorescence microscopy and (2)H NMR spectroscopy. Nonfunctionalized ZrO2 NPs have the lowest miscibility and strongest effect on the LC matrix due to irreversible binding of 6BA to the NPs via a strong zirconium carboxylate bond. The ZrO2 NPs were functionalized with 6-phosphonohexanoic acid (6PHA) or 4-(6-phosphonohexyloxy)benzoic acid (6BPHA) which selectively bind to the ZrO2 NP surface via the phosphonic acid groups. The miscibility was increased by controlling the concentration of the pendant CO2H groups by adding hexylphosphonic acid (HPA) to act as a spacer group. Fluorescence microscopy of lanthanide doped ZrO2 NPs showed no aggregates in the nematic phase below the NP concentration where aggregates are observed in the isotropic phase. The functionalized NPs preferably concentrate into LC defects and any remaining isotropic liquid but are still present throughout the nematic liquid at a lower concentration.

  5. Large gem diamonds from metallic liquid in Earth's deep mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Evan M; Shirey, Steven B; Nestola, Fabrizio; Bullock, Emma S; Wang, Jianhua; Richardson, Stephen H; Wang, Wuyi

    2016-12-16

    The redox state of Earth's convecting mantle, masked by the lithospheric plates and basaltic magmatism of plate tectonics, is a key unknown in the evolutionary history of our planet. Here we report that large, exceptional gem diamonds like the Cullinan, Constellation, and Koh-i-Noor carry direct evidence of crystallization from a redox-sensitive metallic liquid phase in the deep mantle. These sublithospheric diamonds contain inclusions of solidified iron-nickel-carbon-sulfur melt, accompanied by a thin fluid layer of methane ± hydrogen, and sometimes majoritic garnet or former calcium silicate perovskite. The metal-dominated mineral assemblages and reduced volatiles in large gem diamonds indicate formation under metal-saturated conditions. We verify previous predictions that Earth has highly reducing deep mantle regions capable of precipitating a metallic iron phase that contains dissolved carbon and hydrogen.

  6. Phonon dispersion relation of liquid metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P B Thakor; P N Gajjar; A R Jani

    2009-06-01

    The phonon dispersion curves of some liquid metals, viz. Na ( = 1), Mg ( = 2), Al ( = 3) and Pb ( = 4), have been computed using our model potential. The charged hard sphere (CHS) reference system is applied to describe the structural information. Our model potential along with CHS reference system is capable of explaining the phonon dispersion relation for monovalent, divalent, trivalent and tetravalent liquid metals.

  7. Heat-Powered Pump for Liquid Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed thermoelectromagnetic pump for liquid metal powered by waste heat; needs no battery, generator, or other external energy source. Pump turns part of heat in liquid metal into pumping energy. In combination with primary pump or on its own, thermoelectric pump circulates coolant between reactor and radiator. As long as there is decay heat to be removed, unit performs function.

  8. Heat-Powered Pump for Liquid Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed thermoelectromagnetic pump for liquid metal powered by waste heat; needs no battery, generator, or other external energy source. Pump turns part of heat in liquid metal into pumping energy. In combination with primary pump or on its own, thermoelectric pump circulates coolant between reactor and radiator. As long as there is decay heat to be removed, unit performs function.

  9. Method of foaming a liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, A.K.; Johnson, C.E.

    1978-07-28

    A method for promoting the formation of a foam and for improving bubble retention and foam lifetimes in liquid metal NaK or sodium used to generate power in two-phase liquid metal MHD generators is described. In a two-phase liquid metal MHD generator, a compressed, hot, inert gas is used as the thermodynamic working fluid to electrically drive a conductive liquid metal such as NaK, sodium or tin through the generator channel. The gas and liquid are mixed together just as the mixture enters the generator channel so that the expansion of the gas drives the conductive liquid across the magnetic field, generating electrical power. The two phases are then separated and returned to the mixer through different loops.

  10. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jeffrey R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-04-28

    The design and characterization of new materials for hydrogen storage is an important area of research, as the ability to store hydrogen at lower pressures and higher temperatures than currently feasible would lower operating costs for small hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. In particular, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) represent promising materials for use in storing hydrogen in this capacity. MOFs are highly porous, three-dimensional crystalline solids that are formed via linkages between metal ions (e.g., iron, nickel, and zinc) and organic molecules. MOFs can store hydrogen via strong adsorptive interactions between the gas molecules and the pores of the framework, providing a high surface area for gas adsorption and thus the opportunity to store hydrogen at significantly lower pressures than with current technologies. By lowering the energy required for hydrogen storage, these materials hold promise in rendering hydrogen a more viable fuel for motor vehicles, which is a highly desirable outcome given the clean nature of hydrogen fuel cells (water is the only byproduct of combustion) and the current state of global climate change resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels. The work presented in this report is the result of collaborative efforts between researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and General Motors Corporation (GM) to discover novel MOFs promising for H2 storage and characterize their properties. Described herein are several new framework systems with improved gravimetric and volumetric capacity to strongly bind H2 at temperatures relevant for vehicle storage. These materials were rigorously characterized using neutron diffraction, to determine the precise binding locations of hydrogen within the frameworks, and high-pressure H2 adsorption measurements, to provide a comprehensive picture of H2 adsorption at all relevant pressures. A

  11. Transition metal based borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, Chakram; Liu, Jianjun; Wei, Suhuai; Zhao, Yufeng

    2010-03-01

    Using ab-initio studies based on the density-functional theory, we have calculated binding energies per hydrogen molecule for decomposition reactions of transition metal borohydrides MHxB12H12 to MB12 structures, where M corresponds to Sc, Ti, or V. Depending on the valence of the transition metal, x can be 1, 2, or 3. Crystal structures considered for MB12 included both hypothetical and those found in the international crystallographic structural database. On the other hand, the crystal structure considered for MHxB12H12 belongs to C2/c (space group 15) structure as reported in a previous study [V. Ozolins et al. JACS, 131, 230 (2009)]. Among the structures investigated, Titanium-based metal borohydride structure has the lowest binding energy per hydrogen molecule relative to the cubic TiB12 structure (˜0.37 eV/H2). Our finding should be contrasted with the binding energy/H2 for simple metal based borohydrides (e.g., CaB12H12 ), which has a value of ˜ 1.5 eV/H2, suggesting that transition metals play a significant role in lowering the H2 binding energy in borohydrides.

  12. A novel liquid organic hydrogen carrier system based on catalytic peptide formation and hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng; Fogler, Eran; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Iron, Mark A; Milstein, David

    2015-04-17

    Hydrogen is an efficient green fuel, but its low energy density when stored under high pressure or cryogenically, and safety issues, presents significant disadvantages; hence finding efficient and safe hydrogen carriers is a major challenge. Of special interest are liquid organic hydrogen carriers (LOHCs), which can be readily loaded and unloaded with considerable amounts of hydrogen. However, disadvantages include high hydrogen pressure requirements, high reaction temperatures for both hydrogenation and dehydrogenation steps, which require different catalysts, and high LOHC cost. Here we present a readily reversible LOHC system based on catalytic peptide formation and hydrogenation, using an inexpensive, safe and abundant organic compound with high potential capacity to store and release hydrogen, applying the same catalyst for loading and unloading hydrogen under relatively mild conditions. Mechanistic insight of the catalytic reaction is provided. We believe that these findings may lead to the development of an inexpensive, safe and clean liquid hydrogen carrier system.

  13. Self-consistent structure of metallic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, D. M.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1977-01-01

    A calculation is presented of the total energy of metallic hydrogen for a family of face-centered tetragonal lattices carried out within the self-consistent phonon approximation. The energy of proton motion is large and proper inclusion of proton dynamics alters the structural dependence of the total energy, causing isotropic lattices to become favored. For the dynamic lattice the structural dependence of terms of third and higher order in the electron-proton interaction is greatly reduced from static lattice equivalents.

  14. Ionic interaction and conductivity of metallic hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the electroresistivity of metallic hydrogen within the framework of perturbation theory in electron-proton interaction. To this end we employ the Kubo linear response theory while using the two-time retarded Green functions method to calculate the relaxation time. The expressions for the second and third order contributions are given. To describe the electron subsystem, the random phase approximation is used, allowing for the exchange interactions and correlations in a local fiel...

  15. Compatibility of materials with liquid metal targets for SNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiStefano, J.R.; Pawel, S.J.; DeVan, J.H.

    1996-06-01

    Several heavy liquid metals are candidates as the target in a spallation neutron source: Hg, Pb, Bi, and Pb-Bi eutectic. Systems with these liquid metals have been used in the past and a data-base on compatibility already exists. Two major compatibility issues have been identified when selecting a container material for these liquid metals: temperature gradient mass transfer and liquid metal embrittlement or LME. Temperature gradient mass transfer refers to dissolution of material from the high temperature portions of a system and its deposition in the lower temperature areas. Solution and deposition rate constants along with temperature, {Delta}T, and velocity are usually the most important parameters. For most candidate materials mass transfer corrosion has been found to be proportionately worse in Bi compared with Hg and Pb. For temperatures to {approx}550{degrees}C, ferritic/martensitic steels have been satisfactory in Pb or Hg systems and the maximum temperature can be extended to {approx}650{degrees}C with additions of inhibitors to the liquid metal, e.g. Mg, Ti, Zr. Above {approx}600{degrees}C, austenitic stainless steels have been reported to be unsatisfactory, largely because of the mass transfer of nickel. Blockage of flow from deposition of material is usually the life-limiting effect of this type of corrosion. However, mass transfer corrosion at lower temperatures has not been studied. At low temperatures (usually < 150{degrees}C), LME has been reported for some liquid metal/container alloy combinations. Liquid metal embrittlement, like hydrogen embrittlement, results in brittle fracture of a normally ductile material.

  16. Acoustically Forced Coaxial Hydrogen / Liquid Oxygen Jet Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-15

    visualized for both reacting and nonreacting cases. The jet flame was studied unforced, without acoustics , and forced, with transverse acoustic waves in...liquid rocket injector flames react to acoustic waves . In this study, a representative coaxial gaseous hydrogen / liquid oxygen (LOX) jet flame is...hydrogen / liquid oxygen (LOX) jet flame is visualized for both reacting and nonreacting cases. The jet flame was studied unforced, without acoustics , and

  17. The mechanism of nucleation of hydrogen blister in metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN XueChong; ZHOU QingJun; CHU WuYang; LI JinXu; SU YanJing; QIAO LiJie

    2007-01-01

    The nucleating, growing and cracking of hydrogen blister have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The results show that atomic hydrogen induces superabundant vacancies in metals. The superabundant vacancies and hydrogen aggregate into a hydrogen-vacancy cluster (microcavity). The hydrogen atoms in the microcavity become hydrogen molecules which can stabilize the cluster. And the hydrogen blister nucleates. With the entry of vacancies and hydrogen atoms, the blister nucleus grows and the pressure in the cavity increases. When the stress induced by hydrogen pressure on the blister is up to the cohesive strength, cracks will initiate from the wall of the blister.

  18. Fractional Consumption of Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen During the Space Shuttle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Jonathan K.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle uses the propellants, liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, to meet part of the propulsion requirements from ground to orbit. The Kennedy Space Center procured over 25 million kilograms of liquid hydrogen and over 250 million kilograms of liquid oxygen during the 3D-year Space Shuttle Program. Because of the cryogenic nature of the propellants, approximately 55% of the total purchased liquid hydrogen and 30% of the total purchased liquid oxygen were used in the Space Shuttle Main Engines. The balance of the propellants were vaporized during operations for various purposes. This paper dissects the total consumption of liqUid hydrogen and liqUid oxygen and determines the fraction attributable to each of the various processing and launch operations that occurred during the entire Space Shuttle Program at the Kennedy Space Center.

  19. A study on metal organic framework (MOF-177) synthesis, characterization and hydrogen adsorption -desorption cycles

    OpenAIRE

    V.Viditha, M.Venkateswer Rao, K.Srilatha11, V.Himabindu, Anjaneyulu Yerramilli

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen has long been considered to be an ideal alternative to fossil-fuel systems and much work has now been done on its storage. There are four main methods of hydrogen storage: as a liquid; as compressed hydrogen; in the form of metal hydrides; and by physisorption. Among all the materials metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are considered to have desirable properties like high porosity, pore volume and high thermal stability. MOF-177 is considered to be an ideal storage material. In this pap...

  20. Theoretical study on hydrogenation catalysts containing a metal hydride as additional hydrogen supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, E.D.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1992-01-01

    A hypothetical hydrogenation catalyst consisting of porous, catalytically active particles embedded with metal hydride powder was evaluated. The metal hydride provides temporarily additional hydrogen if the mass transfer rate of the hydrogen to the internal of the particle is not sufficient. A numer

  1. Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Ramana Reddy

    2012-04-12

    A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode

  2. Stretchable and Soft Electronics using Liquid Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michael D

    2017-07-01

    The use of liquid metals based on gallium for soft and stretchable electronics is discussed. This emerging class of electronics is motivated, in part, by the new opportunities that arise from devices that have mechanical properties similar to those encountered in the human experience, such as skin, tissue, textiles, and clothing. These types of electronics (e.g., wearable or implantable electronics, sensors for soft robotics, e-skin) must operate during deformation. Liquid metals are compelling materials for these applications because, in principle, they are infinitely deformable while retaining metallic conductivity. Liquid metals have been used for stretchable wires and interconnects, reconfigurable antennas, soft sensors, self-healing circuits, and conformal electrodes. In contrast to Hg, liquid metals based on gallium have low toxicity and essentially no vapor pressure and are therefore considered safe to handle. Whereas most liquids bead up to minimize surface energy, the presence of a surface oxide on these metals makes it possible to pattern them into useful shapes using a variety of techniques, including fluidic injection and 3D printing. In addition to forming excellent conductors, these metals can be used actively to form memory devices, sensors, and diodes that are completely built from soft materials. The properties of these materials, their applications within soft and stretchable electronics, and future opportunities and challenges are considered. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Metallic Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Y.H.; Catalano, Jacopo; Guazzone, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Composite palladium membranes have extensively been studied in laboratories and, more recently, in small pilot industrial applications for the high temperature separation of hydrogen from reactant mixtures such as water-gas shift (WGS) reaction or methane steam reforming (MSR). Composite Pd...... membrane fabrication methods have matured over the last decades, and the deposition of very thin films (1–5 µm) of Pd over porous ceramics or modified porous metal supports is quite common. The H2 permeances and the selectivities achieved at 400–500 °C were in the order of 50–100 Nm3/m/h/bar0.5 and greater...... than 1000, respectively. This chapter describes in detail composite Pd-based membrane preparation methods, which consist of the grading of the support and the deposition of the dense metal layer, their performances, and their applications in catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) at high temperatures (400...

  4. Metallic Hydrogen: The Most Powerful Rocket Fuel Yet To Exist

    OpenAIRE

    Silvera, Isaac F.; Cole, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Wigner and Huntington first predicted that pressures of order 25 GPa were required for the transition of solid molecular hydrogen to the atomic metallic phase. Later it was predicted that metallic hydrogen might be a metastable material so that it remains metallic when pressure is released. Experimental pressures achieved on hydrogen have been more than an order of magnitude higher than the predicted transition pressure and yet it remains an insulator. We discuss the applications of metast...

  5. Computational Analyses of Cavitating Flows in Cryogenic Liquid Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tiezhi Sun; Yingjie Wei; Cong Wang∗

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the fundamental characteristics and the thermodynamic effects of cavitating flows in liquid hydrogen. For this purpose, numerical simulation of cavitating flows are conducted over a three dimensional hydrofoil in liquid hydrogen. Firstly, the efficiency of this computational methodology is validated through comparing the simulation results with the experimental measurements of pressure and temperature. Secondly, after analysing the cavitating flows in liquid hydrogen and water, the characteristics under cryogenic conditions are highlighted. The results show that the thermodynamic effects play a significant role in the cavity structure and the mass transfer, the dimensionless mass transfer rate of liquid hydrogen is much larger, and the peak value is about ninety times as high as water at room temperature. Furthermore, a parametric study of cavitating flows on hydrofoil is conducted by considering different cavitation number and dimensionless thermodynamic coefficient. The obtained results provide an insight into the thermodynamic effect on the cavitating flows.

  6. The Internal Pressure and Cohesive Energy Density of Liquid Metallic Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Yizhak

    2017-02-01

    The internal pressures, P_{int}, of practically all the liquid metallic elements in the periodic table up to plutonium (except highly radioactive ones) at their melting points were calculated from data in the literature. They are compared with the respective cohesive energy densities, ced, obtained from the literature data too. The ratios P_{int}{/}ced for various liquids are ranked as follows: molten salts < polar/hydrogen-bonded molecular solvents ˜ liquid metals < room temperature ionic liquids < nonpolar molecular solvents, and the reverse of this list reflects the relative strengths of the mutual interactions of the particles constituting these liquids.

  7. Mechanics and forming theory of liquid metal forging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗守靖; 姜巨福; 王迎; 藤东东

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of steel liquid forging and aluminium alloy liquid forging, liquid metal forging was investigated, such as the assembly model, metal plastic flowing, the force-displacement curves, the harmonious equation, calculation of value of altitude deformation and determination of specific pressure of liquid metal forging. On the basis of the theory of metal plastic forming and the characteristics of liquid metal forging, the achievements on the mechanics and forming theory of liquid metal forging were given out by combining the theory and experiments systematically, and an important preparation for establishing liquid metal forging theory was suggested.

  8. Crucial issues on liquid metal blanket design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malang, S. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)); Leroy, P. (CEA, CEN Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Casini, G.P. (CEC, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra (Italy)); Mattas, R.F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Strebkov, Yu. (Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (USSR))

    1991-12-01

    Typical design concepts of liquid metal breeder blankets for power reactors are explained and characterized. The major problems of these concepts are described for both water-cooled blankets and self-cooled blankets. Three crucial issues of liquid metal breeder blankets are investigated. They are in the fields of magnetohydrodynamics, tritium control and safety. The influence of the magnetic field on liquid metal flow is of special interest for self-cooled blankets. The main problems in this field and the status of the related R and D work are described. Tritium permeation losses to the cooling water is a crucial issue for water-cooled blankets. Methods for its reduction are discussed. An inherent problem of all liquid breeder blankets is the potential release of activated products in the case of chemical reactions between the breeder material and water or reactive gases. The most important issues in this field are described. (orig.).

  9. SIMULTANEOUS REACTION AND LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION IN THE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuxiang L(u); Li Wang; Zhentao Mi; Yaquan Wang

    2004-01-01

    The gas-liquid-liquid reactive extraction system for preparing hydrogen peroxide via anthraquinone was investigated. The oxidation reaction of hydrogenated working solution was combined with the extraction of hydrogen peroxide from working solution in a sieve plate column. The reaction of 2-ethylanthrahydroquionone with oxygen and the liquid-liquid extraction of hydrogen peroxide take place simultaneously. The oxygen was introduced with hydrogenated working solution through a nozzle in the bottom of the column, which worked as agitated air as well as oxidation reagent. The results showed the oxidation and extraction do not hamper each other, on the contrary, the presence of oxidation gas in the column can promote the transfer of hydrogen peroxide from organic phase to aqueous phase, thus the reaction efficiency and extraction efficiency increased with increasing gas superficial velocity. Furthermore, the oxidation efficiency is almost 100% and the extraction efficiency is higher than 90% in this process.

  10. SIMULTANEOUS REACTION AND LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION IN THE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShuxiangLǖ; LiWang; ZhentaoMi; YaquanWang

    2004-01-01

    The gas-liquid-liquid reactive extraction system for preparing hydrogen peroxide via anthraquinone was investigated. The oxidation reaction of hydrogenated working solution was combined with the extraction of hydrogen peroxide from working solution in a sieve plate column. The reaction of 2-ethylanthrahydroquionone with oxygen and the liquid-liquid extraction of hydrogen peroxide take place simultaneously. The oxygen was introduced with hydrogenated working solution through a nozzle in the bottom of the column, which worked as agitated air as well as oxidation reagent. The results showed the oxidation and extraction do not hamper each other, on the contrary, the presence of oxidation gas in the column can promote the transfer of hydrogen peroxide fi'om organic phase to aqueous phase, thus the reaction efficiency and extraction efficiency increased with increasing gas superficial velocity. Furthermore, the oxidation efficiency is almost 100% and the extraction efficiency is higher than 90% in this process.

  11. Recent development of supported monometallic gold as heterogeneous catalyst for selective liquid phase hydrogenation reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thushara Kandaramath Hari; Zahira Yaakob

    2015-01-01

    The great potential of gold catalysts for chemical conversions in both industrial and environmental concerns has attracted increasing interest in many fields of research. Gold nanoparticles supported by metal oxides with high surface area have been recognized as highly efficient and effective green heterogeneous catalyst even at room temperature under normal reaction conditions, in gas and liquid phase reactions. In the present review, we dis-cuss the recent development of heterogeneous, supported monometal ic gold catalysts for organic transforma-tions emphasizing mainly liquid phase hydrogenation reactions. Discussions on the catalytic synthesis procedures and the promoting effect of other noble metals are omitted since they are already worked out. Appli-cations of heterogeneous, supported monometal ic catalysts for chemoselective hydrogenations in liquid phase are studied including potential articles during the period 2000–2013.

  12. Fluid metals the liquid-vapor transition of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Hensel, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    This is a long-needed general introduction to the physics and chemistry of the liquid-vapor phase transition of metals. Physicists and physical chemists have made great strides understanding the basic principles involved, and engineers have discovered a wide variety of new uses for fluid metals. Yet there has been no book that brings together the latest ideas and findings in the field or that bridges the conceptual gap between the condensed-matter physics relevant to a dense metallic liquid and the molecular chemistry relevant to a dilute atomic vapor. Friedrich Hensel and William Warren seek

  13. First-row transition metal hydrogenation and hydrosilylation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovitch, Ryan J.; Mukhopadhyay, Tufan K.; Pal, Raja; Levin, Hagit Ben-Daat; Porter, Tyler M.; Ghosh, Chandrani

    2017-07-18

    Transition metal compounds, and specifically transition metal compounds having a tetradentate and/or pentadentate supporting ligand are described, together with methods for the preparation thereof and the use of such compounds as hydrogenation and/or hydrosilylation catalysts.

  14. Simulation studies of a model of high-density metallic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, K. K.; Chester, G. V.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1980-01-01

    Upper bounds for the ground-state energies of liquid and solid phases of metallic hydrogen and metallic deuterium have been calculated with variational methods and Monte Carlo techniques. At four densities (0.8, 1.2, 1.36, and 1.488) crystalline phases are clearly preferred in the sense that the energy difference, when compared to the liquid, is in excess of the errors inherent in the numerical procedures. At a fifth density (1.6), the energy differences between solid and liquid phases are smaller than these errors.

  15. Density Measurement of Liquid Metals Using Dilatometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianwen WANG; Qingsong MEI

    2006-01-01

    The dilatometer method for density measurement of liquid metals was improved to give a high measurement accuracy with simple operation. The density of liquid tin was measured and the results are in agreement with values in literature. The melting point density of liquid Sn was measured to be 6.966×103 Kg·m-3 and the temperature (T) dependence of the density (ρ) for liquid Sn can be well described by a polynomial equation ρ(T)=7.406 - 9.94 × 10-4T + 2.12 × 10-7T2.

  16. Structure of Liquid Aluminum and Hydrogen Absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yang; DAI Yongbing; WANG Jun; SHU Da; SUN Baode

    2011-01-01

    The hydrogen content in aluminum melts at different temperature was detected. The structure in aluminum melts was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The first peak position of pair correlation function, atomic coordination number and viscosity of aluminum melts were calculated and they changed abnormally in the same temperature range. The mechanism of hydrogen absorption has been discussed. From molecular dynamics calculations, the interdependence between melt structural properties and hydrogen absorption were obtained.

  17. Metallic glassy Zr70Ni20Pd10 powders for improving the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation behavior of MgH2

    OpenAIRE

    M. Sherif El-Eskandarany

    2016-01-01

    Because of its low density, storage of hydrogen in the gaseous and liquids states possess technical and economic challenges. One practical solution for utilizing hydrogen in vehicles with proton-exchange fuel cells membranes is storing hydrogen in metal hydrides. Magnesium hydride (MgH2) remains the best hydrogen storage material due to its high hydrogen capacity and low cost of production. Due to its high activation energy and poor hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics at moderate temperatur...

  18. Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaland, Carsten M.

    1995-01-01

    An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has-four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

  19. A single-component liquid-phase hydrogen storage material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Campbell, Patrick G; Zakharov, Lev N; Liu, Shih-Yuan

    2011-12-07

    The current state-of-the-art for hydrogen storage is compressed H(2) at 700 bar. The development of a liquid-phase hydrogen storage material has the potential to take advantage of the existing liquid-based distribution infrastructure. We describe a liquid-phase hydrogen storage material that is a liquid under ambient conditions (i.e., at 20 °C and 1 atm pressure), air- and moisture-stable, and recyclable; releases H(2) controllably and cleanly at temperatures below or at the proton exchange membrane fuel cell waste-heat temperature of 80 °C; utilizes catalysts that are cheap and abundant for H(2) desorption; features reasonable gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity; and does not undergo a phase change upon H(2) desorption. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. Reduced hydrogen sulfide from crude oil using metal nanoparticles produced by electrochemical deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Sahar Safarkhani; Ali Akbar MiranBeigi; Amir Vahi; Abolghasem Mirhoseini

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is one of the most dangerous contaminants in crude oil and natural gas that must be removed before transport and refining. It has multiple effects on the environment and the industry is bad that these effects include acid rain, cancer, corrosion of pipelines, poison catalytic converters in car exhaust. In this study, to eliminate H2S crude oil Nano emulsion used ionic liquid. Ionic liquids also with metal nanoparticles (MNPs) have been modified. Improve and reform the electro...

  1. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  2. The solubility of hydrogen in liquid binary Al-Li alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyalebechi, P. N.; Talbot, D. E. J.; Granger, D. A.

    1988-04-01

    The solubility of hydrogen in liquid binary aluminum alloys with 1, 2, and 3 wt pct lithium has been determined for the temperature range of 913 to 1073 K and pressure 5.3 × 104 to 10.7 × 104 Pa, using an appropriate version of Sieverts’ method. The results fit the Van’t Hoff isobar and Sieverts’ isotherm and the solubility, S, is given by: Al-1 pct Li: log( S/S°) - 1/2 log( P/P°) = -2113/T/k + 2.568 Al-1 pct Li: log( S/S°) - 1/2 log( P/P°) = -2797/T/k + 3.329 Al-1 pct Li: log( S/S°) - 1/2 log( P/P°) = -2889/T/k + 3.508 where S° is a standard value of solubility equal to 1 cm3 of diatomic hydrogen measured at 273 K and 101,325 Pa per 100 g of metal, and P° is a standard pressure equal to 101,325 Pa. Added lithium progressively increases the solubility of hydrogen in liquid aluminum, due more to its effect on the entropy of solution of hydrogen, through its influence on the liquid metal structure than to an increase in the solute hydrogen atom binding enthalpy.

  3. Normal state of metallic hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, N. A.; Kutukov, A. A.; Mazur, E. A.

    2017-02-01

    A generalized theory of the normal properties of metals in the case of electron-phonon (EP) systems with a nonconstant density of electron states has been used to study the normal state of the SH3 and SH2 phases of hydrogen sulfide at different pressures. The frequency dependence of the real Re Σ (ω) and imaginary ImΣ (ω) parts of the self-energy Σ (ω) part (SEP) of the Green's function of the electron Σ (ω), real part Re Z (ω), and imaginary part Im Z (ω) of the complex renormalization of the mass of the electron; the real part Re χ (ω) and the imaginary part Imχ (ω) of the complex renormalization of the chemical potential; and the density of electron states N (ɛ) renormalized by strong electron-phonon interaction have been calculated. Calculations have been carried out for the stable orthorhombic structure (space group Im3¯ m) of the hydrogen sulfide SH3 for three values of the pressure P = 170, 180, and 225 GPa; and for an SH2 structure with a symmetry of I4/ mmm ( D4 h1¯7) for three values of pressure P = 150, 180, and 225 GP at temperature T = 200 K.

  4. Na-Zn liquid metal battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junli; Kjos, Ole Sigmund; Osen, Karen Sende; Martinez, Ana Maria; Kongstein, Ole Edvard; Haarberg, Geir Martin

    2016-11-01

    A new kind of membrane free liquid metal battery was developed. The battery employs liquid sodium and zinc as electrodes both in liquid state, and NaCl-CaCl2 molten salts as electrolyte. The discharge flat voltage is in the range of about 1.4 V-1.8 V, and the cycle efficiency achieved is about 90% at low discharge current densities (below 40 mA cm-2). Moreover, this battery can also be charged and discharged at high current density with good performance. The discharge flat voltage is above 1.1 V when it is discharged at 100 mA cm-2, while it is about 0.8 V with 100% cycle efficiency when it is discharged at 200 mA cm-2. Compared to other reported liquid metal battery, this battery has lower cost, which suggests broad application prospect in energy storage systems for power grid.

  5. Observation of the Wigner-Huntington transition to metallic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ranga P.; Silvera, Isaac F.

    2017-02-01

    Producing metallic hydrogen has been a great challenge in condensed matter physics. Metallic hydrogen may be a room-temperature superconductor and metastable when the pressure is released and could have an important impact on energy and rocketry. We have studied solid molecular hydrogen under pressure at low temperatures. At a pressure of 495 gigapascals, hydrogen becomes metallic, with reflectivity as high as 0.91. We fit the reflectance using a Drude free-electron model to determine the plasma frequency of 32.5 ± 2.1 electron volts at a temperature of 5.5 kelvin, with a corresponding electron carrier density of 7.7 ± 1.1 × 1023 particles per cubic centimeter, which is consistent with theoretical estimates of the atomic density. The properties are those of an atomic metal. We have produced the Wigner-Huntington dissociative transition to atomic metallic hydrogen in the laboratory.

  6. NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change

  7. Liquid Metal Fuel Combustion Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    Mechanics. No such analysis seem to have been done todate . The other way is to calculate the fluid Finally the location of the liquid particles within the...3601, July about 10 axial locations before peaking up . At about y=25, the 1987. 5 3. L.P.Cook and E.R.Plante: Survey of alternate Stored Chemical

  8. Some Issues in Liquid Metals Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Caturla

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ten articles [1–10] included in this Special Issue on “Liquid Metals” do not intend to comprehensively cover this extensive field, but, rather, to highlight recent discoveries that have greatly broadened the scope of technological applications of these materials. Improvements in understanding the physics of liquid metals are, to a large extent, due to the powerful theoretical tools in the hands of scientists, either semi-empirical [1,5,6] or ab initio (molecular dynamics, see [7]. Surface tension and wetting at metal/ceramic interfaces is an everlasting field of fundamental research with important technological implications. The review of [2] is broad enough, as the work carried out at Grenoble covers almost all interesting matters in the field. Some issues of interest in geophysics and astrophysics are discussed in [3]. The recently discovered liquid–liquid transition in several metals is dealt with in [4]. The fifth contribution [5] discusses the role of icosahedral superclusters in crystallization. In [6], thermodynamic calculations are carried out to identify the regions of the ternary phase diagram of Al-Cu-Y, where the formation of amorphous alloys is most probable. Experimental data and ab initio calculations are presented in [7] to show that an optimal microstructure is obtained if Mg is added to the Al-Si melt before than the modifier AlP alloy. Shock-induced melting of metals by means of laser driven compression is discussed in [8]. With respect to recent discoveries, one of the most outstanding developments is that of gallium alloys that are liquid at room temperature [9], and that, due to the oxide layer that readily cover their surface, maintain some “stiffness”. This has opened the possibility of 3D printing with liquid metals. The last article in this Special Issue [10] describes nano-liquid metals, a suspension of liquid metal and its alloy containing nanometer-sized particles. A room-temperature nano-liquid metal

  9. On the mechanism of hydrogen storage in a metal-organic framework material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belof, Jonathan L; Stern, Abraham C; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Space, Brian

    2007-12-12

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed modeling hydrogen sorption in a recently synthesized metal-organic framework material (MOF) that exhibits large molecular hydrogen uptake capacity. The MOF is remarkable because at 78 K and 1.0 atm it sorbs hydrogen at a density near that of liquid hydrogen (at 20 K and 1.0 atm) when considering H2 density in the pores. Unlike most other MOFs that have been investigated for hydrogen storage, it has a highly ionic framework and many relatively small channels. The simulations demonstrate that it is both of these physical characteristics that lead to relatively strong hydrogen interactions in the MOF and ultimately large hydrogen uptake. Microscopically, hydrogen interacts with the MOF via three principle attractive potential energy contributions: Van der Waals, charge-quadrupole, and induction. Previous simulations of hydrogen storage in MOFs and other materials have not focused on the role of polarization effects, but they are demonstrated here to be the dominant contribution to hydrogen physisorption. Indeed, polarization interactions in the MOF lead to two distinct populations of dipolar hydrogen that are identified from the simulations that should be experimentally discernible using, for example, Raman spectroscopy. Since polarization interactions are significantly enhanced by the presence of a charged framework with narrow pores, MOFs are excellent hydrogen storage candidates.

  10. Soft-sphere model for liquid metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, D.A.

    1977-11-08

    A semi-empirical soft-sphere model of fluids is modified for application to the thermodynamic properties of liquid metals. Enthalpy, volume, and sound speed are computed as functions of temperature for 13 metals and compared with experimental data. Critical points and coexistence curves are also computed and compared with experimental data, where these have been measured. Strengths and weaknesses of the model are discussed.

  11. Noble metal-free hydrogen evolution catalysts for water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Yu

    2015-08-07

    Sustainable hydrogen production is an essential prerequisite of a future hydrogen economy. Water electrolysis driven by renewable resource-derived electricity and direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion based on photochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting are promising pathways for sustainable hydrogen production. All these techniques require, among many things, highly active noble metal-free hydrogen evolution catalysts to make the water splitting process more energy-efficient and economical. In this review, we highlight the recent research efforts toward the synthesis of noble metal-free electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and their catalytic properties for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We review several important kinds of heterogeneous non-precious metal electrocatalysts, including metal sulfides, metal selenides, metal carbides, metal nitrides, metal phosphides, and heteroatom-doped nanocarbons. In the discussion, emphasis is given to the synthetic methods of these HER electrocatalysts, the strategies of performance improvement, and the structure/composition-catalytic activity relationship. We also summarize some important examples showing that non-Pt HER electrocatalysts could serve as efficient cocatalysts for promoting direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion in both photochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting systems, when combined with suitable semiconductor photocatalysts.

  12. Liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage: catalytic hydrogen generation under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai-Long; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Yan, Jun-Min; Zhang, Xin-Bo; Xu, Qiang

    2010-05-25

    There is a demand for a sufficient and sustainable energy supply. Hence, the search for applicable hydrogen storage materials is extremely important owing to the diversified merits of hydrogen energy. Lithium and sodium borohydride, ammonia borane, hydrazine, and formic acid have been extensively investigated as promising hydrogen storage materials based on their relatively high hydrogen content. Significant advances, such as hydrogen generation temperatures and reaction kinetics, have been made in the catalytic hydrolysis of aqueous lithium and sodium borohydride and ammonia borane as well as in the catalytic decomposition of hydrous hydrazine and formic acid. In this Minireview we briefly survey the research progresses in catalytic hydrogen generation from these liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials.

  13. Nanoporous metal organic framework materials for hydrogen storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Xiao; Qingchun Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen is expected to play an important role in future transportation as a promising alternative clean energy source to carbon-based fuels.One of the key challenges to commercialize hydrogen energy is to develop appropriate onboard hydrogen storage systems,capable of charging and discharging large quantities of hydrogen with fast enough kinetics to meet commercial requirements.Metal organic framework (MOF) is a new type of inorganic and organic hybrid nanoporous particulate materials.Its diverse networks can enhance hydrogen storage through tuning the structure and property of MOFs.The MOF materials so far developed adsorb hydrogen through weak disperston interactions,which allow significant quantity of hydrogen to be stored at cryogenic temperatures with fast kinetics.Novel MOFs are being developed to strengthen the interactions between hydrogen and MOFs in order to store hydrogen under ambient conditions.This review surveys the development of such candidate materials,their performance and future research needs.

  14. Heat transfer analysis of liquid piston compressor for hydrogen applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Nasrin Arjomand; Rokni, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    based on the mass and energy balance of the hydrogen, liquid, and the wall of the compression chamber at each time step and positional node with various compression ratios, to calculate the temperature distribution of the system. The amount of heat extracted from hydrogen, directly at the interface......A hydrogen compression technology using liquid as the compression piston is investigated from heat transfer point of view. A thermodynamic model, simulating a single compression stroke, is developed to investigate the heat transfer phenomena inside the compression chamber. The model is developed...... at the interface. Moreover, the results of the sensitivity analysis illustrates that increasing the total heat transfer coefficients at the interface and the wall, together with compression time, play key roles in reducing the hydrogen temperature. Increasing the total heat transfer coefficient at the interface...

  15. Analysis of ordinary and radiative muon capture in liquid hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, S; Kubodera, K; Ando, Shung-ichi; Myhrer, Fred; Kubodera, Kuniharu

    2002-01-01

    The experimental data on the ordinary muon capture (OMC) rate and the partial branching ratio of radiative muon capture (RMC) in liquid hydrogen are simultaneously analyzed using theoretical estimates for the atomic OMC rates obtained in chiral perturbation theory using the most recent physical constants. Since both data have been obtained in a liquid hydrogen target, we reexamine the formulas for relating the atomic OMC and RMC rates to the liquid hydrogen OMC and RMC rates, respectively. Although the analysis is influenced significantly by the ambiguity in the molecular state population, we can conclude that, while the OMC data can be reproduced, it is not possible to explain the OMC and RMC data simultaneously.

  16. Metallacarboranes: Towards promising hydrogen storage metal organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek; Sadrzadeh, Arta; Yakobson, Boris

    2011-03-01

    Using first principles calculations we show the high hydrogen storage capacity of metallacarboranes, where the transition metal (TM) atoms bind hydrogen via Kubas interaction. The average binding energy of ~ 0.3 eV/H favorably lies within the reversible adsorption range The Sc and Ti are found to be the optimum metal atoms maximizing the number of stored H2 molecules. Depending upon the structure, metallacarboranes can adsorb up to 8 wt% of hydrogen, which exceeds DOE goal for 2015. Being integral part of the cage, TMs do not suffer from the aggregation problem. Furthermore, the presence of carbon atom in the cages permits linking the metallacarboranes to form metal organic frameworks (MOF), thus able to adsorb hydrogen via Kubas interaction, in addition to van der Waals physisorption. A. K. Singh, A. Sadrzadeh, and B. I. Yakobson, Metallacarboranes: Toward Promising Hydrogen Storage Metal Organic Frameworks, JACS 132,14126 (2010).

  17. Paths of progress in liquid metal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, A.; Soda, H.; Sommerville, I. D.

    1995-04-01

    Industry has identified three major issues as being fundamental to future technological developments: process step elimination, product-process integration, and intelligent processing. This article reviews these concepts by discussing recent research at the University of Toronto on plasma processing, netshape casting, and diagnostic sensors for the evaluation of liquid metal quality.

  18. Specificity in liquid metal induced embrittlement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fernandes, PJL

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available compounds between the solid and liquid metals. To study the embrittlement of two brass alloys by molten gallium (Tm = 29.8 °C), Tensile tests on smooth, unnotched specimens were used. The alloys used were CZ106, a 70/30 alpha-brass, and CZ109, a 60/40 alpha...

  19. Hydrogenation of liquid natural rubber via diimide reduction in hydrazine hydrate/hydrogen peroxide system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusof, Muhammad Jefri Mohd; Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR) with molecular weight of lower than 10{sup 5} and shorter polymeric chain than natural rubber was prepared. LNR was then hydrogenated via diimide reduction by oxidation of hydrazine hydrate with hydrogen peroxide. The unsaturated units of the rubber were converted into saturated hydrocarbon to strengthen the backbone of the polymer so it was able to resist thermal degradation. The results indicated that hydrogenation degree of the product (HLNR) could be extended to 91.2% conversion under appropriate conditions. The hydrogenated LNR (HLNR) was characterized using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of HLNR were analyzed with Termogravimetric Analysis (TGA)

  20. Supported liquid membranes technologies in metals removal from liquid effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Agreda, D.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The generation of liquid effluents containing organic and inorganic residues from industries present a potential hazardousness for environment and human health, being mandatory the elimination of these pollutants from the respective solutions containing them. In order to achieve this goal, several techniques are being used and among them, supported liquid membranes technologies are showing their potential for their application in the removal of metals contained in liquid effluents. Supported liquid membranes are a combination between conventional polymeric membranes and solvent extraction. Several configurations are used: flat-sheet supported liquid membranes, spiral wounds and hollow fiber modules. In order to improve their effectiveness, smart operations have been developed: non-dispersive solvent extraction, non-dispersive solvent extraction with strip phase dispersion and hollow fiber renewal liquid membrane. This paper overviewed some of these supported liquid membranes technologies and their applications to the treatment of metal-bearing liquid effluents.

    La generación, por parte de las industrias, de efluentes líquidos conteniendo sustancias orgánicas e inorgánicas, es un peligro potencial tanto para los humanos como para el medio ambiente, siendo necesaria la eliminación de estos elementos tóxicos de las disoluciones que los contienen. Para conseguir este fin, se están aplicando diversas técnicas y entre ellas las tecnologías de membranas líquidas soportadas, están demostrando sus aptitudes para la eliminación de metales contenidos en efluentes líquidos. Las membranas líquidas soportadas, resultan de la unión de las membranas poliméricas y de la tecnología de extracción líquido-líquido. Este tipo de membranas se pueden utilizar en diversas configuraciones: plana, módulo en fibra hueca y módulo en espiral y para aumentar su efectividad se están desarrollando las llamadas operaciones avanzadas: extracción no

  1. Reduced hydrogen sulfide from crude oil using metal nanoparticles produced by electrochemical deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Safarkhani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is one of the most dangerous contaminants in crude oil and natural gas that must be removed before transport and refining. It has multiple effects on the environment and the industry is bad that these effects include acid rain, cancer, corrosion of pipelines, poison catalytic converters in car exhaust. In this study, to eliminate H2S crude oil Nano emulsion used ionic liquid. Ionic liquids also with metal nanoparticles (MNPs have been modified. Improve and reform the electrochemical deposition of metal salts is done. Ionic liquid 1 - Hydro One Atyl2- methyl imidazolium de cyanimide [HEMIM] [DCA] is inherently hydrophilic as Scavenger H2S was added to the crude oil. Two types of metal salts of Fe (acac 3 and Cu (SO4 electrochemical deposition method for producing metal nanoparticles in the ionic liquid [HEMIM] [DCA] was used. Suitable concentrations of ionic liquids for the complete removal of hydrogen sulfide from crude oil were determined by two methods: static and dynamic methods. Dynamic method to determine the required dose used to remove H2S. Static method using response surface and through statistical experimental design for modeling and assessment CCD H2S was removed parameters. Three factors, namely Scavengerdose, contact time and the reaction temperature were studied. The interaction between these factors on the concentration of H2S in the crude oil was studied. 3 important statistical models for ionic liquids and ionic liquid containing two types of metal nanoparticles were developed. This model has an index of noncompliance was not important. The ionic liquid modified with nanoparticles , activity and H2S removal capacity is significantly increased , to the extent that the effect of one or two major factors were considered too small or unimportant . Copper metal nanoparticles showed better performance for the removal of H2S to iron

  2. Track formation in a liquid hydrogen ultrasonic bubble chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, R C A; Jarman, P D

    1973-01-01

    Track sensitivity to minimum ionising particles has been demonstrated in liquid hydrogen using only an intense ultrasonic field. Carefully designed transducer systems are shown to be capable of producing pressure amplitudes >2.8 atm in a standing wave system in liquid hydrogen. The growth of bubbles to visible size (0.1 mm) in less than 0.2 ms, and their collapse in less than 15 ms, indicates that rapid cycling rates of 50-100 pulses per second may be feasible with this technique. (11 refs).

  3. Molecular absorption cryogenic cooler for liquid hydrogen propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, G. A.; Jones, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    A light weight, long life molecular absorption cryogenic cooler (MACC) system is described which can use low temperature waste heat to provide cooling for liquid hydrogen propellant tanks for interplanetary spacecraft. Detailed tradeoff studies were made to evaluate the refrigeration system component interactions in order to minimize the mass of the spacecraft cooler system. Based on this analysis a refrigerator system mass of 31 kg is required to provide the .48 watts of cooling required by a 2.3 meter diameter liquid hydrogen tank.

  4. The Metal-Hydrogen System Basic Bulk Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Fukai, Yuh

    2005-01-01

    Metal hydrides are of inestimable importance for the future of hydrogen energy. This unique monograph presents a clear and comprehensive description of the bulk properties of the metal-hydrogen system. The statistical thermodynamics is treated over a very wide range of pressure, temperature and composition. Another prominent feature of the book is its elucidation of the quantum mechanical behavior of interstitial hydrogen atoms, including their states and motion. The important topic of hydrogen interaction with lattice defects and its materials-science implications are also discussed thoroughly. This second edition has been substantially revised and updated.

  5. Correlation of vapor-liquid equilibrium ratio of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Z.L.; Greenkorn, R.A.; Chao, K.C. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Chemical Engineering

    1995-06-01

    In this work the correlation of vapor-liquid equilibrium ratio of hydrogen in the Chao-Seader correlation is updated with the use of new experimental data that have appeared in the intervening years. The correlation is extended in the direction of high temperature where much new data have been reported over a wide pressure range. The hydrogen correlation in the Chao-Seader correlation was based on experimental data in the temperature range of approximately 200--530 K that was the full extent of available data at the time. Grayson and Streed (1963) extended the hydrogen correlation to higher temperature using proprietary data on oil fractions. Since then a great deal of experimental investigation has been performed to determine the solubility of hydrogen at temperatures up to 730 K and pressure up to 25 MPa. Sebastian and coworkers (1981) developed a correlation for the solubility of hydrogen based on the expanded database. In this work the authors develop a new equation for the standard state liquid fugacity of hydrogen based on the expanded current database. The new equation will be useful to replace the equation for v of hydrogen in the Chao-Seader correlation that is found in process design software packages.

  6. Liquid crystal on subwavelength metal gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palto, S. P.; Barnik, M. I.; Artemov, V. V.; Shtykov, N. M.; Geivandov, A. R.; Yudin, S. G.; Gorkunov, M. V. [Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky pr. 59, 119333 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-14

    Optical and electrooptical properties of a system consisting of subwavelength metal gratings and nematic liquid crystal layer are studied. Aluminium gratings that also act as interdigitated electrodes are produced by focused ion beam lithography. It is found that a liquid crystal layer strongly influences both the resonance and light polarization properties characteristic of the gratings. Enhanced transmittance is observed not only for the TM-polarized light in the near infrared spectral range but also for the TE-polarized light in the visible range. Although the electrodes are separated by nanosized slits, and the electric field is strongly localized near the surface, a pronounced electrooptical effect is registered. The effect is explained in terms of local reorientation of liquid crystal molecules at the grating surface and propagation of the orientational deformation from the surface into the bulk of the liquid crystal layer.

  7. Corrosion behavior of construction materials for ionic liquid hydrogen compressor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arjomand Kermani, Nasrin; Petrushina, Irina; Nikiforov, Aleksey Valerievich

    2016-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of various commercially available stainless steels and nickel-based alloys as possible construction materials for components which are in direct contact with one of five different ionic liquids was evaluated. The ionic liquids, namely: 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium triflate, 1...... liquid hydrogen compressor. An electrochemical cell was specially designed, and steady-state cyclic voltammetry was used to measure the corrosion resistance of the alloys in the ionic liquids at 23 °C, under atmospheric pressure. The results showed a very high corrosion resistance and high stability...... for all the alloys tested. The two stainless steels, AISI 316L and AISI 347 showed higher corrosion resistance compared to AISI 321 in all the ionic liquids tested. It was observed that small addition of molybdenum, tantalum, and niobium to the alloys increased the corrosion stability in the ionic liquids...

  8. Anodic dissolution of metals in ionic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Abbott

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The anodic dissolution of metals is an important topic for battery design, material finishing and metal digestion. Ionic liquids are being used in all of these areas but the research on the anodic dissolution is relatively few in these media. This study investigates the behaviour of 9 metals in an ionic liquid [C4mim][Cl] and a deep eutectic solvent, Ethaline, which is a 1:2 mol ratio mixture of choline chloride and ethylene glycol. It is shown that for the majority of metals studied a quasi-passivation of the metal surface occurs, primarily due to the formation of insoluble films on the electrode surface. The behaviour of most metals is different in [C4mim][Cl] to that in Ethaline due in part to the differences in viscosity. The formation of passivating salt films can be decreased with stirring or by increasing the electrolyte temperature, thereby increasing ligand transport to the electrode surface.

  9. Ionic interaction and conductivity of metallic hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.K.Malynovski

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the electroresistivity of metallic hydrogen within the framework of perturbation theory in electron-proton interaction. To this end we employ the Kubo linear response theory while using the two-time retarded Green functions method to calculate the relaxation time. The expressions for the second and third order contributions are given. To describe the electron subsystem, the random phase approximation is used, allowing for the exchange interactions and correlations in a local field approximation. Thermodynamics of the proton subsystem is assumed to be given by the Percus-Yevick equation. At a given density and temperature the only parameter of the theory is the hard sphere diameter, which is calculated from effective pair ionic interaction. For a completely degenerated electron gas, the latter is determined by the density of the system. The dependence of the second and the third order contributions on the parameters of the theory is investigated. For all densities and temperatures examined here the third order contribution constitutes more than half of the second order term. The corresponding magnitude of resistivity is about 100-250μΩ cm.

  10. Modeling liquid hydrogen cavitating flow with the full cavitation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.B.; Qiu, L.M.; Qi, H.; Zhang, X.J.; Gan, Z.H. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2008-12-15

    Cavitation is the formation of vapor bubbles within a liquid where flow dynamics cause the local static pressure to drop below the vapor pressure. This paper strives towards developing an effective computational strategy to simulate liquid hydrogen cavitation relevant to liquid rocket propulsion applications. The aims are realized by performing a steady state computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study of liquid hydrogen flow over a 2D hydrofoil and an axisymmetric ogive in Hord's reports with a so-called full cavitation model. The thermodynamic effect was demonstrated with the assumption of thermal equilibrium between the gas phase and liquid phase. Temperature-dependent fluid thermodynamic properties were specified along the saturation line from the ''Gaspak 3.2'' databank. Justifiable agreement between the computed surface pressure, temperature and experimental data of Hord was obtained. Specifically, a global sensitivity analysis is performed to examine the sensitivity of the turbulent computations to the wall grid resolution, wall treatments and changes in model parameters. A proper near-wall model and grid resolution were suggested. The full cavitation model with default model parameters provided solutions with comparable accuracy to sheet cavitation in liquid hydrogen for the two geometries. (author)

  11. Proton conducting ceramics for potentiometric hydrogen sensors for molten metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borland, H.; Llivina, L.; Colominas, S.; Abellà, J., E-mail: jordi.abella@iqs.edu

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis and chemical characterization of proton conductor ceramics. • Qualification of ceramics for hydrogen sensors in molten lithium–lead. • Ceramics have well-defined grains with a wide distribution of sizes. • Good agreement with predictions obtained with BaZrY, BaCeZrY and SrFeCo ceramics. -- Abstract: Tritium monitoring in lithium–lead eutectic (Pb–15.7Li) is of great importance for the performance of liquid blankets in fusion reactors. Also, tritium measurements will be required in order to proof tritium self-sufficiency in liquid metal breeding systems. On-line hydrogen (isotopes) sensors must be design and tested in order to accomplish these goals. Potentiometric hydrogen sensors for molten lithium–lead eutectic have been designed at the Electrochemical Methods Lab at Institut Quimic de Sarria (IQS) at Barcelona and are under development and qualification. The probes are based on the use of solid state electrolytes and works as proton exchange membranes (PEM). In this work the following compounds: BaZr{sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}, BaCe{sub 0.6}Zr{sub 0.3}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−α}, Sr(Ce{sub 0.6}-Zr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−α} and Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 1.8}Co{sub 2}O{sub 7} have been synthesized in order to be tested as PEM H-probes. Potentiometric measurements of the synthesized ceramic elements at 500 °C have been performed at a fixed hydrogen concentration. The sensors constructed using the proton conductor elements BaZr{sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}, BaCe{sub 0.6}Zr{sub 0.3}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−δ} and Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 1.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 7−δ} exhibited stable output potential and its value was close to the theoretical value calculated with the Nernst equation (deviation around 60 mV). In contrast, the sensor constructed using the proton conductor element Sr(Ce{sub 0.6}–Zr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−δ} showed a deviation higher than 100 mV between experimental an theoretical data.

  12. Hydrogen storage in Li-doped metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himsl, D.; Hartmann, M. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Erlangen Catalysis Resource Center

    2010-12-30

    Porous Metal-Organic Frameworks have been considered as potential materials for solid state hydrogen storage in recent times. In this context their properties like high permanent porosity, large surface area and the ease of chemical modification due their modular assembly are highly attractive. Unfortunately these materials suffer from low physisorption interaction energies with hydrogen and consequently the need for low adsorption temperatures (77 K) to achieve sufficient hydrogen loadings. One possible approach to overcome the outlined problem is the introduction of unsaturated metal sites within the interior MOF surface to strengthen the adsorbate-adsorbent interaction. We established the functionalization with lithiumalkoxide groups via a post-synthetic transformation of pendant hydroxyl groups with a suitable lithium base. Our results show a significant increase of the isosteric heat of adsorption for hydrogen within the lithium-containing material, thus showing that our approach is a promising strategy to make hydrogen storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks more efficient. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of alternate fuels for aircraft. [liquid hydrogen, liquid methane, and synthetic aviation kerosene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcofski, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen, liquid methane, and synthetic aviation kerosene were assessed as alternate fuels for aircraft in terms of cost, capital requirements, and energy resource utilization. Fuel transmission and airport storage and distribution facilities are considered. Environmental emissions and safety aspects of fuel selection are discussed and detailed descriptions of various fuel production and liquefaction processes are given. Technological deficiencies are identified.

  14. A liquid hydrogen target for the calibration of the MEG and MEG II liquid xenon calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signorelli, G., E-mail: giovanni.signorelli@pi.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Baldini, A.M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; Nicolò, D. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Galli, L.; Gallucci, G.; Grassi, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Papa, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Sergiampietri, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Venturini, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    We designed, built and operated a liquid hydrogen target for the calibration of the liquid xenon calorimeter of the MEG experiment. The target was used throughout the entire data taking period, from 2008 to 2013 and it is being refurbished and partly re-designed to be integrated and used in the MEG-II experiment.

  15. Hydrogen evolution by a metal-free electrocatalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yao

    2014-04-28

    Electrocatalytic reduction of water to molecular hydrogen via the hydrogen evolution reaction may provide a sustainable energy supply for the future, but its commercial application is hampered by the use of precious platinum catalysts. All alternatives to platinum thus far are based on nonprecious metals, and, to our knowledge, there is no report about a catalyst for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution beyond metals. Here we couple graphitic-carbon nitride with nitrogen-doped graphene to produce a metal-free hybrid catalyst, which shows an unexpected hydrogen evolution reaction activity with comparable overpotential and Tafel slope to some of well-developed metallic catalysts. Experimental observations in combination with density functional theory calculations reveal that its unusual electrocatalytic properties originate from an intrinsic chemical and electronic coupling that synergistically promotes the proton adsorption and reduction kinetics. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  16. Hydrogen evolution by a metal-free electrocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yao; Jiao, Yan; Zhu, Yihan; Li, Lu Hua; Han, Yu; Chen, Ying; Du, Aijun; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2014-04-28

    Electrocatalytic reduction of water to molecular hydrogen via the hydrogen evolution reaction may provide a sustainable energy supply for the future, but its commercial application is hampered by the use of precious platinum catalysts. All alternatives to platinum thus far are based on nonprecious metals, and, to our knowledge, there is no report about a catalyst for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution beyond metals. Here we couple graphitic-carbon nitride with nitrogen-doped graphene to produce a metal-free hybrid catalyst, which shows an unexpected hydrogen evolution reaction activity with comparable overpotential and Tafel slope to some of well-developed metallic catalysts. Experimental observations in combination with density functional theory calculations reveal that its unusual electrocatalytic properties originate from an intrinsic chemical and electronic coupling that synergistically promotes the proton adsorption and reduction kinetics.

  17. Hydrogen sensor based on metallic photonic crystal slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, D; Seidel, A; Orzekowsky, R B; Lee, S-H; Deb, S; Giessen, H

    2010-09-15

    We present a hydrogen sensor based on metallic photonic crystal slabs. Tungsten trioxide (WO(3)) is used as a waveguide layer below an array of gold nanowires. Hydrogen exposure influences the optical properties of this photonic crystal arrangement by gasochromic mechanisms, where the photonic crystal geometry leads to sharp spectral resonances. Measurements reveal a change of the transmission depending on the hydrogen concentration. Theoretical limits for the detection range and sensitivity of this approach are discussed.

  18. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1984-05-09

    A study was made of the properties of metal hydrides which may be suitable for use in chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes. Sixty-five alloys were measured, with the best having a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 1.35 at 60/sup 0/C. Chromatographic columns using these alloys produced deuterium enrichments of up to 3.6 in a single pass, using natural abundance hydrogen as starting material. 25 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Impact of nuclear irradiation on helium bubble nucleation at interfaces in liquid metals coupled to permeation through stainless steels

    CERN Document Server

    Fradera, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The impact of nucleating gas bubbles in the form of a dispersed gas phase on hydrogen isotope permeation at interfaces between liquid metals, like LLE, and structural materials, like stainless steel, has been studied. Liquid metal to structural material interfaces involving surfaces, may lower the nucleation barrier promoting bubble nucleation at active sites. Hence, hydrogen isotope absorption into gas bubbles modelling and control at interfaces may have a capital importance regarding design, operation and safety. He bubbles as a permeation barrier principle is analysed showing a significant impact on hydrogen isotope permeation, which may have a significant effect on liquid metal systems, e.g., tritium extraction systems. Liquid metals like LLE under nuclear irradiation in, e.g., breeding blankets of a nuclear fusion reactor would generate tritium which is to be extracted and recirculated as fuel. At the same time that tritium is bred, helium is also generated and may precipitate in the form of nano bubbles...

  20. Character and Structure of Hydrogen Bonding in Liquid Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinghua; Luo, Yi; Augustsson, Andreas; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Sathe, Conny; Agren, Hans; Siegbahn, Hans; Nordgren, Joseph

    2003-03-01

    Pauling stated in the 50s that electron sharing between water molecules results in a covalency in the hydrogen bond. Many attempts have been made in the past to verify PaulingÂ's prediction, but without much success due to the limitation of experimental access to the electronic structure of liquids. We reported the first X-ray emission spectra of liquid water. X-ray emission is a direct probe of the local electronic structure of complex systems. Our experimental and theoretical studies on liquid water provide clear evidence that an electron sharing takes place between water molecules. Such a sharing mainly involves the so-called 3a1 orbital, which is a mixing of oxygen 2p and hydrogen 2s atomic orbitals. The outermost "lone pair" orbital (1b_1), however, hardly shows any change upon solvation, which is in contradiction with the normal definition of so-called coordinate-covalent bonding (also called donor-acceptor or Lewis acid-base bonding). Moreover, the X-ray emission spectra of liquid water nicely show the origin for the increasing of dipole moment in liquid water, and they have also been used to separately determine a particular structure with broken hydrogen bonding.

  1. A quantum fluid of metallic hydrogen suggested by first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonev, Stanimir A; Schwegler, Eric; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Galli, Giulia

    2004-10-07

    It is generally assumed that solid hydrogen will transform into a metallic alkali-like crystal at sufficiently high pressure. However, some theoretical models have also suggested that compressed hydrogen may form an unusual two-component (protons and electrons) metallic fluid at low temperature, or possibly even a zero-temperature liquid ground state. The existence of these new states of matter is conditional on the presence of a maximum in the melting temperature versus pressure curve (the 'melt line'). Previous measurements of the hydrogen melt line up to pressures of 44 GPa have led to controversial conclusions regarding the existence of this maximum. Here we report ab initio calculations that establish the melt line up to 200 GPa. We predict that subtle changes in the intermolecular interactions lead to a decline of the melt line above 90 GPa. The implication is that as solid molecular hydrogen is compressed, it transforms into a low-temperature quantum fluid before becoming a monatomic crystal. The emerging low-temperature phase diagram of hydrogen and its isotopes bears analogies with the familiar phases of 3He and 4He (the only known zero-temperature liquids), but the long-range Coulomb interactions and the large component mass ratio present in hydrogen would result in dramatically different properties.

  2. Cryofenix Mission- Study of Liquid Hydrogen Under Low Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leudiere, V.; Bianchi, S.; Lundin, M.; Andersson, G.; Loth, K.

    2015-09-01

    For the first time in Europe a cryogenic sounding rocket experiment was performed, canying liquid hydrogen. For this purpose was the well proven SSC Sounding rocket system MASER selected. The Cryofenix was launched from ESC, Esrange Space Center on February 22, 2015. The main objective for the mission was to study the global behaviour of liquid hydrogen under controlled gravity conditions. The controlled gravity during the mission was created by a cold gas thruster module. The experiment data obtained during the flight in terms of high resolution videos, pressure and temperature data are well in line with the expected results. The experiment data will support future development of liquid propellant management systems for Ariane.

  3. Liquid metal ion source analysis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, P.

    1986-06-14

    An analysis system for angular and mass resolved energy distribution measurements of liquid metal ion source beams has been constructed. The energy analyser has been calibrated, and preliminary on-axis energy distribution measurements of a gallium source operating between 0.26 and 30.0 ..mu..A have been made. These results closely agree with measurements reported by other workers, confirming the unusual FWHM behaviour of gallium sources below approx. 2 ..mu..A.

  4. Method and apparatus for electrokinetic co-generation of hydrogen and electric power from liquid water microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saykally, Richard J; Duffin, Andrew M; Wilson, Kevin R; Rude, Bruce S

    2013-02-12

    A method and apparatus for producing both a gas and electrical power from a flowing liquid, the method comprising: a) providing a source liquid containing ions that when neutralized form a gas; b) providing a velocity to the source liquid relative to a solid material to form a charged liquid microjet, which subsequently breaks up into a droplet spay, the solid material forming a liquid-solid interface; and c) supplying electrons to the charged liquid by contacting a spray stream of the charged liquid with an electron source. In one embodiment, where the liquid is water, hydrogen gas is formed and a streaming current is generated. The apparatus comprises a source of pressurized liquid, a microjet nozzle, a conduit for delivering said liquid to said microjet nozzle, and a conductive metal target sufficiently spaced from said nozzle such that the jet stream produced by said microjet is discontinuous at said target. In one arrangement, with the metal nozzle and target electrically connected to ground, both hydrogen gas and a streaming current are generated at the target as it is impinged by the streaming, liquid spray microjet.

  5. POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, O.E.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

  6. Stretchable Loudspeaker using Liquid Metal Microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sang Woo; Park, Jeongwon; Hong, Soo Yeong; Park, Heun; Jeong, Yu Ra; Park, Junhong; Lee, Sang-Soo; Ha, Jeong Sook

    2015-07-01

    Considering the various applications of wearable and bio-implantable devices, it is desirable to realize stretchable acoustic devices for body-attached applications such as sensing biological signals, hearing aids, and notification of information via sound. In this study, we demonstrate the facile fabrication of a Stretchable Acoustic Device (SAD) using liquid metal coil of Galinstan where the SAD is operated by the electromagnetic interaction between the liquid metal coil and a Neodymium (Nd) magnet. To fabricate a liquid metal coil, Galinstan was injected into a micro-patterned elastomer channel. This fabricated SAD was operated simultaneously as a loudspeaker and a microphone. Measurements of the frequency response confirmed that the SAD was mechanically stable under both 50% uniaxial and 30% biaxial strains. Furthermore, 2000 repetitive applications of a 50% uniaxial strain did not induce any noticeable degradation of the sound pressure. Both voice and the beeping sound of an alarm clock were successfully recorded and played back through our SAD while it was attached to the wrist under repeated deformation. These results demonstrate the high potential of the fabricated SAD using Galinstan voice coil in various research fields including stretchable, wearable, and bio-implantable acoustic devices.

  7. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-decorated silicon carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Sevak; Solanki, Ankit

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen storage for fuel cell is an active area of research and appropriate materials with excellent hydrogen adsorption properties are highly demanded. Nanotubes, having high surface to volume ratio, are promising storage materials for hydrogen. Recently, silicon carbide nanotubes have been predicted as potential materials for future hydrogen storage application, and studies in this area are ongoing. Here, we report a systematic study on hydrogen adsorption properties in metal (Pt, Ni and Al) decorated silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) using first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The hydrogen adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of adsorption energy, electronic band structure, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that hydrogen adsorptions on Pt, Ni and Al-decorated SiCNTs undergo spontaneous exothermic reactions with significant modulation of electronic structure of SiCNTs in all cases. Importantly, according to the Mulliken charge population analysis, dipole-dipole interaction causes chemisorptions of hydrogen in Pt, Ni and Al decorated SiCNTs with formation of chemical bonds. The study is a platform for the development of metal decorated SiCNTs for hydrogen adsorption or hydrogen storage application.

  8. Interactions of Hydrogen Isotopes and Oxides with Metal Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2008-08-01

    Understanding and accounting for interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their oxides with metal surfaces is important for persons working with tritium systems. Reported data from several investigators have shown that the processes of oxidation, adsorption, absorption, and permeation are all coupled and interactive. A computer model has been developed for predicting the interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their corresponding oxides in a flowing carrier gas stream with the walls of a metallic tube, particularly at low hydrogen concentrations. An experiment has been constructed to validate the predictive model. Predictions from modeling lead to unexpected experiment results.

  9. Two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides and oxides for hydrogen evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibilities of hydrogen evolution by basal planes of 2D metal dichalcogenides and oxides in the 2H and 1T class of structures using the hydrogen binding energy as a computational activity descriptor. For some groups of systems like the Ti, Zr, and Hf dichalcogenides the hydrogen...... of the two phases will be active for the hydrogen evolution reaction; however, in most cases the two phases are very close in formation energy, opening up the possibility for stabilizing the active phase. The study points to many new possible 2D HER materials beyond the few that are already known....

  10. Integrated Refrigeration and Storage for Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, A. M.; Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Tomsik, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA has used liquefied hydrogen (LH2) on a large scale since the beginning of the space program as fuel for the Centaur and Apollo upper stages, and more recently to feed the three space shuttle main engines. The LH2 systems currently in place at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch pads are aging and inefficient compared to the state-of-the-art. Therefore, the need exists to explore advanced technologies and operations that can drive commodity costs down, and provide increased capabilities. The Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen (GODU-LH2) was developed at KSC to pursue these goals by demonstrating active thermal control of the propellant state by direct removal of heat using a cryocooler. The project has multiple objectives including zero loss storage and transfer, liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen, and densification of liquid hydrogen. The key technology challenge was efficiently integrating the cryogenic refrigerator into the LH2 storage tank. A Linde LR1620 Brayton cycle refrigerator is used to produce up to 900W cooling at 20K, circulating approximately 22 g/s gaseous helium through the hydrogen via approximately 300 m of heat exchanger tubing. The GODU-LH2 system is fully operational, and is currently under test. This paper will discuss the design features of the refrigerator and storage system, as well as the current test results.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A NON-NOBLE METAL HYDROGEN PURIFICATION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korinko, P; Kyle Brinkman, K; Thad Adams, T; George Rawls, G

    2008-11-25

    Development of advanced hydrogen separation membranes in support of hydrogen production processes such as coal gasification and as front end gas purifiers for fuel cell based system is paramount to the successful implementation of a national hydrogen economy. Current generation metallic hydrogen separation membranes are based on Pd-alloys. Although the technology has proven successful, at issue is the high cost of palladium. Evaluation of non-noble metal based dense metallic separation membranes is currently receiving national and international attention. The focus of the reported work was to develop a scaled reactor with a VNi-Ti alloy membrane to replace a production Pd-alloy tube-type purification/diffuser system.

  12. Recent Progress in Metal Borohydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig M. Jensen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The prerequisite for widespread use of hydrogen as an energy carrier is the development of new materials that can safely store it at high gravimetric and volumetric densities. Metal borohydrides M(BH4n (n is the valence of metal M, in particular, have high hydrogen density, and are therefore regarded as one such potential hydrogen storage material. For fuel cell vehicles, the goal for on-board storage systems is to achieve reversible store at high density but moderate temperature and hydrogen pressure. To this end, a large amount of effort has been devoted to improvements in their thermodynamic and kinetic aspects. This review provides an overview of recent research activity on various M(BH4n, with a focus on the fundamental dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation properties and on providing guidance for material design in terms of tailoring thermodynamics and promoting kinetics for hydrogen storage.

  13. Ordered ground states of metallic hydrogen and deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    The physical attributes of some of the more physically distinct ordered states of metallic hydrogen and metallic deuterium at T = 0 and nearby are discussed. The likelihood of superconductivity in both is considered with respect to the usual coupling via the density fluctuations of the ions.

  14. Precipitation of metal sulphides using gaseous hydrogen sulphide : mathematical modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarazi, Mousa Al-; Heesink, A. Bert M.; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed that describes the precipitation of metal sulphides in an aqueous solution containing two different heavy metal ions. The solution is assumed to consist of a well-mixed bulk and a boundary layer that is contacted with hydrogen sulphide gas. The model makes use

  15. Hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks: A review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Langmi, Henrietta W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for hydrogen storage have continued to receive intense interest over the past decade. MOFs are a class of organic-inorganic hybrid crystalline materials consisting of metallic moieties that are linked by strong...

  16. Additive Manufacturing a Liquid Hydrogen Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carl P.; Robertson, Elizabeth H.; Koelbl, Mary Beth; Singer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Space Propulsion is a 5 day event being held from 2nd May to the 6th May 2016 at the Rome Marriott Park Hotel in Rome, Italy. This event showcases products like Propulsion sub-systems and components, Production and manufacturing issues, Liquid, Solid, Hybrid and Air-breathing Propulsion Systems for Launcher and Upper Stages, Overview of current programmes, AIV issues and tools, Flight testing and experience, Technology building blocks for Future Space Transportation Propulsion Systems : Launchers, Exploration platforms & Space Tourism, Green Propulsion for Space Transportation, New propellants, Rocket propulsion & global environment, Cost related aspects of Space Transportation propulsion, Modelling, Pressure-Thrust oscillations issues, Impact of new requirements and regulations on design etc. in the Automotive, Manufacturing, Fabrication, Repair & Maintenance industries.

  17. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  18. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Im, Kyung Soo

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the

  19. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Im, Kyung Soo

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the

  20. Properties of structural materials in liquid metal environment. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgstedt, H.U. [ed.

    1991-12-15

    The International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) Specialists Meeting on Properties of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment was held during June 18 to June 20, 1991, at the Nuclear Research Centre (Kernforschungszentrum) in Karlsruhe, Germany. The Specialists Meeting was divided into five technical sessions which addressed topics as follows: Creep-Rupture Behaviour of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; Behaviour of Materials in Liquid Metal Environments under Off-Normal Conditions;Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; Crack Propagation in Liquid Sodium; and Conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  1. Direct energy conversion using liquid metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onea Alexandru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid metals have excellent properties to be used as heat transport fluids due to their high thermal conductivity and their wide applicable temperature range. The latter issue can be used to go beyond limitations of existing thermal solar energy systems. Furthermore, the direct energy converter Alkali Metal Thermo Electric Converter (AMTEC can be used to make intangible areas of energy conversion suitable for a wide range of applications. One objective is to investigate AMTEC as a complementary cycle for the next generation of concentrating solar power (CSP systems. The experimental research taking place in the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT is focused on the construction of a flexible AMTEC test facility, development, test and improvement of liquid-anode and vapor-anode AMTEC devices as well as the coupling of the AMTEC cold side to the heat storage tank proposed for the CSP system. Within this project, the investigations foreseen will focus on the analyses of BASE-metal interface, electrode materials and deposition techniques, corrosion and erosion of materials brought in contact with high temperature sodium. This prototype demonstrator is planned to be integrated in the KArlsruhe SOdium LAboratory (KASOLA, a flexible closed mid-size sodium loop, completely in-house designed, presently under construction at the Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR within KIT.

  2. Direct energy conversion using liquid metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onea, Alexandru; Diez de los Rios Ramos, Nerea; Hering, Wolfgang; Stieglitz, Robert; Moster, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Liquid metals have excellent properties to be used as heat transport fluids due to their high thermal conductivity and their wide applicable temperature range. The latter issue can be used to go beyond limitations of existing thermal solar energy systems. Furthermore, the direct energy converter Alkali Metal Thermo Electric Converter (AMTEC) can be used to make intangible areas of energy conversion suitable for a wide range of applications. One objective is to investigate AMTEC as a complementary cycle for the next generation of concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. The experimental research taking place in the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is focused on the construction of a flexible AMTEC test facility, development, test and improvement of liquid-anode and vapor-anode AMTEC devices as well as the coupling of the AMTEC cold side to the heat storage tank proposed for the CSP system. Within this project, the investigations foreseen will focus on the analyses of BASE-metal interface, electrode materials and deposition techniques, corrosion and erosion of materials brought in contact with high temperature sodium. This prototype demonstrator is planned to be integrated in the KArlsruhe SOdium LAboratory (KASOLA), a flexible closed mid-size sodium loop, completely in-house designed, presently under construction at the Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR) within KIT.

  3. Heat transfer analysis of liquid piston compressor for hydrogen applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Nasrin Arjomand; Rokni, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    at the interface. Moreover, the results of the sensitivity analysis illustrates that increasing the total heat transfer coefficients at the interface and the wall, together with compression time, play key roles in reducing the hydrogen temperature. Increasing the total heat transfer coefficient at the interface......A hydrogen compression technology using liquid as the compression piston is investigated from heat transfer point of view. A thermodynamic model, simulating a single compression stroke, is developed to investigate the heat transfer phenomena inside the compression chamber. The model is developed...... and through the walls, is investigated and compared with the adiabatic case. The results show that depending on heat transfer correlation, the hydrogen temperature reduces slightly between 0.2% and 0.4% compared to the adiabatic case, at 500bar, due to the large wall resistance and small contact area...

  4. Heat Analysis of Liquid piston Compressor for Hydrogen Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Nasrin Arjomand; Rokni, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    of hydrogen temperature from adiabatic case is very small, due to large wall resistance and small contact area at the interface. Moreover, the results illustrates that the increasing of the total heat transfer coefficient at the interface and the wall will play a key role in reducing the hydrogen temperature......A new hydrogen compression technology using liquid as the compression piston is investigated from heat transfer point of view. A thermodynamic model, simulating a single compression stroke, is developed to investigate the heat transfer phenomena inside the compression chamber. The model...... and through the walls, is investigated and compared with the adiabatic case. The amount of heat transfer towards the wall is assessed according to widely used heat transfer models available in the literature.The results show very low sensitivity of the model to different heat transfer correlations. Deviation...

  5. Metal-functionalized silicene for efficient hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Tanveer; Chakraborty, Sudip; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2013-10-21

    First-principles calculations based on density functional theory are used to investigate the electronic structure along with the stability, bonding mechanism, band gap, and charge transfer of metal-functionalized silicene to envisage its hydrogen-storage capacity. Various metal atoms including Li, Na, K, Be, Mg, and Ca are doped into the most stable configuration of silicene. The corresponding binding energies and charge-transfer mechanisms are discussed from the perspective of hydrogen-storage compatibility. The Li and Na metal dopants are found to be ideally suitable, not only for strong metal-to-substrate binding and uniform distribution over the substrate, but also for the high-capacity storage of hydrogen. The stabilities of both Li- and Na-functionalized silicene are also confirmed through molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that both of the alkali metals, Li(+) and Na(+), can adsorb five hydrogen molecules, attaining reasonably high storage capacities of 7.75 and 6.9 wt %, respectively, with average adsorption energies within the range suitable for practical hydrogen-storage applications.

  6. Magnetorotational Instability in Liquid Metal Couette Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Noguchi, K; Colgate, S A; Nordhaus, J; Beckley, H F

    2002-01-01

    Despite the importance of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) as a fundamental mechanism for angular momentum transport in magnetized accretion disks, it has yet to be demonstrated in the laboratory. A liquid sodium alpha-omega dynamo experiment at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology provides an ideal environment to study the MRI in a rotating metal annulus (Couette flow). A local stability analysis is performed as a function of shear, magnetic field strength, magnetic Reynolds number, and turbulent Prandtl number. The later takes into account the minimum turbulence induced by the formation of an Ekman layer against the rigidly rotating end walls of a cylindrical vessel. Stability conditions are presented and unstable conditions for the sodium experiment are compared with another proposed MRI experiment with liquid gallium. Due to the relatively large magnetic Reynolds number achievable in the sodium experiment, it should be possible to observe the excitation of the MRI for a wide range of w...

  7. Understanding hydrogen adsorption in metal-organic frameworks with open metal sites: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingyuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2006-01-19

    Recent experimental investigations show that the open metal sites may have a favorable impact on the hydrogen adsorption capacity of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs); however, no definite evidence has been obtained to date and little is known on the interactions between hydrogen and the pore walls of this kind of MOFs. In this work, a combined grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation and density functional theory calculation is performed on the adsorption of hydrogen in MOF-505, a recently synthesized MOF with open metal sites, to provide insight into molecular-level details of the underlying mechanisms. This work shows that metal-oxygen clusters are preferential adsorption sites for hydrogen, and the strongest adsorption of hydrogen is found in the directions of coordinatively unsaturated open metal sites, providing evidence that the open metal sites have a favorable impact on the hydrogen sorption capacity of MOFs. The storage capacity of hydrogen of MOF-505 at room temperature and moderate pressures is predicted to be low, in agreement with the outcome for hydrogen physisorption in other porous materials.

  8. Liquid Phase Hydrogenation of Nitrobenzene over Nickel Supported on Titania

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Joseph Antony RAJ; M.G.PRAKASH; R.MAHALAKSHMY; T.ELANGOVAN; B.VISWANATHAN

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline employing nickel impregnated on rutile,anatase,and high surface area titania supports has been investigated.The nickel is present in elemental state as fcc phase on the catalyst as evidenced by X-ray diffraction results.The Ni crystallite size was found to be greater for Ni/anatase.The temperature-programmed reduction results suggest a greater metal-support interaction for Ni/rutile.The observed order of catalytic activity for the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene is Ni/rutile > Ni/anatase > Ni/TiO2.A conversion of 99% was observed for Ni/rutile at 140 ℃ and hydrogen pressure of 1.96 MPa.Interestingly,aniline is the only product formed which demonstrates the catalytic hydrogenation of nitrobenzene proceeds with atom economy.Both Ni/rutile and Ni/anatase exhibited a better stability than Ni/TiO2.The hydrogenation proceeds with the preferential adsorption of hydrogen on nickel present in the catalyst surface,possibly assisted by TiOx species.

  9. Glass Bubbles Insulation for Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J. P.; SaintCyr, W. W.; Barrett, T. M.; Baumgartner, R. G.; Lott, J. W.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    A full-scale field application of glass bubbles insulation has been demonstrated in a 218,000 L liquid hydrogen storage tank. This work is the evolution of extensive materials testing, laboratory scale testing, and system studies leading to the use of glass bubbles insulation as a cost efficient and high performance alternative in cryogenic storage tanks of any size. The tank utilized is part of a rocket propulsion test complex at the NASA Stennis Space Center and is a 1960's vintage spherical double wall tank with an evacuated annulus. The original perlite that was removed from the annulus was in pristine condition and showed no signs of deterioration or compaction. Test results show a significant reduction in liquid hydrogen boiloff when compared to recent baseline data prior to removal of the perlite insulation. The data also validates the previous laboratory scale testing (1000 L) and full-scale numerical modeling (3,200,000 L) of boiloff in spherical cryogenic storage tanks. The performance of the tank will continue to be monitored during operation of the tank over the coming years. KEYWORDS: Glass bubble, perlite, insulation, liquid hydrogen, storage tank.

  10. Modeling the Hydrogen Solubility in Liquid Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Jean-Philippe; Chartrand, Patrice

    2010-08-01

    The modeling of hydrogen solubility in multicomponent Al-(Li, Mg, Cu, and Si) liquid phase has been performed with a thermodynamic approach using the modified quasichemical model with the pair approximation (MQMPA). All hydrogen solubility data available in literature was assessed critically to obtain the binary parameters of the MQMPA model for the Al-H, Li-H, Mg-H, Cu-H, Zn-H, and Si-H melts. For the Li-H system, a new thermodynamic description of the stable solid lithium hydride was determined based on the c p found in literature. The thermodynamic model for the Al-Li system also was reassessed in this work to take into account the short-range ordering observed for this system. Built-in interpolation techniques allow the model to estimate the thermodynamic properties of the multicomponent liquid solution from the liquid model parameters of the lower order subsystems. A comparison of the calculated hydrogen solubility performed at various equilibrium conditions of temperature, pressure, and composition with the available experimental data found in the literature is presented in this work, as well as a comparison with some results from previous modeling.

  11. The hydrogen-bond collective dynamics in liquid methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellissima, Stefano; de Panfilis, Simone; Bafile, Ubaldo; Cunsolo, Alessandro; González, Miguel Angel; Guarini, Eleonora; Formisano, Ferdinando

    2016-12-01

    The relatively simple molecular structure of hydrogen-bonded (HB) systems is often belied by their exceptionally complex thermodynamic and microscopic behaviour. For this reason, after a thorough experimental, computational and theoretical scrutiny, the dynamics of molecules in HB systems still eludes a comprehensive understanding. Aiming at shedding some insight into this topic, we jointly used neutron Brillouin scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to probe the dynamics of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded alcohol, liquid methanol. The comparison with the most thoroughly investigated HB system, liquid water, pinpoints common behaviours of their THz microscopic dynamics, thereby providing additional information on the role of HB dynamics in these two systems. This study demonstrates that the dynamic behaviour of methanol is much richer than what so far known, and prompts us to establish striking analogies with the features of liquid and supercooled water. In particular, based on the strong differences between the structural properties of the two systems, our results suggest that the assignment of some dynamical properties to the tetrahedral character of water structure should be questioned. We finally highlight the similarities between the characteristic decay times of the time correlation function, as obtained from our data and the mean lifetime of hydrogen bond known in literature.

  12. Thermal convection in a liquid metal battery

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Generation of thermal convection flow in the liquid metal battery, a device recently proposed as a promising solution for the problem of the short-term energy storage, is analyzed using a numerical model. It is found that convection caused by Joule heating of electrolyte during charging or discharging is virtually unavoidable. It exists in laboratory prototypes larger than a few cm in size and should become much stronger in larger-scale batteries. The phenomenon needs further investigation in view of its positive (enhanced mixing of reactants) and negative (loss of efficiency and possible disruption of operation due to the flow-induced deformation of the electrolyte layer) effects.

  13. Thermal convection in a liquid metal battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuxin; Zikanov, Oleg

    2016-08-01

    Generation of thermal convection flow in the liquid metal battery, a device recently proposed as a promising solution for the problem of the short-term energy storage, is analyzed using a numerical model. It is found that convection caused by Joule heating of electrolyte during charging or discharging is virtually unavoidable. It exists in laboratory prototypes larger than a few centimeters in size and should become much stronger in larger-scale batteries. The phenomenon needs further investigation in view of its positive (enhanced mixing of reactants) and negative (loss of efficiency and possible disruption of operation due to the flow-induced deformation of the electrolyte layer) effects.

  14. Time-resolved crystallization of deeply cooled liquid hydrogen isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehnel, Matthias

    2014-02-15

    This thesis serves two main purposes: 1. The introduction of a novel experimental method to investigate phase change dynamics of supercooled liquids 2. First-time measurements for the crystallization behaviour for hydrogen isotopes under various conditions (1) The new method is established by the synergy of a liquid microjet of ∼ 5 μm diameter and a scattering technique with high spatial resolution, here linear Raman spectroscopy. Due to the high directional stability and the known velocity of the liquid filament, its traveling axis corresponds to a time axis static in space. Utilizing evaporative cooling in a vacuum environment, the propagating liquid cools down rapidly and eventually experiences a phase transition to the crystalline state. This temporal evolution is probed along the filament axis, ultimately resulting in a time resolution of 10 ns. The feasibility of this approach is proven successfully within the following experiments. (2) A main object of study are para-hydrogen liquid filaments. Raman spectra reveal a temperature gradient of the liquid across the filament. This behaviour can quantitatively be reconstructed by numerical simulations using a layered model and is rooted in the effectiveness of evaporative cooling on the surface and a finite thermal conductivity. The deepest supercoolings achieved are ∼ 30% below the melting point, at which the filament starts to solidify from the surface towards the core. With a crystal growth velocity extracted from the data the appropriate growth mechanism is identified. The crystal structure that initially forms is metastable and probably the result of Ostwald's rule of stages. Indications for a transition within the solid towards the stable equilibrium phase support this interpretation. The analog isotope ortho-deuterium is evidenced to behave qualitatively similar with quantitative differences being mass related. In further measurements, isotopic mixtures of para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium are

  15. Critical behavior in the hydrogen insulator-metal transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, R. J.; Mao, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    The vibrational Raman spectrum of solid hydrogen has been measured from 77 to 295 K in the vicinity of the recently observed insulator-metal transition and low-temperature phase transition at 150 gigapascals. The measurements provide evidence for a critical point in the pressure-temperature phase boundary of the low-temperature transition. The result suggests that below the critical temperature the insulator-metal transition changes from continuous to discontinuous, consistent with the general criteria originally proposed by Mott (1949) for metallization by band-gap closure. The effect of temperature on hydrogen metallization closely resembles that of the lower-pressure insulator-metal transitions in doped V2O3 alloys.

  16. Hydrogenation of nitriles on a well-characterized nickel surface: From surface science studies to liquid phase catalytic activity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardin, D.E.

    1993-12-01

    Nitrile hydrogenation is the most commonly used method for preparing diverse amines. This thesis is aimed at the mechanism and factors affecting the performance of Ni-based catalysts in nitrile hydrogenations. Surface science techniques are used to study bonding of nitriles and amines to a Ni(111) surface and to identify surface intermediates. Liquid-phase hydrogenations of cyclohexene and 1-hexene on a Pt foil were carried out successfully. Finally, knowledge about the surface structure, surface chemical bond, dynamics of surface atoms (diffusion, growth), and reactivity of metal surfaces from solid-gas interface studies, is discussed.

  17. Hydrogen Storage in Microporous Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Nathaniel L.; Eckert, Juergen; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Vodak, David T.; Kim, Jaheon; O'Keeffe, Michael; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2003-05-01

    Metal-organic framework-5 (MOF-5) of composition Zn4O(BDC)3 (BDC = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) with a cubic three-dimensional extended porous structure adsorbed hydrogen up to 4.5 weight percent (17.2 hydrogen molecules per formula unit) at 78 kelvin and 1.0 weight percent at room temperature and pressure of 20 bar. Inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy of the rotational transitions of the adsorbed hydrogen molecules indicates the presence of two well-defined binding sites (termed I and II), which we associate with hydrogen binding to zinc and the BDC linker, respectively. Preliminary studies on topologically similar isoreticular metal-organic framework-6 and -8 (IRMOF-6 and -8) having cyclobutylbenzene and naphthalene linkers, respectively, gave approximately double and quadruple (2.0 weight percent) the uptake found for MOF-5 at room temperature and 10 bar.

  18. Production of Liquid Metal Spheres by Molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed G. Mohammed

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates a molding technique for producing spheres composed of eutectic gallium-indium (EGaIn with diameters ranging from hundreds of microns to a couple millimeters. The technique starts by spreading EGaIn across an elastomeric sheet featuring cylindrical reservoirs defined by replica molding. The metal flows into these features during spreading. The spontaneous formation of a thin oxide layer on the liquid metal keeps the metal flush inside these reservoirs. Subsequent exposure to acid removes the oxide and causes the metal to bead up into a sphere with a size dictated by the volume of the reservoirs. This technique allows for the production and patterning of droplets with a wide range of volumes, from tens of nanoliters up to a few microliters. EGaIn spheres can be embedded or encased subsequently in polymer matrices using this technique. These spheres may be useful as solder bumps, electrodes, thermal contacts or components in microfluidic devices (valves, switches, pumps. The ease of parallel-processing and the ability to control the location of the droplets during their formation distinguishes this technique.

  19. Performance Gains of Propellant Management Devices for Liquid Hydrogen Depots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents background, experimental design, and preliminary experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to investigate the parameters that affect liquid acquisition device (LAD) performance in a liquid hydrogen (LH2) propellant tank, to mitigate risk in the final design of the LAD for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission, and to provide insight into optimal LAD operation for future LH2 depots. Preliminary test results show an increase in performance and screen retention over the low reference LH2 bubble point value for a 325 2300 screen in three separate ways, thus improving fundamental LH2 LAD performance. By using a finer mesh screen, operating at a colder liquid temperature, and pressurizing with a noncondensible pressurant gas, a significant increase in margin is achieved in bubble point pressure for LH2 screen channel LADs.

  20. The temperature variation of hydrogen diffusion coefficients in metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients were measured as a function of temperature for a few metal alloys using an electrochemical evolution technique. Results from these measurements are compared to those obtained by the time-lag method. In all cases, diffusion coefficients obtained by the electrochemical method are larger than those by the time-lag method by an order of magnitude or more. These differences are attributed mainly to hydrogen trapping.

  1. Hydrogen-Bonding Liquids at Mineral Surfaces: From Fundamentals to Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Phan, A. T. V.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular-level understanding of properties of hydrogen-bonding liquids and their mixtures at solid-liquid interfaces plays a significant role in several applications including membrane-based separations, shale gas production, etc. Liquid water and ethanol are common hydrogen-bonding fluids. All-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were employed to gain insights regarding the structure and dynamics of these hydrogen-bonding liquids on various free-standing solid surfaces. Models fo...

  2. Computer simulation of carburizers particles heating in liquid metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Janerka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article are introduced the problems of computer simulation of carburizers particles heating (anthracite, graphite and petroleum coke, which are present in liquid metal. The diameter of particles, their quantity, relative velocity of particles and liquid metal and the thermophysical properties of materials (thermal conductivity, specific heat and thermal diffusivity have been taken into account in calculations. The analysis has been carried out in the aspect of liquid metal carburization in metallurgical furnaces.

  3. Tethered Transition Metals Promoted Photocatalytic System for Efficient Hydrogen Evolutions

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-03-05

    The present invention is directed, at least in part, to a process for improving the efficiency of a photocatalyst (a semiconductor photocatalyst) by tethering (depositing) a metal (e.g., metal ions of a late transition metal, such as nickel) to the semiconductor (photocatalyst) surface through the use of an organic ligand. More specifically, 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) functions as an excellent molecular linker (organic ligand) to attach a transition metal complex (e.g., nickel (Ni.sup.2+ ions)) to the semiconductor surface, which can be in the form of a cadmium sulfide surface. The photocatalyst has particular utility in generating hydrogen from H.sub.2S.

  4. Impact Dynamics of Oxidized Liquid Metal Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Qin; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2013-01-01

    With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during the impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number $We^{\\star}$ is employed that uses an effective surface...

  5. Modern Aspects of Liquid Metal Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Liquid metal engineering (LME) refers to a variety of physical and/or chemical treatments of molten metals aimed at influencing their solidification characteristics. Although the fundamentals have been known for decades, only recent progress in understanding solidification mechanisms has renewed an interest in opportunities this technique creates for an improvement of castings. This review covers conventional and novel concepts of LME with their application to modern manufacturing techniques based not only on liquid but also on semisolid routes. The role of external forces applied to the melt combined with grain nucleation control is explained along with laboratory- and commercial-scale equipment designed for implementation of various concepts exploring mechanical, electromagnetic, and ultrasound principles. An influence of melt treatments on quality of the final product is considered through distinguishing between internal integrity of net shape components and the alloy microstructure. Recent global developments indicate that exploring the synergy of melt chemistry and physical treatments achieved through LME allows creating the optimum conditions for nucleation and growth during solidification, positively affecting quality of castings.

  6. Modern Aspects of Liquid Metal Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Frank

    2017-02-01

    Liquid metal engineering (LME) refers to a variety of physical and/or chemical treatments of molten metals aimed at influencing their solidification characteristics. Although the fundamentals have been known for decades, only recent progress in understanding solidification mechanisms has renewed an interest in opportunities this technique creates for an improvement of castings. This review covers conventional and novel concepts of LME with their application to modern manufacturing techniques based not only on liquid but also on semisolid routes. The role of external forces applied to the melt combined with grain nucleation control is explained along with laboratory- and commercial-scale equipment designed for implementation of various concepts exploring mechanical, electromagnetic, and ultrasound principles. An influence of melt treatments on quality of the final product is considered through distinguishing between internal integrity of net shape components and the alloy microstructure. Recent global developments indicate that exploring the synergy of melt chemistry and physical treatments achieved through LME allows creating the optimum conditions for nucleation and growth during solidification, positively affecting quality of castings.

  7. Nanostructure and hydrogen spillover of bridged metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Cheng-Si; Yu, Ming-Sheng; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Liao, Pin-Yen; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Jeng, U-Ser; Tzeng, Yi-Ren; Chung, Tsui-Yun; Wu, Hsiu-Chu

    2009-02-04

    The metal-organic frameworks (MOF) with low and medium specific surface areas (SSA) were shown to be able to adsorb hydrogen via bridged spillover at room temperature (RT) up to an amount of full coverage of hydrogen in the MOF. Anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering was employed to investigate the key relationship between the structures and storage properties of the involved materials. It was found that the tunable imperfect lattice defects and the 3D pore network in the MOF crystal are the most critical structures for RT hydrogen uptake rather than the known micropores in the crystal, SSA, and Pt catalyst structure.

  8. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2006-03-30

    Professors and graduate students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and hydrocarbon gases and liquids produced from coal. An Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report summarizes the results obtained in this program during the period October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2006. The results are presented in detailed reports on 16 research projects headed by professors at each of the five CFFS Universities and an Executive Summary. Some of the highlights from these results are: (1) Small ({approx}1%) additions of acetylene or other alkynes to the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction increases its yield, causes chain initiation, and promotes oxygenate formation. (2) The addition of Mo to Fe-Cu-K/AC F-T catalysts improves catalyst lifetime and activity. (3) The use of gas phase deposition to place highly dispersed metal catalysts on silica or ceria aerogels offers promise for both the F-T and the water-gas shift WGS reactions. (4) Improved activity and selectivity are exhibited by Co F-T catalysts in supercritical hexane. (5) Binary Fe

  9. Direct observation of an abrupt insulator-to-metal transition in dense liquid deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, M. D.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Becker, A.; Lemke, R. W.; Cochrane, K. R.; Savage, M. E.; Bliss, D. E.; Mattsson, T. R.; Redmer, R.

    2015-06-01

    Eighty years ago, it was proposed that solid hydrogen would become metallic at sufficiently high density. Despite numerous investigations, this transition has not yet been experimentally observed. More recently, there has been much interest in the analog of this predicted metallic transition in the dense liquid, due to its relevance to planetary science. Here, we show direct observation of an abrupt insulator-to-metal transition in dense liquid deuterium. Experimental determination of the location of this transition provides a much-needed benchmark for theory and may constrain the region of hydrogen-helium immiscibility and the boundary-layer pressure in standard models of the internal structure of gas-giant planets.

  10. Liquid metal cooled reactors for space power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Van Hoomissen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The technology basis for evaluation of liquid metal cooled space reactors is summarized. Requirements for space nuclear power which are relevant to selection of the reactor subsystem are then reviewed. The attributes of liquid metal cooled reactors are considered in relation to these requirements in the areas of liquid metal properties, neutron spectrum characteristics, and fuel form. Key features of typical reactor designs are illustrated. It is concluded that liquid metal cooled fast spectrum reactors provide a high confidence, flexible option for meeting requirements for SP-100 and beyond.

  11. Magnesium nanoparticles with transition metal decoration for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Luca; Callini, Elsa; Brighi, Matteo; Boscherini, Federico; Montone, Amelia; Jensen, Torben R.; Maurizio, Chiara; Vittori Antisari, Marco; Bonetti, Ennio

    2011-11-01

    We report on the hydrogen storage behaviour of Mg nanoparticles (NPs) (size range 100 nm-1 μm) with metal-oxide core-shell morphology synthesized by inert gas condensation and decorated by transition metal (TM) (Pd or Ti) clusters via in situ vacuum deposition. The structure and morphology of the as-prepared and hydrogenated NPs is studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction including in situ experiments and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, in order to investigate the relationships with the hydrogen storage kinetics measured by the volumetric Sieverts method. With both Pd and Ti, the decoration deeply improves the hydrogen sorption properties: previously inert NPs exhibit complete hydrogenation with fast transformation kinetics, good stability and reversible gravimetric capacity that can attain 6 wt%. In the case of Pd-decoration, the occurrence of Mg-Pd alloying is observed at high temperatures and in dependence of the hydrogen pressure conditions. These structural transformations modify both the kinetics and thermodynamics of hydride formation, while Ti-decoration has an effect only on the kinetics. The experimental results are discussed in relation with key issues such as the amount of decoration, the heat of mixing between TM and Mg and the binding energy between TM and hydrogen.

  12. Hydrogen storage by physisorption on Metal Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailly, Anne

    2008-03-01

    Cryo-adsorption systems based on materials with high specific surface areas have the main advantage that they can store and release hydrogen with fast kinetics and high reversibility over multiples cycles. Recently Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have been proposed as promising adsorbents for hydrogen. These crystallographically well organized hybrid solids resulting from the three dimensional connection of inorganic clusters using organic linkers show the largest specific surface areas of all known crystalline solids. The determination of the relationships between physical properties (chemistry, structure, surface area ) of the MOFs and their hydrogen storage behavior is a key step in the characterization of these materials, if they are to be designed for hydrogen storage applications. Excess hydrogen sorption measurements for different MOFs will be presented. We show that maximum hydrogen uptake at high pressure and 77K does not always scale with the specific surface area. A linear correlation trend only apply within a class of specific materials and breaks down when the surface area measurement does not represent the surface sites that are available to H2. The influence of pore size and shape will also be discussed by comparing several MOFs with different structure types. The hydrogen adsorption and binding energy at low pressure are strongly dependent on the metal ions and the pore size.

  13. Small Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor Safety Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minato, A; Ueda, N; Wade, D; Greenspan, E; Brown, N

    2005-11-02

    The Small Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor Safety Study documents results from activities conducted under Small Liquid Metal Fast Reactor Coordination Program (SLMFR-CP) Agreement, January 2004, between the Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) of Japan and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)[1]. Evaluations were completed on topics that are important to the safety of small sodium cooled and lead alloy cooled reactors. CRIEPI investigated approaches for evaluating postulated severe accidents using the CANIS computer code. The methods being developed are improvements on codes such as SAS 4A used in the US to analyze sodium cooled reactors and they depend on calibration using safety testing of metal fuel that has been completed in the TREAT facility. The 4S and the small lead cooled reactors in the US are being designed to preclude core disruption from all mechanistic scenarios, including selected unprotected transients. However, postulated core disruption is being evaluated to support the risk analysis. Argonne National Laboratory and the University of California Berkeley also supported LLNL with evaluation of cores with small positive void worth and core designs that would limit void worth. Assessments were also completed for lead cooled reactors in the following areas: (1) continuing operations with cladding failure, (2) large bubbles passing through the core and (3) recommendations concerning reflector control. The design approach used in the US emphasizes reducing the reactivity in the control mechanisms with core designs that have essentially no, or a very small, reactivity change over the core life. This leads to some positive void worth in the core that is not considered to be safety problem because of the inability to identify scenarios that would lead to voiding of lead. It is also believed that the void worth will not dominate the severe accident analysis. The approach used by 4S requires negative void worth throughout

  14. Metal-organic frameworks: A new hydrogen storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghi, Omar

    2004-03-01

    Metal-organic framework-5 (MOF-5) of composition Zn4O(BDC)3 (BDC = 1,4-benzenedi-carboxylate) with a cubic 3-D extended porous structure was found to be capable of adsorbing hydrogen up to 4.5 weight percent (17.2 hydrogen molecules per formula unit) at 78 K. At room temperature and pressures up to 20 bar this material has a hydrogen storage capacity which increases linearly as a function of the applied pressure up to 1.0 percent by weight at 20 bar. Inelastic Neutron Scattering spectroscopy of the rotational transitions of the adsorbed hydrogen molecules was performed on hydrogen loaded MOF-5 using doses equivalent to four, eight and twenty-four hydrogen molecules per formula unit at 10 K. The spectra show peaks at 10.3 and 12.3 meV that are sharper than those observed for hydrogen in other porous materials, indicating the presence of two well-defined binding sites (termed I and II), which we associate with hydrogen binding to zinc and the BDC linker, respectively. At the highest dose (twenty-four hydrogen molecules), the peak corresponding to site II splits into four peaks, suggesting that higher capacity for hydrogen may be achieved by the use of larger linkers. Indeed, preliminary studies on isoreticular (of the same topology) metal-organic framework-6 and 8 having cyclobutyl and benzene moieties respectively fused to the benzene of MOF-5 gave approximately double and quadruple (2.0 weight percent) the uptake found for MOF-5 at room temperature and 10 bar.

  15. Toxic Metals Found in E-Cigarette Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_163492.html Toxic Metals Found in E-Cigarette Liquid Their presence in 5 brands studied is ... the metals end up in the aerosol that e-cigarette users inhale," said study leader Ana Maria Rule, ...

  16. Recent applications of liquid metals featuring nanoscale surface oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Taylor V.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2016-05-01

    This proceeding describes recent efforts from our group to control the shape and actuation of liquid metal. The liquid metal is an alloy of gallium and indium which is non-toxic, has negligible vapor pressure, and develops a thin, passivating surface oxide layer. The surface oxide allows the liquid metal to be patterned and shaped into structures that do not minimize interfacial energy. The surface oxide can be selectively removed by changes in pH or by applying a voltage. The surface oxide allows the liquid metal to be 3D printed to form free-standing structures. It also allows for the liquid metal to be injected into microfluidic channels and to maintain its shape within the channels. The selective removal of the oxide results in drastic changes in surface tension that can be used to control the flow behavior of the liquid metal. The metal can also wet thin, solid films of metal that accelerates droplets of the liquid along the metal traces .Here we discuss the properties and applications of liquid metal to make soft, reconfigurable electronics.

  17. Advanced Machinery Liquid Metal Wetting, Cleaning and Materials Compatibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    barium doped NaK 7 8 at temperatures to lOO 0 C for 250 and 500 hours. Doping of the liquid metal created no compatibility... metal - solid metal interface specific contact resistance (ck). Two liquid metal compositions were used, NaK 7 8 and barium doped NaK 7 8 . The...three with NaK - barium as the liquid metal and eight with NaK . They were ranked in ascending value of mean interface specific contact

  18. Transport Properties of Hydrogen-Terminated Silicon Surface Controlled by Ionic-Liquid Gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasama, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takeya, Hiroyuki; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    We fabricated electric double-layer transistors on the hydrogen-terminated (111)-oriented surface of non-doped silicon using ionic liquid as a gate dielectric. We introduced hole carriers into silicon with the application of a negative gate voltage. The sheet resistance of silicon was controlled by more than three orders of magnitude at 220 K by changing the gate voltage. The temperature dependence of sheet resistance became weak as the gate voltage was increased, suggesting the approach to an insulator-metal transition.

  19. Composite metal-hydrogen electrodes for metal-hydrogen batteries. Final report, October 1, 1993--April 15, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M.; Weismann, H. [and others

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and conduct a feasibility study of metallic thin films (multilayered and alloy composition) produced by advanced sputtering techniques for use as anodes in Ni-metal hydrogen batteries that would be deposited as distinct anode, electrolyte and cathode layers in thin film devices. The materials could also be incorporated in secondary consumer batteries (i.e. type AF(4/3 or 4/5)) which use electrodes in the form of tapes. The project was based on pioneering studies of hydrogen uptake by ultra-thin Pd-capped Nb films, these studies suggested that materials with metal-hydrogen ratios exceeding those of commercially available metal hydride materials and fast hydrogen charging and discharging kinetics could be produced. The project initially concentrated on gas phase and electrochemical studies of Pd-capped niobium films in laboratory-scale NiMH cells. This extended the pioneering work to the wet electrochemical environment of NiMH batteries and exploited advanced synchrotron radiation techniques not available during the earlier work to conduct in-situ studies of such materials during hydrogen charging and discharging. Although batteries with fast charging kinetics and hydrogen-metal ratios approaching unity could be fabricated, it was found that oxidation, cracking and corrosion in aqueous solutions made pure Nb films and multilayers poor candidates for battery application. The project emphasis shifted to alloy films based on known elemental materials used for NiMH batteries. Although commercial NiMH anode materials contain many metals, it was found that 0.24 {mu}m thick sputtered Zr-Ni films cycled at least 50 times with charging efficiencies exceeding 95% and [H]/[M] ratios of 0.7-1.0. Multilayered or thicker Zr-Ni films could be candidates for a thin film NiMH battery that may have practical applications as an integrated power source for modern electronic devices.

  20. Heat transfer analysis of metal hydrides in metal-hydrogen secondary batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onischak, M.; Dharia, D.; Gidaspow, D.

    1976-01-01

    The heat transfer between a metal-hydrogen secondary battery and a hydrogen-storing metal hydride was studied. Temperature profiles of the endothermic metal hydrides and the metal-hydrogen battery were obtained during discharging of the batteries assuming an adiabatic system. Two hydride materials were considered in two physical arrangements within the battery system. In one case the hydride is positioned in a thin annular region about the battery stack; in the other the hydride is held in a tube down the center of the stack. The results show that for a typical 20 ampere-hour battery system with lanthanum pentanickel hydride as the hydrogen reservoir the system could perform successfully.

  1. A New Model for Microstructure of Liquid Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田学雷; 沈军; 孙剑飞; 李庆春

    2004-01-01

    A nanocrystalline model for microstructures of liquid metals is constructed. According to the nanocrystalline model, the intensity curves of x-ray diffraction (XRD) on liquid Cu, Al and Al65Cu20Fe15 alloy are derived by broadening the XRD peaks of these metals in some crystal structures. These broadening intensity curves are identical with the results measured by an x-ray diffractometer on these liquid metals. The present results indicate that the nanocrystal model may be helpful to understand the microstructures of liquid metals and that there is aclose correlation between the short-range orders (SROs) of these liquid metals and some crystal lattice structures.That is, the SRO structures of liquid Cu, Al and Al65Cu20Fe15 alloy are fcc, bcc and icosahedron, respectively.

  2. Reconstruction of the electron spectrum in a metal hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, N. A.; Kutukov, A. A.; Mazur, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    Generalized Eliashberg theory of the normal properties of a metal electron-phonon system with a non constant electron density of states has been used to study the effect of the conduction band reconstruction. The electron density of states of the metallic phase of the hydrogen sulfide renormalized by the strong electron-phonon coupling at a pressure of P = 225 GPa has been calculated. It has been found that the reconstructed conduction band contains a series of narrow energy pockets.

  3. HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF METALS: A PRIMER FOR THE FAILURE ANALYST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louthan, M

    2008-01-31

    Hydrogen reduces the service life of many metallic components. Such reductions may be manifested as blisters, as a decrease in fatigue resistance, as enhanced creep, as the precipitation of a hydride phase and, most commonly, as unexpected, macroscopically brittle failure. This unexpected, brittle fracture is commonly termed hydrogen embrittlement. Frequently, hydrogen embrittlement occurs after the component has been is service for a period of time and much of the resulting fracture surface is distinctly intergranular. Many failures, particularly of high strength steels, are attributed to hydrogen embrittlement simply because the failure analyst sees intergranular fracture in a component that served adequately for a significant period of time. Unfortunately, simply determining that a failure is due to hydrogen embrittlement or some other form of hydrogen induced damage is of no particular help to the customer unless that determination is coupled with recommendations that provide pathways to avoid such damage in future applications. This paper presents qualitative and phenomenological descriptions of the hydrogen damage processes and outlines several metallurgical recommendations that may help reduce the susceptibility of a particular component or system to the various forms of hydrogen damage.

  4. Mixing and transient interface condensation of a liquid hydrogen tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Nyland, T. W.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of axial jet-induced mixing on the pressure reduction of a thermally stratified liquid hydrogen tank. The tank was nearly cylindrical, having a volume of about 0.144 cu m with 0.559 m in diameter and 0.711 m long. A mixer/pump unit, which had a jet nozzle outlet of 0.0221 m in diameter was located 0.178 m from the tank bottom and was installed inside the tank to generate the axial jet mixing and tank fluid circulation. The liquid fill and jet flow rate ranged from 42 to 85 percent (by volume) and 0.409 to 2.43 cu m/hr, respectively. Mixing tests began with the tank pressure ranging from 187.5 to 238.5 kPa at which the thermal stratification results in 4.9 to 6.2 K liquid sub cooling. The mixing time and transient vapor condensation rate at the liquid-vapor interface are determined. Two mixing time correlations, based on the thermal equilibrium and pressure equilibrium, are developed. Both mixing time correlations are expressed as functions of system and buoyancy parameters and compared well with other experimental data. The steady state condensation rate correlation of Sonin et al. based on steam-water data is modified and expressed as a function of jet subcooling. The limited liquid hydrogen data of the present study shows that the modified steady state condensation rate correlation may be used to predict the transient condensation rate in a mixing process if the instantaneous values of jet sub cooling and turbulence intensity at the interface are employed.

  5. Flow Visualization of Liquid Hydrogen Line Chilldown Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rame, Enrique; Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen John B.

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental measurements of wall and fluid temperature during chill-down tests of a warm cryogenic line with liquid hydrogen. Synchronized video and fluid temperature measurements are used to interpret stream temperature profiles versus time. When cold liquid hydrogen starts to flow into the warm line, a sequence of flow regimes, spanning from all-vapor at the outset to bubbly with continuum liquid at the end can be observed at a location far downstream of the cold inlet. In this paper we propose interpretations to the observed flow regimes and fluid temperature histories for two chilldown methods, viz. trickle (i.e. continuous) flow and pulse flow. Calculations of heat flux from the wall to the fluid versus wall temperature indicate the presence of the transition/nucleate boiling regimes only. The present tests, run at typical Reynolds numbers of approx O(10 (exp 5)), are in sharp contrast to similar tests conducted at lower Reynolds numbers where a well-defined film boiling region is observed.

  6. Effect of metal adatoms on hydrogen adsorption properties of phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Lei, Shuangying; Wan, Neng; Luan, Shan; Shen, Haiyun; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    Based on first-principles density functional theory, we have investigated hydrogen storage on metal adatoms decorated phosphorene. Almost all metals including alkali, alkaline, 3d, 4d and 5d transition metals (TM) as well as post-TMs are considered to decorate phosphorene, and most metals exhibit an enhancement of H2 adsorption energy (E a), except for Zn, Cd, Hg, and all post-TMs. Nine metals show ideal Ea within the energy window 0.2-0.6 eV/H2 for practical application purposes. Among them, Li, Sc, Ti, Y, Zr, and La exhibit superior adsorption abilities of 3-5 H2 per adatom. Based on local density of states and Barder analyses, underlying mechanisms of interaction between phosphorene, metal, and H2 are also discussed.

  7. Steering liquid metal flow in microchannels using low voltages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Lin, Yiliang; Joshipura, Ishan D; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Dickey, Michael D

    2015-10-07

    Liquid metals based on gallium, such as eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn) and Galinstan, have been integrated as static components in microfluidic systems for a wide range of applications including soft electrodes, pumps, and stretchable electronics. However, there is also a possibility to continuously pump liquid metal into microchannels to create shape reconfigurable metallic structures. Enabling this concept necessitates a simple method to control dynamically the path the metal takes through branched microchannels with multiple outlets. This paper demonstrates a novel method for controlling the directional flow of EGaIn liquid metal in complex microfluidic networks by simply applying a low voltage to the metal. According to the polarity of the voltage applied between the inlet and an outlet, two distinct mechanisms can occur. The voltage can lower the interfacial tension of the metal via electrocapillarity to facilitate the flow of the metal towards outlets containing counter electrodes. Alternatively, the voltage can drive surface oxidation of the metal to form a mechanical impediment that redirects the movement of the metal towards alternative pathways. Thus, the method can be employed like a 'valve' to direct the pathway chosen by the metal without mechanical moving parts. The paper elucidates the operating mechanisms of this valving system and demonstrates proof-of-concept control over the flow of liquid metal towards single or multiple directions simultaneously. This method provides a simple route to direct the flow of liquid metal for applications in microfluidics, optics, electronics, and microelectromechanical systems.

  8. An experiment to evaluate liquid hydrogen storage in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Fester, D. A.; Johns, W. A.; Marino, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The design and verification of a Cryogenic Fluid Management Experiment for orbital operation on the Shuttle is described. The experiment will furnish engineering data to establish design criteria for storage and supply of cryogenic fluids, mainly hydrogen, for use in low gravity environments. The apparatus comprises an LAD (liquid acquisition device) and a TVS (thermodynamic vent system). The hydrogen will be either vented or forced out by injected helium and the flow rates will be monitored. The data will be compared with ground-based simulations to determine optimal flow rates for the pressurizing gas and the release of the cryogenic fluid. It is noted that tests on a one-g, one-third size LAD system are under way.

  9. Biomass transition metal hydrogen-evolution electrocatalysts and electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Fu; Iyer, Shweta; Iyer, Shilpa; Sasaki, Kotaro; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2017-02-28

    A catalytic composition from earth-abundant transition metal salts and biomass is disclosed. A calcined catalytic composition formed from soybean powder and ammonium molybdate is specifically exemplified herein. Methods for making the catalytic composition are disclosed as are electrodes for hydrogen evolution reactions comprising the catalytic composition.

  10. Biomass transition metal hydrogen-evolution electrocatalysts and electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei-Fu; Iyer, Shweta; Iyer, Shilpa; Sasaki, Kotaro; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2017-02-28

    A catalytic composition from earth-abundant transition metal salts and biomass is disclosed. A calcined catalytic composition formed from soybean powder and ammonium molybdate is specifically exemplified herein. Methods for making the catalytic composition are disclosed as are electrodes for hydrogen evolution reactions comprising the catalytic composition.

  11. Using Hydrogen Balloons to Display Metal Ion Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, James H.

    2008-01-01

    We have optimized a procedure for igniting hydrogen-filled balloons containing metal salts to obtain the brightest possible flash while minimizing the quantity of airborne combustion products. We report air quality measurements in a lecture hall immediately after the demonstration. While we recommend that this demonstration be done outdoors or in…

  12. Hydrogen evolution on nano-particulate transition metal sulfides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jacob Lindner; Moses, Poul Georg; Jaramillo, Thomas F.;

    2008-01-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on carbon supported MoS2 nanoparticles is investigated and compared to findings with previously published work on Au(111) supported MoS2. An investigation into MoS2 oxidation is presented and used to quantify the surface concentration of MoS2. Other metal sul...

  13. Metal-organic frameworks as selectivity regulators for hydrogenation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meiting; Yuan, Kuo; Wang, Yun; Li, Guodong; Guo, Jun; Gu, Lin; Hu, Wenping; Zhao, Huijun; Tang, Zhiyong

    2016-11-01

    Owing to the limited availability of natural sources, the widespread demand of the flavouring, perfume and pharmaceutical industries for unsaturated alcohols is met by producing them from α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, through the selective hydrogenation of the carbon-oxygen group (in preference to the carbon-carbon group). However, developing effective catalysts for this transformation is challenging, because hydrogenation of the carbon-carbon group is thermodynamically favoured. This difficulty is particularly relevant for one major category of heterogeneous catalyst: metal nanoparticles supported on metal oxides. These systems are generally incapable of significantly enhancing the selectivity towards thermodynamically unfavoured reactions, because only the edges of nanoparticles that are in direct contact with the metal-oxide support possess selective catalytic properties; most of the exposed nanoparticle surfaces do not. This has inspired the use of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to encapsulate metal nanoparticles within their layers or inside their channels, to influence the activity of the entire nanoparticle surface while maintaining efficient reactant and product transport owing to the porous nature of the material. Here we show that MOFs can also serve as effective selectivity regulators for the hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. Sandwiching platinum nanoparticles between an inner core and an outer shell composed of an MOF with metal nodes of Fe3+, Cr3+ or both (known as MIL-101; refs 19, 20, 21) results in stable catalysts that convert a range of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes with high efficiency and with significantly enhanced selectivity towards unsaturated alcohols. Calculations reveal that preferential interaction of MOF metal sites with the carbon-oxygen rather than the carbon-carbon group renders hydrogenation of the former by the embedded platinum nanoparticles a thermodynamically favoured reaction. We anticipate that our basic design

  14. Directional Solidification Assisted by Liquid Metal Cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian ZHANG; Langhong LOU

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the development and current status of the directional solidification process assisted by liquid metal cooling (LMC) has been presented in this paper. The driving force of the rapid development of the LMC process has been analyzed by considering the demands of (1) newer technologies that can provide higher thermal gradients for alleviated segregation in advanced alloy systems, and (2) better production yield of the large directionally solidified superalloy components. The brief history of the industrialization of the LMC process has been reviewed, followed by the discussion on the LMC parameters including selection of the cooling media, using of the dynamic baffle, and the influence of withdrawal rates and so on. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the traditional superalloys processed by LMC, as well as the new alloys particularly developed for LMC process were then described. Finally, future aspects concerning the LMC process have been summarized.

  15. Impact dynamics of oxidized liquid metal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin; Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2013-04-01

    With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number We is employed that uses an effective surface tension factoring in the yield stress. In contrast, no influence on spreading from different oxidations conditions is observed for high impact velocity. This suggests that the initial kinetic energy is mostly damped by bulk viscous dissipation. Results from both regimes can be collapsed in an impact phase diagram controlled by two variables, the maximum spreading factor Pm=R0/Rm, given by the ratio of initial to maximum drop radius, and the impact number K=We/Re4/5, which scales with the effective Weber number We as well as the Reynolds number Re. The data exhibit a transition from capillary to viscous behavior at a critical impact number Kc≈0.1.

  16. The Role of Water in the Storage of Hydrogen in Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Michael D.; Lomness, Janice K.; Giannuzzi, Lucille A.

    2001-01-01

    One major problem with the use of hydrogen is safe and efficient storage. In the pure form, bulky and heavy containers are required greatly reducing the efficiency of its use. Safety is also a great concern. Storage of hydrogen in the form of a metal hydride offers distinct advantages both in terms of volumetric efficiency and in terms of safety. As a result, an enormous amount of research is currently being done on metal-hydrogen systems. Practical application of these systems to storage of hydrogen can only occur when they are very well understood. In this paper, the preliminary results of a study of the surfaces of magnesium nickel alloys will be presented. Alloys that have been rendered totally unreactive with hydrogen as well as those that have been activated with liquid water and with water vapor were studied. Data obtained from XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer) analysis, with samples held in vacuum for the shortest possible time to minimize the hydroxide degradation will be presented. Furthermore, TEM data on samples prepared in a new way that largely protects the surface from the high vacuum will be discussed.

  17. The Role of Water in the Storage of Hydrogen in Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Michael D.; Lomness, Janice K.; Giannuzzi, Lucille A.

    2001-01-01

    One major problem with the use of hydrogen is safe and efficient storage. In the pure form, bulky and heavy containers are required greatly reducing the efficiency of its use. Safety is also a great concern. Storage of hydrogen in the form of a metal hydride offers distinct advantages both in terms of volumetric efficiency and in terms of safety. As a result, an enormous amount of research is currently being done on metal-hydrogen systems. Practical application of these systems to storage of hydrogen can only occur when they are very well understood. In this paper, the preliminary results of a study of the surfaces of magnesium nickel alloys will be presented. Alloys that have been rendered totally unreactive with hydrogen as well as those that have been activated with liquid water and with water vapor were studied. Data obtained from XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer) analysis, with samples held in vacuum for the shortest possible time to minimize the hydroxide degradation will be presented. Furthermore, TEM data on samples prepared in a new way that largely protects the surface from the high vacuum will be discussed.

  18. A study on metal organic framework (MOF-177) synthesis, characterization and hydrogen adsorption -desorption cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viditha, V.; Venkateswer Rao, M.; Srilatha, K.; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Kukatpally, Hyderabad-500 085, A.P. (India); Yerramilli, Anjaneyulu [Director, TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, JSU, Jackson, MS 32917-0939 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen has long been considered to be an ideal alternative to fossil-fuel systems and much work has now been done on its storage. There are four main methods of hydrogen storage: as a liquid; as compressed hydrogen; in the form of metal hydrides; and by physisorption. Among all the materials metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are considered to have desirable properties like high porosity, pore volume and high thermal stability. MOF-177 is considered to be an ideal storage material. In this paper we study about its synthesis and hydrogen storage capacities of MOF-177 at different pressures ranging from 25, 50, 75 and 100 bar respectively. The obtained samples are characterized by XRD, BET and SEM. The recorded results show that the obtained hydrogen capacity is 1.1, 2.20, 2.4 and 2.80 wt%. The desorption capacity is 0.9, 2.1, 2.37 and 2.7 wt% at certain temperatures like 373 K.

  19. A study on metal organic framework (MOF-177 synthesis, characterization and hydrogen adsorption -desorption cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Viditha, M.Venkateswer Rao, K.Srilatha11, V.Himabindu, Anjaneyulu Yerramilli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen has long been considered to be an ideal alternative to fossil-fuel systems and much work has now been done on its storage. There are four main methods of hydrogen storage: as a liquid; as compressed hydrogen; in the form of metal hydrides; and by physisorption. Among all the materials metal organic frameworks (MOFs are considered to have desirable properties like high porosity, pore volume and high thermal stability. MOF-177 is considered to be an ideal storage material. In this paper we study about its synthesis and hydrogen storage capacities of MOF-177 at different pressures ranging from 25, 50, 75 and 100 bar respectively. The obtained samples are characterized by XRD, BET and SEM. The recorded results show that the obtained hydrogen capacity is 1.1, 2.20, 2.4 and 2.80 wt%. The desorption capacity is 0.9, 2.1, 2.37 and 2.7 wt% at certain temperatures like 373 K.

  20. Large gem diamonds from metallic liquid in Earth’s deep mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Evan M.; Shirey, Steven B.; Nestola, Fabrizio; Bullock, Emma S.; Wang, Jianhua; Richardson, Stephen H.; Wang, Wuyi

    2016-12-01

    The redox state of Earth’s convecting mantle, masked by the lithospheric plates and basaltic magmatism of plate tectonics, is a key unknown in the evolutionary history of our planet. Here we report that large, exceptional gem diamonds like the Cullinan, Constellation, and Koh-i-Noor carry direct evidence of crystallization from a redox-sensitive metallic liquid phase in the deep mantle. These sublithospheric diamonds contain inclusions of solidified iron-nickel-carbon-sulfur melt, accompanied by a thin fluid layer of methane ± hydrogen, and sometimes majoritic garnet or former calcium silicate perovskite. The metal-dominated mineral assemblages and reduced volatiles in large gem diamonds indicate formation under metal-saturated conditions. We verify previous predictions that Earth has highly reducing deep mantle regions capable of precipitating a metallic iron phase that contains dissolved carbon and hydrogen.

  1. New physics of metals: fermi surfaces without Fermi liquids.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, P W

    1995-01-01

    I relate the historic successes, and present difficulties, of the renormalized quasiparticle theory of metals ("AGD" or Fermi liquid theory). I then describe the best-understood example of a non-Fermi liquid, the normal metallic state of the cuprate superconductors.

  2. Pressurization and expulsion of a flightweight liquid hydrogen tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandresar, N. T.; Stochl, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for pressurization and expulsion of a flight-weight 4.89 cu m liquid hydrogen storage tank under normal gravity conditions. Pressurization and expulsion times are parametrically varied to study the effects of longer transfer times expected in future space flight applications. It is found that the increase in pressurant consumption with increased operational time is significant at shorter pressurization or expulsion durations and diminishes as the duration lengthens. Gas-to-wall heat transfer in the ullage is the dominant mode of energy exchange, with more than 50 percent of the pressurant energy being lost to tank wall heating in expulsions and the long duration pressurizations. Advanced data analysis will require a multidimensional approach combined with improved measurement capabilities of liquid-vapor interfacial transport phenomena.

  3. Prediction of pressurant mass requirements for axisymmetric liquid hydrogen tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandresar, N. T.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data from several test series are compared to an existing correlation that predicts the amount of pressurant gas mass required to expel liquid hydrogen from axisymmetric tanks. It was necessary to use an alternate definition of the tank equivalent diameter to accommodate thermal mass in the tank wall that is initially warm and to accommodate liquid residuals in the tank after expulsion is stopped. With this modification, the existing correlation predicted mass requirements to within 14 percent of experimental results. Revision of the correlation constants using a nonlinear least-squares fit of the current experimental data has a minor effect, thus supporting the validity of the original correlation's form, its fitted constants, and the alternate definition of the tank equivalent diameter.

  4. Heavy liquid metals: Research programs at PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Y.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes work at PSI on thermohydraulics, thermal shock, and material tests for mechnical properties. In the presentation, the focus is on two main programs. (1) SINQ LBE target: The phase II study program for SINQ is planned. A new LBE loop is being constructed. The study has the following three objectives: (a) Pump study - design work on an electromagnetic pump to be integrated into the target. (b) Heat pipe performance test - the use of heat pipes as an additional component of the target cooling system is being considered, and it may be a way to futher decouple the liquid metal and water coolant loops. (c) Mixed convection experiment - in order to find an optimal configuration of the additional flow guide for window cooling, mixed convection around the window is to be studied. The experiment will be started using water and then with LBE. (2) ESS Mercury target: For ESS target study, the following experimental studies are planned, some of which are exampled by trial experiments. (a) Flow around the window: Flow mapping around the hemi-cylindrical window will be made for optimising the flow channels and structures, (b) Geometry optimisation for minimizing a recirculation zone behind the edge of the flow separator, (c) Flow induced vibration and buckling problem for a optimised structure of the flow separator and (d) Gas-liquid two-phase flow will be studied by starting to establish the new experimental method of measuring various kinds of two-phase flow characteristics.

  5. Theory of the spin-1 bosonic liquid metal - Equilibrium properties of liquid metallic deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, J.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of a two-component quantum fluid comprised of spin-1/2 fermions and nonzero spin bosons is examined. This system is of interest because it embodies a possible quantum liquid metallic phase of highly compressed deuterium. Bose condensation is assumed present and the two cases of nuclear-spin-polarized and -unpolarized systems are considered. A significant feature in the unpolarized case is the presence of a nonmagnetic mode with quadratic dispersion owing its existence to nonzero boson spin. The physical character of this mode is examined in detail within a Bogoliubov approach. The specific heat, bulk modulus, spin susceptibility, and thermal expansion are all determined. Striking contrasts in the specific heats and thermal-expansion coefficients of the liquid and corresponding normal solid metallic phase are predicted.

  6. Formation of monatomic metallic glasses through ultrafast liquid quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li; Wang, Jiangwei; Sheng, Hongwei; Zhang, Ze; Mao, Scott X

    2014-08-14

    It has long been conjectured that any metallic liquid can be vitrified into a glassy state provided that the cooling rate is sufficiently high. Experimentally, however, vitrification of single-element metallic liquids is notoriously difficult. True laboratory demonstration of the formation of monatomic metallic glass has been lacking. Here we report an experimental approach to the vitrification of monatomic metallic liquids by achieving an unprecedentedly high liquid-quenching rate of 10(14) K s(-1). Under such a high cooling rate, melts of pure refractory body-centred cubic (bcc) metals, such as liquid tantalum and vanadium, are successfully vitrified to form metallic glasses suitable for property interrogations. Combining in situ transmission electron microscopy observation and atoms-to-continuum modelling, we investigated the formation condition and thermal stability of the monatomic metallic glasses as obtained. The availability of monatomic metallic glasses, being the simplest glass formers, offers unique possibilities for studying the structure and property relationships of glasses. Our technique also shows great control over the reversible vitrification-crystallization processes, suggesting its potential in micro-electromechanical applications. The ultrahigh cooling rate, approaching the highest liquid-quenching rate attainable in the experiment, makes it possible to explore the fast kinetics and structural behaviour of supercooled metallic liquids within the nanosecond to picosecond regimes.

  7. The metallization and superconductivity of dense hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yinwei, E-mail: yinwei-li@jsnu.edu.cn; Hao, Jian; Li, Yanling [School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Liu, Hanyu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); Ma, Yanming, E-mail: mym@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-05-07

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is a prototype molecular system and a sister molecule of water (H{sub 2}O). The phase diagram of solid H{sub 2}S at high pressures remains largely unexplored arising from the challenges in dealing with the pressure-induced weakening of S–H bond and larger atomic core difference between H and S. Metallization is yet achieved for H{sub 2}O, but it was observed for H{sub 2}S above 96 GPa. However, the metallic structure of H{sub 2}S remains elusive, greatly impeding the understanding of its metallicity and the potential superconductivity. We have performed an extensive structural study on solid H{sub 2}S at pressure ranges of 10–200 GPa through an unbiased structure prediction method based on particle swarm optimization algorithm. Besides the findings of candidate structures for nonmetallic phases IV and V, we are able to establish stable metallic structures violating an earlier proposal of elemental decomposition into sulfur and hydrogen [R. Rousseau, M. Boero, M. Bernasconi, M. Parrinello, and K. Terakura, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1254 (2000)]. Our study unravels a superconductive potential of metallic H{sub 2}S with an estimated maximal transition temperature of ∼80 K at 160 GPa, higher than those predicted for most archetypal hydrogen-containing compounds (e.g., SiH{sub 4}, GeH{sub 4}, etc.)

  8. Hydrogen Absorbing Material in Carbonaceous-Metal Hydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Mulana

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most promising materials for storing hydrogen in solid state would be included in metal-carbon composites. In order to obtain nanocrystalline metal particles encapsulated by crystalline or amorphous carbon, mechanosynthesis of zirconium-carbonaceous composites and alkali metal-carbonaceous composites was performed. For zirconium-carbonaceous composites, only zirconium-carbon black composite absorbed more hydrogen than expected for a mere mixture with the same composition. The higher hydrogen capacity on the zirconium-carbon black composite would be due to some specific sites on the carbonaceous material created during the milling. Another effect of the composite formation was stabilization of zirconium, that is, the composites did not ignite in air. On alkali metal-carbonaceous composites, carbon black has superior effect in composite formation compared with graphite in which some cooperative effect was only detected on alkali metal-carbon black composite. The effect of the carbonaceous composite formation was resistance to air and anti-sticking characteristics to balls and the wall of the vial during the ball milling.

  9. The problem of introducing an electrical current into liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavoyskiy, V.I.; Khanov, V.K.; Kovalev, P.I.; Povkh, I.L.

    1984-01-01

    The question of introducing an electrical current into a liquid metal by means of steel electrode plates mounted in the walls of groove fettling is examined. The contact between the electrodes and the liquid cast iron and steel was accomplished through openings in the fettling. The supply of current was accomplished through a circuit in which an electrical current, which traveled along the electrode downward and then through the openings in the fettling into the liquid metal, is fed to the upper part of the electrode. The results are of interest for studies of liquid metallic magnetohydrodynamic installations.

  10. Hydrogen Adsorption by Alkali Metal Graphite Intercalation Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purewal, Justin

    Adsorption occurs whenever a solid surface is exposed to a gas or liquid, and is characterized by an increase in fluid density near the interface. Adsorbents have drawn attention in the current effort to engineer materials that store hydrogen at high densities within moderate temperature and pressure regimes. Carbon adsorbents are a logical choice as a storage material due to their low costs and large surface areas. Unfortunately, carbon adsorbents suffer from a low binding enthalpy for H2 (about 5 kJ mol-1), well below the 15 to 18 kJ mol-1) that is considered optimal for hydrogen storage systems. Binding interactions can be increased by the following methods: (1) adjusting the graphite interplanar separation with a pillared structure, and (2) introducing dopant species that interact with H2 molecules by strong electrostatic forces. Graphite intercalation compounds are a class of materials that contain both pillared structures and chemical dopants, making them an excellent model system for studying the fundamentals of hydrogen adsorption in nanostructured carbons. Pressure-composition-temperature diagrams of the MC24(H 2)x graphite intercalation compounds were measured for M = (K, Rb, Cs). Adsorption enthalpies were measured as a function of H2 concentration. Notably, CsC24 had an average adsorption enthalpy of 14.9 kJ mol-1), nearly three times larger than that of pristine graphite. The adsorption enthalpies were found to be positively correlated with the alkali metal size. Adsorption capacities were negatively correlated with the size of the alkali metal. The rate of adsorption is reduced at large H2 compositions, due to the effects of site-blocking and correlation on the H2 diffusion. The strong binding interaction and pronounced molecular-sieving behavior of KC24 is likely to obstruct the translational diffusion of adsorbed H2 molecules. In this work, the diffusion of H2 adsorbed in KC24 was studied by quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular

  11. Modulation of Carbon Nanotube Metal Contacts in Gaseous Hydrogen Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Usgaocar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs, contacted by electrodeposited Pd0.59Ni0.41 alloys, are characterised using electrical measurements and Raman spectroscopy. The high workfunctions of Nickel and Palladium form an ohmic contact with the CNT valence band, but the contact properties change on Hydrogen exposure due to a reduction in the PdNi workfunction and the realignment of the PdNi Fermi level with the CNT band structure. A PdNi contacted semiconducting CNT exhibited significantly lower currents after Hydrogen exposure while a metallic CNT exhibited a small current increase. The semiconducting and metallic natures of the CNTs are confirmed by their Raman spectra. This study demonstrates a technique for modulating the PdNi-CNT contact and differentiating between semiconducting and metallic CNTs via contact modulation. It also provides experimental evidence of the theoretical allocation of features in the CNT Raman spectra.

  12. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-08-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems.

  13. Metallic nanostructure formation limited by the surface hydrogen on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Kathryn A; Teplyakov, Andrew V

    2010-08-03

    Constant miniaturization of electronic devices and interfaces needed to make them functional requires an understanding of the initial stages of metal growth at the molecular level. The use of metal-organic precursors for metal deposition allows for some control of the deposition process, but the ligands of these precursor molecules often pose substantial contamination problems. One of the ways to alleviate the contamination problem with common copper deposition precursors, such as copper(I) (hexafluoroacetylacetonato) vinyltrimethylsilane, Cu(hfac)VTMS, is a gas-phase reduction with molecular hydrogen. Here we present an alternative method to copper film and nanostructure growth using the well-defined silicon surface. Nearly ideal hydrogen termination of silicon single-crystalline substrates achievable by modern surface modification methods provides a limited supply of a reducing agent at the surface during the initial stages of metal deposition. Spectroscopic evidence shows that the Cu(hfac) fragment is present upon room-temperature adsorption and reacts with H-terminated Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces to deposit metallic copper. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to follow the initial stages of copper nucleation and the formation of copper nanoparticles, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) confirms the presence of hfac fragments on the surfaces of nanoparticles. As the surface hydrogen is consumed, copper nanoparticles are formed; however, this growth stops as the accessible hydrogen is reacted away at room temperature. This reaction sets a reference for using other solid substrates that can act as reducing agents in nanoparticle growth and metal deposition.

  14. Photoionization microscopy of hydrogen atom near a metal surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Hai-Feng; Wang Lei; Liu Xiao-Jun; Liu Hong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the ionization of Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface with a semiclassical analysis of photoionization microscopy. Interference patterus of the electron radial distribution are calculated at different scaled energies above the classical saddle point and at various atom-surface distances. We find that different types of trajectories contribute predominantly to different manifolds in a certain interference pattern. As the scaled energy increases, the structure of the interference pattern evolves smoothly and more types of trajectories emerge. As the atom approaches the metal surface closer, there are more types of trajectories contributing to the interference pattern as well. When the Rydberg atom comes very close to the metal surface or the scaled energy approaches the zero field ionization energy,the potential induced by the metal surface will make atomic system chaotic. The results also show that atoms near a metal surface exhibit similar properties like the atoms in the parallel electric and magnetic fields.

  15. Optical and thermodynamic property measurements of liquid metals and alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    Optical properties and spectral emissivities of liquid silicon, titanium, niobium, and zirconium were investigated by HeNe laser polarimetry at λ = 632.8 nm. The metals were of a high purity and, except for zirconium, clean. The more demanding environmental requirements for eliminating oxide or nitride phases from zirconium were not met. Containerless conditions were achieved by electromagnetic levitation and heating. CO2 laser beam heating was also used to extend the temperature range for stable levitation and to heat solid silicon to form the metallic liquid phase. Corrections to previously reported calorimetric measurements of the heat capacity of liquid niobium were derived from the measured temperature dependence of its spectral emissivity. Property measurements were obtained for supercooled liquid silicon and supercooling of liquid zirconium was accomplished. The purification of liquid metals and the extension of this work on liquids to the measurement of thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria are discussed.

  16. Film boiling heat transfer from a wire to upward flow of liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiotsu, M.; Shirai, Y.; Horie, Y.; Shigeta, H.; Higa, D.; Tatsumoto, H.; Hata, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Nonaka, S.; Naruo, Y.; Inatani, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Film boiling heat transfer coefficients in liquid hydrogen were measured for the heater surface superheats to 300 K under pressures from 0.4 to 1.1 MPa, liquid subcoolings to 11 K and flow velocities to 8 m/s. Two test wires were both 1.2 mm in diameter, 120 mm and 200 mm in lengths and were made of PtCo alloy. The test wires were located on the center of 8 mm and 5 mm diameter conduits of FRP (Fiber Reinforced Plastics). Furthermore film boiling heat transfer coefficients in liquid nitrogen were measured only for the 200 mm long wire. The film boiling heat transfer coefficients are higher for higher pressure, higher subcooling, and higher flow velocity. The experimental data were compared with a conventional equation for forced flow film boiling in a wide channel. The data for the 8 mm diameter conduit were about 1.7 times and those for the 5 mm conduit were about 1.9 times higher than the predicted values by the equation. A new equation was presented modifying the conventional equation based on the liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen data. The experimental data were expressed well by the equation.

  17. Hydrogen-bond acidity of ionic liquids: an extended scale†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnia, Kiki A.; Lima, Filipa; Cláudio, Ana Filipa M.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main drawbacks comprising an appropriate selection of ionic liquids (ILs) for a target application is related to the lack of an extended and well-established polarity scale for these neoteric fluids. Albeit considerable progress has been made on identifying chemical structures and factors that influence the polarity of ILs, there still exists a high inconsistency in the experimental values reported by different authors. Furthermore, due to the extremely large number of possible ILs that can be synthesized, the experimental characterization of their polarity is a major limitation when envisaging the choice of an IL with a desired polarity. Therefore, it is of crucial relevance to develop correlation schemes and a priori predictive methods able to forecast the polarity of new (or not yet synthesized) fluids. In this context, and aiming at broadening the experimental polarity scale available for ILs, the solvatochromic Kamlet–Taft parameters of a broad range of bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-([NTf2]−)-based fluids were determined. The impact of the IL cation structure on the hydrogen-bond donating ability of the fluid was comprehensively addressed. Based on the large amount of novel experimental values obtained, we then evaluated COSMO-RS, COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents, as an alternative tool to estimate the hydrogen-bond acidity of ILs. A three-parameter model based on the cation–anion interaction energies was found to adequately describe the experimental hydrogen-bond acidity or hydrogen-bond donating ability of ILs. The proposed three-parameter model is also shown to present a predictive capacity and to provide novel molecular-level insights into the chemical structure characteristics that influence the acidity of a given IL. It is shown that although the equimolar cation–anion hydrogen-bonding energies (EHB) play the major role, the electrostatic-misfit interactions (EMF) and van der Waals forces (EvdW) also contribute

  18. Liquid alternative diesel fuels with high hydrogen content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancsok, Jenoe; Varga, Zoltan; Eller, Zoltan; Poelczmann, Gyoergy [Pannonia Univ., Veszprem (Hungary). MOL Dept. of Hydrocarbon Processing; Kasza, Tamas [MOL Hungarian Oil and Gas Plc., Szazhalombatta (Hungary)

    2013-06-01

    Mobility is a keystone of the sustainable development. In the operation of the vehicles as the tools of mobility internal combustion engines, so thus Diesel engines will play a remarkable role in the next decades. Beside fossil fuels - used for power these engines - liquid alternative fuels have higher and higher importance, because of their known advantages. During the presentation the categorization possibilities based on the chronology of their development and application will be presented. The importance of fuels with high hydrogen content will be reviewed. Research and development activity in the field of such kind of fuels will be presented. During this developed catalytic systems and main performance properties of the product will be presented which were obtained in case of biogasoils produced by special hydrocracking of natural triglycerides and in case of necessity followed by isomerization; furthermore in case of synthetic biogasoils obtained by the isomerization hydrocracking of Fischer-Tropsch paraffins produced from biomass based synthesis gas. Excellent combustion properties (cetane number > 65-75), good cold flow properties and reduced harmful material emission due to the high hydrogen content (C{sub n}H{sub 2n+2}) are highlighted. Finally production possibilities of linear and branched paraffins based on lignocelluloses are briefly reviewed. Summarizing it was concluded that liquid hydrocarbons with high isoparaffin content are the most suitable fuels regarding availability, economical and environmental aspects, namely the sustainable development. (orig.)

  19. Improved metal hydride technology for the storage of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapru, K.; Ming, L.; Ramachandran, S. [Energy Conversion Devices, Inc., Troy, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Low cost, high density storage of hydrogen will remove the most serious barrier to large-scale utilization of hydrogen as a non-polluting, zero-emission fuel. An important challenge for the practical use of Mg-based, high capacity hydrogen storage alloys has been the development of a low-cost, bulk production technique. Two difficulties in preparation of Mg-based alloys are the immiscibility of Mg with many transition metals and the relatively high volatility of Mg compared to many transition metals. These factors preclude the use of conventional induction melting techniques for the Mg-based alloy preparation. A mechanical alloying technique, in which Mg immiscibility and volatility do not present a problem, was developed and shows great promise for production of Mg-based alloys. A number of Mg-based alloys were prepared via modified induction melting and mechanical alloying methods. The alloys were tested for gas phase hydrogen storage properties, composition, structure and morphology. The mechanically alloyed samples are multi-component, multi-phase, highly disordered materials in their as-prepared state. These unoptimized alloys have shown reversible H-storage capacity of more than 5 wt.% hydrogen. After 2000 absorption/desorption cycles, the alloys show no decline in storage capacity or desorption kinetics. The alloys have also demonstrated resistance to CH{sub 4} and CO poisoning in preliminary testing. Upon annealing, with an increase in crystallinity, the H-storage capacity decreases, indicating the importance of disorder.

  20. Analysis of data from spilling experiments performed with liquid hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statharas, J C; Venetsanos, A G; Bartzis, J G; Würtz, J; Schmidtchen, U

    2000-10-02

    This work describes the modelling of liquid hydrogen release experiments using the ADREA-HF 3-D time dependent finite volume code for cloud dispersion, jointly developed by DEMOKRITOS and JRC-Ispra. The experiments were performed by Batelle Ingenieurtechnik for BAM (Bundesanstalt fur Materialforschung und Prufung), Berlin, in the frame of the Euro-Quebec-Hydro-Hydrogen-Pilot-Project and they mainly deal with LH2 near ground releases between buildings. In the present study, the experimental trial #5 was assumed for simulation due to the fact that in this release the largest number of sensor readings were obtained. The simulations illustrated the complex behaviour of LH2 dispersion in presence of buildings, characterized by complicated wind patterns, plume back flow near the source, dense gas behaviour at near range and significant buoyant behaviour at the far range. The simulations showed the strong effect of ground heating in the LH2 dispersion. The model also revealed major features of the dispersion that had to do with the "dense" behaviour of the cold hydrogen and the buoyant behaviour of the "warming-up" gas as well as the interaction of the building and the release wake. Such a behaviour was in qualitative and even quantitative agreement with the experiment. The results are given in terms of concentration time series, scatter plots, contour plots, wind field vector plots and 3-D concentration wireframes. Given all experiment uncertainties, the model gives reasonable results on concentrations levels.

  1. Light metal hydrides and complex hydrides for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüth, F; Bogdanović, B; Felderhoff, M

    2004-10-21

    The availability of feasible methods for hydrogen storage is one of the key-maybe the key-requirements for the large scale application of PEM fuel cells in cars. There are in principle four different approaches, i.e. cryostorage in liquid form, high pressure storage, storage in the form of a chemical compound which is converted to hydrogen by on-board reforming, or reversible chemical storage in different kinds of storage materials. New developments in the field of chemical storage make such systems attractive compared to the other options. This review will discuss the different possibilities for chemical storage of hydrogen and the focus on the presently most advanced system with respect to storage capacity and kinetics, i.e. catalyzed alanates, especially NaAlH(4).

  2. Hot Hydrogen Testing of Refractory Metals and Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Ralph; Chin, Bryan; Cohron, Jon

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to develop a technique with which refractory metal carbide samples can be exposed to hydrogen containing gases at high temperatures, and to use various microstructural and analytical techniques to determine the chemical and rate processes involved in hydrogen degradation in these materials. Five types of carbides were examined including WC, NbC, HfC, ZrC, and TaC. The ceramics were purchased and were all monolithic in nature. The temperature range investigated was from 850 to 1600 C with a hydrogen pressure of one atmosphere. Control experiments, in vacuum, were also conducted for comparison so that the net effects due to hydrogen could be isolated. The samples were analyzed prior to and after exposure. Gas samples were collected in selected experiments and analyzed using gas chromography. Characterization of the resulting microstructure after exposure to hydrogen was conducted using optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and weight change. The ceramics were purchased and were all monolithic in nature. It was found that all samples lost weight after exposure, both in hydrogen and vacuum. Results from the microstructure analyses show that the degradation processes are different among the five types of ceramics involved. In addition, the apparent activation energy for the degradation process is a function of temperature even within the same material. This indicates that there are more than one mechanism involved in each material, and that the mechanisms are temperature dependent.

  3. Space-resolved Resistive Measurement of Liquid Metal Wall Thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Mirhoseini, S M H

    2016-01-01

    In a fusion reactor internally coated with liquid metal, it will be important to diagnose the thickness of the liquid at various locations in the vessel, as a function of time, and possibly respond to counteract undesired bulging or depletion. The electrical conductance between electrodes immersed in the liquid metal can be used as a simple proxy for the local thickness. Here a matrix of electrodes is shown to provide spatially resolved measurements of liquid metal thickness in the absence of plasma. First a theory is developed for mxn electrodes, and then it is experimentally demonstrated for 3x1 electrodes. The experiments were carried out with Galinstan, but are easily extended to Lithium or other liquid metals.

  4. A Microfluidic Chip for Liquid Metal Droplet Generation and Sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A liquid metal based microfluidic system was proposed and demonstrated for the generation and sorting of liquid metal droplets. This micro system utilized silicon oil as the continuous phase and Ga66In20.5Sn13.5 (66.0 wt % Ga, 20.5 wt % In, 13.5 wt % Sn, melting point: 10.6 °C as the dispersed phase to generate liquid metal droplets on a three-channel F-junction generator. The F-junction is an updated design similar to the classical T-junction, which has a special branch channel added to a T-junction for the supplement of 30 wt % aqueous NaOH solution. To perform active sorting of liquid metal droplets by dielectrophoresis (DEP, the micro system utilized liquid-metal-filled microchannels as noncontact electrodes to induce electrical fields through the droplet channel. The electrode channels were symmetrically located on both sides of the droplet channel in the same horizontal level. According to the results, the micro system can generate uniformly spherical liquid metal droplets, and control the flow direction of the liquid metal droplets. To better understand the control mechanism, a numerical simulation of the electrical field was performed in detail in this work.

  5. Silane plus molecular hydrogen as a possible pathway to metallic hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yansun; Klug, Dennis D

    2010-12-07

    The high-pressure behavior of silane, SiH(4), plus molecular hydrogen was investigated using a structural search method and ab initio molecular dynamics to predict the structures and examine the physical origin of the pressure-induced drop in hydrogen intramolecular vibrational (vibron) frequencies. A structural distortion is predicted at 15 GPa from a slightly strained fcc cell to a rhombohedral cell that involves a small volume change. The predicted equation of state and the pressure-induced drop in the hydrogen vibron frequencies reproduces well the experimental data (Strobel TA, Somayazulu M, Hemley RJ (2009) Phys Rev Lett 103:065701). The bond weakening in H(2) is induced by intermolecular interactions between the H(2) and SiH(4) molecules. A significant feature of the high-pressure structures of SiH(4)(H(2))(2) is the dynamical behavior of the H(2) molecules. It is found that H(2) molecules are rotating in this pressure range whereas the SiH(4) molecules remain rigid. The detailed nature of the interactions of molecular hydrogen with SiH(4) in SiH(4)(H(2))(2) is therefore strongly influenced by the dynamical behavior of the H(2) molecules in the high-pressure structure. The phase with the calculated structure is predicted to become metallic near 120 GPa, which is significantly lower than the currently suggested pressure for metallization of bulk molecular hydrogen.

  6. Ground-state structures of atomic metallic hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Jeffrey M; Ceperley, David M

    2011-04-22

    Ab initio random structure searching using density functional theory is used to determine the ground-state structures of atomic metallic hydrogen from 500 GPa to 5 TPa. Including proton zero-point motion within the harmonic approximation, we estimate that molecular hydrogen dissociates into a monatomic body-centered tetragonal structure near 500 GPa (r(s)=1.23) that remains stable to 1 TPa (r(s)=1.11). At higher pressures, hydrogen stabilizes in an …ABCABC… planar structure that is similar to the ground state of lithium, but with a different stacking sequence. With increasing pressure, this structure compresses to the face-centered cubic lattice near 3.5 TPa (r(s)=0.92).

  7. CO2 hydrogenation on a metal hydride surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Ferri, Davide; Bielmann, Michael; Crivello, Jean-Claude; Wiedenmann, Daniel; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Rossbach, Peggy; Lu, Ye; Remhof, Arndt; Züttel, Andreas

    2012-04-28

    The catalytic hydrogenation of CO(2) at the surface of a metal hydride and the corresponding surface segregation were investigated. The surface processes on Mg(2)NiH(4) were analyzed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and mass spectrometry (MS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). CO(2) hydrogenation on the hydride surface during hydrogen desorption was analyzed by catalytic activity measurement with a flow reactor, a gas chromatograph (GC) and MS. We conclude that for the CO(2) methanation reaction, the dissociation of H(2) molecules at the surface is not the rate controlling step but the dissociative adsorption of CO(2) molecules on the hydride surface.

  8. Chemically stable ceramic-metal composite membrane for hydrogen separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fanglin; Fang, Shumin; Brinkman, Kyle S.

    2017-06-27

    A hydrogen permeation membrane is provided that can include a metal and a ceramic material mixed together. The metal can be Ni, Zr, Nb, Ta, Y, Pd, Fe, Cr, Co, V, or combinations thereof, and the ceramic material can have the formula: BaZr.sub.1-x-yY.sub.xT.sub.yO.sub.3-.delta. where 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.0.5, (x+y)>0; 0.ltoreq..delta..ltoreq.0.5, and T is Sc, Ti, Nb, Ta, Mo, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, In, Sn, or combinations thereof. A method of forming such a membrane is also provided. A method is also provided for extracting hydrogen from a feed stream.

  9. Experimental Two-Phase Liquid-Metal Magnetohydrodynamic Generator Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    efficiencies in excess of 0.8 are attainable. Initial measurements of local flow parameters in a NaK -nitrogen two-phase liquid - metal MHD generator...hot liquid metals . Thus, the concept of using surface-active aaents in MHD generators can be evaluated more rapidly and inexpensively with NaK , the...describe this aggregation of bchbles as a foam. When the Ba- NaK solution was transferred, helium was blown under the surface of the liquid metal with the

  10. Modellization of Metal Hydride Canister for Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Maceiras

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen shows very interesting features for its use on-board applications as fuel cell vehicles. This paper presents the modelling of a tank with a metal hydride alloy for on-board applications, which provides good performance under ambient conditions. The metal hydride contained in the tank is Ti0.98Zr0.02V0.43Fe0.09Cr0.05Mn1.5. A two-dimensional model has been performed for the refuelling process (absorption and the discharge process (desorption. For that, individual models of mass balance, energy balance, reaction kinetics and behaviour of hydrogen gas has been modelled. The model has been developed under Matlab / Simulink© environment. Finally, individual models have been integrated into a global model, and simulated under ambient conditions. With the aim to analyse the temperature influence on the state of charge and filling and emptying time, other simulations were performed at different temperatures. The obtained results allow to conclude that this alloy offers a good behaviour with the discharge process under normal ambient conditions. Keywords: Hydrogen storage; metal hydrides; fuel cell; simulation; board applications

  11. Liquid-Liquid Structure Transition in Metallic Melts: Experimental Evidence by Viscosity Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-Qing; WU Yu-Qin; BIAN Xiu-Fang

    2007-01-01

    Temperature dependence of viscosity for more than ten kinds of metallic melts is analysed based on viscosity measurements. An obvious turning point is observed on the Arrhenius curves. Since viscosity is one of the physical properties sensitive to structure, its discontinuous change with temperature reveals the possible liquidliquid structure transition in the metallic melts. Furthermore, an integrated liquid structure transition diagram of the Sn-Bi system is presented. The universality of liquid-liquid structure transition is also discussed simply.

  12. Non-porous metal membranes for selective separation of hydrogen from gas mixtures at higher temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, U.; Schulten, R.; Weirich, W.; Kuegler, B.; Luecke, L.; Oertel, M.; Pietsch, M.; Schmitz, J.

    1986-10-01

    Materials for selective separation of hydrogen from gas mixtures by means of a metal membrane must have high permeability for dissolved oxygen, catalytically active surfaces, and mechanical stability in a hydrogen atmosphere. The transition metals Nb, Ta, and V have high hydrogen permeability, but they must be coated with a catalytically active Pd alloy in order to permit hydrogen permeation. The alloy TiNi can be used without a noble metal coating.

  13. Autotrophic denitrification using hydrogen generated from metallic iron corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunger, Neha; Bose, Purnendu

    2009-09-01

    Hydrogenotrophic denitrification was demonstrated using hydrogen generated from anoxic corrosion of metallic iron. For this purpose, a mixture of hydrogenated water and nitrate solution was used as reactor feed. A semi-batch reactor with nitrate loading of 2000 mg m(-3) d(-1) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 50 days produced effluent with nitrate concentration of 0.27 mg N L(-1) (99% nitrate removal). A continuous flow reactor with nitrate loading of 28.9 mg m(-3) d(-1) and HRT of 15.6 days produced effluent with nitrate concentration of approximately 0.025 mg N L(-1) (95% nitrate removal). In both cases, the concentration of nitrate degradation by-products, viz., ammonia and nitrite, were below detection limits. The rate of denitrification in the reactors was controlled by hydrogen availability, and hence to operate such reactors at higher nitrate loading rates and/or lower HRT than reported in the present study, hydrogen concentration in the hydrogenated water must be significantly increased.

  14. Improved hydrogen desorption from lithium hydrazide by alkali metal hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Liang, E-mail: liangzeng@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Miyaoka, Hiroki [Institute for Sustainable Sciences and Development, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Ichikawa, Takayuki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu [Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •LiH can dramatically improve the hydrogen desorption properties of LiNHNH{sub 2}. •KH doping had positive effect in promoting the hydrogen desorption properties of LiNHNH{sub 2}–LiH mixture. •The reaction mechanism between LiNHNH{sub 2} and LiH was studied and discussed. -- Abstract: Lithium hydrazide (LiNHNH{sub 2}), which is a white solid with 8.0 mass% of theoretical hydrogen content, was synthesized from a reaction between anhydrous hydrazine and n-butyllithium in diethyl ether. The thermodynamic properties of this compound and its detailed decomposition pathways had been investigated in our previous work. However, a number of undesired gaseous products such as hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) were generated during the thermal decomposition of LiNHNH{sub 2}. In this work, alkali metal hydride was used to suppress the impurities in the desorbed hydrogen and improved the hydrogen desorption properties. The reaction mechanism between LiNHNH{sub 2} and LiH was also studied and discussed in this paper.

  15. Hydrogen and Dihydrogen Bonds in the Reactions of Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkova, Natalia V; Epstein, Lina M; Filippov, Oleg A; Shubina, Elena S

    2016-08-10

    The dihydrogen bond-an interaction between a transition-metal or main-group hydride (M-H) and a protic hydrogen moiety (H-X)-is arguably the most intriguing type of hydrogen bond. It was discovered in the mid-1990s and has been intensively explored since then. Herein, we collate up-to-date experimental and computational studies of the structural, energetic, and spectroscopic parameters and natures of dihydrogen-bonded complexes of the form M-H···H-X, as such species are now known for a wide variety of hydrido compounds. Being a weak interaction, dihydrogen bonding entails the lengthening of the participating bonds as well as their polarization (repolarization) as a result of electron density redistribution. Thus, the formation of a dihydrogen bond allows for the activation of both the MH and XH bonds in one step, facilitating proton transfer and preparing these bonds for further transformations. The implications of dihydrogen bonding in different stoichiometric and catalytic reactions, such as hydrogen exchange, alcoholysis and aminolysis, hydrogen evolution, hydrogenation, and dehydrogenation, are discussed.

  16. Structural crossover in a supercooled metallic liquid and the link to a liquid-to-liquid phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, S.; Blodgett, M.; Kelton, K. F.; Ma, J. L.; Fan, J.; Wang, X.-L.

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved synchrotron measurements were carried out to capture the structure evolution of an electrostatically levitated metallic-glass-forming liquid during free cooling. The experimental data shows a crossover in the liquid structure at ˜1000 K, about 115 K below the melting temperature and 150 K above the crystallization temperature. The structure change is characterized by a dramatic growth in the extended-range order below the crossover temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations have identified that the growth of the extended-range order was due to an increased correlation between solute atoms. These results provide structural evidence for a liquid-to-liquid-phase-transition in the supercooled metallic liquid.

  17. Predicted energy densitites for nickel-hydrogen and silver-hydrogen cells embodying metallic hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified design concepts were used to estimate gravimetric and volumetric energy densities for metal hydrogen battery cells for assessing the characteristics of cells containing metal hydrides as compared to gaseous storage cells, and for comparing nickel cathode and silver cathode systems. The silver cathode was found to yield superior energy densities in all cases considered. The inclusion of hydride forming materials yields cells with very high volumetric energy densities that also retain gravimetric energy densities nearly as high as those of gaseous storage cells.

  18. Hydrogen storage and evolution catalysed by metal hydride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Suenobu, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-07

    The storage and evolution of hydrogen are catalysed by appropriate metal hydride complexes. Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide by hydrogen is catalysed by a [C,N] cyclometalated organoiridium complex, [Ir(III)(Cp*)(4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl-κN(2))benzoic acid-κC(3))(OH(2))](2)SO(4) [Ir-OH(2)](2)SO(4), under atmospheric pressure of H(2) and CO(2) in weakly basic water (pH 7.5) at room temperature. The reverse reaction, i.e., hydrogen evolution from formate, is also catalysed by [Ir-OH(2)](+) in acidic water (pH 2.8) at room temperature. Thus, interconversion between hydrogen and formic acid in water at ambient temperature and pressure has been achieved by using [Ir-OH(2)](+) as an efficient catalyst in both directions depending on pH. The Ir complex [Ir-OH(2)](+) also catalyses regioselective hydrogenation of the oxidised form of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to produce the 1,4-reduced form (NADH) under atmospheric pressure of H(2) at room temperature in weakly basic water. In weakly acidic water, the complex [Ir-OH(2)](+) also catalyses the reverse reaction, i.e., hydrogen evolution from NADH to produce NAD(+) at room temperature. Thus, interconversion between NADH (and H(+)) and NAD(+) (and H(2)) has also been achieved by using [Ir-OH(2)](+) as an efficient catalyst and by changing pH. The iridium hydride complex formed by the reduction of [Ir-OH(2)](+) by H(2) and NADH is responsible for the hydrogen evolution. Photoirradiation (λ > 330 nm) of an aqueous solution of the Ir-hydride complex produced by the reduction of [Ir-OH(2)](+) with alcohols resulted in the quantitative conversion to a unique [C,C] cyclometalated Ir-hydride complex, which can catalyse hydrogen evolution from alcohols in a basic aqueous solution (pH 11.9). The catalytic mechanisms of the hydrogen storage and evolution are discussed by focusing on the reactivity of Ir-hydride complexes.

  19. Liquid Metal Engineering by Application of Intensive Melt Shearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jayesh; Zuo, Yubo; Fan, Zhongyun

    In all casting processes, liquid metal treatment is an essential step in order to produce high quality cast products. A new liquid metal treatment technology has been developed which comprises of a rotor/stator set-up that delivers high shear rate to the liquid melt. It generates macro-flow in a volume of melt for distributive mixing and intensive shearing for dispersive mixing. The high shear device exhibits significantly enhanced kinetics for phase transformations, uniform dispersion, distribution and size reduction of solid particles and gas bubbles, improved homogenisation of chemical composition and temperature fields and also forced wetting of usually difficult-to-wet solid particles in the liquid metal. Hence, it can benefit various casting processes to produce high quality cast products with refined microstructure and enhanced mechanical properties. Here, we report an overview on the application of the new high shear technology to the processing of light metal alloys.

  20. Liquid metal heat sink for high-power laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrovec, John; Litt, Amardeep S.; Copeland, Drew A.; Junghans, Jeremy; Durkee, Roger

    2013-02-01

    We report on the development of a novel, ultra-low thermal resistance active heat sink (AHS) for thermal management of high-power laser diodes (HPLD) and other electronic and photonic components. AHS uses a liquid metal coolant flowing at high speed in a miniature closed and sealed loop. The liquid metal coolant receives waste heat from an HPLD at high flux and transfers it at much reduced flux to environment, primary coolant fluid, heat pipe, or structure. Liquid metal flow is maintained electromagnetically without any moving parts. Velocity of liquid metal flow can be controlled electronically, thus allowing for temperature control of HPLD wavelength. This feature also enables operation at a stable wavelength over a broad range of ambient conditions. Results from testing an HPLD cooled by AHS are presented.

  1. Role of exposed metal sites in hydrogen storage in MOFs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitillo, Jenny G; Regli, Laura; Chavan, Sachin; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Spoto, Giuseppe; Dietzel, Pascal D C; Bordiga, Silvia; Zecchina, Adriano

    2008-07-02

    The role of exposed metal sites in increasing the H2 storage performances in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been investigated by means of IR spectrometry. Three MOFs have been considered: MOF-5, with unexposed metal sites, and HKUST-1 and CPO-27-Ni, with exposed Cu(2+) and Ni(2+), respectively. The onset temperature of spectroscopic features associated with adsorbed H2 correlates with the adsorption enthalpy obtained by the VTIR method and with the shift experienced by the H-H stretching frequency. This relationship can be ascribed to the different nature and accessibility of the metal sites. On the basis of a pure energetic evaluation, it was observed that the best performance was shown by CPO-27-Ni that exhibits also an initial adsorption enthalpy of -13.5 kJ mol(-1), the highest yet observed for a MOF. Unfortunately, upon comparison of the hydrogen amounts stored at high pressure, the hydrogen capacities in these conditions are mostly dependent on the surface area and total pore volume of the material. This means that if control of MOF surface area can benefit the total stored amounts, only the presence of a great number of strong adsorption sites can make the (P, T) storage conditions more economically favorable. These observations lead to the prediction that efficient H2 storage by physisorption can be obtained by increasing the surface density of strong adsorption sites.

  2. Experiments on the thermalization of slow neutrons by liquid hydrogen (1962); Experience de thermalisation de neutrons lents par de l'hydrogene liquide (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cribier, D.; Jacrot, B.; Lacaze, A.; Roubeau, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Institut Fourier, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1962-07-01

    In order to increase the flux of neutrons of long wave-length ({lambda} > 4 A) emerging from a channel in the EL-3, a liquid hydrogen device was introduced into a channel of the reactor (Channel H{sub 1}). The principle of the device is simple. A volume of liquid hydrogen is introduced as close as possible to the reactor core into a region of intense isotropic flux. This hydrogen slows down the slow neutrons; because of the very small mean free diffusion path of slow in hydrogen, this slowing down is considerable even in a small volume of liquid hydrogen, and the spectrum temperature of neutrons emerging from the volume of liquid hydrogen can therefore be shifted. The intensity gain for neutrons with a wave length {lambda}, is a G ({lambda}) function which, for perfect thermalization and ignoring capture, is expressed by: G ({lambda}) = 225 exp (- 45.3/{lambda}{sup 2}), assuming a temperature of 300 deg. K for the neutrons before cooling and is 20 deg. K after cooling. For a wave-length of 5 A, the theoretical maximum gain of thus about 37. (authors) [French] Dans le but d'accroitre le flux des neutrons de grande longueur d'onde ({lambda} > 4 A) sortant d'un canal de la pile EL-3, un dispositif a hydrogene liquide a ete introduit dans un canal de la pile (canal H{sub 1}). Le principe du dispositif est simple. Un volume d'hydrogene liquide est introduit le plus pres possible du coeur de ia pile dans une region de flux intense et isotrope. Les neutrons lents sont ralentis par cet hydrogene; a cause du tres faible libre parcours moyen de diffusion des neutrons lents dans l'hydrogene, ce ralentissement est important meme dans un faible volume d'hydrogene liquide et l'on peut ainsi deplacer la temperature du spectre des neutrons sortant du volume d'hydrogene liquide. Le gain en intensite des neutrons de longueur d'onde {lambda} est une fonction G ({lambda}) qui pour une thermalisation parfaite et en negligeant la capture, s

  3. Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor for Space Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzberg, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    The conceptual design is for a liquid metal (LM) cooled nuclear reactor that would provide heat to a closed Brayton cycle (CBC) power conversion subsystem to provide electricity for electric propulsion thrusters and spacecraft power. The baseline power level is 100 kWe to the user. For long term power generation, UN pin fuel with Nb1Zr alloy cladding was selected. As part of the SP-100 Program this fuel demonstrated lifetime with greater than six atom percent burnup, at temperatures in the range of 1400-1500 K. The CBC subsystem was selected because of the performance and lifetime database from commercial and aircraft applications and from prior NASA and DOE space programs. The high efficiency of the CBC also allows the reactor to operate at relatively low power levels over its 15-year life, minimizing the long-term power density and temperature of the fuel. The scope of this paper is limited to only the nuclear components that provide heated helium-xenon gas to the CBC subsystem. The principal challenge for the LM reactor concept was to design the reactor core, shield and primary heat transport subsystems to meet mission requirements in a low mass configuration. The LM concept design approach was to assemble components from prior programs and, with minimum change, determine if the system met the objective of the study. All of the components are based on technologies having substantial data bases. Nuclear, thermalhydraulic, stress, and shielding analyses were performed using available computer codes. Neutronics issues included maintaining adequate operating and shutdown reactivities, even under accident conditions. Thermalhydraulic and stress analyses calculated fuel and material temperatures, coolant flows and temperatures, and thermal stresses in the fuel pins, components and structures. Using conservative design assumptions and practices, consistent with the detailed design work performed during the SP-100 Program, the mass of the reactor, shield, primary heat

  4. Generation of core–shell nanoparticles Al@Ti by laser ablation in liquid for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkov, A.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, “Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University)”, 9, Institutsky lane, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow (Russian Federation); Barmina, E.V.; Simakin, A.V. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuzmin, P.G., E-mail: qzzzma@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Voronov, V.V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 31, Kashirskoye highway, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • Core–shell Al@Ti NPs are generated by laser ablation in isopropanol. • Isopropanol was saturated with molecular hydrogen. • The composite metallic Al-Ti target was used. • HR TEM characterization shows that Ti core is covered by epitaxial Al shell. • Al@Ti NPs are promising for hydrogen storage. - Abstract: Core–shell Al@Ti nanoparticles are generated by ablation of a composite Ti–Al target in liquid isopropanol saturated with molecular hydrogen using a Nd:YAG laser with pulse duration of 10 ps and repetition rate of 200 kHz. The target is made of two plates of corresponding metals stacked together and placed into a flowing cell reactor. Transmission Electron Microscopy analysis of generated NPs reveals their core–shell structure with Ti core and Al shell. Average size of NPs determined by means of measuring disk centrifuge is around 40 nm. Saturation of NPs by hydrogen is due to sharp dependence of its solubility in these metals on temperature. XRD studies of generated NPs show the peaks of both metallic Ti and Al with some amount of TiO{sub 2}. No peaks of Ti–Al alloys are observed.

  5. Transport Modeling of Hydrogen in Metals for Application to Hydrogen Assisted Cracking of Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-04

    flank surfaces; net anodic ( dissolution /filming) reactions take place on the bare surface and net cathodic (hydrogen reduction) reactions take place on...ACL 6ij (12) where: p mass density of the solid [kg/m 3 ]. A Lame’ constant [N/mr2]. ij- Kronecker delta (6ij = 1 for i j and 0 otherwise). G shear...the Diffusion of Hydrogen in Iron and Ferritic Steels", Trans. TMS-AIME, Vol. 227, pp. 618-627. 12. B. G. Pound, (1989), "The Application of a

  6. Design, fabrication and testing of a liquid hydrogen fuel tank for a long duration aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Gary L.; Buchholtz, Brian; Olsen, Al

    2012-06-01

    Liquid hydrogen has distinct advantages as an aircraft fuel. These include a specific heat of combustion 2.8 times greater than gasoline or jet fuel and zero carbon emissions. It can be utilized by fuel cells, turbine engines and internal combustion engines. The high heat of combustion is particularly important in the design of long endurance aircraft with liquid hydrogen enabling cruise endurance of several days. However, the mass advantage of the liquid hydrogen fuel will result in a mass advantage for the fuel system only if the liquid hydrogen tank and insulation mass is a small fraction of the hydrogen mass. The challenge is producing a tank that meets the mass requirement while insulating the cryogenic liquid hydrogen well enough to prevent excessive heat leak and boil off. In this paper, we report on the design, fabrication and testing of a liquid hydrogen fuel tank for a prototype high altitude long endurance (HALE) demonstration aircraft. Design options on tank geometry, tank wall material and insulation systems are discussed. The final design is an aluminum sphere insulated with spray on foam insulation (SOFI). Several steps and organizations were involved in the tank fabrication and test. The tank was cold shocked, helium leak checked and proof pressure tested. The overall thermal performance was verified with a boil off test using liquid hydrogen.

  7. Clogging of Joule-Thomson Devices in Liquid Hydrogen Handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurns, John M.; Lekki, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center indicate that Joule-Thomson devices become clogged when transferring liquid hydrogen (LH2), operating at a temperature range from 20.5 to 24.4 K. Blockage does not exist under all test conditions but is found to be sensitive to the inlet temperature of the LH2. At a subcooled inlet temperature of 20.5 K blockage consistently appears but is dissipated when the fluid temperature is raised above 24.5 K. Clogging steadily reduced flow rate through the orifices, eventually resulting in complete blockage. This tendency poses a threat to spacecraft cryogenic propulsion systems that would utilize passive thermal control systems. We propose that this clogging is due to trace amounts of neon in the regular LH2 supply. Neon freezes at 24.5 K at one atmosphere pressure. It is postulated that between 20.5 and 24.5 K, neon remains in a meta-stable, supercooled liquid state. When impacting the face of an orifice, liquid neon droplets solidify and accumulate, blocking flow over time. The purpose of this test program was to definitively quantify the phenomena experimentally by obtaining direct visual evidence of orifice clogging by accretion from neon contaminates in the LH2 flow stream, utilizing state of the art imaging technology. Tests were conducted with LH2 flowing in the temperature range of 20.5 to 24.4 K. Additional imaging was also done at LH2 temperatures with no flow to verify clear view through the orifice.

  8. A three-cell liquid hydrogen target for an extended focal plane polarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovanov, L.B.; Borzounov, Yu.T.; Piskunov, N.M.; Tsvinev, A.P. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Lab. of High Energy; Ball, J.; Chesny, Ph.; Gheller, J.M.; Guillier, G.; Ladygin, V.P.; Theure, Ph.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E. [Laboratoire National Saturne, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1996-12-31

    This article describes the design and working principle of a 3-cell liquid hydrogen target produced for the high-energy deuteron polarimeter HYPOM. This target uses liquid Helium as a cooling agent. After a general description of the apparatus, tests and operating modes are thoroughly explained. In particular the air controlled self regulation of Helium flow in the cryostat to stabilize the liquid hydrogen level is presented. (author). 12 refs.; Submitted to Nuclear Instruments and Methods, A (NL).

  9. Electron-electron correlations in liquid s-p metals

    CERN Document Server

    Leys, F E

    2003-01-01

    We present calculations for the valence electron-electron structure factor in liquid Mg near freezing, assuming knowledge of the jellium result. On the basis of this, we predict significant corrections to jellium short-range correlations in liquid s-p metals and in particular an increase in the electron-electron contact probability.

  10. OPERATION OF THE ELECTRIC ARC FURNACE WITH LIQUID RESIDUES METAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Steblov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations have shown a positive impact of increasing the mass of the liquid residue (swamps in an electric arc furnace EAF-160, from 10 to 20–30 tonnes on increasing of usable output and reducing the specific energy consumption per ton of liquid metal.

  11. Thermohydraulic safety issues for liquid metal cooled systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerbeth, Gunter; Stefani, Frank [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Fluid Dynamics; Eckert, Sven

    2016-05-15

    In this paper recent developments of various techniques for single-phase and two-phase flow measurements with relevance to liquid metal cooled systems will be presented. Further, the status of the DRESDYN platform for large-scale experiments with liquid sodium is sketched.

  12. Numerical simulation of hydrogen desorption from high-density metal hydride hydrogen storage vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang-Kun, O.; Yi, Kyung-Woo; Cho, Sung-Wook

    2017-07-01

    Metal hydride (MH) alloys are a promising type of material in hydrogen storage applications, allowing for low-pressure, high-density storage. However, while many studies are being performed on enhancing the hydrogen storage properties of such alloys, there has been little research on large-scale storage vessels which make use of the alloys. In particular, large-scale, high-density storage devices must make allowances for the temperature variations caused by the heat of reaction between hydrogen and MH alloys, which may impact the storage characteristics. In this study, we propose a numerical model for the design and evaluation of hydrogen storage devices using MH alloys. Hydrogen desorption reaction behavior for an alloy is observed in terms of temperature and reaction rate. This behavioral correlation is used as the basis for a comprehensive simulation model of the alloy system. Calculated results are found to be in good agreement with experimentally measured data, indicating that the model may be applied to multiple system geometries, scales, and alloy compositions.

  13. Numerical simulation and performance test of metal hydride hydrogen storage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hsiang Yen, Bin-Hao Chen, Bao-Dong Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydride reactors are widely used in many industrial applications, such as hydrogen storage, thermal compression, heat pump, etc. According to the research requirement of metal hydride hydrogen storage, the thermal analyses have been implemented in the paper. The metal hydride reaction beds are considered as coupled cylindrical tube modules which combine the chemical absorption and desorption in metal hydride. The model is then used metal hydride LaNi5 as an example to predict the performance of metal hydride hydrogen storage devices, such as the position of hydration front and the thermal flux. Under the different boundary condition the characteristics of heat transfer and mass transfer in metal hydride have influence on the hydrogen absorption and desorption. The researches revealed that the scroll design can improve the temperature distribution in the reactor and the porous tube for directing hydrogen can increase the penetration depth of hydride reaction to decrease the hydrogen absorption time.

  14. Investigation of the reaction of liquid hydrogen with liquid air in a pressure tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karb, Erich H.

    1987-01-01

    A pressure tube should protect the FR-2 reactor from the consequences of a hydrogen-air reaction, which is conceivable in the breakdown of several safety devices of the planned cold neutron source Project FR-2/16. The magnitudes and time pattern of the pressures to be expected were investigated. In the geometry used and the ignition mechanism selected, which is comparable to the strongest ignition process conceivable in the reactor, the reaction proceeds with greater probability than combustion. The combustion is possibly smaller if local limited partial detonations are superimposed. The magnitude of the pressure was determined by the masses of the reaction partners, liquid H2 and liquid air, and determines their ratio to each other.

  15. Controlled delamination of metal films by hydrogen loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, Eugen

    2008-11-18

    n this work we quantitatively determine the adhesion energy between metal films and their substrates. Therefore a new controlled buckling technique is established, applying the strong compressive in-plane stress that results in thin films clamped on rigid substrates during hydrogen loading. When the elastic energy stored in the H-loaded thin film exceeds the adhesion energy between film and substrate, delamination occurs. At the onset of delamination, a critical hydrogen concentration, a critical stress value and a critical bending of the substrate are present, which are quantitative measures for the adhesion energy and permit its calculation. As the critical values are determined at the onset of delamination, plastic deformation is negligible, which denies the quantitative determination of adhesion energies in conventional test setups. In multilayer-systems, adhesion energies between substrates and films that hardly absorb hydrogen can be measured by the controlled buckling technique, when the films of interest are coated with hydrogen absorbing films (active layer). The measurements are performed easily and can be repeated under the same test conditions, while variables such as the thickness of the coating materials or the boundary surface structure can be varied and optimized. In this work the adhesion energies of different materials on polycarbonate and niobium on sapphire are investigated. (orig.)

  16. REMOVAL OF CERTAIN FISSION PRODUCT METALS FROM LIQUID BISMUTH COMPOSITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, O.E.; Howe, H.E.; Avrutik, E.R.

    1959-11-24

    A method is described for purifying a solution of urarium in liquid bismuth containing at least one metal from the group consisting of selenium, tellurium, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium, niobium, and zirconium. The solution is contacted with zinc in an inert atmosphere to form a homogeneous melt, a solid zinc phase is formed, and the zinc phase containing the metal is separated from the melt.

  17. Ternary Amides Containing Transition Metals for Hydrogen Storage: A Case Study with Alkali Metal Amidozincates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hujun; Richter, Theresia M M; Pistidda, Claudio; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Santoru, Antonio; Gizer, Gökhan; Niewa, Rainer; Chen, Ping; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The alkali metal amidozincates Li4 [Zn(NH2)4](NH2)2 and K2[Zn(NH2)4] were, to the best of our knowledge, studied for the first time as hydrogen storage media. Compared with the LiNH2-2 LiH system, both Li4 [Zn(NH2)4](NH2)2-12 LiH and K2[Zn(NH2)4]-8 LiH systems showed improved rehydrogenation performance, especially K2[Zn(NH2)4]-8 LiH, which can be fully hydrogenated within 30 s at approximately 230 °C. The absorption properties are stable upon cycling. This work shows that ternary amides containing transition metals have great potential as hydrogen storage materials.

  18. Hydrogenation of artemisinin to dihydroartemisinin over heterogeneous metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiani, Anis; Pertiwi, Ralentri; Adilina, Indri Badria

    2017-01-01

    A series of heterogeneous metal catalysts of Ni, Pd, and Pt, both of synthesized and commercial catalysts were used for hydrogenation of artemisinin to dihydroartemisinin. Their catalytic properties were determsined by Surface Area Analyzer and Thermogravimetry Analyzer. The catalytic properties in various reaction conditions in terms of temperature, pressure, reaction time and reactant/catalyst ratio were also studied. The results catalytic activity tests showed that synthesized catalysts of Ni/zeolite, Ni-Sn/zeolite, Ni/bentonite and Ni-Sn/bentonite were not able to produced dihydroartemisinin and deoxyartemisinin was mainly formed. Meanwhile, commercial catalysts of Ni skeletal, Pd/activated charcoal and Pt/activated charcoal yielded the desired dihydroartemisinin product. Ni skeletal commercial catalyst gave the best performance of hydrogenation artemisinin to dihydroartemisinin in room temperature and low H2 pressure.

  19. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A; Ceperley, David M; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-21

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work, we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic body centered cubic atomic hydrogen in its ground state. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transition order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs = 2.27(3) a0. We compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin's GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.

  20. Phase separation of metallic hydrogen-helium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, D. M.; Ashcroft, N. W.; Beck, H.

    1977-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the thermodynamic functions and phase-separation boundaries of solid metallic hydrogen-helium alloys at temperatures between zero and 19,000 K and at pressures between 15 and 90 Mbar. Expressions for the band-structure energy of a randomly disordered alloy (including third order in the electron-ion interaction) are derived and evaluated. Short- and long-range orders are included by the quasi-chemical method, and lattice dynamics in the virtual-crystal harmonic approximation. It is concluded that at temperatures below 4000 K, there is essentially complete phase separation of hydrogen-helium alloys and that a miscibility gap remains at the highest temperatures and pressures considered. The relevance of these results to models of the deep interior of Jupiter is briefly discussed.

  1. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: recent advances and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman; Bowman, Robert C.

    2016-04-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the MHs. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units, are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modelling of a two-stage compressor aimed at describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS and the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the MH compression in the overall development of the hydrogen-driven energy systems. The work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.

  2. Experimental investigation on coupling flows between liquid and liquid metal layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Kanako; Tasaka, Yuji; Murai, Yuichi; Takeda, Yasushi; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi

    2008-11-01

    This study aims to clarify coupling of flows between liquid metal and other usual liquids, e.g. water or oil, in fluid dynamical systems. In past studies for two-layer Rayleigh-Bénard system where the immiscible two liquids are layered, two types of coupling were observed; these are called as ``mechanical coupling'' and ``thermal coupling.'' As a typical character of low Pr fluid, large-scale structure in the liquid metal layer has oscillating motion. In this study we investigate ``thermal coupling'' especially how the oscillation of cells in the liquid metal layer propagates to the upper liquid layer and vice versa by changing a ratio of the height of the layers and viscosity of the upper layer fluid. Visualization of the liquid metal motion was conducted by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling, and then the oscillating motion is expressed on the space-time velocity map. PIV measurement of the upper, transparent fluid layer shows the modulation of the convective motion due to the oscillation in the liquid metal layer. Point-wise measurement of temperature at several positions in the fluid layer represents the modulation quantitatively.

  3. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-organic frameworks: the role of nuclear quantum effects

    CERN Document Server

    Wahiduzzaman, Mohammad; Heine, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The role of nuclear quantum effects on the adsorption of molecular hydrogen in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been investigated on grounds of Grand-Canonical Quantized Liquid Density-Functional Theory (GC-QLDFT) calculations. For this purpose, we have carefully validated classical H2 -host interaction potentials that are obtained by fitting Born-Oppenheimer ab initio reference data. The hydrogen adsorption has first been assessed classically using Liquid Density-Functional Theory (LDFT) and the Grand-Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) methods. The results have been compared against the semi-classical treatment of quantum effects by applying the Feynman-Hibbs correction to the Born-Oppenheimer-derived potentials, and by explicit treatment within the Grand-Canonical Quantized Liquid Density-Functional Theory (GC-QLDFT). The results are compared with experimental data and indicate pronounced quantum and possibly many-particle effects. After validation calculations have been carried out for IRMOF-1 (MOF-5), GC-QLD...

  4. Subtask 12E1: Compatibility of structural materials in liquid alkali metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L.; Haglund, R.; Clark, R.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the chemical compatibility of structural alloys such as V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloy and Type 316 stainless steel for application in liquid alkali metals such as lithium and sodium-78 wt.% potassium (NaK) at temperatures that are in the range of interest for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER); (b) evaluate the transfer of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen between structural materials and liquid metals; and (c) evaluate the effects of such transfers on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the materials for long-term service in liquid-metal environments. Candidate structural materials are being evaluated for their compatibility, interstitial-element transfer, and corrosion in liquid alkali-metal systems such as lithium and NaK. Type 316 stainless steel and V-5Cr-5Ti coupon specimens with and without prealuminizing treatment have been exposed to NaK and lithium environments of commercial purity for times up to 3768 h at temperatures between 300 and 400{degrees}C. 13 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Modeling hydrogen storage in boron-substituted graphene decorated with potassium metal atoms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tokarev, A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Boron-substituted graphene decorated with potassium metal atoms was considered as a novel material for hydrogen storage. Density functional theory calculations were used to model key properties of the material, such as geometry, hydrogen packing...

  6. Dispersion relations of the acoustic modes in divalent liquid metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inui Masanori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Collective dynamics in liquid Ca and liquid Cd was studied by inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS. Using our experimental technique to prepare proper sample cells and high performance of an IXS beamline (BL35XU at SPring-8 in Japan, the dynamic structure factor with reasonable statistics was obtained for these divalent liquid metals. For both liquids, the dynamic structure factor at low Q exhibits a central peak with a shoulder or small hump clearly visible on each side, and the inelastic excitation energy determined using the model function composed of Lorentzian and the damped harmonic oscillator function disperses with increasing Q. The dispersion curves of these liquids were compared with that of the longitudinal acoustic phonon in each crystalline phase. From these results, clear difference in the interatomic interaction be- tween liquid Ca and liquid Cd was inferred.

  7. Thermal Performance Comparison of Glass Microsphere and Perlite Insulation Systems for Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J. P.; Fesmire, J. E.; Nagy, Z. F.; Sojourner, S. J.; Morris, D. L.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2008-03-01

    A technology demonstration test project was conducted by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to provide comparative thermal performance data for glass microspheres, referred to as bubbles, and perlite insulation for liquid hydrogen tank applications. Two identical 1/15th scale versions of the 3,200,000 liter spherical liquid hydrogen tanks at Launch Complex 39 at KSC were custom designed and built to serve as test articles for this test project. Evaporative (boil-off) calorimeter test protocols, including liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, were established to provide tank test conditions characteristic of the large storage tanks that support the Space Shuttle launch operations. This paper provides comparative thermal performance test results for bubbles and perlite for a wide range of conditions. Thermal performance as a function of cryogenic commodity (nitrogen and hydrogen), vacuum pressure, insulation fill level, tank liquid level, and thermal cycles will be presented.

  8. Trial wave functions for High-Pressure Metallic Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Pierleoni, Carlo; Morales, Miguel A; Ceperley, David M; Holzmann, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Many body trial wave functions are the key ingredient for accurate Quantum Monte Carlo estimates of total electronic energies in many electron systems. In the Coupled Electron-Ion Monte Carlo method, the accuracy of the trial function must be conjugated with the efficiency of its evaluation. We report recent progress in trial wave functions for metallic hydrogen implemented in the Coupled Electron-Ion Monte Carlo method. We describe and characterize several types of trial functions of increasing complexity in the range of the coupling parameter $1.0 \\leq r_s \\leq1.55$. We report wave function comparisons for disordered protonic configurations and preliminary results for thermal averages.

  9. Examination of Solubility Models for the Determination of Transition Metals within Liquid Alkali Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Isler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The experimental solubility of transition metals in liquid alkali metal was compared to the modeled solubility calculated using various equations for solubility. These equations were modeled using the enthalpy calculations of the semi-empirical Miedema model and various entropy calculations. The accuracy of the predicted solubility compared to the experimental data is more dependent on which liquid alkali metal is being examined rather than the transition metal solute examined. For liquid lithium the calculated solubility by the model was generally larger than experimental values, while for liquid cesium the modeling solubility was significantly smaller than the experimental values. For liquid sodium, potassium, and rubidium the experimental solubilities were within the range calculated by this study. Few data approached the predicted temperature dependence of solubility and instead most data exhibited a less pronounced temperature dependence.

  10. A Transition to Metallic Hydrogen: Evidence of the Plasma Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    The insulator-metal transition in hydrogen is one of the most outstanding problems in condensed matter physics. The high-pressure metallic phase is now predicted to be liquid atomic from T =0 K to very high temperatures. We have conducted measurements of optical properties of hot dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K in a diamond anvil cell using pulsed laser heating of the sample. We present evidence in two forms: a plateau in the heating curves (average laser power vs temperature) characteristic of a first-order phase transition with latent heat, and changes in transmittance and reflectance characteristic of a metal for temperatures above the plateau temperature. For thick films the reflectance saturates at ~0.5. The phase line of this transition has a negative slope in agreement with theories of the so-called plasma phase transition. The NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H supported this research.

  11. Oxidation of Group 8 transition-Metal Hydrides and Ionic Hydrogenation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kjell-Tore

    1996-08-01

    Transition-metal hydrides have received considerable attention during the last decades because of their unusual reactivity and their potential as homogeneous catalysts for hydrogenation and other reactions of organic substrates. An important class of catalytic processes where transition-metal hydrides are involved is the homogeneous hydrogenation of alkenes, alkynes, ketones, aldehydes, arenes and nitro compounds. This thesis studies the oxidation of Group 8 transition-metal hydrides and the ionic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes.

  12. Neutron powder diffraction of metal-organic frameworks for hydrogen storage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Craig M Brown; Yun Liu; Dan A Neumann

    2008-10-01

    We review recent structural studies that we have undertaken aimed at elucidating the fundamental properties of metal-organic framework materials and their interactions with hydrogen. We have shown that exposing coordinatively unsaturated metal centers can greatly enhance the hydrogen binding energy and that they result in a significant increase of the surface packing density of adsorbed hydrogen molecules on materials' surface. We will review some of the structural aspects of these materials, especially the adsorbed hydrogen molecule surface packing density in one type of metal-organic framework, MOF-74, which can be packed even denser than that in solid hydrogen.

  13. Solar Thermal Upper Stage Liquid Hydrogen Pressure Control Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. D.; Otto, J. M.; Cody, J. C.; Hastings, L. J.; Bryant, C. B.; Gautney, T. T.

    2015-01-01

    High-energy cryogenic propellant is an essential element in future space exploration programs. Therefore, NASA and its industrial partners are committed to an advanced development/technology program that will broaden the experience base for the entire cryogenic fluid management community. Furthermore, the high cost of microgravity experiments has motivated NASA to establish government/aerospace industry teams to aggressively explore combinations of ground testing and analytical modeling to the greatest extent possible, thereby benefitting both industry and government entities. One such team consisting of ManTech SRS, Inc., Edwards Air Force Base, and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was formed to pursue a technology project designed to demonstrate technology readiness for an SRS liquid hydrogen (LH2) in-space propellant management concept. The subject testing was cooperatively performed June 21-30, 2000, through a partially reimbursable Space Act Agreement between SRS, MSFC, and the Air Force Research Laboratory. The joint statement of work used to guide the technical activity is presented in appendix A. The key elements of the SRS concept consisted of an LH2 storage and supply system that used all of the vented H2 for solar engine thrusting, accommodated pressure control without a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), and minimized or eliminated the need for a capillary liquid acquisition device (LAD). The strategy was to balance the LH2 storage tank pressure control requirements with the engine thrusting requirements to selectively provide either liquid or vapor H2 at a controlled rate to a solar thermal engine in the low-gravity environment of space operations. The overall test objective was to verify that the proposed concept could enable simultaneous control of LH2 tank pressure and feed system flow to the thruster without necessitating a TVS and a capillary LAD. The primary program objectives were designed to demonstrate technology readiness of the SRS concept

  14. Diagnosis of a Poorly Performing Liquid Hydrogen Bulk Storage Sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, Angela G.

    2011-01-01

    There are two 850,000 gallon Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage spheres used to support the Space Shuttle Program; one residing at Launch Pad A and the other at Launch Pad B. The LH2 Sphere at Pad B has had a high boiloff rate since being brought into service in the 1960's. The daily commodity loss was estimated to be approximately double that of the Pad A sphere, and well above the minimum required by the sphere's specification. Additionally, after being re-painted in the late 1990's a "cold spot" appeared on the outer sphere which resulted in a poor paint bond, and mold formation. Thermography was used to characterize the area, and the boiloff rate was continually evaluated. All evidence suggested that the high boiloff rate was caused by an excessive heat leak into the inner sphere due to an insulation void in the annulus. Pad B was recently taken out of Space Shuttle program service which provided a unique opportunity to diagnose the sphere's poor performance. The sphere was drained and inerted, and then opened from the annular relief device on the top where a series of boroscoping operations were accomplished. Boroscoping revealed a large Perlite insulation void in the region of the sphere where the cold spot was apparent. Perlite was then trucked in and off-loaded into the annular void region until the annulus was full. The sphere has not yet been brought back into service.

  15. Towards hydrogen metallization: an Ab initio approach; Vers la metallisation de l`hydrogene: approche AB initio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, St

    1998-12-31

    The quest for metallic hydrogen is a major goal for both theoretical and experimental condensed matter physics. Hydrogen and deuterium have been compressed up to 200 GPa in diamond anvil cells, without any clear evidence for a metallic behaviour. Loubeyere has recently suggested that hydrogen could metallize, at pressures within experimental range, in a new Van der Waals compound: Ar(H{sub 2}){sub 2} which is characterized at ambient pressure by an open and anisotropic sublattice of hydrogen molecules, stabilized by an argon skeleton. This thesis deals with a detailed ab initio investigation, by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics methods, of the evolution under pressure of this compound. In a last chapter, we go to much higher pressures and temperatures, in order to compare orbital and orbital free ab initio methods for the dense hydrogen plasma. (author) 109 refs.

  16. Liquid Galvanic Coatings for Protection of Imbedded Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowell, Louis G. (Inventor); Curran, Joseph J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Coating compositions and methods of their use are described herein for the reduction of corrosion in imbedded metal structures. The coatings are applied as liquids to an external surface of a substrate in which the metal structures are imbedded. The coatings are subsequently allowed to dry. The liquid applied coatings provide galvanic protection to the imbedded metal structures. Continued protection can be maintained with periodic reapplication of the coating compositions, as necessary, to maintain electrical continuity. Because the coatings may be applied using methods similar to standard paints, and because the coatings are applied to external surfaces of the substrates in which the metal structures are imbedded, the corresponding corrosion protection may be easily maintained. The coating compositions are particularly useful in the protection of metal-reinforced concrete.

  17. Electronic Principles of Hydrogen Incorporation and Dynamics in Metal Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Matović

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An approach to various metal hydrides based on electronic principles is presented. The effective medium theory (EMT is used to illustrate fundamental aspects of metal-hydrogen interaction and clarify the most important processes taking place during the interaction. The elaboration is extended using the numerous existing results of experiment and calculations, as well as using some new material. In particular, the absorption/desorption of H in the Mg/MgH2 system is analyzed in detail, and all relevant initial structures and processes explained. Reasons for the high stability and slow sorption in this system are noted, and possible solutions proposed. The role of the transition-metal impurities in MgH2 is briefly discussed, and some interesting phenomena, observed in complex intermetallic compounds, are mentioned. The principle mechanism governing the Li-amide/imide transformation is also discussed. Latterly, some perspectives for the metal-hydrides investigation from the electronic point of view are elucidated.

  18. Hydrogen Bonding and Related Properties in Liquid Water: A Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardia, Elvira; Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Masia, Marco

    2015-07-23

    The local hydrogen-bonding structure and dynamics of liquid water have been investigated using the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation technique. The radial distribution functions and coordination numbers around water molecules have been found to be strongly dependent on the number of hydrogen bonds formed by each molecule, revealing also the existence of local structural heterogeneities in the structure of the liquid. The results obtained have also revealed the strong effect of the local hydrogen-bonding network on the local tetrahedral structure and entropy. The investigation of the dynamics of the local hydrogen-bonding network in liquid water has shown that this network is very labile, and the hydrogen bonds break and reform very rapidly. Nevertheless, it has been found that the hydrogen-bonding states associated with the formation of four hydrogen bonds by a water molecule exhibit the largest survival probability and corresponding lifetime. The reorientational motions of water molecules have also been found to be strongly dependent on their initial hydrogen-bonding state. Finally, the dependence of the librational and vibrational modes of water molecules on the local hydrogen-bonding network has been carefully examined, revealing a significant effect upon the libration and bond-stretching peak frequencies. The calculated low frequency peaks come in agreement with previously reported interpretations of the experimental low-frequency Raman spectrum of liquid water.

  19. Nature of the Metallization Transition in Solid Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Azadi, Sam; Foulkes, W M C

    2016-01-01

    We present an accurate study of the static-nucleus electronic energy band gap of solid molecular hydrogen at high pressure. The excitonic and quasiparticle gaps of the $C2/c$, $Pc$, $Pbcn$, and $P6_3/m$ structures at pressures of 250, 300, and 350~GPa are calculated using the fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) method. The difference between the mean-field and many-body band gaps at the same density is found to be almost independent of system size and can therefore be applied as a scissor correction to the mean-field gap of an infinite system to obtain an estimate of the many-body gap in the thermodynamic limit. By comparing our static-nucleus DMC energy gaps with available experimental results, we demonstrate the important role played by nuclear quantum effects in the electronic structure of solid hydrogen. Our DMC results suggest that the metallization of high-pressure solid hydrogen occurs via a structural phase transition rather than band gap closure.

  20. Molecular metal-Oxo catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2015-02-24

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition having the general formula [(PY5W.sub.2)MO].sup.2+, wherein PY5W.sub.2 is (NC.sub.5XYZ)(NC.sub.5H.sub.4).sub.4C.sub.2W.sub.2, M is a transition metal, and W, X, Y, and Z can be H, R, a halide, CF.sub.3, or SiR.sub.3, where R can be an alkyl or aryl group. The two accompanying counter anions, in one embodiment, can be selected from the following Cl.sup.-, I.sup.-, PF.sub.6.sup.-, and CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water containing electrolyte or straight sea water can be subject to an electric potential of between 1.0 V and 1.4 V relative to the standard hydrogen electrode, which at pH 7 corresponds to an overpotential of 0.6 to 1.0 V, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen with an optimal turnover frequency of ca. 1.5 million mol H.sub.2/mol catalyst per h.

  1. Infrared spectroscopy of trapped hydrogen in metal-organic-frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Stephen; Allen, Kelty; Landerman, Patrick; Rowsell, Jesse

    2007-03-01

    We present a novel use of diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy to study the quantum dynamics of molecular hydrogen trapped within metal-organic-framework (MOF) hosts. This technique is particularly useful in the context of hydrogen storage since it provides detailed information about the intermolecular potential at the binding site. The spectra consist of quite sharp bands associated with the quantized vibrational and rotational motion of the trapped hydrogen. The vibrational bands are redshifted relative to the gas phase while the rotational sidebands contain an additional fine structure due to the orientational dependence of the binding potential. Results on MOF-5 reveal the presence of two primary binding sites. The first saturates at a loading concentration on the order of 4 H2 per Zn ion and has a binding energy of roughly 4 kJ/mole. The second has a somewhat lower binding energy. Both site produce an ortho to para conversion rate on the order of 30-50 % per hour.

  2. Performance study of a hydrogen powered metal hydride actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainul Hossain Bhuiya, Md; Kim, Kwang J.

    2016-04-01

    A thermally driven hydrogen powered actuator integrating metal hydride hydrogen storage reactor, which is compact, noiseless, and able to generate smooth actuation, is presented in this article. To test the plausibility of a thermally driven actuator, a conventional piston type actuator was integrated with LaNi5 based hydrogen storage system. Copper encapsulation followed by compaction of particles into pellets, were adopted to improve overall thermal conductivity of the reactor. The operation of the actuator was thoroughly investigated for an array of operating temperature ranges. Temperature swing of the hydride reactor triggering smooth and noiseless actuation over several operating temperature ranges were monitored for quantification of actuator efficiency. Overall, the actuator generated smooth and consistent strokes during repeated cycles of operation. The efficiency of the actuator was found to be as high as 13.36% for operating a temperature range of 20 °C-50 °C. Stress-strain characteristics, actuation hysteresis etc were studied experimentally. Comparison of stress-strain characteristics of the proposed actuator with traditional actuators, artificial muscles and so on was made. The study suggests that design modification and use of high pressure hydride may enhance the performance and broaden the application horizon of the proposed actuator in future.

  3. Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence Metal Hydride Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-05-31

    The Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) was established in 2009 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance the development of materials-based hydrogen storage systems for hydrogen-fueled light-duty vehicles. The overall objective of the HSECoE is to develop complete, integrated system concepts that utilize reversible metal hydrides, adsorbents, and chemical hydrogen storage materials through the use of advanced engineering concepts and designs that can simultaneously meet or exceed all the DOE targets. This report describes the activities and accomplishments during Phase 1 of the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE, which lasted 30 months from February 2009 to August 2011. A complete list of all the HSECoE partners can be found later in this report but for the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE work the major contributing organizations to this effort were the United Technology Research Center (UTRC), General Motors (GM), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Specific individuals from these and other institutions that supported this effort and the writing of this report are included in the list of contributors and in the acknowledgement sections of this report. The efforts of the HSECoE are organized into three phases each approximately 2 years in duration. In Phase I, comprehensive system engineering analyses and assessments were made of the three classes of storage media that included development of system level transport and thermal models of alternative conceptual storage configurations to permit detailed comparisons against the DOE performance targets for light-duty vehicles. Phase 1 tasks also included identification and technical justifications for candidate storage media and configurations that should be capable of reaching or exceeding the DOE targets. Phase 2 involved bench-level testing and

  4. Dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum under the influence of a strong acoustic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebon, Gerard S. B.; Pericleous, Koulis; Tzanakis, Iakovos; Eskin, Dmitry G.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic melt processing significantly improves the properties of metallic materials. However, this promising technology has not been successfully transferred to the industry because of difficulties in treating large volumes of melt. To circumvent these difficulties, a fundamental understanding of the efficiency of ultrasonic treatment of liquid metals is required. In this endeavor, the dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum are studied to determine the effect of a strong acoustic field on their behavior. It is shown that coalescence readily occurs at low frequencies in the range of 16 to 20 kHz; forcing frequencies at these values are likely to promote degassing. Emitted acoustic pressures from relatively isolated bubbles that resonate with the driving frequency are in the megapascal range and these cavitation shock waves are presumed to promote grain refinement by disrupting the growth of the solidification front.

  5. Key study on the potential of hydrazine bisborane for solid- and liquid-state chemical hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylypko, Sergii; Petit, Eddy; Yot, Pascal G; Salles, Fabrice; Cretin, Marc; Miele, Philippe; Demirci, Umit B

    2015-05-04

    Hydrazine bisborane N2H4(BH3)2 (HBB; 16.8 wt %) recently re-emerged as a potential hydrogen storage material. However, such potential is controversial: HBB was seen as a hazardous compound up to 2010, but now it would be suitable for hydrogen storage. In this context, we focused on fundamentals of HBB because they are missing in the literature and should help to shed light on its effective potential while taking into consideration any risk. Experimental/computational methods were used to get a complete characterization data sheet, including, e.g., XRD, NMR, FTIR, Raman, TGA, and DSC. From the reported results and discussion, it is concluded that HBB has potential in the field of chemical hydrogen storage given that both thermolytic and hydrolytic dehydrogenations were analyzed. In solid-state chemical hydrogen storage, it cannot be used in the pristine state (risk of explosion during dehydrogenation) but can be used for the synthesis of derivatives with improved dehydrogenation properties. In liquid-state chemical hydrogen storage, it can be studied for room-temperature dehydrogenation, but this requires the development of an active and selective metal-based catalyst. HBB is a thus a candidate for chemical hydrogen storage.

  6. Effects of hydrogen-bond environment on single particle and pair dynamics in liquid water

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amalendu Chandra; Snehasis Chowdhuri

    2001-10-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water at 298 and 258 K to investigate the effects of hydrogen-bond environment on various single-particle and pair dynamical properties of water molecules at ambient and supercooled conditions. The water molecules are modelled by the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) model. We first calculate the distribution of hydrogen-bond environment in liquid water at both temperatures and then investigate how the selfdiffusion and orientational relaxation of a single water molecule and also the relative diffusion and relaxation of the hydrogen-bond of a water pair depend on the nature of the hydrogen-bond environment of the tagged molecules. We find that the various dynamical quantities depend significantly on the hydrogen-bond environment, especially at the supercooled temperature. The present study provides a molecular-level insight into the dynamics of liquid water under ambient and supercooled conditions.

  7. A Liquid Hydrogen Cooler with a Cooling Capacity of 20 Watts Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For the future spaceport and long-term storage of liquid hydrogen NASA requires cryocoolers that can provide cooling power in the range of 20 watts at 20 K. The...

  8. Effect of coal-derived-liquid solvent on the hydrogenation and restrictive diffusion of nickel porphyrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.H.; Massoth, F.E.; Lee, S.Y.; Seader, J.D. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (USA). Dept. of Fuels Engineering)

    1991-12-01

    Hydrogenation of nickel porphyrins was carried out at 335{degree}C and 50 atm hydrogen pressure with two Ni-Mo/alumina catalysts of different pore sizes. Solvents employed were a triple-hydrotreated coal-derived-liquid and four pure hydrocarbons (n-decane, decalin, tetralin, and mesitylene). Reaction rates in the hydrotreated coal-derived-liquid solvent were higher than those in pure solvents with higher hydrogen solubilities. The results were attributed to the greater hydrogen-donor ability of the hydrotreated coal-derived-liquid solvent. Reaction rates of different catalyst particle sizes were used to calculate effective diffusivities under processing conditions. Reactivity was significantly affected by catalyst deactivation via coke buildup at catalyst pore mouths. Accounting for this additional diffusional constraint, restrictive diffusion in the coal-liquid solvent under processing conditions was found to be in reasonable agreement with approximate hydrodynamic theory for non-reactive conditions. 33 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Creation of Electron-doping Liquid Water with Reduced Hydrogen Bonds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Lee, Ming-Jer; Chen, Ching-Hsiang; Wang, Shwu-Huey; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The strength of hydrogen bond (HB) decides water's property and activity. Here we propose the mechanisms on creation and persistence of innovatively prepared liquid water, which is treated by Au nanoparticles (AuNPs...

  10. Polonium evaporation from dilute liquid metal solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzi, Matthias; Eichler, Robert; Türler, Andreas; Mendonça, Tania Melo; Stora, Thierry; Gonzalez Prieto, Borja; Aerts, Alexander; Schumann, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    The evaporation behavior of polonium as one of the most hazardous radionuclides produced in spallation based neutron sources with liquid lead-bismuth targets has been quantified in this study. The normalized apparent vapor pressure, i.e. the Henry constant of polonium over liquid lead-bismuth eutectic was determined in the temperature range relevant for operation of such targets, i.e. 164-500 degrees C. For comparison and better fundamental understanding, the Henry constant of polonium over pure liquid bismuth was determined in a temperature range of 300-500 degrees C. The Henry constants of polonium in this temperature range were found to be orders of magnitude higher than expected from earlier studies at higher temperatures. Possible mechanisms responsible for this unexpected behavior are discussed.

  11. Metal-Assisted Hydrogen Storage on Pt-Decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yun [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Brown, Craig [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Neumann, Dan [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Hu, Hui [ORNL; Styers-Barnett, David J [ORNL; Krasnov, Pavel O. [Rice University; Yakobson, Boris I. [Rice University

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic dissociation of hydrogen molecules by metal nanoparticles and spillover of atomic hydrogen onto various supports is a well-established phenomenon in catalysis. However, the mechanisms by which metal catalyst nanoparticles can assist in enhanced hydrogen storage on high-surface area supports are still under debate. Experimental measurements of metal-assisted hydrogen storage have been hampered by inaccurate estimation of atomically stored hydrogen deduced from comparative measurements between metal-decorated and undecorated samples. Here we report a temperature cycling technique combined with inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements of quantum rotational transitions of molecular H2 to more accurately quantify adsorbed hydrogen aided by catalytic particles using single samples. Temperature cycling measurements on single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs) decorated with 2-3 nm Pt nanoparticles showed 0.17 % mass fraction of metal-assisted hydrogen storage (at 0.5 MPa) at room temperature. Temperature cycling of Pt-decorated SWCNHs using a Sievert s apparatus also indicated metal-assisted hydrogen adsorption of 0.08 % mass fraction at 5 MPa at room temperature. No additional metal-assisted hydrogen storage was observed in SWCNH samples without Pt nanoparticles cycled to room temperature, or in Pt-SWCNHs when the temperature was cycled to less than 150K. The possible formation of C-H bonds due to spilled-over atomic hydrogen was also investigated using both INS and density functional theory calculations.

  12. An overview of hydrogen storage materials: Making a case for metal organic frameworks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Langmi, Henrietta W

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges facing the transition to a Hydrogen Economy is the development of a suitable storage medium for hydrogen. Conventionally, hydrogen is stored as compressed gas or cryogenically as a liquid. In order to meet future targets...

  13. Free surface stability of liquid metal plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiflis, P.; Christenson, M.; Szott, M.; Kalathiparambil, K.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2016-10-01

    An outstanding concern raised over the implementation of liquid metal plasma facing components in fusion reactors is the potential for ejection of liquid metal into the fusion plasma. The influences of Rayleigh-Taylor-like and Kelvin-Helmholtz-like instabilities were experimentally observed and quantified on the thermoelectric-driven liquid-metal plasma-facing structures (TELS) chamber at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. To probe the stability boundary, plasma currents and velocities were first characterized with a flush probe array. Subsequent observations of lithium ejection under exposure in the TELS chamber exhibited a departure from previous theory based on linear perturbation analysis. The stability boundary is mapped experimentally over the range of plasma impulses of which TELS is capable to deliver, and a new theory based on a modified set of the shallow water equations is presented which accurately predicts the stability of the lithium surface under plasma exposure.

  14. Stretchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Liquid Metal-Filled Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeongseob Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A stretchable metamaterial absorber is proposed in this study. The stretchability was achieved by liquid metal and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS. To inject liquid metal, microfluidic channels were fabricated using PDMS powers and microfluidic-channel frames, which were built using a three-dimensional printer. A top conductive pattern and ground plane were designed after considering the easy injection of liquid metal. The proposed metamaterial absorber comprises three layers of PDMS substrate. The top layer is for the top conductive pattern, and the bottom layer is for the meandered ground plane. Flat PDMS layers were inserted between the top and bottom PDMS layers. The measured absorptivity of the fabricated absorber was 97.8% at 18.5 GHz, and the absorption frequency increased from 18.5 to 18.65 GHz as the absorber was stretched from its original length (5.2 cm to 6.4 cm.

  15. Single-magnet rotary flowmeter for liquid metals

    CERN Document Server

    Priede, Jānis; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2010-01-01

    We present the theory of single-magnet flowmeter for liquid metals and compare it with experimental results. The flowmeter consists of a freely rotating permanent magnet, which is magnetized perpendicularly to the axle it is mounted on. When such a magnet is placed close to a tube carrying liquid metal flow, it rotates so that the driving torque due to the eddy currents induced by the flow is balanced by the braking torque induced by the rotation itself. The equilibrium rotation rate depends directly on the flow rate but not on the electrical conductivity of the metal or the magnet strength. We obtain simple analytical solutions for the force and torque on slowly moving and rotating magnets due to eddy currents in a layer of infinite horizontal extent. The predicted equilibrium rotation rate for a dipole agrees well with the magnet rotation rate measured at a stainless steel duct with a liquid sodium flow.

  16. Hydrogen bonding and related properties in liquid water: a Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Guàrdia Manuel, Elvira; Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Masia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The local hydrogen-bonding structure and dynamics of liquid water have been investigated using the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation technique. The radial distribution functions and coordination numbers around water molecules have been found to be strongly dependent on the number of hydrogen bonds formed by each molecule, revealing also the existence of local structural heterogeneities in the structure of the liquid. The results obtained have also revealed the strong effect of the ...

  17. Liquid Metal-Organic Frameworks: Formation Mechanism, Structure and Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Gaillac, Romain; Pullumbi, Pluton; Beyer, Kevin A.; Chapman, Karena W.; Keen, David A.; Bennett, Thomas D.; Coudert, François-Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Metal--organic frameworks are a novel family of chemically diverse materials, with applications in a wide field covering engineering, physics, chemistry, biology and medicine. Research so far has focused almost entirely on crystalline structures, yet a clear trend has emerged shifting the emphasis onto disordered states of MOFs, including "defective by design" crystals, as well as amorphous phases such as glasses and gels. Here we introduce a MOF liquid, a strongly associated liquid obtained ...

  18. A unified equation for the viscosity of pure liquid metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaptay, G. [Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Miskolc, Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary)

    2005-01-01

    The following unified equation has been elaborated in the present paper, to describe the viscosity of all liquid metals as a function of temperature: {eta}{sub i} = A . M{sub i}{sup 1/2} / V{sub i}{sup 2/3} . T{sup 1/2} . exp (B . T{sub m,i} / T) with {eta}{sub i}, M{sub i}, V{sub i}, T{sub m,i} being the dynamic viscosity, atomic mass, molar volume and melting point of the given metal i, and T is temperature. The above equation was tested on 101 measured points of 15 selected liquid metals, and the average values of the generally valid parameters were found as: A = (1.80 {+-} 0.39) . 10{sup -8} (J/Kmol{sup 1/3}){sup 1/2}, B = 2.34 {+-} 0.20. Based on these parameters, the temperature dependence of viscosity was estimated for 32 liquid metals. The above equation was derived by (i) combining Andrade's equation with the activation energy concept, and (ii) by combining Andrade's equation with the free volume concept. It is shown, that the activation energy and the free volume concepts have identical roots and lead to identical results. The above equation is shown to be valid for liquid semi-metals (Si,Ge,Sb,Bi), if their actual melting points are replaced by their corrected melting points, corresponding to (unstable) metallic solid crystals. The ratio of viscosity to surface tension of pure liquid metals is discussed, as well. (orig.)

  19. Seismic base isolation technologies for Korea advanced liquid metal reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, B.; Lee, J.-H.; Koo, G.-H.; Lee, H.-Y.; Kim, J.-B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    This paper describes the status and prospects of the seismic base isolation technologies for Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (KALIMER). The research and development program on the seismic base isolation for KALIMER began in 1993 by KAERI under the national long-term R and D program. The objective of this program is to enhance the seismic safety, to accomplish the economic design, and to standardize the plant design through the establishment of technologies on seismic base isolation for liquid metal reactors. In this paper, tests and analyses performed in the program are presented. (orig.)

  20. Development of oxygen sensors for use in liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nieuwenhove, Rudi [Institutt for Energiteknikk, Halden, (Norway); Ejenstam, Jesper; Szakalos, Peter [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Stockholm, (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    For generation IV reactor concepts, based on liquid metal cooling, there is a need for robust oxygen sensors which can be used in the core of the reactor since corrosion can only be kept sufficiently low by controlling the dissolved oxygen content in the liquid metal. A robust, ceramic membrane type sensor has been developed at IFE/Halden (Norway) and tested in an autoclave system at KTH (Sweden). The sensor has been tested in lead-bismuth at 550 deg. C and performed well. (authors)

  1. Coalescence of Immiscible Liquid Metal Drop on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Li, Jie; Wang, Long; Duan, Yunrui; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the wetting and coalescence of liquid Al and Pb drops on four carbon-based substrates. We highlight the importance of the microstructure and surface topography of substrates in the coalescence process. Our results show that the effect of substrate on coalescence is achieved by changing the wettability of the Pb metal. Additionally, we determine the critical distance between nonadjacent Al and Pb films required for coalescence. These findings improve our understanding of the coalescence of immiscible liquid metals at the atomistic level. PMID:27667589

  2. Hydrogen storage over alkali metal hydride and alkali metal hydroxide composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Yu; Yong Shen Chua; Hujun Cao; Zhitao Xiong; Guotao Wu; Ping Chen

    2014-01-01

    Alkali metal hydroxide and hydride composite systems contain both protic (H bonded with O) and hydridic hydrogen. The interaction of these two types of hydrides produces hydrogen. The enthalpy of dehydrogenation increased with the increase of atomic number of alkali metals, i.e.,-23 kJ/molH2 for LiOH-LiH, 55.34 kJ/molH2 for NaOH-NaH and 222 kJ/molH2 for KOH-KH. These thermodynamic calculation results were consistent with our experimental results. H2 was released from LiOH-LiH system during ball milling. The dehydrogenation temperature of NaOH-NaH system was about 150◦C; whereas KOH and KH did not interact with each other during the heating process. Instead, KH decomposed by itself. In these three systems, NaOH-NaH was the only reversible hydrogen storage system, the enthalpy of dehydrogenation was about 55.65 kJ/molH2 , and the corresponding entropy was ca. 101.23 J/(molH2 ·K), so the temperature for releasing 1.0 bar H2 was as high as 518◦C, showing unfavorable thermodynamic properties. The activation energy for hydrogen desorption of NaOH-NaH was found to be 57.87 kJ/mol, showing good kinetic properties.

  3. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-organic frameworks: The role of nuclear quantum effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahiduzzaman, Mohammad; Walther, Christian F. J.; Heine, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The role of nuclear quantum effects on the adsorption of molecular hydrogen in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been investigated on grounds of Grand-Canonical Quantized Liquid Density-Functional Theory (GC-QLDFT) calculations. For this purpose, we have carefully validated classical H2-host interaction potentials that are obtained by fitting Born-Oppenheimer ab initio reference data. The hydrogen adsorption has first been assessed classically using Liquid Density-Functional Theory and the Grand-Canonical Monte Carlo methods. The results have been compared against the semi-classical treatment of quantum effects by applying the Feynman-Hibbs correction to the Born-Oppenheimer-derived potentials, and by explicit treatment within the GC-QLDFT. The results are compared with experimental data and indicate pronounced quantum and possibly many-particle effects. After validation calculations have been carried out for IRMOF-1 (MOF-5), GC-QLDFT is applied to study the adsorption of H2 in a series of MOFs, including IRMOF-4, -6, -8, -9, -10, -12, -14, -16, -18, and MOF-177. Finally, we discuss the evolution of the H2 quantum fluid with increasing pressure and lowering temperature.

  4. Structural disorder in metallic glass-forming liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-Peng Pan; Shi-Dong Feng; Li-Min Wang; Jun-Wei Qiao; Xiao-Feng Niu; Bang-Shao Dong; Wei-Min Wang; Jing-Yu Qin

    2016-01-01

    We investigated structural disorder by a new structural parameter, quasi-nearest atom (QNA), in atomistic configurations of eight metallic glass-forming systems generated through molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures. Structural analysis reveals that the scaled distribution of the number of QNA appears to be an universal property of metallic liquids and the spatial distribution of the number of QNA displays to be clearly heterogeneous. Furthermore, the new parameter can be di...

  5. Study on Introduction of CO2 Free Energy to Japan with Liquid Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Shoji; Nishimura, Motohiko; Harada, Eichi

    In Japan, both CO2(Carbon dioxide) emission reduction and energy security are the very important social issues after Fukushima Daiichi accident. On the other hand, FCV (Fuel Cell Vehicle)using hydrogen will be on the market in 2015. Introducing large mass hydrogen energy is being expected as expanding hydrogen applications, or solution to energy issues of Japan.And then,the Japanese government announced the road map for introducing hydrogen energy supply chain in this June,2014. Under these circumstances, imported CO2 free hydrogen will be one of the solutions for energy security and CO2 reduction, if the hydrogen price is affordable. To achieve this, Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI) performed a feasibility studyon CO2-free hydrogen energy supply chainfrom Australian brown coal linked with CCS (Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage) to Japan. In the study, hydrogen production systems utilizing brown coal gasificationandLH2 (liquid hydrogen)systems as storing and transporting hydrogen are examined.This paper shows the possibilityof realizingthe CO2 free hydrogen supply chain, the cost breakdown of imported hydrogen cost, its cost competitiveness with conventionalfossil, andLH2systems as key technologies of the hydrogen energy chain.

  6. The structure of liquid metals probed by XAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipponi, Adriano; Di Cicco, Andrea; Iesari, Fabio; Trapananti, Angela

    2017-08-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a powerful technique to investigate the short-range order around selected atomic species in condensed matter. The theoretical framework and previous applications to undercooled elemental liquid metals are briefly reviewed. Specific results on undercooled liquid Ni obtained using a peak fitting approach validated on the spectra of solid Ni are presented. This method provides a clear evidence that a signature from close packed triangular configurations of nearest neighbors survives in the liquid state and is clearly detectable below k ≈ 5 Å-1, stimulating the improvement of data-analysis methods that account properly for the ensemble average, such as Reverse Monte Carlo.

  7. Study on Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption by Metal Hydride Slurries Ⅰ. Absorption of Hydrogen by Hydrogen Storage Alloy MlNi5 Suspended in Benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安越; 陈长聘; 徐国华; 蔡官明; 王启东

    2002-01-01

    The absorption of hydrogen was studied in metal hydride slurry, which is formed by benzene and hydrogen storage alloy powder. The influence of temperature on the rate of absorption was discussed using three-phase mass transfer model. It is also concluded that the suitable absorption temperature is 313 K.

  8. Designing Kitaev Spin Liquids in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masahiko G.; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Oshikawa, Masaki

    2017-08-01

    Kitaev's honeycomb lattice spin model is a remarkable exactly solvable model, which has a particular type of spin liquid (Kitaev spin liquid) as the ground state. Although its possible realization in iridates and α -RuCl3 has been vigorously discussed recently, these materials have substantial non-Kitaev direct exchange interactions and do not have a spin liquid ground state. We propose metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with Ru3 + (or Os3 + ), forming the honeycomb lattice as promising candidates for a more ideal realization of Kitaev-type spin models, where the direct exchange interaction is strongly suppressed. The great flexibility of MOFs allows generalization to other three-dimensional lattices for the potential realization of a variety of spin liquids, such as a Weyl spin liquid.

  9. Increasing the density of adsorbed hydrogen with coordinatively unsaturated metal centers in metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Kabbour, Houria; Brown, Craig M; Neumann, Dan A; Ahn, Channing C

    2008-05-06

    Storing molecular hydrogen in porous media is one of the promising avenues for mobile hydrogen storage. In order to achieve technologically relevant levels of gravimetric density, the density of adsorbed H2 must be increased beyond levels attained for typical high surface area carbons. Here, we demonstrate a strong correlation between exposed and coordinatively unsaturated metal centers and enhanced hydrogen surface density in many framework structures. We show that the MOF-74 framework structure with open Zn(2+) sites displays the highest surface density for physisorbed hydrogen in framework structures. Isotherm and neutron scattering methods are used to elucidate the strength of the guest-host interactions and atomic-scale bonding of hydrogen in this material. As a metric with which to compare adsorption density with other materials, we define a surface packing density and model the strength of the H(2-)surface interaction required to decrease the H(2)-H(2) distance and to estimate the largest possible surface packing density based on surface physisorption methods.

  10. Solubility of Iron in Metallic Hydrogen and Stability of Dense Cores in Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, Sean; Militzer, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the giant planets in our solar system, and likely a majority of giant exoplanets, is commonly explained by the accretion of nebular hydrogen and helium onto a large core of terrestrial-like composition. The fate of this core has important consequences for the evolution of the interior structure of the planet. It has recently been shown that H2O, MgO and SiO2 dissolve in liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperature and pressure. In this study, we perform ab initio calculations to study the solubility of an innermost metallic core. We find dissolution of iron to be strongly favored above 2000 K over the entire pressure range (0.4-4 TPa) considered. We compare with and summarize the results for solubilities on other probable core constituents. The calculations imply that giant planet cores are in thermodynamic disequilibrium with surrounding layers, promoting erosion and redistribution of heavy elements. Differences in solubility behavior between iron and rock may influence evolution of interior...

  11. Gas and liquid phase fuels desulphurization for hydrogen production via reforming processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoguet, Jean-Christophe; Karagiannakis, George P.; Valla, Julia A.; Agrafiotis, Christos C. [Aerosol and Particle Technology Laboratory, CERTH/CPERI, P.O. Box 361, 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G. [Aerosol and Particle Technology Laboratory, CERTH/CPERI, P.O. Box 361, 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University, P.O. Box 1517, 54006 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2009-06-15

    The present work focuses on the development of efficient desulphurization processes for multi-fuel reformers for hydrogen production. Two processes were studied: liquid hydrocarbon desulphurization and H{sub 2}S removal from reformate gases. For each process, materials with various chemical compositions and microporous structures were synthesized and characterized with respect to their physicochemical properties and desulphurization ability. In the case of liquid phase desulphurization, the adsorption of sulphur compounds contained in diesel fuel under ambient conditions was studied employing as sorbents, zeolite-based materials, i.e. NaY, HY and metal ion-exchanged NaY and HY, as well as a high-surface area activated carbon (AC), for three different diesel fuels with sulphur content varying between 5 and 180 ppmw. Among all sorbents studied, AC showed the best desulphurization performance followed by cerium ion-exchanged HY. The gas phase desulphurization experiments involved the evaluation of zinc-based mixed oxides, synthesized by non-conventional (combustion synthesis) techniques on high steam content reformate gas mixtures. (author)

  12. Liquid metal cooling in thermal management of computer chips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Kunquan; LIU Jing

    2007-01-01

    With the rapid improvement of computer performance,tremendous heat generation in the chip becomes a major serious concern for thermal management.Meanwhile,CPU chips are becoming smaller and smaller with almost no room for the heat to escape.The total power-dissipation levels now reside on the order of 100 W with a peak power density of 400-500 W/cm2,and are still steadily climbing.As a result,it is extremely hard to attain higher performance and reliability.Because the conventional conduction and forcedair convection techniques are becoming incapable in providing adequate cooling for sophisticated electronic systems,new solutions such as liquid cooling,thermoelectric cooling,heat pipes,vapor chambers,etc.are being studied.Recently,it was realized that using a liquid metal or its alloys with a low melting point as coolant could significantly lower the chip temperature.This new generation heat transfer enhancement method raised many important fundamentals and practical issues to be solved.To accommodate to the coming endeavor in this area,this paper is dedicated to presenting an overall review on chip cooling using liquid metals or their alloys as coolant.Much more attention will be paid to the thermal properties of liquid metals with low melting points or their alloys and their potential applications in the chip cooling.Meanwhile,principles of several typical pumping methods such as mechanical,electromagnetic or peristaltic pumps will be illustrated.Some new advancement in making a liquid metal cooling device will be discussed.The liquid metal cooling is expected to open a new world for computer chip cooling because of its evident merits over traditional coolant.

  13. Data acquisition and quantitative analysis of stable hydrogen isotope in liquid and gas in the liquid phase catalytic exchange process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, H. J.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, K. R.; Cheong, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Lee, S. H.; Paek, S. W.; Kang, H. S.; Kim, J. G

    2001-01-01

    A pilot plant for the Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange process was built and has been operating to test the hydrophobic catalyst developed to remove the tritium generated at the CANDU nuclear power plants. The methods of quantitative analysis of hydrogen stable isotope were compared. Infrared spectroscopy was used for the liquid samples, and gas chromatography with hydrogen carrier gas showed the best result for gas samples. Also, a data acquisition system was developed to record the operation parameters. This record was very useful to investigate the causes of the system trip.

  14. Characterization of Zr-Cu Base Metallic Glasses by means of Hydrogen Internal Friction Peak

    OpenAIRE

    Mizubayashi, H.; Nakamura, I.; Yamagishi, K.; Tanimoto, H.

    2007-01-01

    The hydrogen internal friction peak in Zr50-metallic glasses (Zr50Cu50, Zr50Cu40Al10 and Zr50Cu35Al10Ni5) was studied. The hydrogen internal friction peak was shifted exponentially to lower temperatures with increasing hydrogen concentration similarly to other Zr-Cu base metallic glasses reported in the literature. The peak height increased in proportion to the square-root of hydrogen concentration. These results were discussed in the view point of the hydrogen induced structural relaxation i...

  15. Standard practice for evaluation of hydrogen uptake, permeation, and transport in metals by an electrochemical technique

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This practice gives a procedure for the evaluation of hydrogen uptake, permeation, and transport in metals using an electrochemical technique which was developed by Devanathan and Stachurski. While this practice is primarily intended for laboratory use, such measurements have been conducted in field or plant applications. Therefore, with proper adaptations, this practice can also be applied to such situations. 1.2 This practice describes calculation of an effective diffusivity of hydrogen atoms in a metal and for distinguishing reversible and irreversible trapping. 1.3 This practice specifies the method for evaluating hydrogen uptake in metals based on the steady-state hydrogen flux. 1.4 This practice gives guidance on preparation of specimens, control and monitoring of the environmental variables, test procedures, and possible analyses of results. 1.5 This practice can be applied in principle to all metals and alloys which have a high solubility for hydrogen, and for which the hydrogen permeation is ...

  16. NATO International Symposium on the Electronic Structure and Properties of Hydrogen in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Satterthwaite, C

    1983-01-01

    Hydrogen is the smallest impurity atom that can be implanted in a metallic host. Its small mass and strong interaction with the host electrons and nuclei are responsible for many anomalous and interesting solid state effects. In addition, hydrogen in metals gives rise to a number of technological problems such as hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen storage, radiation hardening, first wall problems associated with nuclear fusion reactors, and degradation of the fuel cladding in fission reactors. Both the fundamental effects and applied problems have stimulated a great deal of inter­ est in the study of metal hydrogen systems in recent years. This is evident from a growing list of publications as well as several international conferences held in this field during the past decade. It is clear that a fundamental understanding of these problems re­ quires a firm knowledge of the basic interactions between hydrogen, host metal atoms, intrinsic lattice defects and electrons. This understanding is made particularly di...

  17. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Ceperley, David M. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Kim, Jeongnim [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-11-21

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work, we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic body centered cubic atomic hydrogen in its ground state. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transition order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of r{sub s} = 2.27(3) a{sub 0}. We compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin’s GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.

  18. LSPR properties of metal nanoparticles adsorbed at a liquid-liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhilin; Chen, Shu; Fang, Pingping; Ren, Bin; Girault, Hubert H; Tian, Zhongqun

    2013-04-21

    Unlike the solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces, the optical properties of metal nanoparticles adsorbed at the liquid-liquid interface have not been theoretically exploited to date. In this work, the three dimensional finite difference time domain (3D-FDTD) method is employed to clarify the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) based optical properties of gold nanoparticles (NPs) adsorbed at the water-oil interface, including near field distribution, far field absorption and their relevance. The LSPR spectra of NPs located at a liquid-liquid interface are shown to differ significantly from those in a uniform liquid environment or at the other interfaces. The absorption spectra exhibit two distinct LSPR peaks, the positions and relative strengths of which are sensitive to the dielectric properties of each liquid and the exact positions of the NPs with respect to the interface. Precise control of the particles' position and selection of the appropriate wavelength of the excitation laser facilitates the rational design and selective excitation of localized plasmon modes for interfacial NPs, a necessary advance for the exploration of liquid-liquid interfaces via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). According to our calculations, the SERS enhancement factor for Au nanosphere dimers at the water-oil interface can be as high as 10(7)-10(9), implying significant promise for future investigations of interfacial structure and applications of liquid-liquid interfaces towards chemical analysis.

  19. Electronic properties of hybrid metal-discotic liquid crystal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsall, R. W.; Pecchia, A.; Bourlange, A.; Movaghar, B.; Evans, S. D.; Hickey, B. J.; Boden, N.

    2003-04-01

    A new class of hybrid organic/inorganic nanostructures, comprising self-organised discotic liquid crystal layers deposited on ultrathin metal films, has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Calculations show that the periodic self-organised molecular layer gives rise to a new, hybrid electronic bandstructure, resulting in modulation of the metal film conductivity. In situ conductivity measurements during deposition of such self-organised layers confirm that the metal film conductivity is altered. Theoretical modeling also shows that the AC conductivity should show structure related to the carrier trapping and one-dimensional transport features of the self-organised layer.

  20. Ecotoxicology of heavy metals: Liquid-phase extraction by nanosorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakov, A.; Romantsova, I.; Babkin, A.; Neskoromnaya, E.; Kucherova, A.; Kashevich, Z.

    2015-11-01

    The paper considers the problem of extreme toxicity heavy metal compounds dissolved in wastewater and liquid emissions of industrial enterprises to living organisms and environment as a whole. The possibility of increasing extraction efficiency of heavy metal ions by sorption materials was demonstrated. The porous space of the latter was modified by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) during process of the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of carbon on metal oxide catalysts. The increasing of the sorption capacity (10-30%) and the sorption rate of nanomodified activated carbons in comparison with standard materials in the example of absorption of Co2+ and Ni2+ ions from aqueous solutions was proven.

  1. Generation and characterization of gas bubbles in liquid metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, S.; Gerbeth, G.; Witke, W.

    1996-06-01

    There is an ongoing research performed in the RCR on local transport phenomena in turbulent liquid metal (LM) duct flows exposed to external magnetic fields. In this context so-called MHD flow phenomena can be observed, which are unknown in usual hydraulic engineering. The field of interest covers also the influence of magnetic fields on the behaviour of liquid metal - gas mixtures. Profound knowledge on these LMMHD two-phase flow plays an important role in a variety of technological applications, in particular, in the design of Liquid-Metal MHD generators or for several metallurgical processes employing gas-stirred reactors. However, the highly empirical nature of two-phase flow analysis gives little hope for the prediction of MHD two-phase flows without extensive experimental data. A summary is given about the authors research activities focussing on two directions: (a) Momentum transfer between gas and liquid metal in a bubbly flow regime to investigate the influence of the external magnetic field on the velocity slip ration S (b) Peculiarities of the MHD turbulence to use small gas bubbles as local tracers in order to study the turbulent mass transfer.

  2. Wideband-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Injected Liquid Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterial absorbers can provide good solutions for radar-cross-section (RCS) reduction. In spite of their attractive features of thinness, lightness, and low cost, resonant metamaterial absorbers have a drawback of narrow bandwidth. For practical radar applications, wideband absorbers are necessary. In this paper, we propose a wideband-switchable metamaterial absorber using liquid metal. In order to reduce RCS both for X-band and C-band, the switchable Jerusalem cross (JC) resonator is introduced. The JC resonator consists of slotted circular rings, chip resistors, and microfluidic channels. The JC resonator is etched on a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), and the microfluidic channels are laser-etched on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can switch the absorption frequency band by injecting a liquid metal alloy into the channels. The performance of the absorber was demonstrated through full-wave simulation and through measurements employing prototypes. The experimental results showed absorption ratios of over 90% from 7.43 GHz to 14.34 GHz, and from 5.62 GHz to 7.3 GHz, with empty channels and liquid metal-filled channels, respectively. Therefore, the absorption band was successfully switched between the C-band (4–8 GHz) and the X-band (8–12 GHz) by injecting liquid metal eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) into the channels. PMID:27546310

  3. Handwritten, Soft Circuit Boards and Antennas Using Liquid Metal Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yiliang; Cooper, Christopher; Wang, Meng; Adams, Jacob J; Genzer, Jan; Dickey, Michael D

    2015-12-22

    Soft conductors are created by embedding liquid metal nanoparticles between two elastomeric sheets. Initially, the particles form an electrically insulating composite. Soft circuit boards can be handwritten by a stylus, which sinters the particles into conductive traces by applying localized mechanical pressure to the elastomeric sheets. Antennas with tunable frequencies are formed by sintering nanoparticles in microchannels.

  4. A review of liquid metal anode solid oxide fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIYA TOLEUOVA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC variant that uses liquid metal electrodes (anodes with the advantage of greater fuel tolerance and the ability to operate on solid fuel. Key features of the approach are discussed along with the technological and research challenges that need to be overcome for scale-up and commercialisation.

  5. Liquid Metal Oscillation and Arc Behaviour during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yudodibroto, B.Y.B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to obtain insight into the oscillation behaviour of the liquid metal and the arc behaviour during GMA welding. Observations of the weld pool and the arc were undertaken by visual means using a high-speed video and by analysis of the voltage. To deal with the complex p

  6. X-ray scattering: Liquid metal/vapor interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershan, P. S.

    2011-05-01

    We will review the principal x-ray scattering measurements that have been carried out on the free surface of liquid metals over the past two decades. For metals such as K, Ga, In Sn, Bi etc the surface induces well-defined layering with atomic spacing `d' that penetrates into the bulk a distance of the order of the bulk liquid correlation length. As a consequence the angular dependence of the surface structure factor observed by x-ray reflectivity displays a broad peak at wavevector transfer ˜ 2π/ d with a half width that is comparable to the width of the bulk liquid structure factor. Quantitative measurement of this surface structure factor requires correction for a singular Debye-Waller like effect arising from thermally excited capillary waves. For liquid metal alloys the layering is accompanied by chemical segregation (i.e. Gibbs absorption) that can be characterized from the energy dependence of the reflectivity. Particularly interesting are the temperature dependence and elasticity of the two-dimensional surface frozen phases that form on the surface of the Au82Si18 liquid eutectic. Surface freezing, although not observed near the eutectic points of alloys such as Au-Ge, Pd-Ge and Pd-Si, has been observed at the free surface of the glass forming alloy Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3.

  7. Ordering and dimensional crossovers in metallic glasses and liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David Z.; An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Greer, Julia R.

    2017-01-01

    The atomic-level structures of liquids and glasses are amorphous, lacking long-range order. We characterize the atomic structures by integrating radial distribution functions (RDF) from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for several metallic liquids and glasses: C u46Z r54 , N i80A l20 , N i33.3Z r66.7 , and P d82S i18 . Resulting cumulative coordination numbers (CN) show that metallic liquids have a dimension of d =2.55 ±0.06 from the center atom to the first coordination shell and metallic glasses have d =2.71 ±0.04 , both less than 3. Between the first and second coordination shells, both phases crossover to a dimension of d =3 , as for a crystal. Observations from discrete atom center-of-mass position counting are corroborated by continuously counting Cu glass- and liquid-phase atoms on an artificial grid, which accounts for the occupied atomic volume. Results from Cu grid analysis show short-range d =2.65 for Cu liquid and d =2.76 for Cu glass. Cu grid structures crossover to d =3 at ξ ˜8 Å (˜3 atomic diameters). We study the evolution of local structural dimensions during quenching and discuss its correlation with the glass transition phenomenon.

  8. Hydrogen storage in Pd nanocrystals covered with a metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangqin; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Taylor, Jared M; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Toh, Shoichi; Matsumura, Syo; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen is an essential component in many industrial processes. As a result of the recent increase in the development of shale gas, steam reforming of shale gas has received considerable attention as a major source of H2, and the more efficient use of hydrogen is strongly demanded. Palladium is well known as a hydrogen-storage metal and an effective catalyst for reactions related to hydrogen in a variety of industrial processes. Here, we present remarkably enhanced capacity and speed of hydrogen storage in Pd nanocrystals covered with the metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 (copper(II) 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate). The Pd nanocrystals covered with the MOF have twice the storage capacity of the bare Pd nanocrystals. The significantly enhanced hydrogen storage capacity was confirmed by hydrogen pressure-composition isotherms and solid-state deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The speed of hydrogen absorption in the Pd nanocrystals is also enhanced by the MOF coating.

  9. Hydrogen storage in Pd nanocrystals covered with a metal-organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangqin; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Taylor, Jared M.; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Toh, Shoichi; Matsumura, Syo; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen is an essential component in many industrial processes. As a result of the recent increase in the development of shale gas, steam reforming of shale gas has received considerable attention as a major source of H2, and the more efficient use of hydrogen is strongly demanded. Palladium is well known as a hydrogen-storage metal and an effective catalyst for reactions related to hydrogen in a variety of industrial processes. Here, we present remarkably enhanced capacity and speed of hydrogen storage in Pd nanocrystals covered with the metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 (copper(II) 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate). The Pd nanocrystals covered with the MOF have twice the storage capacity of the bare Pd nanocrystals. The significantly enhanced hydrogen storage capacity was confirmed by hydrogen pressure-composition isotherms and solid-state deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The speed of hydrogen absorption in the Pd nanocrystals is also enhanced by the MOF coating.

  10. Molecular simulation of adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen in metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingyuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2005-06-23

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are thought to be a set of promising hydrogen storage materials; however, little is known about the interactions between hydrogen molecules and pore walls as well as the diffusivities of hydrogen in MOFs. In this work, we performed a systematic molecular simulation study on the adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen in MOFs to provide insight into molecular-level details of the underlying mechanisms. This work shows that metal-oxygen clusters are preferential adsorption sites for hydrogen in MOFs, and the effect of the organic linkers becomes evident with increasing pressure. The hydrogen storage capacity of MOFs is similar to carbon nanotubes, which is higher than zeolites. Diffusion of hydrogen in MOFs is an activated process that is similar to diffusion in zeolites. The information derived in this work is useful to guide the future rational design and synthesis of tailored MOF materials with improved hydrogen adsorption capability.

  11. Hydrogenation of CO2 to formic acid promoted by a diamine-functionalized ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaofu; Hu, Suqin; Song, Jinliang; Li, Wenjing; Yang, Guanying; Han, Buxing

    2009-01-01

    Amines to an end: The basic diamine-functionalized ionic liquid 1,3-di(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl)-2-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate was prepared and used in the hydrogenation of CO(2) to formic acid. One mole of the ionic liquid coordinates two moles of formic acid to promote the reaction. Both the ionic liquid and catalyst can be reused directly after their separation from the formic acid produced.

  12. Surface entropy of liquid transition and noble metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosh, R. C.; Das, Ramprosad; Sen, Sumon C.; Bhuiyan, G. M.

    2015-07-01

    Surface entropy of liquid transition and noble metals has been investigated using an expression obtained from the hard-sphere (HS) theory of liquid. The expression is developed from the Mayer's extended surface tension formula [Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids 380 (2013) 42-47]. For interionic interaction in metals, Brettonet-Silbert (BS) pseudopotentials and embedded atom method (EAM) potentials have been used. The liquid structure is described by the variational modified hypernetted chain (VMHNC) theory. The essential ingredient of the expression is the temperature dependent effective HS diameter (or packing fraction), which is calculated from the aforementioned potentials together with the VMHNC theory. The obtained results for the surface entropy using the effective HS diameter are found to be good in agreement with the available experimental as well as other theoretical values.

  13. A Study of Eutectic Gallium Indium Liquid Metal in Microsystems and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mohammed Gamal Abdel Naser

    This dissertation studies the behavior of the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium (commonly called EGaIn) in microfluidic channels, on thin metal films and with metal powders. EGaIn is a metal alloy that is liquid at room temperature, has high surface tension and low viscosity. EGaIn forms in presence of oxygen a thin robust oxide skin that allows the liquid metal to take non-spherical shapes despite its high surface tension. The first chapter discusses properties and applications of liquid metals in general and EGaIn in more details. The second chapter studies the phenomenon of spectral colors that appear on PDMS microchannels filled with EGaIn upon applying a compression strain on it. The channels are sealed using oxygen plasma which alters the surface chemistry by attaching oxygen atoms to it and forming a thin rigid film. Buckles form on that thin rigid layer when the channel is compressed due to the difference in elastic moduli between the film and the bulk of PDMS. Optical microscopy and AFM confirmed the presence of the buckles. The third chapter presents a new method for producing liquid metal droplets by forcing EGaIn into reservoirs with designed dimensions. The dimensions of the reservoir can be easily manipulated to produce the desired drop size. We can collect the drops or embed them in PDMS. The fourth chapter studies the behavior of these drops upon contacting metal films. EGaIn drops self-run on weakly-bounded metal films to substrate in media that continuously etch its oxide skin like acid solution or under reducing bias. Our experiments show that EGaIn drops achieve the highest velocities on films of Ag over Au on glass substrates. The running mechanism is novel and has not been reported before, the liquid metal drop pulls the film from the substrate while dissolving it and running forward. The contact between the EGaIn drop and the metal film creates an electrochemical cell that leads to formation of hydrogen bubbles beneath the metal film, the

  14. Hydrogen release at metal-oxide interfaces: A first principle study of hydrogenated Al/SiO2 interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianqiu; Tea, Eric; Li, Guanchen; Hin, Celine

    2017-06-01

    The Anode Hydrogen Release (AHR) mechanism at interfaces is responsible for the generation of defects, that traps charge carriers and can induce dielectric breakdown in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors. The AHR has been extensively studied at Si/SiO2 interfaces but its characteristics at metal-silica interfaces remain unclear. In this study, we performed Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to study the hydrogen release mechanism at the typical Al/SiO2 metal-oxide interface. We found that interstitial hydrogen atoms can break interfacial Alsbnd Si bonds, passivating a Si sp3 orbital. Interstitial hydrogen atoms can also break interfacial Alsbnd O bonds, or be adsorbed at the interface on aluminum, forming stable Alsbnd Hsbnd Al bridges. We showed that hydrogenated Osbnd H, Sisbnd H and Alsbnd H bonds at the Al/SiO2 interfaces are polarized. The resulting bond dipole weakens the Osbnd H and Sisbnd H bonds, but strengthens the Alsbnd H bond under the application of a positive bias at the metal gate. Our calculations indicate that Alsbnd H bonds and Osbnd H bonds are more important than Sisbnd H bonds for the hydrogen release process.

  15. ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

    2011-07-18

    The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

  16. Assembly of metal nanoparticle-carbon nanotube composite materials at the liquid/liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Yeol; Kim, Minjung; Hahn, Joeoong; Suh, Jung Sang; Lee, Inhyung; Kim, Kwan; Han, Sang Woo

    2006-02-14

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-mediated self-assembly of metal (Au and Ag) nanoparticles at the liquid/liquid interface in the form of a stable nanocomposite film is reported. The metallic luster results from the electronic coupling of nanoparticles, suggesting the formation of closely packed nanoparticle thin films. The interfacial film could be transferred to mica substrates and carbon-coated transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. The transferred films were very stable for a prolonged time. The samples were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), TEM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SEM and TEM results show that the films formed at the liquid/liquid interface are indeed composite materials consisting of CNTs and nanoparticles. XPS measurements further indicate the presence of the interaction between nanoparticles and CNTs.

  17. Liquid Acquisition Device Hydrogen Outflow Testing on the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Engineering Design Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Greg; Statham, Geoff; Garces, Rachel; Cartagena, Will

    2015-01-01

    As part of the NASA Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Engineering Design Unit (EDU) testing with liquid hydrogen, screen-channel liquid acquisition devices (LADs) were tested during liquid hydrogen outflow from the EDU tank. A stainless steel screen mesh (325x2300 Dutch T will weave) was welded to a rectangular cross-section channel to form the basic LAD channel. Three LAD channels were tested, each having unique variations in the basic design. The LADs fed a common outflow sump at the aft end of the 151 cu. ft. volume aluminum tank, and included a curved section along the aft end and a straight section along the barrel section of the tank. Wet-dry sensors were mounted inside the LAD channels to detect when vapor was ingested into the LADs during outflow. The use of warm helium pressurant during liquid hydrogen outflow, supplied through a diffuser at the top of the tank, always led to early breakdown of the liquid column. When the tank was pressurized through an aft diffuser, resulting in cold helium in the ullage, LAD column hold-times as long as 60 minutes were achieved, which was the longest duration tested. The highest liquid column height at breakdown was 58 cm, which is 23 less than the isothermal bubble-point model value of 75 cm. This paper discusses details of the design, construction, operation and analysis of LAD test data from the CPST EDU liquid hydrogen test.

  18. A Novel Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Supported on Hybrid Polymer/Metal Oxide as Catalysts for p-Chloronitrobenzene Hydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian H. Campos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution reports a novel preparation of gold nanoparticles on polymer/metal oxide hybrid materials (Au/P[VBTACl]-M metal: Al, Ti or Zr and their use as heterogeneous catalysts in liquid phase hydrogenation of p-chloronitrobenzene. The support was prepared by in situ radical polymerization/sol gel process of (4-vinyl-benzyltrimethylammonium chloride and 3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl methacrylate in conjunction with metal-alkoxides as metal oxide precursors. The supported catalyst was prepared by an ion exchange process using chloroauric acid (HAuCl4 as gold precursor. The support provided the appropriate environment to induce the spontaneous reduction and deposition of gold nanoparticles. The hybrid material was characterized. TEM and DRUV-vis results indicated that the gold forms spherical metallic nanoparticles and that their mean diameter increases in the sequence, Au/P[VBTACl]-Zr > Au/P[VBTACl]-Al > Au/P[VBTACl]-Ti. The reactivity of the Au catalysts toward the p-CNB hydrogenation reaction is attributed to the different particle size distributions of gold nanoparticles in the hybrid supports. The kinetic pseudo-first-order constant values for the catalysts in the hydrogenation reaction increases in the order, Au/P[VBTACl]-Al > Au/P[VBTACl]-Zr > Au/P[VBTACl]-Ti. The selectivity for all the catalytic systems was greater than 99% toward the chloroaniline target product. Finally the catalyst supported on the hybrid with Al as metal oxide could be reused at least four times without loss in activity or selectivity for the hydrogenation of p-CNB in ethanol as solvent.

  19. Collaborative Research and Development on Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, M. A.; Abrams, T.; Ellis, R.; Khodak, A.; Leblanc, B.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Stotler, D. P.; Detemmerman, G.; Gleeson, M. A.; Lof, A. R.; Scholten, J.; van den Berg, M. A.; van den Meiden, H. J.; Gray, T. K.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Hu, J.; Wang, L.; Zuo, G.

    2012-10-01

    Liquid metal plasma facing components (PFCs) provide the potential to avoid component replacement by continually replenishing the plasma-facing surface. Data during the NSTX liquid lithium divertor (LLD) campaign indicate that impurity accumulation on the static lithium resulted in a mixed-material surface. However, no lithium ejection nor substrate influx was observed during normal operation. This motivates research on flowing systems for near-term machines. Experiments on the Magnum-PSI linear test-stand and EAST tokamak have begun to explore issues related to near-surface lithium transport, surface evolution and coating lifetime for exposures of 5-10s. Technology development for a fully-flowing liquid lithium PFC is being conducted including construction of a liquid lithium flow loop and thermal-hydraulic studies of novel, capillary-restrained lithium PFCs for possible use on EAST and NSTX-U.

  20. Testing of T91 steel in heavy liquid metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chocholoušek, M.; Fulín, Z.; Janoušek, J.; Špirit, Z.

    2017-02-01

    Tests of candidate construction materials for a heavy liquid metal environment are performed at Centrum Vyzkumu Rez. Tests are focused among other things on the influence of corrosive environments on the mechanical properties of T91 steel. Non-standard environments require special testing devices, which must be able to perform tests in liquid lead or liquid lead bismuth eutectic. An important issue is also the monitoring of the oxygen volume, which has an influence on the production and stability of oxide layers and therefore on crack initiation. This article presents the issue of testing steel T91 and the associated development of a testing device for slow strain rate tests, especially in liquid lead bismuth eutectic environment.

  1. Laser-induced metal reduction from liquid electrolyte precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongsoo; Choi, Choljin

    2013-11-01

    A special sort of laser methods such as direct writing of metal and thin film deposition from liquid precursors was developed for the surface processing and the localized metallization of different kinds of materials. Laser radiation initiates the chemical reaction resulted in the reduction of the metal complexes to the metals in the liquid electrolyte, followed by the metal deposition on the substrate with a high degree of the adhesion. In this study, continuous wave of Ar+ laser generated in multiwave regime with laser power from 5 to 500 mW was chosen for the Copper reduction and deposition on SiO2 substrate. In order to investigate the effect of salt precursors on the properties of the deposited structures, two kinds of electrolyte solution were prepared on the base of CuSO4 and CuCl2. It was shown that metal deposition can be initiated at the laser power of 50 mW. The width of the deposits was found to be substantially dependent on the applied laser power. Deposits were revealed as conductive layers and the resistance of the layers depends strongly on the solution temperature and the salt precursor.

  2. Liquid Metal Infiltration Processing of Metallic Composites: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sree Manu, K. M.; Ajay Raag, L.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Gupta, Manoj; Pai, B. C.

    2016-10-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) are one of the advanced materials widely used for aerospace, automotive, defense, and general engineering applications. MMC can be tailored to have superior properties such as enhanced high-temperature performance, high specific strength and stiffness, increased wear resistance, better thermal and mechanical fatigue, and creep resistance than those of unreinforced alloys. To fabricate such composites with ideal properties, the processing technique has to ensure high volume fraction of reinforcement incorporation, uniform distribution of the reinforcement, and acceptable adhesion between the matrix and the reinforcing phase without unwanted interfacial reactions which degrades the mechanical properties. A number of processing techniques such as stir casting/vortex method, powder metallurgy, infiltration, casting etc. have been developed to synthesize MMC employing a variety of alloy and the reinforcement's combinations. Among these, infiltration process is widely used for making MMC with high volume fraction of reinforcements and offers many more advantages compared to other conventional manufacturing processes. The present paper critically reviews the various infiltration techniques used for making the MMC, their process parameters, characteristics, and selected studies carried out worldwide and by authors on the development of metal ceramic composites by squeeze infiltration process.

  3. The novel metallic states of the cuprates: Topological Fermi liquids and strange metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, Subir; Chowdhury, Debanjan

    2016-12-01

    We review ideas on the nature of the metallic states of the hole-doped cuprate high temperature superconductors, with an emphasis on the connections between the Luttinger theorem for the size of the Fermi surface, topological quantum field theories (TQFTs), and critical theories involving changes in the size of the Fermi surface. We begin with the derivation of the Luttinger theorem for a Fermi liquid, using momentum balance during a process of flux insertion in a lattice electronic model with toroidal boundary conditions. We then review the TQFT of the ℤ spin liquid, and demonstrate its compatibility with the toroidal momentum balance argument. This discussion leads naturally to a simple construction of "topological" Fermi liquid states: the fractionalized Fermi liquid (FL*) and the algebraic charge liquid (ACL). We present arguments for a description of the pseudogap metal of the cuprates using ℤ-FL* or ℤ-ACL states with Ising-nematic order. These pseudogap metal states are also described as Higgs phases of a SU(2) gauge theory. The Higgs field represents local antiferromagnetism, but the Higgs-condensed phase does not have long-range antiferromagnetic order: the magnitude of the Higgs field determines the pseudogap, the reconstruction of the Fermi surface, and the Ising-nematic order. Finally, we discuss the route to the large Fermi surface Fermi liquid via the critical point where the Higgs condensate and Ising nematic order vanish, and the application of Higgs criticality to the strange metal.

  4. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-09-30

    hydrogen and carbon nanotubes using binary Fe-based catalysts containing Mo, Ni, or Pd in a single step non-oxidative reaction. (7) Partial dehydrogenation of liquid hydrocarbons (cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane) has been performed using catalysts consisting of Pt and other metals on stacked-cone carbon nanotubes. (8) An understanding of the catalytic reaction mechanisms of the catalysts developed in the CFFS C1 program is being achieved by structural characterization using multiple techniques, including XAFS and Moessbauer spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, NMR, ESR, and magnetometry.

  5. Chemomechanical Origin of Hydrogen Trapping at Grain Boundaries in fcc Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao; Marchand, Daniel; McDowell, David L; Zhu, Ting; Song, Jun

    2016-02-19

    Hydrogen embrittlement of metals is widely observed, but its atomistic origins remain little understood and much debated. Combining a unique identification of interstitial sites through polyhedral tessellation and first-principles calculations, we study hydrogen adsorption at grain boundaries in a variety of face-centered cubic metals of Ni, Cu, γ-Fe, and Pd. We discover the chemomechanical origin of the variation of adsorption energetics for interstitial hydrogen at grain boundaries. A general chemomechanical formula is established to provide accurate assessments of hydrogen trapping and segregation energetics at grain boundaries, and it also offers direct explanations for certain experimental observations. The present study deepens our mechanistic understanding of the role of grain boundaries in hydrogen embrittlement and points to a viable path towards predictive microstructure engineering against hydrogen embrittlement in structural metals.

  6. The role of hydrogen atoms in interactions involving imidazolium-based ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempter, V.; Kirchner, B.

    2010-05-01

    In the first part of this report experimental results are discussed which focus onto the importance of hydrogen atoms in the interaction of imidazolium-based ionic liquids. These include examples for the cation-anion interaction in neat ionic liquids as well as the interactions between ionic liquids and their molecular environment, water in particular. Most of the studies emphasize the importance of the C(2)-H group of the imidazolium ring for the intra- and intermolecular interactions; commonly, the interactions of the type C-H … X (X =: O, halide) are attributed to "hydrogen bonding". In the second part it is analyzed whether these interactions and their consequences fulfill the criteria set by standard definitions of hydrogen bonding. Two cation-anion co-conformations at the C(2)-H group are found. One co-conformer (in-plane) often resembles a hydrogen bond while the other one (on-top) points to a non-hydrogen bonding behavior. Furthermore, the degree of hydrogen bonding for the in-plane structure is very dependent on the anion. Spatial distribution functions show that, in general, both co-conformations are occupied. However, the question of how long a particular co-conformer is populated in the liquid state has yet to be answered. Therefore, it is concluded that the term "hydrogen bond" should, at present, be treated with care to characterize the cation-anion contacts, because of the above-mentioned difficulties. Once more it must be stressed that oversimplifications and generalizations, even for this subclass of ionic liquids have to be avoided, because these liquids are more complicated than it appears from first sight.

  7. Hydrogen absorption induced metal deposition on palladium and palladium-alloy particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia X.; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to methods for producing metal-coated palladium or palladium-alloy particles. The method includes contacting hydrogen-absorbed palladium or palladium-alloy particles with one or more metal salts to produce a sub-monoatomic or monoatomic metal- or metal-alloy coating on the surface of the hydrogen-absorbed palladium or palladium-alloy particles. The invention also relates to methods for producing catalysts and methods for producing electrical energy using the metal-coated palladium or palladium-alloy particles of the present invention.

  8. Analysis on liquid metal corrosion-oxidation interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jinsuo [International and Nuclear System Engineering, MS K-575, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: jszhang@lanl.gov; Li Ning [International and Nuclear System Engineering, MS K-575, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    The interaction between growing surface oxides and flowing liquid metals is of importance in many high temperature applications such as coolant systems using liquid lead or lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) in advanced nuclear energy systems. The impact of flow can manifest through particle erosion, mass transfer corrosion, stress scrape, etc. In the present study, we consider the continuous flow-induced corrosion by dissolution of steel components or dissociation of surface oxides. In oxygen controlled liquid lead or LBE systems, steels exposed to the liquid metals are subject to both oxidation and flow-induced corrosion. It is necessary and important to understand the corrosion-oxidation interactions for selecting structural materials and optimizing operating conditions. A comprehensive theoretical analysis of the key corrosion-oxidation interactions is presented here. Possible corrosion-oxidation mechanisms are considered and the corrosion-oxidation interactions are classified into different regimes. In each regime, a theoretical model is given. Based on the analysis, corrosion-oxidation maps are developed for selecting and optimizing the operation conditions for liquid lead-alloy systems.

  9. In-situ Hydrogen Sorption 2D-ACAR Facility for the Study of Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legerstee, W. J.; de Roode, J.; Anastasopol, A.; Falub, C. V.; Eijt, S. W. H.

    We developed a dedicated hydrogen sorption setup coupled to a positron 2D-ACAR (two-dimensional Angular Correlation of Annihilation Radiation) setup employing a 22Na-source, which will enable to collect 2D-ACAR momentum distributions in-situ as a function of temperature, hydrogen pressure and hydrogen content. In parallel, a dedicated glovebox was constructed for handling air-sensitive metal and metal hydride samples, with a special entrance for the 2D-ACAR sample insert. The 2D-ACAR setup was tested in first measurements on a Pd0.75Ag0.25 foil and on a ball-milled MgH2 powder in both the hydrogen loaded and desorbed states. The hydrogen loaded Pd0.75Ag0.25Hx sample was kept under a 1 bar hydrogen pressure to prevent partial desorption during measurements at room temperature. The collected 2D-ACAR distributions of Pd0.75Ag0.25 and Pd0.75Ag0.25Hx showed similar features as observed in previous studies. The broadening of the ACAR distributions observed for the Mg to MgH2 metal-insulator transition was compared in a quantitative manner to ab-initio calculations reported in the literature.

  10. Surface tension of liquid metals and alloys--recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egry, I; Ricci, E; Novakovic, R; Ozawa, S

    2010-09-15

    Surface tension measurements are a central task in the study of surfaces and interfaces. For liquid metals, they are complicated by the high temperatures and the consequently high reactivity characterising these melts. In particular, oxidation of the liquid surface in combination with evaporation phenomena requires a stringent control of the experimental conditions, and an appropriate theoretical treatment. Recently, much progress has been made on both sides. In addition to improving the conventional sessile drop technique, new containerless methods have been developed for surface tension measurements. This paper reviews the experimental progress made in the last few years, and the theoretical framework required for modelling and understanding the relevant physico-chemical surface phenomena.

  11. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Bagby, L F; James, C C; Jones, B J P; Jostlein, H; Lockwitz, S; Naples, D; Raaf, J L; Rameika, R; Schukraft, A; Strauss, T; Weber, M S; Wolbers, S A

    2014-01-01

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period to simulate the electric breakdown in a HV-divider chain. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131\\,kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  12. FINAL REPORT: Room Temperature Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Confined Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VAJO, JOHN

    2014-06-12

    DOE continues to seek solid-state hydrogen storage materials with hydrogen densities of ≥6 wt% and ≥50 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at room temperature and moderate pressures enabling widespread use in transportation applications. Meanwhile, development including vehicle engineering and delivery infrastructure continues for compressed-gas hydrogen storage systems. Although compressed gas storage avoids the materials-based issues associated with solid-state storage, achieving acceptable volumetric densities has been a persistent challenge. This project examined the possibility of developing storage materials that would be compatible with compressed gas storage technology based on enhanced hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquid solvents. These materials would store hydrogen in molecular form eliminating many limitations of current solid-state materials while increasing the volumetric capacity of compressed hydrogen storage vessels. Experimental methods were developed to study hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquids. These methods included 1) fabrication of composites comprised of volatile liquid solvents for hydrogen confined within the nano-sized pore volume of nanoporous scaffolds and 2) measuring the hydrogen uptake capacity of these composites without altering the composite composition. The hydrogen storage capacities of these nano-confined solvent/scaffold composites were compared with bulk solvents and with empty scaffolds. The solvents and scaffolds were varied to optimize the enhancement in hydrogen solubility that accompanies confinement of the solvent. In addition, computational simulations were performed to study the molecular-scale structure of liquid solvent when confined within an atomically realistic nano-sized pore of a model scaffold. Confined solvent was compared with similar simulations of bulk solvent. The results from the simulations were used to formulate a mechanism for the enhanced solubility and to guide the

  13. High temperature interaction behavior at liquid metal-ceramic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDeavitt, S. M.; Billings, G. W.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2002-08-01

    Liquid metal/ceramic interaction experiments were undertaken at elevated temperatures with the purpose of developing reusable crucibles for melting reactive metals. The metals used in this work included zirconium (Zr), Zr-8 wt.% stainless steel, and stainless steel containing 15 wt.% Zr. The ceramic substrates include yttria, Zr carbide, and hafnium (Hf) carbide. The metal-ceramic samples were placed on top of a tungsten (W) dish. These experiments were conducted with the temperature increasing at a controlled rate until reaching set points above 2000 °C; the systems were held at the peak temperature for about five min and then cooled. The atmosphere in the furnace was argon (Ar). An outside video recording system was used to monitor the changes on heating up and cooling down. All samples underwent a post-test metallurgical examination. Pure Zr was found to react with yttria, resulting in oxygen (O) evolution at the liquid metal-ceramic interface. In addition, dissolved O was observed in the as-cooled Zr metal. Yttrium (Y) was also present in the Zr metal, but it had segregated to the grain boundaries on cooling. Despite the normal expectations for reactive wetting, no transition interface was developed, but the Zr metal was tightly bound to yttria ceramic. Similar reactions occurred between the yttria and the Zr-stainless steel alloys. Two other ceramic samples were Zr carbide and Hf carbide; both carbide substrates were wetted readily by the molten Zr, which flowed easily to the sides of the substrates. The molten Zr caused a very limited dissolution of the Zr carbide, and it reacted more strongly with the Hf carbide. These reactive wetting results are relevant to the design of interfaces and the development of reactive filler metals for the fabrication of high temperature components through metal-ceramic joining. Parameters that have a marked impact on this interface reaction include the thermodynamic stability of the substrate, the properties of the modified

  14. Miniaturized metal (metal alloy)/ PdO.sub.x/SiC hydrogen and hydrocarbon gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO.sub.x ). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600.degree. C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sized sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  15. Miniaturized Metal (Metal Alloy)/PdO(x)/SiC Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO(x)). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600 C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sided sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  16. Effect of transition-metal additives on hydrogen desorption kinetics of MgH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anindya; Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2013-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the effect of transition-metal additives (Ti, Fe, Co, and Ni) on the rate of hydrogen desorption in MgH2. The presence of large concentrations of transition-metal impurities causes the Fermi level to shift according to the position of the transition-metal acceptor/donor levels in the band gap. This shift can lower the formation energy of native defects and increase their concentration. The resulting higher rates of hydrogen desorption enhance the prospect of MgH2 as a solid-state hydrogen-storage material.

  17. Magnetorotational Instability in a Rotating Liquid Metal Annulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantao Ji; Jeremy Goodman; Akira Kageyama

    2001-03-10

    Although the magnetorotational instability (MRI) has been widely accepted as a powerful accretion mechanism in magnetized accretion disks, it has not been realized in the laboratory. The possibility of studying MRI in a rotating liquid-metal annulus (Couette flow) is explored by local and global stability analysis and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Stability diagrams are drawn in dimensionless parameters, and also in terms of the angular velocities at the inner and outer cylinders. It is shown that MRI can be triggered in a moderately rapidly rotating table-top apparatus, using easy-to-handle metals such as gallium. Practical issues of this proposed experiment are discussed.

  18. Hydrogen bonding in the protic ionic liquid triethylammonium nitrate explored by density functional tight binding simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentel, Tobias; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    The applicability of the density functional based tight binding (DFTB) method to the description of hydrogen bond dynamics and infrared (IR) spectroscopy is addressed for the exemplary protic ionic liquid triethylammonium nitrate. Potential energy curves for proton transfer in gas and liquid phases are shown to be comparable to the high level coupled cluster theory in the thermally accessible range of bond lengths. Geometric correlations in the hydrogen bond dynamics are analyzed for a cluster of six ion pairs. Comparing DFTB and DFT data lends further support for the reliability of the DFTB method. Therefore, DFTB bulk simulations are performed to quantify the extent of geometric correlations in terms of Pauling's bond order model. Further, IR absorption spectra are obtained using DFTB and analyzed putting emphasis on the signatures of hydrogen bonding in the NH-stretching and far IR hydrogen bond range.

  19. Hydrogen bonding in the protic ionic liquid triethylammonium nitrate explored by density functional tight binding simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Zentel, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The applicability of the density functional based tight binding (DFTB) method to the description of hydrogen bond dynamics and infrared spectroscopy is addressed for the exemplary protic ionic liquid triethylammonium nitrate. Potential energy curves for proton transfer in gas and liquid phase are shown to be comparable to high level coupled cluster theory in the thermally accessible range of bond lengths. Geometric correlations in the hydrogen bond dynamics are analyzed for a cluster of six ion pairs. Comparing DFTB and regular DFT data lends further support for the reliability of the DFTB method. Therefore, DFTB bulk simulations are performed to quantify the extent of geometric correlations in terms of Pauling's bond order model. Further, infrared (IR) absorption spectra are obtained and analyzed putting emphasis on the signatures of hydrogen bonding in the NH-stretching and far IR hydrogen bond range.

  20. Technical and economic evaluation of hydrogen storage systems based on light metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jepsen, Julian

    2014-07-01

    Novel developments regarding materials for solid-state hydrogen storage show promising prospects. These complex hydrides exhibit high mass-related storage capacities and thus great technical potential to store hydrogen in an efficient and safe way. However, a comprehensive evaluation of economic competitiveness is still lacking, especially in the case of the LiBH4 / MgH2 storage material. In this study, an assessment with respect to the economic feasibility of implementing complex hydrides as hydrogen storage materials is presented. The cost structure of hydrogen storage systems based on NaAlH4 and LiBH4 / MgH2 is discussed and compared with the conventional high pressure (700 bar) and liquid storage systems. Furthermore, the properties of LiBH4 / MgH2, so-called Li-RHC (Reactive Hydride Composite), are scientifically compared and evaluated on the lab and pilot plant scale. To enhance the reaction rate, the addition of TiCl3 is investigated and high energy ball milling is evaluated as processing technique. The effect of the additive in combination with the processing technique is described in detail. Finally, an optimum set of processing parameters and additive content are identified and can be applied for scaled-up production of the material based on simple models considering energy input during processing. Furthermore, thermodynamic, heat transfer and kinetic properties are experimentally determined by different techniques and analysed as a basis for modelling and designing scaled-up storage systems. The results are analysed and discussed with respect to the reaction mechanisms and reversibility of the system. Heat transfer properties are assessed with respect to the scale-up for larger hydrogen storage systems. Further improvements of the heat transfer were achieved by compacting the material. In this regard, the influence of the compaction pressure on the apparent density, thermal conductivity and sorption behaviour, was investigated in detail. Finally, scaled

  1. Ionic Liquid Assisted Acetylene Partial Hydrogenation Over Surface of Palladium Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshidfar, Farshad; Kazemzad, Mahmood; Khanlarkhani, Ali; Rezaei, Mehran

    2016-06-01

    The loss of acetylene partial hydrogenation selectivity over bare palladium catalyst is observed by aging. In this study, 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolinium hydroxide ionic liquid (BMIm[OH]) is loaded on Pd/γ-Al2O3 solid catalyst for enhancing the selectivity and different experimental techniques such as surface area measurements and catalytic performance have been performed to characterize the modified catalyst. Results revealed that the addition of ionic liquid maintains higher selectivity of partial hydrogenation over Pd/γ-Al2O3 catalyst for more than 30h especially at the temperature of acetylene complete removal (>100∘C). The activation energies of partial and complete acetylene hydrogenation on bare and ionic liquid loaded Pd/γ-Al2O3 are also calculated and utilized to clarify the obtained results.

  2. Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M.

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the results of research on the development of new catalytic pathways for the hydrogenation of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons and the hydrotreating of coal liquids at The University of Chicago under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-91PC91056. The work, which is described in three parts, is primarily concerned with the research on the development of new catalytic systems for the hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen. Part A discusses the activation of dihydrogen by very basic molecular reagents to form adducts that can facilitate the reduction of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons. Part B examines the hydrotreating of coal liquids catalyzed by the same base-activated dihydrogen complexes. Part C concerns studies of molecular organometallic catalysts for the hydrogenation of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under mild conditions.

  3. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J.

    2017-06-20

    A method is provided for extracting hydrogen from lithium hydride. The method includes (a) heating lithium hydride to form liquid-phase lithium hydride; (b) extracting hydrogen from the liquid-phase lithium hydride, leaving residual liquid-phase lithium metal; (c) hydriding the residual liquid-phase lithium metal to form refined lithium hydride; and repeating steps (a) and (b) on the refined lithium hydride.

  4. Liquid state of hydrogen bond network in ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhkin, M. I.; Klyuev, A. V.; Sinitsyn, V. V.; Ryzhkin, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Here we theoretically show that the Coulomb interaction between violations of the Bernal-Fowler rules leads to a temperature induced step-wise increase in their concentration by 6-7 orders of magnitude. This first-order phase transition is accompanied by commensurable decrease in the relaxation time and can be interpreted as melting of the hydrogen bond network. The new phase with the melted hydrogen lattice and survived oxygen one is unstable in the bulk of ice, and further drastic increase in the concentrations of oxygen interstitials and vacancies accomplishes the ice melting. The fraction of broken hydrogen bonds immediately after the melting is about 0.07 of their total number that implies an essential conservation of oxygen lattice in water.

  5. Liquid state of hydrogen bond network in ice

    CERN Document Server

    Ryzhkin, M I; Sinitsyn, V V; Ryzhkin, I A

    2016-01-01

    Here we show that the Coulomb interaction between violations of the Bernal-Fowler rules leads to a temperature induced step-wise increase in their concentration by 6-7 orders of magnitude. This first-order phase transition is accompanied by commensurable decrease in the relaxation time and can be interpreted as melting of the hydrogen bond network. The new phase with the melted hydrogen lattice and survived oxygen one is unstable in the bulk of ice, and further drastic increase in the concentrations of oxygen interstitials and vacancies accomplishes the ice melting. The fraction of broken hydrogen bonds immediately after the melting is about 0.07 of their total number that implies an essential conservation of oxygen lattice in water.

  6. Performance of a 10-kJ SMES model cooled by liquid hydrogen thermo-siphon flow for ASPCS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makida, Y.; Shintomi, T.; Hamajima, T.; Ota, N.; Katsura, M.; Ando, K.; Takao, T.; Tsuda, M.; Miyagi, D.; Tsujigami, H.; Fujikawa, S.; Hirose, J.; Iwaki, K.; Komagome, T.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new electrical power storage and stabilization system, called an Advanced Superconducting Power Conditioning System (ASPCS), which consists of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) and hydrogen energy storage, converged on a liquid hydrogen station for fuel cell vehicles. A small 10- kJ SMES system, in which a BSCCO coil cooled by liquid hydrogen was installed, was developed to create an experimental model of an ASPCS. The SMES coil is conductively cooled by liquid hydrogen flow through a thermo-siphon line under a liquid hydrogen buffer tank. After fabrication of the system, cooldown tests were carried out using liquid hydrogen. The SMES coil was successfully charged up to a nominal current of 200 A. An eddy current loss, which was mainly induced in pure aluminum plates pasted onto each pancake coils for conduction cooling, was also measured.

  7. Metal Alloys for The New Generation of Compressors at Hydrogen Stations: Parametric study of Corrosion Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arjomand Kermani, Nasrin; Petrushina, Irina; Nikiforov, Aleksey Valerievich

    2017-01-01

    Compressors are one of the most costly components at hydrogen stations, which leads to the high price of hydrogen production. The substitution of a solid piston with ionic liquid is a promising option that may solve some of the challenges related to conventional reciprocating compressors and, con...

  8. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hua, T. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kromer, M. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Lasher, S. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, K. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Law, K. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, J. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2011-06-21

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. This joint performance (ANL) and cost analysis (TIAX) report summarizes the results of this assessment. These results should be considered only in conjunction with the assumptions used in selecting, evaluating, and costing the systems discussed here and in the Appendices.

  9. Seismic Base Isolation Analysis for PASCAR Liquid Metal Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kuk Hee; Yoo, Bong; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    This paper presents a study for developing a seismic isolation system for the PASCAR (Proliferation resistant, Accident-tolerant, Self-supported, Capsular and Assured Reactor) liquid metal reactor design. PASCAR use lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) as coolant. Because the density (10,000kg/m{sup 3}) of LBE coolant is very heavier than sodium coolant and water, this presents a challenge to designers of the seismic isolation systems that will be used with these heavy liquid metal reactors. Finite element analysis is adapted to determine the characteristics of the isolator device. Results are presented from a study on the use of three-dimensional seismic isolation devices to the full-scale reactor. The seismic analysis responses of the two-dimensional and the three-dimensional isolation systems for the PASCAR are compared with that of the conventional fixed base system.

  10. Two cylinder permanent magnet stirrer for liquid metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojarevičs, A.; Baranovskis, R.; Kaldre, I.; Milgrāvis, M.; Beinerts, T.

    2017-07-01

    To achieve a uniform liquid metal composition and temperature distribution, stirring is often necessary for industrial processes. Here, a novel permanent magnet system for liquid melt stirring is proposed. It promises very low energy consumption and options for multiple different flow types compared to traditional travelling magnetic field inductors or mechanical stirrers. The proposed system has a simple design: it consists of two rotating permanent magnet cylinders, which are magnetized transversely to the axis of the cylinders. The experimental device was developed and tested under various regimes using GaInSn alloy in a cylindrical crucible. Aluminum stirring by permanent magnets in laboratory scale is tested, and stirring impact on directional solidification of metallic alloys is experimentally investigated.

  11. A Liquid Metal Flume for Free Surface Magnetohydrodynamic Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nornberg, M.D.; Ji, H.; Peterson, J.L.; Rhoads, J.R.

    2008-08-27

    We present an experiment designed to study magnetohydrodynamic effects in free-surface channel flow. The wide aspect ratio channel (the width to height ratio is about 15) is completely enclosed in an inert atmosphere to prevent oxidization of the liquid metal. A custom-designed pump reduces entrainment of oxygen, which was found to be a problem with standard centrifugal and gear pumps. Laser Doppler Velocimetry experiments characterize velocity profiles of the flow. Various flow constraints mitigate secondary circulation and end effects on the flow. Measurements of the wave propagation characteristics in the liquid metal demonstrate the surfactant effect of surface oxides and the damping of fluctuations by a cross-channel magnetic field.

  12. Sloshing instability and electrolyte layer rupture in liquid metal batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Norbert; Beckstein, Pascal; Herreman, Wietze; Horstmann, Gerrit Maik; Nore, Caroline; Stefani, Frank; Weier, Tom

    2017-05-01

    Liquid metal batteries (LMBs) are discussed today as a cheap grid scale energy storage, as required for the deployment of fluctuating renewable energies. Built as stable density stratification of two liquid metals separated by a thin molten salt layer, LMBs are susceptible to short-circuit by fluid flows. Using direct numerical simulation, we study a sloshing long wave interface instability in cylindrical cells, which is already known from aluminium reduction cells. After characterising the instability mechanism, we investigate the influence of cell current, layer thickness, density, viscosity, conductivity and magnetic background field. Finally we study the shape of the interface and give a dimensionless parameter for the onset of sloshing as well as for the short-circuit.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of liquid metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitmann, D.

    1990-12-01

    The Knight shift K and quadrupolar relaxation rate Rq in liquid metallic systems, in which effects of bonding become increasingly prominent, are surveyed. In Rb, a theoretical calculation of Rq, including mode-coupling theory for the liquid, and the r-dependent Sternheimer factor, predicted closely the recent experimental redetermination. In Ge and in Cu-Ge and similar nearly free-electron systems, the quantitative analysis of K still poses problems, while qualitatively K(x) displays clearly a correspondence to the resistivity maximum. In metallic alloys with compound forming tendency, models based on an association (A+B from or to AB) connect K and Rq quantitatively with the heat of mixing, but the microscopic foundation of the association ansatz is uncertain.

  14. Critical concentration for hydrogen bubble formation in metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lu; Jin, Shuo; Zhou, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Wenqing; Ueda, Y; Lee, H T; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2014-10-01

    Employing a thermodynamic model with previously calculated first-principle energetics as inputs, we determined the hydrogen (H) concentration at the interstitial and monovacancy as well as its dependence on temperature and pressure in tungsten and molybdenum. Based on this, we predicted the critical H concentration for H bubble formation at different temperatures. The critical concentration, defined as the value when the concentration of H at a certain mH-vacancy complex first became equal to that of H at the interstitial, was 24 ppm/7.3 GPa and 410 ppm/4.7 GPa at 600 K in tungsten and molybdenum in the case of a monovacancy. Beyond the critical H concentration, numerous H atoms accumulated in the monovacancy, leading to the formation and rapid growth of H-vacancy complexes, which was considered the preliminary stage of H bubble formation. We expect that the proposed approach will be generally used to determine the critical H concentration for H bubble formation in metals.

  15. Oxidative Dissolution of Nickel Metal in Hydrogenated Hydrothermal Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemniak, S. E.; Guilmette, P. A.; Turcotte, R. A.; Tunison, H. M.

    2007-03-27

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility is used to investigate the solubility behavior of metallic nickel in hydrogenated ammonia and sodium hydroxide solutions between 175 and 315 C. The solubility measurements were interpreted by means of an oxidative dissolution reaction followed by a sequence of Ni(II) ion hydrolysis reactions: Ni(s) + 2H+(aq) = Ni2+(aq) + H2(g) and Ni{sup 2+}(aq) + nH{sub 2}O = Ni(OH){sub n}{sup 2-n}(aq) + nH{sup +}(aq) where n = 1 and 2. Gibbs energies associated with these reaction equilibria were determined from a least-squares analysis of the data. The extracted thermochemical properties ({Delta}fG{sup 0}, {Delta}fH{sup 0} and S{sup 0}) for Ni2{sup +}(aq), Ni(OH){sup +}(aq) and Ni(OH){sub 2}(aq) were found to be consistent with those determined in a previous solubility study of NiO/Ni(OH){sub 2} conducted in our laboratory. The thermodynamic basis of the Ni/NiO phase boundary in aqueous solutions is examined to show that Ni(s) is stable relative to NiO(s) in solutions saturated at 25 C with 1 atm H{sub 2} for temperatures below 309 C.

  16. Heat energy from hydrogen-metal nuclear interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjichristos, John; Gluck, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The discovery of the Fleischmann-Pons Effect in 1989, a promise of an abundant, cheap and clean energy source was premature in the sense that theoretical knowledge, relative technologies and the experimental tools necessary for understanding and for scale-up still were not available. Therefore the field, despite efforts and diversification remained quasi-stagnant, the effect (a scientific certainty) being of low intensity leading to mainstream science to reject the phenomenon and not supporting its study. Recently however, the situation has changed, a new paradigm is in statunascendi and the obstacles are systematically removed by innovative approaches. Defkalion, a Greek company (that recently moved in Canada for faster progress) has elaborated an original technology for the Ni-H system [1-3]. It is about the activation of hydrogen and creation of nuclear active nano-cavities in the metal through a multi-stage interaction, materializing some recent breakthrough announcements in nanotechnology, superconductivity, plasma physics, astrophysics and material science. A pre-industrial generator and a novel mass-spectrometry instrumentations were created. Simultaneously, a meta-theory of phenomena was sketched in collaboration with Prof. Y. Kim (Purdue U).

  17. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  18. Optimization of neutron tomography for rapid hydrogen concentration inspection of metal castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, M. R., LLNL

    1998-02-03

    Hydrogen embrittlement describes a group of phenomena leading to the degradation of metal alloy properties. The hydrogen concentration in the alloy can be used as an indicator for the onset of embrittlement. A neutron tomography system has been optimized to perform nondestructive detection of hydrogen concentration in titanium aircraft engine compressor blades. Preprocessing of back projection images and postprocessing of tomographic reconstructions are used to achieve hydrogen concentration sensitivity below 200 ppm weight. This paper emphasizes the postprocessing techniques which allow automated reporting of hydrogen concentration.

  19. Optimization of neutron tomography for rapid hydrogen concentration inspection of metal castings

    CERN Document Server

    Gibbons, M R; Shields, K

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement describes a group of phenomena leading to the degradation of metal alloy properties. The hydrogen concentration in the alloy can be used as an indicator for the onset of embrittlement. A neutron tomography system has been optimized to perform nondestructive detection of hydrogen concentration in titanium aircraft engine compressor blades. Preprocessing of backprojection images and postprocessing of tomographic reconstructions are used to achieve hydrogen concentration sensitivity below 200 ppm weight. This paper emphasizes the postprocessing techniques which allow automated reporting of hydrogen concentration.

  20. Short-range order in undercooled metallic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland-Moritz, D.; Schenk, T.; Simonet, V.; Bellissent, R.; Convert, P.; Hansen, T.; Herlach, D.M

    2004-07-15

    The containerless processing technique of electromagnetic levitation was combined with elastic neutron scattering in order to study the short-range order (SRO) of stable and deeply undercooled liquids of the pure elements Ni, Fe and Zr and of the quasicrystal-forming alloy Al{sub 65}Cu{sub 25}Co{sub 10}. The results deliver experimental evidence for an icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) prevailing in the investigated metallic melts.

  1. Development of insulating coatings for liquid metal blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malang, S.; Borgstedt, H.U. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Farnum, E.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Vitkovski, I.V. [Efremov Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation). MHD-Machines Lab.

    1994-07-01

    It is shown that self-cooled liquid metal blankets are feasible only with electrically insulating coatings at the duct walls. The requirements on the insulation properties are estimated by simple analytical models. Candidate insulator materials are selected based on insulating properties and thermodynamic consideration. Different fabrication technologies for insulating coatings are described. The status of the knowledge on the most crucial feasibility issue, the degradation of the resisivity under irradiation, is reviewed.

  2. Liquid Metal Thermal Electric Converter bench test module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, L.L.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.

    1988-04-01

    This report describes the design, fabrication, and test of a Liquid Metal Thermal Electric Converter Bench Test Module. The work presented in this document was conducted as a part of Heat Engine Task of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Technology Program. The objective of this task is the development and evaluation of heat engine technologies applicable to distributed receiver systems, in particular, dish electric systems.

  3. Design of Hydrogen Storage Alloys/Nanoporous Metals Hybrid Electrodes for Nickel-Metal Hydride Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. M.; Yang, C. C.; Wang, C. C.; Wen, Z.; Zhu, Y. F.; Zhao, M.; Li, J. C.; Zheng, W. T.; Lian, J. S.; Jiang, Q.

    2016-06-01

    Nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries have demonstrated key technology advantages for applications in new-energy vehicles, which play an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the world’s dependence on fossil fuels. However, the poor high-rate dischargeability of the negative electrode materials—hydrogen storage alloys (HSAs) limits applications of Ni-MH batteries in high-power fields due to large polarization. Here we design a hybrid electrode by integrating HSAs with a current collector of three-dimensional bicontinuous nanoporous Ni. The electrode shows enhanced high-rate dischargeability with the capacity retention rate reaching 44.6% at a discharge current density of 3000 mA g-1, which is 2.4 times that of bare HSAs (18.8%). Such a unique hybrid architecture not only enhances charge transfer between nanoporous Ni and HSAs, but also facilitates rapid diffusion of hydrogen atoms in HSAs. The developed HSAs/nanoporous metals hybrid structures exhibit great potential to be candidates as electrodes in high-performance Ni-MH batteries towards applications in new-energy vehicles.

  4. Design of Hydrogen Storage Alloys/Nanoporous Metals Hybrid Electrodes for Nickel-Metal Hydride Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. M.; Yang, C. C.; Wang, C. C.; Wen, Z.; Zhu, Y. F.; Zhao, M.; Li, J. C.; Zheng, W. T.; Lian, J. S.; Jiang, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries have demonstrated key technology advantages for applications in new-energy vehicles, which play an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the world’s dependence on fossil fuels. However, the poor high-rate dischargeability of the negative electrode materials—hydrogen storage alloys (HSAs) limits applications of Ni-MH batteries in high-power fields due to large polarization. Here we design a hybrid electrode by integrating HSAs with a current collector of three-dimensional bicontinuous nanoporous Ni. The electrode shows enhanced high-rate dischargeability with the capacity retention rate reaching 44.6% at a discharge current density of 3000 mA g−1, which is 2.4 times that of bare HSAs (18.8%). Such a unique hybrid architecture not only enhances charge transfer between nanoporous Ni and HSAs, but also facilitates rapid diffusion of hydrogen atoms in HSAs. The developed HSAs/nanoporous metals hybrid structures exhibit great potential to be candidates as electrodes in high-performance Ni-MH batteries towards applications in new-energy vehicles. PMID:27270184

  5. Power generation in fuel cells using liquid methanol and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is directed to an encapsulated fuel cell including a methanol source that feeds liquid methanol (CH.sub.3 OH) to an anode. The anode is electrical communication with a load that provides electrical power. The fuel cell also includes a hydrogen peroxide source that feeds liquid hydrogen peroxide (H.sub.2 O.sub.2) to the cathode. The cathode is also in communication with the electrical load. The anode and cathode are in contact with and separated by a proton-conducting polymer electrolyte membrane.

  6. Activity and selectivity of palladium catalysts during the liquid-phase hydrogenation of phenol. Influence of temperature and pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Velasco, J.R.; Gonzalez-Marcos, M.P.; Arnaiz, S.; Gutierrez-Ortiz, J.I.; Gutierrez-Ortiz, M.A. [Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain)

    1995-04-01

    Two series of highly dispersed palladium catalysts supported on alumina have been prepared by adsorption from solution, with palladium contents varying from 0.25 to 2.0 wt %. The first series was calcined at 773 K for 4 h in air, whereas the second series was just heated at 423 K for 1 h in nitrogen, before reduction. Complete dispersion of the metal has been found for the calcined catalysts, and metal dispersion was favored with low palladium contents for the noncalcined catalysts. The kinetic behavior of the catalysts has been analyzed for the liquid-phase hydrogenation of phenol in a stirred tank reactor, ensuring a chemically controlled regime for stirring speed above 750 rpm and catalyst particle below 0.08--0.16 mm in the studied conditions. Despite their higher metallic dispersion, the calcined catalysts presented lower activity than their corresponding noncalcined catalysts. The influence of hydrogen partial pressure on activity showed a reaction order of 2. The apparent activation energy resulted in 56.8 kJ/mol. Selectivity to cyclohexanone was found to be very high for all experiments. Some conclusions on the kinetic reaction rate equations and the apparent activation energies of phenol to cyclohexanone and cyclohexanone to cyclohexanol are given.

  7. The influence of reduction methods and conditions on the activity of alumina-supported platinum catalysts for the liquid phase hydrogenation of benzaldehyde in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, M.; Obata, A.; Nishiyama, Y. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    The activities of supported metal catalysts depend on various preparation variables, including the method of reduction. A variety of reduction procedures can be applied to the preparation of supported metal catalysts. Previously, the authors used a solid-liquid reduction by sodium tetrahydroborate solution for preparing supported platinum catalysts. In this reduction, platinum precursors adsorbed on supports were brought into contact with the reducing solution. The alumina-supported platinum catalysts prepared in this way were found to display interesting activities in the liquid-phase hydrogenation of {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes; they were highly selective to the formation of unsaturated alcohols. The selective hydrogenation of C=O bonds of {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes is difficult to achieve with platinum catalysts without using some additives like tin and iron. The maximum temperature that the supported platinum catalysts went through was 110{degrees}C, required for the removal of water. This thermal history is a possible reason for the catalytic activity observed. Following those observations, in the present work, the authors have further examined the influence of reduction procedures by using hydrazine as well as sodium tetrahydroborate and different temperatures common during gas-phase reduction with hydrogen. The catalytic activity has been tested by the liquid-phase hydrogenation of benzaldehyde (BAL) in ethanol under mild conditions. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Metal-activated histidine carbon donor hydrogen bonds contribute to metalloprotein folding and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedekamp, Ann; Nanda, Vikas

    2009-07-01

    Carbon donor hydrogen bonds are typically weak interactions that contribute less than 2 kcal/mol, and provide only modest stabilization in proteins. One exception is the class of hydrogen bonds donated by heterocyclic side chain carbons. Histidine is capable of particularly strong interactions through the Cepsilon(1) and Cdelta(2) carbons when the imidazole is protonated or bound to metal. Given the frequent occurrence of metal-bound histidines in metalloproteins, we characterized the energies of these interactions through DFT calculations on model compounds. Imidazole-water hydrogen bonding could vary from -11.0 to -17.0 kcal/mol, depending on the metal identity and oxidation state. A geometric search of metalloprotein structures in the PDB identified a number of candidate His C-H...O hydrogen bonds which may be important for folding or function. DFT calculations on model complexes of superoxide reductase show a carbon donor hydrogen bond positioning a water molecule above the active site.

  9. A Novel Catalyst for Liquid Phase Hydrogenation of m-Dinitrobenzene to m-Phenylenediamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Xin LIU; Zuo Jun WEI; Ji Xiang CHEN; Ji Yan ZHANG; Xin Xue LI; Xiong Hui WEI

    2005-01-01

    A novel lanthana-promoted nickel catalyst supported on silica for the liquid phase hydrogenation of m-dinitrobenzene to m-phenylenediamine was prepared by an incipient wetness sequential impregnation method. It was found that Ni-La/SiO2 catalyst exhibited high activity and stability for m-dinitrobenzene hydrogenation. Over this catalyst, the conversion of m-dinitrobenzene and the yield of m-phenylenediamine were up to 97.1% and 93.5%, respectively,at 373 K and 2.6 MPa hydrogen pressure after reaction for 1 h.

  10. Cooperativity in Surface Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding of Water and Hydroxyl at Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Ogasawara, H.; Naslund, L. A.;

    2010-01-01

    of the mixed phase at metal surfaces. The surface bonding can be considered to be similar to accepting a hydrogen bond, and we can thereby apply general cooperativity rules developed for hydrogen-bonded systems. This provides a simple understanding of why water molecules become more strongly bonded...... to the surface upon hydrogen bonding to OH and why the OH surface bonding is instead weakened through hydrogen bonding to water. We extend the application of this simple model to other observed cooperativity effects for pure water adsorption systems and H3O+ on metal surfaces.......We examine the balance of surface bonding and hydrogen bonding in the mixed OH + H2O overlayer on Pt(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) via density functional theory calculations. We find that there is a cooperativity effect between surface bonding and hydrogen bonding that underlies the stability...

  11. Metal-inorganic-organic matrices as efficient sorbents for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouz, Abdelkrim; Nousir, Saadia; Bouazizi, Nabil; Roy, René

    2015-03-01

    Stabilization of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) without re-aggregation is a major challenge. An unprecedented strategy is developed for achieving high dispersion of copper(0) or palladium(0) on montmorillonite-supported diethanolamine or thioglycerol. This results in novel metal-inorganic-organic matrices (MIOM) that readily capture hydrogen at ambient conditions, with easy release under air stream. Hydrogen retention appears to involve mainly physical interactions, slightly stronger on thioglycerol-based MIOM (S-MIOM). Thermal enhancement of desorption suggests also a contribution of chemical interactions. The increase of hydrogen uptake with prolonged contact times arises from diffusion hindrance, which appears to be beneficial by favoring hydrogen entrapment. Even with compact structures, MIOMs act as efficient sorbents with much higher efficiency factor (1.14-1.17 mmol H 2 m(-2)) than many other sophisticated adsorbents reported in the literature. This opens new prospects for hydrogen storage and potential applications in microfluidic hydrogenation reactions.

  12. Strategies for the improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of metal hydride materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui

    2008-10-24

    Metal hydrides are an important family of materials that can potentially be used for safe, efficient and reversible on-board hydrogen storage. Light-weight metal hydrides in particular have attracted intense interest due to their high hydrogen density. However, most of these hydrides have rather slow absorption kinetics, relatively high thermal stability, and/or problems with the reversibility of hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. This paper discusses a number of different approaches for the improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of these materials, with emphasis on recent research on tuning the ionic mobility in mixed hydrides. This concept opens a promising pathway to accelerate hydrogenation kinetics, reduce the activation energy for hydrogen release, and minimize deleterious possible by-products often associated with complex hydride systems.

  13. Hydrogen storage: beyond conventional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalebrook, Andrew F; Gan, Weijia; Grasemann, Martin; Moret, Séverine; Laurenczy, Gábor

    2013-10-09

    The efficient storage of hydrogen is one of three major hurdles towards a potential hydrogen economy. This report begins with conventional storage methods for hydrogen and broadly covers new technology, ranging from physical media involving solid adsorbents, to chemical materials including metal hydrides, ammonia borane and liquid precursors such as alcohols and formic acid.

  14. In situ Raman spectroscopy study of metal-enhanced hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of VO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe

    2016-11-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) has a phase transition from insulator to metal at 340 K, and this transition can be strongly modified by hydrogenation. In this work, two dimensional (2D) VO2 sheets have been grown on Si(1 1 1) surfaces through chemical vapor deposition, and metal (Au, Pt) thin films were deposited on VO2 surfaces by sputtering. The hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of VO2 and metal-decorated VO2 structures in H2 and in air were in situ studied by Raman. We found that hydrogenation and dehydrogenation temperatures have been significantly decreased with the VO2 surface decorated by Au and Pt. The enhanced hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions can be attributed to catalytic dissociation of H2 and O2 molecules on metal surfaces and subsequent spillover of dissociated H and O atoms to the oxide surfaces.

  15. Modification of Metal Complex on the Stereoselective Hydrogenation of 2,3-Butanedione

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The modification of some metal complexes on Pt/Al2O3 clusters leads to remarkable increases in both the activity and the selectivity for meso-2,3-butanediol in the stereoselective hydrogenation of 2,3-butanedione.

  16. Conformational equilibrium and hydrogen bonding in liquid 2-phenylethylamine explored by Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min; Qi, Yajing; Hu, Yongjun

    2011-04-14

    2-Phenylethylamine (PEA) is the simplest aromatic amine neurotransmitter, as well as one of the most important. In this work, the conformational equilibrium and hydrogen bonding in liquid PEA were studied by means of Raman spectroscopy and theoretical calculations (DFT/MP2). By changing the orientation of the ethyl and the NH(2) group, nine possible conformers of PEA were found, including four degenerate conformers. Comparison of the experimental Raman spectra of liquid PEA and the calculated Raman spectra of the five typical conformers in selected regions (550-800 and 1250-1500 cm(-1)) revealed that the five conformers can coexist in conformational equilibrium in the liquid. The NH(2) stretching mode of the liquid is red-shifted by ca. 30 cm(-1) relative to that of an isolated PEA molecule (measured previously), implying that intermolecular N-H···N hydrogen bonds play an important role in liquid PEA. The relative intensity of the Raman band at 762 cm(-1) was found to increase with increasing temperature, indicating that the anti conformer might be favorable in liquid PEA at room temperature. The blue shift of the band for the bonded N-H stretch with increasing temperature also provides evidence of the existence of intermolecular N-H···N hydrogen bonds.

  17. High Density Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydride Composites with Air Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Dieterich, Mila; Bürger, Inga; Linder, Marc

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In order to combine fluctuating renewable energy sources with the actual demand of electrical energy, storages are essential. The surplus energy can be stored as hydrogen to be used either for mobile use, chemical synthesis or reconversion when needed. One possibility to store the hydrogen gas at high volumetric densities, moderate temperatures and low pressures is based on a chemical reaction with metal hydrides. Such storages must be able to absorb and desorb the hydrogen qu...

  18. The role of iron compounds and hydrogen peroxideon the oxidation of metallic mercury

    OpenAIRE

    "愛甲, 博美"

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of metallic mercury with ferric and ferrous ions was studied. The results were; (1) Mercury uptake of free ferric ion increased with hydrogen peroxide, the maximum uptake was 1.0 mM. However, ferric ion was not taken up without hydrogen peroxide. (2) In the presence of ferric and ferrous ions with hydrogen peroxide, mercury uptake was maximum when the mole ratio (Fe(3+)/Fe(2+)) was 0.1.

  19. Identification of non-precious metal alloy catalysts for selective hydrogenation of acetylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Bligaard, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The removal of trace acetylene from ethylene is performed industrially by palladium hydrogenation catalysts ( often modified with silver) that avoid the hydrogenation of ethylene to ethane. In an effort to identify catalysts based on less expensive and more available metals, density functional...... calculations were performed that identified relations in heats of adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules and fragments on metal surfaces. This analysis not only verified the facility of known catalysts but identified nickel- zinc alloys as alternatives. Experimental studies demonstrated that these alloys...

  20. Liquid Hydrogen Fuel System for Small Unmanned Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-07

    propulsion plant comprised a hydrogen fuel cell system, built by Protonex Technology Corporation, which weighed 2.5 lbs and produced a maximum of 550... NASA for flight on long-endurance UAVs. 9 Aluminum was selected for both the inner and outer walls of the LH2 dewar because of its low H2...impact of cooling from air flow would ordinarily be tested in a wind tunnel, LH2 safety complicates indoor testing in a wind tunnel, as

  1. Tunable hydrogen storage in magnesium-transition metal compounds: first-principles calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Er, S.; Tiwari, Dhirendra; Tiwari, D.; de Wijs, Gilles A.; Brocks, G.

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium dihydride (MgH2) stores 7.7 wt % hydrogen but it suffers from a high thermodynamic stability and slow (de)hydrogenation kinetics. Alloying Mg with lightweight transition metals (TM) (=Sc,Ti,V,Cr) aims at improving the thermodynamic and kinetic properties. We study the structure and

  2. The impact of carbon materials on the hydrogen storage properties of light metal hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adelhelm, P.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313907854; de Jongh, P.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/186125372

    2011-01-01

    The safe and efficient storage of hydrogen is still one of the remaining challenges towards fuel cell powered cars. Metal hydrides are a promising class of materials as they allow the storage of large amounts of hydrogen in a small volume at room temperature and low pressures. However, usually the

  3. Optical studies of hydrogen above 200 gigapascals - Evidence for metallization by band overlap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, N. K.; Hemley, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Direct optical observations of solid hydrogen to pressures in the 250-gigapascal range at 77 K are reported. Hydrogen samples appear nearly opaque at the maximum pressures. Measurements of absorption and Raman spectra provide evidence that electronic excitations in the visible region begin at about 200 gigapascals. The optical data are consistent with a band-overlap mechanism of metallization.

  4. Carborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with High Methane and Hydrogen Storage Capacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    NMR , HR -MS, elemental analysis), and crystallographic information files (CIF) for LH4, LEt4, and NU-135; PXRD, adsorption excess isotherms, BET...boron, MOF, metal?organic framework, coordination polymer , porous, hydrogen, methane Vaiva Krungleviciute, Daniel J. Clingerman, Joseph E. Mondloch...framework, coordination polymer , porous, hydrogen, methane ■ INTRODUCTION Nanoporous materials such as metal−organic frameworks (MOFs) with tailorable pore

  5. The impact of carbon materials on the hydrogen storage properties of light metal hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adelhelm, P.A.; de Jongh, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    The safe and efficient storage of hydrogen is still one of the remaining challenges towards fuel cell powered cars. Metal hydrides are a promising class of materials as they allow the storage of large amounts of hydrogen in a small volume at room temperature and low pressures. However, usually the k

  6. Thermodynamic aspects of oxidation of metallic impurities and steel surfaces in heavy liquid metal melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Lavrova

    2017-03-01

    It is shown that the composition and stability of the iron-based oxide system in molten liquid heavy metals is determined by the temperature and oxygen partial pressure in the related external environment. A change in any of these parameters changes the oxide phase composition with the oxygen fraction increase or decrease.

  7. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don; Harmon, Laurel

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 LiAlH4Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the

  8. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don; Harmon, Laurel

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 LiAlH4Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the

  9. Powered by DFT: Screening methods that accelerate materials development for hydrogen in metals applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Kelly M; Chandrasekhar, Nita; Sholl, David S

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: Not only is hydrogen critical for current chemical and refining processes, it is also projected to be an important energy carrier for future green energy systems such as fuel cell vehicles. Scientists have examined light metal hydrides for this purpose, which need to have both good thermodynamic properties and fast charging/discharging kinetics. The properties of hydrogen in metals are also important in the development of membranes for hydrogen purification. In this Account, we highlight our recent work aimed at the large scale screening of metal-based systems with either favorable hydrogen capacities and thermodynamics for hydrogen storage in metal hydrides for use in onboard fuel cell vehicles or promising hydrogen permeabilities relative to pure Pd for hydrogen separation from high temperature mixed gas streams using dense metal membranes. Previously, chemists have found that the metal hydrides need to hit a stability sweet spot: if the compound is too stable, it will not release enough hydrogen under low temperatures; if the compound is too unstable, the reaction may not be reversible under practical conditions. Fortunately, we can use DFT-based methods to assess this stability via prediction of thermodynamic properties, equilibrium reaction pathways, and phase diagrams for candidate metal hydride systems with reasonable accuracy using only proposed crystal structures and compositions as inputs. We have efficiently screened millions of mixtures of pure metals, metal hydrides, and alloys to identify promising reaction schemes via the grand canonical linear programming method. Pure Pd and Pd-based membranes have ideal hydrogen selectivities over other gases but suffer shortcomings such as sensitivity to sulfur poisoning and hydrogen embrittlement. Using a combination of detailed DFT, Monte Carlo techniques, and simplified models, we are able to accurately predict hydrogen permeabilities of metal membranes and screen large libraries of candidate alloys

  10. Modeling of Plasma-Assisted Conversion of Liquid Ethanol into Hydrogen Enriched Syngas in the Nonequilibrium Electric Discharge Plasma-Liquid System

    CERN Document Server

    Levko, Dmitry; Naumov, Vadim; Chernyak, Valery; Yukhymenko, Vitaly; Prysiazhnevych, Irina; Olszewski, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    In this work we report recent results of our experimental and theoretical studies related to plasma conversion of liquid ethanol into hydrogen-enriched syngas in the plasma-liquid system with the electric discharge in a gas channel with liquid wall using available diagnostics and numerical modeling.

  11. Comment on "Protonium annihilation into $\\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ at rest in a liquid hydrogen target"

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, Claude; Barnett, B M; Batty, C J; Benayoun, M; Blüm, P; Braune, K; Bugg, D V; Case, T; Credé, V; Crowe, K M; Doser, Michael; Dünnweber, W; Engelhardt, D; Faessler, M A; Haddock, R P; Heinsius, F H; Heinzelmann, M; Hessey, N P; Hidas, P; Jamnik, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammel, P; Kisiel, J; Klempt, E; Koch, H; Kunze, M; Kurilla, U; Landua, Rolf; Matthäy, H; Meyer, C A; Meyer-Wildhagen, F; Ouared, R; Peters, K; Pick, B; Ratajczak, M; Regenfus, C; Reinnarth, J; Röthel, W; Sarantsev, A V; Spanier, S; Strohbusch, U; Suffert, Martin; Suh, J S; Thoma, U; Uman, I; Wallis-Plachner, S; Walther, D; Wiedner, U; Wittmack, K; Zou, B S

    2002-01-01

    We comment on the recent paper published by the Obelix Collaboration on protonium annihilation into pi /sup 0/ pi /sup 0/ at rest in a liquid hydrogen target ÝPhys. Rev. D 65, 012001 (2002)¿, with particular reference to the discrepancy with the results obtained by the Crystal Barrel Collaboration.

  12. Ionic liquids for extraction of metals and metal containing compounds from communal and industrial waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Lisa; Falta, Thomas; Koellensperger, Gunda; Stojanovic, Anja; Kogelnig, Daniel; Galanski, Markus; Krachler, Regina; Keppler, Bernhard K; Hann, Stephan

    2011-10-01

    In a fundamental study the potential of ionic liquids based on quaternary ammonium- and phosphonium cations and thiol-, thioether-, hydroxyl-, carboxylate- and thiocyanate-functionalized anions has been assessed for future application in advanced sewage treatment. The elimination of the metal(oid)s Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Pt, Sn, Zn and the cancerostatic platinum compounds cisplatin and carboplatin was screened using a liquid phase micro-extraction set-up. The analytical tool-set consisted of ICP-SFMS and LC-ICP-MS for quantification of metal(oid)s and cancerostatic platinum compounds, respectively. The purity of the ILs was assessed for the investigated metal(oid)s on the base of present EU environmental quality standards and was found to be sufficient for the intended use. In model solutions at environmental relevant concentrations extraction efficiencies≥95% could be obtained for Ag, Cu, Hg and Pt with both phosphonium- and ammonium-based ILs bearing sulphur functionality in the form of thiosalicylate and 2-(methylthiobenzoate) anions, as well as with tricaprylmethylammonium thiocyanate within an extraction time of 120 min. All other metals were extracted to a lower extent (7-79%). In the case of cancerostatic platinum compounds a phosphonium-based IL bearing thiosalicylate functionality showed high extraction efficiency for monoaquacisplatin. For the first time, liquid phase micro extraction with ionic liquids was applied to industrial and communal waste water samples. The concentration of all investigated metal(oid)s could be significantly reduced. The degree of elimination varied with the initial concentration of metals, pH and the amount of suspended particulate matter.

  13. Self-pressurization of a spherical liquid hydrogen storage tank in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal stratification and self-pressurization of partially filled liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage tanks under microgravity condition is studied theoretically. A spherical tank is subjected to a uniform and constant wall heat flux. It is assumed that a vapor bubble is located in the tank center such that the liquid-vapor interface and tank wall form two concentric spheres. This vapor bubble represents an idealized configuration of a wetting fluid in microgravity conditions. Dimensionless mass and energy conservation equations for both vapor and liquid regions are numerically solved. Coordinate transformation is used to capture the interface location which changes due to liquid thermal expansion, vapor compression, and mass transfer at liquid-vapor interface. The effects of tank size, liquid fill level, and wall heat flux on the pressure rise and thermal stratification are studied. Liquid thermal expansion tends to cause vapor condensation and wall heat flux tends to cause liquid evaporation at the interface. The combined effects determine the direction of mass transfer at the interface. Liquid superheat increases with increasing wall heat flux and liquid fill level and approaches an asymptotic value.

  14. Study of liquid metals as a basis for nanoscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Makoto; Ohmasa, Yoshinori

    2008-03-19

    There are two ways to proceed with nanoscience: so-called top-down and bottom-up methods. Usually, the former methods are thought of as in the province of physicists and the latter in that of chemists. However, this is not entirely true because the physics of disordered matter, especially liquid metals, is well-developed bottom-up science and it has indeed provided nanoscience with basic ideas and theoretical tools such as ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here we wish to present experimental studies on such phenomena that originate from quantum mechanical properties and subsequently lead to classical non-equilibrium processes: among these are slow dynamics due to metal-nonmetal transitions in liquids, and wetting and dewetting transitions of liquid semiconductors. Since all these phenomena are related to a spatiotemporal range far wider than that treated by the present ab initio MD simulations, it is desirable that new progress in theoretical physics be stimulated, resulting in further developments in nanoscience.

  15. Hydrogen Bonding in Ionic Liquids Probed by Linear and Nonlinear Vibrational Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Roth, C; Kerlé, D; Friedriszik, F; Lütgens, M; Lochbrunner, S; Kühn, O; Ludwig, R

    2012-01-01

    Three imidazolium-based ionic liquids of the type [Cnmim][NTf2] with varying alkyl chain lengths (n = 1, 2 and 8) at the 1 position of the imidazolium ring were studied applying IR, linear Raman, and multiplex CARS spectroscopy. The focus has been on the CH-stretching region of the imidazolium ring, which is supposed to carry information about a possible hydrogen bonding network in the ionic liquid. The measurements are compared to calculations of the corresponding anharmonic vibrational spectra for a cluster of [C2mim][NTf2] consisting of four ion pairs. The results support the hypothesis of moderate hydrogen bonding involving the C(4)-H and C(5)-H groups and somewhat stronger hydrogen bonds of the C(2)-H groups.

  16. A Low Cost, Self Acting, Liquid Hydrogen Boil-Off Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelfrey, Joy W.; Sharp, Kirk V. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a prototype liquid hydrogen boll-off recovery system. Perform analyses to finalize recovery system cycle, design detail components, fabricate hardware, and conduct sub-component, component, and system level tests leading to the delivery of a prototype system. The design point and off-design analyses identified cycle improvements to increase the robustness of the system by adding a by-pass heat exchanger. Based on the design, analysis, and testing conducted, the recovery system will liquefy 31% of the gaseous boil off from a liquid hydrogen storage tank. All components, including a high speed, miniature turbocompressor, were designed and manufacturing drawings were created. All hardware was fabricated and tests were conducted in air, helium, and hydrogen. Testing validated the design, except for the turbocompressor. A rotor-to-stator clearance issue was discovered as a result of a concentricity tolerance stack-up.

  17. Effects of carbon nanotubes and metal catalysts on hydrogen storage in magnesium nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, X; Wu, C Z; Wang, H; Cheng, H M; Lu, G Q

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports a study on nanostructured magnesium composites with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and catalytic transition metals with high H2 adsorption capacity and fast adsorption kinetics at reduced hydrogenation temperatures. Nanostructures in such a composite are shown to be responsible for improvements in both adsorption capacity and kinetics. It is found that the carbon nanotubes significantly increase the hydrogen storage capacity, and the catalytic transition metals (Fe and Ti) greatly improve the kinetics. This could be understood from the enhancement of diffusion by CNTs and decrease in energy barrier of hydrogen dissociation at the magnesium surface.

  18. Direct Observation of Hydrogen Adsorption Sites and Nanocage Formation in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, T.; Hartman, M. R.

    2005-11-01

    The hydrogen adsorption sites in MOF5 were determined using neutron powder diffraction along with first-principles calculations. The metal-oxide cluster is primarily responsible for the adsorption while the organic linker plays only a secondary role. Equally important, at low temperatures and high-concentration, H2 molecules form unique interlinked high-symmetry nanoclusters with intermolecular distances as small as 3.0 Å and H2 uptake as high as 11 wt %. These results hold the key to optimizing metal-organic framework (MOF) materials for hydrogen storage applications and also suggest that MOFs can be used as templates to create artificial interlinked hydrogen nanocages with novel properties.

  19. Synergy effects in the deformation response of thermodynamically open metal-hydrogen systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivak, L V [Perm State University, Perm (Russian Federation)

    2008-09-30

    This paper reviews how polycrystalline and amorphous metals respond to the combined effect of a nonuniform force field and a high-intensity hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion flow. It is shown that deformation effects in such thermodynamically open systems result from phase transitions occurring due to changes in the hydrogen (deuterium) concentration. The necessary and sufficient criteria for observing such synergy effects are formulated. It is shown that the deformation response in a nonuniform stress field is a very sensitive means for indicating first and second-order structural phase transitions in metal-hydrogen systems. (reviews of topical problems)

  20. Studies on Hydrogenation of Liquid Natural Rubber Using Diimide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Hanis Adila Azhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid natural rubber (LNR is a depolymerized natural rubber (NR which consists of shorter polymeric chains and lower molecular weight (Mw90% was achieved by manipulating the reaction parameters such as sources of diimide, TSH concentration, solvent, and reaction time. The optimum condition was 3 : 1 weight ratio of TSH/LNR in o-xylene at 130°C in 4-hour reaction period.