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Sample records for liquid level measurement

  1. Design, Development and Testing of a Semi Cylindrical Capacitive Sensor for Liquid Level Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagarika PAL

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper a low cost noncontact semi cylindrical capacitive type liquid level sensor has been designed, developed and tested. The semi cylindrical capacitive sensor consisting of two thin semi cylindrical metal plates separated by a gap distance and mounted around a non conducting storage tank, has been used to measure the liquid level in the tank. The measured capacitance variation with variation of liquid level is linear and obtained in the nano farad range which again has been converted into voltage variation by using proper signal conditioning circuit. Since the sensor is noncontact type it can be used for both conducting and non conducting type of liquid contained within a non conducting tank. For converting the capacitance variation in to voltage variation a series R-L-C resonating circuit has been used instead of conventional bridge circuit. Experimental results confirm the satisfactory performance of the sensor for liquid level measurement.

  2. Liquid-level Measurement with Fiber-optic Low Coherence Interferometer:Micrometer-resolution Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yan-fang; SUN Yu-xing; SUN Chang-sen

    2007-01-01

    According to the fact that the surface of liquid with low viscosity coefficient is a good reflection plane for a broadband light beam,liquid-level measurement in micrometer resolution is designed based on a fiber-optic low coherence interferometer in Michelson configuration.The wave front of the reflected light beam is well enough to form an interferogram with a beam reflected from an optic mirror mounted on a stepping scanning-motor.The central peak of the interferogram is read as a measure of the liquid level.Experimental results show that this noncontact method can reach a resolution of ±1.25 μm in the measurement range of 86 mm.

  3. The capacitive sensor for liquid level measurement, fabricated with the inkjet printing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczesny, Daniel; Tarapata, Grzegorz; Marzecki, Michał; Woyke, Michał; Jachowicz, Ryszard

    2016-11-01

    The paper reports a capacitive multisection sensor for measuring level of various liquids. Presented sensor was fully fabricated with the inkjet printing technology on thin Kapton substrate. The measurement of liquids level based on capacitive sensing is already well known technique, however the novelty of presented sensor is the technology of fabrication that was used, approach to the pattern design which combines analog and digital capacitive section and obtained self-calibration feature of whole system independently on measured liquid type. Fabricated sensor structure has dimension of 210 mm x 12 mm and the thickness approximately of 27 μm. It contains 8 digital-like sections along the sensor and one analog section which allows to fine measurements. The sensor was tested in a vessel during filling and emptying with various liquids. Performed tests exhibited the linearity of the sensor characteristic and the lack of hysteresis. Obtained sensitivity of the sensor prototype was approximately 6.8 pF/mm, but it could be easily modify on the design stage due to the fast prototyping feature of inkjet printing technology. Thanks to the flexibility of the substrate, the sensor structure can be applied to any shape of vessel. Furthermore, the sensor construction is fairly simple and costs in mass production could be extremely low. This type of sensor was design especially for autonomous cleaning and washing robots for large areas operation.

  4. Long-period fiber grating sensors for the measurement of liquid level and fluid-flow velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Neng; Luo, Ching-Ying

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development and assessment of two types of Long Period Fiber Grating (LPFG)-based sensors including a mobile liquid level sensor and a reflective sensor for the measurement of liquid level and fluid-flow velocity. Shewhart control charts were used to assess the liquid level sensing capacity and reliability of the mobile CO(2)-laser engraved LPFG sensor. There were ten groups of different liquid level experiment and each group underwent ten repeated wavelength shift measurements. The results showed that all measurands were within the control limits; thus, this mobile sensor was reliable and exhibited at least 100-cm liquid level measurement capacity. In addition, a reflective sensor consisting of five LPFGs in series with a reflective end has been developed to evaluate the liquid level and fluid-flow velocity. These five LPFGs were fabricated by the electrical arc discharge method and the reflective end was coated with silver by Tollen's test. After each liquid level experiment was performed five times, the average values of the resonance wavelength shifts for LPFG Nos. 1-5 were in the range of 1.35-9.14 nm. The experimental findings showed that the reflective sensor could be used to automatically monitor five fixed liquid levels. This reflective sensor also exhibited at least 100-cm liquid level measurement capacity. The mechanism of the fluid-flow velocity sensor was based on analyzing the relationship among the optical power, time, and the LPFG's length. There were two types of fluid-flow velocity measurements: inflow and drainage processes. The differences between the LPFG-based fluid-flow velocities and the measured average fluid-flow velocities were found in the range of 8.7-12.6%. For the first time to our knowledge, we have demonstrated the feasibility of liquid level and fluid-flow velocity sensing with a reflective LPFG-based sensor without modifying LPFGs or coating chemical compounds.

  5. Design of Liquid Level Measurement System Using Multi Sensor Data Fusion for Improved Characteristics and Fault Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANTHOSH K V Shashank Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Online validation of multi sensor data fusion based liquid level measurement technique using capacitance level sensor and ultrasonic level sensor is implemented in this work. The objectives of the proposed work is to calibrate level measurement system by fusing the outputs of fuzzy sets of Capacitive Level Sensor (CLS and Ultrasonic Level Sensor (ULS such that (i sensitivity and linearity should be improved as compared to ULS, (ii reduction of nonlinear characteristics like offset and saturation which persists in CLS, and (iii detection and identification of faults in sensors if any. These objectives are achieved by using the Joint Directors of Laboratories (JDL multi sensor data fusion framework in cascade to the outputs of both the sensor. The proposed liquid level measurement technique was subjected to testing with practical data and results show successful implementation of liquid level measurement system.

  6. Design of Liquid Level Measurement System Using Multi Sensor Data Fusion for Improved Characteristics and Fault Detection

    OpenAIRE

    SANTHOSH K V Shashank Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Online validation of multi sensor data fusion based liquid level measurement technique using capacitance level sensor and ultrasonic level sensor is implemented in this work. The objectives of the proposed work is to calibrate level measurement system by fusing the outputs of fuzzy sets of Capacitive Level Sensor (CLS) and Ultrasonic Level Sensor (ULS) such that (i) sensitivity and linearity should be improved as compared to ULS, (ii) reduction of nonlinear characteristics like offset and sat...

  7. Long-Period Fiber Grating Sensors for the Measurement of Liquid Level and Fluid-Flow Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Neng Wang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and assessment of two types of Long Period Fiber Grating (LPFG-based sensors including a mobile liquid level sensor and a reflective sensor for the measurement of liquid level and fluid-flow velocity. Shewhart control charts were used to assess the liquid level sensing capacity and reliability of the mobile CO2-laser engraved LPFG sensor. There were ten groups of different liquid level experiment and each group underwent ten repeated wavelength shift measurements. The results showed that all measurands were within the control limits; thus, this mobile sensor was reliable and exhibited at least 100-cm liquid level measurement capacity. In addition, a reflective sensor consisting of five LPFGs in series with a reflective end has been developed to evaluate the liquid level and fluid-flow velocity. These five LPFGs were fabricated by the electrical arc discharge method and the reflective end was coated with silver by Tollen’s test. After each liquid level experiment was performed five times, the average values of the resonance wavelength shifts for LPFG Nos. 1–5 were in the range of 1.35–9.14 nm. The experimental findings showed that the reflective sensor could be used to automatically monitor five fixed liquid levels. This reflective sensor also exhibited at least 100-cm liquid level measurement capacity. The mechanism of the fluid-flow velocity sensor was based on analyzing the relationship among the optical power, time, and the LPFG’s length. There were two types of fluid-flow velocity measurements: inflow and drainage processes. The differences between the LPFG-based fluid-flow velocities and the measured average fluid-flow velocities were found in the range of 8.7–12.6%. For the first time to our knowledge, we have demonstrated the feasibility of liquid level and fluid-flow velocity sensing with a reflective LPFG-based sensor without modifying LPFGs or coating chemical compounds.

  8. A Measurement of the Absorption of Liquid Argon Scintillation Light by Dissolved Nitrogen at the Part-Per-Million Level

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, B. J. P.; Chiu, C. S.; J. M. Conrad; Ignarra, C. M.; Katori, T.; Toups, M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the absorption length of scintillation light in liquid argon due to dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million (ppm) level. We inject controlled quantities of nitrogen into a high purity volume of liquid argon and monitor the light yield from an alpha source. The source is placed at different distances from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube assembly. By comparing the light yield from each position we extract the absorption cross section of nitrogen. We find that n...

  9. Liquid Level Measurement in Oil Tanks Based on Double-differential Pressure Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The system principle and configuration of the double-differential pressure method for measuring oil tank level are presented. The fundamental method and circuit of fiber optic transmission are analyzed .The accuracy and security of level measurement in the oil tanks have been greatly improved.

  10. A Liquid Level Measurement Technique Outside a Sealed Metal Container Based on Ultrasonic Impedance and Echo Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The proposed method for measuring the liquid level focuses on the ultrasonic impedance and echo energy inside a metal wall, to which the sensor is attached directly, not on ultrasonic waves that penetrate the gas–liquid medium of a container. Firstly, by analyzing the sound field distribution characteristics of the sensor in a metal wall, this paper proposes the concept of an "energy circle" and discusses how to calculate echo energy under three different states in detail. Meanwhile, an ultrasonic transmitting and receiving circuit is designed to convert the echo energy inside the energy circle into its equivalent electric power. Secondly, in order to find the two critical states of the energy circle in the process of liquid level detection, a program is designed to help with calculating two critical positions automatically. Finally, the proposed method is evaluated through a series of experiments, and the experimental results indicate that the proposed method is effective and accurate in calibration of the liquid level outside a sealed metal container.

  11. A Liquid Level Measurement Technique Outside a Sealed Metal Container Based on Ultrasonic Impedance and Echo Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Wei, Yue-Juan; Liu, Wen-Yi; Zhang, Yan-Jun; Yao, Zong; Zhao, Li-Hui; Xiong, Ji-Jun

    2017-01-19

    The proposed method for measuring the liquid level focuses on the ultrasonic impedance and echo energy inside a metal wall, to which the sensor is attached directly, not on ultrasonic waves that penetrate the gas-liquid medium of a container. Firstly, by analyzing the sound field distribution characteristics of the sensor in a metal wall, this paper proposes the concept of an "energy circle" and discusses how to calculate echo energy under three different states in detail. Meanwhile, an ultrasonic transmitting and receiving circuit is designed to convert the echo energy inside the energy circle into its equivalent electric power. Secondly, in order to find the two critical states of the energy circle in the process of liquid level detection, a program is designed to help with calculating two critical positions automatically. Finally, the proposed method is evaluated through a series of experiments, and the experimental results indicate that the proposed method is effective and accurate in calibration of the liquid level outside a sealed metal container.

  12. Study on the measurement method of oil well’s dynamic liquid level based on air column resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Gan, Liqun; Zhou, Pan; Li, Taifu; Gu, Xiaohua

    2017-08-01

    A method measuring the depth of liquid surface of oil well based on the resonance principle of air column is proposed in this paper. In the method, air resonance in casing pipe is inspired by sending white noise to oil well continuously, and then dynamic liquid level of oil well can be calculated by analysing frequency spectrum of the experimental resonance signal. Aiming at the problem that the resonance signal contains a lot of white noise, firstly, convolution window function with stronger filtering characteristics is used to improve the signal to noise ratio; then the method of Welch multi segment average power spectrum is used to eliminate noise interference further in frequency domain; finally, the real resonance frequency is measured on the base of the smooth and clear Welch power spectrum, and the depth of the oil well can be estimated effectively. The experimental results show that the above signal processing method can greatly improve the accuracy of measuring the dynamic liquid level depth.

  13. Helium II level measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, D.; Hilton, D. K.; Zhang, T.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, a survey of cryogenic liquid level measurement techniques applicable to superfluid helium (He II) is given. The survey includes both continuous and discrete measurement techniques. A number of different probes and controlling circuits for this purpose have been described in the literature. They fall into one of the following categories: capacitive liquid level gauges, superconducting wire liquid level gauges, thermodynamic (heat transfer-based) liquid level gauges, resistive gauges, ultrasound and transmission line-based level detectors. The present paper reviews these techniques and their suitability for He II service. In addition to these methods, techniques for measuring the total liquid volume and mass gauging are also discussed.

  14. Research on Influential Factors Analysis and Uncertainty Evaluation About Connected Liquid Level Sensor System Online Measuring Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, L.; Liu, J.

    The accuracy of damage alarming and damage identification of bridge structural and the reliability of reliability evaluation and the fatigue life evaluation depend on the data of sensor. At present, sample calibration is only done hi the initial installation of sensors of the sensing system for long-term monitoring of the bridge and generally is not done in using. So whether the system is stable and reliable is unable to be known. In this paper, on the model of connected liquid level sensor system, value traceability approach of sensor system online measuring method is studied by the field experiment and theory research based on technical index of measurement (output displacement) proposed by output parameters of integrated deflection sensing system. Applicable connected liquid level sensor system online measuring method is established and influential factors and the uncertainty are analyzed. Finally the applicable scope of the method is obtained. This paper has made the beneficial exploration on online measurement of the instrument after the installation of the bridge health monitoring system.

  15. A Measurement of the Absorption of Liquid Argon Scintillation Light by Dissolved Nitrogen at the Part-Per-Million Level

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, B J P; Conrad, J M; Ignarra, C M; Katori, T; Toups, M

    2013-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the absorption length of scintillation light in liquid argon due to dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million (ppm) level. We inject controlled quantities of nitrogen into a high purity volume of liquid argon and monitor the light yield from an alpha source. The source is placed at different distances from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube assembly. By comparing the light yield from each position we extract the absorption cross section of nitrogen. We find that nitrogen absorbs argon scintillation light with strength of $\\left(1.51\\pm 0.15\\right)\\times10^{-4} \\;\\mathrm{cm^{-1} ppm^{-1}}$, corresponding to an absorption cross section of $\\left(4.99 \\pm 0.51 \\right)\\times10^{-21}\\;\\mathrm{cm^{2} molecule^{-1}}$. We obtain the relationship between absorption length and nitrogen concentration over the 0 to 50 ppm range and discuss the implications for the design and data analysis of future large liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) detectors. Our results indicate that for a ...

  16. A Measurement of the Absorption of Liquid Argon Scintillation Light by Dissolved Nitrogen at the Part-Per-Million Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B. J.P. [MIT, LNS; Chiu, C. S. [MIT, LNS; Conrad, J. M. [MIT, LNS; Ignarra, C. M. [MIT, LNS; Katori, T. [MIT, LNS; Toups, M. [MIT, LNS

    2013-07-24

    Here we report on a measurement of the absorption length of scintillation light in liquid argon due to dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million (ppm)level. We inject controlled quantities of nitrogen into a high purity volume of liquid argon and monitor the light yield from an alpha source.The source is placed at different distances from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube assembly. By comparing the light yield from each position we extract the absorption cross section of nitrogen. We find that nitrogen absorbs argon scintillation light with strength of (1.51±0.15) × 10$-$4 cm$-$1ppm$-$1, correspondingto an absorption cross section of (4.99±0.51) × 10$-$21 cm2 molecule$-$1.We obtain the relationship between absorption length and nitrogenconcentration over the 0 to 50 ppm range and discuss the implicationsfor the design and data analysis of future large liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC)detectors. Our results indicate that for a current-generation LArTPC, wherea concentration of 2 parts per million of nitrogen is expected, the attenuationlength due to nitrogen will be 30±3 meters.

  17. Tethered float liquid level sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, III, William Dean

    2016-09-06

    An apparatus for sensing the level of a liquid includes a float, a tether attached to the float, a pulley attached to the tether, a rotation sensor connected to the pulley that senses vertical movement of said float and senses the level of the liquid.

  18. Low-level measurements with liquid scintillation spectrometry development and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenhofer, F. [Federal Inst. for Food Control and Research, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-03-01

    Since the availability of a commerical low-level counter a large number of applications has been introduced, many well known applications have been improved. Here only a few typical examples can be given - mostly work done in the authors laboratory. The instruments used were the `Quantulus` from Wallac Oy, Finland (we have four of them), vials were in nearly all cases PTFE-coated PE vials from Zinsser, Germany and the cocktails used were from Zinsser, Germany and Packard Instrument BV, Netherlands. All LLD`s mentioned in this paper are based on 3 sigma of the background for a 500 min count. (orig.)

  19. Liquid Metal Dynamo Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, W. J.; Choi, Y. H.; Hardy, B. S.; Brown, M. R.

    1997-11-01

    Detection of convected magnetic fields in a small-scale liquid metal dynamo is attempted. Initial experiments will focus on the conversion of toroidal to poloidal flux (a version of the ω effect). A precision vector magnetometer will be used to measure the effect of a rotating magnetofluid on a static magnetic field. Water will be used as a control medium and effects will be compared with a conducting medium (liquid sodium or NaK). A small spherical flask (0.16 m diameter) houses 2 liters of fluid, a teflon stirrer creates an asymmetrical flow pattern, and Helmholtz coils generate a constant magnetic field on the order of 10 gauss. The Reynold's number will be of order unity.

  20. Methane Liquid Level Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Technologies Group, Inc. proposes the development of a Methane Liquid-Level Sensor, (MLS) for In-Space cryogenic storage capable of continuous monitoring of...

  1. Liquid Drop Measuring Device for Analyzing Liquid Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the correlation between certain properties of liquid and the properties of the corresponding liquid drop formed under given conditions, a liquid drop measuring device is utilized to monitor the drop formation process of the liquid sample with photoelectric measuring methods. The mechanical and optical characteristic of the liquid is explored with the optical fibers from the internal of the liquid drop during its formation. The drop head capacitor is utilized to monitor the growth process of the liquid drop to gain the drop volume information related to the physical property of liquid. The unique liquid drop trace containing the integrated properties of liquid is generated, and it is proved by experiment that for different liquids their liquid drop traces are different. The analysis on liquid properties and discrimination between different liquids can be proceeded with the liquid drop trace obtained by the liquid drop measuring device.

  2. In-fiber quasi-Michelson interferometer for liquid level measurement with a core-cladding-modes fiber end-face mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Qiangzhou; Qiao, Xueguang; Du, Yanying; Sun, Hao; Feng, Dingyi; Wang, Ruohui; Hu, Manli; Feng, Zhongyao

    2014-06-01

    An in-fiber quasi-Michelson interferometer (IFQMI) working on reflection is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for liquid level measurement. The device consists of a short piece of small-core fiber (SCF) followed by a standard single-mode fiber (SMF) where its end-face is terminated by a thick silver film. A well-defined interference pattern is obtained as the result of the fiber-core mismatch and core-cladding modes interference. The proposed device with a 30 mm pigtail SMF at a wavelength of 1555 nm presents a water level sensitivity of -68.3 pm/mm. Besides, the proposed device can also discriminate the refractive index (RI) of liquid measured. The IFQMI with 50 mm-long SMF provides a high RI sensitivity of -1200.61 (pm/mm)/RIU.

  3. Design of Ultrasonic Measurement System for Complex Inner Drum Liquid Level%复杂内筒的超声波液量检测仪设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李勇; 何耀欣; 李刚

    2016-01-01

    In order to measure the liquid level of complex inner drum,an ultrasonic measurement system was designed based on principle of ultrasonic liquid level detection. Composite piezoelectric ceramic probe was adopted. The probe can detect difference of the two echo singles.Experiment results indicate that the difference between echo signal of air and that of liquid after 100 μm is maximum.Measurement accuracy of the ultrasonic measurement system is tested when tilt angle of counterrecoil is less than 30°.The height error of liquid level is less than 1.4 cm and correspondingly volume error is less than 0.15 cm.Live-fire test indicates that test value and actual value have good conformity.%为准确方便快速地测量复杂内筒的液位,设计了超声波液量检测仪。对比采用灵敏度较高的复合压电陶瓷探头,可明显地测出气液回波差异。实验结果表明:100μm后气液的回波包络差别最大,可用来进行气液界面的分辨。以某型复进机为例,验证了复进机倾斜角度在0~30°之间时检测仪测量精度的稳定性。测试结果显示液位高度误差小于1.4 cm,容量误差小于0.15 cm,实装测试表明测试值与实际值具有良好的一致性。

  4. Liquid Level Estimation in Dynamic Condition using Kalman Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Kapale

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to estimate true liquid level of tank from noisy measurements due to dynamic conditions using kalman filter algorithm. We proposed kalman filter based approach to reduce noise in liquid level measurement system due to effect like sloshing. The function of kalman filter is to reduce error in liquid level measurement that produced from sensor resulting from effect like sloshing in dynamic environment. A prototype model was constructed and placed in dynamic condition, level data was acquired using ultrasonic sensor to verify the effectiveness of kalman filter. The tabulated data are shown for comparison of accuracy and error analysis between both measurements with Kalman filter and statistical averaging filter. After several test with different liquid levels and analysis of the recorded data, the technique shows the usefulness in liquid level measurement application in dynamic condition.

  5. Measurements in liquid fuel sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigier, N.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for studying the events directly preceding combustion in the liquid fuel sprays are being used to provide information as a function of space and time on droplet size, shape, number density, position, angle of flight and velocity. Spray chambers were designed and constructed for: (1) air-assist liquid fuel research sprays; (2) high pressure and temperature chamber for pulsed diesel fuel sprays; and (3) coal-water slurry sprays. Recent results utilizing photography, cinematography, and calibration of the Malvern particle sizer are reported. Systems for simultaneous measurement of velocity and particle size distributions using laser Doppler anemometry interferometry and the application of holography in liquid fuel sprays are being calibrated.

  6. Liquid level sensor using ultrasonic Lamb waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharov, V E; Kuznetsov, S A; Zaitsev, B D; Kuznetsova, I E; Joshi, S G

    2003-06-01

    This paper describes a novel, noninvasive method for measurement of liquid level in closed metal tanks that are under high pressure. It is based on the use of ultrasonic Lamb waves propagating along the tank wall. Contact with liquid substantially changes the characteristics of these waves and this can be used as an indicator of liquid presence. Theoretical analysis shows that the symmetric and antisymmetric Lamb wave modes, both fundamental and higher order, are sensitive to presence of the liquid. The optimal wave frequency depends on the thickness of the tank wall and wall material. A prototype level sensor based on this principle has been developed. It uses two pairs of wedge transducers to generate and detect Lamb waves propagating along the circumference of the gas tank. An operating frequency of 100 kHz is found to be optimal for use with tanks having a wall thickness of 30-50 mm. Prototype sensors developed under this program have been used successfully in oil fields in the far northern region of Russia.

  7. Convenient liquidity measure for Financial markets

    OpenAIRE

    Oleh Danyliv; Bruce Bland; Daniel Nicholass

    2014-01-01

    A liquidity measure based on consideration and price range is proposed. Initially defined for daily data, Liquidity Index (LIX) can also be estimated via intraday data by using a time scaling mechanism. The link between LIX and the liquidity measure based on weighted average bid-ask spread is established. Using this liquidity measure, an elementary liquidity algebra is possible: from the estimation of the execution cost, the liquidity of a basket of instruments is obtained. A formula for the ...

  8. Application of curium measurements for safeguarding at reprocessing plants. Study 1: High-level liquid waste and Study 2: Spent fuel assemblies and leached hulls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinard, P.M.; Menlove, H.O.

    1996-03-01

    In large-scale reprocessing plants for spent fuel assemblies, the quantity of plutonium in the waste streams each year is large enough to be important for nuclear safeguards. The wastes are drums of leached hulls and cylinders of vitrified high-level liquid waste. The plutonium amounts in these wastes cannot be measured directly by a nondestructive assay (NDA) technique because the gamma rays emitted by plutonium are obscured by gamma rays from fission products, and the neutrons from spontaneous fissions are obscured by those from curium. The most practical NDA signal from the waste is the neutron emission from curium. A diversion of waste for its plutonium would also take a detectable amount of curium, so if the amount of curium in a waste stream is reduced, it can be inferred that there is also a reduced amount of plutonium. This report studies the feasibility of tracking the curium through a reprocessing plant with neutron measurements at key locations: spent fuel assemblies prior to shearing, the accountability tank after dissolution, drums of leached hulls after dissolution, and canisters of vitrified high-level waste after separation. Existing pertinent measurement techniques are reviewed, improvements are suggested, and new measurements are proposed. The authors integrate these curium measurements into a safeguards system.

  9. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtgen, C

    2001-04-01

    The objectives of the research performed in the area of low-level radioactivity measurements are (1) to maintain and develop techniques for the measurement of low-level environmental and biological samples, (2) to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters, alpha spectrometry), (3) to support and advice the nuclear and non-nuclear industry in matters concerning radioactive contamination and/or low-level radioactivity measurements; (4) to maintain the quality assurance system according to the EN45001/ISO17025 standard; and (5) to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides of workers of the nuclear industry. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are reported.

  10. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtgen, C

    2002-04-01

    The objectives of the research performed in the area of low-level radioactivity measurements are (1) to maintain and develop techniques for the measurement of low-level environmental and biological samples, (2) to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters, alpha spectrometry), (3) to support and advise the nuclear and non-nuclear industry on problems of radioactive contamination and low-level radioactivity measurements; (4) to maintain and improve the quality assurance system according to the ISO17025 standard; and (5) to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides of workers of the nuclear industry. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are reported.

  11. Design of Controllers for Liquid Level Control

    OpenAIRE

    Augustin Simon,; Elizabeth Varghese

    2015-01-01

    The liquid level control system is commonly used in many process control applications. The aim of the process is to keep the liquid level in the tank at the desired value. The conventional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is simple, reliable and eliminates the error rate but it cannot handle complex problems. Fuzzy logic controllers are rule based systems which simulates human behavior of the process. The fuzzy controller is combined with the PID controller and th...

  12. Liquidity Risk – Measurement and Control

    OpenAIRE

    Blahová, Naďa

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with the liquidity risk in the banks in the context of the financial crisis. At first, the balance sheet and market liquidity are defined and the main principles of the methods for measuring liquidity risk, which banks use, are identified. Then follow review of main challenges of managing the liquidity of banks. Finally, it discusses qualitative regulatory requirements and eligibility of newly formulated standards with regard to minimum liquidity in general and in relation t...

  13. Correlation between Serum Levels of 3,3',5'-Triiodothyronine and Thyroid Hormones Measured by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Immunoassay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Sakai

    Full Text Available For measuring serum 3,3',5'-triiodothyronine (rT3 levels, radioimmunoassay (RIA has traditionally been used owing to the lack of other reliable methods; however, it has recently become difficult to perform. Meanwhile, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS has recently been attracting attention as a novel alternative method in clinical chemistry. To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies to date comparing results of the quantification of human serum rT3 between LC-MS/MS and RIA. We therefore examined the feasibility of LC-MS/MS as a novel alternative method for measuring serum rT3, thyroxine (T4, and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3 levels.Assay validation was performed by LC-MS/MS using quality control samples of rT3, T4, and T3 at 4 various concentrations which were prepared from reference compounds. Serum samples of 50 outpatients in our department were quantified both by LC-MS/MS and conventional immunoassay for rT3, T4, and T3. Correlation coefficients between the 2 measurement methods were statistically analyzed respectively.Matrix effects were not observed with our method. Intra-day and inter-day precisions were less than 10.8% and 9.6% for each analyte at each quality control level, respectively. Intra-day and inter-day accuracies were between 96.2% and 110%, and between 98.3% and 108.6%, respectively. The lower limit of quantification was 0.05 ng/mL. Strong correlations were observed between the 2 measurement methods (correlation coefficient, T4: 0.976, p < 0.001; T3: 0.912, p < 0.001; rT3: 0.928, p < 0.001.Our LC-MS/MS system requires no manual cleanup operation, and the process after application of a sample is fully automated; furthermore, it was found to be highly sensitive, and superior in both precision and accuracy. The correlation between the 2 methods over a wide range of concentrations was strong. LC-MS/MS is therefore expected to become a useful tool for clinical diagnosis and research.

  14. Cryogenic Liquid Level-Sensing using Fiber-Optic Strain Sensor (FOSS) Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Armstrong innovators have developed a highly accurate method for measuring liquid levels using optical fibers. Unlike liquid level gauges that rely on discrete...

  15. Density Measurement of Liquid Metals Using Dilatometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianwen WANG; Qingsong MEI

    2006-01-01

    The dilatometer method for density measurement of liquid metals was improved to give a high measurement accuracy with simple operation. The density of liquid tin was measured and the results are in agreement with values in literature. The melting point density of liquid Sn was measured to be 6.966×103 Kg·m-3 and the temperature (T) dependence of the density (ρ) for liquid Sn can be well described by a polynomial equation ρ(T)=7.406 - 9.94 × 10-4T + 2.12 × 10-7T2.

  16. Design of Controllers for Liquid Level Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustin Simon,

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The liquid level control system is commonly used in many process control applications. The aim of the process is to keep the liquid level in the tank at the desired value. The conventional proportional-integral-derivative (PID controller is simple, reliable and eliminates the error rate but it cannot handle complex problems. Fuzzy logic controllers are rule based systems which simulates human behavior of the process. The fuzzy controller is combined with the PID controller and then applied to the tank level control system. This paper proposes Inverse fuzzy with fuzzy logic controller for controlling liquid level system for a plant. This paper also compares the transient response as well as error indices of PID, Fuzzy logic controller, inverse fuzzy controllers. The responses of the controllers are verified through simulation. From the simulation results, it is observed that inverse fuzzy-PID controller gives the superior performance than the other controllers. The inverse fuzzy-PID controller gives better performance than the PID and fuzzy controller in terms of overshoot and settling time. Performance analysis is carried out with Liquid Flow Control System Design with Fuzzy logic controller. Results are evaluated by comparing the response time of conventional PID, fuzzy logic and Inverse fuzzy controller. Comparative analysis of the performance of different controllers is done in MATLAB and Simulink.

  17. Research of Liquid Level Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominykas Beištaras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents liquid level control system model and analysis of dynamic characteristics. The system consists of scalar controlled induction motor drive, fuzzy logic controller, water tank and centrifugal pump. Simulink models of water tank, pump and controller are presented. The simulation of the system shows that the use of fuzzy logic controller reduces valve opening time and reservoir filling time.

  18. On the Measurement of Morphine Level and Determination of Consumption of Different Drugs in People’s Urine at Different Ages through High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    saeed shahabi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Morphine is one of the important narcotics which constitutes one of the alkaloid and opium components. If this substance is prepared defectively, it will appear in a variety of colors. Therefore, it is not possible to identify this substance by its color. Method: In this study, drug addicts were invited to take urine tests. After morphine extraction from urine samples by chromium toxicity method, different standard concentrations were injected into HPLC device and the resultant diagrams were analyzed. Then, some changes were made into the methodology for the optimality of measurement process and morphine determination in human urine. Results: It was found that the amount of morphine available in the urine samples was measureable through high-performance liquid chromatography and the amount of impurities added to drugs could be determined. Conclusion: This method can be used for diagnosis.

  19. Characterization of POF for liquid level and concentration sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumanta, B. G.; Candidato, R. T., Jr.; Reserva, R. L.

    2015-06-01

    Measuring liquid level and solution concentration play an important role in commercial and technological applications. For years, polymer optical fibers (POFs) have been very attractive for industrial applications because of their unique characteristics. In this work, we created simple, low cost and efficient set-up for sensing liquid level and solution concentration using POFs. We have calculated the acceptance angle of the POF to be 30°from numerical aperture (NA) measurements (NA ≈ 0.500).Images of a single POF showed the presence of impurities within the fiber which can contribute to power loss of the transmitted light. Light leakage was also observed when the fiber was bent to a tight radius, i.e. beyond its minimum bend radius of 15 mm. The experimental results show that as liquid level increases, the output power decreases. Furthermore, when the liquid concentration was increased, its response showed a greater loss of optical power due to the light rays in the submerged region of the POF tend to be refracted out of the fiber instead of being totally internally reflected and transmitted when index of refraction of the surrounding liquid medium is increased.

  20. Ultrasonic level sensors for liquids under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Mazel, D. S.; Hodges, D. Y.

    1986-01-01

    An ultrasonic level sensor of novel design continuously measures the level of a liquid subjected to a high pressure (up to about 40 MPa), as is sometimes required for the effective transfer of the liquid. The sensor operates as a composite resonator fabricated from a standard high-pressure plug. A flat-bottom hole is machined into the plug along its center line. An ultrasonic transducer is bonded rigidly to the interior surface of the bottom wall, while the exterior surface is in contact with the liquid. Although the bottom wall is designed to satisfy the pressure code, it is still sufficiently thin to permit ready excitation of the axisymmetric plate modes of vibration. The liquid level is measured by a conventional pulse-echo technique. A prototype sensor was tested successfully in a 2300-l water vessel at pressures up to about 37 MPa. A spectral analysis of the transmitted pulse reveals that the flexural, extensional, thickness-shear, and radial plate modes are excited into vibration, but none of these appears to be significantly affected by the pressurization of the liquid.

  1. Measuring liquid density using Archimedes' principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2006-09-01

    A simple technique is described for measuring absolute and relative liquid density based on Archimedes' principle. The technique involves placing a container of the liquid under test on an electronic balance and suspending a probe (e.g. a glass marble) attached to a length of line beneath the surface of the liquid. If the volume of the probe is known, the density of liquid is given by the difference between the balance reading before and after immersion of the probe divided by the volume of the probe. A test showed that the density of water at room temperature could be measured to an accuracy and precision of 0.01 ± 0.1%. The probe technique was also used to measure the relative density of milk, Coca-Cola, fruit juice, olive oil and vinegar.

  2. A survey report: how hospitals measure liquidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleverley, W O; Massar, G S

    1983-11-01

    Liquidity is an important financial concept that is widely understood although not authoritatively defined. In many situations the actual assessment of liquidity is based on the relationship of current assets and current liabilities. Nationally, a decline in traditional measures of liquidity such as current and quick ratios has occurred for both general industry and the hospital industry. There are a variety of possible explanations for this trend, but one of special interest in this article was the effect of financial reporting practices. A recent Principles & Practices Board survey of Financial Analysis Service subscribers indicated that there is a potential for underreporting working capital, (current assets less current liabilities), in the hospital industry. However, this does not necessarily imply that the recent decline in liquidity measures is in any way due to reporting practices. No information about changes in reporting practices was obtained in this study. Finally, the results of the study do suggest that examination of more than one liquidity indicator is useful. Specifically, restricting attention to just the current ratio could be misleading. In this vein, it is interesting to note that six measures of liquidity are used in the FAS. All may provide insight into an accurate assessment of liquidity.

  3. Limitation of Traditional Differential Pressure Transmitter in Liquid Ammonia Spherical Tank Liquid Level Measurement and Renovation%传统差压变送器在液氨球罐液位测量中的局限性及改造

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕江

    2016-01-01

    The limitation of measuring liquid level in liquid ammonia spherical tank with traditional differential pressure transmitter is analyzed and discussed , the technical characteristics of 3051S ERS, electrics remote digital differential pressure liquid level system , are presented.After the revamp of traditional differential pressure transmitter with ERS , the problem of gas-phase tube liquid accumulation of traditional differential pressure transmitter is solved completely .%分析探讨了传统差压变送器在液氨球罐液位测量中的局限性,介绍了3051S ERS电子远传数字差压液位系统的技术特点。对传统的差压变送器采用ERS系统改造后,彻底解决了传统差压变送器气相管积液的问题。

  4. A simple and selective method for the measurement of azadirachtin and related azadirachtoid levels in fruits and vegetables using liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarais, Giorgia; Caboni, Pierluigi; Sarritzu, Erika; Russo, Mariateresa; Cabras, Paolo

    2008-05-14

    Neem-based insecticides containing azadirachtin and related azadirachtoids are widely used in agriculture. Here, we report an analytical method for the rapid and accurate quantification of the insecticide azadirachtin A and B and other azadirachtoids such as salannin, nimbin, and their deacetylated analogues on tomatoes and peaches. Azadirachtoids were extracted from fruits and vegetables with acetonitrile. Using high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer, azadirachtoids were selectively detected monitoring the multiple reaction transitions of sodium adduct precursor ions. For azadirachtin A, calibration was linear over a working range of 1-1000 microg/L with r > 0.996. The limit of detection and limit of quantification for azadirachtin A were 0.4 and 0.8 microg/kg, respectively. The presence of interfering compounds in the peach and tomato extracts was evaluated and found to be minimal. Because of the linear behavior, it was concluded that the multiple reaction transitions of sodium adduct ions can be used for analytical purposes, that is, for the identification and quantification of azadirachtin A and B and related azadirachtoids in fruit and vegetable extracts at trace levels.

  5. Attenuation measurements of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumeier, A. [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Dandl, T.; Himpsl, A. [Physik-Department E12, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Hofmann, M. [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); KETEK GmbH, Hofer Straße 3, 81737 München (Germany); Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Schönert, S. [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ulrich, A., E-mail: andreas.ulrich@ph.tum.de [Physik-Department E12, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-11-11

    The attenuation of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon in the context of its application in large liquid noble gas detectors has been studied. Compared to a previous publication several technical issues concerning transmission measurements in general are addressed and several systematic effects were quantitatively measured. Wavelength-resolved transmission measurements have been performed from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near-infrared region. On the current level of sensitivity with a length of the optical path of 11.6 cm, no xenon-related absorption effects could be observed, and pure liquid argon is fully transparent down to the short wavelength cut-off of the experimental setup at 118 nm. A lower limit for the attenuation length of pure liquid argon for its own scintillation light has been estimated to be 1.10 m based on a very conservative approach.

  6. Attenuation measurements of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Neumeier, A; Himpsl, A; Hofmann, M; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Schönert, S; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    The attenuation of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon in the context of its application in large liquid noble gas detectors has been studied. Compared to a previous publication several technical issues concerning transmission measurements in general are addressed and several systematic effects were quantitatively measured. Wavelength-resolved transmission measurements have been performed from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near-infrared region. On the current level of sensitivity with a length of the optical path of 11.6 cm, no xenon-related absorption effects could be observed, and pure liquid argon is fully transparent down to the short wavelength cut-off of the experimental setup at 118 nm. A lower limit for the attenuation length of pure liquid argon for its own scintillation light has been estimated to be 1.10 m based on a very conservative approach.

  7. Measuring the attenuation length in liquid scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellgartner, Dominikus; Oberauer, Lothar; Prummer, Sabrina; Sawatzki, Julia; Zimmer, Vincenz [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Departement E15, James Franck Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ulrich, Andreas [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Departement E12, James Franck Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The next generation of liquid scintillator detectors like the proposed LENA detector or the planned JUNO detector will feature diameters of order 30 m. Due to this vast size, the optical quality of the scintillator is of crucial importance. To determine the attenuation length of liquid scintillators, an experiment with a 5 m long measurement section was set-up in the underground laboratory in Garching. The current set-up of the experiment is presented along with a discussion of the results of the first measurements. Additionally, there is an outlook towards possible upgrades of the experiment in the future.

  8. Measuring g using a rotating liquid mirror: enhancing laboratory learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Andréas; Adawi, Tom

    2016-09-01

    We describe a low-cost yet experimentally challenging method to measure the acceleration of gravity, g, using a liquid in a rotating bowl and a laser pointer. The idea underpinning this novel method is that the rotating liquid surface will form a parabolic reflector which will focus light into a unique focal point. By measuring the height of the focal point, g could be determined to 9.78+/- 0.13 m s-2. We discuss the pedagogical merits of this method compared to more traditional methods for measuring g, and how it can be implemented as an experimental problem at different educational levels.

  9. How to measure Corporate Bond Liquidity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Houweling (Patrick); A.A. Mentink; A.C.F. Vorst (Ton)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe consider eight different measures (issued amount, coupon, listed, age, missing prices, price volatility, number of contributors and yield dispersion) to approximate corporate bond liquidity and use a five-variable model to control for maturity, credit and currency differences between

  10. 微分法实现与介质无关的电容式液位测量%Utilizing differential method to implement a medium-independent capacitive liquid level measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符欲梅; 张巧娥; 昝昕武; 李华文; 冯斌; 李勇智

    2011-01-01

    电容式液位传感器因价格低廉、结构简单,广泛应用于工农业生产和医疗卫生等不同领域.由于需要预知被测液体的介电常数,且必须定期标定,因而其应用范围受到极大限制.分析了现有电容式液位测量方法存在的问题,在此基础上采用等高、对称布置,且结构参数完全相同的一对直角三角形平行平板电容器同时进行液位的测量,并利用微分方法消除了被测液体介电常数对液位高度的影响,实现了与介质无关的电容式液位测量.汽油与水的对比实验表明了本方法的有效性.%Capacitive liquid level sensor is used widely in industry, agriculture, health care and other fields due to its low price and simple structure. However, because the dielectric constant of the media should be gained before measurement and this constant must be calibrated periodically,its application is restricted greatly. Based on the analysis of the problems existing in the present capacitive liquid level measurement, two parallel plate capacitors with right-angled triangle shape and same structural parameters, which symmetrically aligned in the same height,are utilized as liquid level sensor at the same time. The differential method is adopted to eliminate the influence of the dielectric constant to the measurement and the medium-independent capacitive liquid level measurement is implemented. The experiments of pure water and gasoline show the validity of this method.

  11. 储罐中的超稠油液位检测设计与实现%Design and Implement of the Liquid Level Measurement of Surperheavy Oil in Storege

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶传刚

    2011-01-01

    Superheavy oil is extremely viscous at normal temperature due to its unique characteristics resulting in requirement of high temperature in the production process. Taking account of the density of superheavy oil which is similar to the density of water and high operation temperature, practical and accurate measuring methods should be selected according to the real issues in terms of liquid level measurement. The common means of the measurement of the dielectric liquid level involves microwave, ray, difference pressure and so on.%超稠油介质具有独特的物性,常温下的粘度极高,其生产过程需要在较高温度下进行操作运行。由于操作运行温度较高,且超稠油的密度与水接近,在液位测量方面需要针对实际,采取可靠、实用的测量方法。此方法的介质液位检测通常有微波法、射线法、射频导纳型、差压式等。

  12. Permittivity measurements in solids, powders, and liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Frank

    2005-08-01

    A microwave waveguide cell has been constructed to facilitate the measurement of permittivity on solids, powders, and liquids. By employing this cell and a vector network analyzer, permittivity values have been obtained, at room temperature, for samples of perspex, PTFE, sand, and sunflower oil. These values are in agreement with published data. It is hoped that this experiment will provide students with an opportunity to use modern microwave instrumentation and gain a greater appreciation of the physical properties of materials.

  13. Landau Levels of Majorana Fermions in a Spin Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel, Stephan; Fritz, Lars; Vojta, Matthias

    2016-04-22

    Majorana fermions, originally proposed as elementary particles acting as their own antiparticles, can be realized in condensed-matter systems as emergent quasiparticles, a situation often accompanied by topological order. Here we propose a physical system which realizes Landau levels-highly degenerate single-particle states usually resulting from an orbital magnetic field acting on charged particles-for Majorana fermions. This is achieved in a variant of a quantum spin system due to Kitaev which is distorted by triaxial strain. This strained Kitaev model displays a spin-liquid phase with charge-neutral Majorana-fermion excitations whose spectrum corresponds to that of Landau levels, here arising from a tailored pseudomagnetic field. We show that measuring the dynamic spin susceptibility reveals the Landau-level structure by a remarkable mechanism of probe-induced bound-state formation.

  14. 30 CFR 250.1202 - Liquid hydrocarbon measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Liquid hydrocarbon measurement. 250.1202..., Surface Commingling, and Security § 250.1202 Liquid hydrocarbon measurement. (a) What are the requirements for measuring liquid hydrocarbons? You must: (1) Submit a written application to, and obtain...

  15. Global liquidity - concept, measurement and policy implications

    OpenAIRE

    Bank for International Settlements

    2011-01-01

    Global liquidity has become a key focus of international policy debates over recent years. This reflects the view that global liquidity and its drivers are of major importance for international financial stability. The concept of global liquidity, however continues to be used in a variety of ways and this ambiguity can lead to unfounded and potentially destabilising policy initiatives. This report analyses global liquidity from a financial stability perspective, using two distinct liquidity c...

  16. Light Path Model of Fiber Optic Liquid Level Sensor Considering Residual Liquid Film on the Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The working principle of the refractive-type fiber optic liquid level sensor is analyzed in detail based on the light refraction principle. The optic path models are developed in consideration of common simplification and the residual liquid film on the glass tube wall. The calculating formulae for the model are derived, constraint conditions are obtained, influencing factors are discussed, and the scopes and skills of application are analyzed through instance simulations. The research results are useful in directing the correct usage of the fiber optic liquid level sensor, especially in special cases, such as those involving viscous liquid in the glass tube monitoring.

  17. System for water level measurement based on pressure transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczesny, Daniel; Marzecki, Michał; Woyke, Michał; Tarapata, Grzegorz

    2016-09-01

    The paper reports system for water level measurement, which is designed to be used for measuring liquid levels in the tanks of an autonomous industrial cleaning robot. The selected method of measurement utilized by the designed system is based on pressure measurement. Such system is insensitive on vibrations, foams presence and liquid impurities. The influences of variable pressure on the measurements were eliminated by utilizing the differential method and as well as the system design. The system is capable of measuring water level in tanks up to 400 mm of height with accuracy of about 2,5%. The system was tested in a container during filling and emptying with various liquids. Performed tests exhibited the linearity of the sensor characteristic and the lack of hysteresis. Obtained sensitivity of the sensor prototype was approximately 6,2 mV/mm H2O.

  18. Radon measurement using a liquid scintillation spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige; Kawai, Hiroshi; Kondo, Sohei (Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.); Mifune, Masaki; Konishi, Masanobu; Shirai, Chiaki

    1992-12-01

    A convenient radon detecting device for the purpose of estimating natural radiation exposure is described. The [alpha] radioactivity of radon gas absorbed in fine active carbon particles exposed to air is measured with a liquid scintillation spectrometer (Packard-PICO-RAD system). Its detection limits are 2mBq/l in air and 0.5 Bq/l in water with an accuracy of about 10 %. Radon concentrations at Misasa hot springs in Tottori prefecture were measured using this method. They were 0.16 [approx] 7.7 Bq/l in a bath room and 0.057 [approx] 0.36 Bq/l outdoors. Radon concentrations of the hot springs were 82 [approx] 1,700 Bq/l. (author).

  19. Accurate level set method for simulations of liquid atomization☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changxiao Shao; Kun Luo; Jianshan Yang; Song Chen; Jianren Fan

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics is an efficient numerical approach for spray atomization study, but it is chal enging to accurately capture the gas–liquid interface. In this work, an accurate conservative level set method is intro-duced to accurately track the gas–liquid interfaces in liquid atomization. To validate the capability of this method, binary drop collision and drop impacting on liquid film are investigated. The results are in good agreement with experiment observations. In addition, primary atomization (swirling sheet atomization) is studied using this method. To the swirling sheet atomization, it is found that Rayleigh–Taylor instability in the azimuthal direction causes the primary breakup of liquid sheet and complex vortex structures are clustered around the rim of the liq-uid sheet. The effects of central gas velocity and liquid–gas density ratio on atomization are also investigated. This work lays a solid foundation for further studying the mechanism of spray atomization.

  20. Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines in Electronic Cigarettes: Comparison between Liquid and Aerosol Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos E. Farsalinos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although electronic cigarette (EC liquids contain low levels of tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs, studies evaluating the levels emitted to the aerosol are scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare the levels of TSNAs between liquids and generated aerosol. Methods: Three EC liquids were obtained from the market. An additional (spiked sample was prepared by adding known amounts of standard TSNAs solutions to one of the obtained liquids. N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN, N-nitrosoanatabine (NAT, N-nitrosoanabasine (NAB and 4-(methylnitrosamino1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK were measured. Three 100-puff sets from each liquid were trapped in filter pads and were subsequently analyzed for the presence of TSNAs. The expected levels of TSNAs (calculated based on the liquid consumption were compared with the measured levels in the aerosol. Results: Only NAB was found at trace levels in two commercial liquids (1.2 and 2.3 ng/g, while the third contained 1.5 ng/g NAB and 7.7 ng/g NNN. The 100-puff sets resulted in 336–515 mg liquid consumption, with no TSNAs being detected in the aerosol. The spiked sample contained 42.0–53.9 ng/g of each of the TSNAs. All TSNAs were detected in the aerosol with the measured levels being statistically similar to the expected amounts. A significant correlation between expected and measured levels of TSNAs in the aerosol was found (r = 0.83, p < 0.001. Conclusion: The findings of this study show that exposure of EC users to TSNAs can be accurately assessed based on the levels present in the liquid, without the need to analyze the aerosol.

  1. 46 CFR 154.1300 - Liquid level gauging system: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1300 Liquid level gauging system: General. (a) If Table 4 lists a closed... type device, electronic or magnetic probe, or bubble tube indicator. (b) If Table 4 lists a...

  2. Continuous liquid level sensor based on a reflective long period fiber grating interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hao; Xu, Zuowei; Chen, Hao; Yang, Yunyun; You, Jianzhou; Yan, Jiarong; Fu, Hongyan; Zhang, Dan

    2015-03-01

    A continuous liquid level sensor (LLS) based on an in-fiber Michelson interferometer is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The in-fiber Michelson interferometer is formed by a single long period grating (LPG) together with a reflective mirror at the end of the fiber. The portion between the mirror and LPG is immersed in the liquid to be measured as an LLS sensing probe, and the liquid level can be measured by monitoring the wavelength of interference fringes of the in-fiber Michelson interferometer. The experimental results show that the proposed LLS has a good sensing linearity and sensitivity.

  3. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for measurement of serum 25 ( OH ) D level%血清25(OH)D测定的液相色谱质谱法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周建烈; 陈悦; 余琛; 李水军

    2011-01-01

    维生素D缺乏与多种疾病相关,血清25(OH)D水平可以作为维生素D营养状况的客观指标.液相色谱质谱法(LC-MS)是临床营养常规测量25(OH)D的标准方法.本文总结了检测25 (OH) D2和25 (OH)D3的意义,比较了各种25(OH)D的检测方法及其优缺点,介绍了我国采用美国国立标准技术研究院质控品标准的LC-MS法常规检测25(OH)D2和25(OH)D3的情况.%Many diseases are associated with vitamin D deficiency.Serum 25 (OH)D levels can serve as objective indicators of the nutritional status of vitamin D.Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method may be applied for routine measurement of 25 ( OH ) D levels in clinical practice.This article reviewed the significance of detecting 25 (OH) D2 and 25 (OH) D3,compared the advantages and disadvantages of different 25 (OH) D measurement methods,and introduced the application of LC-MS method for routine detection of serum 25 (OH) D2 and 25 (OH) D3 levels following the standard by National Institute of Standards and Technology of America.

  4. Optical and thermodynamic property measurements of liquid metals and alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    Optical properties and spectral emissivities of liquid silicon, titanium, niobium, and zirconium were investigated by HeNe laser polarimetry at λ = 632.8 nm. The metals were of a high purity and, except for zirconium, clean. The more demanding environmental requirements for eliminating oxide or nitride phases from zirconium were not met. Containerless conditions were achieved by electromagnetic levitation and heating. CO2 laser beam heating was also used to extend the temperature range for stable levitation and to heat solid silicon to form the metallic liquid phase. Corrections to previously reported calorimetric measurements of the heat capacity of liquid niobium were derived from the measured temperature dependence of its spectral emissivity. Property measurements were obtained for supercooled liquid silicon and supercooling of liquid zirconium was accomplished. The purification of liquid metals and the extension of this work on liquids to the measurement of thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria are discussed.

  5. Measurement of liquid permittivity by solenoid self-resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Patrick; Mazzeo, Brian

    2010-10-01

    Permittivity of a liquid is an important macroscopic property which is dependent on the composition and physical state of the liquid. Measurement of liquid permittivity is usually performed using a parallel-plate capacitor or terminated coaxial line. In this study, a solenoid surrounding a column of liquid is used to measure permittivity changes. The inductance of the solenoid is not greatly affected by permittivity and conductivity changes for small diameters. However, the self-capacitance is greatly affected by changing solution conditions. The self-resonance, due to the changing self-capacitance, thus reveals properties of the solution. This is demonstrated on a variety of liquids with varying permittivity and conductivity.

  6. Symmetry and Asymmetry Level Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Garrido

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Usually, Symmetry and Asymmetry are considered as two opposite sides of a coin: an object is either totally symmetric, or totally asymmetric, relative to pattern objects. Intermediate situations of partial symmetry or partial asymmetry are not considered. But this dichotomy on the classification lacks of a necessary and realistic gradation. For this reason, it is convenient to introduce "shade regions", modulating the degree of Symmetry (a fuzzy concept. Here, we will analyze the Asymmetry problem by successive attempts of description and by the introduction of the Asymmetry Level Function, as a new Normal Fuzzy Measure. Our results (both Theorems and Corollaries suppose to be some new and original contributions to such very active and interesting field of research. Previously, we proceed to the analysis of the state of art.

  7. LET measurements with a liquid ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegami, Sara

    2013-02-08

    Deep-seated tumors can be efficiently treated with heavy charged particles. The characteristic depth dose profile inside the tissue (Bragg peak) allows to deliver a high dose inside the tumor, while sparing the neighboring healthy tissue. As compared to protons, heavy ions like carbon or oxygen produce a higher amount of ionization events along their track (and in particular at the end of the ion beam path), resulting in an irreparable damage to the DNA of the tumor cells. The density of such ionization events is described in terms of Linear Energy Transfer (LET), an important physical quantity, but difficult to be measured directly. The aim of this work is to determine LET of hadrontherapy beams by using Liquid Ionization Chambers (LIC). The ionization signal in LICs is affected by recombination effects that depend on the LET of the incident radiation. Differences in recombination effects in LICs and air-filled ionization chambers can be exploited to obtain the recombination index, which can be related to the LET, calculated by Monte Carlo methods. We thus developed a method to construct a calibration curve, which relates the recombination index with the LET at each depth in water. The result of this work can be used for online monitoring of the ion beam quality.

  8. An airborne microwave radiometer and measurements of cloud liquid water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Hengchi; JIN Dezhen; WEI Chong; SHEN Zhilai

    2003-01-01

    A single-channel (9.5 mm) airborne microwave radiometer with one antenna is developed. The retrieval methods and primary observation results of cloud liquid water and super-cooled cloud liquid water are discussed. The aircraft experiments show that the cloud liquid water and super-cooled liquid water can be sensitively monitored at some level of accuracy by the radiometer. The results of cloud liquid water content are reasonable and correspond well with the surface radar echo intensity. The design of the airborne radiometer and its retrieval methods are feasible, giving it application value.

  9. Survey on Detecting Method of Liquid Level of Tank%储罐液位检测方法综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁朝庆; 谌飞翔; 徐松芝; 刘燕; 李晓丽; 于洋; 刘迎春

    2011-01-01

    The accurate measurement of liquid level of tanks is an important role in management and safety production. There are some common methods to detect liquid level of tank, such as hand gauging measurement, differential pressure liquid measurement, magnetostriction liquid level measurement, ultrasonic liquid level measurement, radar liquid level measurement, fiber-optical liquid level measurement. The basic principle, advantage / and disadvantage, detection range and accuracy of every method of detecting liquid level of tank are presented in detail in the paper, and meanwhile a comparative analysis is given.%储罐液位的准确测量对生产安全和管理起着重要的作用。储罐液位常用的检测方法主要有人工检尺法、差压式液位测量法、磁致伸缩液位测量法、超声波液位测量法、雷达液位测量法、光纤液位检测法。详细介绍了每种储罐液位检测方法的基本原理、优缺点以及它们各自的检测范围和精度,并对其进行了对比分析。

  10. System-level simulation of liquid filling in microfluidic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2011-06-01

    Liquid filling in microfluidic channels is a complex process that depends on a variety of geometric, operating, and material parameters such as microchannel geometry, flow velocity∕pressure, liquid surface tension, and contact angle of channel surface. Accurate analysis of the filling process can provide key insights into the filling time, air bubble trapping, and dead zone formation, and help evaluate trade-offs among the various design parameters and lead to optimal chip design. However, efficient modeling of liquid filling in complex microfluidic networks continues to be a significant challenge. High-fidelity computational methods, such as the volume of fluid method, are prohibitively expensive from a computational standpoint. Analytical models, on the other hand, are primarily applicable to idealized geometries and, hence, are unable to accurately capture chip level behavior of complex microfluidic systems. This paper presents a parametrized dynamic model for the system-level analysis of liquid filling in three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic networks. In our approach, a complex microfluidic network is deconstructed into a set of commonly used components, such as reservoirs, microchannels, and junctions. The components are then assembled according to their spatial layout and operating rationale to achieve a rapid system-level model. A dynamic model based on the transient momentum equation is developed to track the liquid front in the microchannels. The principle of mass conservation at the junction is used to link the fluidic parameters in the microchannels emanating from the junction. Assembly of these component models yields a set of differential and algebraic equations, which upon integration provides temporal information of the liquid filling process, particularly liquid front propagation (i.e., the arrival time). The models are used to simulate the transient liquid filling process in a variety of microfluidic constructs and in a multiplexer, representing a

  11. Method of Measurement Isobaric Heat Capacity of the Organic Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.A. Neruchev

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A technique for measuring the heat capacity of liquids on modernized authors the installation of IT-Cp-400 is considered. The results of measurements the isobaric heat capacity of some bromosubstituted n-alkanes is presented.

  12. Measuring the optical chirality of molecular aggregates at liquid-liquid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watarai, Hitoshi; Adachi, Kenta

    2009-10-01

    Some new experimental methods for measuring the optical chirality of molecular aggregates formed at liquid-liquid interfaces have been reviewed. Chirality measurements of interfacial aggregates are highly important not only in analytical spectroscopy but also in biochemistry and surface nanochemistry. Among these methods, a centrifugal liquid membrane method was shown to be a highly versatile method for measuring the optical chirality of the liquid-liquid interface when used in combination with a commercially available circular dichroism (CD) spectropolarimeter, provided that the interfacial aggregate exhibited a large molar absorptivity. Therefore, porphyrin and phthalocyanine were used as chromophoric probes of the chirality of itself or guest molecules at the interface. A microscopic CD method was also demonstrated for the measurement of a small region of a film or a sheet sample. In addition, second-harmonic generation and Raman scattering methods were reviewed as promising methods for detecting interfacial optical molecules and measuring bond distortions of chiral molecules, respectively.

  13. Nicotine Levels and Presence of Selected Tobacco-Derived Toxins in Tobacco Flavoured Electronic Cigarette Refill Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos E. Farsalinos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Some electronic cigarette (EC liquids of tobacco flavour contain extracts of cured tobacco leaves produced by a process of solvent extraction and steeping. These are commonly called Natural Extract of Tobacco (NET liquids. The purpose of the study was to evaluate nicotine levels and the presence of tobacco-derived toxins in tobacco-flavoured conventional and NET liquids. Methods. Twenty-one samples (10 conventional and 11 NET liquids were obtained from the US and Greek market. Nicotine levels were measured and compared with labelled values. The levels of tobacco-derived chemicals were compared with literature data on tobacco products. Results. Twelve samples had nicotine levels within 10% of the labelled value. Inconsistency ranged from −21% to 22.1%, with no difference observed between conventional and NET liquids. Tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs were present in all samples at ng/mL levels. Nitrates were present almost exclusively in NET liquids. Acetaldehyde was present predominantly in conventional liquids while formaldehyde was detected in almost all EC liquids at trace levels. Phenols were present in trace amounts, mostly in NET liquids. Total TSNAs and nitrate, which are derived from the tobacco plant, were present at levels 200–300 times lower in 1 mL of NET liquids compared to 1 gram of tobacco products. Conclusions. NET liquids contained higher levels of phenols and nitrates, but lower levels of acetaldehyde compared to conventional EC liquids. The lower levels of tobacco-derived toxins found in NET liquids compared to tobacco products indicate that the extraction process used to make these products did not transfer a significant amount of toxins to the NET. Overall, all EC liquids contained far lower (by 2–3 orders of magnitude levels of the tobacco-derived toxins compared to tobacco products.

  14. Nicotine levels and presence of selected tobacco-derived toxins in tobacco flavoured electronic cigarette refill liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsalinos, Konstantinos E; Gillman, I Gene; Melvin, Matt S; Paolantonio, Amelia R; Gardow, Wendy J; Humphries, Kathy E; Brown, Sherri E; Poulas, Konstantinos; Voudris, Vassilis

    2015-03-24

    Some electronic cigarette (EC) liquids of tobacco flavour contain extracts of cured tobacco leaves produced by a process of solvent extraction and steeping. These are commonly called Natural Extract of Tobacco (NET) liquids. The purpose of the study was to evaluate nicotine levels and the presence of tobacco-derived toxins in tobacco-flavoured conventional and NET liquids. Twenty-one samples (10 conventional and 11 NET liquids) were obtained from the US and Greek market. Nicotine levels were measured and compared with labelled values. The levels of tobacco-derived chemicals were compared with literature data on tobacco products. Twelve samples had nicotine levels within 10% of the labelled value. Inconsistency ranged from -21% to 22.1%, with no difference observed between conventional and NET liquids. Tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) were present in all samples at ng/mL levels. Nitrates were present almost exclusively in NET liquids. Acetaldehyde was present predominantly in conventional liquids while formaldehyde was detected in almost all EC liquids at trace levels. Phenols were present in trace amounts, mostly in NET liquids. Total TSNAs and nitrate, which are derived from the tobacco plant, were present at levels 200-300 times lower in 1 mL of NET liquids compared to 1 gram of tobacco products. NET liquids contained higher levels of phenols and nitrates, but lower levels of acetaldehyde compared to conventional EC liquids. The lower levels of tobacco-derived toxins found in NET liquids compared to tobacco products indicate that the extraction process used to make these products did not transfer a significant amount of toxins to the NET. Overall, all EC liquids contained far lower (by 2-3 orders of magnitude) levels of the tobacco-derived toxins compared to tobacco products.

  15. Basel III Liquidity Risk Measures and Bank Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. P. Hlatshwayo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Basel III banking regulation emphasizes the use of liquidity coverage and nett stable funding ratios as measures of liquidity risk. In this paper, we approximate these measures by using global liquidity data for 391 hand-selected, LIBOR-based, Basel II compliant banks in 36 countries for the period 2002 to 2012. In particular, we compare the risk sensitivity of the aforementioned Basel III liquidity risk measures to those of traditional measures such as the nonperforming assets ratio, return-on-assets, LIBOR-OISS, Basel II Tier 1 capital ratio, government securities ratio, and brokered deposits ratio. Furthermore, we use a discrete-time hazard model to study bank failure. In this regard, we find that Basel III risk measures have limited ability to predict bank failure when compared with their traditional counterparts. An important result is that a higher liquidity coverage ratio is associated with a higher bank failure rate. We also find that market-wide liquidity risk (proxied by LIBOR-OISS was the major predictor of bank failures in 2009 and 2010 while idiosyncratic liquidity risk (proxied by other liquidity risk measures was less. In particular, our contribution is the first to achieve these results on a global scale over a relatively long period for a variety of banks.

  16. Gamma thermometer based reactor core liquid level detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Thomas J.

    1983-01-01

    A system is provided which employs a modified gamma thermometer for determining the liquid coolant level within a nuclear reactor core. The gamma thermometer which normally is employed to monitor local core heat generation rate (reactor power), is modified by thermocouple junctions and leads to obtain an unambiguous indication of the presence or absence of coolant liquid at the gamma thermometer location. A signal processor generates a signal based on the thermometer surface heat transfer coefficient by comparing the signals from the thermocouples at the thermometer location. The generated signal is a direct indication of loss of coolant due to the change in surface heat transfer when coolant liquid drops below the thermometer location. The loss of coolant indication is independent of reactor power at the thermometer location. Further, the same thermometer may still be used for the normal power monitoring function.

  17. Liquid-Liquid Structure Transition in Metallic Melts: Experimental Evidence by Viscosity Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-Qing; WU Yu-Qin; BIAN Xiu-Fang

    2007-01-01

    Temperature dependence of viscosity for more than ten kinds of metallic melts is analysed based on viscosity measurements. An obvious turning point is observed on the Arrhenius curves. Since viscosity is one of the physical properties sensitive to structure, its discontinuous change with temperature reveals the possible liquidliquid structure transition in the metallic melts. Furthermore, an integrated liquid structure transition diagram of the Sn-Bi system is presented. The universality of liquid-liquid structure transition is also discussed simply.

  18. Ultrasonics Liquid Level Meter%超声波液位仪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春晓; 袁峰; 申安安

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasonics liquid level meter is important in liquid level measurement with its contactless working mode and can adapt to severe environment.This paper introduced the hardware and software of the ultrasonics liquid level meter.Using two step measurement means,the ability of processing return echo was improved.%超声波液位仪以其非接触的测量方式在液位测量中具有不可替代的位置,能够适应过程自动化苛刻条件要求.文中对超声波液位仪的硬件和软件设计进行了阐述.通过采用二次测量方法,提高了仪表对回波的处理能力.

  19. A new method for measurement of liquid dilatation parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondris, Lubomír; Rusina, Viktor

    1997-04-01

    A new user-friendly method for measuring dilatation parameters of non-volatile liquids, based on an optoelectronic hydrolevelling sensor, is described. The system is capable of measuring a liquid column height with an accuracy of about 0957-0233/8/4/004/img1 and allows determination of the temperature dilatation volume coefficient for transparent liquids with an accuracy that depends on the used thermometer accuracy. The method is also suitable for specific mass or density measurements with an accuracy comparable to that obtained with the pycnometric method.

  20. Measurement of Liquid Viscosities in Tapered or Parabolic Capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershov; Zorin; Starov

    1999-08-01

    The possibility of using tapered or parabolic capillaries for measurement of liquid viscosities is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. It is demonstrated that even small deviations in capillary radius from a constant value may substantially affect measurement results. Equations are derived which allow correct analysis of the measurement results in tapered or parabolic capillaries. The following cases are analyzed: a water imbibition into a tapered or parabolic capillary and displacement of one liquid by another immiscible liquid in tapered or parabolic capillaries. Two possibilities are considered: (a) the narrow end of the capillary as capillary inlet and (b) the wide end of the capillary as capillary inlet. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  1. Liquidity risk meets economic capital and RAROC: a framework for measuring liquidity risk in banks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loebnitz, Kolja

    2011-01-01

    Liquidity risk is a crucial and inherent feature of the business model of banks. While banks and regulators use sophisticated mathematical methods to measure a bank's solvency risk, they use relatively simple tools for a bank's liquidity risk such as coverage ratios, sensitivity analyses, and scenar

  2. Liquidity Risk meets Economic Capital and RAROC. A framework for measuring liquidity risk in banks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loebnitz, K.

    2011-01-01

    Liquidity risk is a crucial and inherent feature of the business model of banks. While banks and regulators use sophisticated mathematical methods to measure a bank's solvency risk, they use relatively simple tools for a bank's liquidity risk such as coverage ratios, sensitivity analyses, and scenar

  3. Liquidity Risk meets Economic Capital and RAROC. A framework for measuring liquidity risk in banks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loebnitz, K.

    2011-01-01

    Liquidity risk is a crucial and inherent feature of the business model of banks. While banks and regulators use sophisticated mathematical methods to measure a bank's solvency risk, they use relatively simple tools for a bank's liquidity risk such as coverage ratios, sensitivity analyses, and

  4. Accurate measure by weight of liquids in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, M.R.

    1992-12-12

    This research's focus was to build a prototype of a computerized liquid dispensing system. This liquid metering system is based on the concept of altering the representative volume to account for temperature changes in the liquid to be dispensed. This is actualized by using a measuring tank and a temperature compensating displacement plunger. By constantly monitoring the temperature of the liquid, the plunger can be used to increase or decrease the specified volume to more accurately dispense liquid with a specified mass. In order to put the device being developed into proper engineering perspective, an extensive literature review was undertaken on all areas of industrial metering of liquids with an emphasis on gravimetric methods.

  5. Accurate measure by weight of liquids in industry. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, M.R.

    1992-12-12

    This research`s focus was to build a prototype of a computerized liquid dispensing system. This liquid metering system is based on the concept of altering the representative volume to account for temperature changes in the liquid to be dispensed. This is actualized by using a measuring tank and a temperature compensating displacement plunger. By constantly monitoring the temperature of the liquid, the plunger can be used to increase or decrease the specified volume to more accurately dispense liquid with a specified mass. In order to put the device being developed into proper engineering perspective, an extensive literature review was undertaken on all areas of industrial metering of liquids with an emphasis on gravimetric methods.

  6. A New Liquidity Risk Measure for the Chilean Banking Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastián Becerra; Gregory Claeys; Juan Francisco Martínez

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to construct an appropriate measure of liquidity risk for Chilean banks. There are already several measures of liquidity risk in the literature. Most of these metrics are based on specific assumptions and expert opinion. In order to overcome the potential problems associated with discretionary assumptions, and to exploit the information available, similar to the work of Drehman and Nikolaou (2012), we propose a metric based on the behavior of banks in the procure...

  7. Uncertainty in Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy Measurement of Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Liu, Liping; Song, Maojiang; Han, Feng; Shen, Li; Hu, Pengfei; Zhang, Fang

    2017-02-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is a significant technique for characterizing materials as it allows fast and broadband measurement of optical constants in the THz regime. The measurement precision of the constants is highly influenced by the complicated measurement procedure and data processing. Taking THz transmission measurement of liquids into account, the sources of error existing in THz-TDS process are identified. The contributions of each source to the uncertainty of optical constants in THz-TDS process are formulated, with particular emphasis on the effect of multilayer reflections and plane wave assumption. As a consequence, an analytical model is proposed for uncertainty evaluation in a THz-TDS measurement of liquids. An actual experiment with a Di 2-Ethyl Hexyl Phthalate (DEHP) sample is carried out to show that the proposed model could be a basis to evaluate the measurement precision of optical constants of liquids.

  8. Space-resolved Resistive Measurement of Liquid Metal Wall Thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Mirhoseini, S M H

    2016-01-01

    In a fusion reactor internally coated with liquid metal, it will be important to diagnose the thickness of the liquid at various locations in the vessel, as a function of time, and possibly respond to counteract undesired bulging or depletion. The electrical conductance between electrodes immersed in the liquid metal can be used as a simple proxy for the local thickness. Here a matrix of electrodes is shown to provide spatially resolved measurements of liquid metal thickness in the absence of plasma. First a theory is developed for mxn electrodes, and then it is experimentally demonstrated for 3x1 electrodes. The experiments were carried out with Galinstan, but are easily extended to Lithium or other liquid metals.

  9. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymantas Kazys

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10−3 g/cm3 (1%.

  10. Measuring static and dynamic contact angles using a liquid needle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanedrin, Raymond; Jin, Ming; Frese, Daniel; Scheithauer, Carsten; Willers, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    The optical determination of static and advancing contact angle is made on drops applied or extended, respectively, onto a substrate through the use of thin solid needles. Although this method has been used extensively, this method of dosing can be time consuming, cumbersome and if not meticulously performed can lead to erroneous contact angle results. Herein, we present an alternative way of applying drops onto substrates using a small liquid jet, which is produced by a liquid pressure dosing system acting as a "liquid needle." A comparative static contact angle study on 14 different surfaces with two different liquids were performed utilizing two different ways of dosing: the conventional solid and a novel liquid needle based technique. We found, for all but one sample, that the obtained results were highly comparable. Observed differences can be explained by the characteristics of either way of dosing. In addition, we used the liquid pressure based dosing system for optical advancing contact angle measurement on two different samples. The liquid needle based method facilitates the expansion of a drop from 0.1 to 22 μL within less than 1.2 seconds, which provided constant contact angle versus drop base diameter curves. The obtained results were highly comparable with dynamic Wilhelmy contact angle measurements.

  11. Liquid film thickness measurement by two-line TDLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huinan; Chen, Jun; Cai, Xiaoshu; Greszik, Daniel; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2014-04-01

    A fiber-based two-line tunable diode-laser absorption sensor with two near-infrared (NIR) distributed-feedback (DFB) diode lasers at ˜1.4 μm was used for non-intrusive time-resolved liquid water film thickness measurement. When probing the liquid film at two different wavelengths with significantly different absorption cross-sections, the additional signal losses due to surface fowling, reflection and beam steering can be eliminated. In this work, the evaporation process of a liquid film on transparent quartz plate was tracked and large fluctuations of film thickness were found at the end of the evaporation.

  12. Liquid film thickness measurement by two-line TDLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Huinan [School of Energy and Power Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, 200093, Shanghai, China and IVG, University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057, Duisburg (Germany); Chen, Jun; Cai, Xiaoshu [School of Energy and Power Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, 200093, Shanghai (China); Greszik, Daniel; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof [IVG, University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057, Duisburg (Germany)

    2014-04-11

    A fiber-based two-line tunable diode-laser absorption sensor with two near-infrared (NIR) distributed-feedback (DFB) diode lasers at ∼1.4 μm was used for non-intrusive time-resolved liquid water film thickness measurement. When probing the liquid film at two different wavelengths with significantly different absorption cross-sections, the additional signal losses due to surface fowling, reflection and beam steering can be eliminated. In this work, the evaporation process of a liquid film on transparent quartz plate was tracked and large fluctuations of film thickness were found at the end of the evaporation.

  13. Liquid Crystal Thermography Measurement Uncertainty Analysis and Its Application to Turbulent Heat Transfer Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid crystal thermography is an advanced nonintrusive measurement technique, which is capable of providing a high-accuracy continuous temperature field measurement, especially for a complex structured heat transfer surface. The first part of the paper presents a comprehensive introduction to the thermochromic liquid crystal material and the related liquid crystal thermography technique. Then, based on the aythors' experiences in using the liquid crystal thermography for the heat transfer measurement, the parameters affecting the measurement uncertainty of the liquid crystal thermography have been discussed in detail through an experimental study. The final part of the paper describes the applications of the steady and transient liquid crystal thermography technique in the study of the turbulent flow heat transfer related to the aeroengine turbine blade cooling.

  14. FEATURES OF MEASURING IN LIQUID MEDIA BY ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V. Zhukov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The paper presents results of experimental study of measurement features in liquids by atomic force microscope to identify the best modes and buffered media as well as to find possible image artifacts and ways of their elimination. Method. The atomic force microscope Ntegra Aura (NT-MDT, Russia with standard prism probe holder and liquid cell was used to carry out measurements in liquids. The calibration lattice TGQ1 (NT-MDT, Russia was chosen as investigated structure with a fixed shape and height. Main Results. The research of probe functioning in specific pH liquids (distilled water, PBS - sodium phosphate buffer, Na2HPO4 - borate buffer, NaOH 0.1 M, NaOH 0.5 M was carried out in contact and semi-contact modes. The optimal operating conditions and the best media for the liquid measurements were found. Comparison of atomic force microscopy data with the results of lattice study by scanning electron microscopy was performed. The features of the feedback system response in the «probe-surface» interaction were considered by the approach/retraction curves in the different environments. An artifact of image inversion was analyzed and recommendation for its elimination was provided. Practical Relevance. These studies reveal the possibility of fine alignment of research method for objects of organic and inorganic nature by atomic force microscopy in liquid media.

  15. Passive Wireless Cryogenic Liquid Level Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based liquid level sensors for NASA application to cryogenic liquid level...

  16. An apparatus for the specific heat measurement of undercooled liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsaka, K.; Gatewood, J. R.; Trinh, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a drop calorimeter with an electromagnetic levitator that was specifically built for enthalpy measurements of undercooled liquids, including high-melting-point metals. Design diagrams of this device and of a furnace for making a suspended drop are presented together with results of measurements on an aluminum sample.

  17. A liquid-independent volume flow measurement principle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geers, L.F.G.; Volker, A.W.F.; Hunter, T.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    A novel flow measurement principle is presented enabling non-intrusive volume flow measurements of liquids in the ml/min range. It is based on an opto-acoustical time-of-flight principle, where the time interval is recorded in which a thermal label travels a known distance through a flow channel. Bi

  18. An ionic liquid based strain sensor for large displacement measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulemans, Grim; Ceyssens, Frederik; Puers, Robert

    2017-03-01

    A robust and low cost ionic liquid based strain sensor is fabricated for high strain measurements in biomedical applications (up to 40 % and higher). A tubular 5 mm long silicone microchannel with an inner diameter of 310 µm and an outer diameter of 650 µm is filled with an ionic liquid. Three ionic liquids have been investigated: 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, ethylammonium nitrate and cholinium ethanoate. When the channel is axially stretched, geometrical deformations change the electrical impedance of the liquid channel. The sensors display a linear response and low hysteresis with an average gauge factors of 1.99 for strains up to 40 %. Additionally, to fix the sensor by surgical stitching to soft biological tissue, a sensor with tube clamps consisting of photopatternable SU-8 epoxy-based resin is proposed.

  19. Viscosity measurement of Newtonian liquids using the complex reflection coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ediguer E; Adamowski, Julio C; Higuti, Ricardo T; Buiochi, Flávio

    2008-10-01

    This work presents the implementation of the ultrasonic shear reflectance method for viscosity measurement of Newtonian liquids using wave mode conversion from longitudinal to shear waves and vice versa. The method is based on the measurement of the complex reflection coefficient (magnitude and phase) at a solid-liquid interface. The implemented measurement cell is composed of an ultrasonic transducer, a water buffer, an aluminum prism, a PMMA buffer rod, and a sample chamber. Viscosity measurements were made in the range from 1 to 3.5 MHz for olive oil and for automotive oils (SAE 40, 90, and 250) at 15 and 22.5 degrees C, respectively. Moreover, olive oil and corn oil measurements were conducted in the range from 15 to 30 degrees C at 3.5 and 2.25 MHz, respectively. The ultrasonic measurements, in the case of the less viscous liquids, agree with the results provided by a rotational viscometer, showing Newtonian behavior. In the case of the more viscous liquids, a significant difference was obtained, showing a clear non-Newtonian behavior that cannot be described by the Kelvin-Voigt model.

  20. Measuring the 14C content in liquid scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enqvist, T.; Barabanov, I. R.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gavrilyuk, Y. M.; Grishina, V. Yu; Gurentsov, V. I.; Hissa, J.; Joutsenvaara, J.; Kazalov, V. V.; Krokhaleva, S.; Kutuniva, J.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Kurlovich, A. S.; Loo, K.; Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Lubsandorzhiev, S.; Morgalyuk, V. P.; Novikova, G. Y.; Pshukov, A. M.; Sinev, V. V.; Słupecki, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Umerov, Sh I.; Veresnikova, A. V.; Virkajärvi, A.; Yanovich, Y. A.; Zavarzina, V. P.

    2016-05-01

    We are going to perform a series of measurements where the 14C/12 C ratio will be measured from several liquid scintillator samples with a dedicated setup. The setup is designed with the aim of measuring ratios smaller than 10-18. Measurements take place in two underground laboratories: in the Baksan Neutrino Observatory, Russia and in the Pyhäsalmi mine, Finland. In Baksan the measurements started in 2015 and in Pyhäsalmi they start in the beginning of 2015. In order to fully understand the operation of the setup and its background contributions a development of simulation packages has also been started. Low-energy neutrino detection with a liquid scintillator requires that the intrinsic 14C content in the liquid is extremely low. In the Borexino CTF detector at Gran Sasso, Italy the 14C/12C ratio of 2 × 10-18 has been achieved being the lowest 14C concentration ever measured. In principle, the older the oil or gas source that the liquid scintillator is derived of and the deeper it situates, the smaller the 14C/12C ratio is supposed to be. This, however, is not generally the case, and the ratio is probably determined by the U and Th content of the local environment.

  1. Electron drift velocity measurements in liquid krypton-methane mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Folegani, M; Magri, M; Piemontese, L

    1999-01-01

    Electron drift velocities have been measured in liquid krypton, pure and mixed with methane at different concentrations (1-10% in volume) versus electric field strength, and a possible effect of methane on electron lifetime has been investigated. While no effect on lifetime could be detected, since lifetimes were in all cases longer than what measurable, a very large increase in drift velocity (up to a factor 6) has been measured.

  2. Design and Implementation of an Intrinsically Safe Liquid-Level Sensor Using Coaxial Cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoquan Jin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Real-time detection of liquid level in complex environments has always been a knotty issue. In this paper, an intrinsically safe liquid-level sensor system for flammable and explosive environments is designed and implemented. The poly vinyl chloride (PVC coaxial cable is chosen as the sensing element and the measuring mechanism is analyzed. Then, the capacitance-to-voltage conversion circuit is designed and the expected output signal is achieved by adopting parameter optimization. Furthermore, the experimental platform of the liquid-level sensor system is constructed, which involves the entire process of measuring, converting, filtering, processing, visualizing and communicating. Additionally, the system is designed with characteristics of intrinsic safety by limiting the energy of the circuit to avoid or restrain the thermal effects and sparks. Finally, the approach of the piecewise linearization is adopted in order to improve the measuring accuracy by matching the appropriate calibration points. The test results demonstrate that over the measurement range of 1.0 m, the maximum nonlinearity error is 0.8% full-scale span (FSS, the maximum repeatability error is 0.5% FSS, and the maximum hysteresis error is reduced from 0.7% FSS to 0.5% FSS by applying software compensation algorithms.

  3. Composite Fermi liquids in the lowest Landau level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Senthil, T.

    2016-12-01

    We study composite Fermi liquid (CFL) states in the lowest Landau level (LLL) limit at a generic filling ν =1/n . We begin with the old observation that, in compressible states, the composite fermion in the lowest Landau level should be viewed as a charge-neutral particle carrying vorticity. This leads to the absence of a Chern-Simons term in the effective theory of the CFL. We argue here that instead a Berry curvature should be enclosed by the Fermi surface of composite fermions, with the total Berry phase fixed by the filling fraction ϕB=-2 π ν . We illustrate this point with the CFL of fermions at filling fractions ν =1 /2 q and (single and two-component) bosons at ν =1 /(2 q +1 ) . The Berry phase leads to sharp consequences in the transport properties including thermal and spin Hall conductances. We emphasize that these results only rely on the LLL limit and do not require particle-hole symmetry, which is present microscopically only for fermions at ν =1 /2 . Nevertheless, we show that the existing LLL theory of the composite Fermi liquid for bosons at ν =1 does have an emergent particle-hole symmetry. We interpret this particle-hole symmetry as a transformation between the empty state at ν =0 and the boson integer quantum hall state at ν =2 . This understanding enables us to define particle-hole conjugates of various bosonic quantum Hall states which we illustrate with the bosonic Jain and Pfaffian states. For bosons at ν =1 we construct paired non-Abelian states distinct from both the standard bosonic Pfaffian and its particle hole conjugate and show how they may arise naturally out of the neutral vortex composite Fermi liquid. The bosonic particle-hole symmetry can be realized exactly on the surface of a three-dimensional boson topological insulator. We also show that with the particle-hole and spin S U (2 ) rotation symmetries, there is no gapped topological phase for bosons at ν =1 . Finally we comment on systems that are not strictly in the

  4. Direct Measurement of Effective Magnetic Diffusivity in Turbulent Flow of Liquid Sodium

    CERN Document Server

    Frick, Peter; Denisov, Sergey; Stepanov, Rodion

    2010-01-01

    The first direct measurements of effective magnetic diffusivity in turbulent flow of electro-conductive fluids (the so-called beta-effect) under magnetic Reynolds number Rm >> 1 are reported. The measurements are performed in a nonstationary turbulent flow of liquid sodium, generated in a closed toroidal channel. The peak level of the Reynolds number reached Re \\approx 3 10^6, which corresponds to the magnetic Reynolds number Rm \\approx 30. The magnetic diffusivity of the liquid metal was determined by measuring the phase shift between the induced and the applied magnetic fields. The maximal deviation of magnetic diffusivity from its basic (laminar) value reaches about 50% .

  5. Direct measurement of effective magnetic diffusivity in turbulent flow of liquid sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Peter; Noskov, Vitaliy; Denisov, Sergey; Stepanov, Rodion

    2010-10-29

    The first direct measurements of effective magnetic diffusivity in turbulent flow of electroconductive fluids (the so-called β effect) under the magnetic Reynolds number Rm≫1 are reported. The measurements are performed in a nonstationary turbulent flow of liquid sodium, generated in a closed toroidal channel. The peak level of the Reynolds number reached Re≈3×10(6), which corresponds to the magnetic Reynolds number Rm≈30. The magnetic diffusivity of the liquid metal was determined by measuring the phase shift between the induced and the applied magnetic fields. The maximal deviation of magnetic diffusivity from its laminar value reaches about 50%.

  6. Continuous in situ measurements of stable isotopes in liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbstritt, Barbara; Gralher, Benjamin; Weiler, Markus

    2012-03-01

    We developed a method to measure in situ the isotopic composition of liquid water with minimal supervision and, most important, with a temporal resolution of less than a minute. For this purpose a microporous hydrophobic membrane contactor (Membrana) was combined with an isotope laser spectrometer (Picarro). The contactor, originally designed for degassing liquids, was used with N2 as a carrier gas in order to transform a small fraction of liquid water to water vapor. The generated water vapor was then analyzed continuously by the Picarro analyzer. To prove the membrane's applicability, we determined the specific isotope fractionation factor for the phase change through the contactor's membrane across an extended temperature range (8°C-21°C) and with different waters of known isotopic compositions. This fractionation factor is needed to subsequently derive the liquid water isotope ratio from the measured water vapor isotope ratios. The system was tested with a soil column experiment, where the isotope values derived with the new method corresponded well (R2 = 0.998 for δ18O and R2 = 0.997 for δ2H) with those of liquid water samples taken simultaneously and analyzed with a conventional method (cavity ring-down spectroscopy). The new method supersedes taking liquid samples and employs only relatively cheap and readily available components. This makes it a relatively inexpensive, fast, user-friendly, and easily reproducible method. It can be applied in both the field and laboratory wherever a water vapor isotope analyzer can be run and whenever real-time isotope data of liquid water are required at high temporal resolution.

  7. A Wireless Fluid-Level Measurement Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a recently developed wireless measurement acquisition system to fluid-level measurement. This type of fluid-level measurement system alleviates many shortcomings of fluid-level measurement methods currently being used, including limited applicability of any one fluid-level sensor design. Measurement acquisition shortcomings include the necessity for power to be supplied to each sensor and for the measurement to be extracted from each sensor via a physical connection to the sensor. Another shortcoming is existing measurement systems require that a data channel and signal conditioning electronics be dedicated to each sensor. Use of wires results in other shortcomings such as logistics needed to add or replace sensors, weight, potential for electrical arcing and wire degradations. The fluid level sensor design is a simple passive inductor-capacitor circuit that is not subject to mechanical failure that is possible when float and lever-arm systems are used. Methods are presented for using the sensor in caustic, acidic or cryogenic fluids. Oscillating magnetic fields are used to power the sensor. Once electrically excited, the sensor produces a magnetic field response. The response frequency corresponds to the amount to fluid within the capacitor s electric field. The sensor design can be modified for measuring the level of any fluid or fluent substance that can be stored in a non-conductive reservoir. The interrogation method for discerning changes in the sensor response frequency is also presented.

  8. Liquid high-level waste storage - can we tolerate it?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P. [Terramares Group (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    High-level radioactive waste from reprocessing is stored at British Nuclear Fuel`s Sellafield site in High Active Storage Tanks (HAST`s), which require constant cooling and ventilation. The author argues that, containing as they do, about 100 times the caesium 137 released during the Chernobyl accident, these containment tanks represent an unacceptably high risk of a major release of caesium 137, a volatile gamma-emitter with a half-life of about 30 years. It is readily transferred into food chains and difficult to remove from soils, tarmac and concrete. Still worse, it is argued, are the tens of thousands of cancers and other biological radiation effects likely to occur as a result of such a release. He argues for the vitrification of all such highly active liquid wastes, which would slow further reprocessing down to accommodate the current backlog. (UK).

  9. Bias-dependent molecular-level structure of electrical double layer in ionic liquid on graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jennifer M; Walters, Deron; Labuda, Aleksander; Feng, Guang; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Proksch, Roger; Balke, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the bias-evolution of the electrical double layer structure of an ionic liquid on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite measured by atomic force microscopy. We observe reconfiguration under applied bias and the orientational transitions in the Stern layer. The synergy between molecular dynamics simulation and experiment provides a comprehensive picture of structural phenomena and long and short-range interactions, which improves our understanding of the mechanism of charge storage on a molecular level.

  10. Disordered Fermi liquid in epitaxial graphene from quantum transport measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Avila, Samuel; Tzalenchuk, Alexander; Kubatkin, Sergey; Yakimova, Rositza; Janssen, T J B M; Cedergren, Karin; Bergsten, Tobias; Fal'ko, Vladimir

    2011-10-14

    We have performed magnetotransport measurements on monolayer epitaxial graphene and analyzed them in the framework of the disordered Fermi liquid theory. We have separated the electron-electron and weak-localization contributions to resistivity and demonstrated the phase coherence over a micrometer length scale, setting the limit of at least 50 ps on the spin relaxation time in this material.

  11. Measurement of Radiation Damage of Water-based Liquid Scintillator and Liquid Scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Bignell, Lindsey J; Hans, Sunej; Jaffe, David E; Rosero, Richard; Vigdor, Steven; Viren, Brett; Worcester, Elizabeth; Yeh, Minfang; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of $5\\%$ scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of $1.74 \\pm 0.55 \\%$ and $1.31 \\pm 0.59 \\%$ after $\\approx$ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Whilst some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical conte...

  12. A magnetic suspension system for measuring liquid density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Centeno González

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Density is a derived quantity of mass and length; it is defined as mass per volume unit and its SI unit is kg/m3. National metrology institutes have been designing and building their own magnetic suspension systems during the last 5 decades for making fluid density measurements; this has allowed them to carry out research into liquids and gases’ physical characteristics. This paper was aimed at designing and developing a magnetic suspension system for a magnetic balance used in determining liquid density to be used in CENAM’s metrology density laboratories.

  13. Measurement of vapor-liquid-liquid phase equilibrium-Equipment and results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Michael Grynnerup; von Solms, Nicolas; Richon, Dominique;

    2015-01-01

    -water-gas hydrate inhibitor systems, at temperatures ranging from 283 to 353 K and at pressures up to 40 MPa. The core of the equipment is an equilibrium cell, equipped with sapphire windows and connected to an analytical system by capillary samplers.New vapor-liquid-liquid equilibrium data are reported for methane......+ n-hexane + methanol + water at 296.2 K and pressures of 6 to 10 MPa. The Cubic-Plus-Association (CPA) equation of state is used to model the phase equilibria data measured. A good agreement between predictions and experimental data is observed, supporting the reliability of the new data. (C) 2015...

  14. Passive Wireless Cryogenic Liquid Level Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the continued development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based liquid level sensors for NASA application to cryogenic liquid...

  15. Measurement of Longitudinal Electron Diffusion in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yichen; Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Joshi, Jyoti; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William; Rao, Triveni; Stewart, Jim; Tang, Wei; Viren, Brett

    2015-01-01

    We report the measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients in liquid argon for electric fields between 100 and 2000 V/cm with a gold photocathode as a bright electron source. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. Our results, which are consistent with previous measurements in the region between 100 to 350 V/cm [1] , are systematically higher than the prediction of Atrazhev-Timoshkin[2], and represent the world's best measurement in the region between 350 to 2000 V/cm. The quantum efficiency of the gold photocathode, the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficients in gas argon are also presented.

  16. Time-resolved optical spectroscopy measurements of shocked liquid deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. E.; Knudson, M. D.; Carlson, A. L.; Dunham, G. S.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Hanson, D. L.; Asay, J. R.

    2008-10-01

    Time-resolved optical spectroscopy has been used to measure the shock pressure steadiness, emissivity, and temperature of liquid deuterium shocked to 22-90 GPa. The shock was produced using magnetically accelerated flyer plate impact, and spectra were acquired with a suite of four fiber-optic-coupled spectrometers with streak camera detectors. The shock pressure changes by an average of -1.2% over the 10-30 ns cell transit time, determined from the relative changes in the shock front self-emission with time. The shock front reflectivity was measured from 5140Å and 5320Å laser light reflected from the D2 shock. The emissivity inferred from the reflectivity measurements was in reasonably good agreement with quantum molecular dynamics simulation predictions. The spectral radiance wavelength dependence was found to agree well (average normalized χ2=1.6 ) with a Planckian multiplied by the emissivity. The shock front temperature was determined from the emissivity and the wavelength-dependent shock self-emission. Thirty-seven temperature measurements spanning the 22-90 GPa range were accumulated. The large number of temperature measurements enables a comparison of the scatter in the data with expectations for a Gaussian distribution. This facilitates determination of uncertainties that incorporate both apparatus contributions and otherwise unquantified systematic effects that cause self-emission variations from one experiment to another. Agreement between temperatures determined from the absolute spectral radiance and from the relative shape of the spectrum further substantiates the absence of systematic biases. The weighted mean temperature uncertainties were as low as ±3-4% , enabling the discrimination between competing models for the D2 equation of state (EOS). The temperature results agree well with models that predict a maximum compression of ˜4.4 . Softer models that predict approximately sixfold compression are inconsistent with the data to a very high

  17. Measurements of proportional scintillation in liquid xenon using thin wires

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, E; Goetzke, L W; Fernandez, A J Melgarejo; Messina, M; Naganoma, J; Plante, G; Rizzo, A; Shagin, P; Wall, R

    2014-01-01

    Proportional scintillation in liquid xenon has a promising application in the field of direct dark matter detection, potentially allowing for simpler, more sensitive detectors. However, knowledge of the basic properties of the phenomenon as well as guidelines for its practical use are currently limited. We report here on measurements of proportional scintillation light emitted in liquid xenon around thin wires. The maximum proportional scintillation gain of $287^{+97}_{-75}$ photons per drift electron was obtained using 10 $\\mu$m diameter gold plated tungsten wire. The thresholds for electron multiplication and proportional scintillation are measured as $725^{+48}_{-139}$ and $412^{+10}_{-133}$ kV/cm, respectively. The threshold for proportional scintillation is in good agreement with a previously published result, while the electron multiplication threshold represents a novel measurement. A complete set of parameters for the practical use of the electron multiplication and proportional scintillation processe...

  18. Alterations in maternal corticosteroid levels influence fetal urine and lung liquid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Ellen; Wood, Charles E; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2003-12-01

    This study was designed to test the hypotheses that disruption of maternal adrenal secretion in late pregnancy requires fetal adaptations in order to maintain fetal blood volume and fetal viability. Pregnant ewes were adrenalectomized at approximately 112 days, and cortisol and aldosterone were replaced to either normal pregnant levels (with 1 mg/kg per day of cortisol and 3 microg/kg per day of aldosterone) or normal nonpregnant levels of aldosterone or cortisol (0.5 mg/kg per day of cortisol or 1.5 microg/kg per day of aldosterone). Fetal blood volume, blood pressure, lung liquid production, urine production, free water clearance, and glomerular filtration rate were measured at 130 days. In a separate group, fetal organ blood flow was measured. Fetal blood volume was not significantly decreased by disruption of maternal corticosteroid secretion. However fetal urine production and free water clearance were reduced in fetuses of low cortisol or low aldosterone ewes. Fetal lung liquid secretion was also significantly reduced in the low aldosterone group. The glomerular filtration rate was reduced in fetuses of all adrenalectomized ewes, regardless of replacement dose. Fetal blood pressure was significantly reduced in the fetuses of low aldosterone ewes; blood flow to several fetal organs was increased in this group, indicating that decreased vascular resistance may contribute to the relative hypotension. Alterations in maternal adrenal corticosteroid levels resulted in fetal adaptation to maintain fetal blood volume despite relative maternal hypovolemia. These adaptations occurred at the expense of fetal urine and lung liquid production.

  19. Calibration of a liquid scintillation counter to assess tritium levels in various samples

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Haddad, M N; Abu-Jarad, F A

    1999-01-01

    An LKB-Wallac 1217 Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC) was calibrated with a newly adopted cocktail. The LSC was then used to measure tritium levels in various samples to assess the compliance of tritium levels with the recommended international levels. The counter was calibrated to measure both biological and operational samples for personnel and for an accelerator facility at KFUPM. The biological samples include the bioassay (urine), saliva, and nasal tests. The operational samples of the light ion linear accelerator include target cooling water, organic oil, fomblin oil, and smear samples. Sets of standards, which simulate various samples, were fabricated using traceable certified tritium standards. The efficiency of the counter was obtained for each sample. The typical range of the efficiencies varied from 33% for smear samples down to 1.5% for organic oil samples. A quenching curve for each sample is presented. The minimum detectable activity for each sample was established. Typical tritium levels in bio...

  20. Measurement of scintillation efficiency for nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Gastler, D; Hime, A; Stonehill, L C; Seibert, S; Klein, J; Lippincott, W H; McKinsey, D N; Nikkel, J A

    2010-01-01

    The scintillation light yield of liquid argon from nuclear recoils relative to electronic recoils has been measured as a function of recoil energy from 10 keVr up to 250 keVr. The scintillation efficiency, defined as the ratio of the nuclear recoil scintillation response to the electronic recoil response, is 0.25 \\pm 0.02 + 0.01(correlated) above 20 keVr.

  1. Viscoelasticity measurement of gel formed at the liquid-liquid reactive interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujiie, Tomohiro

    2012-11-01

    We have experimentally studied a reacting liquid flow with gel formation by using viscous fingering (VF) as a flow field. Here, two systems were employed. In one system, sodium polyacrylate (SPA) solution and ferric ion solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. In another system, xthantan gum (XG) solution and the ferric ion solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. We showed that influence of gel formation on VF were qualitatively different in these two systems. We consider that the difference in the two systems will be caused by the difference in the properties of the gels. Therefore, we have measured the rheological properties of the gels by means of a rheometer. In the present study, viscoelasticity measurement was performed by two methods. One is the method which uses Double Wall Ring sensor (TA instrument) and another is the method using parallel plate. In both viscoelasticity measurements, the behavior of the formed gel was qualitatively consistent. We have found that the gel in the SPA system shows viscoelastic fluid like behavior. Moreover, we have found that the gel in the XG system shows solid like behavior.

  2. Density measurements of compressed-liquid dimethyl ether + pentane mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outcalt, Stephanie L; Lemmon, Eric W

    2016-01-01

    Compressed-liquid densities of three compositions of the binary mixture dimethyl ether (CAS No. 115-10-6) + pentane (CAS No. 109-66-0) have been measured with a vibrating U-tube densimeter. Measurements were made at temperatures from 270 K to 390 K with pressures from 1.0 MPa to 50 MPa. The overall combined uncertainty (k=2) of the density data is 0.81 kg·m(-3). Data presented here have been used to improve a previously formulated Helmholtz energy based mixture model. The newly derived parameters are given.

  3. Equation of state measurements in liquid deuterium to 100 GPa

    CERN Document Server

    Knudson, M D; Bailey, J E; Lemke, R W; Hall, C A; Deeney, C; Asay, J R

    2003-01-01

    Using intense magnetic pressure, a method was developed to launch flyer plates to velocities in excess of 20 km s sup - sup 1. This technique was used to perform plate-impact, shock wave experiments on cryogenic liquid deuterium (LD sub 2) to examine its high-pressure equation of state (EOS). Using an impedance matching method, Hugoniot measurements were obtained in the pressure range of 22-100 GPa. The results of these experiments disagree with the previously reported Hugoniot measurements of LD sub 2 in the pressure range above approx 40 GPa, but are in good agreement with first principles, ab initio models for hydrogen and its isotopes.

  4. Measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yichen, E-mail: yichen@bnl.gov [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 Pennsylvania St., Building 510E, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Tsang, Thomas [Instrumentation Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 N. Technology St., Building 535B, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Joshi, Jyoti; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 Pennsylvania St., Building 510E, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rao, Triveni [Instrumentation Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 N. Technology St., Building 535B, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Stewart, James; Tang, Wei; Viren, Brett [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 Pennsylvania St., Building 510E, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    We report the measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients in liquid argon for electric fields between 100 and 2000 V/cm with a gold photocathode as a bright electron source. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. In the region between 100 and 350 V/cm, our results show a discrepancy with the previous measurement [1]. In the region between 350 and 2000 V/cm, our results represent the world's best measurement. Over the entire measured electric field range, our results are systematically higher than the calculation of Atrazhev‐Timoshkin [2]. The quantum efficiency of the gold photocathode, the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficients in gas argon are also presented.

  5. Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kisner, Roger A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-07-10

    A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

  6. Calorimetric Measurements of Liquid Al-Zn Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dębski, Adam; Gąsior, Władysław; Szmit, Katarzyna

    2016-10-01

    The integral molar enthalpies of mixing were determined by the drop calorimetric method for binary AL-Zn liquid solutions and compared with the Miedema model as well as the earlier experimental data. The measurements were conducted at two temperatures: 957 K and 1001 K (684 °C and 728 °C), in the entire concentration range. Based on the experimental calorimetric data of this study as well as those available in the literature and the results of the activity studies, the interaction parameters of the Redlich-Kister equation for the liquid Al-Zn phase were worked out with the use of the least square method. The partial and integral Gibbs energies, entropies and enthalpies were calculated and presented in tables and figures. Additionally, the concentration-concentration partial structure factors for the ideal and real Al-Zn solutions were calculated and graphically presented.

  7. Measurement of Thermal Conductivity of Liquids at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, V.; Remy, B.; Degiovanni, A.; Demeurie, F.; Meulemans, J.; Lombard, P.

    2012-11-01

    The goal purchased in this paper is to implement a pulse method to measure the thermal conductivity of liquid silica glass above 1200°C until 1600°C. A heat flux stimulation controlled in energy and in time is generated on the front face of an experimental cell. The temperature rise is measured on the rear face of this cell face by using a fast cooled infrared camera. The choice of the measurement cell geometry is fundamental to be able to estimate at the same time the thermal diffusivity and the specific heat of the liquid by an inverse technique. The parameters estimation problem takes into account the optimization of the cell wall thickness. The theoretical model used for the inversion takes into account the coupled heat transfer modes (conduction, convection and radiation) that can occur during the experiment, particularly the thermal conductive short-cut through metallic lateral walls of the cell and radiative transfer within the semi-transparent and participating medium. First measurements are performed on a cell filled with water at ambient temperature in order to validate the parameters estimation procedure.

  8. Development of an Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter for Trace Level Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Finn, Erin C.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Panisko, Mark E.; Shaff, Sarah M.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-09-01

    Low-level liquid scintillation counting (LSC) has been established as one of the radiation detection techniques useful in elucidating environmental processes and environmental monitoring around nuclear facilities. The Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter (ULB-LSC) under construction in the Shallow Underground Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory aims to further reduce the MDAs and/or required sample processing. Through layers of passive shielding in conjunction with an active veto and 30 meters water equivalent overburden, the background reduction is expected to be 10 to 100 times below typical analytic low-background liquid scintillation systems. Simulations have shown an expected background of around 14 counts per day. A novel approach to the light collection will use a coated hollow light guide cut into the inner copper shielding. Demonstration LSC measurements will show low-energy detection, spectral deconvolution, and alpha/beta discrimination capabilities, from trials with standards of tritium, strontium-90, and actinium-227, respectively. An overview of the system design and expected demonstration measurements will emphasize the potential applications of the ULB-LSC in environmental monitoring for treaty verification, reach-back sample analysis, and facility inspections.

  9. Field measurement and analysis of harmonic levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karunakara, K.; Muthu Kumar, E.; Rajesh Kumar, O.; Nambudiri, P.V.V.; Srinivasan, K.N. [Central Power Research Institute, Bangalore (India)

    1999-07-01

    The level of harmonics on the transmission and distribution network is rising over the years, due to the rapid development and usage of electronic and semiconductor devices in the industries, as these devices produce harmonic currents. As the harmonic currents produced by these devices are unproductive and affect the ideal sinusoidal waveshapes, these have to be limited to a tolerable limit at the Point of Common Coupling (PCC). Before setting a tolerable limit on harmonics it is necessary to know the level of harmonics already present in the system, so that the limits suggested are comprehensive and practicable. To have a fair idea about the current and voltage harmonics on the Indian system, Central Power Research Institute (CPRI) has carried out a lot of measurements both on the distribution network and transmission network over the past 13 years. This paper discusses the harmonic measurements carried out by CPRI on different loads and voltage levels on the Indian network. The methodology adopted for measurement and results are also discussed in this paper. (author)

  10. Velocity Measurements of Thermoelectric Driven Flowing Liquid Lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szott, Matthew; Xu, Wenyu; Fiflis, Peter; Haehnlein, Ian; Kapat, Aveek; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David N.

    2014-10-01

    Liquid lithium has garnered additional attention as a PFC due to its several advantages over solid PFCs, including reduced erosion and thermal fatigue, increased heat transfer, higher device lifetime, and enhanced plasma performance due to the establishment of low recycling regimes at the wall. The Lithium Metal Infused Trenches concept (LiMIT) has demonstrated thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic flow of liquid lithium through horizontal open-faced metal trenches with measured velocities varying from 3.7+/-0.5 cm/s in the 1.76 T field of HT-7 to 22+/-3 cm/s in the SLiDE facility at UIUC at 0.059 T. To demonstrate the versatility of the concept, a new LiMIT design using narrower trenches shows steady state, thermoelectric-driven flow at an arbitrary angle from horizontal. Velocity characteristics are measured and discussed. Based on this LiMIT concept, a new limiter design has been developed to be tested on the mid-plane of the EAST plasma. Preliminary modelling suggests lithium flow of 6 cm/s in this device. Additionally, recent testing at the Magnum-PSI facility has given encouraging results, and velocity measurements in relation to magnetic field strength and plasma flux are also presented.

  11. Electropyroelectric technique for measurement of the thermal effusivity of liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, R; Moreno, I; Araujo, C [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Calz. Solidaridad Esquina Paseo de la Bufa s/n, C. P. 98060, Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Marin, E, E-mail: emarin63@yahoo.e, E-mail: emarinm@ipn.m [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y TecnologIa Avanzada, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, LegarIa 694, Colonia Irrigacion, C. P. 11500, Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-06-09

    The photopyroelectric method has been recognized as a reliable and useful tool for the measurement of the thermal properties of condensed matter samples. Usually the photothermal signal is generated using intensity modulated light beams, whose amplitudes are difficult to maintain stable. In this paper we describe a variant of this technique that uses amplitude modulated electrical current as excitation source, via Joule heating of the metal contact on one side of the pyroelectric sensor. The possibilities of this method, called by us the electropyroelectric technique, for thermal effusivity measurements of liquid samples are shown using test samples of distilled water, ethanol and glycerine. The results obtained for this parameter agree well with the values reported in the literature. Our measurement uncertainties are about 3%, a fact that opens several possible applications.

  12. Fast Tritium Separation From the Low Level Radioactive Liquid Waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG; Xiao-hu; YANG; Su-liang; YANG; Lei; YANG; Jin-ling

    2012-01-01

    <正>Due to the needed of high efficiency monitoring and controlling of the waste water generated from the spent fuel reprocessing process, analyzing work need to be done quickly. Tritium is an important nuclide in the liquid waste and its content must be determined. But the existing tritium analysis method

  13. Optical Feedback Interferometry for Velocity Measurement of Parallel Liquid-Liquid Flows in a Microchannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelio E. Ramírez-Miquet

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Optical feedback interferometry (OFI is a compact sensing technique with recent implementation for flow measurements in microchannels. We propose implementing OFI for the analysis at the microscale of multiphase flows starting with the case of parallel flows of two immiscible fluids. The velocity profiles in each phase were measured and the interface location estimated for several operating conditions. To the authors knowledge, this sensing technique is applied here for the first time to multiphase flows. Theoretical profiles issued from a model based on the Couette viscous flow approximation reproduce fairly well the experimental results. The sensing system and the analysis presented here provide a new tool for studying more complex interactions between immiscible fluids (such as liquid droplets flowing in a microchannel.

  14. Analysis of the transient rotating cylinder apparatus for the measurement of liquid-liquid interface shear viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Westborg, H

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of the transient rotating cylinder apparatus for the measurement of liquid-liquid interface viscosity is given. An analytical expression that allows the determination of the interfacial viscosity from observations of the interface movement is given. The expression is presented...... in tabular form for selected values of the physical parameters of the two phases, and suggestions for apparatus design are given....

  15. Density of Ni-Al Alloys in Liquid and Solid-Liquid Coexistence State Measured by a Modified Pycnometric Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang FANG; Feng XIAO; Zushu LI; Zainan TAO

    2004-01-01

    The density of Ni-Al alloys in both liquid state and solid-liquid coexistence state was measured with a modified pycnometric method. It was found that the density of NI-Al alloys decreases with increasing temperature and Al concentration in the alloys. The molar volume of liquid Ni-Al binary alloys increases with the increase of temperature and Al concentration. The partial molar volume of Al in NI-Al binary alloy was calculated approximately. The molar volume of liquid NI-Al alloy determined in the present work shows a negative deviation from the ideal linear molar volume.

  16. Return and Liquidity Relationships on Market and Accounting Levels in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Finotti Cordeiro Perobelli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This article discusses profitability-liquidity relationships on accounting and market levels for 872 shares of publicly-traded Brazilian companies, observed between 1994 and 2013. On the market level, the assumption is that share liquidity is able to reduce some of the risks incurred by investors, making them more willing to pay a higher price for liquid shares, which would lower expected market returns. On the accounting level, the basic hypothesis argues that a firm's holding more liquid assets is related to a conservative investment policy, possibly reducing accounting returns for shareholders. Under the assumption of financial constraint, however, more accounting liquidity would allow positive net present value investments to be carried out, increasing future accounting returns, which would positively affect market liquidity and share prices in an efficient market, resulting in a lower market risk/expected return premium. Under the assumption of no financial constraint, however, more accounting liquidity would only represent a carry cost, compromising future accounting returns, which would adversely affect market liquidity and share prices and result in a higher market risk/expected return premium. Among the hypotheses, the presence of a negative market liquidity premium was verified in Brazil, with shares that traded more exhibiting a higher expected market return. On the margins of the major theories on the subject, only two negative relationships between excess accounting liquidity and market liquidity and accounting return, supporting the carry cost assumption for financially unconstrained firms, were verified. In terms of this paper's contributions, there is the analysis, unprecedented in Brazil as far as is known, of the relationship between liquidity and return on market and accounting levels, considering the financial constraint hypothesis to which the firms are subject.

  17. Modeling of Liquid Level and Bubble Behavior in Vacuum Chamber of RH Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-hong LI; Yan-ping BAO; Rui WANG; Min WANG; Qing-xue HUANG; Yu-gui LI

    2016-01-01

    In the Ruhrstahl-Heraeus (RH)refining process,liquid steel flow pattern in a ladle is controlled by the fluid flow behavior in the vacuum chamber.Potassium chloride solution and NaOH solution saturated with CO 2 were respectively used as a tracer to investigate the liquid and gas flow behaviors in the vacuum chamber.Principal compo-nent and comparative analysis were made to show the factors controlling mixing and circulation flow rate.The liquid level and bubble behavior in the vacuum chamber greatly affect fluid flow in RH process.Experiments were per-formed to investigate the effects of liquid steel level,gas flow rate,bubble residence time,and gas injection mode on mixing,decarburization,and void fraction.The results indicate that the mixing process can be divided into three re-gions:the flow rate-affected zone,the concentration gradient-affected zone,and their combination.The liquid steel level in the vacuum chamber of 300 mm is a critical point in the decarburization transition.For liquid level lower than 300 mm,liquid steel circulation controls decarburization,while for liquid level higher than 300 mm,bubble behavior is the main controlling factor.During the RH process,it is recommended to use the concentrated bubble injection mode for low gas flow rates and the uniform bubble injection mode for high gas flow rates.

  18. Paramagnetic ionic liquids for measurements of density using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwambok, David K; Thuo, Martin M; Atkinson, Manza B J; Mirica, Katherine A; Shapiro, Nathan D; Whitesides, George M

    2013-09-03

    Paramagnetic ionic liquids (PILs) provide new capabilities to measurements of density using magnetic levitation (MagLev). In a typical measurement, a diamagnetic object of unknown density is placed in a container containing a PIL. The container is placed between two magnets (typically NdFeB, oriented with like poles facing). The density of the diamagnetic object can be determined by measuring its position in the magnetic field along the vertical axis (levitation height, h), either as an absolute value or relative to internal standards of known density. For density measurements by MagLev, PILs have three advantages over solutions of paramagnetic salts in aqueous or organic solutions: (i) negligible vapor pressures; (ii) low melting points; (iii) high thermal stabilities. In addition, the densities, magnetic susceptibilities, glass transition temperatures, thermal decomposition temperatures, viscosities, and hydrophobicities of PILs can be tuned over broad ranges by choosing the cation-anion pair. The low melting points and high thermal stabilities of PILs provide large liquidus windows for density measurements. This paper demonstrates applications and advantages of PILs in density-based analyses using MagLev.

  19. Measuring receptive collocational competence across proficiency levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déogratias Nizonkiza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates, (i English as Foreign Language (EFL learners’ receptive collocational knowledge growth in relation to their linguistic proficiency level; (ii how much receptive collocational knowledge is acquired as proficiency develops; and (iii the extent to which receptive knowledge of collocations of EFL learners varies across word frequency bands. A proficiency measure and a collocation test were administered to English majors at the University of Burundi. Results of the study suggest that receptive collocational competence develops alongside EFL learners’ linguistic proficiency; which lends empirical support to Gyllstad (2007, 2009 and Author (2011 among others, who reported similar findings. Furthermore, EFL learners’ collocations growth seems to be quantifiable wherein both linguistic proficiency level and word frequency occupy a crucial role. While more gains in terms of collocations that EFL learners could potentially add as a result of change in proficiency are found at lower levels of proficiency; collocations of words from more frequent word bands seem to be mastered first, and more gains are found at more frequent word bands. These results confirm earlier findings on the non-linearity nature of vocabulary growth (cf. Meara 1996 and the fundamental role played by frequency in word knowledge for vocabulary in general (Nation 1983, 1990, Nation and Beglar 2007, which are extended here to collocations knowledge.

  20. Physical Properties of Liquid Terbium Measured by Levitation Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To understand the nature and behavior of rare earth metals in their liquid phases, accurate values of their physical properties are essential.However, to measure their physical properties, the samples should be maintained in liquid phases for prolonged time, and this raises a formidable challenge.This is mainly explained by their high melting temperatures (e.g., 1629 K for Tb), high vapor pressure, and the risk of melt contamination with a crucible or support.An electrostatic levitation furnace alleviated these difficulties and allowed the determination of density, surface tension, and viscosity of several metals above their melting temperature.Here, first, the levitation furnace facility and the noncontact diagnostic procedures were briefly discussed, followed by the explanation of their thermophysical property measurements over wide temperature ranges.The density was obtained using an ultraviolet-based imaging technique that allowed excellent illumination, even at elevated temperatures.Over the 1615 to 1880 K temperature span, the density measurements could be expressed as ρ(T)=7.84×103-0.47 (T-Tm) (kg·m-3) with Tm=1629 K, yielding a volume expansion coefficient α(T) =6.0×10-5 (K-1).In addition, the surface tension and the viscosity could be determined by inducing a drop oscillation to a molten sample.Using this technique, the surface tension data could be expressed as σ(T)=8.93×102-0.10 (T-Tm)(mN·m-1) and those for viscosity as η(T) =0.583 exp [4.1×104/(RT)] (MPa·s) over the 1690 to 1980 K temperature range.

  1. Direct measurements of ionic liquid layering at a single mica-liquid interface and in nano-films between two mica-liquid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Lucy R; Browning, Kathryn L; Clarke, Stuart M; Smith, Alexander M; Perkin, Susan; Skoda, M W A; Norman, Sarah E

    2016-12-21

    The layering of ionic liquids close to flat, charged interfaces has been identified previously through theoretical and some experimental measurements. Here we present evidence for oscillations in ion density ('layering') in a long chain ionic liquid (1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide) near the interface with mica using two complementary approaches. Neutron reflection at the ionic liquid-mica interface is used to detect structure at a single interface, and surface force balance (SFB) measurements carried out with the same ionic liquid reveal oscillatory density in the liquid confined between two mica sheets. Our findings imply the interfacial structure is not induced by confinement alone. Structural forces between two mica surfaces extend to approximately twice the distance of the density oscillations measured at a single interface and have similar period in both cases.

  2. High performance liquid-level sensor based on mPOFBG for aircraft applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, C. A. F.; Pospori, A.; Saez-Rodriguez, D.

    2015-01-01

    A high performance liquid-level sensor based on microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg grating (mPOFBG) array sensors is reported in detail. The sensor sensitivity is found to be 98pm/cm of liquid, enhanced by more than a factor of 9 compared to a reported silica fiber-based sensor....

  3. Evapotranspiration Modeling and Measurements at Ecosystem Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirca, C.; Snyder, R. L.; Mereu, S.; Kovács-Láng, E.; Ónodi, G.; Spano, D.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, the availability of reference evapotranspiration (ETo) data is greatly increased. ETo, in conjunction with coefficients accounting for the difference between the vegetation and the reference surface, provides estimation of the actual evapotranspiration (ETa). The coefficients approach was applied in the past mainly for crops, due the lack of experimental data and difficulties to account for terrain and vegetation variability in natural ecosystems. Moreover, the assessment of ETa over large spatial scale by measurements is often time consuming, and requires several measurement points with relatively expensive and sophisticated instrumentation and techniques (e.g. eddy covariance). The Ecosystem Water Program (ECOWAT) was recently developed to help estimates of ETa of ecosystems by accounting for microclimate, vegetation type, plant density, and water stress. ETa on natural and semi-natural ecosystems has several applications, e.g. water status assessment, fire danger estimation, and ecosystem management practices. In this work, results obtained using ECOWAT to assess ETa of a forest ecosystem located in Hungary are reported. The site is a part of the EU-FP7 INCREASE project, which aims to study the effects of climate change on European shrubland ecosystems. In the site, a climate manipulation experiment was setted up to have a warming and a drought treatment (besides the control). Each treatment was replicated three times We show how the ECOWAT model performed when the predicted actual evapotranspiration is compared with actual evapotranspiration obtained from Surface Renewal method and with soil moisture measurements. ECOWAT was able to capture the differences in the water balance at treatment level, confirming its potential as a tool for water status assessment. For the Surface Renewal method, high frequency temperature data were collected to estimate the sensible heat flux (H'). The net radiation (Rn) and soil heat flux density (G) were also

  4. Reduction of Liquid Bridge Force for 3D Microstructure Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Murakami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed an increased demand for a method for precise measurement of the microstructures of mechanical microparts, microelectromechanical systems, micromolds, optical devices, microholes, etc. This paper presents a measurement system for three-dimensional (3D microstructures that use an optical fiber probe. This probe consists of a stylus shaft with a diameter of 2.5 µm and a glass ball with a diameter of 5 µm attached to the stylus tip. In this study, the measurement system, placed in a vacuum vessel, is constructed suitably to prevent adhesion of the stylus tip to the measured surface caused by the surface force resulting from the van der Waals force, electrostatic force, and liquid bridge force. First, these surface forces are analyzed with the aim of investigating the causes of adhesion. Subsequently, the effects of pressure inside the vacuum vessel on surface forces are evaluated. As a result, it is found that the surface force is 0.13 µN when the pressure inside the vacuum vessel is 350 Pa. This effect is equivalent to a 60% reduction in the surface force in the atmosphere.

  5. Interferometric measurements of silicon carbide mirrors at liquid helium temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Paul N.; Huff, Lynn W.; Forney, Paul B.; Petrovsky, Gury T.; Ljubarsky, Sergey V.; Khimitch, Yuri P.

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents the results of interferometric tests of two silicon carbide mirrors tested at room temperature and 6 K. The first mirror has a spherical f/1.73 surface, a diameter of 170 mm, and is of solid, plano-concave construction. The other mirror, a plano measuring 308 mm by 210 mm, is of lightweighted, closed-back construction. The mirrors were manufactured by the Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia, and were loaned to Lockheed for these tests. Optical tests on both mirrors were performed using the Lockheed cryogenic optical test facility at liquid helium temperature and a Zygo Mark II interferometer. There was no change in the surface figure of the mirrors, within the test uncertainty of approximately plus or minus 0.02 waves at 0.6328-micrometer wavelength.

  6. 78 FR 71817 - Liquidity Coverage Ratio: Liquidity Risk Measurement, Standards, and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    .... Liquidity Characteristics of HQLA a. Risk Profile b. Market-based Characteristics c. Central Bank... supervision of Federal branches and agencies of foreign banks before considering applying a liquidity coverage... liquidity coverage ratio as an enhanced prudential standard for bank holding companies and savings and...

  7. Notion and methods of measurement of enterprise financial liquidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Gołaś

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article shows methods of assessment of the financial liquidity of an enterprise. Static, dynamic and non-classic methods of the financial liquidity assessment have been shown. The following static methods are discussed: construction and information content of current indicator, rapid indicator and indicator of an instant liquidity. In the case of dynamic part, indicators were shown of cash efficiency and sufficiency i.e. criteria of financial liquidity assessing based on the financial circulations. Moreover, chosen methods were mentioned of the financial liquidity assessment, which are less frequently used in practice, which are called non-classic.

  8. Drift Time Measurement in the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter using Cosmic Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adorisio, C; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahmed, H; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Aktas, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amorós, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anjos, N; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonelli, S; Antos, J; Antunovic, B; Anulli, F; Aoun, S; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Archambault, J P; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J F; Argyropoulos, T; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Arutinov, D; Asai, M; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Asner, D; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Atoian, G; Auerbach, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Austin, N; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Ay, C; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Bacci, C; Bach, A; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Baranov, S P; Baranov, S; Barashkou, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baron, S; Baroncelli, A; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Barros, N; Bartoldus, R; Bartsch, D; Bastos, J; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Bazalova, M; Beare, B; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Becerici, N; Bechtle, P; Beck, G A; Beck, H P; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Bedajanek, I; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednár, P; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Ben Ami, S; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendel, M; Benedict, B H; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benincasa, G P; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernardet, K; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertin, A; Besana, M I; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J B; Blanchot, G; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bocci, A; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Böser, S; Bogaerts, J A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A; Bondarenko, V G; Bondioli, M; Boonekamp, M; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borroni, S; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bosteels, M; Boterenbrood, H; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boulahouache, C; Bourdarios, C; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Braem, A; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Breton, D; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brodbeck, T J; Brodet, E; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brubaker, E; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Bulekov, O; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butin, F; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Byatt, T; Caballero, J; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Camarri, P; Cambiaghi, M; Cameron, D; Campabadal Segura, F; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Cantero, J; Capasso, L; Capeans Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Caracinha, D; Caramarcu, C; Cardarelli, R; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, B; Caron, S; Carrillo Montoya, G D; Carron Montero, S; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cascella, M; Caso, C; Castaneda Hernadez, A M; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N; Cataldi, G; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Cattani, G; Caughron, S; 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Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Zivkovic, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V

    2010-01-01

    The ionization signals in the liquid argon of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied in detail using cosmic muons. In particular, the drift time of the ionization electrons is measured and used to assess the intrinsic uniformity of the calorimeter gaps and estimate its impact on the constant term of the energy resolution. The drift times of electrons in the cells of the second layer of the calorimeter are uniform at the level of 1.3% in the barrel and 2.7% in the endcaps. This leads to an estimated contribution to the constant term of 0.29% in the barrel and 0.53% in the endcaps. The same data are used to measure the drift velocity of ionization electrons in liquid argon, which is found to be 4.61 +- 0.07 mm/microsecond at 88.5 K and 1 kV/mm.

  9. Drift Time Measurement in the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter using Cosmic Muons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. 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W.; Jones, T. J.; Jonsson, O.; Joos, D.; Joram, C.; Jorge, P. M.; Juranek, V.; Jussel, P.; Kabachenko, V. V.; Kabana, S.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kaiser, S.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kalinovskaya, L. V.; Kalinowski, A.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Karagounis, M.; Karagoz Unel, M.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasmi, A.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kastoryano, M.; Kataoka, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Katsoufis, E.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kayl, M. S.; Kayumov, F.; Kazanin, V. A.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Kazi, S. I.; Keates, J. R.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P. T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Kelly, M.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, M.; Kepka, O.; Kerschen, N.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Khakzad, M.; Khalil-Zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharchenko, D.; Khodinov, A.; Kholodenko, A. G.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khovanskiy, N.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kilvington, G.; Kim, H.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, P. C.; Kim, S. H.; Kind, O.; Kind, P.; King, B. T.; Kirk, J.; Kirsch, G. P.; Kirsch, L. E.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kisielewska, D.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiyamura, H.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klemetti, M.; Klier, A.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E. B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P. F.; Klous, S.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluge, T.; Kluit, P.; Klute, M.; Kluth, S.; Knecht, N. S.; Kneringer, E.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koblitz, B.; Kocian, M.; Kocnar, A.; Kodys, P.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Köpke, L.; Koetsveld, F.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kohn, F.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Kokott, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolesnikov, V.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Kollar, D.; Kolos, S.; Kolya, S. D.; Komar, A. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kondo, T.; Kono, T.; Kononov, A. I.; Konoplich, R.; Konovalov, S. P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Koperny, S.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Koreshev, V.; Korn, A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Korotkov, V. A.; Kortner, O.; Kostka, P.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotamäki, M. J.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotov, K. Y.; Koupilova, Z.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, H.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kral, V.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kreisel, A.; Krejci, F.; Krepouri, A.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krieger, P.; Krobath, G.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Krumshteyn, Z. V.; Kubota, T.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kuhn, D.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kummer, C.; Kuna, M.; Kunkle, J.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurata, M.; Kurchaninov, L. L.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kus, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Kvasnicka, O.; Kwee, R.; La Rotonda, L.; Labarga, L.; Labbe, J.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lamanna, M.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lancon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lane, J. L.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Larionov, A. V.; Larner, A.; Lasseur, C.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Laycock, P.; Lazarev, A. B.; Lazzaro, A.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Maner, C.; Le Menedeu, E.; Le Vine, M.; Leahu, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebel, C.; Lecompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Lee, S. C.; Lefebvre, M.; Legendre, M.; Legeyt, B. C.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehmacher, M.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leitner, R.; Lelas, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lellouch, J.; Leltchouk, M.; Lendermann, V.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzen, G.; Lenzi, B.; Leonhardt, K.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, J.-R.; Lester, C. G.; Leung Fook Cheong, A.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levitski, M. S.; Levonian, S.; Lewandowska, M.; Leyton, M.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Liang, Z.; Liang, Z.; Liberti, B.; Lichard, P.; Lichtnecker, M.; Lie, K.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lilley, J. N.; Lim, H.; Limosani, A.; Limper, M.; Lin, S. C.; Lindsay, S. W.; Linhart, V.; Linnemann, J. T.; Liolios, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lipinsky, L.; Lipniacka, A.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, C.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, M.; Liu, S.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Lockwitz, S.; Loddenkoetter, T.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loginov, A.; Loh, C. W.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Loken, J.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Loureiro, K. F.; Lovas, L.; Love, J.; Love, P.; Lowe, A. J.; Lu, F.; Lu, J.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, D.; Ludwig, I.; Ludwig, J.; Luehring, F.; Luisa, L.; Lumb, D.; Luminari, L.; Lund, E.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Lundberg, J.; Lundquist, J.; Lutz, G.; Lynn, D.; Lys, J.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Macana Goia, J. A.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Maček, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Mackeprang, R.; Madaras, R. J.; Mader, W. F.; Maenner, R.; Maeno, T.; Mättig, P.; Mättig, S.; Magalhaes Martins, P. J.; Magradze, E.; Magrath, C. A.; Mahalalel, Y.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahmood, A.; Mahout, G.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makouski, M.; Makovec, N.; Malecki, Pa.; Malecki, P.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V.; Malyukov, S.; Mambelli, M.; Mameghani, R.; Mamuzic, J.; Manabe, A.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Mangeard, P. S.; Manjavidze, I. D.; Manning, P. M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mapelli, A.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchand, J. F.; Marchese, F.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marino, C. P.; Marques, C. N.; Marroquim, F.; Marshall, R.; Marshall, Z.; Martens, F. K.; Marti I Garcia, S.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, B.; Martin, B.; Martin, F. F.; Martin, J. P.; Martin, T. A.; Martin Dit Latour, B.; Martinez, M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V.; Martini, A.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Maruyama, T.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massaro, G.; Massol, N.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathes, M.; Matricon, P.; Matsunaga, H.; Matsushita, T.; Mattravers, C.; Maxfield, S. J.; May, E. N.; Mayne, A.; Mazini, R.; Mazur, M.; Mazzanti, M.; Mazzanti, P.; Mc Donald, J.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; McGlone, H.; McHedlidze, G.; McLaren, R. A.; McMahon, S. J.; McMahon, T. R.; McPherson, R. A.; Meade, A.; Mechnich, J.; Mechtel, M.; Medinnis, M.; Meera-Lebbai, R.; Meguro, T. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meirose, B.; Melachrinos, C.; Melamed-Katz, A.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meng, Z.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Merkl, D.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A. M.; Messmer, I.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, T. C.; Meyer, W. T.; Miao, J.; Michal, S.; Micu, L.; Middleton, R. P.; Migas, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikuž, M.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, W. J.; Mills, C. M.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Miñano, M.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Misawa, S.; Miscetti, S.; Misiejuk, A.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Mladenov, D.; Moa, T.; Moed, S.; Moeller, V.; Mönig, K.; Möser, N.; Mohn, B.; Mohr, W.; Mohrdieck-Möck, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Molina-Perez, J.; Moloney, G.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montesano, S.; Monticelli, F.; Moore, R. W.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Morais, A.; Morel, J.; Morello, G.; Moreno, D.; Llácer, M. Moreno; Morettini, P.; Morii, M.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morozov, S. V.; Morris, J. D.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Mudrinic, M.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Müller, T. A.; Muenstermann, D.; Muir, A.; Munwes, Y.; Murillo Garcia, R.; Murray, W. J.; Mussche, I.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Nakatsuka, H.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Nash, M.; Nation, N. R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nderitu, S. K.; Neal, H. A.; Nebot, E.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neusiedl, A.; Neves, R. N.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicolas, L.; Nicoletti, G.; Niedercorn, F.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, H.; Nilsson, P.; Nisati, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Nisius, R.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nordberg, M.; Nordkvist, B.; Notz, D.; Novakova, J.; Nozaki, M.; Nožička, M.; Nugent, I. M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.-E.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Ochi, A.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Odier, J.; Odino, G. A.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohshima, T.; Ohshita, H.; Ohsugi, T.; Okada, S.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Olcese, M.; Olchevski, A. G.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver, J.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Ordonez, G.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Ortega, E. O.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Osuna, C.; Otec, R.; P Ottersbach, J.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Oyarzun, A.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozone, K.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padhi, S.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pajchel, K.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panes, B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Park, S. J.; Park, W.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, S. I.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passardi, G.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Patwa, A.; Pauly, T.; Peak, L. S.; Pecsy, M.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Peng, H.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Persembe, S.; Perus, P.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Pfeifer, B.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccinini, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Ping, J.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Plano, W. G.; Pleier, M.-A.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poffenberger, P.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Porter, R.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospichal, P.; Pospisil, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Potter, K. P.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Preda, T.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Prichard, P. M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Puigdengoles, C.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qian, Z.; Qin, Z.; Qing, D.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammes, M.; Ratoff, P. N.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renkel, P.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richards, R. A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieke, S.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E. R.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rottländer, I.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sanchis Lozano, M. A.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, J.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A. Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmid, P.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Sospedra Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S. N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Suchkov, S. I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, R. P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y. D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Thadome, J.; Thananuwong, R.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tovey, S. N.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Villate, J.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O. V.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, S. M.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Webel, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M. D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-12-01

    The ionization signals in the liquid argon of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied in detail using cosmic muons. In particular, the drift time of the ionization electrons is measured and used to assess the intrinsic uniformity of the calorimeter gaps and estimate its impact on the constant term of the energy resolution. The drift times of electrons in the cells of the second layer of the calorimeter are uniform at the level of 1.3% in the barrel and 2.8% in the endcaps. This leads to an estimated contribution to the constant term of (0.29^{+0.05}_{-0.04})% in the barrel and (0.54^{+0.06}_{-0.04})% in the endcaps. The same data are used to measure the drift velocity of ionization electrons in liquid argon, which is found to be 4.61±0.07 mm/μs at 88.5 K and 1 kV/mm.

  10. Liquid level sensor based on fiber ring laser with single-mode-offset coreless-single-mode fiber structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zixiao; Tan, Zhongwei; Xing, Rui; Liang, Linjun; Qi, Yanhui; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-10-01

    A novel reflective liquid level sensor based on single-mode-offset coreless-single-mode (SOCS) fiber structure is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Theory analyses and experimental results indicate that offset fusion can remarkably enhance the sensitivity of sensor. Ending-reflecting structure makes the sensor compact and easy to deploy. Meanwhile, we propose a laser sensing system, and the SOCS structure is used as sensing head and laser filter simultaneously. Experimental results show that laser spectra with high optical signal-to-noise ratio (-30 dB) and narrow 3-dB bandwidth (<0.15 nm) are achieved. Various liquids with different indices are used for liquid level sensing, besides, the refractive index sensitivity is also investigated. In measurement range, the sensing system presents steady laser output.

  11. Flux-measuring approach of high temperature metal liquid based on BP neural networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡燕瑜; 桂卫华; 李勇刚

    2003-01-01

    A soft-measuring approach is presented to measure the flux of liquid zinc with high temperature andcausticity. By constructing mathematical model based on neural networks, weighing the mass of liquid zinc, the fluxof liquid zinc is acquired indirectly, the measuring on line and flux control are realized. Simulation results and indus-trial practice demonstrate that the relative error between the estimated flux value and practical measured flux value islower than 1.5%, meeting the need of industrial process.

  12. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems. PMID:27112404

  13. A Continuous Liquid-Level Sensor for Fuel Tanks Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Antonio M; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco; Rabaza, Ovidio

    2016-05-19

    A standard problem in large tanks at oil refineries and petrol stations is that water and fuel usually occupy the same tank. This is undesirable and causes problems such as corrosion in the tanks. Normally, the water level in tanks is unknown, with the problems that this entails. We propose herein a method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to detect in real time the interfaces in a tank which can simultaneously contain water, gasoline (or diesel) and air. The plasmonic sensor is composed of a hemispherical glass prism, a magnesium fluoride layer, and a gold layer. We have optimized the structural parameters of the sensor from the theoretical modeling of the reflectance curve. The sensor detects water-fuel and fuel-air interfaces and measures the level of each liquid in real time. This sensor is recommended for inflammable liquids because inside the tank there are no electrical or electronic signals which could cause explosions. The sensor proposed has a sensitivity of between 1.2 and 3.5 RIU(-1) and a resolution of between 5.7 × 10(-4) and 16.5 × 10(-4) RIU.

  14. A Continuous Liquid-Level Sensor for Fuel Tanks Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Antonio M.; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco; Rabaza, Ovidio

    2016-01-01

    A standard problem in large tanks at oil refineries and petrol stations is that water and fuel usually occupy the same tank. This is undesirable and causes problems such as corrosion in the tanks. Normally, the water level in tanks is unknown, with the problems that this entails. We propose herein a method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to detect in real time the interfaces in a tank which can simultaneously contain water, gasoline (or diesel) and air. The plasmonic sensor is composed of a hemispherical glass prism, a magnesium fluoride layer, and a gold layer. We have optimized the structural parameters of the sensor from the theoretical modeling of the reflectance curve. The sensor detects water-fuel and fuel-air interfaces and measures the level of each liquid in real time. This sensor is recommended for inflammable liquids because inside the tank there are no electrical or electronic signals which could cause explosions. The sensor proposed has a sensitivity of between 1.2 and 3.5 RIU−1 and a resolution of between 5.7 × 10−4 and 16.5 × 10−4 RIU. PMID:27213388

  15. A Continuous Liquid-Level Sensor for Fuel Tanks Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. Pozo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A standard problem in large tanks at oil refineries and petrol stations is that water and fuel usually occupy the same tank. This is undesirable and causes problems such as corrosion in the tanks. Normally, the water level in tanks is unknown, with the problems that this entails. We propose herein a method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR to detect in real time the interfaces in a tank which can simultaneously contain water, gasoline (or diesel and air. The plasmonic sensor is composed of a hemispherical glass prism, a magnesium fluoride layer, and a gold layer. We have optimized the structural parameters of the sensor from the theoretical modeling of the reflectance curve. The sensor detects water-fuel and fuel-air interfaces and measures the level of each liquid in real time. This sensor is recommended for inflammable liquids because inside the tank there are no electrical or electronic signals which could cause explosions. The sensor proposed has a sensitivity of between 1.2 and 3.5 RIU−1 and a resolution of between 5.7 × 10−4 and 16.5 × 10−4 RIU.

  16. Chiroptical Measurement of Chiral Aggregates at Liquid-Liquid Interface in Centrifugal Liquid Membrane Cell by Mueller Matrix and Conventional Circular Dichroism Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Watarai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The centrifugal liquid membrane (CLM cell has been utilized for chiroptical studies of liquid-liquid interfaces with a conventional circular dichroism (CD spectropolarimeter. These studies required the characterization of optical properties of the rotating cylindrical CLM glass cell, which was used under the high speed rotation. In the present study, we have measured the circular and linear dichroism (CD and LD spectra and the circular and linear birefringence (CB and LB spectra of the CLM cell itself as well as those of porphyrine aggregates formed at the liquid-liquid interface in the CLM cell, applying Mueller matrix measurement method. From the results, it was confirmed that the CLM-CD spectra of the interfacial porphyrin aggregates observed by a conventional CD spectropolarimeter should be correct irrespective of LD and LB signals in the CLM cell.

  17. VUV/XUV measurements of impurity emission in plasmas with liquid lithium surfaces on LTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritz, Kevin; Bell, Ronald E.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Boyle, Dennis; Clementson, Joel; Finkenthal, Michael; Kaita, Robert; Kozub, Tom; Kubota, Shigeyuki; Lucia, Matthew; Majeski, Richard; Merino, Enrique; Schmitt, John; Stutman, Dan

    2014-12-01

    The VUV/XUV spectrum has been measured on the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) using a transmission grating imaging spectrometer (TGIS) coupled to a direct-detection x-ray charge-coupled device camera. TGIS data show significant changes in the ratios between the lithium and oxygen impurity line emission during discharges with varying lithium wall conditions. Lithium coatings that have been passivated by lengthy exposure to significant levels of impurities contribute to a large O/Li ratio measured during LTX plasma discharges. Furthermore, previous results have indicated that a passivated lithium film on the plasma facing components will function as a stronger impurity source when in the form of a hot liquid layer compared to a solid lithium layer. However, recent TGIS measurements of plasma discharges in LTX with hot stainless steel boundary shells and a fresh liquid lithium coating show lower O/Li impurity line ratios when compared to discharges with a solid lithium film on cool shells. These new measurements help elucidate the somewhat contradictory results of the effects of solid and liquid lithium on plasma confinement observed in previous experiments.

  18. Measurement Challenges at Low Blood Lead Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Kathleen L; Cheng, Po-Yung; Jarrett, Jeffery M; Makhmudov, Amir; Vance, Kathryn; Ward, Cynthia D; Jones, Robert L; Mortensen, Mary E

    2017-08-01

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) adopted its Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention recommendation to use a population-based reference value to identify children and environments associated with lead hazards. The current reference value of 5 μg/dL is calculated as the 97.5th percentile of the distribution of blood lead levels (BLLs) in children 1 to 5 years old from 2007 to 2010 NHANES data. We calculated and updated selected percentiles, including the 97.5th percentile, by using NHANES 2011 to 2014 blood lead data and examined demographic characteristics of children whose blood lead was ≥90th percentile value. The 97.5th percentile BLL of 3.48 µg/dL highlighted analytical laboratory and clinical interpretation challenges of blood lead measurements ≤5 μg/dL. Review of 5 years of results for target blood lead values Lead and Multi-Element Proficiency quality assurance program showed 40% unable to quantify and reported a nondetectable result at a target blood lead value of 1.48 µg/dL, compared with 5.5% at a target BLL of 4.60 µg/dL. We describe actions taken at the CDC's Environmental Health Laboratory in the National Center for Environmental Health, which measures blood lead for NHANES, to improve analytical accuracy and precision and to reduce external lead contamination during blood collection and analysis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Measuring market liquidity risk - which model works best?

    OpenAIRE

    Ernst, Cornelia; Stange, Sebastian; Kaserer, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Market liquidity risk, the difficulty or cost of trading assets in crises, has been recognized as an important factor in risk management. Literature has already proposed several models to include liquidity risk in the standard Value-at-Risk framework. While theoretical comparisons between those models have been conducted, their empirical performance has never been benchmarked. This paper performs comparative back-tests of daily risk forecasts for a large selection of traceable liquidity risk ...

  20. An electrodeless system for measurement of liquid sample dielectric properties in radio frequency band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, V; Giovannetti, G; Vanello, N; Costantino, M; Landini, L; Benassi, A

    2006-01-01

    An electrodeless measurement system based on a resonant circuit is proposed for the measurement of dielectric properties of liquid samples at RF (radio frequency). Generally, properties as dielectric constant, loss factor and conductivity are measured by parallel plate capacitor cells: this method has several limitations in the case of particular liquid samples and in the range of radiofrequencies. Our method is based on the measurements of resonance frequency and quality factor of a LC resonant circuit in different measuring conditions, without and with the liquid sample placed inside a test tube around which the home made coil is wrapped. The measurement is performed using a network analyzer and a dual loop probe, inductively coupled with the resonant circuit. One of the advantages of this method is the contactless between the liquid sample and the measurement electrodes. In this paper the measurement system is described and test measurements of conventional liquids dielectric properties are reported.

  1. Separation of aromatic precipitates from simulated high level radioactive waste by hydrolysis, evaporation and liquid-liquid extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, S.R.; Shah, H.B.; Carter, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the SRS will be the United States' first facility to process High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) into a borosilicate glass matrix. The removal of aromatic precipitates by hydrolysis, evaporation and liquid-liquid extraction will be a key step in the processing of the HLW. This step, titled the Precipitate Hydrolysis Process, has been demonstrated by the Savannah River Laboratory with the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). The mission of the PHEF is to demonstrate processing of simulated high level radioactive waste which contains tetraphenylborate precipitates and nitrite. Reduction of nitrite by hydroxylamine nitrate and hydrolysis of the tetraphenylborate by formic acid is discussed. Gaseous production, which is primarily benzene, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide, has been quantified. Production of high-boiling organic compounds and the accumulation of these organic compounds within the process are addressed.

  2. Separation of aromatic precipitates from simulated high level radioactive waste by hydrolysis, evaporation and liquid-liquid extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, S.R.; Shah, H.B.; Carter, J.T.

    1991-12-31

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the SRS will be the United States` first facility to process High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) into a borosilicate glass matrix. The removal of aromatic precipitates by hydrolysis, evaporation and liquid-liquid extraction will be a key step in the processing of the HLW. This step, titled the Precipitate Hydrolysis Process, has been demonstrated by the Savannah River Laboratory with the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). The mission of the PHEF is to demonstrate processing of simulated high level radioactive waste which contains tetraphenylborate precipitates and nitrite. Reduction of nitrite by hydroxylamine nitrate and hydrolysis of the tetraphenylborate by formic acid is discussed. Gaseous production, which is primarily benzene, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide, has been quantified. Production of high-boiling organic compounds and the accumulation of these organic compounds within the process are addressed.

  3. A Novel Technology for Measurements of Dielectric Properties of Extremely Small Volumes of Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Na Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A high sensitivity sensor for measurement radio frequency (RF dielectric permittivity of liquids is described. Interference is used and parasitic effects are cancellation, which makes the sensor can catch weak signals caused by liquids with extremely small volumes. In addition, we present the relationship between transmission coefficient and permittivity of liquids under test (LUT. Using this sensor, quantitative measurements of the dielectric properties at 5.8 GHz are demonstrated of LUTs. Experiments show that the proposed method only requires the volume of 160 nanoliters for liquids. Therefore, the technology can be used for RF spectroscopic analysis of biological samples and extremely precious liquids.

  4. High performance liquid level monitoring system based on polymer fiber Bragg gratings embedded in silicone rubber diaphragms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Carlos A. F.; Peng, Gang-Ding; Webb, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Liquid-level sensing technologies have attracted great prominence, because such measurements are essential to industrial applications, such as fuel storage, flood warning and in the biochemical industry. Traditional liquid level sensors are based on electromechanical techniques; however they suffer from intrinsic safety concerns in explosive environments. In recent years, given that optical fiber sensors have lots of well-established advantages such as high accuracy, costeffectiveness, compact size, and ease of multiplexing, several optical fiber liquid level sensors have been investigated which are based on different operating principles such as side-polishing the cladding and a portion of core, using a spiral side-emitting optical fiber or using silica fiber gratings. The present work proposes a novel and highly sensitive liquid level sensor making use of polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (POFBGs). The key elements of the system are a set of POFBGs embedded in silicone rubber diaphragms. This is a new development building on the idea of determining liquid level by measuring the pressure at the bottom of a liquid container, however it has a number of critical advantages. The system features several FBG-based pressure sensors as described above placed at different depths. Any sensor above the surface of the liquid will read the same ambient pressure. Sensors below the surface of the liquid will read pressures that increase linearly with depth. The position of the liquid surface can therefore be approximately identified as lying between the first sensor to read an above-ambient pressure and the next higher sensor. This level of precision would not in general be sufficient for most liquid level monitoring applications; however a much more precise determination of liquid level can be made by linear regression to the pressure readings from the sub-surface sensors. There are numerous advantages to this multi-sensor approach. First, the use of linear regression using

  5. Ultra Low Level Tritium Analysis Method Using a Liquid Scintillation Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H.; Lim, H. J.; Lee, M. W.; Jeong, D. H.; Kim, J. K.; Kang, Y. R. [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, S. H. [Inje University, Gimhae, (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    To evaluate {sup 3}H concentration in the atmosphere more accurately compared to the conventional methods, the author of this paper intended to suggest more improved analytical methods and derived the elements which might occur during analysis or required improvements. The method suggested in this study is able to reduce the uncertainty and errors which may be existent in evaluating the {sup 3}H concentration of environmental sample s and thus will serve as the best solution in the technical and economic point of view. Liquid Scintillation Counter is the most widely used to analyze ultra-low level {sup 3}H by using CPM / DPM Counting Mode using external radiation source and Spectrum Plot Mode using internal radiation source. In CPM / DPM Counting Mode, multiple samples can be measured by single calibration despite its rather higher background whereas Spectrum Plot Mode requires more time and cost to analyze multiple samples despite its reliability to reduce the contribution of other radionuclides.

  6. A method of measuring the thermal conductivity of liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Held, E.F.M. van der; Drunen, F.G. van

    1949-01-01

    We described the development of an apparatus for the determination of the thermal conductivity of liquids. The apparatus is suitable for all kinds of liquids, including the strongest acids. From a given time we pass an electric current through a thin straight wire, placed in a homogeneous material o

  7. 7 CFR 52.773 - Liquid media and Brix measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PROCESSED FOOD PRODUCTS 1 United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Liquid... requirements for the liquid media in canned red tart pitted cherries are not incorporated in the grades of the... 15 days or more after the cherries are canned or on the blended homogenized slurry of the...

  8. New ultrasonic Bleustein-Gulyaev wave method for measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiełczyński, P.; Szalewski, M.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, a new method for measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure is presented. To this end the authors have applied an ultrasonic method using the Bleustein-Gulyaev (BG) surface acoustic wave. By applying the perturbation method, we can prove that the change in the complex propagation constant of the BG wave produced by the layer of liquid loading the waveguide surface is proportional to the shear mechanical impedance of the liquid. In the article, a measuring setup employing the BG wave for the purpose of measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure (up to 1GPa) is presented. The results of high-pressure viscosity measurements of triolein and castor oil are also presented. In this paper the model of a Newtonian liquid was applied. Using this new method it is also possible to measure the viscosity of liquids during the phase transition and during the decompression process (hysteresis of the dependence of viscosity on pressure).

  9. Liquid oscillations in the tanks' level sensors of aerospace objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, I. E.; Davydov, E. I.

    2017-01-01

    Here are considered reasons of longitudinal oscillations appearance in the propellant consumption control system and ways of reducing them. Estimation of the most significant disturbing factors, which influence on the accuracy of the whole system's work, has been made. There is set the formation of geometric layout of sensitive elements in the system's level sensors.

  10. Precise measurement of liquid petroleum tank volume based on data cloud analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jintao; Liu, Ziyong; Zhang, Long; Guo, Ligong; Bao, Xuesong; Tong, Lin

    2010-08-01

    Metal tanks are generally used for the measurement of liquid petroleum products for fiscal or custody transfer application. One tank volume precise measurement method based on data cloud analysis was studied, which was acquired by laser scanning principle. Method of distance measurement by laser phase shift and angular measurement by optical grating were applied to acquire coordinates of points in tank shell under the control of a servo system. Direct Iterative Method (DIM) and Section Area Method (SAM) were used to process measured data for vertical and horizontal tanks respectively. In comparison experiment, one 1000m3 vertical tank and one 30m3 horizontal tank were used as test objects. In the vertical tank experiment, the largest measured radius difference between the new laser method and strapping method (international arbitrary standard) is 2.8mm. In the horizontal tank experiment, the calibration result from laser scanning method is more close to reference than manual geometric method, and the mean deviation in full-scale range of the former and latter method are 75L and 141L respectively; with the increase of liquid level, the relative errors of laser scanning method and manual geometric method become smaller, and the mean relative errors are 0.6% and 1.5% respectively. By using the method discussed, the calibration efficiency of tank volume can be improved.

  11. Baseline-Corrected Second-Order Derivative Electroanalysis Combined With Ultrasound-Assisted Liquid-Liquid Microextraction: Simultaneous Quantification of Fluoroquinolones at Low Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Luiz Henrique; Trindade, Magno Aparecido Gonçalves

    2016-06-21

    A baseline-corrected second-order derivative procedure and a miniaturized sample preparation based on low-density solvent and ultrasound-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (LDS-UA-LLME) was combined to provide the simultaneous electroanalysis of three fluoroquinolones (FQ) as emerging contaminants (ECs). The enhanced mathematical processing provided the best separation with an accurate measurement of the overlapping peaks during the simultaneous electro-oxidation of target FQs that were directly dropped on the surface of carbon nanofiber-modified screen-printed electrodes. The adapted LDS-UA-LLME protocol was the key step involved in the sample preparation, which preconcentrate target analytes from diluted tap water samples with an enrichment factor of around 80×, allowing their quantification at trace levels. This combined feature demonstrated the unique application of an electroanalytical technique for the simultaneous electroanalysis of three FQs in spiked tap water samples, with recovery values remarkably close to 100%.

  12. Fiber-optic liquid level monitoring system using microstructured polymer fiber Bragg grating array sensors: performance analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, C. A. F.; Pospori, A.; Saez-Rodriguez, D.;

    2015-01-01

    to interrogate liquid level by measuring the strain induced in each mPOFBG embedded in a silicone rubber (SR) diaphragm, which deforms due to hydrostatic pressure variations. The sensor exhibits a highly linear response over the sensing range, a good repeatability, and a high resolution. The sensitivity......A highly sensitive liquid level monitoring system based on microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg grating (mPOFBG) array sensors is reported for the first time. The configuration is based on five mPOFBGs inscribed in the same fiber in the 850 nm spectral region, showing the potential...... of the sensor is found to be 98 pm/cm of water, enhanced by more than a factor of 9 when compared to an equivalent sensor based on a silica fiber around 1550 nm. The temperature sensitivity is studied and a multi-sensor arrangement proposed, which has the potential to provide level readings independent...

  13. Experimental Measurement for Shock Velocity-Mass Velocity Relationship of Liquid Argon Up to 46 GPa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟川民; 施尚春; 董石; 杨向东; 谭华; 经福谦

    2003-01-01

    Shock properties of liquid argon were measured in the shock pressure up to 46 GPa by employing the two-stage light gas gun. Liquid nitrogen was used as coolant liquid. The cryogenic target system has been improved to compare with the previous work. Shock velocities were measured with self-shorting electrical probes. Impactor velocities were measured with an electrical-magnetic induction system. Mass velocities were obtained by mean of shock impedance matching method. The experimental data shows that the slope of experimental Hugoniot curve of liquid argon begins to decrease above 30 GPa.

  14. The Application of Asymmetric Liquidity Risk Measure in Modelling the Risk of Investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garsztka Przemysław

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the relationship between investment risk (as measured by the variance of returns or standard deviation of returns and liquidity risk. The paper presents a method for calculating a new measure of liquidity risk, based on the characteristic line. In addition, it is checked what is the impact of liquidity risk to the volatility of daily returns. To describe this relationship dynamic econometric models were used. It was found that there was an econometric relationship between the proposed measure liquidity risk and the variance of returns.

  15. Automated Liquid-Level Control of a Nutrient Reservoir for a Hydroponic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Boris; Asumadu, Johnson A.; Dogan, Numan S.

    1997-01-01

    A microprocessor-based system for control of the liquid level of a nutrient reservoir for a plant hydroponic growing system has been developed. The system uses an ultrasonic transducer to sense the liquid level or height. A National Instruments' Multifunction Analog and Digital Input/Output PC Kit includes NI-DAQ DOS/Windows driver software for an IBM 486 personal computer. A Labview Full Development system for Windows is the graphical programming system being used. The system allows liquid level control to within 0.1 cm for all levels tried between 8 and 36 cm in the hydroponic system application. The detailed algorithms have been developed and a fully automated microprocessor based nutrient replenishment system has been described for this hydroponic system.

  16. The Research Progress of the Liquid Scintillation Detectors on Neutron Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG; Yi-mei; XU; Xiao-ming; ZHU; Li-qun; BAI; Lei; XU; Zhen; HE; Li-xia; YIN; Hong-he

    2012-01-01

    <正>The research for liquid scintillation detectors on neutron measurement is one of the study objects of technique research on neutron measurement. According to the task requirements, we accomplished the purchase of some detectors and related performance testing. The purchased liquid scintillation detectors BC-501A is produced by Saint-Gobain Company. According to the formulated performance testing outlines for liquid scintillation detectors, we conducted

  17. Simulation of Water Level Fluctuations in a Hydraulic System Using a Coupled Liquid-Gas Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A model for simulating vertical water level fluctuations with coupled liquid and gas phases is presented. The Preissmann implicit scheme is used to linearize the governing equations for one-dimensional transient flow for both liquid and gas phases, and the linear system is solved using the chasing method. Some classical cases for single liquid and gas phase transients in pipelines and networks are studied to verify that the proposed methods are accurate and reliable. The implicit scheme is extended using a dynamic mesh to simulate the water level fluctuations in a U-tube and an open surge tank without consideration of the gas phase. Methods of coupling liquid and gas phases are presented and used for studying the transient process and interaction between the phases, for gas phase limited in a chamber and gas phase transported in a pipeline. In particular, two other simplified models, one neglecting the effect of the gas phase on the liquid phase and the other one coupling the liquid and gas phases asynchronously, are proposed. The numerical results indicate that the asynchronous model performs better, and are finally applied to a hydropower station with surge tanks and air shafts to simulate the water level fluctuations and air speed.

  18. Structural evolution in Ni-Nb and Ni-Nb-Ta liquids and glasses - A measure of liquid fragility?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauro, N. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Bendert, J. C.; Kelton, K. F. [WU

    2013-01-07

    The structures of Ni59.5Nb40.5, Ni62Nb38, and Ni60Nb30Ta10 liquids and glasses were studied using synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction. To avoid reactions between the liquids and their containers and to deeply supercool them below their equilibrium liquidus temperatures, the liquids were processed without a container using the beamline electrostatic levitation (BESL) technique. The total static structure factor, S(q), and the total pair-correlation function, g(r), were obtained for all liquid compositions over a temperature range of approximately 250 °C; S(q) and g(r) were measured for the corresponding glasses at room temperature. All of the S(q)s have a shoulder on the high-q side of the second peak; this becomes more pronounced as the liquid is supercooled, and is most prominent in the glass. Based on a Honeycutt–Andersen analysis of the atomic configurations obtained from Reverse Monte Carlo fits to the total structure factors obtained from the scattering data, icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) is dominant in all liquids and becomes particularly pronounced in the glasses. No correlation is noted, however, between the amount of ISRO and easy glass formability. Structural features show evidence for an acceleration of ordering in the supercooled liquid above the glass transition temperature, consistent with the behavior expected for fragile liquids. This suggests that scattering data can provide a new method to assess liquid fragility, which is typically obtained from the temperature behavior of the viscosity near the glass transition temperature.

  19. Development of a test system for high level liquid waste partitioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Wu H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The partitioning and transmutation strategy has increasingly attracted interest for the safe treatment and disposal of high level liquid waste, in which the partitioning of high level liquid waste is one of the critical technical issues. An improved total partitioning process, including a tri-alkylphosphine oxide process for the removal of actinides, a crown ether strontium extraction process for the removal of strontium, and a calixcrown ether cesium extraction process for the removal of cesium, has been developed to treat Chinese high level liquid waste. A test system containing 72-stage 10-mm-diam annular centrifugal contactors, a remote sampling system, a rotor speed acquisition-monitoring system, a feeding system, and a video camera-surveillance system was successfully developed to carry out the hot test for verifying the improved total partitioning process. The test system has been successfully used in a 160 hour hot test using genuine high level liquid waste. During the hot test, the test system was stable, which demonstrated it was reliable for the hot test of the high level liquid waste partitioning.

  20. 外测液位计在液氯测量中的应用%The Application of External Liquid Meter in Liquid Chlorine Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟庆河

    2014-01-01

    在液氯储罐的液位测量中,普遍存在差压液位计易腐蚀、雷达液位计精度较低、不稳定的问题。本文讲述了在东营赫邦化工30万吨/年离子膜烧碱项目中,应用外测液位计解决了这些难题的成功案例。%In the level measurement of liquid chlorine,the differential level meter is easy corrosion,the radar level meter is low precision and instable.The article introduce in the 300 million kilogram per year ionic membrane caustic soda project,the use of external liquid meter successfully solve these problems.

  1. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II. A Critical Assessment of Current and Primordial Helium Levels in the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Before a solar model becomes viable in astrophysics, one mus t consider how the ele- mental constitution of the Sun was ascertained, especially relative to its principle com- ponents: hydrogen and helium. Liquid metallic hydrogen has been proposed as a solar structural material for models based on condensed matter (e .g. Robitaille P.-M. Liq- uid Metallic Hydrogen: A Building Block for the Liquid Sun. Progr. Phys. , 2011, v. 3, 60–74. There can be little doubt that hydrogen plays a d ominant role in the uni- verse and in the stars; the massive abundance of hydrogen in t he Sun was established long ago. Today, it can be demonstrated that the near isointe nse nature of the Sun’s Balmer lines provides strong confirmatory evidence for a dis tinct solar surface. The situation relative to helium remains less conclusive. Stil l, helium occupies a prominent role in astronomy, both as an element associated with cosmol ogy and as a byproduct of nuclear energy generation, though its abundances within the Sun cannot be reliably estimated using theoretical approaches. With respect to th e determination of helium lev- els, the element remains spectroscopically silent at the le vel of the photosphere. While helium can be monitored with ease in the chromosphere and the prominences of the corona using spectroscopic methods, these measures are hig hly variable and responsive to elevated solar activity and nuclear fragmentation. Dire ct assays of the solar winds are currently viewed as incapable of providing definitive in formation regarding solar helium abundances. As a result, insight relative to helium r emains strictly based on the- oretical estimates which couple helioseismological appro aches to metrics derived from solar models. Despite their “state of the art” nature, heliu m estimates based on solar models and helioseismology are suspect on several fronts, i ncluding their reliance on solar opacities. The best knowledge can only come from the so

  2. Broadband electrostatic acoustic transducer for ultrasonic measurements in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, J H; Heyman, J S; Yost, W T; Torbett, M A; Breazeale, M A

    1979-01-01

    A broadband capacitive electrostatic acoustic transducer (ESAT) has been developed for use in a liquid environment at megahertz frequencies. The ESAT basically consists of a thin conductive membrane stretched over a metallic housing. The membrane functions as the ground plate of a parallel plate capacitor, the other plate being a dc biased electrode recessed approximately 10 mum from the electrically grounded membrane. An ultrasonic wave incident on the membrane varies the membrane-electrode gap spacing and generates an electrical signal proportional to the wave amplitude. The entire assembly is sealed for immersion in a liquid environment. Calibration of the ESAT with incident ultrasonic waves of constant displacement amplitude from 1 to 15 MHz reveals a decrease in signal response with increasing frequency independent of membrane tension. The use of the ESAT as a broadband ultrasonic transducer in liquids with a predictable frequency response is promising.

  3. Solvent extraction in the treatment of acidic high-level liquid waste : where do we stand?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, E. P.; Schulz, W. W.

    1998-06-18

    During the last 15 years, a number of solvent extraction/recovery processes have been developed for the removal of the transuranic elements, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs from acidic high-level liquid waste. These processes are based on the use of a variety of both acidic and neutral extractants. This chapter will present an overview and analysis of the various extractants and flowsheets developed to treat acidic high-level liquid waste streams. The advantages and disadvantages of each extractant along with comparisons of the individual systems are discussed.

  4. An impedance-measurement setup optimized for measuring relaxations of glass-forming liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Brian; Christensen, Tage; Larsen, Ebbe H; Olsen, Niels Boye; Pedersen, Ib H; Rasmussen, Torben; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2008-04-01

    An electronics system has been assembled to measure frequency-dependent response functions of glass-forming liquids in the extremely viscous state approaching the glass transition. We determine response functions such as dielectric permittivity and shear and bulk moduli by measuring electrical impedances of liquid-filled transducers, and this technique requires frequency generators capable of producing signals that are reproducible over the span of several days or even several weeks. To this end, we have constructed a frequency generator that produces low-frequency (1 mHz-100 Hz) sinusoidal signals with voltages that are reproducible within 10 ppm. Two factors that partly account for this precision are that signals originate from voltages stored in a look-up table and that only coil-less filters are used in this unit, which significantly reduces fluctuations of output caused by changes of temperatures of circuits. This generator also includes a special triggering facility that makes it possible to measure up to 512 voltages per cycle that are spaced apart at uniform phase intervals. Fourier transformations of such data yield precise determinations of complex amplitudes of voltages and currents applied to a transducer, which ultimately allows us to determine electrical impedances of transducers with a reproducibility error that is only a few parts per hundred thousand. This equipment is used in tandem with a commercial LCR meter and/or impedance analyzer that give(s) impedance measurements at higher frequencies, up to 1 MHz. The experimental setup allows measurements of the transducer impedance over nine decades of frequency within a single run.

  5. Remote management of liquid level using Raspberry Pi with ultrasonic sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Lingden, Ganga

    2015-01-01

    Modern system management has been used remotely using various tools and techniques. One such practical example is fuel level management at a gas station. Fuel levels can be managed with remote management, saving extra costs and manpower. This kind of remote management can be achieved a solution implemented with Raspberry Pi, ultrasonic sensors, and Arduino. Most specifically, ultrasonic sensors equip the Arduino in the container of the fuel to update the status of the current level of liquid ...

  6. Separate density and viscosity measurements of unknown liquid using quartz crystal microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Tan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous liquids have a wide range of applications in many fields. Basic physical properties like the density and the viscosity have great impacts on the functionalities of a given ionic liquid. For the millions kinds of existing liquids, only a few have been systematically measured with the density and the viscosity using traditional methods. However, these methods are limited to measure the density and the viscosity of an ionic liquid simultaneously especially in processing micro sample volumes. To meet this challenge, we present a new theoretical model and a novel method to separate density and viscosity measurements with single quartz crystal microbalance (QCM in this work. The agreement of experimental results and theocratical calculations shows that the QCM is capable to measure the density and the viscosity of ionic liquids.

  7. Cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius, and number density measurements using a Raman lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, David N. [Laser Remote Sensing Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States); Melfi, S. Harvey [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore (United States)

    1999-12-27

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius, and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid microspheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  8. Cloud Liquid Water, Mean Droplet Radius and Number Density Measurements Using a Raman Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid micro-spheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested.

  9. THE INEXPENSIVE DEVICE FOR SEA LEVEL MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Annunziato

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new mareograph device has been designed at the Joint Research Centre (JRC of the European Commission (EC in order improve the sea level network in use for the Tsunami Hazard monitoring in the Mediterranean Sea and in the North Atlantic area (NEAMTWS area of UNESCO. The instrument has the characteristic to be cheap and very effective but its reliability, duration and quality need to be determined and qualified. For this reason a number of experimental campaigns are being conducted, whose first results are presented here. In collaboration with the UNESCO/IOC (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, responsible of the definition of the Tsunami Warning System of this geographical area, a set of 20 devices has been offered by JRC for a period of 1 year of testing of the devices; the surveys for the installation of the devices is under way and the installation should be completed by the end of 2015.

  10. Experiences on pollution level measurement in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya-Tena, Gerardo; Hernandez-Corona, Ramiro; Ramirez-Vazquez, Isaias [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Reforma 113 Cuernavaca, Mor. (Mexico)

    2005-09-15

    The pollution on overhead insulators is influenced by the pollutant type as well as by the climate of the site. In Mexico, due to its orography and diversity of lands, there are several areas where the failures on the overhead insulation are mainly caused by the pollution. Since the decade of 1980s, various studies have been performed to solve or at least alleviate such transmission and distribution power line pollution-related problems. This paper presents a description of several studies conducted by the Mexican Electrical Research Institute 'Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas' (IIE) together with the Mexican electrical utility 'Comision Federal de Electricidad' (CFE), from the elaboration of a contamination map to the development of a system for measuring leakage current, which is used as a tool for the in-service diagnostic of insulators installed on lines of transmission. (author)

  11. Accurate photopyroelectric measurements of thermal diffusivity of (semi)liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dadarlat, D.; Neamtu, C.; Surducan, E.; Sahraoui, A.H.; Longuemart, S.; Bicanic, D.

    2002-01-01

    The back photopyroelectric (PPE) configuration, with opaque sample and thermally thick sample and sensor, was applied in order to obtain room temperature values of the thermal diffusivity of some (semi)liquid materials. The methodology is based on a sample's thickness scan, and not on a frequency sc

  12. Thermal Properties of Some Organic Liquids Using Ultrasonic Velocity Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ramadoss

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Debye temperature and thermal relaxation time has been calculated in normal and boiling temperature. Using thermal relaxation time, the heat of fusion has been calculated for nineteen organic liquids and the results throw light on the method of calculating heat of fusion.

  13. Pixel-level tunable liquid crystal lenses for auto-stereoscopic display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Robertson, Brian; Pivnenko, Mike; Chu, Daping; Zhou, Jiong; Yao, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Mobile video and gaming are now widely used, and delivery of a glass-free 3D experience is of both research and development interest. The key drawbacks of a conventional 3D display based on a static lenticular lenslet array and parallax barriers are low resolution, limited viewing angle and reduced brightness, mainly because of the need of multiple-pixels for each object point. This study describes the concept and performance of pixel-level cylindrical liquid crystal (LC) lenses, which are designed to steer light to the left and right eye sequentially to form stereo parallax. The width of the LC lenses can be as small as 20-30 μm, so that the associated auto-stereoscopic display will have the same resolution as the 2D display panel in use. Such a thin sheet of tunable LC lens array can be applied directly on existing mobile displays, and can deliver 3D viewing experience while maintaining 2D viewing capability. Transparent electrodes were laser patterned to achieve the single pixel lens resolution, and a high birefringent LC material was used to realise a large diffraction angle for a wide field of view. Simulation was carried out to model the intensity profile at the viewing plane and optimise the lens array based on the measured LC phase profile. The measured viewing angle and intensity profile were compared with the simulation results.

  14. Density Measurement of Liquid Ni-Ta Alloys by a Modified Sessile Drop Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Liang; XIAO Feng; TAO Zainan; Kusuhiro Mukai

    2005-01-01

    The density of liquid Ni-Ta alloys was measured by using a modified sessile drop method. It is found that the density of the liquid Ni-Ta alloys decreases with the increasing temperature, but increases with the increase of tantalum concentration in the alloys. The molar volume of liquid Ni-Ta binary alloys increases with the increase of temperature and tantalum concentration.

  15. Possibilities and limitations of ionic liquids in electrochemical and electroanalytical measurements (a review)

    OpenAIRE

    Weidlich, Tomáš; Stočes, Matěj; Švancara, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    A review (with 155 refs.) concerning the current achievements and typical trends in the chemistry of (room temperature) ionic liquids, (RT)ILs, with particular emphasis on their applicability in electrochemical and electroanalytical measurements. The latter is documented on a rapid progress of ionic liquid-modified carbon paste electrodes (IL-CPEs), the so-called carbon ionic liquid electrodes (CILEs), and related configurations in the last half-decade, within the period of 200...

  16. Ultrasonic methods for measuring liquid viscosity and volume percent of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, S.H.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes two ultrasonic techniques under development at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the tank-waste transport effort undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy in treating low-level nuclear waste. The techniques are intended to provide continuous on-line measurements of waste viscosity and volume percent of solids in a waste transport line. The ultrasonic technique being developed for waste-viscosity measurement is based on the patented ANL viscometer. Focus of the viscometer development in this project is on improving measurement accuracy, stability, and range, particularly in the low-viscosity range (<30 cP). A prototype instrument has been designed and tested in the laboratory. Better than 1% accuracy in liquid density measurement can be obtained by using either a polyetherimide or polystyrene wedge. To measure low viscosities, a thin-wedge design has been developed and shows good sensitivity down to 5 cP. The technique for measuring volume percent of solids is based on ultrasonic wave scattering and phase velocity variation. This report covers a survey of multiple scattering theories and other phenomenological approaches. A theoretical model leading to development of an ultrasonic instrument for measuring volume percent of solids is proposed, and preliminary measurement data are presented.

  17. Pulsed-laser Pumped Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy for Liquid Thermal Diffusivity Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Liantuan; LI Changyong; ZHANG Linjie; ZHAO Yanting; JIA Suotang; ZHOU Guosheng

    2000-01-01

    The pulsed-laser pumped photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PPDS) is applied to measure liquid thermal diffusivity in a modified collinear configuration. Here the pulsed beam is regarded as in the form of a Dirac delta function. The experiment setup used is described. Measurement result for the thermal diffusivity of a liquid sample(magnta/ethanol saturated solution) is reported. The measurement error is less than 3%.

  18. Refractive Index Measurement of Liquids Based on Microstructured Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on microstructured optical fiber sensors developed in recent years for liquid RI sensing. The review is divided into three parts: the first section introduces a general view of the most relevant refractometric sensors that have been reported over the last thirty years. Section 2 discusses several microstructured optical fiber designs, namely, suspended-core fiber, photonic crystal fiber, large-core air-clad photonic crystal fiber, and others. This part is also divided into two main groups: the interferometric-based and resonance-based configurations. The sensing methods rely either on full/selective filling of the microstructured fiber air holes with a liquid analyte or by simply immersing the sensing fiber into the liquid analyte. The sensitivities and resolutions are tabled at the end of this section followed by a brief discussion of the obtained results. The last section concludes with some remarks about the microstructured fiber-based configurations developed for RI sensing and their potential for future applications.

  19. Measurement of liquid-liquid equilibria for condensate + glycol and condensate + glycol + water systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    Today's oil and gas production requires the application of various chemicals in large amounts. To evaluate the effects of those chemicals on the environment, it is of crucial importance to know how much of the chemicals are discharged via produced water and how much is dissolved in the crude oil....... The ultimate objective of this work is to develop a predictive thermodynamic model for the mutual solubility of oil, water, and polar chemicals. But for the development and validation of the model, experimental data are required. This work presents new experimental liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) data for 1......,2-ethanediol (MEG) + condensate and MEG + water + condensate systems at temperatures from (275 to 323) K at atmospheric pressure. The condensate used in this work is a stabilized natural gas condensate from an offshore field in the North Sea. Compositional analysis of the natural gas condensate was carried out...

  20. The Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector Filling System and Liquid Mass Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Band, H R; Draeger, E; Heeger, K M; Hinrichs, P; Lewis, C A; Mattison, H; McFarlane, M C; Webber, D M; Wenman, D; Wang, W; Wise, T; Xiao, Q

    2013-01-01

    The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment has measured the neutrino mixing angle \\theta_{13} to world-leading precision. The experiment uses eight antineutrino detectors filled with 20-tons of gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator to detect antineutrinos emitted from the Daya Bay nuclear power plant through the inverse beta decay reaction. The precision measurement of sin^{2}2\\theta_{13} relies on the relative antineutrino interaction rates between detectors at near (400 m) and far (roughly 1.8 km) distances from the nuclear reactors. The measured interaction rate in each detector is directly proportional to the number of protons in the liquid scintillator target. A precision detector filling system was developed to simultaneously fill the three liquid zones of the antineutrino detectors and measure the relative target mass between detectors to <0.02%. This paper describes the design, operation, and performance of the system and the resulting precision measurement of the detectors' target liquid masses.

  1. A Thin Liquid Film and Its Effects in an Atomic Force Microscopy Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Jing; ZHENG Zhi-Jun; YU Ji-Lin; BAI Yi-Long

    2009-01-01

    Recently,it has been observed that a liquid film spreading on a sample surface will significantly distort atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements.In order to elaborate on the effect,we establish an equation governing the deformation of liquid film under its interaction with the AFM tip and substrate.A key issue is the critical liquid bump height yoc,at which the liquid film jumps to contact the AFM tip.It is found that there are three distinct regimes in the variation of yoc with film thickness H,depending on Hamaker constants of tip,sample and liquid.Noticeably,there is a characteristic thickness H* physically defining what a thin fihn is;namely,once the film thickness H is the same order as H*,the effect of film thickness should be taken into account.The value of H* is dependent on Hamaker constants and liquid surface tension as well as tip radius.

  2. Background vapor from six ionic liquids and the partition coefficients and limits of detection for 10 different analytes in those ionic liquids measured using headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Wald, Grant; Albers, David; Cortes, Hernan; McCabe, Terry

    2008-08-01

    The concentration and identity of the compounds detected in the vapor above six ionic liquids by headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC) at 100 degrees C are reported. In addition, the partition coefficients for 10 different compounds in these ionic liquids and limits of detection were measured. These results provide quantitative guidance for the application of ionic liquids for HS-GC.

  3. Free radially expanding liquid sheet in air: time- and space-resolved measurement of the thickness field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligoure, Christian; Vernay, Clara; Ramos, Laurence

    2014-11-01

    The collision of a liquid drop against a small target results in the formation of a thin liquid sheet that extends radially until it reaches a maximum diameter. We have developed an original time- and space-resolved technique to measure the thickness field of this class of liquid sheet, based on the grey level measurement of the image of a dyed liquid sheet recorded using a fast camera. This method enables a precise measurement of the thickness in the range (10--450) μm, with a temporal resolution equals to that of the camera. Two asymptotic regimes for the expansion of the sheet are evidenced. The scalings of the thickness with t and r measured in the two regimes are those that were predicted but never experimentally measured before. Interestingly, our experimental data also evidence the existence of a maximum of the film thickness hmax (r) at a radial position rhmax (t) corresponding to the crossover of these two asymptotic regimes. The maximum moves with a constant velocity of the order of the impact velocity, Hence, our data has allowed one to reconcile the two apparently inconsistent theoretical predictions found in the literature Thanks to our visualization technique, we also evidence an azimuthal thickness modulation. Financial support from Solvay is acknowledged.

  4. Functions and requirements document, WESF decoupling project, low-level liquid waste system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, J.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-27

    The Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) was constructed in 1974 to encapsulate and store cesium and strontium which were isolated at B Plant from underground storage tank waste. The WESF, Building 225-B, is attached physically to the west end of B Plant, Building 221-B, 200 East area. The WESF currently utilizes B Plant facilities for disposing liquid and solid waste streams. With the deactivation of B Plant, the WESF Decoupling Project will provide replacement systems allowing WESF to continue operations independently from B Plant. Four major systems have been identified to be replaced by the WESF Decoupling Project, including the following: Low Level Liquid Waste System, Solid Waste Handling System, Liquid Effluent Control System, and Deionized Water System.

  5. Improved methods for measuring thermal parameters of liquid samples using photothermal infrared radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriakose, Maju; Depriester, Michael; Dadarlat, Dorin; Sahraoui, Abdelhak Hadj

    2013-02-01

    High accuracy, non-contact measuring methods for finding thermal properties of liquid samples using photothermal infrared radiometry (PTR) are presented. The use of transparent windows to confine micro volume liquid samples and the implementation of front and/or back signal detection procedures helped the successful implementation of the PTR technique for measuring liquids with high proficiency. We present two configurations, the so-called back-front photothermal infrared radiometry and back photothermal infrared radiometry to find thermal diffusivity and thermal effusivity of liquid samples. Sensitivity studies and error analyses included prove the robustness of each method. As an illustration of the temperature and electric field varying studies, we have included the experimental results on a 5CB (4-cyano-4‧-pentylbiphenyl) liquid crystal.

  6. Dielectric constant of liquids confined in the extended nanospace measured by a streaming potential method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Kyojiro; Kazoe, Yutaka; Mawatari, Kazuma; Tsukahara, Takehiko; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2015-02-01

    Understanding liquid structure and the electrical properties of liquids confined in extended nanospaces (10-1000 nm) is important for nanofluidics and nanochemistry. To understand these liquid properties requires determination of the dielectric constant of liquids confined in extended nanospaces. A novel dielectric constant measurement method has thus been developed for extended nanospaces using a streaming potential method. We focused on the nonsteady-state streaming potential in extended nanospaces and successfully measured the dielectric constant of liquids within them without the use of probe molecules. The dielectric constant of water was determined to be significantly reduced by about 3 times compared to that of the bulk. This result contributes key information toward further understanding of the chemistry and fluidics in extended nanospaces.

  7. BUSINESS SURVEY LIQUIDITY MEASURE AS A LEADING INDICATOR OF CROATIAN INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Čižmešija

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Business survey liquidity measure is one of the modifications of the uniform EU business survey methodology applied in Croatia. Consequent liquidity problem have been, since socialist times, one of the major problem for Croatia's business. The problem rapidly increased between 1995 and 2000 and now it again represents the main difficulty for the Croatian economy. In order to improve the forecasting properties of business survey liquidity measure, some econometric models ware applied. Based on the regression analysis we concluded that the changes in the liquidity variable can predict the direction of changes in industrial production with one quarter lead. The results also show that liquidity can be a proxy of the Industrial Confidence Indicator in the observed period. The empirical analysis was performed using quarterly data covering the period from the first quarter 2005 to the fourth quarter 2011. The data sources were Privredni vjesnik (a business magazine in Croatia and the Croatian Bureau of Statistics.

  8. Measurements of interfacial dynamics of gas-liquid displacement in a capillary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Changfei; Qiu, Huihe

    2016-06-01

    Measurement of liquid film thickness in gas-liquid plug/slug flows is a challenging task. A novel laser interference method for measuring the interfacial film thickness of gas-liquid displacement in a plug flow has been developed. This novel technique utilizes light scattering from different liquid/gas interfaces in forming interference fringes. The interference fringes are used for calculating the film thickness. A set of simultaneous equations is derived based on geometrical optics. The experiment set up is not complex and is easy to install. The fringes are recorded by a charge-coupled device high speed camera and the image data are calculated using fast Fourier transform (FFT) and a non-linear least squares Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The uncertainty of this measurement technique is quite small (0.3 μm) and the entire film thickness profile can be measured at the same time.

  9. Ultrasonic measurement device for the characterization of microbiological and biochemical processes in liquid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira, L.; Durán, C.; Sierra, C.; Resa, P.; Montero de Espinosa, F.

    2007-07-01

    A measuring device for the characterization of liquid media based on the propagation of ultrasonic waves is presented. It is a four-channel system especially designed for monitoring microbiological and biochemical processes. The liquid samples are placed in commercial glass bottles which can be sterilized. The bottles have inlet and outlet tubes, which can be used for adding substances or extracting samples during the measuring process without interruption. Magnetic stirring can be used to keep the liquid agitated for homogenization purposes. Thermal control elements assure the temperature stability during the measurement. The liquid characterization is based on the detection of amplitude and time-of-flight changes in the sample under study. The main features, operation and performance of this ultrasonic device are analysed in this work, and some measurements and preliminary results are shown.

  10. Correlation measurements of light transmittance in polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimyak, P. P.; Nehrych, A. L.

    2015-11-01

    The methods of correlation optics are for the first time applied to study structure of liquid crystal (LC) - polymer (P) composites at various concentrations of LC and P. Their phase correlation function (PCF) was obtained considering LC-P composite as a random phase screen. The amplitude of PCF contains information about number of LC domains and structure of LC director inside of them, while a half-width of this function is connected with a size of these domains. We studied unpowered and powered composite layers with a thickness of 5 μm. As liquid crystal and polymer were used nematic LC E7 from Merck and photopolymer composition NOA65 from Norland. Concentration of polymer φP was varied in a range 10-55 vol. %. In good agreement with previous studies by SEM technique we detected monotone decrease of LC domains with concentration of polymer. With application of electric field, amplitude of PCF behaves differently for the samples with different polymer content. For the samples with φP>35 vol. % (samples having morphology of polymer dispersed LC), this dependence is monotonic. In turn, if φPLC morphology), the amplitude of PCF non-monotonically depends on the applied voltage going through a maximum. The latter fact is explained by transformation of orientational defects of LC phase with the applied voltage.

  11. Thermodynamic properties of the liquid Hg-Tl alloys determined from vapour pressure measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gierlotka W.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The partial vapour pressure of mercury over liquid Hg-Tl liquid solutions were determined in the temperature range from 450 to 700 K by direct vapour pressure measurements carried out with the quartz gauge. From the measured ln pHg vs. T relationships activities of mercury were determined. Using Redlich-Kister formulas logarithms of the activity coefficients were described with the following equations: From which all thermodynamic functions in the solutions can be derived.

  12. Polarized fluorescence measurements of orientational order in a uniaxial liquid crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapoy, L. Lawrence; DuPré, Donald B.

    1979-01-01

    The second and fourth orientational order parameters and , have been measured throughout the liquid crystalline phase of p-methoxybenzylidene-p[prime]-n-butylaniline (MBBA) using small quantities of a fluorescent probe. Complications of rotational Brownian motion and the intramolecular transfer...... of excitation energy were considered in the analysis. The results are in agreement with previous Raman measurements on the doped liquid crystal. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  13. Laser flash method for measurement of liquid metals heat transfer coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankus, S. V.; Savchenko, I. V.

    2009-12-01

    New laser flash technique for the measurement of heat transfer coefficients of liquid metals is presented. The thermal diffusivity of the liquid mercury has been studied experimentally over the room temperature range. The thermal conductivity coefficient has been calculated with the use of the reference data on density and heat capacity. Analysis of systematic errors of the measurements has shown that the data error is about 3%. Comparison of the obtained results with data available in publications has proved their reliability.

  14. A technique for measuring velocity and attenuation of ultrasound in liquid foams

    CERN Document Server

    Pierre, Juliette; Leroy, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    We describe an experimental setup specifically designed for measuring the ultrasonic transmission through liquid foams, over a broad range of frequencies (60-600 kHz). The question of determining the ultrasonic properties of the foam (density, phase velocity and attenuation) from the transmission measurements is addressed. An inversion method is proposed, tested on synthetic data, and applied to a liquid foam at different times during the coarsening. The ultrasonic velocity and attenuation are found to be very sensitive to the foam bubble sizes, suggesting that a spectroscopy technique could be developed for liquid foams.

  15. Novel method for the measurement of liquid film thickness during fuel spray impingement on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, S; Beyrau, F; Hardalupas, Y; Taylor, A M K P

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a novel optical technique for the measurement of liquid film thickness formed on surfaces during the impingement of automotive fuel sprays. The technique makes use of the change of the light scattering characteristics of a metal surface with known roughness, when liquid is deposited. Important advantages of the technique over previously established methods are the ability to measure the time-dependent spatial distribution of the liquid film without a need to add a fluorescent tracer to the liquid, while the measurement principle is not influenced by changes of the pressure and temperature of the liquid or the surrounding gas phase. Also, there is no need for non-fluorescing surrogate fuels. However, an in situ calibration of the dependence of signal intensity on liquid film thickness is required. The developed method can be applied to measure the time-dependent and two-dimensional distribution of the liquid fuel film thickness on the piston or the liner of gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. The applicability of this technique was evaluated with impinging sprays of several linear alkanes and alcohols with different thermo-physical properties. The surface temperature of the impingement plate was controlled to simulate the range of piston surface temperatures inside a GDI engine. Two sets of liquid film thickness measurements were obtained. During the first set, the surface temperature of the plate was kept constant, while the spray of different fuels interacted with the surface. In the second set, the plate temperature was adjusted to match the boiling temperature of each fuel. In this way, the influence of the surface temperature on the liquid film created by the spray of different fuels and their evaporation characteristics could be demonstrated.

  16. Structural Equation Modeling Applied to the Reaction to Stock Dividends and Stock Splits: integrating signaling, liquidity and optimal price level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelmara Mendes Vieira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work develops a hybrid model of structural equations able to take simultaneously the hypotheses of signaling, liquidity, and optimal price level to explain the reaction to the stock dividends and stock splits. In the measurement model four constructs were defined: trading activity, spread, size, and price. The structural model defines extant relations from the proposition of 22 sub-hypotheses. A sample of 321 splits performed in the Brazilian market between 1990 and 2004 was used for assessing the model. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed the validity and coherence of the four constructs. The structural model confirmed 9 original sub-hypotheses.

  17. Sound level measurements using smartphone "apps": Useful or inaccurate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Nast

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many recreational activities are accompanied by loud concurrent sounds and decisions regarding the hearing hazards associated with these activities depend on accurate sound measurements. Sound level meters (SLMs are designed for this purpose, but these are technical instruments that are not typically available in recreational settings and require training to use properly. Mobile technology has made such sound level measurements more feasible for even inexperienced users. Here, we assessed the accuracy of sound level measurements made using five mobile phone applications or "apps" on an Apple iPhone 4S, one of the most widely used mobile phones. Accuracy was assessed by comparing application-based measurements to measurements made using a calibrated SLM. Whereas most apps erred by reporting higher sound levels, one application measured levels within 5 dB of a calibrated SLM across all frequencies tested.

  18. The Use of Helmholtz Resonance for Measuring the Volume of Liquids and Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive E. Davies

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was undertaken to ascertain the potential of using Helmholtz resonance for volume determination and the factors that may influence accuracy. The uses for a rapid non-interference volume measurement system range from agricultural produce and mineral sampling through to liquid fill measurements. By weighing the sample the density can also measured indirectly.

  19. The use of Helmholtz resonance for measuring the volume of liquids and solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Emile S; Davies, Clive E

    2010-01-01

    An experimental investigation was undertaken to ascertain the potential of using Helmholtz resonance for volume determination and the factors that may influence accuracy. The uses for a rapid non-interference volume measurement system range from agricultural produce and mineral sampling through to liquid fill measurements. By weighing the sample the density can also measured indirectly.

  20. Using FT-IR spectroscopy to measure charge organization in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, Christopher M; Janzen, Jonathan; Butson, Eric D; Coltrain, Gage L

    2013-07-25

    A major goal in the field of ionic liquids is correlating transport property trends with the underlying liquid structure of the compounds, such as the degree of charge organization among the constituent ions. Traditional techniques for experimentally assessing charge organization are specialized and not readily available for routine measurements. This represents a significant roadblock in elucidating these correlations. We use a combination of transmission and polarized-ATR infrared spectroscopy to measure the degree of charge organization for ionic liquids. The technique is illustrated with a family of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ionic liquids at 30 °C. As expected, the amount of charge organization decreases as the alkyl side chain is lengthened, highlighting the important role of short-range repulsive interactions in defining quasilattice structure. Inherent limitations of the method are identified and discussed. The quantitative measurements of charge organization are then correlated with trends in the transport properties of the compounds to highlight the relationship between charge and momentum transport and the underlying liquid structure. Most research laboratories possess infrared spectrometers capable of conducting these measurements; thus, the proposed method may represent a cost-effective solution for routinely measuring charge organization in ionic liquids.

  1. Novel liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods for measuring steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keevil, Brian G

    2013-10-01

    Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is increasingly becoming the method of choice for steroid hormone measurements due to small sample volumes, fast analysis times and improved specificity compared to immunoassays. Achievement of demanding analytical targets for steroid analysis is now becoming possible because of improvements in sample preparation technology, liquid chromatography column technology and mass spectrometer design. The most popular sample treatment strategies comprise protein precipitation (PP), solid-phase extraction (SLE) and liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Modern liquid chromatography columns can ensure the adequate separation of isobaric compounds e.g. 21 Deoxycortisol, 11 Deoxycortisol and Corticosterone. The most appropriate method may be chosen to improve assay sensitivity by reducing matrix effects (LLE, SPE) or simplicity and speed (PP). Specific examples of some clinically important steroids including oestradiol, aldosterone, renin, serum cortisol, salivary cortisol and salivary testosterone will be described.

  2. Local liquid velocity measurement of Trickle Bed Reactor using Digital Industrial X-ray Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Salleh, Khairul Anuar

    Trickle Bed Reactors (TBRs) are fixed beds of particles in which both liquid and gas flow concurrently downward. They are widely used to produce not only fuels but also lubrication products. The measurement and the knowledge of local liquid velocities (VLL) in TBRs is less which is essential for advancing the understanding of its hydrodynamics and for validation computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Therefore, this work focused on developing a new, non-invasive, statistically reliable technique that can be used to measure local liquid velocity (VLL) in two-dimensions (2-D). This is performed by combining Digital Industrial X-ray Radiography (DIR) and Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) techniques. This work also make possible the development of three-dimensional (3-D) VLL measurements that can be taken in TBRs. Measurements taken through both the combined and the novel technique, once validated, were found to be comparable to another technique (a two-point fiber optical probe) currently being developed at Missouri University of Science and Technology. The results from this study indicate that, for a gas-liquid-solid type bed, the measured VLL can have a maximum range that is between 35 and 51 times that of its superficial liquid velocity (VSL). Without the existence of gas, the measured VLL can have a maximum range that is between 4 and 4.7 times that of its VSL. At a higher V SL, the particle tracer was greatly distributed and became carried away by a high liquid flow rate. Neither the variance nor the range of measured VLL varied for any of the replications, confirming the reproducibility of the experimental measurements used, regardless of the VSL . The liquid's movement inside the pore was consistent with findings from previous studies that used various techniques.

  3. Local Measurement of Gas-Liquid Bubbly Flow with a Double-Sensor Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙科霞; 张鸣远; 陈学俊

    2000-01-01

    A double-sensor probe was used to measure local interfacial parameters of a gas-liquid bubbly flow in a horizontal tube. The parameters included void fraction, interfacial concentration, bubble size distribution, bubble frequency and bubble interface velocity. The authors paid special attention to the probe design and construction for minimizing measurement errors. Measures were also taken in the design of sensor ends for preventing corrosions in the flow. This is an effort to improve the current double-sensor probe technique to meet the ever-increasing needs to local varameter measurements in gas-liquid two-phase flows.

  4. Selecting Level-Specific Specialized Vocabulary Using Statistical Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chujo, Kiyomi; Utiyama, Masao

    2006-01-01

    To find an easy-to-use, automated tool to identify technical vocabulary applicable to learners at various levels, nine statistical measures were applied to the 7.3-million-word "commerce and finance" component of the British National Corpus. The resulting word lists showed that each statistical measure extracted a different level of specialized…

  5. Treatment of low level radioactive liquid waste containing appreciable concentration of TBP degraded products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsala, T P; Sonavane, M S; Kore, S G; Sonar, N L; De, Vaishali; Raghavendra, Y; Chattopadyaya, S; Dani, U; Kulkarni, Y; Changrani, R D

    2011-11-30

    The acidic and alkaline low level radioactive liquid waste (LLW) generated during the concentration of high level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) prior to vitrification and ion exchange treatment of intermediate level radioactive liquid waste (ILW), respectively are decontaminated by chemical co-precipitation before discharge to the environment. LLW stream generated from the ion exchange treatment of ILW contained high concentrations of carbonates, tributyl phosphate (TBP) degraded products and problematic radio nuclides like (106)Ru and (99)Tc. Presence of TBP degraded products was interfering with the co-precipitation process. In view of this a modified chemical treatment scheme was formulated for the treatment of this waste stream. By mixing the acidic LLW and alkaline LLW, the carbonates in the alkaline LLW were destroyed and the TBP degraded products got separated as a layer at the top of the vessel. By making use of the modified co-precipitation process the effluent stream (1-2 μCi/L) became dischargeable to the environment after appropriate dilution. Based on the lab scale studies about 250 m(3) of LLW was treated in the plant. The higher activity of the TBP degraded products separated was due to short lived (90)Y isotope. The cement waste product prepared using the TBP degraded product was having good chemical durability and compressive strength. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Indirect measurement of molten steel level in tundish based on laser triangulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Zhiqi; He, Qing, E-mail: heqing@ise.neu.edu.cn; Xie, Zhi [State Key Laboratory of Synthetical Automation for Process Industries, School of Information Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2016-03-15

    For real-time and precise measurement of molten steel level in tundish during continuous casting, slag level and slag thickness are needed. Among which, the problem of slag thickness measurement has been solved in our previous work. In this paper, a systematic solution for slag level measurement based on laser triangulation is proposed. Being different from traditional laser triangulation, several aspects for measuring precision and robustness have been done. First, laser line is adopted for multi-position measurement to overcome the deficiency of single point laser range finder caused by the uneven surface of the slag. Second, the key parameters, such as installing angle and minimum requirement of the laser power, are analyzed and determined based on the gray-body radiation theory to fulfill the rigorous requirement of measurement accuracy. Third, two kinds of severe noises in the acquired images, which are, respectively, caused by heat radiation and Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI), are cleaned via morphological characteristic of the liquid slag and color difference between EMI and the laser signals, respectively. Fourth, as false target created by stationary slag usually disorders the measurement, valid signals of the slag are distinguished from the false ones to calculate the slag level. Then, molten steel level is obtained by the slag level minus the slag thickness. The measuring error of this solution is verified by the applications in steel plants, which is ±2.5 mm during steady casting and ±3.2 mm at the end of casting.

  7. Indirect measurement of molten steel level in tundish based on laser triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhiqi; He, Qing; Xie, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    For real-time and precise measurement of molten steel level in tundish during continuous casting, slag level and slag thickness are needed. Among which, the problem of slag thickness measurement has been solved in our previous work. In this paper, a systematic solution for slag level measurement based on laser triangulation is proposed. Being different from traditional laser triangulation, several aspects for measuring precision and robustness have been done. First, laser line is adopted for multi-position measurement to overcome the deficiency of single point laser range finder caused by the uneven surface of the slag. Second, the key parameters, such as installing angle and minimum requirement of the laser power, are analyzed and determined based on the gray-body radiation theory to fulfill the rigorous requirement of measurement accuracy. Third, two kinds of severe noises in the acquired images, which are, respectively, caused by heat radiation and Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI), are cleaned via morphological characteristic of the liquid slag and color difference between EMI and the laser signals, respectively. Fourth, as false target created by stationary slag usually disorders the measurement, valid signals of the slag are distinguished from the false ones to calculate the slag level. Then, molten steel level is obtained by the slag level minus the slag thickness. The measuring error of this solution is verified by the applications in steel plants, which is ±2.5 mm during steady casting and ±3.2 mm at the end of casting.

  8. Half-filled Landau level, topological insulator surfaces, and three-dimensional quantum spin liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Senthil, T.

    2016-02-01

    We synthesize and partly review recent developments relating the physics of the half-filled Landau level in two dimensions to correlated surface states of topological insulators in three dimensions. The latter are in turn related to the physics of certain three-dimensional quantum spin liquid states. The resulting insights provide an interesting answer to the old question of how particle-hole symmetry is realized in composite fermion liquids. Specifically the metallic state at filling ν =1/2 —described originally in pioneering work by Halperin, Lee, and Read as a liquid of composite fermions—was proposed recently by Son to be described by a particle-hole symmetric effective field theory distinct from that in the prior literature. We show how the relation to topological insulator surface states leads to a physical understanding of the correctness of this proposal. We develop a simple picture of the particle-hole symmetric composite fermion through a modification of older pictures as electrically neutral "dipolar" particles. We revisit the phenomenology of composite fermi liquids (with or without particle-hole symmetry), and show that their heat/electrical transport dramatically violates the conventional Wiedemann-Franz law but satisfies a modified one. We also discuss the implications of these insights for finding physical realizations of correlated topological insulator surfaces.

  9. A Technique for Measuring the Solubilities of Gases in Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    measured using a mercury manometer referenced to vacuum. To begin the experiment, a pure, dry gas is injected quickly into the system by opening valve...Tbath Vx - v - V 2 - V 3Apfinal Tm where Pb - ambient pressure (mmHg). The ambient pressure is measured using a mercury manometer and the ambient

  10. Measuring the Coefficient of Friction of a Small Floating Liquid Marble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Nguyen, Anh Van; Evans, Geoffrey M.; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates the friction coefficient of a moving liquid marble, a small liquid droplet coated with hydrophobic powder and floating on another liquid surface. A floating marble can easily move across water surface due to the low friction, allowing for the transport of aqueous solutions with minimal energy input. However, the motion of a floating marble has yet to be systematically characterised due to the lack of insight into key parameters such as the coefficient of friction between the floating marble and the carrier liquid. We measured the coefficient of friction of a small floating marble using a novel experimental setup that exploits the non-wetting properties of a liquid marble. A floating liquid marble pair containing a minute amount magnetite particles were immobilised and then released in a controlled manner using permanent magnets. The capillarity-driven motion was analysed to determine the coefficient of friction of the liquid marbles. The “capillary charge” model was used to fit the experimental results. We varied the marble content and carrier liquid to establish a relationship between the friction correction factor and the meniscus angle.

  11. PC Based Instrument for the Measurement of Dielectric Constant of Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ramana C. H.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A PC based instrument for the measurement of dielectric constant in liquids has been developed. It is based on the technique that utilizes frequency measurement for determination of capacitance using the personal computer as a tool. The change in frequency of XR–2206 function generator, when the liquid forms the dielectric medium of the dielectric cell, is measured with a personal computer. The programmable interval timer 8254 available in the DIOT card is used to measure the frequency, which in turn determines the capacitance of the cell and dielectric constant. The necessary software is developed in C language. The instrument system covers a wide range of dielectric constant for various liquids. The system is reasonably successful in measuring dielectric constant with an accuracy of ± 0.5 %. The paper deals with the hardware and software details.

  12. Measuring the thermal conductivity of liquids using photo-thermal radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusiak, A.; Pradere, Ch; Battaglia, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    A method for the estimation of thermal conductivity of liquids is proposed. The measurement is based on the front face-modulated photothermal radiometry usually used for studies of solid deposit (thin film) on substrate systems. The system considered here is in the three-layer form, the intermediate layer being the investigated liquid. An experimental setup has been developed in order to avoid the drawbacks of the classical methods such as flash or hot wire measurement. The measurement is carried out with low-temperature oscillations, and the studied liquid is confined in a specific (low thickness) container. This configuration leads to very low Rayleigh number and permits us to eliminate the convection phenomenon during the experiment and to characterize a very small (~1 µl) volume of liquid. This is an important feature for metrology of expensive or hazardous samples. According to the knowledge of the thermophysical properties of two solid layers external to a liquid, the phase lag between the thermal perturbation and the response of the sample is used as the experimental data. The measurement was validated using two well-known liquids: water and sunflower oil.

  13. Liquid-liquid equilibria for binary and ternary systems containing glycols, aromatic hydrocarbons, and water: Experimental measurements and modeling with the CPA EoS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Michelsen, Michael Locht;

    2006-01-01

    Liquid-liquid equilibrium data of four binary glycol + aromatic hydrocarbon systems and three ternary systems containing water have been measured at atmospheric pressure. The measured systems are monoethylene glycol (MEG) + benzene or toluene, triethylene glycol (TEG) + benzene or toluene, MEG + ...

  14. Measurements of sea level off Tikkavanipalem - Coast India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desai, R.G.P.; Peshwe, V.B.; Desa, E.; VijayKumar, K.; Desa, E.S.; Mehra, P.; Nagvekar, S.

    that are induced by local and remote meteorological forcings. The sea level residue (i.e. measured sea level minus the astronomically induced sea level) in this region is particularly by the local wind pattern and air pressure variations. The observed response...

  15. July 2012 Greenland melt extent enhanced by low-level liquid clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennartz, R; Shupe, M D; Turner, D D; Walden, V P; Steffen, K; Cox, C J; Kulie, M S; Miller, N B; Pettersen, C

    2013-04-04

    Melting of the world's major ice sheets can affect human and environmental conditions by contributing to sea-level rise. In July 2012, an historically rare period of extended surface melting was observed across almost the entire Greenland ice sheet, raising questions about the frequency and spatial extent of such events. Here we show that low-level clouds consisting of liquid water droplets ('liquid clouds'), via their radiative effects, played a key part in this melt event by increasing near-surface temperatures. We used a suite of surface-based observations, remote sensing data, and a surface energy-balance model. At the critical surface melt time, the clouds were optically thick enough and low enough to enhance the downwelling infrared flux at the surface. At the same time they were optically thin enough to allow sufficient solar radiation to penetrate through them and raise surface temperatures above the melting point. Outside this narrow range in cloud optical thickness, the radiative contribution to the surface energy budget would have been diminished, and the spatial extent of this melting event would have been smaller. We further show that these thin, low-level liquid clouds occur frequently, both over Greenland and across the Arctic, being present around 30-50 per cent of the time. Our results may help to explain the difficulties that global climate models have in simulating the Arctic surface energy budget, particularly as models tend to under-predict the formation of optically thin liquid clouds at supercooled temperatures--a process potentially necessary to account fully for temperature feedbacks in a warming Arctic climate.

  16. Robust sensor for turbidity measurement from light scattering and absorbing liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontturi, Ville; Turunen, Petri; Uozumi, Jun; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2009-12-01

    Internationally standardized turbidity measurements for probing solid particles in liquid are problematic in the case of simultaneous light scattering and absorption. A method and a sensor to determine the turbidity in the presence of light absorption are presented. The developed sensor makes use of the total internal reflection of a laser beam at the liquid-prism interface, and the turbidity is assessed using the concept of laser speckle pattern. Using average filtering in speckle data analyzing the observed dynamic speckle pattern, which is due to light scattering from particles and the static speckle due to stray light of the sensor, can be separated from each other. Good correlation between the standard deviation of dynamic speckle and turbidity value for nonabsorbing and for absorbing liquids was observed. The sensor is suggested, for instance, for the measurement of ill-behaved as well as small-volume turbid liquids in both medicine and process industry.

  17. Viscosity and Liquid Density of Asymmetric n-Alkane Mixtures: Measurement and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queimada, António J.; Marrucho, Isabel M.; Coutinho, João A.P.

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity and liquid density Measurements were performed, at atmospheric pressure. in pure and mixed n-decane. n-eicosane, n-docosane, and n-tetracosane from 293.15 K (or above the melting point) up to 343.15 K. The viscosity was determined with a rolling ball viscometer and liquid densities with...... of state and a corresponding states model recently proposed for surface tension, viscosity, vapor pressure, and liquid densities of the series of n-alkanes. Advantages and shortcoming of these models are discussed....

  18. Study on the Extraction of Actinides From Simulated High-level Liquid Waste by Mixture of DHDECMP and TBP in Kerosene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The distribution ratios of U(VI), Np(V), Pu(IV) and Am(III) are measured by the single stage extraction experiments of simulated high-level liquid waste with 22%DHDECMP-42%TBP/OK. The extraction behavior of U, Np, Pu and Am in simulated high-level liquid waste is determined on miniature countercurrent centrifugal contactor cascade (6 stages for extraction, 2 stages for scrubbing, 6 stages for stripping, AF : AX : AS=1 : 1.5 : 0.5; BF : BX=1 : 1). The experimental results show that removal efficiency of U(VI), Np(V), Pu(IV) and Am(III) from simulated high-level liquid waste, all of them ,is equal or more than 99.9%. The stripping efficiency of U(VI),

  19. Biocomponent determination in vinegars with the help of 14C measured by liquid scintillation counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudyka, Konrad; Pawlyta, Jacek

    2014-02-15

    This article presents a method of carbon extraction from vinegar used in preparation of liquid scintillation counting cocktails for measurements of low (14)C radioactivity. The presented method is relatively fast and can be used to produce liquid scintillation cocktails e.g., via benzene synthesis. In this work we present specific radiocarbon radioactivity determinations and based on them estimation of bio product content for five commercially available vinegars. All investigated vinegars are likely produced from plants in fermentation process.

  20. Focal length measurement of a varifocal liquid lens with capacitance detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Kentaro; Binh-Khiem, Nguyen; Takei, Yusuke; Takahata, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports on a detailed deformation model of varifocal liquid lenses fabricated by Parylene-on-liquid-deposition (POLD), which can be applied to measure and adjust the focal length of such lenses without using extra sensors or sensing mechanisms. The lens was fabricated by encapsulating a liquid between a transparent electrode and a polymer film that was covered with a metal electrode. When voltage is applied to the two electrodes, the lens deforms due to the electrostatic force, and its focal length and the capacitance between the two electrodes change simultaneously. This characteristic enables the focal length of the lens to be adjusted and detected by measuring the capacitance change. The focal length of the fabricated varifocal liquid lens changed from 153.6 to 82.6 mm by applying 150-V. The focal length change of the liquid lens was calculated from the change in its capacitance. Finally, to confirm the efficiency of this varifocal liquid lens, we fabricated a confocal distance sensor using the lens for laser scanning and demonstrated that this system can be used to measure distances of 94-140 mm with an average error of 0.83 mm and a standard deviation of 0.77 mm.

  1. Acoustic velocity measurement across the diameter of a liquid metal column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calder, C.A.; Wilcox, W.W.

    1978-05-15

    Present techniques for measuring sound velocity in liquid metals have been limited by the use of transducers which cannot survive in extreme temperature conditions. These methods also require relatively long measurement times. An optical noncontacting method has been developed which may be used for extremely short experimental times and very high temperatures and pressures. This technique is being incorporated into an isobaric expansion apparatus in which a 1 mm diam wire sample in a high pressure argon gas environment is resistively heated to melt within a time period of only a few microseconds. Before instability of the liquid column occurs, thermal expansion, enthalpy, and temperature are measured. The addition of the sound velocity measurement permits a more complete determination of the thermophysical properties of the liquid metal.

  2. Characterization of biomaterials polar interactions in physiological conditions using liquid-liquid contact angle measurements: relation to fibronectin adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velzenberger, Elodie; El Kirat, Karim; Legeay, Gilbert; Nagel, Marie-Danielle; Pezron, Isabelle

    2009-02-01

    Wettability of biomaterials surfaces and protein-coated substrates is generally characterized with the sessile drop technique using polar and apolar liquids. This procedure is often performed in air, which does not reflect the physiological conditions. In this study, liquid/liquid contact angle measurements were carried out to be closer to cell culture conditions. This technique allowed us to evaluate the polar contribution to the work of adhesion between an aqueous medium and four selected biomaterials widely used in tissue culture applications: bacteriological grade polystyrene (PS), tissue culture polystyrene (tPS), poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) film (PolyHEMA), and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose-carboxymethylcellulose bi-layered Petri dish (CEL). The contributions of polar interactions were also estimated on the same biomaterials after fibronectin (Fn) adsorption. The quantity of Fn adsorbed on PS, tPS, PolyHEMA and CEL surfaces was evaluated by using the fluorescein-labeled protein. PolyHEMA and CEL were found to be hydrophilic, tPS was moderately hydrophilic and PS was highly hydrophobic. After Fn adsorption on PS and tPS, a significant increase of the surface polar interaction was observed. On PolyHEMA and CEL, no significant adsorption of Fn was detected and the polar interactions remained unchanged. Finally, an inverse correlation between the polarity of the surfaces and the quantity of adsorbed Fn was established.

  3. Stabilization of liquid low-level and mixed wastes: a treatability study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, S.; Cheng, Yu-Cheng; Yellowhorse, L.; Peterson, P.

    1996-02-01

    A treatability study has been conducted on liquid low-level and mixed wastes using the stabilization agents Aquaset, Aquaset II, Aquaset II-H, Petroset, Petroset-H, and Petroset and Petroset II. A total of 40 different waste types with activities ranging from 10{sup {minus}14} to 10{sup {minus}4} curies/ml have been stabilized. Reported data for each waste include its chemical and radiological composition and the optimum composition or range of compositions (weight of agent/volume of waste) for each stabilization agent used. All wastes were successfully stabilized with one or more of the stabilization agents and all final waste forms passed the Paint Filter Liquids Test (EPA Method 9095).

  4. Transition Temperatures of Thermotropic Liquid Crystals from the Local Binary Gray Level Cooccurrence Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sreehari Sastry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method which combines the statistical analysis with texture structural analysis called Local Binary Gray Level Cooccurrence Matrix (LBGLCM to investigate the phase transition temperatures of thermotropic p,n-alkyloxy benzoic acid (nOBA, n=4,6,8,10 and 12 liquid crystals. Textures of the homeotropically aligned liquid crystal compounds are recorded as a function of temperature using polarizing optical microscope attached to the hot stage and high resolution camera. In this method, second-order statistical parameters (contrast, energy, homogeneity, and correlation are extracted from the LBGLCM of the textures. The changes associatedwiththe values of extracted parameters as a function of temperature are a helpful process to identify the phases and phase transition temperatures of the samples. Results obtained from this method have validity and are in good agreement with the literature.

  5. FY 1995 separation studies for liquid low-level waste treatment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostick, D.T.; Arnold, W.D.; Burgess, M.W. [and others

    1995-01-01

    During FY 1995, studies were continued to develop improved methods for centralized treatment of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Focus in this reporting period was on (1) identifying the parameters that affect the selective removal of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs, two of the principal radioactive contaminants expected in the waste; (2) validating the effectiveness of the treatment methods by testing an ac Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernate; (3) evaluating the optimum solid/liquid separation techniques for the waste; (4) identifying potential treatment methods for removal of technetium from LLLW; and (5) identifying potential methods for stabilizing the high-activity secondary solid wastes generated by the treatment.

  6. Measurement of the solubility of H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} in liquid sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, R.; Lesage, K.

    2010-01-15

    The solubility of hydrogen sulphide and sulphur dioxide in liquid sulfur were measured using a novel Thermo Scientific Nicolet iS10 FTIR Spectrometer. This power point presentation included the graphs depicting the detailed spectrographic measurements of pure, degassed liquid sulfur, hydrogen sulfide in liquid sulfur, sulfur dioxide in liquid sulfur, and hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide in liquid sulfur. Liquid sulfur in a sapphire-windowed quartz IR cell, the solidification of liquid sulfur in a sapphire-windowed quartz IR cell (monoclinic sulfur and next day orthorhombic sulfur), the isobaric solubility of sulfur dioxide in liquid sulfur, and a low head space liquid sulfur saturation vessel inside a thermostated oven were also shown. Head space analysis and direct injection of hot solvents with iodine for back titration may provide a better analytical technique. These new solubilities can be used to derive molar absorptivity from previous spectra. 11 figs.

  7. Measurement of Viscosity of Hydrocarbon Liquids Using a Microviscometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandekar, Abhijit; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    The viscosity of normal alkanes, their mixtures, and true boiling point (TBP) fractions (C (sub 6) -C (sub 19)) of four North Sea petroleum reservoir fluids have been measured by use of an automatic rolling ball mixroviscometer at 20°C. The equipment is specially suited for samples of limited amo...

  8. Comparative Study of the Intermolecular Dynamics of Benzene/Ionic Liquid Mixtures and Benzyl Functionalized Ionic Liquids: Femtosecond OKE Spectroscopic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitevis, Edward; Xue, Lianjie; Tamas, George

    2014-03-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are salts with melting points below 100 °C that are comprised of an organic cation and an inorganic or organic anion. There is great interest in obtaining a molecular level understanding of their unique physical and chemical properties, of which one of them is their ability, despite being inherently polar liquids, to dissolve large quantities of nonpolar aromatic compounds. In order to understand further the solvation of aromatic molecules in ILs, we have performed optical effect (OKE) spectroscopic measurements on 1-benzyl-3-methylimidazolum bistriflate, 1,3-dibenzylimidazolum bistriflate and the corresponding 1:1 and 2:1 benzene/1,3-dimethylimazolium bistrifate (C6H6/C1C1) mixtures. In contrast to being free in benzene/IL mixtures, the benzene rings are tethered to the imidazolium ring via methylene linkages in the case of first two ILs. The intermolecular Kerr spectra indicate that the motion of the benzene rings becomes increasingly more restricted in going from neat benzene to benzene dissolved in 1,3-dimethylimazolium bistrifate to benzene rings tethered to the imidazolium ring. This restriction causes the Kerr spectra effectively to shift to higher frequency in going from neat liquid benzene to C6H6/C1C1 mixtures to benzylimidazolium ILs. This work was supported by NSF Grant CHE-1153077.

  9. Novel System for Continuous Measurements of Dissolved Gases in Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, D. S.; Liem, J.; Owano, T. G.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of dissolved gases in lakes, rivers and oceans may be used to quantify underwater greenhouse gas generation, air-surface exchange, and pollution migration. Studies involving quantification of dissolved gases typically require obtaining water samples (from streams, lakes, or ocean water) and transporting them to a laboratory, where they are degased. The gases obtained are then generally measured using gas chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for concentrations and isotope ratios, respectively. This conventional, off-line, discrete-sample methodology is time consuming and labor intensive, and thus severely inhibits detailed spatial and temporal mapping of dissolved gases. In this work, we describe the commercial development of a new portable membrane-based gas extraction system (18.75" x 18.88" x 10.69", 16 kg, 85 watts) that interfaces directly to our cavity enhanced laser absorption based (or Off-Axis ICOS) gas analyzers to continuously and quickly measure concentrations and isotope ratios of dissolved gases. By accurately controlling the water flow rate through the membrane contactor, gas pressure on the outside and water pressure on the inside of the membrane, the system can generate precise and highly reproducible results. Furthermore, the gas-phase mole fractions (parts per million, ppm) may be converted into dissolved gas concentrations (nM), by accurately measuring the gas flow rates in and out of the extraction system. We will present detailed laboratory test data that quantifies the performance (linearity, precision, and dynamic range) of the system for measurements of the concentrations and isotope ratios of dissolved greenhouse gases (methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide) continuously and in real time.

  10. Superconducting characteristics of short MgB2 wires of long level sensor for liquid hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, M.; Inoue, Y.; Maekawa, K.; Matsuno, Y.; Fujikawa, S.; Kumakura, H.

    2015-12-01

    To establish the worldwide storage and marine transport of hydrogen, it is important to develop a high-precision and long level sensor, such as a superconducting magnesium diboride (MgB2) level sensor for large liquid hydrogen (LH2) tanks on board ships. Three 1.7- m-long MgB2 wires were fabricated by an in situ method, and the superconducting characteristics of twenty-four 20-mm-long MgB2 wires on the 1.7-m-long wires were studied. In addition, the static level-detecting characteristics of five 500-mm-long MgB2 level sensors were evaluated under atmospheric pressure.

  11. Density of liquid NiCoAlCr quarternary alloys measured by modified sessile drop method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Liang; ZHANG Shu-fang; XIAO Feng; YANG Ling-chuan; DONG Jian-xin; CAO Chun-lan; TAO Zai-nan; K. MUKAI

    2006-01-01

    The densities of liquid NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys with a fixed molar ratio of Ni to Co to Al (x(Ni)-x(Co)-x(Al)≈73-12-15) which is close to the average value of the commercial Ni-based superalloys TMS75, INCO713, CM247LC and CMSX-4, and the mass fraction of chromium changes from 0 to 9% were measured by a modified sessile drop method. It is found that with increasing temperature and chromium concentration in the alloys, the densities of the liquid NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys decrease, whereas the molar volume of the liquid NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys increases. And the liquid densities of NiCoAlCr quaternary alloys calculated from the partial molar volumes of nickel, cobalt, aluminum and chromium in the corresponding Ni-bases binary alloys are in good agreement with the experimental ones, i.e. within the error tolerance range the densities of the liquid Ni-based multi-component alloys can be predicted from the partial volumes of elements in Ni-based binary alloys in liquid state. The molar volume of liquid NiCoAlCr binary alloy shows a negative deviation from the ideal linear mixing and the deviation changes small with the increase of chromium concentration at the same temperature.

  12. Measurement of Trace $^{129}I$ Concentrations in CsI Powder and Organic Liquid Scintillator with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, K J

    2007-01-01

    Levels of trace radiopurity in active detector materials is a subject of major concern in low-background experiments. Procedures were devised to measure trace concentrations of I-129 in the inorganic salt CsI as well as in organic liquid scintillator with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) which leads to improvement in sensitivities by several orders of magnitude over other methods. No evidence of their existence in these materials were observed. Limits of < 6 X 10^{-13} g/g and < 2.6 X 10^{-17} g/g on the contaminations of I-129 in CsI and liquid scintillator, respectively, were derived.These are the first results in a research program whose goals are to develop techniques to measure trace radioactivity in detector materials by AMS.

  13. Analysis and measurement of thermal conductivity of polypropylene laminated paper impregnated with subcooled liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Mitsuho; Fuchino, Shuichiro

    2014-09-01

    We measured the thermal conductivity of polypropylene laminated paper (PPLP) impregnated with subcooled liquid nitrogen. PPLP is widely used for the electrical insulation of high-Tc superconducting (HTS) power transmission cables. Although the thermal conductivity of PPLP is an important factor in the design of HTS cables, there has been very limited work on its measurement in subcooled liquid nitrogen. We prepared PPLP samples and symmetrically stacked them on both sides of a heater. The stacked samples were immersed in liquid nitrogen in an open cryostat. A cryocooler mounted on the cryostat was used to maintain the subcooled temperature of the liquid nitrogen. The thermal conductivity of the stacked PPLPs was measured by the steady state method at a bath temperature of 65-75 K and was found to be 0.23-0.26 W/m K, which is about five times that measured in a vacuum as presented in available literature. We also discuss possible mechanisms for boosting the thermal conductivity of PPLP by liquid nitrogen impregnation.

  14. Measuring adhesion on rough surfaces using atomic force microscopy with a liquid probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan V. Escobar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a procedure to perform and interpret pull-off force measurements during the jump-off-contact process between a liquid drop and rough surfaces using a conventional atomic force microscope. In this method, a micrometric liquid mercury drop is attached to an AFM tipless cantilever to measure the force required to pull this drop off a rough surface. We test the method with two surfaces: a square array of nanometer-sized peaks commonly used for the determination of AFM tip sharpness and a multi-scaled rough diamond surface containing sub-micrometer protrusions. Measurements are carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere to avoid water capillary interactions. We obtain information about the average force of adhesion between a single peak or protrusion and the liquid drop. This procedure could provide useful microscopic information to improve our understanding of wetting phenomena on rough surfaces.

  15. Noncontact Optical Fiber Sensor for Measuring the Refractive Index of Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Selvas-Aguilar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A noncontact optical fiber sensor for measuring the refractive index of transparent liquids is proposed. It operates by calculating the path of a focused laser beam at 635 nm that travels across the boundaries of a liquid sample. The optical power Fresnel reflections are detected and, subsequently, the refractive index is determined as the ratio between the traveled beam paths when the liquid is deposited versus a reference without the liquid sample. Additionally, a mathematical analysis of the geometrical case is included. The theoretical data from our sensor are in good agreement with the experimental results. The resolution achieved by the sensor is better than 10−3 RIU.

  16. Application of matching liquid on the refractive index measurement of biotissue: A theoretical and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Ye, Qing; Deng, Zhichao; Zhou, Wenyuan; Mei, Jianchun; Zhang, Chunping; Tian, Jianguo

    2014-05-01

    The application of matching liquid on the measurement of the refractive index (RI) of biotissue using total internal reflection (TIR) method is investigated in detail. A theoretical model describing samples with different absorbing and scattering ability is given based on Fresnel formula. The theoretical calculation is verified by experimental results of three simulation samples (transparent plexiglass, white plexiglass and ZB3 glass) and cedar wood oil as the matching liquid. Reflectance curves of porcine tissue samples were recorded and systematically studied using two kinds of matching liquid (cedar wood oil and adipose oil) at the incident of TE and TM wave, respectively. Method for proper selection of matching liquid under different conditions is discussed.

  17. Measurement of Acceptable Noise Level with Background Music

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Hyun-Jung; Bahng, Junghwa; Lee, Jae Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Acceptable noise level (ANL) is a measure of the maximum background noise level (BNL) that a person is willing to tolerate while following a target story. Although researchers have used various sources of target sound in ANL measures, a limited type of background noise has been used. Extending the previous study of Gordon-Hickey & Moore (2007), the current study determined the effect of music genre and tempo on ANLs as possible factors affecting ANLs. We also investi...

  18. Method for measuring multiple scattering corrections between liquid scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, J. M.; Glenn, A. M.; Keefer, G. J.; Wurtz, R. E.

    2016-07-01

    A time-of-flight method is proposed to experimentally quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between scintillators. An array of scintillators is characterized in terms of crosstalk with this method by measuring a californium source, for different neutron energy thresholds. The spectral information recorded by the scintillators can be used to estimate the fractions of neutrons multiple scattering. With the help of a correction to Feynman's point model theory to account for multiple scattering, these fractions can in turn improve the mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation.

  19. Rheological measurements of liquid-solid flows with inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Esperanza; Hunt, Melany; Zenit, Roberto

    2015-11-01

    This talk presents experimental measurements of effective viscosity for neutrally-buoyant suspensions in which the Reynolds numbers based on particle diameter varies from 1 to 1000 and for solid fractions from 10% to 50%. The measurements are conducted in a rough-walled, coaxial-cylinder rheometer. For Reynolds numbers from 1 to 100 and solid fractions less than 30%, the effective viscosities increase with Reynolds number and are comparable with recent numerical simulations found in the literature. For higher solid fractions, the effective viscosity shows shear thinning at the lowest shear rates, followed by thickening at higher shear rates. Over this range of Reynolds numbers for a pure fluid, the flow is laminar. At higher Reynolds numbers for a pure fluid, the flow transitions to turbulence. When particles are added under these flow conditions (particle Reynolds number greater than 100), the effective viscosity continues to increase with Reynolds number but with a greater magnitude. At the highest solid fractions, the effective viscosity is independent of shear rate.

  20. Retrieval of Vertical Profiles of Liquid Water and Ice Content in Mixed Clouds from Doppler Radar and Microwave Radiometer Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvageot, Henri

    1996-01-01

    A new method to retrieve vertical profiles of liquid water content Mw(z), ice water content Mi(z), and ice particle size distribution Ni(D, z), (where D is the ice particle size and z the vertical coordinate) in mixed nonprecipitating clouds using the observations of a zenith-viewing Doppler radar and of a microwave radiometer is proposed. In this method, the profile of the vertical air velocity deduced from Doppler radar measurements is used to describe the rate of production by the updrafts of water. vapor in excess of saturation with respect to ice. Using a Zi Mi power-law relation with an unknown linear parameter (let i, be this parameter) and initially assuming that Zw is negligible with respect to Zi, (where Zw and Zi are the radar reflectivity factors of liquid water and ice particles respectively), the measured radar reflectivity factor profile Zm ( Zi) is inverted to estimate Ni(D, z). From Ni(D, z), the profile of the rate of water vapor that can be consumed by pure deposition on ice particles is calculated. The difference between the rate of production of the exam water vapor and the rate of deposited water vapor is an expression of the rate of liquid water generation at each level. By writing that the integral of the liquid water along the profile has to be equal to the total liquid water deduced from the microwave radiometer measurement, an estimation of the i parameter is obtained. From i, an estimation of the profiles Mw(z), Mi(z), Zw(z), Zi(z) (=Zm Zw), and Ni(D, z) is calculated. If Zw is effectively negligible with respect to Zi, the computation of the retrieved profiles is ended. If not, Zi(z) is corrected and a new estimation of the profiles is computed. The results of the numerical simulation of the algorithm are presented.

  1. Comparing volume of fluid and level set methods for evaporating liquid-gas flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    This presentation demonstrates three numerical strategies for simulating liquid-gas flows undergoing evaporation. The practical aim of this work is to choose a framework capable of simulating the combustion of liquid fuels in an internal combustion engine. Each framework is analyzed with respect to its accuracy and computational cost. All simulations are performed using a conservative, finite volume code for simulating reacting, multiphase flows under the low-Mach assumption. The strategies used in this study correspond to different methods for tracking the liquid-gas interface and handling the transport of the discontinuous momentum and vapor mass fractions fields. The first two strategies are based on conservative, geometric volume of fluid schemes using directionally split and un-split advection, respectively. The third strategy is the accurate conservative level set method. For all strategies, special attention is given to ensuring the consistency between the fluxes of mass, momentum, and vapor fractions. The study performs three-dimensional simulations of an isolated droplet of a single component fuel evaporating into air. Evaporation rates and vapor mass fractions are compared to analytical results.

  2. New Liquidity Measurement: Mechanical Approach (Case of Pre Opening Session on IDX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luluk Kholisoh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} The aim of this study is to develop a new liquidity measurement. The mechanical approach is used to measure the liquidity. This study uses trade order base that is more pronounced than conventional ones. To confirm the result of this study, we use pre opening session in the term of event as Kholisoh and Hermawati (2010 and Kholisoh (2011. This study collects trade base and order base intraday data one month period before and after pre opening session was implemented with the 25 most active stocks in LQ45. This study examines the velocity (how fast the order is executed as new liquidity measurement. The result of this study confirms Kholisoh (2011, but contradicts to Kholisoh and Hermawati (2010 in the same event. The use of “velocity” as a metric of liquidity measurement is better in understanding the theoretical wisdom. This new liquidity measurement can cover the speed of the order to be executed in all capital market. Keywords: Market microstructure, opening call, liquidity measurement, velocity

  3. Measurement uncertainty of liquid chromatographic analyses visualized by Ishikawa diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Veronika R

    2003-09-01

    Ishikawa, or cause-and-effect diagrams, help to visualize the parameters that influence a chromatographic analysis. Therefore, they facilitate the set up of the uncertainty budget of the analysis, which can then be expressed in mathematical form. If the uncertainty is calculated as the Gaussian sum of all uncertainty parameters, it is necessary to quantitate them all, a task that is usually not practical. The other possible approach is to use the intermediate precision as a base for the uncertainty calculation. In this case, it is at least necessary to consider the uncertainty of the purity of the reference material in addition to the precision data. The Ishikawa diagram is then very simple, and so is the uncertainty calculation. This advantage is given by the loss of information about the parameters that influence the measurement uncertainty.

  4. Experimental Measurements of Spreading of Volatile Liquid Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Neng-Li; Chao, David F.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the laser shadowgraphic system used by the first author of the present paper, a simple optical system, which combined the laser shadowgraphy and the direct magnified-photography, has been developed to measure the contact angle, the spreading speed, and the evaporation rate. Additionally, the system can also visualize thermocapillary convection inside of a sessile drop simultaneously. The experimental results show that evaporation/condensation and thermocapillary convection in the sessile drop induced by the evaporation strongly affects the wetting and spreading of the drop. Condensation always promotes the wetting and spreading of the drop. Evaporation may increase or decrease the contact angle of the evaporating sessile drops, depending on the evaporation rate. The thermocapillary convection in the drop induced by the evaporation enhances the effects of evaporation to suppress the spreading.

  5. Biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid simulation waste containing detergent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundari, Noor Anis; Putra, Sugili; Mukaromah, Umi

    2015-12-01

    Research of biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid waste containing detergent has been done. Thse organic liquid wastes are generated in nuclear facilities such as from laundry. The wastes that are cotegorized as hazard and poison materials are also radioactive. It must be treated properly by detoxification of the hazard and decontamination of the radionuclides to ensure that the disposal of the waste meets the requirement of standard quality of water. This research was intended to determine decontamination factor and separation efficiensies, its kinetics law, and to produce a supernatant that ensured the environmental quality standard. The radioactive element in the waste was thorium with activity of 5.10-5 Ci/m3. The radioactive liquid waste which were generated in simulation plant contains detergents that was further processed by aerobic biochemical process using SGB 103 bacteria in a batch reactor equipped with aerators. Two different concentration of samples were processed and analyzed for 212 hours and 183 hours respectively at a room temperature. The product of this process is a liquid phase called as supernatant and solid phase material called sludge. The chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), suspended solid (SS), and its alpha activity were analyzed. The results show that the decontamination factor and the separation efficiency of the lower concentration samples are higher compared to the samples with high concentration. Regarding the decontamination factor, the result for 212 hours processing of waste with detergent concentration of 1.496 g/L was 3.496 times, whereas at the detergent concentration of 0.748 g/L was 15.305 times for 183 hours processing. In case of the separation efficiency, the results for both samples were 71.396% and 93.465% respectively. The Bacterial growth kinetics equation follow Monod's model and the decreasing of COD and BOD were first order with the rate constant of 0.01 hour-1.

  6. Anisotropic Quantum Hall Liquid States with No Translational Invariance in the Lowest Landau Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftja, Orion

    2016-05-01

    Strongly correlated two-dimensional electron systems in a high perpendicular magnetic field have displayed remarkable new physics leading to the discovery of phenomena such as the integer and the fractional quantum Hall effect, to mention a few. Laughlin's theoretical model and the composite fermion's (CFs) approach provide a good description of the liquid electronic phases in the lowest Landau level (LLL) at relatively large filling factors. Other electronic phases at smaller filling factors of the LLL likely represent electronic Wigner solid states. It is believed that no other phases with intermediate order stabilize at the liquid-solid transition region. The current study deals with filling factor 1/6 in the LLL, a state which is very close to the critical filling factor where the liquid-solid transition takes place. With the assumption that the underlying signs of crystalline order are starting to appear at this transitional regime, we focus our attention and study the properties of a hybrid electronic phase that lacks translational invariance. To describe such a state, we consider a wave function that lies entirely in the LLL but, unlike a typical quantum Hall liquid phase, does not possess translational invariance. Although inspired by Laughlin's approach, the wave function we introduce differs from Laughlin's or CFs wave functions that describe translationally invariant uniform electronic phases. We perform quantum Monte Carlo simulations in a standard disk geometry to gain a better understanding of the properties of this wave function that may be considered as a precursor to the more conventional Wigner crystal phase.

  7. Biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid simulation waste containing detergent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundari, Noor Anis, E-mail: nooranis@batan.go.id; Putra, Sugili; Mukaromah, Umi [Sekolah Tinggi Teknologi Nuklir – Badan Tenaga Nuklir Nasional Jl. Babarsari P.O. BOX 6101 YKBB Yogyakarta 55281 Telp : (0274) 48085, 489716, Fax : (0274) 489715 (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Research of biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid waste containing detergent has been done. Thse organic liquid wastes are generated in nuclear facilities such as from laundry. The wastes that are cotegorized as hazard and poison materials are also radioactive. It must be treated properly by detoxification of the hazard and decontamination of the radionuclides to ensure that the disposal of the waste meets the requirement of standard quality of water. This research was intended to determine decontamination factor and separation efficiensies, its kinetics law, and to produce a supernatant that ensured the environmental quality standard. The radioactive element in the waste was thorium with activity of 5.10{sup −5} Ci/m{sup 3}. The radioactive liquid waste which were generated in simulation plant contains detergents that was further processed by aerobic biochemical process using SGB 103 bacteria in a batch reactor equipped with aerators. Two different concentration of samples were processed and analyzed for 212 hours and 183 hours respectively at a room temperature. The product of this process is a liquid phase called as supernatant and solid phase material called sludge. The chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), suspended solid (SS), and its alpha activity were analyzed. The results show that the decontamination factor and the separation efficiency of the lower concentration samples are higher compared to the samples with high concentration. Regarding the decontamination factor, the result for 212 hours processing of waste with detergent concentration of 1.496 g/L was 3.496 times, whereas at the detergent concentration of 0.748 g/L was 15.305 times for 183 hours processing. In case of the separation efficiency, the results for both samples were 71.396% and 93.465% respectively. The Bacterial growth kinetics equation follow Monod’s model and the decreasing of COD and BOD were first order with the rate constant of 0

  8. Measuring Structural Gender Equality in Mexico: A State Level Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Sonia M.

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of this article is to assess the level of gender equality across the 32 Mexican states. After reviewing conceptual and methodological issues related to previous measures of structural inequality I detail the logic and methodology involved in the construction of a composite and multidimensional measure of gender equality, at the…

  9. Drift time measurement in the ATLAS liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter using cosmic muons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aad..[], G.; Dam, Mogens; Hansen, Jørgen Beck

    2010-01-01

    The ionization signals in the liquid argon of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied in detail using cosmic muons. In particular, the drift time of the ionization electrons is measured and used to assess the intrinsic uniformity of the calorimeter gaps and estimate its impact on the co......The ionization signals in the liquid argon of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied in detail using cosmic muons. In particular, the drift time of the ionization electrons is measured and used to assess the intrinsic uniformity of the calorimeter gaps and estimate its impact...

  10. Liquid level sensor based on CMFTIR effect in polymer optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yulong; Liu, Wenyi; Zhang, Huixin; Su, Shan; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Yanjun; Liu, Jun; Xiong, Jijun

    2016-09-01

    The macro-bending induced optical fiber cladding modes frustrated total internal reflection effect is used to realize the liquid level probe with a simple structure of single macro-bend polymer optical fiber loop. The test results show that the extinction ratio reaches 1.06 dB. "First bath" phenomenon is not obvious (about 0.8%). The robustness of the sensor is better, and the ability of anti-pollution is stronger compared with the conventional sensors. The process of making this sensing probe is extremely easy, and the cost is very low.

  11. Lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery for grid-level energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kangli; Jiang, Kai; Chung, Brice; Ouchi, Takanari; Burke, Paul J.; Boysen, Dane A.; Bradwell, David J.; Kim, Hojong; Muecke, Ulrich; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2014-10-01

    The ability to store energy on the electric grid would greatly improve its efficiency and reliability while enabling the integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies (such as wind and solar) into baseload supply. Batteries have long been considered strong candidate solutions owing to their small spatial footprint, mechanical simplicity and flexibility in siting. However, the barrier to widespread adoption of batteries is their high cost. Here we describe a lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery that potentially meets the performance specifications for stationary energy storage applications. This Li||Sb-Pb battery comprises a liquid lithium negative electrode, a molten salt electrolyte, and a liquid antimony-lead alloy positive electrode, which self-segregate by density into three distinct layers owing to the immiscibility of the contiguous salt and metal phases. The all-liquid construction confers the advantages of higher current density, longer cycle life and simpler manufacturing of large-scale storage systems (because no membranes or separators are involved) relative to those of conventional batteries. At charge-discharge current densities of 275 milliamperes per square centimetre, the cells cycled at 450 degrees Celsius with 98 per cent Coulombic efficiency and 73 per cent round-trip energy efficiency. To provide evidence of their high power capability, the cells were discharged and charged at current densities as high as 1,000 milliamperes per square centimetre. Measured capacity loss after operation for 1,800 hours (more than 450 charge-discharge cycles at 100 per cent depth of discharge) projects retention of over 85 per cent of initial capacity after ten years of daily cycling. Our results demonstrate that alloying a high-melting-point, high-voltage metal (antimony) with a low-melting-point, low-cost metal (lead) advantageously decreases the operating temperature while maintaining a high cell voltage. Apart from the fact that this finding

  12. Numerical simulation of Marangoni effects of single drops induced by interphase mass transfer in liquid-liquid extraction systems by the level set method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The mathematical model of mass transfer-induced Marangoni effect is formulated. The drop surface evolution is captured by the level set method, in which the interface is represented by the embedded set of zero level of a scalar distance function defined in the whole computational domain. Numerical simulation of the Marangoni effect induced by interphase mass transfer to/from deformable single drops in unsteady motion in liquid-liquid extraction systems is performed in a Eulerian axisymmetric reference frame. The occurrence and development of the Marangoni effect are simulated, and the re- sults are in good agreement with the classical theoretical analysis and previous simulation.

  13. Numerical simulation of Marangoni effects of single drops induced by interphase mass transfer in liquid-liquid extraction systems by the level set method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG JianFeng; YANG Chao; MAO ZaiSha

    2008-01-01

    The mathematical model of mass transfer-induced Marangoni effect is formulated. The drop surface evolution is captured by the level set method, in which the interface is represented by the embedded set of zero level of a scalar distance function defined in the whole computational domain. Numerical simulation of the Marangoni effect induced by interphase mass transfer to/from deformable single drops in unsteady motion in liquid-liquid extraction systems is performed in a Eulerian axisymmetric reference frame. The occurrence and development of the Marangoni effect are simulated, and the re-sults are in good agreement with the classical theoretical analysis and previous simulation.

  14. Conventional methods fail to measure cp(omega) of glass-forming liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tage Emil; Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    thermal-wave method does not measure the isobaric frequency-dependent specific heat cp(omega). This method rather measures a "longitudinal" frequency-dependent specific heat, a quantity defined and detailed here that is in between cp(omega) and cV(omega). This result means that no reliable wide......-frequency measurements of cp(omega) on liquids approaching the calorimetric glass transition exist. We briefly discuss consequences for experiment....

  15. Visual Measurements of Droplet Size in Gas Liquid Annular Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fore, L.B.; Ibrahim, B.B.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-07-01

    Drop size distributions have been measured for nitrogen-water annular flow in a 9.67 mm hydraulic diameter duct, at system pressures of 3.4 and 17 atm and a temperature of 38 C. These new data extend the range of conditions represented by existing data in the open literature, primarily through an increase in system pressure. Since most existing correlations were developed from data obtained at lower pressures, it should be expected that the higher-pressure data presented in this paper would not necessarily follow those correlations. The correlation of Tatterson, et al. (1977) does not predict the new data very well, while the correlation of Kataoka, et al. (1983) only predicts those data taken at the lower pressure of 3.4 atm. However, the maximum drop size correlation of Kocamustafaogullari, et al. (1994) does predict the current data to a reasonable approximation. Similarly, their correlation for the Sauter mean diameter can predict the new data, provided the coefficient in the equation is adjusted.

  16. Direct Measurement of Free Estradiol in Human Serum and Plasma by Equilibrium Dialysis-Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Julie A; Kushnir, Mark M; Rockwood, Alan L; Meikle, A Wayne

    2016-01-01

    We describe a direct method of measurement of free estradiol using equilibrium dialysis followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Serum aliquots and internal standards are extracted by liquid-liquid extraction using methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) followed by derivatization with dansyl chloride. An API 5500 mass spectrometer operated in positive electrospray mode is used for detection.

  17. Displacement measurement with multi-level spiral phase filtering in speckle interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Alberto; Dávila, Abundio; Landgrave, J. E. A.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-level spiral phase filter is proposed in electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) for out-of-plane displacement measurements. This filter generates a particular kind of speckle pattern that results from the convolution of standard speckles with the filter point spread function (Fourier transform). We shall refer to it as a vortex-filtered speckle pattern (VF-SP). It is shown here that if unresolved and fully developed VF-SPs are generated, then each speckle contains embedded phase terms which can be controlled by the multi-level spiral filter rotation. This mechanism effectively allows the application of standard phase extraction procedures for displacement measurements. Numerical simulations of an interferometer working with VF-SPs were done to verify this technique. Experimental validation was achieved with an out-of-plane electronic speckle pattern interferometer, in which an Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCoS) was used to generate the multi-level spiral phase filters.

  18. Measurement of Peltier Heat at the Solid/Liquid Interface and Its Application to Crystal Growth II : Measurement and Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.H. [Chungju National University, Chungju (Korea); Jang, K.W. [Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea); Lee, D.H. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-11-01

    Thermoelectric effects on the temperature changes at the solid- and liquid-phase and its interface were studied by using the unidirectional solidification of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. Cooling or heating effects measured with current density, polarity and current passing time were quite different. By separating sole Peltier, Thomson and Joule heat theoretically and experimentally, the Peltier coefficient at the solid/liquid interface of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} was -1.10 X 10{sup -1} V, and the Thomson coefficients of solid- and liquid-phase were 7.31 X 10{sup -4} V/K, 5.77 X 10{sup -5}V/K, respectively. When D.C. passed from solid-phase to liquid-phase during the crystal growth of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, the crystal with more directionality was obtained owing to increase of the temperature gradient in liquid by the Peltier cooling. But in reverse current direction, the crystallinity was not changed significantly. (author). 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Measurements of extremely low radioactivity levels in BOREXINO

    CERN Document Server

    Arpesella, C

    2001-01-01

    The techniques researched, developed and applied towards the measurement of radioisotope concentrations at ultra-low levels in the real-time solar neutrino experiment BOREXINO at Gran Sasso are presented and illustrated with specific results of widespread interest. We report the use of low-level germanium gamma spectrometry, low-level miniaturized gas proportional counters and low background scintillation detectors developed in solar neutrino research. Each now sets records in its field. We additionally describe our techniques of radiochemical ultra-pure, few atom manipulations and extractions. Forefront measurements also result from the powerful combination of neutron activation and low-level counting. Finally, with our techniques and commercially available mass spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy, new low-level detection limits for isotopes of interest are obtained.

  20. Measurement of (90)Sr in environmental samples by cation-exchange and liquid scintillation counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, H; Yanase, N

    1990-06-01

    A new method for the measurement of (90)Sr in environmental samples by cation-exchange and liquid scintillation counting is described. Strontium carbonate is purified by precipitation and ion-exchange, weighed for the determination of chemical yield, dissolved in hydrochloric acid and mixed with the liquid scintillator, Aquasol-2. Two channels of a low-background liquid scintillation counter are used to determine (90)Sr, (90)Y and (89)Sr, free from the effects of environmental tritium. The values of (90)Sr obtained by this method are in good agreement with those from ordinary (90)Y milking and the gas proportional counting method. The concentration of (90)Sr in the air at Tokai-mura in Japan has been measured by the new method.

  1. Highly Sensitive Measurement of Liquid Density in Air Using Suspended Microcapillary Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Malvar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the use of commercially available glass microcapillaries as micromechanical resonators for real-time monitoring of the mass density of a liquid that flows through the capillary. The vibration of a suspended region of the microcapillary is optically detected by measuring the forward scattering of a laser beam. The resonance frequency of the liquid filled microcapillary is measured for liquid binary mixtures of ethanol in water, glycerol in water and Triton in ethanol. The method achieves a detection limit in an air environment of 50 µg/mL that is only five times higher than that obtained with state-of-the-art suspended microchannel resonators encapsulated in vacuum. The method opens the door to novel advances for miniaturized total analysis systems based on microcapillaries with the add-on of mechanical transduction for sensing the rheological properties of the analyzed fluids without the need for vacuum encapsulation of the resonators.

  2. A transit-time flow meter for measuring milliliter per minute liquid flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Canqian; Kymmel, Mogens; Søeberg, Henrik

    1988-01-01

    A transit-time flow meter, using periodic temperature fluctuations as tracers, has been developed for measuring liquid flow as small as 0.1 ml/min in microchannels. By injecting square waves of heat into the liquid flow upstream with a tiny resistance wire heater, periodic temperature fluctuations...... are generated downstream. The fundamental frequency phase shift of the temperature signal with respect to the square wave is found to be a linear function of the reciprocal mean velocity of the fluid. The transit-time principle enables the flow meter to have high accuracy, better than 0.2%, and good linearity....... This flow meter will be used to measure and control the small liquid flow in microchannels in flow injection analysis. Review of Scientific Instruments is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  3. Optomechanical Measurement of the Abraham Force in an Adiabatic Liquid Core Optical Fiber Waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, H; Elliott, D S; Oh, K

    2016-01-01

    We report quantitative experimental measurements of the Abraham force associated with a propagating optical wave. We isolate this force using a guided light wave undergoing an adiabatic mode transformation (AMT) along a liquid-filled hollow optical fiber (HOF). Utilizing this light intensity distribution within the liquid, we were able to generate a time-averaged non-vanishing Abraham force density, while simultaneously suppressing the Abraham-Minkowski force density. The incident laser field induced a linear axial displacement of the air-liquid interface inside the HOF, which provided a direct experimental measure of the Abraham force density. We find good agreement between the experimental results and theoretical determinations of the Abraham force density

  4. Highly Sensitive Measurement of Liquid Density in Air Using Suspended Microcapillary Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvar, Oscar; Ramos, Daniel; Martínez, Carmen; Kosaka, Priscila; Tamayo, Javier; Calleja, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    We report the use of commercially available glass microcapillaries as micromechanical resonators for real-time monitoring of the mass density of a liquid that flows through the capillary. The vibration of a suspended region of the microcapillary is optically detected by measuring the forward scattering of a laser beam. The resonance frequency of the liquid filled microcapillary is measured for liquid binary mixtures of ethanol in water, glycerol in water and Triton in ethanol. The method achieves a detection limit in an air environment of 50 µg/mL that is only five times higher than that obtained with state-of-the-art suspended microchannel resonators encapsulated in vacuum. The method opens the door to novel advances for miniaturized total analysis systems based on microcapillaries with the add-on of mechanical transduction for sensing the rheological properties of the analyzed fluids without the need for vacuum encapsulation of the resonators. PMID:25831083

  5. Effect of the Thermocouple on Measuring the Temperature Discontinuity at a Liquid-Vapor Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Mohammad Amin; Nobes, David S; Elliott, Janet A W

    2017-07-18

    The coupled heat and mass transfer that occurs in evaporation is of interest in a large number of fields such as evaporative cooling, distillation, drying, coating, printing, crystallization, welding, atmospheric processes, and pool fires. The temperature jump that occurs at an evaporating interface is of central importance to understanding this complex process. Over the past three decades, thermocouples have been widely used to measure the interfacial temperature jumps at a liquid-vapor interface during evaporation. However, the reliability of these measurements has not been investigated so far. In this study, a numerical simulation of a thermocouple when it measures the interfacial temperatures at a liquid-vapor interface is conducted to understand the possible effects of the thermocouple on the measured temperature and features in the temperature profile. The differential equations of heat transfer in the solid and fluids as well as the momentum transfer in the fluids are coupled together and solved numerically subject to appropriate boundary conditions between the solid and fluids. The results of the numerical simulation showed that while thermocouples can measure the interfacial temperatures in the liquid correctly, they fail to read the actual interfacial temperatures in the vapor. As the results of our numerical study suggest, the temperature jumps at a liquid-vapor interface measured experimentally by using a thermocouple are larger than what really exists at the interface. For a typical experimental study of evaporation of water at low pressure, it was found that the temperature jumps measured by a thermocouple are overestimated by almost 50%. However, the revised temperature jumps are still in agreement with the statistical rate theory of interfacial transport. As well as addressing the specific application of the liquid-vapor temperature jump, this paper provides significant insight into the role that heat transfer plays in the operation of thermocouples

  6. Ultrasound assisted extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (US-DLLME)-a fast new approach to measure phthalate metabolites in nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Andreia; Vanermen, Guido; Covaci, Adrian; Voorspoels, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    A new, fast, and environmentally friendly method based on ultrasound assisted extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (US-DLLME) was developed and optimized for assessing the levels of seven phthalate metabolites (including the mono(ethyl hexyl) phthalate (MEHP), mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (5-OH-MEHP), mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (5-oxo-MEHP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP), mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP), monoethyl phthalate (MEP), and mono-benzyl phthalate (MBzP)) in human nails by UPLC-MS/MS. The optimization of the US-DLLME method was performed using a Taguchi combinatorial design (L9 array). Several parameters such as extraction solvent, solvent volume, extraction time, acid, acid concentration, and vortex time were studied. The optimal extraction conditions achieved were 180 μL of trichloroethylene (extraction solvent), 2 mL trifluoroacetic acid in methanol (2 M), 2 h extraction and 3 min vortex time. The optimized method had a good precision (6-17 %). The accuracy ranged from 79 to 108 % and the limit of method quantification (LOQm) was below 14 ng/g for all compounds. The developed US-DLLME method was applied to determine the target metabolites in 10 Belgian individuals. Levels of the analytes measured in nails ranged between Extraction and phase separation of the US-DLLME procedure.

  7. A Simple Model for Measuring Refractive Index of a Liquid Based upon Fresnel Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-Wei; WU Zhi-Fang; WEN Ting-Dun

    2007-01-01

    Due to many experimental data required and a lot of calculations involved, it is very complex and cumbersome to model prism-based liquid-refractive-index-measuring methods. We develop a new method of mathematical modelling for measuring refractive index of a liquid based upon the Fresnel formula and prism internal reflection at an incident angle less than the critical angle. With this method, only two different concentrations measurements for a kind of solution can lead to the determination of computational model. Measurements are performed to examine the validity of the theoretical model. Experimental results indicate the feasibility of the theoretical model with an error of 1%. The method is also capable of measuring even smaller changes in the optical refractive index of the material on a metal surface by the surface plasma resonance sensing techniques.

  8. A Method To Measure Protein Unfolding at an Air-Liquid Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiske, Danielle L; Shieh, Ian C; Tse, Martha Lovato

    2016-10-04

    Proteins are surface-active molecules that have a propensity to adsorb to hydrophobic interfaces, such as the air-liquid interface. Surface flow can increase aggregation of adsorbed proteins, which may be an undesirable consequence depending on the application. As changes in protein conformation upon adsorption are thought to induce aggregation, the ability to measure the folded state of proteins at interfaces is of particular interest. However, few techniques currently exist to measure protein conformation at interfaces. Here we describe a technique capable of measuring the hydrophobicity, and therefore the conformation and folded state, of proteins at air-liquid interfaces by exploiting the environmentally sensitive fluorophore Nile red. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with high (mAb1) and low (mAb2) surface activity were used to highlight the technique. Both mAbs showed low background fluorescence of Nile red in the liquid subphase and at a glass-liquid interface. In contrast, at the air-liquid interface Nile red fluorescence for mAb1 increased immediately after protein adsorption, whereas the Nile red fluorescence of the mAb2 film evolved more slowly in time even though the adsorbed quantity of protein remained constant. The results demonstrate that hydrophobicity upon mAb adsorption to the air-liquid interface evolves in a time-dependent manner. Interfacial hydrophobicity may be indicative of protein conformation or folded state, where rapid unfolding of mAb1 upon adsorption would be consistent with increased protein aggregation compared to mAb2. The ability to measure protein hydrophobicity at interfaces using Nile red, combined with small sample requirements and minimal sample preparation, fills a gap in existing interfacial techniques.

  9. Dielectric measurements of nanoliter liquids with a photonic crystal resonator at terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanham, S. M.; Watts, C.; Otter, W. J.; Lucyszyn, S.; Klein, N.

    2015-07-01

    We present a highly sensitive technique for determining the complex permittivity of nanoliter liquid samples in the terahertz band based on a photonic crystal resonator and microcapillary. Liquids are characterized by using a capillary tube to introduce a ˜4 nl liquid sample into the electromagnetic field of a resonant mode confined by an L3 resonant cavity in a high-resistivity silicon photonic crystal slab. Monitoring the perturbation of the resonant frequency and unloaded Q-factor of the resonant mode at 100 GHz and ˜5800, respectively, allows a sample's permittivity to be calculated. An analytical model describing the system response based on perturbation theory and quasi-static analysis of the electric field within the capillary is also presented and found to agree well with FEM simulations and experimental measurements of ethanol-water mixtures of various concentrations for low to moderate loss tangents of the liquid samples. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by measuring the complex permittivity of several bioliquids, including suspensions of red and white blood cells. These results represent a step towards a lab-on-a-chip device for the analysis of extremely small quantities of biological, toxic, explosive, and other liquid types at terahertz frequencies.

  10. Applications of optical fiber SPR sensor for measuring of temperature and concentration of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jie; Liang, Dakai; Cao, Zhenxin

    2005-05-01

    A novel optical fiber sensor based on surface plasmon resonance phenomenon that can be used for liquid temperature testing around the sensing probe is presented. According to the attribute of liquid refractive index decreasing with the rise of liquid temperature, a series of SPR spectrum curves, corresponding to temperature range from 10 °C to 90 °C, can be obtained from spectrum signal processing. The range of temperature testing can be adjusted by choosing liquids with different boil and refractive index as environmental medium. This paper analyzes theoretically the influence of a variety of liquid temperature on the metal film coated onto the sensing probe surface and the refractive index of fiber core. A real-time double-parameter testing involving resonance wavelength and the lowest light intensity reflectivity is also proposed. Moreover, the proportion concentration of mixed solutions with different refractive indices ranging from 1.3675 to 1.4281 refractive index units, including ethanol and glycol, is investigated utilizing relative spectrum measurement technology. The preliminary experiments confirm the feasibility of the optical fiber SPR sensor based on wavelength-interrogation for temperature and refractive index measurement.

  11. Optimized measurement of radium-226 concentration in liquid samples with radon-222 emanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Aupiais, Jean; Girault, Frédéric; Przylibski, Tadeusz A; Bouquerel, Hélène

    2016-06-01

    Measuring radium-226 concentration in liquid samples using radon-222 emanation remains competitive with techniques such as liquid scintillation, alpha or mass spectrometry. Indeed, we show that high-precision can be obtained without air circulation, using an optimal air to liquid volume ratio and moderate heating. Cost-effective and efficient measurement of radon concentration is achieved by scintillation flasks and sufficiently long counting times for signal and background. More than 400 such measurements were performed, including 39 dilution experiments, a successful blind measurement of six reference test solutions, and more than 110 repeated measurements. Under optimal conditions, uncertainties reach 5% for an activity concentration of 100 mBq L(-1) and 10% for 10 mBq L(-1). While the theoretical detection limit predicted by Monte Carlo simulation is around 3 mBq L(-1), a conservative experimental estimate is rather 5 mBq L(-1), corresponding to 0.14 fg g(-1). The method was applied to 47 natural waters, 51 commercial waters, and 17 wine samples, illustrating that it could be an option for liquids that cannot be easily measured by other methods. Counting of scintillation flasks can be done in remote locations in absence of electricity supply, using a solar panel. Thus, this portable method, which has demonstrated sufficient accuracy for numerous natural liquids, could be useful in geological and environmental problems, with the additional benefit that it can be applied in isolated locations and in circumstances when samples cannot be transported.

  12. In-situ liquid storage capacity measurement of subsurface wastewater absorption system products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quisenberry, Virgil; Brown, Philip; Smith, Bill; Hallahan, Dennis F

    2006-11-01

    A method is presented for measuring the in-situ liquid storage capacity of subsurface wastewater infiltration system (SWIS) products. While these products vary in composition, geometry, and porosity, they all have the same function: to provide a conduit for the flow of effluent from a septic tank to and through a trench so that infiltration into the soil can occur. A functional SWIS must also provide temporary liquid storage. Storage is necessary for periods when discharge from the septic tank exceeds the infiltration rate of the soil. Storage is also important during times when the soil in and around the trench is saturated. Many states now have regulatory requirements pertaining to storage volume, and these requirements commonly establish the traditional gravel-pipe system as the standard for minimally acceptable volume. Raliable comparisons between various alternative products and gravel have been difficult or impossible, because there has been no standard method for measuring storage volume. Some products have been evaluated under realistic field conditions; others have been evaluated under theoretical or ideal conditions. The protocol developed by the study reported here can serve as a common, accurate basis for comparisons. A 3-foot-deep trench was excavated, and the bottom was leveled. Markers (nails or rods) were attached to the products to indicate the invert and full-volume heights. The products were then enclosed in plastic, placed in a trench, and covered with soil. A 4-inch-diameter pipe extended from the product to the surface to allow metered additions of water into the products and precise determinations when the systems had been filled to capacity. Four plastic chambers, three expanded polystyrene (ESP) products, two multipipe arrangements, and a standard gravel-pipe system were evaluated. The standard gravel-pipe system held 10.2 gal/ft Three of the four plastic chambers stored from 100 to 130 percent of what the standard system held. The

  13. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium Measurements and Modeling of the Propyl Mercaptan plus Methane plus Water System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awan, Javeed; Thomsen, Kaj; Coquelet, Christophe;

    2010-01-01

    In this work, vapor−liquid equilibrium (VLE) measurements of propyl mercaptan (PM) in pure water were performed at three different temperatures, (303, 323, and 365) K, with a pressure variation from (1 to 8) MPa. The total system pressure was maintained by CH4. The inlet mole fraction of propyl m...

  14. Solvents for CO2 capture. Structure-activity relationships combined with vapour-liquid-equilibrium measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mergler, Y.L.; Rumley-Van Gurp, R.; Brasser, P.; Koning, M.C. de; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2011-01-01

    In this study a systematic approach was chosen to test and characterize amine systems for CO2 capture. Vapour-liquid-equilibrium measurements were performed on a homologue series of amines, with ethylene amine as base structure. Various functional groups were used that ranged in chemical and

  15. Solvents for CO2 capture. Structure-activity relationships combined with vapour-liquid-equilibrium measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mergler, Y.L.; Rumley-Van Gurp, R.; Brasser, P.; Koning, M.C. de; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2011-01-01

    In this study a systematic approach was chosen to test and characterize amine systems for CO2 capture. Vapour-liquid-equilibrium measurements were performed on a homologue series of amines, with ethylene amine as base structure. Various functional groups were used that ranged in chemical and physica

  16. Reaction-based azide gas sensing with tailored ionic liquids measured by quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ming-Chung; Chu, Yen-Ho

    2014-02-18

    On the basis of the strain-promoted [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction performed at ambient temperature, a label-free, online, and chemospecific gas-phase measurement of organic azides in real time was efficiently achieved on QCM chips thin-coated with tailored ionic liquid TIL 1.

  17. Measurement of absorbed dose and proposed radiation exposure level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masayuki; Furukawa, Tomo [Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). Hospital

    2003-03-01

    Absorbed dose was measured in clinical X-ray examinations using thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD). Moreover, we distributed the levels of radiation exposure into 3 classes. The presumed dose of the internal organs, e.g., uterus dose, was computed to depth doses with a surface dose. This information provides a prediction of the influence of radiation, and the examination can be performed with the informed consent of the patient. Moreover, we examined the distribution of the level of absorbed dose. We proposed two kinds of radiation exposure level, one to the fetus in a pregnant woman and a general level of radiation exposure that is not applied to pregnant women. The levels were as follows: 0.5 mGy and 100 mGy were considered the boundaries for fetal radiation exposure in a pregnant woman, and 200 mGy and 3 Gy were considered the boundaries for the general level of radiation exposure (excluding pregnant women). (author)

  18. 投入式液位计在液肥液位检测中的应用%Application of Input Level Gauge in Liquid Fertilizer of the Liquid Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周文娟; 欧阳斌林; 雷冬阁; 赵健评; 任雪; 孙文峰

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at the shortage of liquid fertilizer in agricultural machinery currently, liquid fertilizer precise, quantita-tive control is one of the limiting factors.This paper takes the microcontroller as the control core, using input liquid level to acquire data sensor, convert changed liquid level into voltage variation, then use A/D transform analog quantity into digital quantity, at the same time, processing through the MCU to convert voltage values into the corresponding capacity value and display.Finally using MATLAB analysis of test data, the results show that the measuring capacity value and the height of liquid level value error are concerned with the container, but the error meets the actual requirements, can be applied to the liquid fertilizer applicator.%针对当前液态施肥机在液肥的精确及定量控制等方面存在的不足,以单片机作为控制核心,采用投入式液位传感器进行数据采集,将液位的变化转换成电压变化,再利用 A/D 将模拟量转化成数字量;同时,通过单片机处理将电压值换算成相应的液位高度值及容量值并显示,并用 MatLab 分析试验数据。结果表明:液位高度值各容量值测量误差均满足实际要求,可应用于液态施肥机。

  19. Development of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Metrics and Risk Measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Anderson, K. K.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Lansing, Carina

    2012-10-01

    This is an internal project milestone report to document the CCSI Element 7 team's progress on developing Technology Readiness Level (TRL) metrics and risk measures. In this report, we provide a brief overview of the current technology readiness assessment research, document the development of technology readiness levels (TRLs) specific to carbon capture technologies, describe the risk measures and uncertainty quantification approaches used in our research, and conclude by discussing the next steps that the CCSI Task 7 team aims to accomplish.

  20. Going the distance solids level measurement with radar

    CERN Document Server

    Little, Tim

    2012-01-01

    From industry newcomers to experienced veterans in the field of process instrumentation, this book offers a comprehensive guide to radar level measurement for solids that is both detailed and approachable. Beginning with a brief history of solids level measurement, the book covers topics such as frequency and performance, installation of radar devices, and connection to communication networks. Also included is a helpful guide on process intelligence troubleshooting. Explanatory diagrams accompany the text, along with a collection of interesting - and often humorous - anecdotes gathered over au

  1. Measurement of Noise Level in Enumeration Station in Rubber Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizkya, I.; Syahputri, K.; Sari, R. M.; Siregar, I.

    2017-03-01

    This research was conducted in companies engaged in the production of crumb rubber. In the rubber industry, the potential noise occurs in the enumeration station. Stations enumeration use machine and equipment that potentially generated noise. Noise can be defined as an unwanted sound because it does not fit the context of space and time so that may interfere with the comfort and human health. The noise level measured at random during the initial observation station enumeration is 101.8 dB. This value has exceeded the Threshold Limit Value (TLV) Kep-51 / MEN / 1999 and SNI No. 16-7063-2004 so research must be done to measure the level of noise in the enumeration station. Quantitative methods used in the study. Observations made with the calculation method of equivalent noise level. Observations were made on six measurement points for one shift for three days. The results showed the noise level over the Threshold Limit Value is equal to 85 dBA/8 hours. Based on the measurement results, the whole point of observation was far above the threshold Limit Value (TLV). The highest noise level equivalent is in the observation point 6 with a value of 102, 21 dB.

  2. International workshop on measuring techniques for liquid metal flows (MTLM). Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerbeth, G.; Eckert, S. [eds.

    1999-11-01

    The international workshop on 'Measuring techniques in liquid metal flows' (MTLM workshop) was organised in frame of the Dresden 'Innovationskolleg Magnetofluiddynamik'. The subject of the MTLM workshop was limited to methods to determine physical flow quantities such as velocity, pressure, void fraction, inclusion properties, crystallisation fronts etc. The present proceedings contain abstracts and viewgraphs of the oral presentations. During the last decades numerical simulations have become an important tool in industry and research to study the structure of flows and the properties of heat and mass transfer. However, in case of liquid metal flows there exists a significant problem to validate the codes with experimental data due to the lack of available measuring techniques. Due to the material properties (opaque, hot, chemical aggressive) the measurement of flow quantities is much more delicate in liquid metals compared to ordinary water flows. The generalisation of results obtained by means of water models to real liquid metal flows has often to be considered as difficult due to the problems to meet the actual values of n0n-dimensional flow parameters (Re, Pr, Gr, Ha, etc.). Moreover, a strong need has to be noted to make measuring techniques available tomonitor and to control flow processes in real industrial facilities. The objectives of the MTLM workshop were to: Review of existing information on a available techniques and experiences about the use in liquid metal flows, initiate a discussion between developers and potential users with respect to the actual need of information about the flow structure as well as the capabilities of existing and developing measuring techniques. Explore opportunities for co-operative R and D projects to expedite new developments and results, to share expertise and resources. (orig.)

  3. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium Measurements and Modeling of the Propyl Mercaptan plus Methane plus Water System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awan, Javeed; Thomsen, Kaj; Coquelet, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    In this work, vapor−liquid equilibrium (VLE) measurements of propyl mercaptan (PM) in pure water were performed at three different temperatures, (303, 323, and 365) K, with a pressure variation from (1 to 8) MPa. The total system pressure was maintained by CH4. The inlet mole fraction of propyl...... mercaptan in all experiments was the same, around 4.5·10−4 in the liquid phase. The objective was to provide experimental VLE data points of the propyl mercaptan + methane + water system for modeling since there is a lack of available data. These data will allow the industrial modeling of sulfur emission...

  4. In situ recording of particle network formation in liquids by ion conductivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaffenhuber, Christian; Sörgel, Seniz; Weichert, Katja; Bele, Marjan; Mundinger, Tabea; Göbel, Marcus; Maier, Joachim

    2011-09-21

    The formation of fractal silica networks from a colloidal initial state was followed in situ by ion conductivity measurements. The underlying effect is a high interfacial lithium ion conductivity arising when silica particles are brought into contact with Li salt-containing liquid electrolytes. The experimental results were modeled using Monte Carlo simulations and tested using confocal fluorescence laser microscopy and ζ-potential measurements.

  5. Pixel size and pitch measurements of liquid crystal spatial light modulator by optical diffraction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravinder Kumar Banyal; B Raghavendra Prasad

    2005-08-01

    We present a simple technique for the determination of pixel size and pitch of liquid crystal (LC) based spatial light modulator (SLM). The proposed method is based on optical diffraction from pixelated LC panel that has been modeled as a two-dimensional array of rectangular apertures. A novel yet simple, two-plane measurement technique is implemented to circumvent the difficulty in absolute distance measurement. Experimental results are presented for electrically addressed twisted nematic LC-SLM removed from the display projector.

  6. Measurements of liquid film thickness, concentration, and temperature of aqueous urea solution by NIR absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, R.; Jeffries, J. B.; Dreier, T.; Schulz, C.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-wavelength near-infrared (NIR) diode laser absorption sensor has been developed and demonstrated for real-time monitoring of the thickness, solute concentration, and temperature of thin films of urea-water solutions. The sensor monitors the transmittance of three near-infrared diode lasers through the thin liquid film. Film thickness, urea mass fraction, and liquid temperature were determined from measured transmittance ratios of suitable combinations of lasers. Available laser wavelengths were selected depending on the variation of the NIR absorption spectrum of the solution with temperature and solute concentration. The spectral database was measured by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer in the range 5500-8000 cm-1 for urea solutions between 5 and 40 wt% and temperatures between 298 and 338 K. A prototype sensor was constructed, and the sensor concept was first validated with measurements using a calibration cell providing liquid layers of variable thickness (200-1500 µm), urea mass fraction (5-40 wt%) and temperature (298-318 K). Temporal variations of film thickness and urea concentration were captured during the constant-temperature evaporation of a liquid film deposited on an optically polished heated quartz flat.

  7. Design and theoretical analysis of a resonant sensor for liquid density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dezhi; Shi, Jiying; Fan, Shangchun

    2012-01-01

    In order to increase the accuracy of on-line liquid density measurements, a sensor equipped with a tuning fork as the resonant sensitive component is designed in this paper. It is a quasi-digital sensor with simple structure and high precision. The sensor is based on resonance theory and composed of a sensitive unit and a closed-loop control unit, where the sensitive unit consists of the actuator, the resonant tuning fork and the detector and the closed-loop control unit comprises precondition circuit, digital signal processing and control unit, analog-to-digital converter and digital-to-analog converter. An approximate parameters model of the tuning fork is established and the impact of liquid density, position of the tuning fork, temperature and structural parameters on the natural frequency of the tuning fork are also analyzed. On this basis, a tuning fork liquid density measurement sensor is developed. In addition, experimental testing on the sensor has been carried out on standard calibration facilities under constant 20 °C, and the sensor coefficients are calibrated. The experimental results show that the repeatability error is about 0.03% and the accuracy is about 0.4 kg/m(3). The results also confirm that the method to increase the accuracy of liquid density measurement is feasible.

  8. Measurement of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotides by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähre, Heike; Kaever, Volkhard

    2014-08-01

    Recently, the occurrence of 2',3'-cyclic nucleoside monophosphates (2',3'-cNMPs) in addition to 3',5'-cNMPs in mammalian tissues was reported. We developed a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the measurement of four 2',3'-cyclic nucleotides, i.e., 2',3'-cAMP, 2',3'-cCMP, 2',3'-cGMP, 2',3'-cUMP, in cell samples. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a Zorbax eclipse XCB-C18 (50 mm×4.6 mm; 1.8 μm column; Agilent) connected to a QTRAP5500 system (AB Sciex) operating in positive ionization mode. Calibration curves were constructed in the range 0.41 fmol/μL to 1666.6 fmol/μL for 2',3'-cAMP, 2',3'-cCMP, and 2',3'-cGMP, and 3.3-1666.6 fmol/μL for 2',3'-cUMP, respectively, showing squared correlation coefficients >0.9992. Accuracy and inter- and intra-day precision lay within the required ranges of <20% for LLOQ and <15% for higher concentration levels. The method was applied to the analysis of nucleotides in two different cell lines (Hek293T and HuT-78). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluorescence Spectrum and Decay Measurement for Hsil VS Normal Cytology Differentiation in Liquid Pap Smear Supernatant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitkuviene, A.; Gegzna, V.; Juodkazis, S.; Jursenas, S.; Miasojedovas, S.; Kurtinaitiene, R.; Rimiene, J.; Vaitkus, J.

    2009-06-01

    Cervical smear material contains endo and exocervical cells, mucus and inflammative, immune cells in cases of pathology. Just not destroyed keratinocytes lay on the glass for microscopy. Liquid cytology supernatant apart other diagnostics could be used for photodiagnostic. The spectroscopic parameters suitable for Normal and HSIL cytology groups supernatant differentiation are demonstrated. The dried liquid PAP supernatant fractions—sediment and liquid were investigated. Excitation and emission matrices (EEM), supernatant fluorescence decay measured under 280 nm diode short pulse excitation and fluorescence spectroscopy by excitation with 355 nm laser light were analyzed. The differences between Normal and HSIL groups were statistically proven in the certain spectral regions. Fluorescence decay peculiarities show spectral regions consisting of few fluorophores. Obtained results on fluorescence differences in Normal and HSIL groups' supernatant shows the potency of photodiagnosis application in cervical screening.

  10. Density of Liquid Ni-Mo Alloys Measured by a Modified Sessile Drop Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang FANG; Zushu LI; ZaiNan TAO; Feng XIAO

    2004-01-01

    The density of liquid binary Ni-Mo alloys with molybdenum concentration from 0 to 20% (mass fraction) was measured by a modified sessile drop method. It has been found that the density of the liquid Ni-Mo alloys decreases with increasing temperature, but increases with the increase of molybdenum concentration in the alloys. The molar volume of liquid Ni-Mo binary alloys increases with the increase of temperature and molybdenum concentration. The partial molar volume of molybdenum in Ni-Mo binary alloy has been approximately calculated as [13.18 - 2.65 × 10-3T + (-47.94 + 3.10 × 10-2T) × 10-2XMo] × 10-6m3·mol-1. The molar volume of Ni-Mo alloy determined in the present work shows a negative deviation from the ideal linear mixing molar volume.

  11. Brillouin-scattering measurements of the acoustic absorption coefficient in liquid CS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, R. W.; Detenbeck, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    High-resolution Brillouin spectra were recorded for light scattered at small angles from liquid CS2. The use of a single-mode He-Ne laser, locked in frequency to a Fabry-Perot interferometer, permitted measurements of line widths of the order of 10 MHz for frequencies in the range 300-1000 MHz. These measurements extend previous Brillouin line-width measurements at higher frequencies into the region where relaxation effects are dominant and connect the optical measurements with lower-frequency acoustical data.

  12. Creating Classroom-Level Measures of Citizenship Education Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Carolyn; Sweetwood, Sachiko Ogata; King, Makini

    2015-01-01

    Optimal classroom climates for civic education encourage the development of knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary for students to become involved citizens. One of the simplest and most common ways of measuring classroom climate in this field is to aggregate individual students' perceptions of classroom climate to the group level; however,…

  13. Measuring higher cognitive levels by multiple choice questions: a myth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, J J; Dorval, J; Levasseur, L

    1987-03-01

    Available evidence is inconclusive as to the ability of multiple choice items to measure different taxonomic levels of the cognitive domain. The present study analysed the tests of the Examen de Synthèse for the years 1982, 1983 and 1984. Items used in the study were those for which a consensus was reached between three judges and committees for a given taxonomic level. The initial part of the study showed that judges do not classify items at random but according to a mental representation which is individual, personal and relatively stable. In examining results obtained by students, the study failed to show any significant difference in item difficulty or discrimination for items classified as measuring memorization, interpretation of data and problem-solving. Correlations between results (scores and ranks) obtained for items involving memorization and those obtained for items involving higher cognitive levels fail to show that different traits are measured. If further studies corroborate these results, then future efforts should be directed at developing other instruments to measure higher cognitive levels.

  14. Measuring Resistance to Change at the Within-Session Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonneau, Francois; Rios, Americo; Cabrera, Felipe

    2006-01-01

    Resistance to change is often studied by measuring response rate in various components of a multiple schedule. Response rate in each component is normalized (that is, divided by its baseline level) and then log-transformed. Differential resistance to change is demonstrated if the normalized, log-transformed response rate in one component decreases…

  15. Integrating detector for measuring low levels of gamma rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samson, D.M.; Bos, A.J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of NL 1001913 (C2) The integrating detector (1) for measuring low levels of ~c-rays, added (9) to the natural background radiation, is provided with a screen (4) placed between at least two thermo-luminescent dosimeters (5-7). It is covered with a housing. Also claimed is the measuremen

  16. Creating Classroom-Level Measures of Citizenship Education Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Carolyn; Sweetwood, Sachiko Ogata; King, Makini

    2015-01-01

    Optimal classroom climates for civic education encourage the development of knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary for students to become involved citizens. One of the simplest and most common ways of measuring classroom climate in this field is to aggregate individual students' perceptions of classroom climate to the group level; however,…

  17. Process Analysis and Level Measurement of Textbooks Use by Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanzhe; Shi, Ningzhong

    2009-01-01

    Teachers and textbooks are two important elements in curriculum implementation. Based on Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM), a curriculum implementation measurement model designed by G. Hall and S. M. Hord, this paper analyzes the general process of curriculum implementation in terms of textbook use, establishes a model that gauges the level of…

  18. Measuring free thyroxine levels in neonatal heel-prick samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelen, A.; Veen, M. van; Verkerk, P.H.; Diependaal, G.; Loeber, G.; Elvers, B.; Endert, E.

    2013-01-01

    The Dutch neonatal screening scheme for Congenital Hypothyroidism (CH) is primarily based on the determination of thyroxine (T4) in filter paper blood spots. In the lowest 5% of T4 values, thyroxine binding globulin (TBG) is measured in order to be able to correct for occasional low TBG levels. Howe

  19. Measuring Developmental Levels of Understanding of Ability and Effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Arden T.; Nicholls, John G.

    Discussed are research methods used to measure developmental changes in children's reasoning about ability. While adults generally differentiate ability, effort, luck, and task difficulty as causes for success and failure, children progressively think that effort or outcome is ability (level 1), that effort is the cause of performance outcomes…

  20. Measurement of indoor radon levels in the Bologna metropolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beozzo, M. (ENEA, Bologna (Italy)); Bottazzi, E.; Calligola, P. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy)) (and others)

    1991-01-01

    Indoor radon concentrations in Bologna were monitored using two types of detectors with different characteristics. The detectors were the polymeric track detector, CR-39, and activated charcoal. The measurements gave consistent results. It has been verified that the radon concentration in Bologna is well below the 'attention' level given in the scientific literature. (author).

  1. Authentication Assurance Level Application to the Inventory Sampling Measurement System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaney, Mike M.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Hansen, Randy R.; Geelhood, Bruce D.

    2001-09-06

    This document concentrates on the identification of a standardized assessment approach for the verification of security functionality in specific equipment, the Inspection Sampling Measurement System (ISMS) being developed for MAYAK. Specifically, an Authentication Assurance Level 3 is proposed to be reached in authenticating the ISMS.

  2. Measuring Resistance to Change at the Within-Session Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonneau, Francois; Rios, Americo; Cabrera, Felipe

    2006-01-01

    Resistance to change is often studied by measuring response rate in various components of a multiple schedule. Response rate in each component is normalized (that is, divided by its baseline level) and then log-transformed. Differential resistance to change is demonstrated if the normalized, log-transformed response rate in one component decreases…

  3. A New Research of Pipe Liquid-Level Sensor%一种新型管道液位传感器的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋军庭

    2013-01-01

      在判断管道内液体是否存在方面一直没有相应的检测有效手段,现有的超声波和电磁式测量等技术方法都是基于流量检测的,可以检测管道内液体的流量大小,但是对于流速较慢或者液体静止的情况,测量效果不明显;传统的机械式流量开关因为传感器探头有运动固件存在于管道中,可能对液体流动造成干扰,甚至在液体有腐蚀性或污浊时出现误判断或者损坏。本文主要是针对于流速慢或者静止状态下检测情况,研究一款能用于煤矿井下的液位检测传感器。%There has been no corresponding effective detection method in judging whether the liquid in the pipe,the existing ultrasonic and magnetic measurement technique is based on flow detection,it can detect the flow liquid in the pipe.But for flow velocity slower or liquid static,the measuring error is bigger;because of the sensor probe have structure parts in pipeline,the traditional mechanical flow switch might be impact on liquid flow,the probe wil have wrong judgment or damage in corrosive and dirty liquid.Mainly based on flow velocity slow and liquid static detection,research and design the liquid-level detection sensor can be used to coal mine.

  4. Lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery for grid-level energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kangli; Jiang, Kai; Chung, Brice; Ouchi, Takanari; Burke, Paul J; Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Kim, Hojong; Muecke, Ulrich; Sadoway, Donald R

    2014-10-16

    The ability to store energy on the electric grid would greatly improve its efficiency and reliability while enabling the integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies (such as wind and solar) into baseload supply. Batteries have long been considered strong candidate solutions owing to their small spatial footprint, mechanical simplicity and flexibility in siting. However, the barrier to widespread adoption of batteries is their high cost. Here we describe a lithium-antimony-lead liquid metal battery that potentially meets the performance specifications for stationary energy storage applications. This Li||Sb-Pb battery comprises a liquid lithium negative electrode, a molten salt electrolyte, and a liquid antimony-lead alloy positive electrode, which self-segregate by density into three distinct layers owing to the immiscibility of the contiguous salt and metal phases. The all-liquid construction confers the advantages of higher current density, longer cycle life and simpler manufacturing of large-scale storage systems (because no membranes or separators are involved) relative to those of conventional batteries. At charge-discharge current densities of 275 milliamperes per square centimetre, the cells cycled at 450 degrees Celsius with 98 per cent Coulombic efficiency and 73 per cent round-trip energy efficiency. To provide evidence of their high power capability, the cells were discharged and charged at current densities as high as 1,000 milliamperes per square centimetre. Measured capacity loss after operation for 1,800 hours (more than 450 charge-discharge cycles at 100 per cent depth of discharge) projects retention of over 85 per cent of initial capacity after ten years of daily cycling. Our results demonstrate that alloying a high-melting-point, high-voltage metal (antimony) with a low-melting-point, low-cost metal (lead) advantageously decreases the operating temperature while maintaining a high cell voltage. Apart from the fact that this

  5. Apparatus and methods of measuring minority carrier lifetime using a liquid probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian

    2016-04-12

    Methods and apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes using liquid probes are provided. In one embodiment, a method of measuring the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor material comprises: providing a semiconductor material having a surface; forming a rectifying junction at a first location on the surface by temporarily contacting the surface with a conductive liquid probe; electrically coupling a second junction to the semiconductor material at a second location, wherein the first location and the second location are physically separated; applying a forward bias to the rectifying junction causing minority carrier injection in the semiconductor material; measuring a total capacitance as a function of frequency between the rectifying junction and the second junction; determining an inflection frequency of the total capacitance; and determining a minority lifetime of the semiconductor material from the inflection frequency.

  6. Measurement of indoor radon concentration levels in Islamabad, Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, S.U.; Anwar, J. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Matiullah [PD, PINSTECH Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: matiullah@pieas.edu.pk

    2008-08-15

    Indoor radon measurement survey has been carried out in properly selected houses of the city of Islamabad. In this regard, CR-39-based NRPB radon dosimeters were used. The dosimeters were installed at head heights in bedroom and living room of each house. For intercomparison purpose, houses having basements were also selected. In such houses, dosimeters were installed in basements, ground floor and first floor. All the dosimeters were exposed to radon for a period of three months. After exposure, CR-39 detectors were etched for 16 h in 6 M NaOH at 80{sup 0}C and were counted under an optical microscope. The observed track densities were then related to radon concentration levels using a calibration factor of 2.7trackscm{sup -2}h{sup -1}(kBqm{sup -3}){sup -1}. Measured indoor radon concentration levels were found to vary from 11 to 78Bqm{sup -3}. The average radon concentration levels in bedrooms and sitting/living rooms in basements were found to be 40 and 32Bqm{sup -3}, respectively. In bedrooms and living rooms, on ground floor, the average radon concentration levels were found to be 30 and 27Bqm{sup -3}, whereas on first floor the average values were 29 and 27Bqm{sup -3}, respectively. The radon concentration levels found in this study are below the action level recommended by the ICRP.

  7. Rapid Preconcentration for Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Assay of Trace Level Neuropeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Kennedy, Robert T.

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of neuropeptides in the brain through in vivo microdialysis sampling provides direct correlation between neuropeptide concentration and brain function. Capillary liquid chromatography-multistage mass spectrometry (CLC-MSn) has proven to be effective at measuring endogenous neuropeptides in microdialysis samples. In the method, microliter samples are concentrated onto nanoliter volume packed beds before ionization and mass spectrometry analysis. The long times required for extensive preconcentration present a barrier to routine use because of the many samples that must be analyzed and instability of neuropeptides. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of 75 μm inner diameter (i.d.) capillary column packed with 10 μm reversed phase particles for increasing the throughput in CLC-MSn based neuropeptide measurement. Coupling a high injection flow rate for fast sample loading/desalting with a low elution flow rate to maintain detection sensitivity, this column has reduced analysis time from ˜30 min to 3.8 min for 5 μL sample, with 3 pM limit of detection (LOD) for enkephalins and 10 pM LOD for dynorphin A1-8 in 5 μL sample. The use of isotope-labeled internal standard lowered peptide signal variation to less than 5 %. This method was validated for in vivo detection of Leu and Met enkephalin with microdialysate collected from rat globus pallidus. The improvement in speed and stability makes CLC-MSn measurement of neuropeptides in vivo more practical.

  8. Preliminary analysis of the ORNL Liquid Low-Level Waste system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, T.J.; DePaoli, S.M.; Robinson, S.M.; Walker, A.B.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the status of the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) Systems Analysis project. The focus of this project has been to collect and tabulate data concerning the LLLW system, analyze the current LLLW system operation, and develop the information necessary for the development of long-term treatment options for the LLLW generated at ORNL. The data used in this report were collected through a survey of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) literature, various letter reports, and a survey of all current LLLW generators. These data are also being compiled in a user friendly database for ORNL-wide distribution. The database will allow the quick retrieval of all information collected on the ORNL LLLW system and will greatly benefit any LLLW analysis effort. This report summarizes the results for the analyses performed to date on the LLLW system.

  9. Measuring the level of social support using latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Letícia Marques; Amorim, Leila Denise A F; Santos, Darci Neves; Barreto, Maurício L

    2015-03-01

    Different instruments have been used to measure social support in epidemiological studies of which the most widely used is the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Scale (SSS-MOS). However, these studies lack measures of the level of social support on health risks. We used latent class analysis (LCA) to distinguish subgroups with different levels of perceived social support and tested the consistency of these subgroups by their associations with the prevalence of Common Mental Disorders (CMD). This is a cross-sectional study of 1013 mothers living in the city of Salvador, Brazil in which psychosocial data were collected through home visits using the SSS-MOS and the Self Reporting Questionnaire-20. For each dimension of social support analysed here, we selected models with two classes using LCA. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between participants' perceived social support and the prevalence of CMD to verify the consistency of the groups defined by LCA. There was a clear difference in the reporting of perceived social support between those classified as high or low using LCA. The probability of perceiving several types of social support was lower in the subgroup classified as low level of social support (13.7-59.8%), and it was much higher in the group classified as high level of social support (84.3-98%). A greater prevalence of CMD was found among mothers with lower levels of social support. LCA seems to be a useful tool to improve measurement of perceived social support by separation into two levels in which the lower level is associated with an increased prevalence of CMD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Measuring differentiation among populations at different levels of genetic integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorius Hans-Rolf

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most genetic studies of population differentiation are based on gene-pool frequencies. Population differences for gene associations that show up as deviations from Hardy-Weinberg proportions (homologous association or gametic disequilibria (non-homologous association are disregarded. Thus little is known about patterns of population differentiation at higher levels of genetic integration nor the causal forces. Results To fill this gap, a conceptual approach to the description and analysis of patterns of genetic differentiation at arbitrary levels of genetic integration (single or multiple loci, varying degrees of ploidy is introduced. Measurement of differentiation is based on the measure Δ of genetic distance between populations, which is in turn based on an elementary genic difference between individuals at any given level of genetic integration. It is proven that Δ does not decrease when the level of genetic integration is increased, with equality if the gene associations at the higher level follow the same function in both populations (e.g. equal inbreeding coefficients, no association between loci. The pattern of differentiation is described using the matrix of pairwise genetic distances Δ and the differentiation snail based on the symmetric population differentiation ΔSD. A measure of covariation compares patterns between levels. To show the significance of the observed differentiation among possible gene associations, a special permutation analysis is proposed. Applying this approach to published genetic data on oak, the differentiation is found to increase considerably from lower to higher levels of integration, revealing variation in the forms of gene association among populations. Conclusion This new approach to the analysis of genetic differentiation among populations demonstrates that the consideration of gene associations within populations adds a new quality to studies on population differentiation that is

  11. Thermodynamic properties of liquid Al–Li–Zn alloys determined from electromotive force measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trybula, Marcela, E-mail: m.trybula@imim.pl; Fima, Przemysław; Gąsior, Władysław

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Electromotive force (emf) was measured in liquid Al–Li–Zn alloys. • Partial thermodynamic properties (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) were determined from emf data. • A set of Redlich–Kister (RK) parameters for liquid was optimized using these data. • Partial and mixing ΔG and ΔH were modelled using new and literature RK parameters. • Calculated mixing enthalpy is in good agreement with literature calorimetric data. - Abstract: Electromotive force measurements (emf) were carried out over broad temperature range for liquid ternary Al–Li–Zn alloys. Partial excess thermodynamic functions of lithium: Gibbs energy, enthalpy and entropy in liquid Al–Li–Zn alloys were determined. These data were compared to modelled values obtained using Redlich–Kister–Muggianu (RMK) equation and the set of literature binary and ternary interaction parameters. Mixing Gibbs energy and enthalpy was also computed with the new set of ternary parameters optimized in this work and confronted to available experimentally determined data.

  12. Detecting, visualizing, and measuring gold nanoparticle chirality using helical pitch measurements in nematic liquid crystal phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshul; Mori, Taizo; Lee, Huey-Charn; Worden, Matthew; Bidwell, Eric; Hegmann, Torsten

    2014-12-23

    Chirality at the nanoscale, or more precisely, the chirality or chiroptical effects of chiral ligand-capped metal nanoparticles (NPs) is an intriguing and rapidly evolving field in nanomaterial research with promising applications in catalysis, metamaterials, and chiral sensing. The aim of this work was to seek out a system that not only allows the detection and understanding of NP chirality but also permits visualization of the extent of chirality transfer to a surrounding medium. The nematic liquid crystal phase is an ideal candidate, displaying characteristic defect texture changes upon doping with chiral additives. To test this, we synthesized chiral cholesterol-capped gold NPs and prepared well-dispersed mixtures in two nematic liquid crystal hosts. Induced circular dichroism spectropolarimetry and polarized light optical microscopy revealed that all three gold NPs induce chiral nematic phases, and that those synthesized in the presence of a chiral bias (disulfide) are more powerful chiral inducers than those where the NP was formed in the absence of a chiral bias (prepared by conjugation of a chiral silane to preformed NPs). Helical pitch data here visually show a clear dependence on the NP size and the number of chiral ligands bound to the NP surface, thereby supporting earlier experimental and theoretical data that smaller metal NPs made in the presence of a chiral bias are stronger chiral inducers.

  13. Thermodynamic Properties of Liquid Silver-Antimony-Tin Alloys Determined from Electrochemical and Calorimetric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łapsa, Joanna; Onderka, Bogusław

    2016-08-01

    The thermodynamic properties of liquid Ag-Sb-Sn alloys were obtained through use of the drop solution calorimetric method and electromotive force (emf) measurements of galvanic cells with a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) solid electrolyte. The experiments were carried out along Ag0.25Sb0.75, Ag0.5Sb0.5 and Ag0.75Sb0.25 sections of the ternary system in the temperature range from 973 K to 1223 K. From the measured emf, the tin activity in liquid solutions of Ag-Sb-Sn was determined for the first time. The partial and integral enthalpy of mixing were determined from calorimetric measurements at two temperatures. These measurements were performed along two cross-sections: Sb0.5Sn0.5 at 912 K and 1075 K, and Ag0.75Sb0.25 at 1075 K. Both experimental data sets were used to find ternary interaction parameters by applying the Redlich-Kister-Muggianu model of the substitutional solution. Consequently, the set of parameters describing the thermodynamic properties of the liquid phase was derived.

  14. Effects of Blowing Ratio Measured by Liquid Crystal on Heat Transfer Characteristics of Trailing Edge Cutback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Hepeng; Zhu Huiren; Kong Manzhao

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with the effects of a blowing ratio measured with narrowbend liquid crystal in transonic experiments on the heat transfer characteristics of trailing edge cutback. The experimental results are compared end contrasted in terms of available data for tra-ditional experiments with thermocouples. It is concluded that the blowing ratio exerts rather significant effects on film cooling effec-tiveness distribution of the rib center line. As the blowing ratio decreases, similar to the cooling effectiveness distribution curve of the slot center line, that of the rib center line makes a clockwise rotation about the end. When the blowing ratio increases, the regular film cooling effectiveness curve of the surface becomes rather smooth. On the whole measuring surface, the most intensive heat transfer oc-curs at the extended borderline of the slot end the rib, neither at the rib center line nor at the slot center line. The experimental results of cooling effectiveness measured with thermocouples are lower than those with liquid crystal. In addition, the transient experiments using narrowband liquid crystal can eliminate the higher errors of Nusselt numbers in measurements with thermocouples at the slot outlet.

  15. Selected Essays in Stock Market Liquidity. Innovative XLM Measure at the Frankfurt Stock Exchange: Cloudy Skies, Time of the Day and the Role of Designated Sponsors for Stock Market Liquidity.

    OpenAIRE

    Verrier, Tatjana

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is built around three separate papers that research several aspects of stock market liquidity. All three papers use the innovative XLM (Exchange Liquidity Measure) data to measure the liquidity. The first paper entitled Does Screen Trading Weather the Weather? A Note on Cloudy Skies, Liquidity and Computerized Stock Markets tests for the presence of a weather effect on liquidity in a screen-based electronic stock market. The empirical evidence suggests that cloudy skies corr...

  16. Measurements of the Coexistence Curve near the Liquid-Gas Critical Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Inseob

    2003-01-01

    The shape of the liquid-gas coexistence curve of He-3 very near the critical point (-2x10(exp -6) critical point was strongly affected by the gravitational field. Away from the critical point, the coexistence curve obtained using this technique was also consistent with the earlier work using the local density measurements of Pittman et al. The recent crossover parametric model of the equation-of-state are used to analyze the height-dependent measured coexistence curves. Data analyses have indicated that microgravity will permit measurements within two additional decades in reduced temperatures beyond the best gravity-free data obtained in Earth-bound experiments.

  17. Time domain reflectometry-measuring dielectric permittivity to detect soil non-acqeous phase liquids contamination-decontamination processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Comegna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of soils with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL constitutes a serious geo-environmental problem, given the toxicity level and high mobility of these organic compounds. To develop effective decontamination methods, characterisation and identification of contaminated soils are needed. The objective of this work is to explore the potential of dielectric permittivity measurements to detect the presence of NAPLs in soils. The dielectric permittivity was measured by Time Domain Reflectometry method (TDR in soil samples with either different volumetric content of water (w and NAPL (NAPL or at different stages during immiscible displacement test carried out with two different flushing solutions. A mixing model proposed by Francisca and Montoro, was calibrated to estimate the volume fraction of contaminant present in soil. Obtained results, showed that soil contamination with NAPL and the monitoring of immiscible fluid displacement, during soil remediation processes, can be clearly identified from dielectric measurements.

  18. Validation of keratan sulfate level in mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Montaño, Adriana M; Oguma, Toshihiro; Dung, Vu Chi; Oikawa, Hirotaka; de Carvalho, Talita Giacomet; Gutiérrez, María L; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Fukushi, Masaru; Kida, Kazuhiro; Kubota, Mitsuru; Barrera, Luis; Orii, Tadao

    2010-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA, Morquio A disease), a progressive lysosomal storage disease, causes skeletal chondrodysplasia through excessive storage of keratan sulfate (KS). KS is synthesized mainly in cartilage and released to the circulation. The excess storage of KS disrupts cartilage, consequently releasing more KS into circulation, which is a critical biomarker for MPS IVA. Thus, assessment of KS level provides a potential screening strategy and determines clinical course and efficacy of therapies. We have recently developed a tandem mass spectrometry liquid chromatography [LC/MS/MS] method to assay KS levels in blood. Forty-nine blood specimens from patients with MPS IVA [severe (n = 33), attenuated (n = 11) and undefined (n = 5)] were analyzed for comparison of blood KS concentration with that of healthy subjects and for correlation with clinical severity. Plasma samples were digested by keratanase II to obtain disaccharides of KS. Digested samples were assayed by LC/MS/MS. We found that blood KS levels (0.4-26 µg/ml) in MPS IVA patients were significantly higher than those in age-matched controls (0.67-4.6 µg/ml; P IVA peaked between 2 years and 5 years of age (mean 11.4 µg/ml). Blood KS levels in severe MPS IVA (mean 7.3 µg/ml) were higher than in the attenuated form (mean 2.1 µg/ml) (P = 0.012). We also found elevated blood KS levels in other types of MPS. These findings indicate that the new KS assay for blood is suitable for early diagnosis and longitudinal assessment of disease severity in MPS IVA.

  19. New Isotopic Water Analyzer for Hydrological Measurements of Both Liquid Water and Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owano, T.; Gupta, M.; Berman, E.; Baer, D.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of the stable isotope ratios of liquid water allow determination of water flowpaths, residence times in catchments, and groundwater migration. Previously, discrete water samples have been collected and transported to an IRMS lab for isotope characterization. Due to the expense and labor associated with such sampling, isotope studies have thus been generally limited in scope and in temporal resolution. We report on the recent development of the first Isotopic Water Analyzer that simultaneously quantifies δ2H, δ17O and δ18O in liquid water or in water vapor from different natural water sources (e.g., rain, snow, streams and groundwater). In High-Throughput mode, the IWA can report measurements at the unprecedented rate of over 800 injections per day, which yields more than 140 total unknown and reference samples per day (still with 6 injections per measurement). This fast time response provides isotope hydrologists with the capability to study dynamic changes in δ values quickly (minutes) and over long time scales (weeks, months), thus enabling studies of mixing dynamics in snowmelt, canopy throughfall, stream mixing, and allows for individual precipitation events to be independently studied. In addition, the same IWA can also record fast measurements of isotopic water vapor (δ2H, δ17O, δ18O) in real time (2 Hz data rate or faster) over a range of mole fractions greater than 60000 ppm H2O in air. Changing between operational modes requires a software command, to enable the user to switch from measuring liquid water to measuring water vapor, or vice versa. The new IWA, which uses LGR's patented Off-axis ICOS technology, incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for stable measurements with essentially zero drift despite changes in ambient temperature (over the entire range from 0-45 degrees C). Measurements from recent field studies using the IWA will be presented.

  20. Ultrasonic crystallization monitoring technique for simultaneous in-line measurement of liquid and solid phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, T.; Pertig, D.; Ulrich, J.

    2013-01-01

    The mean crystal size, the suspension density and the liquid concentration are the three most important process parameters to quantify the progress of industrial crystallization processes. It will be shown that these parameters can be in-line monitored simultaneously by means of an ultrasonic crystallization monitoring technique (UCM), which will be introduced here in a proof of concept. This process analytical technology (PAT) differs from the known ultrasonic attenuation spectroscopy (UAS). For the UCM the ultrasonic velocity and attenuation were correlated and related to characteristic events during a crystallization process measured at only one frequency (no spectra of frequencies as it is used for UAS). The results shown in this study prepare the ground to establish the UCM as a simple, less complex, robust, universal applicable, inexpensive and, therefore, a winning alternative PAT to monitor and control in-line the solid as well as the liquid phase in the industrial crystallization by means of only one measuring device with two sensors.

  1. Measuring Moisture Levels in Graphite Epoxy Composite Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark; Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Graphite epoxy composite (GEC) materials are used in the construction of rocket fairings, nose cones, interstage adapters, and heat shields due to their high strength and light weight. However, they absorb moisture depending on the environmental conditions they are exposed to prior to launch. Too much moisture absorption can become a problem when temperature and pressure changes experienced during launch cause the water to vaporize. The rapid state change of the water can result in structural failure of the material. In addition, heat and moisture combine to weaken GEC structures. Diffusion models that predict the total accumulated moisture content based on the environmental conditions are one accepted method of determining if the material strength has been reduced to an unacceptable level. However, there currently doesn t exist any field measurement technique to estimate the actual moisture content of a composite structure. A multi-layer diffusion model was constructed with Mathematica to predict moisture absorption and desorption from the GEC sandwich structure. This model is used in conjunction with relative humidity/temperature sensors both on the inside and outside of the material to determine the moisture levels in the structure. Because the core materials have much higher diffusivity than the face sheets, a single relative humidity measurement will accurately reflect the moisture levels in the core. When combined with an external relative humidity measurement, the model can be used to determine the moisture levels in the face sheets. Since diffusion is temperaturedependent, the temperature measurements are used to determine the diffusivity of the face sheets for the model computations.

  2. DLTS measurement of energetic levels, generated in silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosetti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Croitoru, N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Furetta, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Leroy, C. [Universite de Montreal, Montreal, PQ H3C 3J7 (Canada); Pensotti, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Rancoita, P.G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Rattaggi, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Redaelli, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Rizzatti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Seidman, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy)

    1995-07-15

    DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were performed on irradiated Si detectors to record data on the energetic levels traps generated by neutrons. For moderate fluences ({phi}) of neutrons ({phi}<10{sup 12} n cm{sup -2}) electron and hole trap levels have been detected. Four electron trap levels were found for both FZ (float zone) and MCZ (magnetic Czochralsky) types of Si detectors but only two hole trap levels in FZ and one in MCZ detectors. This indicates that the type of silicon has an influence on the traps generated by irradiation. From the values obtained for the relative concentration of E1 centers in MCZ and FZ detectors, it results that the E1 centers are oxygen and not vacancy limited. Since the concentration of the E2, E3, and E4 levels are larger in FZ than in MCZ detectors, it may be assumed that the ``gettering effect`` can control the formation of deeper traps. Filling pulses were applied for various voltages and at the flat band filling voltage, maximum ratio of N{sub t}/N of the E1 center was achieved. This may indicate that the concentration of E1 centers, near the p{sup +}-n interface, can be larger than in the rest of the junction. (orig.).

  3. A Pilot Study on Measuring Customer’s Satisfaction Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vide Boltez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RQ: Determine the level of customer satisfaction of a company’s products and services to obtain information on needed improvements.Purpose: The purpose of measuring customer’s satisfaction level is to obtain information directly from the final buyer that bought our product. The next step is to analyze the information obtained and to take the results into consideration to improve the working process in production and in other departments of the company.Method: The method used for the pilot study to measure customer satisfaction was a short questionnaire that was given to 10 customers of our product and 10 completed questionnaires were obtained.Results: The results showed the level of satisfaction of final buyers of roof tiles and roofs that the company has achieved through their products and services. The results facilitate the production, logistics, purchasing and sales department to obtain information on positive satisfaction levels and areas that need change. At the same time, the final buyer was identified (i.e., name, surname, address, and so forth, which up until now had not been.Organization: The organization will save time and money in the future, because it will continuously measure customer satisfaction to improve production and other departments in the organization towards creating satisfied customers.Society: Final buyers of roofs are, and will be, more satisfied with their decisions, because the organization carries out after-sales satisfaction levels.Originality: The research was original, because up to this date the organization has not conducted research in such a manner.Limitations: The pilot study used 10 completed questionnaires that represent a very small sample to make any generalizations.

  4. A Spectrometric Setup for Synchronous Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Measurement at the Solid/Liquid Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A spectrometric setup to perform total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) and synchronous TIRF measurements at solid/liquid interfaces is presented. The combination of TIRF and synchronous fluorescence was proposed to analyze simultaneously different components at interfaces. The TIRF excitation, emission and synchronous spectra of a water-soluble porphyrin were obtained from water/glass interface using this setup without the existence of a surfactant.

  5. Liquid-filled transient pressure measuring systems: A method for determining frequency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. C.; Englund, D. R., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    An equation is given and experimentally verified for computing the resonant frequency of liquid-filled transient pressure measuring systems. Resonant frequencies of 100 to 1000 Hz are typical of those systems tested. The effect of noncondensable gas bubbles on system response is described. A method for determining transducer volumetric compliance is presented. An example system is described and analyzed to demonstrate the use of the theory.

  6. Measurement of actinides in environmental samples by Photo-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadieux, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Clark, S. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Univ. of Georgia (United States); Fjeld, R.A.; Reboul, S.; Sowder, A. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Systems Engineering

    1994-05-01

    This work describes the adaptation of extractive scintillation with a Photo-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS) (ORDELA, Inc.) spectrometer to the analysis of actinides in environmental samples from the Savannah River Site (SRS). Environmental quality assurance standards and actual water samples were treated by one of two methods; either a two step direct extraction, or for more complex samples, pretreatment by an extraction chromatographic separation prior to measurement of the alpha activity by PERALS.

  7. Direct measurement of the surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol by optical scanning a film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Fang; Zhang Guo-Feng; Dong Shuang-Li; Sun Jian-Hu; Chen Rui-Yun; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2009-01-01

    The surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol is studied by scanning the thickness of the glycerol film with single photon detection. Measurements are performed at room temperature well above the glycerol's glass transition temperature. It is shown that the surface dynamics of the glycerol film is very sensitive to the temperature. The linear relationship between the thickness of the film and the viscosity predicted by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTH) law is also presented experimentally.

  8. In Situ Measurement of Airway Surface Liquid [K+] Using a Ratioable K+-sensitive Fluorescent Dye*

    OpenAIRE

    Namkung, Wan; Song, Yuanlin; Mills, Aaron D.; Padmawar, Prashant; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Verkman, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    The airway surface liquid (ASL) is the thin fluid layer lining airway surface epithelial cells, whose volume and composition are tightly regulated and may be abnormal in cystic fibrosis (CF). We synthesized a two-color fluorescent dextran to measure ASL [K+], TAC-Lime-dextran-TMR, consisting of a green-fluorescing triazacryptand K+ ionophore-Bodipy conjugate, coupled to dextran, together with a red fluorescing tetramethylrhodamine reference chromophore. TAC-Lime-dextran-TMR fluorescence was K...

  9. Subsurface disposal of liquid low-level radioactive wastes at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stow, S.H.; Haase, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) subsurface injection has been used to dispose of low-level liquid nuclear waste for the last two decades. The process consists of mixing liquid waste with cement and other additives to form a slurry that is injected under pressure through a cased well into a low-permeability shale at a depth of 300 m (1000 ft). The slurry spreads from the injection well along bedding plane fractures and forms solid grout sheets of up to 200 m (660 ft) in radius. Using this process, ORNL has disposed of over 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ Ci of activity; the principal nuclides are /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs. In 1982, a new injection facility was put into operation. Each injection, which lasts some two days, results in the emplacement of approximately 750,000 l (180,000 gal) of slurry. Disposal cost per liter is approximately $0.30, including capital costs of the facility. This subsurface disposal process is fundamentally different from other operations. Wastes are injected into a low-permeability aquitard, and the process is designed to isolate nuclides, preventing dispersion in groundwaters. The porosity into which wastes are injected is created by hydraulically fracturing the host formation along bedding planes. The site is in the structurally complex Valley and Ridge Province. The stratigraphy consists of lower Paleozoic rocks. Investigations are under way to determine the long-term hydrologic isolation of the injection zone and the geochemical impact of saline groundwater on nuclide mobility. Injections are monitored by gamma-ray logging of cased observation wells to determine grout sheet orientation after an injection. Recent monitoring work has involved the use of tiltmeters, surface uplift surveys, and seismic arrays. 26 refs., 7 figs.

  10. THE LEVEL OF CUSTOMER SATISFACTION - MEASURE OF SOCIAL EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNGIU-PUPĂZAN MARIANA CLAUDIA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pricing models for social efficiency focuses on assessing the quality, namely the comparison of the desired product to the consumer and the product received, the level of consumer satisfaction on the products and / or services will be therefore a very important component in measuring the effectiveness social. Between the two concepts there is a relationship of mutual interdependence: the level of consumer satisfaction is the result of the quality performance of products and services and high quality products and services is reflected in consumer satisfaction. From the theoretical point of view, according to the marketing strategy, it is necessary to bring to a common level of perceived benefit to consumer expectations. Customer satisfaction is actually the result of a complex information processing.

  11. Laser triangulation measurement of the level in a coal silo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Jiping; Jiang Jing

    2011-01-01

    Laser triangulation theory was used to develop a novel contact-free method for measuring the coal level in a silo under harsh environmental conditions found in coal mines,such as the presence of dense dust,high humidity,and low illumination.A laser source and a camera were mounted at the top of the silo.The laser spot projected into the silo was imaged by the camera.The pinhole imaging principle allows the level to be found from the lateral shift of the spot image on the sensor.A pre-calibrated look-up table of the coal depth versus spot position was used to obtain the depth.The measurement accuracy depends on the step size used during pre-calibration.The actual application of a device designed according to these principles shows that it is easy to implement.The detection of the coal level in a silo at the low illumination level found in coal mines is demonstrated.

  12. Population-Level Quality Measures for Behavioral Screening and Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard L; Smith, Mindy A

    2016-07-01

    Delivered routinely in general health care settings, smoking, alcohol, depression, and obesity screening and intervention (behavioral screening and intervention [BSI]) could substantially improve population health and reduce health care costs. Yet BSI is seldom delivered in an evidence-based manner. This article assesses the adequacy of quality measures for BSI. Online searches of the National Quality Forum's Quality Positioning System and the National Clearinghouse for Quality Measures databases were conducted using the keywords smoking, tobacco, alcohol, depression, and obesity The types and focuses of each measure were classified, and differences between the metrics and evidence-based practice were identified. Most measures indicate whether BSI components are delivered, not how well. Clinicians can perform well on most metrics without delivering evidence-based services. More rigorous quality measures are needed. A new kind of measure is proposed, whereby separate terms representing the reach and effectiveness of key BSI components are multiplied to produce a single indicator of population-level impact for each behavioral topic.

  13. Measurement of the neutron spectrum of a Pu-C source with a liquid scintillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Song-Lin; HUANG Han-Xiong; RUAN Xi-Chao; LI Xia; BAO Jie; NIE Yang-So; ZHONG Qi-Ping; ZHOU Zu-Ying; KONG Xiang-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    The neutron response function for a BC501A liquid scintillator (LS) has been measured using a series of monoenergetic neutrons produced by the p-T reaction. The proton energies were chosen such as to produce neutrons in the energy range of 1 to 20 MeV. The principles of the technique of unfolding a neutron energy spectrum by using the measured neutron response function and the measured Pulse Height (PH) spectrum is briefly described. The PH spectrum of neutrons from the Pu-C source, which will be used for the calibration of the reactor antineutrino detectors for the Daya Bay neutrino experiment, was measured and analyzed to get the neutron energy spectrum. Simultaneously the neutron energy spectrum of an Am-Be source was measured and compared with other measurements as a check of the result for the Pu-C source. Finally, an error analysis and a discussion of the results are given.

  14. Assessing the accuracy of contact angle measurements for sessile drops on liquid-repellent surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Siddarth; McKinley, Gareth H; Cohen, Robert E

    2011-11-15

    Gravity-induced sagging can amplify variations in goniometric measurements of the contact angles of sessile drops on super-liquid-repellent surfaces. The very large value of the effective contact angle leads to increased optical noise in the drop profile near the solid-liquid free surface and the progressive failure of simple geometric approximations. We demonstrate a systematic approach to determining the effective contact angle of drops on super-repellent surfaces. We use a perturbation solution of the Bashforth-Adams equation to estimate the contact angles of sessile drops of water, ethylene glycol, and diiodomethane on an omniphobic surface using direct measurements of the maximum drop width and height. The results and analysis can be represented in terms of a dimensionless Bond number that depends on the maximum drop width and the capillary length of the liquid to quantify the extent of gravity-induced sagging. Finally, we illustrate the inherent sensitivity of goniometric contact angle measurement techniques to drop dimensions as the apparent contact angle approaches 180°.

  15. Measurement of steady and transient liquid coiling with high-speed video and digital image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mier, Frank Austin; Bhakta, Raj; Castano, Nicolas; Thackrah, Joshua; Marquis, Tyler; Garcia, John; Hargather, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Liquid coiling occurs as a gravitationally-accelerated viscous fluid flows into a stagnant reservoir causing a localized accumulation of settling material, commonly designated as stack. This flow is broadly characterized by a vertical rope of liquid, the tail, flowing into the stack in a coiled motion with frequency defined parametrically within four different flow regimes. These regimes are defined as viscous, gravitational, inertial-gravitational, and inertial. Relations include parameters such as flow rate, drop height, rope radius, gravitational acceleration, and kinematic viscosity. While previous work on the subject includes high speed imaging, only basic and often averaged measurements have been taken by visual inspection of images. Through the implementation of additional image processing routines in MATLAB, time resolved measurements are taken on coiling frequency, tail diameter, stack diameter and height. Synchronization between a high speed camera and stepper motor driven syringe pump provides accurate correlation with flow rate. Additionally, continuous measurement of unsteady transition between flow regimes is visualized and quantified. This capability allows a deeper experimental understanding of processes involved in the liquid coiling phenomenon.

  16. Waveform measurement of charge- and spin-density wavepackets in a chiral Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashisaka, M.; Hiyama, N.; Akiho, T.; Muraki, K.; Fujisawa, T.

    2017-06-01

    In contrast to a free-electron system, a Tomonaga-Luttinger (TL) liquid in a one-dimensional (1D) electron system hosts charge and spin excitations as independent entities. When an electron is injected into a TL liquid, it transforms into charge- and spin-density wavepackets that propagate at different group velocities and move away from each other. This process, known as spin-charge separation, is the hallmark of TL physics. While spin-charge separation has been probed in momentum- or frequency-domain measurements in various 1D systems, waveforms of separated excitations, which are a direct manifestation of the TL behaviour, have been long awaited to be measured. Here, we present a waveform measurement for the pseudospin-charge separation process in a chiral TL liquid comprising quantum Hall edge channels. The charge- and pseudospin-density waveforms are captured by utilizing a spin-resolved sampling scope that records the spin-up or -down component of the excitations. This experimental technique provides full information for time evolution of the 1D electron system, including not only propagation of TL eigenmodes but also their decay in a practical device.

  17. Measurement of light and charge yield of low-energy electronic recoils in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Goetzke, L W; Anthony, M; Plante, G; Weber, M

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of the light and charge yield of liquid xenon on the applied electric field and recoil energy is important for dark matter detectors using liquid xenon time projections chambers. Few measurements have been made of this field dependence at recoil energies less than 10 keV. In this paper we present results of such measurements using a specialized detector. Recoil energies are determined via the Compton coincidence technique at four drift fields relevant for liquid xenon dark matter detectors: 0.19, 0.48, 1.02, and 2.32 kV/cm. Mean recoil energies down to 1 keV were measured with unprecedented precision. We find that the charge and light yield are anti-correlated above 3 keV, and that the field dependence becomes negligible below 6 keV. However, below 3 keV we find a charge yield significantly higher than expectation and a reconstructed energy deviating from linearity.

  18. A Novel Vibrating Finger Viscometer for High-Temperature Measurements in Liquid Metals and Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubberstein, T.; Schürmann, M.; Chaves, H.; Heller, H.-P.; Aneziris, C. G.

    2016-10-01

    A novel vibrating finger viscometer for high-temperature measurement in liquid metals and alloys up to 1823 K was constructed. The dynamic viscosity (η ) of the liquid fluid is measured as a product of (ρ \\cdot η )^{0.5} and the relative change of the field coil input for a constant amplitude recording at the resonant frequency of the oscillator. The viscometer was calibrated at 298 K using reference silicon oils with varying kinematic viscosities (ν ), (0.79 to 200)× 10^{-6} m2\\cdot s^{-1}. In the present study, the viscosity of liquid gold (99.99 % Au), silver (99.9 % Ag), and tin (99.9 % Sn) was measured. The viscosities expressed as an Arrhenius function of temperature are: {for Au:}quad quad ln η= & {} -0.1990+2669/T {for Ag:} quad quad ln η= & {} -0.4631+2089/T {for Sn:} quad quad ln η= & {} -0.5472+671/T The viscosity values are consistent within the range of available literature data.

  19. Effects of carbonated liquids on oropharyngeal swallowing measures in people with neurogenic dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdravou, Katerina; Walshe, Margaret; Dagdilelis, Lukas

    2012-06-01

    Aspiration is common in adults with neurogenic dysphagia and pharyngeal delay. This can lead to dehydration, malnutrition, and aspiration pneumonia. Diet modifications aimed at reducing thin liquid aspiration are partially successful or unpalatable or both. Carbonated liquids show some potential in influencing swallowing behavior. However, there is a paucity of evidence to support this intervention. This study compares the effects of carbonated thin liquids (CTL) with that of noncarbonated thin liquids (NCTL) on oropharyngeal swallowing in adults with neurogenic dysphagia and examines the palatability of the CTL stimulus. Seventeen people with pharyngeal delay attended for videofluoroscopy (VFSS). Outcome measures were oral transit time (OTT), pharyngeal transit time (PTT), stage transition duration (STD), initiation of the pharyngeal swallow (IPS), penetration-aspiration scale (PENASP), and pharyngeal retention (PR). A modification of Quartermaster Hedonic Scale (AQHS) was employed to assess palatability of the CTL. CTL vs. NCTL significantly decreased penetration and aspiration on 5-ml (P = 0.028) and 10-ml (P = 0.037) swallows. CTL had no significant effect on OTT, PTT, IPS, and PR for any volume of bolus. Only one participant disliked the CTL stimulus. These findings support the hypothesis that oropharyngeal swallowing can be modulated in response to sensory stimuli. Implications for research and clinical practice are discussed.

  20. Liquid–Liquid Equilibrium Measurements for Model Systems Related to Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasperson, Louis V.; McDougal, Rubin J.; Diky, Vladimir; Paulechka, Eugene; Chirico, Robert D.; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Iisa, Kristiina; Dutta, Abhijit

    2017-01-12

    We report liquid-liquid mutual solubilities for binary aqueous mixtures involving 2-, 3-, and 4-ethylphenol, 2-, 3-, and 4-methoxyphenol, benzofuran, and 1H-indene for the temperature range (300 < T/K < 360). Measurements in the water-rich phase for (2-ethylphenol + water) were extended to T = 440 K to facilitate comparison with literature values. Liquid-liquid equilibrium tie-line determinations were made for four ternary systems involving (water + toluene) mixed with a third component; phenol, 3-ethylphenol, 4-methoxyphenol, or 2,4-dimethylphenol. Literature values at higher temperatures are available for the three (ethylphenol + water) systems, and, in general, good agreement is seen. The ternary system (water + toluene + phenol) has been studied previously with inconsistent results reported in the literature, and one report is shown to be anomalous. All systems are modeled with the predictive methods NIST-Modified-UNIFAC and NIST-COSMO-SAC, with generally good success in the temperature range of interest (300 < T/K < 360). This work is part of a larger project on the testing and development of predictive phase equilibrium models for compound types occurring in catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass, and background information for the larger project is provided.

  1. Measurement of thermal conductivity, viscosity and density of ionic liquid [EMIM][DEP]-based nanofluids☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Xie; Zongchang Zhao; Jianhua Zhao; Hongtao Gao

    2016-01-01

    This article studied experimental y the effect of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the thermo physical properties of ionic liquid-based nanofluids. The nanofluids were composed of ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethylphosphate [EMIM][DEP], or its aqueous solution[EMIM][DEP](1)+H2O(2) and MWCNTs without any surfactants. The thermal conductivity, viscosity and density of the nanofluids were mea-sured experimental y. The effects of the mass fraction of MWCNTs, temperature and the mole fraction of water on the thermo physical properties of nanofluids were studied. Results show that the thermal conductivity of nanofluids increases within the range of 1.3%–9.7%compared to their base liquids, and have a well linear depen-dence on temperature. The viscosity and density of the nanofluids exhibit a remarkable increase compared with those of the base liquids. Finally, the correlation of the effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of the nanofluids was made using the models in the literatures.

  2. Thermodynamic properties of liquid Au-Cu-Sn alloys determined from electromotive force measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Zhongnan, E-mail: guozhongn@163.com [Institute of Inorganic chemistry/Material chemistry, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical and Biological engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 100083 Beijing (China); Hindler, Michael [Institute of Inorganic chemistry/Material chemistry, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Yuan, Wenxia [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical and Biological engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 100083 Beijing (China); Mikula, Adolf [Institute of Inorganic chemistry/Material chemistry, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-10-20

    Highlights: {yields} A full thermodynamic description of the liquid ternary Au-Cu-Sn system is reported. {yields} The electromotive force method with a liquid electrolyte was used to determine the activity of tin in the alloys. {yields} The partial free energies of tin in this system were calculated from the obtained EMF values. {yields} The Gibbs-Duhem integration was used to calculate the integral Gibbs free energy and integral enthalpy of the entire system. - Abstract: The thermodynamic properties of the ternary Au-Cu-Sn system were determined with the electromotive force (EMF) method using a liquid electrolyte. Three different cross-sections with constant Au:Cu ratios of 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3 were applied to measure the thermodynamic properties of the ternary system in the temperature range between the liquidus temperature of the alloys and 1023 K. The partial free energies of Sn in liquid Au-Cu-Sn alloys were obtained from EMF data. The integral Gibbs free energy and the integral enthalpy at 900 K were calculated by Gibbs-Duhem integration. The ternary interaction parameters were evaluated using the Redlich-Kister-Muggianu polynomial.

  3. Real-time measurement of the average temperature profiles in liquid cooling using digital holographic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Mendez, Carlos; Anaya, Tonatiuh Saucedo; Araiza-Esquivel, M.; Balderas-Navarro, Raúl E.; Aranda-Espinoza, Said; López-Martínez, Alfonso; Olvera-Olvera, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    We present an alternative optical method to estimate the temperature during the cooling process of a liquid using digital holographic interferometry (DHI). We make use of phase variations that are linked to variations in the refractive index and the temperature property of a liquid. In DHI, a hologram is first recorded using an object beam scattered from a rectangular container with a liquid at a certain reference temperature. A second hologram is then recorded when the temperature is decreased slightly. A phase difference between the two holograms indicates a temperature variation, and it is possible to obtain the temperature value at each small point of the sensed optical field. The relative phase map between the two object states is obtained simply and quickly through Fourier-transform method. Our experimental results reveal that the temperature values measured using this method and those obtained with a thermometer are consistent. We additionally show that it is possible to analyze the heat-loss process of a liquid sample in dynamic events using DHI.

  4. Research on polarization state of prism coupler sensor for measuring liquid refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Due to many experimental data required and a lot of calculations involved, it is very complex and cumbersome to model prism-based liquid-refractive-index-measuring methods. By use of the feature of TE-polarized wave and TM-polarized wave and differential measurement principle, we developed a new method of mathematical modeling for measuring refractive index of a liquid based upon Fresnel formula and prism internal reflection at incident angle less than critical angle. With this method only two different concentrations measurements for a kind of solution can lead to the determination of computational model. It introduces the principle of an optic-fiber sensor system based on prism-coupler for measuring refractive index of a liquid, and it contains the configuration picture of the sensing optical path, the spectrogram of the semiconductor laser and the structure block diagram of measuring system, the system is mainly made up of the semiconductor laser with 1654.14nm in wavelength, 1×2 optical switch, Y-shaped photo-coupler with coupled rate 50:50, the detector based on isosceles prism-coupler, the data process and control system based on AT89C51 and photoelectric transformer. For TM-polarized wave and TE-polarized wave, theoretical simulations show that the ratio of sensitivity is 1.11, therefore, the beam that the component of TM-polarized wave is more than the one of TE-polarized wave is advantageous to heightening the systemۥs measurement sensitivity. Measurements are performed to examine the validity of the theoretical model and four theoretical models are given, and these results indicate the feasibility of four theoretical models with an error of 3%. In this study, a beam of light is broken down into two beams in the coupler of Y-shaped coupler, the one acts as the reference optical path, the other is known as the sensing optical path, consequently the method can limit well the fluctuation of the light source, the variation of the photodiodeۥ s dark

  5. AUTOMATED WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS IN SMALL-DIAMETER AQUIFER TUBES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW; EDRINGTON RS; MAHOOD RO; VANMIDDLESWORTH PE

    2011-01-14

    Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium, strontium-90, and uranium discharges into the Columbia River along approximately 16 km (10 mi) of the shoreline. Various treatment systems have and will continue to be implemented to eliminate the impact of Hanford Site contamination to the river. To optimize the various remediation strategies, it is important to understand interactions between groundwater and the surface water of the Columbia River. An automated system to record water levels in aquifer sampling tubes installed in the hyporheic zone was designed and tested to (1) gain a more complete understanding of groundwater/river water interactions based on gaining and losing conditions ofthe Columbia River, (2) record and interpret data for consistent and defensible groundwater/surface water conceptual models that may be used to better predict subsurface contaminant fate and transport, and (3) evaluate the hydrodynamic influence of extraction wells in an expanded pump-and-treat system to optimize the treatment system. A system to measure water levels in small-diameter aquifer tubes was designed and tested in the laboratory and field. The system was configured to allow manual measurements to periodically calibrate the instrument and to permit aquifer tube sampling without removing the transducer tube. Manual measurements were collected with an e-tape designed and fabricated especially for this test. Results indicate that the transducer system accurately records groundwater levels in aquifer tubes. These data are being used to refine the conceptual and numeric models to better understand interactions in the hyporheic zone of the Columbia River and the adjacent river water and groundwater, and changes in hydrochemistry relative to groundwater flux as river water recharges the aquifer and then drains back out in response to changes in the river level.

  6. Image-based Water Level Measurement Method under Stained Ruler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jae-do KIM; Young-joon HAN; Hern-soo HAHN

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes the water level measuring method based on the image,while the ruler used to indicate the water level is stained.The contamination of the ruler weakens or eliminates many features which are required for the image processing.However,the feature of the color difference between the ruler and the water surface are firmer on the environmental change compare to the other features.As the color differences are embossed,only the region of the ruler is limited to eliminate the noise,and the average image is produced by using several continuous frames.A histogram is then produced based on the height axis of the produced intensity average image.Local peaks and local valleys are detected,and the section between the peak and valley which have the greatest change is looked for.The valley point at this very moment is used to detect the water level.The detected water level is then converted to the actual water level by using the mapping table.The proposed method is compared to the ultrasonic based method to evaluate its accuracy and efficiency on the various contaminated environments.

  7. Measurement of Acceptable Noise Level with Background Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyun-Jung; Bahng, Junghwa; Lee, Jae Hee

    2015-09-01

    Acceptable noise level (ANL) is a measure of the maximum background noise level (BNL) that a person is willing to tolerate while following a target story. Although researchers have used various sources of target sound in ANL measures, a limited type of background noise has been used. Extending the previous study of Gordon-Hickey & Moore (2007), the current study determined the effect of music genre and tempo on ANLs as possible factors affecting ANLs. We also investigated the relationships between individual ANLs and the familiarity of music samples and between music ANLs and subjective preference. Forty-one participants were seperated into two groups according to their ANLs, 29 low-ANL listeners and 12 high-ANL listeners. Using Korean ANL material, the individual ANLs were measured based on the listeners' most comfortable listening level and BNL. The ANLs were measured in six conditions, with different music tempo (fast, slow) and genre (K-pop, pop, classical) in a counterbalanced order. Overall, ANLs did not differ by the tempo of background music, but music genre significantly affected individual ANLs. We observed relatively higher ANLs with K-pop music and relatively lower ANLs with classical music. This tendency was similar in both low-ANL and high-ANL groups. However, the subjective ratings of music familiarity and preference affected ANLs differently for low-ANL and high-ANL groups. In contrast to the low-ANL listeners, the ANLs of the high-ANL listeners were significantly affected by music familiarity and preference. The genre of background music affected ANLs obtained using background music. The degree of music familiarity and preference appears to be associated with individual susceptibility to background music only for listeners who are greatly annoyed by background noise (high-ANL listeners).

  8. The capacitive drop tensiometer - a novel multianalysing technique for measuring the properties of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. H.; Augousti, A. T.; Mason, J.; McMillan, N. D.

    1999-01-01

    A new instrumental method for measuring the physical properties of a liquid has been developed. The instrument, called a capacitive drop tensiometer (CDT), is based on the drop volume principle in combination with a capacitive transducer. A delivery head with a specialized wetting design was constructed for forming drops. The capacitive transducer uses the delivery head as one of its plates and a cylindrical ring plate, which surrounds the delivery head and the space occupied by the drop that is formed, as another. Excellent linearity is achieved by optimizing the design, with an accuracy of drop volume measurement of approximately 0957-0233/10/1/007/img6. The system is suitable for measuring both drops in equilibrium and those in the process of growing. Its capability of real-time measurement makes it particularly useful for volatile liquids, in which instance the measurement of drop volume using a flowmeter or a pump is no longer reliable. The CDT can also be used to determine concentration. It was found that the concentration curve is linear for aqueous glycerol solutions although not so for aqueous ethanol solutions. The CDT's ability to measure surface tension was also explored and experimental results are presented here.

  9. Quick measurement of electrorheological effect for small amounts of nematic liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro, Chiharu; Hosomi, Yuki; Nakano, Ken

    2015-08-01

    A quick measurement method of effective viscosity, employing damped oscillation between two parallel plates, was proposed to examine the electrorheological (ER) effect for small amounts of nematic liquid crystal (LC). To demonstrate the validity of the method, the viscosity measurements were conducted for ordinary liquids [polyalphaolefins (PAOs)] and a nematic LC [4-pentyl-4‧-cyanobiphenyl (5CB)] by using a newly developed apparatus that embodied the measurement principle. The viscosity measurements for PAOs showed that when the film thickness is in the submillimeter range (e.g. 0.2 mm), this method provides reliable values of the effective viscosity. The viscosity measurement for 5CB showed that this method evaluates the ER effect with a few dozen cubic millimeters of the sample (e.g. 16 mm3) under the application of a voltage (e.g. 0 to 300 V). It was confirmed that the effective viscosities of 5CB measured at various conditions were scaled to a single master curve as a function of the applied voltage, effective velocity and film thickness.

  10. Ultrasound-based measurement of liquid-layer thickness: A novel time-domain approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praher, Bernhard; Steinbichler, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Measuring the thickness of a thin liquid layer between two solid materials is important when the adequate separation of metallic parts by a lubricant film (e.g., in bearings or mechanical seals) is to be assessed. The challenge in using ultrasound-based systems for such measurements is that the signal from the liquid layer is a superposition of multiple reflections. We have developed an algorithm for reconstructing this superimposed signal in the time domain. By comparing simulated and measured signals, the time-of-flight of the ultrasonic pulse in a layer can be estimated. With the longitudinal sound velocity known, the layer thickness can then be calculated. In laboratory measurements, we validate successfully (maximum relative error 4.9%) our algorithm for layer thicknesses ranging from 30 μm to 200 μm. Furthermore, we tested our method in the high-temperature environment of polymer processing by measuring the clearance between screw and barrel in the plasticisation unit of an injection moulding machine. The results of such measurements can indicate (i) the wear status of the tribo-mechanical screw-barrel system and (ii) unsuitable process conditions.

  11. Theoretical Analysis of Thermodynamic Measurements near a Liquid-Gas Critical Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M.; Zhong, Fang; Hahn, Inseob

    2003-01-01

    Over the years, many ground-based studies have been performed near liquid-gas critical points to elucidate the expected divergences in thermodynamic quantities. The unambiguous interpretation of these studies very near the critical point is hindered by a gravity-induced density stratification. However, these ground-based measurements can give insight into the crossover behavior between the asymptotic critical region near the transition and the mean field region farther away. We have completed a detailed analysis of heat capacity, susceptibility and coexistence curve measurements near the He-3 liquid-gas critical point using the minimal-subtraction renormalization (MSR) scheme within the phi(exp 4) model. This MSR scheme, using only two adjustable parameters, provides a reasonable global fit to all of these experimental measurements in the gravity-free region out to a reduced temperature of |t| approx. 2x10(exp -2). Recently this approach has also been applied to the earlier microgravity measurements of Haupt and Straub in SF(sub 6) with surprising results. The conclusions drawn from the MSR analyses will be presented. Measurements in the gravity-affected region closer to the He-3 critical point have also been analyzed using the recent crossover parametric model (CPM) of the equation-of-state. The results of fitting heat capacity measurements to the CPM model along the He-3 critical isochore in the gravity-affected region will also be presented.

  12. Apparatus and method to measure dielectric properties (epsilon(') and epsilon(")) of ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göllei, Attila; Vass, András; Pallai, Elisabeth; Gerzson, Miklós; Ludányi, Lajos; Mink, János

    2009-04-01

    Conventional techniques for measurement of dielectric properties of ionic liquids or electrolyte solutions fail because the samples are largely short circuited by the high electrical conductance. The object of the author's research activity was to elaborate an apparatus (microwave dielectrometer) and method suitable to measure the dielectric constant (epsilon(')) and loss factor (epsilon(")) of well conducting ionic liquids and other solvents. This process is based on a revised waveguide method completed with an automatic calibration possibility. Contrary to conventional measuring methods this technique uses about 20 W/g power density. The measurements were carried out at 2.45 GHz frequency in the temperature range from 10 up to 100 degrees C. The obtained (epsilon(')) and (epsilon(")) values of different solvents were compared with several published (calculated and measured) data. Statistical analysis was used to determine the error of measurements and distilled water was chosen as a standard for study of data dispersion. To accomplish statistical analysis, namely, the dielectric characteristics have to be determined at the same temperature. The values of variances were less or equal 1 in case of epsilon(') and decrease with increasing temperature. In case of epsilon(") the variance data were much smaller.

  13. The Effects of P, I and D Parameters in Automatic Liquid Level Control Using UniTrain Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfatirta Mufti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The research discusses some experiments to control the level of liquid inside a tank by using PID controllers which can be divided into four categories. The experiments describe the effect of P, I, and D element. It also discusses the best possible controller, which is a PI controller, for the liquid level tank system. The liquid level controlling is done by adjusting the voltage pump which will further regulate the flow rate of the fluid entering the inlet valve. The liquid that flows through the outlet valve is considered as the disturbance variable to the system. The liquid tank sensor needs to be calibrated prior to the experiments. Calibration can be done manually by using a digital multimeter or by using the computer sofware that is connected directly to the plant system. Set point and PID parameters are determined by the UniTrain and the computer interface. In these experiments, PI controller has the best result with a medium proportional gain (KP = 5 and a small integral gain (TN = 0.2.

  14. Measuring Air Leaks into the Vacuum Space of Large Liquid Hydrogen Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley; Nurge, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Large cryogenic liquid hydrogen tanks are composed of inner and outer shells. The outer shell is exposed to the ambient environment while the inner shell holds the liquid hydrogen. The region between these two shells is evacuated and typically filled with a powderlike insulation to minimize radiative coupling between the two shells. A technique was developed for detecting the presence of an air leak from the outside environment into this evacuated region. These tanks are roughly 70 ft (approx. equal 21 m) in diameter (outer shell) and the inner shell is roughly 62 ft (approx. equal 19 m) in diameter, so the evacuated region is about 4 ft (approx. equal 1 m) wide. A small leak's primary effect is to increase the boil-off of the tank. It was preferable to install a more accurate fill level sensor than to implement a boil-off meter. The fill level sensor would be composed of an accurate pair of pressure transducers that would essentially weigh the remaining liquid hydrogen. This upgrade, allowing boil-off data to be obtained weekly instead of over several months, is ongoing, and will then provide a relatively rapid indication of the presence of a leak.

  15. Measurements of serum glucose using the luciferin/Luciferase system and a liquid scintillation spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idahl, L.A.; Sandstroem, P.E.; Sehlin, J.

    1986-05-15

    A single-step assay for serum glucose measurements is described. The assay is based on the phosphorylation of D-glucose by glucokinase and the measurement of ATP consumption by firefly luciferase. The luminescence is recorded in an ordinary liquid scintillation spectrometer. The use of stable reagents and a stable final signal (light emission) makes it possible to analyze a large number of samples in each assay run. The assay is of particular value when repeated serum glucose determinations are performed on samples from small laboratory animals.

  16. Bovine serum albumin detection and quantitation based on capacitance measurements of liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Hao; Lee, Mon-Juan; Lee, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based biosensing is generally limited by the lack of accurate quantitative strategies. This study exploits the unique electric capacitance properties of LCs to establish quantitative assay methods for bovine serum albumin (BSA) biomolecules. By measuring the voltage-dependent electric capacitance of LCs under an alternating-current field with increasing amplitude, positive correlations were derived between the BSA concentration and the electric capacitance parameters of LCs. This study demonstrates that quantitative analysis can be achieved in LC-based biosensing through electric capacitance measurements extensively employed in LCD research and development.

  17. Capillary method for measuring near-infrared spectra of microlitre volume liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Bo; MURAYAMA Koichi

    2007-01-01

    The present study theoretically explored the feasibility of the capillary method for measuring near-infrared (NIR) spectra of liquid or solution samples with microlitre volume, which was proposed in our previous studies. Lambert-Beer absorbance rule was applied to establish a model for the integral absorbance of capillary, which was then implemented in numerical analyses of the effects of capillary on various spectral features and dynamic range of absorption measurement. The theoretical speculations indicated that the capillary method might be used in NIR spectroscopy, which was further supported by the empirical data collected from our experiments by comparison between capillary NIR spectra of several organic solvents and cuvette cell NIR spectra.

  18. Measurement of Flow Velocity and Inference of Liquid Viscosity in a Microfluidic Channel by Fluorescence Photobleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, Nick J.; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Parsa, Shima

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple, noninvasive method for simultaneous measurement of flow velocity and inference of liquid viscosity in a microfluidic channel. We track the dynamics of a sharp front of photobleached fluorescent dye using a confocal microscope and measure the intensity at a single point...... downstream of the initial front position. We fit an exact solution of the advection diffusion equation to the fluorescence intensity recovery curve to determine the average flow velocity and the diffusion coefficient of the tracer dye. The dye diffusivity is correlated to solute concentration to infer...

  19. High Resolution Temperature Measurement of Liquid Stainless Steel Using Hyperspectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devesse, Wim; De Baere, Dieter; Guillaume, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    A contactless temperature measurement system is presented based on a hyperspectral line camera that captures the spectra in the visible and near infrared (VNIR) region of a large set of closely spaced points. The measured spectra are used in a nonlinear least squares optimization routine to calculate a one-dimensional temperature profile with high spatial resolution. Measurements of a liquid melt pool of AISI 316L stainless steel show that the system is able to determine the absolute temperatures with an accuracy of 10%. The measurements are made with a spatial resolution of 12 µm/pixel, justifying its use in applications where high temperature measurements with high spatial detail are desired, such as in the laser material processing and additive manufacturing fields. PMID:28067764

  20. High Resolution Temperature Measurement of Liquid Stainless Steel Using Hyperspectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Devesse

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A contactless temperature measurement system is presented based on a hyperspectral line camera that captures the spectra in the visible and near infrared (VNIR region of a large set of closely spaced points. The measured spectra are used in a nonlinear least squares optimization routine to calculate a one-dimensional temperature profile with high spatial resolution. Measurements of a liquid melt pool of AISI 316L stainless steel show that the system is able to determine the absolute temperatures with an accuracy of 10%. The measurements are made with a spatial resolution of 12 µm/pixel, justifying its use in applications where high temperature measurements with high spatial detail are desired, such as in the laser material processing and additive manufacturing fields.

  1. GPS water level measurements for Indonesia's Tsunami Early Warning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöne, T.; Pandoe, W.; Mudita, I.; Roemer, S.; Illigner, J.; Zech, C.; Galas, R.

    2011-03-01

    On Boxing Day 2004, a severe tsunami was generated by a strong earthquake in Northern Sumatra causing a large number of casualties. At this time, neither an offshore buoy network was in place to measure tsunami waves, nor a system to disseminate tsunami warnings to local governmental entities. Since then, buoys have been developed by Indonesia and Germany, complemented by NOAA's Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) buoys, and have been moored offshore Sumatra and Java. The suite of sensors for offshore tsunami detection in Indonesia has been advanced by adding GPS technology for water level measurements. The usage of GPS buoys in tsunami warning systems is a relatively new approach. The concept of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) (Rudloff et al., 2009) combines GPS technology and ocean bottom pressure (OBP) measurements. Especially for near-field installations where the seismic noise may deteriorate the OBP data, GPS-derived sea level heights provide additional information. The GPS buoy technology is precise enough to detect medium to large tsunamis of amplitudes larger than 10 cm. The analysis presented here suggests that for about 68% of the time, tsunamis larger than 5 cm may be detectable.

  2. GPS water level measurements for Indonesia's Tsunami Early Warning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schöne

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available On Boxing Day 2004, a severe tsunami was generated by a strong earthquake in Northern Sumatra causing a large number of casualties. At this time, neither an offshore buoy network was in place to measure tsunami waves, nor a system to disseminate tsunami warnings to local governmental entities. Since then, buoys have been developed by Indonesia and Germany, complemented by NOAA's Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART buoys, and have been moored offshore Sumatra and Java. The suite of sensors for offshore tsunami detection in Indonesia has been advanced by adding GPS technology for water level measurements.

    The usage of GPS buoys in tsunami warning systems is a relatively new approach. The concept of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS (Rudloff et al., 2009 combines GPS technology and ocean bottom pressure (OBP measurements. Especially for near-field installations where the seismic noise may deteriorate the OBP data, GPS-derived sea level heights provide additional information.

    The GPS buoy technology is precise enough to detect medium to large tsunamis of amplitudes larger than 10 cm. The analysis presented here suggests that for about 68% of the time, tsunamis larger than 5 cm may be detectable.

  3. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, H; Avetisyan, R; Back, H O; Cocco, A G; DeJongh, F; Fiorillo, G; Galbiati, C; Grandi, L; Guardincerri, Y; Kendziora, C; Lippincott, W H; Love, C; Lyons, S; Manenti, L; Martoff, C J; Meng, Y; Montanari, D; Mosteiro, P; Olvitt, D; Pordes, S; Qian, H; Rossi, B; Saldanha, R; Sangiorgio, S; Siegl, K; Strauss, S Y; Tan, W; Tatarowicz, J; Walker, S; Wang, H; Watson, A W; Westerdale, S; Yoo, J

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrowband neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation and ionization yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.2 keV and for applied electric fields from 0 to 1000 V/cm. We also report the observation of an anti-correlation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anti-correlation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. A comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field yielded a first evidence of sensitivity to direct...

  4. Measurement of boiling heat transfer coefficient in liquid nitrogen bath by inverse heat conduction method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao JIN; Jian-ping HONG; Hao ZHENG; Ke TANG; Zhi-hua GAN

    2009-01-01

    Inverse heat conduction method (IHCM)is one of the most effective approaches to obtaining the boiling heat transfer coefficient from measured results.This paper focuses on its application in cryogenic boiling heat transfer.Experiments were conducted on the heattransfer of a stainless steel block in a liquid nitrogen bath.with the assumption of a ID conduction condition to realize fast acquisition of the temperature of the test points inside the block.With the inverse-heat conduction theory and the explicit finite difference model,a solving program was developed to calculate the heat flux and the boiling heat transfer coefficient of a stainless steel block in liquid nitrogen bath based on the temperature acquisition data.Considering the oscillating data and some unsmooth transition points in the inverse-heat-conduction calculation result of the heat-transfer coefficient,a two-step data-fitting procedure was proposed to obtain the expression for the boiling heat transfer coefficients.The coefficient was then verified for accuracy by a comparison between the simulation results using this expression and the verifying experimental results of a stainless steel block.The maximum error with a revised segment fitting iS around 6%.which verifies the feasibility of using IHCM to measure the boiling heat transfer coefficient in liquid nitrogen bath.

  5. High-accuracy measurement of the emission spectrum of liquid xenon in the vacuum ultraviolet region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Keiko, E-mail: fujii-keiko-nv@ynu.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan); Endo, Yuya; Torigoe, Yui; Nakamura, Shogo [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501 (Japan); Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Kasami, Katsuyu [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Mihara, Satoshi; Saito, Kiwamu; Sasaki, Shinichi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); The Graduate School of Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Tawara, Hiroko [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2015-09-21

    The emission spectrum of cryogenic liquid xenon in the vacuum ultraviolet region was measured by irradiating liquid xenon with gamma-rays from a radioactive source. To achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio, we employed coincident photon counting. Additionally, the charge of the photo-sensor signals was measured to estimate the number of detected photons accurately. In addition, proper corrections were incorporated for the wavelength; response functions of the apparatus obtained using a low-pressure mercury lamp, and photon detection efficiencies of the optical system were considered. The obtained emission spectrum is found to be in the shape of a Gaussian function, with the center at 57,199±34 (stat.)±33 (syst.) cm{sup −1} (174.8±0.1 (stat.)±0.1 (syst.) nm) and the full width at half maximum of 3328±72 (stat.)±65 (syst.) cm{sup −1} (10.2±0.2 (stat.)±0.2 (sys.) nm). These results are the most accurate values obtained in terms of the data acquisition method and the calibration for the experimental system and provide valuable information regarding the high-precision instruments that employ a liquid-xenon scintillator.

  6. Measurements of Concentration differences between Liquid Mixtures using Digital Holographic Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrero-Méndez Carlos

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an alternative method to detect and measure the concentration changes in liquid solutions. The method uses Digital Holographic Interferometry (DHI and is based on measuring refractive index variations. The first hologram is recorded when a wavefront from light comes across an ordinary cylindrical glass container filled with a liquid solution. The second hologram is recorded after slight changing the liquid’s concentration. Differences in phase obtained from the correlation of the first hologram with the second one provide information about the refractive index variation, which is directly related to the changes in physical properties related to the concentration. The method can be used − with high sensitivity, accuracy, and speed − either to detect adulterations or to measure a slight change of concentration in the order of 0.001 moles which is equivalent to a difference of 0.003 g of sodium chloride in solutions. The method also enables to measure and calculate the phase difference among each pixel of two samples. This makes it possible to generate a global measurement of the phase difference of the entire sensed region.

  7. Contact-free measurement of the flow field of a liquid metal inside a closed container

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinicke Christiane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of flow velocities inside metal melts is particularly challenging. Due to the high temperatures of the melts it is impossible to employ measurement techniques that require either mechanical contact with the melt or are only adaptable to translucent fluids. In the past years a number of electromagnetic techniques have been developed that allows a contact-free measurement of volume flows. One of these techniques is the so-called Lorentz Force Velocimetry (LFV in which the metal flow is exposed to an external, permanent magnetic field. The interaction between the metal and the magnet not only leads to a force on the fluid, but also on the magnet. The force can be measured and is proportional to the velocity of the melt. Moreover, by using a small permanent magnet it is possible to resolve spatial structures inside the flow.We will demonstrate this using a model experiment that has been investigated with different reference techniques previously. The experimental setup is a cylindrical vessel filled with a eutectic alloy which is liquid at room temperature. The liquid metal can be set into motion by means of a propeller at the top of the liquid. Depending on the direction of rotation of the propeller, the flow inside the vessel takes on different states. Beside the vessel, we place a Lorentz Force Flowmeter (LFF equipped with a small permanent magnet. By measuring the force on the magnet at different positions and different rotation speeds, we demonstrate that we can qualitatively and quantitatively reconstruct the flow field inside the vessel.

  8. Atom-interferometric measurement of Stark level splittings

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Limei; Zhang, Linjie; Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2015-01-01

    Multiple adiabatic/diabatic passages through avoided crossings in the Stark map of cesium Rydberg atoms are employed as beam splitters and recombiners in an atom-interferometric measurement of energy-level splittings. We subject cold cesium atoms to laser-excitation, electric-field and detection sequences that constitute an (internal-state) atom interferometer. For the read-out of the interferometer we utilize state-dependent collisions, which selectively remove atoms of one kind from the detected signal. We investigate the dependence of the interferometric signal on timing and field parameters, and find good agreement with time-dependent quantum simulations of the interferometer. Fourier analysis of the interferometric signals yield coherence frequencies that agree with corresponding energy-level differences in calculated Stark maps. The method enables spectroscopy of states that are inaccessible to direct laser-spectroscopic observation, due to selection rules, and has applications in field metrology.

  9. Measurement of the absolute reflectance of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) immersed in liquid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, F.; Lindote, A.; Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Silva, C.; Bras, P.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Lopes, M. I.

    2017-01-01

    The performance of a detector using liquid xenon (LXe) as a scintillator is strongly dependent on the collection efficiency for xenon scintillation light, which in turn is critically dependent on the reflectance of the surfaces that surround the active volume. To improve the light collection in such detectors the active volume is usually surrounded by polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) reflector panels, used due to its very high reflectance—even at the short wavelength of scintillation light of LXe (peaked at 178 nm). In this work, which contributed to the overall R&D effort towards the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment, we present experimental results for the absolute reflectance measurements of three different PTFE samples (including the material used in the LUX detector) immersed in LXe for its scintillation light. The obtained results show that very high bi-hemispherical reflectance values (>= 97%) can be achieved, enabling very low energy thresholds in liquid xenon scintillator-based detectors.

  10. Thermodynamic properties of liquid Au–Cu–Sn alloys determined from electromotive force measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhongnan; Hindler, Michael; Yuan, Wenxia; Mikula, Adolf

    2011-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of the ternary Au–Cu–Sn system were determined with the electromotive force (EMF) method using a liquid electrolyte. Three different cross-sections with constant Au:Cu ratios of 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3 were applied to measure the thermodynamic properties of the ternary system in the temperature range between the liquidus temperature of the alloys and 1023 K. The partial free energies of Sn in liquid Au–Cu–Sn alloys were obtained from EMF data. The integral Gibbs free energy and the integral enthalpy at 900 K were calculated by Gibbs–Duhem integration. The ternary interaction parameters were evaluated using the Redlich–Kister–Muggianu polynomial. PMID:22039311

  11. Thermodynamic properties of liquid Au-Cu-Sn alloys determined from electromotive force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhongnan; Hindler, Michael; Yuan, Wenxia; Mikula, Adolf

    2011-10-20

    The thermodynamic properties of the ternary Au-Cu-Sn system were determined with the electromotive force (EMF) method using a liquid electrolyte. Three different cross-sections with constant Au:Cu ratios of 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3 were applied to measure the thermodynamic properties of the ternary system in the temperature range between the liquidus temperature of the alloys and 1023 K. The partial free energies of Sn in liquid Au-Cu-Sn alloys were obtained from EMF data. The integral Gibbs free energy and the integral enthalpy at 900 K were calculated by Gibbs-Duhem integration. The ternary interaction parameters were evaluated using the Redlich-Kister-Muggianu polynomial.

  12. Imaging and force measurement of LDL and HDL by AFM in air and liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Chaoye; Ao, Meiying; Liu, Zhanghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The size and biomechanical properties of lipoproteins are tightly correlated with their structures/functions. While atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image lipoproteins the force measurement of these nano-sized particles is missing. We detected that the sizes of LDL and HDL in liquid are close to the commonly known values. The Young's modulus of LDL or HDL is ∼0.4 GPa which is similar to that of some viral capsids or nanovesicles but greatly larger than that of various liposomes. The adhesive force of LDL or HDL is small (∼200 pN). The comparison of AFM detection in air and liquid was also performed which is currently lacking. Our data may provide useful information for better understanding and AFM detection of lipoproteins.

  13. In-Situ Measurement of Relative Attenuation Length of Gadolinium-Loaded Liquid Scintillator Using Source Data at RENO Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, H S; Choi, J H; Choi, W Q; Choi, Y; Jang, H I; Jang, J S; Joo, K K; Kim, B R; Kim, J Y; Kim, S B; Kim, W; Kwon, E; Lee, D H; Lim, I T; Pac, M Y; Park, I G; Park, J S; Park, R G; Seo, H; Seo, S H; Seon, Y G; Shin, C D; Yeo, I S; Yu, I

    2016-01-01

    We present an in-situ method of measuring the relative attenuation length of gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator in the RENO detectors using radioactive source calibration data without requiring any PMT performance model. We observed the degradation of the attenuation length of the gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator in the RENO detectors by ~50% over a period of about 4 years.

  14. Measurements on polar liquids at a microwave frequency – evaluation of molecular parameters – a new method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M B R Murthy; B S Dyasagar; R L Patil

    2003-10-01

    A simple method of estimating the dipole moment () and relaxation time () of polar molecules in liquid state, from a single set of dielectric measurements at high frequency, is proposed by using the concept of dielectric virial coefficients and employing Onsager model. The proposed method is tested in a number of polar liquids and the results are discussed.

  15. Probe and Sensors Development for Level Measurement of Fats, Oils and Grease in Grease Boxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Faria

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The wide spread of food outlets has become an environmental and sanitation infrastructure problem, due to Fats, Oils and Grease (FOG. A grease box is used at the industrials facilities to collect the FOG, in a specific time window, while its quality is good for recycling (e.g., biodiesel and it is economically valuable. After this period, it will be disposed at a cost. For the proper management of the grease boxes, it is necessary to know the quantity of FOG inside the boxes, which is a major problem, as the boxes are sealed and permanently filled with water. The lack of homogeneity of the FOG renders it not detectable by current probes for level detection in liquids. In this article, the design, development and testing of a set of probes for FOG level measurement, based on the principles used in sensors for the detection of liquids inside containers, is described. The most suitable probe, based on the capacitance principle, together with the necessary hardware and software modules for data acquisition and transmission, was developed and tested. After the development phase, the probe was integrated on a metropolitan system for FOG collection and grease box management in partnership with a grease box management company.

  16. Apparatus to measure low level helium for neutron dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, Shuji; Takao, Yoshiyuki; Muramasu, Masatomo; Hida, Tomoya; Sou, Hirofumi; Nakashima, Hideki [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Kanda, Yukinori

    1998-03-01

    An apparatus to measure low level helium in a solid sample for neutron dosimetry in the practical use such as area monitoring in the long-term and reactor surveillance was reported. In our previous work, the helium atoms measurement system (HAMS) was developed. A sample was evaporated in the furnace and the released gas from the sample was analyzed with the mass spectrometer of the system to determine the amount of helium contained in it. The system has been improved to advance the lower helium measurement limit in a solid sample for its application to an area monitoring system. The mass of a solid is up to 100mg. Two important points should be considered to advance the lower limit. One was to produce a high quality vacuum in the system chamber for suppressing background gases during the sample measurement. The other important point was to detect very small output from the mass spectrometer. A pulse counting system was used to get high sensitivity in the mass 4 analyzing. (author)

  17. Conditioning of Boron-Containing Low and Intermediate Level Liquid Radioactive Waste - 12041

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbunova, Olga A. [SUE SIA ' Radon' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Kamaeva, Tatiana S. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Improved cementation of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW and LLW) aided by vortex electromagnetic treatment as well as silica addition was investigated. Positive effects including accelerated curing of boron-containing cement waste forms, improve end product quality, decreased product volume and reduced secondary LRW volume from equipment decontamination were established. These results established the possibility of boron-containing LRW cementation without the use of neutralizing alkaline additives that greatly increase the volume of the final product intended for long-term storage (burial). Physical (electromagnetic) treatment in a vortex mixer can change the state of LRW versus chemical treatment. By treating the liquid phase of cement solution only, instead of the whole solution, and using fine powder and nano-particles of ferric oxides instead of separable ferromagnetic cores for the activating agents the positive effect are obtained. VET for 1 to 3 minutes yields boron-containing LRW cemented products of satisfactory quality. Silica addition at 10 % by weight will accelerate curing and solidification and to decrease radionuclide leaching rates from boron-containing cement products. (authors)

  18. Measurement of Peltier Heat at the Solid/Liquid Interface and Its Application to Crystal Growth I : Theoretical Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.H. [Chungju National University, Chungju (Korea); Jang, K.W. [Hanseo University,Seosan (Korea); Lee, D.H. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-11-01

    The Peltier heat absorbed or evolved at the solid/liquid interface in the unidirectional solidification process could contribute to the increase of temperature gradient in liquid and growth velocity, and the enhancement of crystal orientation. In this study, in order to measure the Peltier heat generated at the solid/liquid interface as a way of application to crystal growth, the thermoelectric effects were investigated on the temperature changes at the solid-and liquid-phase of the same material and its interface. Through the theoretical consideration, it was possible to separate sole Peltier, Thomson or Joule heat from the temperature changes due to current density, polarity, and temperature gradient. Thomson coefficient of solid- and liquid-phase as well as Peltier coefficient at the solid/liquid interface could be obtained. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Ultra Low Level Environmental Neutron Measurements Using Superheated Droplet Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, A.C. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10 - km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa. Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649- 003 Lisboa (Portugal); Felizardo, M.; Girard, T.A.; Kling, A.; Ramos, A.R. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa. Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649- 003 Lisboa (Portugal); Marques, J.G.; Prudencio, M.I.; Marques, R.; Carvalho, F.P. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10 - km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    Through the application of superheated droplet detectors (SDDs), the SIMPLE project for the direct search for dark matter (DM) reached the most restrictive limits on the spin-dependent sector to date. The experiment is based on the detection of recoils following WIMP-nuclei interaction, mimicking those from neutron scattering. The thermodynamic operation conditions yield the SDDs intrinsically insensitive to radiations with linear energy transfer below ∼150 keVμm{sup -1} such as photons, electrons, muons and neutrons with energies below ∼40 keV. Underground facilities are increasingly employed for measurements in a low-level radiation background (DM search, gamma-spectroscopy, intrinsic soft-error rate measurements, etc.), where the rock overburden shields against cosmic radiation. In this environment the SDDs are sensitive only to α-particles and neutrons naturally emitted from the surrounding materials. Recently developed signal analysis techniques allow discrimination between neutron and α-induced signals. SDDs are therefore a promising instrument for low-level neutron and α measurements, namely environmental neutron measurements and α-contamination assays. In this work neutron measurements performed in the challenging conditions of the latest SIMPLE experiment (1500 mwe depth with 50-75 cm water shield) are reported. The results are compared with those obtained by detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the neutron background induced by {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th traces in the facility, shielding and detector materials. Calculations of the neutron energy distribution yield the following neutron fluence rates (in 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}): thermal (<0.5 eV): 2.5; epithermal (0.5 eV-100 keV): 2.2; fast (>1 MeV): 3.9. Signal rates were derived using standard cross sections and codes routinely employed in reactor dosimetry. The measured and calculated neutron count rates per unit of active mass were 0.15 ct/kgd and 0.33 ct/kg-d respectively. As the major

  20. Attenuation length measurements of liquid scintillator with LabVIEW and reliability evaluation of the device

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, L; Ding, YY; Zhou, L; Wen, LJ; Xie, YG; Wang, ZG; Cai, X; Sun, XL; Fang, J; Xue, Z; Zhang, AW; LÜ, QW; Sun, LJ; Ge, YS; Liu, YB; Niu, SL; Hu, T; Cao, J; LÜ, JG

    2013-01-01

    The attenuation length measuring device was constructed by using oscilloscope and LabVIEW for signal acquisition and processing. The performance of the device has been tested with a variety of ways, the test results show that the set-up has a good stability and high precision (sigma/mean reached 0.4 percent). Besides, the accuracy of the measurement system will decrease by about 17 percent if a filter is used. The attenuation length of gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) was measured as 15.10 plus or minus 0.35 m where Gd-LS was heavily used in Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment. In addition, one method based on the Beer-Lambert law was proposed to investigate the reliability of the measurement device, the R-square reached 0.9995. Moreover, three purification methods for Linear Alkyl Benzene (LAB) production were compared in the experiment.

  1. LOW LEVEL LIQUID RADIOACTIVE WASTE TREATMENT AT MURMANSK, RUSSIA: FACILITY UPGRADE AND EXPANSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOWERMAN,B.; CZAJKOWSKI,C.; DYER,R.S.; SORLIE,A.

    2000-03-01

    Today there exist many almost overfilled storage tanks with liquid radioactive waste in the Russian Federation. This waste was generated over several years by the civil and military utilization of nuclear power. The current waste treatment capacity is either not available or inadequate. Following the London Convention, dumping of the waste in the Arctic seas is no longer an alternative. Waste is being generated from today's operations, and large volumes are expected to be generated from the dismantling of decommissioned nuclear submarines. The US and Norway have an ongoing co-operation project with the Russian Federation to upgrade and expand the capacity of a treatment facility for low level liquid waste at the RTP Atomflot site in Murmansk. The capacity will be increased from 1,200 m{sup 3}/year to 5,000 m{sup 3} /year. The facility will also be able to treat high saline waste. The construction phase will be completed the first half of 1998. This will be followed by a start-up and a one year post-construction phase, with US and Norwegian involvement for the entire project. The new facility will consist of 9 units containing various electrochemical, filtration, and sorbent-based treatment systems. The units will be housed in two existing buildings, and must meet more stringent radiation protection requirements that were not enacted when the facility was originally designed. The US and Norwegian technical teams have evaluated the Russian design and associated documentation. The Russian partners send monthly progress reports to US and Norway. Not only technical issues must be overcome but also cultural differences resulting from different methods of management techniques. Six to eight hour time differentials between the partners make real time decisions difficult and relying on electronic age tools becomes extremely important. Language difficulties is another challenge that must be solved. Finding a common vocabulary, and working through interpreters make the

  2. MEASUREMENT OF AGGLOMERATION ECONOMIES AT COUNTY LEVEL IN JIANGSU PROVINCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Ying; PU Ying-xia; YAO Shi-mou

    2005-01-01

    Agglomeration economies are the important factors for the regional development. However, the common indicators to measure them, such as Gini Coefficients neglect the spatial ingredient of data, leading to a-spatial estimates. In order to assess spatial neighbor effects of agglomeration economies, this study makes the new attempts by applying a series of techniques of spatial autocorrelation analysis, specifically, measuring the economies of urbanization and localization at the county level in the secondary and tertiary industries of Jiangsu Province in 1999 and 2002. The conclusions in this study reveal that on the whole, the localization effects on the economies of the secondary industry might be stronger than urbanization effects for that period, and highly agglomerative economies were limited within the southern Jiangsu and parts of middle along the Changjiang (Yangtze) River. Moreover, the tertiary industry has been strong urbanization rather than localization economies in the whole Jiangsu. Unlike the secondary industry, the tertiary industry held the high levels of agglomeration economies can be also found in the poor northern Jiangsu, and then the spatial clusters of trade and services might be basically seen in each of urban districts in 13 cities. All in all, spatial autocorrelation analysis is a better method to test agglomeration economies.

  3. Fiber-optic liquid level monitoring system using microstructured polymer fiber Bragg grating array sensors: performance analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, C. A. F.; Pospori, A.; Saez-Rodriguez, D.

    2015-01-01

    A highly sensitive liquid level monitoring system based on microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg grating (mPOFBG) array sensors is reported for the first time. The configuration is based on five mPOFBGs inscribed in the same fiber in the 850 nm spectral region, showing the potential to inte...

  4. Method development for liquid chromatographic/triple quadrupole mass spectrometric analysis of trace level perfluorocarboxylic acids in articles of commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    An analytical method to identify and quantify trace levels of C5 to C12 perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) in articles of commerce (AOC) is developed and rigorously validated. Solid samples were extracted in methanol, and liquid samples were diluted with a solvent consisting of 60...

  5. Measuring snow liquid water content with low-cost GPS receivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Franziska; Prasch, Monika; Schmid, Lino; Schweizer, Jürg; Mauser, Wolfram

    2014-11-06

    The amount of liquid water in snow characterizes the wetness of a snowpack. Its temporal evolution plays an important role for wet-snow avalanche prediction, as well as the onset of meltwater release and water availability estimations within a river basin. However, it is still a challenge and a not yet satisfyingly solved issue to measure the liquid water content (LWC) in snow with conventional in situ and remote sensing techniques. We propose a new approach based on the attenuation of microwave radiation in the L-band emitted by the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). For this purpose, we performed a continuous low-cost GPS measurement experiment at the Weissfluhjoch test site in Switzerland, during the snow melt period in 2013. As a measure of signal strength, we analyzed the carrier-to-noise power density ratio (C/N0) and developed a procedure to normalize these data. The bulk volumetric LWC was determined based on assumptions for attenuation, reflection and refraction of radiation in wet snow. The onset of melt, as well as daily melt-freeze cycles were clearly detected. The temporal evolution of the LWC was closely related to the meteorological and snow-hydrological data. Due to its non-destructive setup, its cost-efficiency and global availability, this approach has the potential to be implemented in distributed sensor networks for avalanche prediction or basin-wide melt onset measurements.

  6. Measuring Snow Liquid Water Content with Low-Cost GPS Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Koch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The amount of liquid water in snow characterizes the wetness of a snowpack. Its temporal evolution plays an important role for wet-snow avalanche prediction, as well as the onset of meltwater release and water availability estimations within a river basin. However, it is still a challenge and a not yet satisfyingly solved issue to measure the liquid water content (LWC in snow with conventional in situ and remote sensing techniques. We propose a new approach based on the attenuation of microwave radiation in the L-band emitted by the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS. For this purpose, we performed a continuous low-cost GPS measurement experiment at the Weissfluhjoch test site in Switzerland, during the snow melt period in 2013. As a measure of signal strength, we analyzed the carrier-to-noise power density ratio (C/N0 and developed a procedure to normalize these data. The bulk volumetric LWC was determined based on assumptions for attenuation, reflection and refraction of radiation in wet snow. The onset of melt, as well as daily melt-freeze cycles were clearly detected. The temporal evolution of the LWC was closely related to the meteorological and snow-hydrological data. Due to its non-destructive setup, its cost-efficiency and global availability, this approach has the potential to be implemented in distributed sensor networks for avalanche prediction or basin-wide melt onset measurements.

  7. Distinguishing Functional DNA Words; A Method for Measuring Clustering Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddasi, Hanieh; Khalifeh, Khosrow; Darooneh, Amir Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Functional DNA sub-sequences and genome elements are spatially clustered through the genome just as keywords in literary texts. Therefore, some of the methods for ranking words in texts can also be used to compare different DNA sub-sequences. In analogy with the literary texts, here we claim that the distribution of distances between the successive sub-sequences (words) is q-exponential which is the distribution function in non-extensive statistical mechanics. Thus the q-parameter can be used as a measure of words clustering levels. Here, we analyzed the distribution of distances between consecutive occurrences of 16 possible dinucleotides in human chromosomes to obtain their corresponding q-parameters. We found that CG as a biologically important two-letter word concerning its methylation, has the highest clustering level. This finding shows the predicting ability of the method in biology. We also proposed that chromosome 18 with the largest value of q-parameter for promoters of genes is more sensitive to dietary and lifestyle. We extended our study to compare the genome of some selected organisms and concluded that the clustering level of CGs increases in higher evolutionary organisms compared to lower ones. PMID:28128320

  8. Distinguishing Functional DNA Words; A Method for Measuring Clustering Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddasi, Hanieh; Khalifeh, Khosrow; Darooneh, Amir Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Functional DNA sub-sequences and genome elements are spatially clustered through the genome just as keywords in literary texts. Therefore, some of the methods for ranking words in texts can also be used to compare different DNA sub-sequences. In analogy with the literary texts, here we claim that the distribution of distances between the successive sub-sequences (words) is q-exponential which is the distribution function in non-extensive statistical mechanics. Thus the q-parameter can be used as a measure of words clustering levels. Here, we analyzed the distribution of distances between consecutive occurrences of 16 possible dinucleotides in human chromosomes to obtain their corresponding q-parameters. We found that CG as a biologically important two-letter word concerning its methylation, has the highest clustering level. This finding shows the predicting ability of the method in biology. We also proposed that chromosome 18 with the largest value of q-parameter for promoters of genes is more sensitive to dietary and lifestyle. We extended our study to compare the genome of some selected organisms and concluded that the clustering level of CGs increases in higher evolutionary organisms compared to lower ones.

  9. The measurement of carbon dioxide levels in a city canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jenny; Budinov, Daniel; Robinson, Iain; Jack, James

    2016-10-01

    Cities today have two major environmental concerns - carbon emissions and air quality. Global carbon levels are increasing and cities require to show plans to tackle and reduce the amount of carbon which they are emitting. At present carbon emissions in urban areas are calculated rather than measured. In some cities where industrial activity is not carbon intensive, the major contributors are the burning of fuel for heating and the emissions from vehicles. Air quality levels have a direct impact on human health and cities are under increased pressure to demonstrate plans to control and reduce levels of air pollution. Of great importance is the way in which emissions, both carbon rich emissions and pollutants, disperse in a city environment. Little work has been reported on the movement of CO2 in the urban environment and the effect the structure of the environment exerts on the movement and dispersion. This paper describes an investigation into the dispersion of CO2 within an urban environment in the Old Town of the City of Edinburgh, using a hand carried low cost portable CO2 sensor.

  10. Electric Sensors for Express-Method Checking of Liquid Quality Level Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro STOLYARCHUK

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The research covered in the suggested article is meant for ecological monitoring in the broad sense. The express-method of water solution quality level estimation and the technique of fast response to the quality level of industrial, agricultural and domestic wastewaters along with food products are proposed. The novelty of the proposed technique roots in the implementation of suggested methods and means of electric parameter measurement aimed at the quality index controlling of nonelectric qualimetry objects. Relevant research includes the exploration of water-solutions as well as different-level purification of industrial and domestic spillage waters, colloid solutions (cream, milk with the known contaminants, mixtures of superficially active substances and chlorine-containing substances.

  11. Susceptibility Measurements Near the He-3 Liquid-Gas Critical Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin; Zhong, Fang; Hahn, Inseob

    2000-01-01

    An experiment is now being developed to measure both the linear susceptibility and specific heat at constant volume near the liquid-gas critical point of He-3 in a microgravity environment. An electrostriction technique for measuring susceptibility will be described. Initial electrostriction measurements were performed on the ground along the critical isochore in a 0.5 mm high measurement cell filled to within 0.1 % of the critical density. These measurements agreed with the susceptibility determined from pressure-density measurements along isotherms. The critical temperature, T(sub c), determined separately from specific heat and susceptibility measurements was self-consistent. Susceptibility measurements in the range t = T/T(sub c) - 1 > 10(exp -4)were fit to Chi(sup *)(sub T) = Gamma(sup +)t(exp -lambda)(1 + Gamma(sup +)(sub 1)t(sup delta). Best fit parameters for the asymptotic amplitude Gamma(sup +) and the first Wegner amplitude Gamma(sup +)(sub 1) will be presented and compared to previous measurements.

  12. Effects of Hemoglobin Variants on Hemoglobin A1c Values Measured Using a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-La-Iglesia, Silvia; Ropero, Paloma; Nogueira-Salgueiro, Patricia; Santana-Benitez, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is routinely used to monitor long-term glycemic control and for diagnosing diabetes mellitus. However, hemoglobin (Hb) gene variants/modifications can affect the accuracy of some methods. The potential effect of Hb variants on HbA1c measurements was investigated using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method compared with an immunoturbimetric assay. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c levels were measured in 42 371 blood samples. Samples producing abnormal chromatograms were further analyzed to characterize any Hb variants. Fructosamine levels were determined in place of HbA1c levels when unstable Hb variants were identified. Abnormal HPLC chromatograms were obtained for 160 of 42 371 samples. In 26 samples HbS was identified and HbA1c results correlated with FPG. In the remaining 134 samples HbD, Hb Louisville, Hb Las Palmas, Hb N-Baltimore, or Hb Porto Alegre were identified and HbA1c did not correlate with FPG. These samples were retested using an immunoturbidimetric assay and the majority of results were accurate; only 3 (with the unstable Hb Louisville trait) gave aberrant HbA1c results. Hb variants can affect determination of HbA1c levels with some methods. Laboratories should be aware of Hb variants occurring locally and choose an appropriate HbA1c testing method. PMID:25355712

  13. Measurement of photoelectron yield of the CDEX-10 liquid argon detector prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing-Hao; Yue, Qian; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Kang, Ke-Jun; Li, Yuan-Jing; Lin, Shin-Ted; Tang, Chang-Jian; Xing, Hao-Yang; Yu, Xun-Zhen; Zeng, Ming; Zhu, Jing-Jun

    2016-11-01

    The China Dark Matter Experiment (CDEX) is a low background experiment at China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL) designed to directly detect dark matter with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In the second phase, CDEX-10, which has a 10 kg germanium array detector system, a liquid argon (LAr) anti-Compton active shielding and cooling system is proposed. To study the properties of the LAr detector, a prototype with an active volume of 7 liters of liquid argon was built and operated. The photoelectron yields, as a critically important parameter for the prototype detector, have been measured to be 0.051-0.079 p.e./keV for 662 keV γ rays at different positions. The good agreement between the experimental and simulation results has provided a reasonable understanding and determination of the important parameters such as the surviving fraction of the excimers, the absorption length for 128 nm photons in liquid argon, the reflectivity of Teflon and so on.

  14. A method for measurement of the bubble formation threshold in biological liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorno, L; Kornum, L O; Krag, P; Nielsen, C H; Paulev, P E

    1977-06-01

    Liquid under pressure is saturated with a given gas, such as argon, nitrogen, or air, by circulation through a column of gas exchangers. A sample of the gas-saturated liquid is isolated in a test chamber, the volume of which can be increased by means of a moving piston. The piston motion is cyclical with a variable frequency. Pressure in the test chamber is measured by means of a capacitive pressure pick-up. When the volume increase of the gas-saturated liquid in the test chamber is compensated for by the development of gas phase bubbles, the pressure decrease will stop; the recording device will show a pressure plateau, or a dip in the pressure-time course, depending on the velocity of the growth of the bubbles. Bubble formation threshold was independent of the frequency of the piston movement within frequency limits from 1 Hz down to 10(-3) Hz. Most experiements were carried out at a single frequency of 0.5 Hz. This new method appears to have advantages over previous ones.

  15. Gas-liquid Phase Distribution and Void Fraction Measurements Using the MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daidzic, N. E.; Schmidt, E.; Hasan, M. M.; Altobelli, S.

    2004-01-01

    We used a permanent-magnet MRI system to estimate the integral and spatially- and/or temporally-resolved void-fraction distributions and flow patterns in gas-liquid two-phase flows. Air was introduced at the bottom of the stagnant liquid column using an accurate and programmable syringe pump. Air flow rates were varied between 1 and 200 ml/min. The cylindrical non-conducting test tube in which two-phase flow was measured was placed in a 2.67 kGauss MRI with MRT spectrometer/imager. Roughly linear relationship has been obtained for the integral void-fraction, obtained by volume-averaging of the spatially-resolved signals, and the air flow rate in upward direction. The time-averaged spatially-resolved void fraction has also been obtained for the quasi-steady flow of air in a stagnant liquid column. No great accuracy is claimed as this was an exploratory proof-of-concept type of experiment. Preliminary results show that MRI a non-invasive and non-intrusive experimental technique can indeed provide a wealth of different qualitative and quantitative data and is especially well suited for averaged transport processes in adiabatic and diabatic multi-phase and/or multi-component flows.

  16. Oil Concentration Measurement In Saturated Liquid Refrigerant Flowing Inside A Refrigeration Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Morvan

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available

    An ultrasonic device was calibrated to measure in situ and in real time the polyol ester oil (POE concentration of the refrigerant liquid R 410A. The first part of this paper is devoted to the properties of the mixture, to the effects of the presence of oil on the speed of sound in the liquid phase and to the calibration and validation procedures carried out with a saturated liquid refrigerant. In order to have a number of calibration points that is not too large, it is necessary to maintain the mixture as close as possible to saturation conditions, which constrains the choice of the location of the sensor on the installation investigated. In the second part, the first results obtained on this installation are presented. It appears that the speed of sound in the POE / R 410A mixture is a strong function of the temperature and oil concentration, as was expected, but it also significantly depends on the pressure. Consequently, if the use of a sensor in a sub-cooled area is considered, additional calibration and validation procedures are necessary.

    • This paper was presented at the ECOS'00 Conference in Enschede, July 5-7, 2000 

  17. Limiting activity coefficients and gas-liquid partition coefficients of various solutes in piperidinium ionic liquids: measurements and LSER calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduszyński, Kamil; Domańska, Urszula

    2011-06-30

    This paper is a continuation of our systematic investigations on piperidinium ionic liquids and presents new data on activity coefficients at infinite dilution for 43 solutes: linear and branched alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkynes, benzene, alkylbenzenes, alcohols, water, thiophene, tetrahyrdofuran (THF), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), linear ethers, acetone, and linear ketones in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methyl-piperidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [BMPIP][NTf2]. The data were determined by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) at temperatures from 308.15 to 358.15 K. These values were compared to those previously published for the bis-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-based ionic liquids. The partial molar excess enthalpies ΔH1(E,∞) and entropies ΔS1(E,∞) at infinite dilution were calculated from the experimental γ13(∞) values obtained over the temperature range. The values of the selectivities for different separation problems were calculated from γ13(∞) and compared to literature values for N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), sulfolane, and additional ionic liquids. Experimental limiting activity coefficients were used to calculate gas-IL partition coefficients of solutes, K(L). The modeling with specific linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) equations was performed for data obtained in this work and those reported earlier for 1-butyl-1-methylpiperidinium thiocyanate, [BMPIP][SCN].

  18. Rigorous evaluation of chemical measurement uncertainty: liquid chromatographic analysis methods using detector response factor calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, Blaza; Nelson, Michael A.; Bedner, Mary

    2017-06-01

    Chemical measurement methods are designed to promote accurate knowledge of a measurand or system. As such, these methods often allow elicitation of latent sources of variability and correlation in experimental data. They typically implement measurement equations that support quantification of effects associated with calibration standards and other known or observed parametric variables. Additionally, multiple samples and calibrants are usually analyzed to assess accuracy of the measurement procedure and repeatability by the analyst. Thus, a realistic assessment of uncertainty for most chemical measurement methods is not purely bottom-up (based on the measurement equation) or top-down (based on the experimental design), but inherently contains elements of both. Confidence in results must be rigorously evaluated for the sources of variability in all of the bottom-up and top-down elements. This type of analysis presents unique challenges due to various statistical correlations among the outputs of measurement equations. One approach is to use a Bayesian hierarchical (BH) model which is intrinsically rigorous, thus making it a straightforward method for use with complex experimental designs, particularly when correlations among data are numerous and difficult to elucidate or explicitly quantify. In simpler cases, careful analysis using GUM Supplement 1 (MC) methods augmented with random effects meta analysis yields similar results to a full BH model analysis. In this article we describe both approaches to rigorous uncertainty evaluation using as examples measurements of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in solution reference materials via liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection (LC-UV) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometric detection using isotope dilution (LC-IDMS).

  19. Rigorous evaluation of chemical measurement uncertainty: Liquid chromatographic analysis methods using detector response factor calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, Blaza; Nelson, Michael A; Bedner, Mary

    2017-06-01

    Chemical measurement methods are designed to promote accurate knowledge of a measurand or system. As such, these methods often allow elicitation of latent sources of variability and correlation in experimental data. They typically implement measurement equations that support quantification of effects associated with calibration standards and other known or observed parametric variables. Additionally, multiple samples and calibrants are usually analyzed to assess accuracy of the measurement procedure and repeatability by the analyst. Thus, a realistic assessment of uncertainty for most chemical measurement methods is not purely bottom-up (based on the measurement equation) or top-down (based on the experimental design), but inherently contains elements of both. Confidence in results must be rigorously evaluated for the sources of variability in all of the bottom-up and top-down elements. This type of analysis presents unique challenges due to various statistical correlations among the outputs of measurement equations. One approach is to use a Bayesian hierarchical (BH) model which is intrinsically rigorous, thus making it a straightforward method for use with complex experimental designs, particularly when correlations among data are numerous and difficult to elucidate or explicitly quantify. In simpler cases, careful analysis using GUM Supplement 1 (MC) methods augmented with random effects meta analysis yields similar results to a full BH model analysis. In this article we describe both approaches to rigorous uncertainty evaluation using as examples measurements of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in solution reference materials via liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection (LC-UV) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometric detection using isotope dilution (LC-IDMS).

  20. Highly sensitive liquid-level sensor based on dual-wavelength double-ring fiber laser assisted by beat frequency interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yi; Sun, Qizhen; Tan, Sisi; Wo, Jianghai; Zhang, Jiejun; Liu, Deming

    2012-12-01

    A highly sensitive liquid-level sensor based on dual-wavelength single-longitudinal-mode fiber laser is proposed and demonstrated. The laser is formed by exploiting two parallel arranged phase-shift fiber Bragg gratings (ps-FBGs), acting as ultra-narrow bandwidth filters, into a double-ring resonators. By beating the dual-wavelength lasing output, a stable microwave signal with frequency stability better than 5 MHz is obtained. The generated beat frequency varies with the change of dual-wavelength spacing. Based on this characteristic, with one ps-FBG serving as the sensing element and the other one acting as the reference element, a highly sensitive liquid level sensor is realized by monitoring the beat frequency shift of the laser. The sensor head is directly bonded to a float which can transfer buoyancy into axial strain on the fiber without introducing other elastic elements. The experimental results show that an ultra-high liquid-level sensitivity of 2.12 × 10(7) MHz/m within the measurement range of 1.5 mm is achieved. The sensor presents multiple merits including ultra-high sensitivity, thermal insensitive, good reliability and stability.

  1. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield and scintillation pulse shape from nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, H.; Alexander, T.; Aprahamian, A.; Avetisyan, R.; Back, H. O.; Cocco, A. G.; DeJongh, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, Y.; Kendziora, C.; Lippincott, W. H.; Love, C.; Lyons, S.; Manenti, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meng, Y.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Olvitt, D.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Rossi, B.; Saldanha, R.; Sangiorgio, S.; Siegl, K.; Strauss, S. Y.; Tan, W.; Tatarowicz, J.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Yoo, J.

    2015-05-01

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V / cm . For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V / cm . We also report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83 m Kr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207 Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons ( N ex ) and ion pairs ( N i ) and their ratio ( N ex / N i ) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  2. Interferometer for Measuring Fast Changes of Refractive Index and Temperature in Transparent Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Hussmann, E. K.; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A double‐beam interferometer has been designed for detecting changes of refractive index in transparent liquids associated with the absorption of ionizing radiation energy, due to short electron beam pulses from an accelerator. The response time of the interferometer is less than 0.2 μsec......, and refractive index changes of the order of 10−7 can be measured, corresponding to a temperature change of ∼10−3  °C and an absorbed dose in water of ∼350 rad. The interferometer can be used as either a real‐time or integrating radiation dosimeter, if the temperature coefficient of the refractive index (dn...

  3. Measurement and Correlation of the Ionic Conductivity of Ionic Liquid-Molecular Solvent Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Wen-Jing; HAN,Bu-Xing; TAO,Ran-Ting; ZHANG,Zhao-Fu; ZHANG,Jian-Ling

    2007-01-01

    The ionic conductivity of the solutions formed from 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Bmim][BF4]) or 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Bmim][PF6]) and different molecular solvents (MSs) were measured at 298.15 K. The molar conductivity of the ionic liquids (ILs) increased dramatically with increasing concentration of the MSs. It was found that the molar conductivity of the IL in the solutions studied in this work could be well correlated by the molar conductivity of the neat ILs and the dielectric constant and molar volume of the MSs.

  4. A new method for measuring concentration of a fluorescent tracer in bubbly gas-liquid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddas, J. S.; Trägårdh, C.; Kovacs, T.; Östergren, K.

    2002-06-01

    A new experimental model, the two-tracer method (TTM), based on the planar laser-induced fluorescence technique (PLIF), is presented for the measurement of the local concentration of a fluorescent tracer in the liquid phase of a bubbly two-phase system. Light scattering and shading effects due to the bubbles were compensated for using the new model. The TTM results were found to give more accurate predictions of the local concentration than the normal PLIF method in a bubbly two-phase system.

  5. Absolute Equation of State Measurements on Shocked Liquid Deuterium up to 200GPa (2Mbar)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L.; Celliers, P.; Collins, G.; Budil, K.; Holmes, N.; Barbee, T. Jr.; Hammel, B.; Kilkenny, J.; Wallace, R.; Ross, M.; Cauble, R. [Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Ng, A.; Chiu, G. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    1997-01-01

    We present results of the first measurements of density, shock speed, and particle speed in liquid deuterium compressed by laser-generated shock waves to pressures from 25 to 210Gpa (0.25 to 2.1Mbar). The data show a significant increase in D{sub 2} compressibility above 50Gpa compared to a widely used equation of state model. The data strongly suggest a thermal molecular dissociation transition of the diatomic fluid into a monatomic phase. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Measurement of the properties of liquids and gases using a transient hot-wire technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, J R; Mulligan, J C

    1978-10-01

    A transient method of making simultaneous, in situ measurements of the thermal conductivity, volumetric specific heat, and kinematic viscosity of liquids and gases is presented. The technique utilizes the temperature response record of a fine horizontal wire, functioning as a resistance thermometer, when subjected to a sudden and constant electrical heating. It is shown that a formulation of the transient mechanisms governing the transition from pure conductive to free convective heat transfer from the wire can be used to produce simultaneous determinations of fluid properties from a single wire temperature versus time record. A simple apparatus is presented, along with the results of its use in determining the properties of air.

  7. An in-situ RBS system for measuring nuclides adsorbed at the liquid-solid interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, K.; Yuhara, J.; Ishigami, R. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Engineering] [and others

    1997-03-01

    An in-situ RBS system has been developed in which heavier nuclides adsorbed at the inner surface of a thin lighter window specimen of liquid container in order to determine the rate constants for their sorption and release at the interface. The testing of a thin silicon window of the sample assembly, in which Xe gas of one atmosphere was enclosed, against the bombardment of the probing ion beam has been performed. A desorption behavior of a lead layer adsorbed at the SiO{sub 2} layer of silicon window surface into deionized water has been measured as a preliminary experiment. (author)

  8. The Measurement of Wall Shear Stress in the Low-Viscosity Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamec J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on quantitative evaluation of the value of the wall shear stress in liquids with low viscosity by means of the method of the hot film anemometry in a laminar and turbulent flow. Two systems for calibration of probes are described in the paper. The first of these uses an innovative method of probe calibration using a known flow in a cylindrical gap between two concentric cylinders where the inner cylinder is rotated and a known velocity profile and shear rate, or shear stress profile, is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations. This method is usable for lower values of the wall shear stress, particularly in the areas of laminar flow. The second method is based on direct calibration of the probes using a floating element. This element, with a size of 120x80 mm, is part of a rectangular channel. This method of calibration enables the probe calibration at higher shear rates and is applicable also to turbulent flow. Values obtained from both calibration methods are also compared with results of measurements of the wall shear stress in a straight smooth channel for a certain range of Reynolds numbers and compared with analytical calculations. The accuracy of the method and the influence of various parasitic phenomena on the accuracy of the measured results were discussed. The paper describes in particular the influence of geometric purity of the probe location, the impact of various transfer phenomena, requirements for the measured liquid and layout of the experiment.

  9. Adaptation of a High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography System for the Measurement of Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The state-of-the-art instruments for the determination of viscosity of liquids typically require a significant amount of sample, and have relatively low throughput due to manual and sequential measurements. In this study, it was demonstrated that the pressure generated by the flow of viscous fluids through a capillary could be precisely measured employing high-pressure liquid chromatography systems (HPLC using glycerol solutions of moderate viscosity as a mobile phase, and correlated to the dynamic (absolute viscosity. The parameters allowing calculation of the viscosity of glycerol calibration standards as a function of temperature were established. The measurements were made with volumes as small as 10 μL, and the use of an autosampler permitted unattended analysis of a large number samples. The method appears to be particularly well suited for the development of viscous formulations of therapeutic, protein-based macromolecules, where the amount sample is typically limited and relatively wide ranges of conditions are considered in the optimization process. The utility of the methods was illustrated by application to the development of concentrated inactivated virus vaccines.

  10. Method to measure the phase modulation characteristics of a liquid crystal spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunlong; Nie, Jinsong; Shao, Li

    2016-11-01

    The universal liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) is widely used in many aspects of optical studies. The working principles and applications of LC-SLM were introduced briefly. The traditional Twyman-Green interference method, which was used to measure the phase modulation characteristics of a liquid spatial light modulator, had some obvious disadvantages in practice. To avoid these issues, the traditional Twyman-Green interference method was improved. Also, a new method to process interference fringes and measure the shift distances and cycles automatically by computers was proposed. The phase modulation characteristics of P512-1064 LC-SLM produced by the Meadowlark Company were measured to verify the validity of the newly proposed method. In addition, in order to compensate and correct the nonlinear characteristics of the phase modulation curve, three universal inverse interpolation methods were utilized. The root mean squared error and residual sum of squares between the calibrated phase modulation curve and the ideal phase modulation curve were reduced obviously by taking advantage of the inverse interpolation methods. Subsequently, the method of shape-preserving subsection cubic interpolation had acquired the best performance with high computation efficiency. Experiments have been performed to verify the validity of the interpolation method. The experimental results showed that the phase modulation characteristics of LC-LSM could be acquired and calibrated automatically with convenience and high efficiency by utilizing the newly proposed processing method.

  11. Measurement of temperature gradient in a heated liquid cylinder using rainbow refractometry assisted with infrared thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Feihu; Xu, Chuanlong; Wang, Shimin; Li, Zhenfeng

    2016-12-01

    In a heated liquid cylinder, a temperature gradient exists between the hotter surface and the colder core. Measurement of the temperature gradient is very important for the in-depth investigation into the mechanism and optimized control of the heat transfer process. Rainbow refractometry has been attempted to achieve the measurement since several years ago. Yet there is no effective inversion algorithm without predicting refractive index profiles based on experience. In the paper, an improved rainbow refractometry assisted with infrared thermometry was proposed to measure the diameter and the inside temperature gradient of a heated liquid cylinder. The inversion algorithm was designed based on the nonlinear least square method and an optimization process. To evaluate the feasibility of the proposed method, numerical simulations and experiments were carried out. The results of the numerical simulation showed that the relative error of the inversion diameter was about 1%, and the error of the refractive index was less than 6×10-4 at all the radial locations. In the experimental research, t rainbows reconstructed with the reversion parameters were all similar to the corresponding captured ones.

  12. Quenching measurements and modeling of a boron-loaded organic liquid scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerdale, S.; Xu, J.; Shields, E.; Froborg, F.; Calaprice, F.; Alexander, T.; Aprahamian, A.; Back, H. O.; Casarella, C.; Fang, X.; Gupta, Y. K.; Lamere, E.; Liu, Q.; Lyons, S.; Smith, M.; Tan, W.

    2017-08-01

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in a wide variety of applications in experimental nuclear and particle physics. Boron-loaded scintillators are particularly useful for detecting neutron captures, due to the high thermal neutron capture cross section of 10B. These scintillators are commonly used in neutron detectors, including the DarkSide-50 neutron veto, where the neutron may produce a signal when it scatters o protons in the scintillator or when it captures on 10B. Reconstructing the energy of these recoils is complicated by scintillation quenching. Understanding how nuclear recoils are quenched in these scintillators is an important and dicult problem. In this article, we present a set of measurements of neutron-induced proton recoils in a boron-loaded organic liquid scintillator at recoil energies ranging from 57-467 keV, and we compare these measurements to predictions from different quenching models. We and that a modified Birks' model whose denominator is quadratic in dE=dx best describes the measurements, with χ2/NDF = 1:6. This result will help model nuclear recoil scintillation in similar detectors and can be used to improve their neutron tagging efficiency.

  13. Quenching Measurements and Modeling of a Boron-Loaded Organic Liquid Scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerdale, Shawn [Princeton U.; Xu, Jingke [Princeton U.; Shields, Emily [Princeton U.; Froborg, Francis [Princeton U.; Calaprice, Frank [Princeton U.; Alexander, Thomas [Fermilab; Aprahamian, Ani [Notre Dame U.; Back, Henning O. [Princeton U.; Casarella, Clark [Notre Dame U.; Fang, Xiao [Notre Dame U.; Gupta, Yogesh K. [Notre Dame U.; Lamere, Edward [Notre Dame U.; Liu, Qian [Notre Dame U.; Lyons, Stephanie [Notre Dame U.; Smith, Mallory [Notre Dame U.; Tan, Wanpeng [Notre Dame U.

    2017-03-18

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in a wide variety of applications in experimental nuclear and particle physics. Boron-loaded scintillators are particularly useful for detecting neutron captures, due to the high thermal neutron capture cross section of $^{10}$B. These scintillators are commonly used in neutron detectors, including the DarkSide-50 neutron veto, where the neutron may produce a signal when it scatters off protons in the scintillator or when it captures on $^{10}$B. Reconstructing the energy of these recoils is complicated by scintillation quenching. Understanding how nuclear recoils are quenched in these scintillators is an important and difficult problem. In this article, we present a set of measurements of neutron-induced proton recoils in a boron-loaded organic liquid scintillator at recoil energies ranging from 57--467 keV, and we compare these measurements to predictions from different quenching models. We find that a modified Birks' model whose denominator is quadratic in $dE/dx$ best describes the measurements, with $\\chi^2$/NDF$=1.6$. This result will help model nuclear recoil scintillation in similar detectors and can be used to improve their neutron tagging efficiency.

  14. High frequency electric field levels: An example of determination of measurement uncertainty for broadband measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulević Branislav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining high frequency electromagnetic field levels in urban areas represents a very complex task, having in mind the exponential growth of the number of sources embodied in public cellular telephony systems in the past twenty years. The main goal of this paper is a representation of a practical solution in the evaluation of measurement uncertainty for in-situ measurements in the case of spatial averaging. An example of the estimation of the uncertainty for electric field strength broadband measurements in the frequency range from 3 MHz to 18 GHz is presented.

  15. Investigation on Effect of Gravity Level on Bubble Distribution and Liquid Turbulence Modification for Horizontal Channel Bubbly Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, M. J.; Wei, J. J.; Yu, B.

    2017-08-01

    Bubbly flows in the horizontal channel or pipe are often seen in industrial engineering fields, so it is very necessary to fully understand hydrodynamics of horizontal bubbly flows so as to improve industrial efficiency and to design an efficient bubbly system. In this paper, in order to fully understand mechanisms of phase distribution and liquid-phase turbulence modulation in the horizontal channel bubbly flow, the influence of gravity level on both of them were investigated in detail with the developed Euler-Lagrange two-way coupling method. For the present investigation, the buoyance on bubbles in both sides of the channel always points to the corresponding wall in order to study the liquid-phase turbulence modulation by bubbles under the symmetric physical condition. The present investigation shows that the gravity level has the important influence on the wall-normal distribution of bubbles and the liquid-phase turbulence modulation; the higher the gravity level is, the more bubbles can overcome the wall-normal resistance to accumulate near the wall, and the more obvious the liquid-phase turbulence modulation is. It is also discovered that interphase forces on the bubbles are various along the wall-normal direction, which leads to the fact that the bubble located in different wall-normal places has a different wall-normal velocity.

  16. Thrust measurement method verification and analytical studies on a liquid-fueled pulse detonation engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Jie

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to test the feasibility of a new thrust stand system based on impulse thrust measurement method, a liquid-fueled pulse detonation engine (PDE is designed and built. Thrust performance of the engine is obtained by direct thrust measurement with a force transducer and indirect thrust measurement with an eddy current displacement sensor (ECDS. These two sets of thrust data are compared with each other to verify the accuracy of the thrust performance. Then thrust data measured by the new thrust stand system are compared with the verified thrust data to test its feasibility. The results indicate that thrust data from the force transducer and ECDS system are consistent with each other within the range of measurement error. Though the thrust data from the impulse thrust measurement system is a litter lower than that from the force transducer due to the axial momentum losses of the detonation jet, the impulse thrust measurement method is valid when applied to measure the averaged thrust of PDE. Analytical models of PDE are also discussed in this paper. The analytical thrust performance is higher than the experimental data due to ignoring the losses during the deflagration to detonation transition process. Effect of equivalence ratio on the engine thrust performance is investigated by utilizing the modified analytical model. Thrust reaches maximum at the equivalence ratio of about 1.1.

  17. Thrust measurement method verification and analytical studies on a liquid-fueled pulse detonation engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Jie; Zheng Longxi; Wang Zhiwu; Peng Changxin; Chen Xinggu

    2014-01-01

    In order to test the feasibility of a new thrust stand system based on impulse thrust mea-surement method, a liquid-fueled pulse detonation engine (PDE) is designed and built. Thrust per-formance of the engine is obtained by direct thrust measurement with a force transducer and indirect thrust measurement with an eddy current displacement sensor (ECDS). These two sets of thrust data are compared with each other to verify the accuracy of the thrust performance. Then thrust data measured by the new thrust stand system are compared with the verified thrust data to test its feasibility. The results indicate that thrust data from the force transducer and ECDS system are consistent with each other within the range of measurement error. Though the thrust data from the impulse thrust measurement system is a litter lower than that from the force transducer due to the axial momentum losses of the detonation jet, the impulse thrust measurement method is valid when applied to measure the averaged thrust of PDE. Analytical models of PDE are also discussed in this paper. The analytical thrust performance is higher than the experimental data due to ignor-ing the losses during the deflagration to detonation transition process. Effect of equivalence ratio on the engine thrust performance is investigated by utilizing the modified analytical model. Thrust reaches maximum at the equivalence ratio of about 1.1.

  18. FTS Measurements of Submillimeter-Wave Atmospheric Opacity at Pampa la Bola: III. Water Vapor, Liquid Water, and 183GHz Water Vapor Line Opacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Satoki; Matsuo, Hiroshi

    2003-02-01

    Further analysis has been made on the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave (100-1600GHz or 3mm-188 μm) atmospheric opacity data taken with the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) at Pampa la Bola, 4800 m above the sea level in northern Chile, which is the site of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Time-sequence plots of millimeter- and submillimeter-wave opacities show similar variations to each other, except for during the periods with liquid water (fog or clouds) in the atmosphere. Using millimeter- and submillimeter-wave opacity correlations under two conditions, which are affected and not affected by liquid water, we succeeded to separate the measured opacity into water vapor and liquid water opacity components. The water vapor opacity shows a good correlation with the 183GHz water vapor line opacity, which is also covered in the measured spectra. On the other hand, the liquid water opacity and the 183GHz line opacity show no correlation. S ince only the water vapor component is expected to affect the phase of interferometers significantly, and the submillimeter-wave opacity is less affected by the liquid water component, it may be possible to use the submillimeter-wave opacity for a phase correction of submillimeter interferometers.

  19. Simple field-based automated dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of trace level phthalate esters in natural waters with gas chromatography and mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Geng; Chen, Wenjin; Wang, Yong

    2016-09-01

    A small, simple, and field-based automated dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method followed by gas chromatography mass spectrometric analysis was developed for trace level phthalate esters analysis in natural waters. With a single syringe pump that is coupled with a multiposition valve, the whole extraction procedure including cleaning, sampling, mixing of extractant and disperser solvents, extraction, phase separation, and analytes collection was carried out in a totally automated way with a sample throughput of 21 h(-1) . Key factors, such as type and ratio of the extractant and disperser solvent, aspiration flow rate, extraction time, and matrix effect, were thoroughly investigated. Under the optimum conditions, linearity was found in the range from 0.03 to 60 μg/L. Limits of detection ranged from 0.0015 to 0.003 μg/L. Enrichment factors were in a range of 106-141. Reproducibility and recoveries were assessed by testing a series of three natural water samples that were spiked with different concentration levels. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied in analysis of real surface waters. The developed system is inexpensive, light (2.6 kg), simple to use, applicable in the field, with high sample throughput, and sensitive enough for trace level phthalate esters analysis in natural waters.

  20. Measurement of viscosity and shear wave velocity of a liquid or slurry for on-line process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Margaret Stautberg; Bamberger, Judith Ann

    2002-08-01

    An on-line sensor to measure the density of a liquid or slurry, based on longitudinal wave reflection at the solid-fluid interface, has been developed by the staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of this research is to employ shear wave reflection at the solid-fluid interface to provide an on-line measurement of viscosity as well. Both measurements are of great interest for process control in many industries. Shear wave reflection measurements were conducted for a variety of liquids. By analyzing multiple reflections within the solid (only 0.63 cm thick-similar to pipe wall thickness) we increased the sensitivity of the measurement. At the sixth echo, sensitivity was increased sufficiently and this echo was used for fluid interrogation. Shear wave propagation of ultrasound in liquids is dependent upon the viscosity and the shear modulus. The data are analyzed using the theory for light liquids (such as water and sugar water solutions) and also using the theory for highly viscous liquids (such as silicone oils). The results show that, for light liquids, the shear wave reflection measurements interrogate the viscosity. However, for highly viscous liquids, it is the shear wave modulus that dominates the shear wave reflection. Since the density is known, the shear wave velocity in the liquid can be determined from the shear wave modulus. The results show that shear wave velocities in silicone oils are very small and range from 315 to 2389 cm/s. Shear wave reflection measurements are perhaps the only way that shear wave velocity in liquids can be determined, because the shear waves in liquids are highly attenuated. These results show that, depending on the fluid characteristics, either the viscosity or the shear wave velocity can be used for process control. There are several novel features of this sensor: (1) The sensor can be mounted as part of the wall of a pipeline or tank or submerged in a tank. (2) The sensor is very compact and can be

  1. Measurements of the Coexistence Curve near the Liquid-Gas Critical Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Inseob

    2003-01-01

    The shape of the liquid-gas coexistence curve of He-3 very near the critical point (-2x10(exp -6) < t < -5x10(exp -3) was measured using the quasi-static thermogram method. The study was performed in Earth s gravitational field using two different height calorimetry cells, both originally designed for simultaneous measurements of the isochoric heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, and PVT. The heights of two cells were 0.5 mm and 4.8 cm. The uncertainty in measuring the phase transition temperature was typically +/-2 micro-K. The measured coexistence curve near the critical point was strongly affected by the gravitational field. Away from the critical point, the coexistence curve obtained using this technique was also consistent with the earlier work using the local density measurements of Pittman et al. The recent crossover parametric model of the equation-of-state are used to analyze the height-dependent measured coexistence curves. Data analyses have indicated that microgravity will permit measurements within two additional decades in reduced temperatures beyond the best gravity-free data obtained in Earth-bound experiments.

  2. Electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges over liquid water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeni Simeni, M.; Roettgen, A.; Petrishchev, V.; Frederickson, K.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    Time-resolved electron density, electron temperature, and gas temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium and O2-He mixtures near liquid water surface are measured using Thomson/pure rotational Raman scattering, in two different geometries, (a) ‘diffuse filament’ discharge between a spherical high-voltage electrode and a grounded pin electrode placed in a reservoir filled with distilled water, with the tip exposed, and (b) dielectric barrier discharge between the high-voltage electrode and the liquid water surface. A diffuse plasma filament generated between the electrodes in helium during the primary discharge pulse exhibits noticeable constriction during the secondary discharge pulse several hundred ns later. Adding oxygen to the mixture reduces the plasma filament diameter and enhances constriction during the secondary pulse. In the dielectric barrier discharge, diffuse volumetric plasma occupies nearly the entire space between the high voltage electrode and the liquid surface, and extends radially along the surface. In the filament discharge in helium, adding water to the container results in considerable reduction of plasma lifetime compared to the discharge in dry helium, by about an order of magnitude, indicating rapid electron recombination with water cluster ions. Peak electron density during the pulse is also reduced, by about a factor of two, likely due to dissociative attachment to water vapor during the discharge pulse. These trends become more pronounced as oxygen is added to the mixture, which increases net rate of dissociative attachment. Gas temperature during the primary discharge pulse remains near room temperature, after which it increases up to T ~ 500 K over 5 µs and decays back to near room temperature before the next discharge pulse several tens of ms later. As expected, electron density and electron temperature in diffuse DBD plasmas are considerably lower compared to peak values in the filament discharge. Use of Thomson

  3. High temperature radiance spectroscopy measurements of solid and liquid uranium and plutonium carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, D.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Tougait, O.; Eloirdi, R.; Malki, M.

    2012-07-01

    In this work, an experimental study of the radiance of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides at wavelengths 550 nm ⩽ λ ⩽ 920 nm is reported. A fast multi-channel spectro-pyrometer has been employed for the radiance measurements of samples heated up to and beyond their melting point by laser irradiation. The melting temperature of uranium monocarbide, soundly established at 2780 K, has been taken as a radiance reference. Based on it, a wavelength-dependence has been obtained for the high-temperature spectral emissivity of some uranium carbides (1 ⩽ C/U ⩽ 2). Similarly, the peritectic temperature of plutonium monocarbide (1900 K) has been used as a reference for plutonium monocarbide and sesquicarbide. The present spectral emissivities of solid uranium and plutonium carbides are close to 0.5 at 650 nm, in agreement with previous literature values. However, their high temperature behaviour, values in the liquid, and carbon-content and wavelength dependencies in the visible-near infrared range have been determined here for the first time. Liquid uranium carbide seems to interact with electromagnetic radiation in a more metallic way than does the solid, whereas a similar effect has not been observed for plutonium carbides. The current emissivity values have also been used to convert the measured radiance spectra into real temperature, and thus perform a thermal analysis of the laser heated samples. Some high-temperature phase boundaries in the systems U-C and Pu-C are shortly discussed on the basis of the current results.

  4. Temperature-Dependent Galvanomagnetic Measurements on Doped InSb and InAs Grown by Liquid Encapsulated Czochralski

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Kasap; S. Acar; S. (O)z(c)elik; S. Karadeniz2; N. Tu(g)luo(g)lu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Resistivity, magnetoresistivity and Hall effect measurements in n-type Te-doped InSb and S-doped InAs samples grown by the liquid encapsulated Czochralski technique were carried out as a function of temperature (14-350 K) and magnetic field (0-1.35 T). In Te-doped InSb, an impurity level with energy E1 -= 3 meV and the activation energy Eo =- 0.26 eV, which is the band gap energy, are obtained from the resistivity and Hall carrier concentration analysis. In S-doped InAs, both the linear and power law models are used in explaining the temperature-dependent resistivity. The effects of impurities on the electron and magnetic transportation properties of InAs and InSb have also been discussed.

  5. Relating Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Performance to Measurements in a Liquid Half Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christoffer Mølleskov; Tynelius, Oskar; Lund-Olesen, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) could act as a replacement for batteries in low power electronics. For instance, micro—DMFC’s could be used to power hearing instruments[1]. The power output of a DMFC is limited by the sluggish kinetics of both the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) on the anode......) in the presence of methanol. By comparing the two measurements, we make recommendations for performing liquid half-cell measurements under realistic conditions. [1] J.H. Hales, C. Kallesøe, T. Lund-Olesen, A.-C. Johansson, H.C. Fanøe, Y. Yu, et al., Micro fuel cells power the hearing aids of the future, Fuel...... allow further miniaturization or powering more advanced and more power hungry devices. The activity of fuel cell catalysts is often probed in the form of thin films in liquid half cells. However, it is challenging to mimic the conditions in an actual DMFC. On the other hand, it can also be problematic...

  6. Acoustic Monitor for Liquid-Solid Slurries Measurements at Low Weight Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taviarides, Lawrence L.

    2005-06-01

    Our effort in this project is to develop an acoustic monitor for accurate, real-time characterization of the size and weight fractions of solids in slurries for process monitoring and to determine the optimal timing for slurry transfers. This capability will be valuable in the Savannah River Site accelerated clean-up program. Our scientific work during the first research period developed a theory, supported by experiments, to describe sound attenuation of solids in suspensions in the presence of bubbles, which permits us to determine the solid-liquid weight percent. Engineering developments during the second research period led to the design, construction, and demonstration, in our laboratories, of the Syracuse Acoustic Monitor (SAM) system that measures weight percent solids accurately in slurries of 0.5 to 8.0 weight percent on-line and in real-time. Also, we had shown the potential for these measurements in solid-gas-liquid slurries by removing the interference due to the presence of gas bubbles.

  7. Optical absorbance measurements of opaque liquids by pulsed laser photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Thomas; Panne, Ulrich; Niessner, Reinhard; Haisch, Christoph

    2009-03-15

    In many relevant industrial applications, UV-vis online process monitoring is hampered by light scattering and opacity of the samples, whereas diluted and filtered samples are rarely available. Pulsed laser photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy allows the measurement of both high and low absorptions without any need for sample preparation. An optimized detection geometry for absorption measurements in opaque liquids is described. The proposed PA sensor was realized by using two orthogonal detectors based on piezoelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF). Laser-induced pressure waves were sensed perpendicularly to (side-on mode) and along the axis of the laser beam (forward mode). Pressure waves generated by a single laser pulse, optical transmission and absorption, as well as the speed of sound in liquid samples were determined simultaneously using time-resolved detection. Evaluation of the PA signal permits the determination of absorption coefficients ranging from 0.1 to 1000 cm(-1). The influence of absorbing or scattering compounds on the signal was investigated in dye solutions and suspensions of TiO(2) particles.

  8. Analysis and methodology for measuring oxygen concentration in liquid sodium with a plugging meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nollet, B. K.; Hvasta, M.; Anderson, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Oxygen concentration in liquid sodium is a critical measurement in assessing the potential for corrosion damage in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). There has been little recent work on sodium reactors and oxygen detection. Thus, the technical expertise dealing with oxygen measurements within sodium is no longer readily available in the U.S. Two methods of oxygen detection that have been investigated are the plugging meter and the galvanic cell. One of the overall goals of the Univ. of Wisconsin's sodium research program is to develop an affordable, reliable galvanic cell oxygen sensor. Accordingly, attention must first be dedicated to a well-known standard known as a plugging meter. Therefore, a sodium loop has been constructed on campus in effort to develop the plugging meter technique and gain experience working with liquid metal. The loop contains both a galvanic cell test section and a plugging meter test section. Consistent plugging results have been achieved below 20 [wppm], and a detailed process for achieving effective plugging has been developed. This paper will focus both on an accurate methodology to obtain oxygen concentrations from a plugging meter, and on how to easily control the oxygen concentration of sodium in a test loop. Details of the design, materials, manufacturing, and operation will be presented. Data interpretation will also be discussed, since a modern discussion of plugging data interpretation does not currently exist. (authors)

  9. Advances in High-Frequency Liquid Water Isotope Analyzer for Hydrological Measurements in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owano, T. G.; Berman, E. S.; Leen, J.; Baer, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of the stable isotope ratios of liquid water (δ2H and δ18O) allow determination of water flowpaths, residence times in catchments, and groundwater migration. In the past, discrete water samples have been collected and transported to an IRMS lab for isotope characterization. Due to the expense and labor associated with such sampling, isotope studies have thus been generally limited in scope and in temporal resolution. We report on the recent development of an improved field-portable Liquid Water Isotope Analyzer (LWIA) that accurately quantifies δ2H and δ18O of different natural water sources (e.g., rain, snow, streams and groundwater) at the unprecedented rate of over 1000 injections per day, which yields 166 total unknown and reference samples per day (132 unknown samples per day), or 1 measurement of an unknown sample every 10 minutes (with 6 injections per measurement). This fast time response provides isotope hydrologists with the capability to study dynamic changes in δ values quickly (minutes) and over long time scales (weeks, months), thus enabling studies of mixing dynamics in snowmelt, canopy throughfall, stream mixing, and allows for individual precipitation events to be independently studied. In addition, the new LWIA includes post-analysis software that significantly accelerates data processing and provides data visualization and diagnostics. This software automatically processes sample measurements recorded by the LWIA to calibrated delta values. In addition, new software tools allow post-processing of every injected sample to generate a spectral interference metric, which quantifies the likelihood of interferences from contaminants and can then generate a flag to notify the user when interfering contamination is likely. This technology detects both narrow and broadband absorption spectral interferences that may be generated by water samples containing contaminants such as methanol, ethanol, and others. The ability of the LWIA to

  10. Phase behaviour of macromolecular liquid crystalline materials. Computational studies at the molecular level

    CERN Document Server

    Stimson, L M

    2003-01-01

    Molecular simulations provide an increasingly useful insight into the static and dynamic characteristics of materials. In this thesis molecular simulations of macro-molecular liquid crystalline materials are reported. The first liquid crystalline material that has been investigated is a side chain liquid crystal polymer (SCLCP). In this study semi-atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted at a range of temperatures and an aligning potential has been applied to mimic the effect of a magnetic field. In cooling the SCLCP from an isotropic melt, microphase separation was observed yielding a domain structure. The application of a magnetic field to this structure aligns the domains producing a stable smectic mesophase. This is the first study in which mesophases have been observed using an off-lattice model of a SCLCP. The second material that has been investigated is a dendrimer with terminal mesogenic functionalization. Here, a multi-scale approach has been taken with Monte Carlo studies of a s...

  11. Measurement of Activity of Indium in Liquid Bi-In-Sn Alloys by EMF Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M. R.; Mohan, S.; Behera, C. K.

    2016-08-01

    The electrochemical technique based on a molten salt electrolyte galvanic cell has been used to measure the activity of indium in liquid Bi-In-Sn alloys in the temperature range of 723 K to 855 K along three ternary sections. The activity of tin in Bi-Sn binary alloys has also been measured by the same technique in the above temperature range. The activity of indium in Bi-In-Sn alloys shows negative deviation from Raoult's law for most of the compositions and slight positive deviations for a few indium-rich compositions. The ternary excess molar free energies have been calculated by Darken's treatment. Isoactivity curves at 813 K in the ternary Bi-In-Sn alloys were derived by combining the activity data of In-Sn and Bi-In alloys. The values of excess molar free energy obtained in this study are compared with those calculated from the Muggianu model at 813 K.

  12. Measurements of the Liquid Viscosities of Mixtures of Isobutane with Squalane to 30 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, A.; Tomida, D.; Yokoyama, C.

    2007-08-01

    The viscosities of liquid mixtures of isobutane with squalane, which seem to be representative of mixtures of refrigerants with refrigeration oil, were measured from 273.15 to 333.15 K at pressures to 30 MPa using a falling-body viscometer. The uncertainty of the measurements was estimated to be no larger than 2.9%. The experimental viscosity values were fitted with a Tait-like equation within 2.8%. There are large deviations between the experimental data and calculated values predicted by the equation of Kanti et al., which is derived from Flory’s theory. By introducing two index numbers of the energetic mixing rule into the equation, the predictions could be improved considerably.

  13. Measurement of the transverse diffusion coefficient of charge in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, W -T; Cussonneau, J -P; Donnard, J; Duval, S; Mohamad-Hadi, A -F; Lamblin, J; Lemaire, O; Ray, P Le; Morteau, E; Oger, T; Scotto-Lavina, L; Stutzmann, J -S; Thers, D

    2011-01-01

    Liquid xenon (LXe) is a very attractive material as a detection medium for ionization detectors due to its high density, high atomic number, and low energy required to produce electron-ion pairs. Therefore it has been used in several applications, like {\\gamma} detection or direct detection of dark matter. Now Subatech is working on the R & D of LXe Compton telescope for 3{\\gamma} medical imaging, which can make precise tridimensional localization of a ({\\beta}+, {\\gamma}) radioisotope emitter. The diffusion of charge carriers will directly affect the spatial resolution of LXe ionization signal. We will report how we measure the transverse diffusion coefficient for different electric field (0.5 ~ 1.2 kV/cm) by observing the spray of charge carriers on drift length varying until 12cm. With very-low-noise front-end electronics and complete Monte-Carlo simulation of the experiment, the values of transverse diffusion coefficient are measured precisely.

  14. Laser Spectrometric Measurement System for Local Express Diagnostics of Flame at Combustion of Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobtsev, V. D.; Kozlov, D. N.; Kostritsa, S. A.; Smirnov, V. V.; Stel'makh, O. M.; Tumanov, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    A laboratory laser spectrometric measurement system for investigation of spatial distributions of local temperatures in a flame at combustion of vapors of various liquid hydrocarbon fuels in oxygen or air at atmospheric pressure is presented. The system incorporates a coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectrometer with high spatial resolution for local thermometry of nitrogen-containing gas mixtures in a single laser shot and a continuous operation burner with a laminar diffusion flame. The system test results are presented for measurements of spatial distributions of local temperatures in various flame zones at combustion of vapor—gas n-decane/nitrogen mixtures in air. Its applicability for accomplishing practical tasks in comparative laboratory investigation of characteristics of various fuels and for research on combustion in turbulent flames is discussed.

  15. Photoacoustically Measured Speeds of Sound of Liquid HBO2: On Unlocking the Fuel Potential of Boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S; Crowhurst, J; Armstrong, M; ., N T

    2010-03-24

    Elucidation of geodynamic, geochemical, and shock induced processes is often limited by challenges to accurately determine molecular fluid equations of state (EOS). High pressure liquid state reactions of carbon species underlie physiochemical mechanisms such as differentiation of planetary interiors, deep carbon sequestration, propellant deflagration, and shock chemistry. Here we introduce a versatile photoacoustic technique developed to measure accurate and precise speeds of sound (SoS) of high pressure molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. SoS of an intermediate boron oxide, HBO{sub 2} are measured up to 0.5 GPa along the 277 C isotherm. A polarized Exponential-6 interatomic potential form, parameterized using our SoS data, enables EOS determinations and corresponding semi-empirical evaluations of > 2000 C thermodynamic states including energy release from bororganic formulations. Our thermochemical model propitiously predicts boronated hydrocarbon shock Hugoniot results.

  16. Application of pulse decay discrimination liquid scintillation counting for indoor radon measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bem, H.; Ostrowska, M.; Bem, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The pulse decay discrimination (PDD) liquid scintillation technique has been applied to optimise radon counting by the Pico-Rad method. A dermination limit (with 10% relative error) of 4.8 Bqm-3 for indoor radon measurement has been achieved for optimal PDD setting with a radon elution cocktail containing 20% (v/v) of Ultima Gold AB in Instafluor. From a practical point of view this procedure allows a shortening of the counting time to 1 hour after 48 hours exposure to detectors. This method has been applied to indoor radon determinations in 626 places (municipal offices and private dwellings) in the Lódz region. These measureents resulted in an average concentration of 21.4 Bqm-3 and a median value of 15.1 Bqm-3. Analysis of the data indicates that most indoor radon comes from the underlying soil, which contains relatively little226Ra (10-20 Bqkg-1).

  17. Direct nanomechanical measurement of layer thickness and compressibility of smectic liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Giovanni; Zappone, Bruno; Barberi, Riccardo; Bartolino, Roberto; Musevic, Igor

    2011-05-01

    Using an atomic force microscope (AFM) we confined a smectic-A liquid crystal (LC) between a flat glass plate and a 10-μm glass sphere attached to the free end of the AFM cantilever. Both surfaces were treated with a surfactant that induces normal alignment of the LC molecules. We measured the force F acting on the cantilever while varying the plate-sphere distance D with subnanometer precision. For D thickness a(0) and compressibility modulus B. Compared to other techniques used to determine a(0) and B, AFM measurements are faster and require a much smaller amount (microliters) of LC. Moreover, they are based on purely mechanical deformations of the LC structure and do not require any static or radiative electromagnetic field.

  18. Liquid-phase catalytic reactor combined with measurement of hot electron flux and chemiluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedrygailov, Ievgen I.; Lee, Changhwan; Moon, Song Yi; Lee, Hyosun; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the role of electronically nonadiabatic interactions during chemical reactions on metal surfaces in liquid media is of great importance for a variety of applications including catalysis, electrochemistry, and environmental science. Here, we report the design of an experimental apparatus for detection of the highly excited (hot) electrons created as a result of nonadiabatic energy transfer during the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide on thin-film metal-semiconductor nanodiodes. The apparatus enables the measurement of hot electron flows and related phenomena (e.g., surface chemiluminescence) as well as the corresponding reaction rates at different temperatures. The products of the chemical reaction can be characterized in the gaseous phase by means of gas chromatography. The combined measurement of hot electron flux, catalytic activity, and light emission can lead to a fundamental understanding of the elementary processes occurring during the heterogeneous catalytic reaction.

  19. Direct emissivity measurements on liquids and corrections to multi-color pyrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Schiffman, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Optical pyrometry provides a means for non-contact temperature measurements whose accuracy depends on the accuracy with which specimen emittance is known. Two methods for obtaining the required emittance data are discussed in which the emittance is determined from measurements of the wavelength or polarization dependence of light emitted by the specimen. The spectral technique, multi-color pyrometry, yields apparent values for specimen emittance and temperature from emitted intensity measurements at two or more wavelengths. Emittance corrections cannot be eliminated by increasing the number of spectral intensity measurements required by an n-color pyrometer. Even if this were possible, the accuracy of temperature measurements by n-color pyrometry decreases with n such that pyrometers that require four intensity measurements would be impractical. In contrast, emittance values and corrections for one-color pyrometers can be accurately measured by the polarized light technique. The polarized light technique involves measurement of the degree of polarization for light emitted at an angle of 45 deg to the specimen normal. The reflectivities (r) for light polarized parallel (p) and normal (n) to the plane of emission are related by r(p) = r(n) squared. This leads to a simple relation between the intensity ratio for light emitted in the two polarized states and the emittance, i.e., e(n) = 2 - I(p)/I(n). The true specimen temperature is also obtained if absolute intensities are measured. Delvelopment of the polarized light technique in combination with one-color optical pyrometry is recommended to achieve accurate non-contact temperature measurements on liquids.

  20. Visualization of Structured Packing with Laser Induced Fluorescence Technique:Two-Dimensional Measurement of Liquid Concentration Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伯潭; 申言同; 张会书; 刘春江; 唐忠利; 袁希钢

    2016-01-01

    A method of using laser induced fluorescence(LIF)technique was applied to two-dimensional meas-urement of the liquid concentration distribution in the 250Y structured packing sheet. The experimental structured packing sheet was made of perspex so that the laser could pass through it. The visualization of the distribution of the liquid concentration in the structured packing sheet was realized. The calibration of the thickness and liquid concentration was carried out firstly and the regression formulaI=kcd was acquired, in which concentrationc and the liquid film thicknessd were both considered. Then the liquid feed of uniform tracer(rhodamine)concentration entered the perspex structured packing from the top under different spraying densities. The corresponding thickness of liquid film on the packing was calculated. Finally, tracer(rhodamine)with a high concentration was injected only at one fixed point of the structured packing under different spraying densities of the liquid. With the known liquid film thickness, the concentration distribution of the tracer can be calculated inside the structured packing sheet.

  1. A microcontroller-based microwave free-space measurement system for permittivity determination of lossy liquid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasar, U C

    2009-05-01

    A microcontroller-based noncontact and nondestructive microwave free-space measurement system for real-time and dynamic determination of complex permittivity of lossy liquid materials has been proposed. The system is comprised of two main sections--microwave and electronic. While the microwave section provides for measuring only the amplitudes of reflection coefficients, the electronic section processes these data and determines the complex permittivity using a general purpose microcontroller. The proposed method eliminates elaborate liquid sample holder preparation and only requires microwave components to perform reflection measurements from one side of the holder. In addition, it explicitly determines the permittivity of lossy liquid samples from reflection measurements at different frequencies without any knowledge on sample thickness. In order to reduce systematic errors in the system, we propose a simple calibration technique, which employs simple and readily available standards. The measurement system can be a good candidate for industrial-based applications.

  2. Planar anchoring strength and pitch measurements in achiral and chiral chromonic liquid crystals using 90-degree twist cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinn, Christine K.; Laderman, Laura I.; Zimmermann, Natalie; Kitzerow, Heinz-S.; Collings, Peter J.

    2013-12-01

    Chromonic liquid crystals are formed by molecules that spontaneously assemble into anisotropic structures in water. The ordering unit is therefore a molecular assembly instead of a molecule as in thermotropic liquid crystals. Although it has been known for a long time that certain dyes, drugs, and nucleic acids form chromonic liquid crystals, only recently has enough knowledge been gained on how to control their alignment so that studies of their fundamental liquid crystal properties can be performed. In this article, a simple method for producing planar alignment of the nematic phase in chromonic liquid crystals is described, and this in turn is used to create twisted nematic structures of both achiral and chiral chromonic liquid crystals. The optics of 90-degree twist cells allows the anchoring strength to be measured in achiral systems, which for this alignment technique is quite weak, about 3×10-7 J/m2 for both disodium cromoglycate and Sunset Yellow FCF. The addition of a chiral amino acid to the system causes the chiral nematic phase to form, and similar optical measurements in 90-degree twist cells produce a measurement of the intrinsic pitch of the chiral nematic phase. From these measurements, the helical twisting power for L-alanine is found to be (1.1±0.4)×10-2 μm-1 wt%-1 for 15 wt% disodium cromoglycate.

  3. Production of liquid biofuels in the world after 2000. Its level and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Borychowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As crude oil resources decrease, the demand for this raw material is growing and its extraction is becoming less certain. In this situation the world turns to renewable energy sources, which include inter alia liquid biocomponents I generation (conventional biocomponents, which are produced from agricultural raw materials. The global biofuels has been sector is for several years developing fast. The main indications of this is the increasing production and consumption of liquid biocomponents in an increasing number of countries on all continents – both in developed countries, as well as developing countries. The main basis for the development of this industry tends to be the economic benefits, but we must not ignore the risks that arise in relation to this segment of the economy. The significance of this subject is fact that today the importance of liquid biocomponents (and other renewable energy sources is increasing. In addition, the production of biofuels from edible agricultural raw materials is controversial, and hence we need a world wide discourse to look at the sector from the perspective of both the benefits and risks (economic, social, environmental. The purpose of this article is to present the production and consumption of liquid biocomponents worldwide and in selected countries the release dynamics in recent years. In addition, this article is an attempt to identify the factors determining the development of the industry on a global scale.

  4. Quantitative Contact Resonance Force Microscopy for Viscoelastic Measurement of Soft Materials at the Solid-Liquid Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churnside, Allison B; Tung, Ryan C; Killgore, Jason P

    2015-10-13

    Viscoelastic property measurements made at the solid-liquid interface are key to characterizing materials for a variety of biological and industrial applications. Further, nanostructured materials require nanoscale measurements. Here, material loss tangents (tan δ) were extracted from confounding liquid effects in nanoscale contact resonance force microscopy (CR-FM), an atomic force microscope based technique for observing mechanical properties of surfaces. Obtaining reliable CR-FM viscoelastic measurements in liquid is complicated by two effects. First, in liquid, spurious signals arise during cantilever excitation. Second, it is challenging to separate changes to cantilever behavior due to the sample from changes due to environmental damping and added mass effects. We overcame these challenges by applying photothermal cantilever excitation in multiple resonance modes and a predictive model for the hydrodynamic effects. We demonstrated quantitative, nanoscale viscoelastic CR-FM measurements of polymers at the solid-liquid interface. The technique is demonstrated on a point-by-point basis on polymer samples and while imaging in contact mode on a fixed plant cell wall. Values of tan δ for measurements made in water agreed with the values for measurements in air for some experimental conditions on polystyrene and for all examined conditions on polypropylene.

  5. Toward in Situ Measurement of the Density of Liquid Benzene Using Optical Kerr Effect Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, John S; Cohen, Samuel R; He, Xiaoxiao; Fourkas, John T; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-09-01

    The high-frequency portion of the optical Kerr effect (OKE) spectrum of benzene shifts to higher frequency with decreasing temperature at constant pressure. This behavior has been interpreted previously in terms of an increase in librational frequencies due to the decrease in free volume with liquid densification. However, decreasing temperature also provides less access to the more repulsive portion of the intermolecular potential, which would cause the blue edge of the spectrum to red-shift. To explore the relative importance of these phenomena, molecular dynamics simulations of benzene are used to isolate the effects of temperature and density on the spectrum. The simulations show that, at constant density, the high-frequency portion of the spectrum shifts to lower frequency with decreasing temperature. In contrast, at constant temperature, the high-frequency portion of the spectrum shifts to higher frequency with increasing density. These results indicate that density plays a greater role in determining the position of the blue edge of the low-frequency Raman spectrum of benzene than does temperature. Empirical fits show that the effects of changing density or temperature are similar in experimental and simulated OKE spectra. Furthermore, line-shape analysis of simulated spectra under isochoric and isothermal conditions shows that the effects of density and temperature are separable, suggesting that OKE spectroscopy is a viable technique for in situ measurement of the density of van der Waals liquids.

  6. Main components and performances of the IMGC calibration facilities for liquid helium flow rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivetti, A.; Martini, G.; Goria, R.; Lorefice, S.

    Within the framework of a National Project on superconductivity two facilities have been designed and built at the Istituto di Metrologia 'G. Colonnetti' (IMGC) with the purpose of studying and calibrating liquid helium flowmeters in the range 1-20 g s -1 of liquid helium (LHe). After a brief description of these set-ups, this Paper examines in detail the solutions adopted in the design of the main calibration facility, particularly with regard to the circulating pump and the submerged driving motor. The latter has been devised for working only at LHe temperature, having an a.c. three-phase stator winding made of thin superconducting wire. The construction characteristics and operation conditions are discussed. As a flow rate reference, a new turbine flowmeter with its rotor magnetically suspended by the Meissner effect (described in another paper presented at the workshop), is used. A LHe flow rate transducer, based upon the measurement of the transit time of short thermal pulses, has been designed and tested with these facilities: the good results obtained using commercial low cost diodes as ΔT sensors are reported.

  7. Muramic Acid Measurements for Bacterial Investigations in Marine Environments by High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Toru; Romano, Jean-Claude

    1985-01-01

    Muramic acid, a constituent of procaryotic cell walls, was assayed by high-pressure liquid chromatography in samples from several marine environments (water column, surface microlayer, and sediment) and a bacterial culture. It is used as a microbial biomass indicator. The method gave a good separation of muramic acid from interfering compounds with satisfactory reproducibility. A pseudomonad culture had a muramic acid content of 4.7 × 10−10 to 5.3 × 10−10 μg per cell during growth. In natural water samples, highly significant relationships were found between muramic acid concentrations and bacterial numbers for populations of 108 to 1011 cells per liter. The muramic acid content in natural marine water decreased from 5.3 × 10−10 to 1.6 × 10−10 μg per cell with increasing depth. In coastal sediments exposed to sewage pollution, concentrations of muramic acid, ATP, organic carbon, and total amino acids displayed a parallel decrease with increasing distance from the sewage outlet. Advantages of muramic acid measurement by high-pressure liquid chromatography are its high sensitivity and reduction of preparation steps, allowing a short time analysis. PMID:16346848

  8. Hybrid Young interferometer for high resolution measurement of dynamic speckle using high birefringence liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, N.; Holdynski, Z.; Merta, I.; Marc, P.; Kula, P.; Mazur, R.; Piecek, W.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that the Young interference experiment is the fundamental setup to combine two beams and to construct the phase modulated light. Moreover, homodyne phase demodulator is based on signal decoding in back Fourier focal plane using bicell photodetector (B-PD). On the above base, we propose a novel experimental approach to the signals demodulation by using the optical interferometer which operates in homodyne mode, combined with liquid crystal spatial light modulators operating both phase as speckle modulator. Dynamic phase changes between the two beams can be controlled by monopixel liquid crystals cell placed in one branch of the interferometer. A phase modulation effect in a signal arm of interferometer is observed as a dynamic shift of the speckle pattern. Simple arithmetic combination of signals from B-PD placed in speckle pattern plane is only one necessary numerical manipulation to obtain exactly phase difference. Concept of signals demodulation in the Fourier focal plane can be only used for exactly defined geometrical (B-PD as well as Young interferometer) and physical parameters (polarization, wavelength). We optimize the setup geometry to obtain extremely high measurement resolution. In this paper we focus on the principles of operation of each part of the system as well as discussion their requirement in order to increase the signal to noise ratio.

  9. A rapid liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry-based method for measuring propranolol on dried blood spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Malvagia, Sabrina; Villanelli, Fabio; Giocaliere, Elisa; Ombrone, Daniela; Funghini, Silvia; Filippi, Luca; Cavallaro, Giacomo; Bagnoli, Paola; Guerrini, Renzo; la Marca, Giancarlo

    2013-05-05

    Propranolol, a non-selective beta blocker drug, is used in young infants and newborns for treating several heart diseases; its pharmacokinetics has been extensively evaluated in adult patients using extrapolation to treat pediatric population. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate a method to measure propranolol levels in dried blood spots. The analysis was performed by using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry operating in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The calibration curve in matrix was linear in the concentration range of 2.5-200 μg/L with correlation coefficient r=0.9996. Intra-day and inter-day precisions and biases were less than 8.0% (n=10) and 11.5% (n=10) respectively. The recoveries ranged from 94 to 100% and the matrix effect did not result in a severe signal suppression. Propranolol on dried blood spot showed a good stability at three different temperatures for one month. This paper describes a micromethod for measuring propranolol levels on dried blood spot, which determines a great advantage in neonates or young infants during pharmacokinetic studies because of less invasive sampling and small blood volume required.

  10. A Facile Vortex-Assisted Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Method for the Determination of Uranyl Ion at Low Levels by Spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Marcela Zanetti; Pires, Igor Matheus Ruiz; Diniz, Kristiany Moreira; Segatelli, Mariana Gava; Tarley, César Ricardo Teixeira

    2015-08-01

    A facile and reliable UV-Vis spectrophotometric method associated with vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction has been developed and applied to the determination of U(VI) at low levels in water samples. It was based on preconcentration of 24.0 mL sample at pH 8.0 in the presence of 7.4 µmol L(-1) 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol, 1.0 mL of methanol as disperser solvent and 1.0 mL of chloroform as extraction solvent. A high preconcentration factor was achieved (396 times), thus providing a wide analytical curve from 6.9 up to 75.9 µg L(-1) (r=0.9982) and limits of detection and quantification of 0.40 and 1.30 µg L(-1), respectively. When necessary, EDTA or KCN can be used to remove interferences of foreign ions. The method was applied to the analysis of real water samples, such as tap, mineral and lake waters with good recovery values.

  11. Time-frequency analysis for ultrasonic measurement of liquid-layer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jingpin; Liu, Wenhua; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qiang; He, Cunfu; Wu, Bin

    2013-02-01

    Lubricant film thickness is one of the most important parameters to indicate the operating condition of machine elements, such as mechanical seals and hydrostatic slideway. When ultrasonic waves illuminate the interfaces between the substrates and a lubricant film, it will be reflected due to the change of the material properties at the interfaces. These reflected ultrasonic waves contain information about film thickness. In this paper, wavelet transform modulus maximum method was explored to extract the film thickness from its reflection ultrasonic signals. The performance of different wavelet functions within various scale factors was experimentally investigated, and the optimal wavelet function with the optimal scale factor was pointed out. It has been shown that the measurement error is less than 5% when the thickness of liquid layer is within a certain range.

  12. Measurement of serum pralidoxime methylsulfate (Contrathion) by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houzé, Pascal; Borron, Stephen W; Scherninski, François; Bousquet, Bernard; Gourmel, Bernard; Baud, Frédéric

    2005-01-05

    Pralidoxime methylsulfate (Contrathion) is widely used to treat organophosphate poisoning. Despite animal and human studies, the usefulness of Contrathion therapy remains a matter of debate. Therapeutic dosage regimens need to be clarified and availability of a reliable method for plasma pralidoxime quantification would be helpful in this process. We here describe a high-performance liquid chromatography technique with electrochemical detection to measure pralidoxime concentrations in human serum using guanosine as an internal standard. The assay was linear between 0.25 and 50 microg mL(-1) with a quantification limit of 0.2 microg mL(-1). The analytical precision was satisfactory, with variation coefficients lower 10%. This assay was applied to the analysis of a serum from an organophosphorate poisoned patient and treated by Contrathion infusions (100 and 200 mg h(-1)) after a loading dose (400 mg).

  13. Laboratory measurement of radioactivity purification for 212Pb in liquid scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Fang, Jian; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Li; Cai, Xiao; Sun, Li-Jun; Liu, Wan-Jin; Wang, Lan; Lü, Jun-Guang

    2016-09-01

    Liquid scintillator (LS) has been widely used in past and running neutrino experiments, and is expected also to be used in future experiments. Requirements on LS radio-purity have become higher and higher. Water extraction is a powerful method to remove soluble radioactive nuclei, and a mini-extraction station has been constructed. To evaluate the extraction efficiency and optimize the operation parameters, a setup to load radioactivity to LS and a laboratory scale setup to measure radioactivity using the 212Bi-212Po-208Pb cascade decay have been developed. Experience from this laboratory study will be useful for the design of large scale water extraction plants and the optimization of working conditions in the future. Supported by The Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA10010500), Natural Science Foundation of China (11390384)

  14. Flow Visualization in Evaporating Liquid Drops and Measurement of Dynamic Contact Angles and Spreading Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Neng-Li; Chao, David F.

    2001-01-01

    A new hybrid optical system, consisting of reflection-refracted shadowgraphy and top-view photography, is used to visualize flow phenomena and simultaneously measure the spreading and instant dynamic contact angle in a volatile-liquid drop on a nontransparent substrate. Thermocapillary convection in the drop, induced by evaporation, and the drop real-time profile data are synchronously recorded by video recording systems. Experimental results obtained from this unique technique clearly reveal that thermocapillary convection strongly affects the spreading process and the characteristics of dynamic contact angle of the drop. Comprehensive information of a sessile drop, including the local contact angle along the periphery, the instability of the three-phase contact line, and the deformation of the drop shape is obtained and analyzed.

  15. Electromagnetic modeling for gap measurement between nuclear fuel channel and liquid injection nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D. H.; Heo, H.; Jeong, H. G. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    Fuel channels including Pressure Tube(PT) and Calandria Tube(CT) are important components of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor(PHWR). A sagging for fuel channel increases by heat and radiation exposure with the increasing operating time. The possibility of contact to Liquid Injection Nozzle(LIN) is thus a critical issue in power plant safety. In order to solve this safety issue, electromagnetic technique was applied to compliment the ultrasonic technology. Electromagnetic fields were investigated for the gap measurement between CT and LIN using computer modeling. We calculated the electromagnetic fields, such as, magnetic flux density, current density near the fuel channel and simulated an impedance and a phase angle in receiving coil for obtaining the optimal inspection parameters, such as, frequency, inter-coil spacing, coil size and configuration. This paper shows that the simulated eddy current signals in variance with the CT/LIN gap can be used for baseline data of experimental electromagnetic technique.

  16. Dynamic equilibrium under vibrations of H₂ liquid-vapor interface at various gravity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandikota, G; Chatain, D; Lyubimova, T; Beysens, D

    2014-06-01

    Horizontal vibration applied to the support of a simple pendulum can deviate from the equilibrium position of the pendulum to a nonvertical position. A similar phenomenon is expected when a liquid-vapor interface is subjected to strong horizontal vibration. Beyond a threshold value of vibrational velocity the interface should attain an equilibrium position at an angle to the initial horizontal position. In the present paper experimental investigation of this phenomenon is carried out in a magnetic levitation device to study the effect of the vibration parameters, gravity acceleration, and the liquid-vapor density on the interface position. The results compare well with the theoretical expression derived by Wolf [G. H. Wolf, Z. Phys. B 227, 291 (1969)].

  17. 30 CFR 250.1163 - How must I measure gas flaring or venting volumes and liquid hydrocarbon burning volumes, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must I measure gas flaring or venting... SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Requirements Flaring, Venting, and Burning Hydrocarbons § 250.1163 How must I measure gas flaring or venting volumes and liquid...

  18. Evaluation of hemoglobin A1c measurement from filter paper using high-performance liquid chromatography and immunoturbidimetric assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yonghua; Yang, Xu; Wang, Haining; Li, Zhenrong; Wang, Tiancheng

    2017-04-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) measurement from whole blood (WB) samples is inconvenient for epidemic surveillance and self-monitoring of glycemic level. We evaluated HbA1c measurement from WB blotted on filter paper (FP), which can be easily transported to central laboratories, with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and immunoturbidimetric assay (ITA). WB was applied to Whatman filter paper. By using HPLC and WB samples as reference methods, these FP samples were evaluated on HPLC and ITA. Inter- and intra-assay variation, WB vs. FP agreement and sample stability at 20-25 °C and -70 °C were assessed by statistical analysis. Results showed that the coefficient of variation (CV, %) of FP samples for HPLC and ITA were 0.44-1.02% and 1.47-2.72%, respectively (intra-assay); 2.13-3.56% and 3.21-4.82%, respectively (inter-assay). The correlation of WB HPLC with FP analyzed using HPLC and ITA are both significant (p < 0.001). Sample stability showed that FP method up to 5 days at 20-25 °C and 5 weeks at -70 °C is accurate and reproducible. In conclusion, FP samples analyzed by HPLC and ITA can both provide an alternative to WB for HbA1c measurement, supporting the use of FP method in epidemic surveillance and healthcare units.

  19. Circuit-level simulation of the hysteresis inversion frequency of the ferroelectric liquid crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Mengyao; Pan Wei; Luo Bin; Zhang Weili; Zou Xihua

    2009-01-01

    The V-shaped electro-optical properties control is investigated by an equivalent circuit model. Simulation results show that genuine V-shaped form is only observed at hysteresis inversion frequency, and below and above this frequency an anomalous and normal hysteresis are observed. And the inversion frequency decreases with the resistance of ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) layer following logfi=-alogRLC+b. The results are in good accordance with the reported experimental results.

  20. Production of liquid biofuels in the world after 2000. Its level and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    As crude oil resources decrease, the demand for this raw material is growing and its extraction is becoming less certain. In this situation the world turns to renewable energy sources, which include inter alia liquid biocomponents I generation (conventional biocomponents), which are produced from agricultural raw materials. The global biofuels has been sector is for several years developing fast. The main indications of this is the increasing production and consumption of liqui...

  1. Optimal methods for identifying the pollution level of liquid mediums. Opticheskiye metody opredeleniya zagryaznennosti zhidkikh sred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolshakov, G.F.; Novichkov, M.N.; Timofeyev, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    The results are cited of experimental studies performed between 1964 and 1982, the nature and dispersion composition of pollutants are examined and the contemporary specifications on the purity and methods for testing fuel are presented. Practical recommendations are given for developing new high speed methods for evaluating the contamination of fuels and oils. These data are important for studies of the processes of transformation of homogeneous liquid mediums into heterogeneous ones.

  2. 超声波传感器um30—15112在液位控制中的应用%The application of ultrasonic sensor urn30- 15112 on liquid level control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓刚

    2012-01-01

    通过一个液位控制的实例,介绍超声波传感器um30—15112在液位控制中的安装要点、与DCS数字输入卡的连接方式以及um30—15112的设置方法,为腐蚀性介质的液位测量提供一个选择。%By a sample of liquid level control, the installing key point in a liquid level control, the connect way with DCS digital input card and setting process of ultrasonic sensor urn30 - 15112 was introduced, so that provides a option for liquid level measurement of corrosive media.

  3. Spectral contaminant identifier for off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy measurements of liquid water isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Leen, J.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Gupta, Manish [Los Gatos Research, 67 East Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, California 94041-1518 (United States); Liebson, Lindsay [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Developments in cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry have made it possible to measure water isotopes using faster, more cost-effective field-deployable instrumentation. Several groups have attempted to extend this technology to measure water extracted from plants and found that other extracted organics absorb light at frequencies similar to that absorbed by the water isotopomers, leading to {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O measurement errors ({Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O). In this note, the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) spectra of stable isotopes in liquid water is analyzed to determine the presence of interfering absorbers that lead to erroneous isotope measurements. The baseline offset of the spectra is used to calculate a broadband spectral metric, m{sub BB}, and the mean subtracted fit residuals in two regions of interest are used to determine a narrowband metric, m{sub NB}. These metrics are used to correct for {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O. The method was tested on 14 instruments and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O was found to scale linearly with contaminant concentration for both narrowband (e.g., methanol) and broadband (e.g., ethanol) absorbers, while {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H scaled linearly with narrowband and as a polynomial with broadband absorbers. Additionally, the isotope errors scaled logarithmically with m{sub NB}. Using the isotope error versus m{sub NB} and m{sub BB} curves, {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O resulting from methanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 0.93 per mille and 0.25 per mille respectively, while {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O from ethanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 1.22 per mille and 0.22 per mille . Large variation between instruments indicates that the sensitivities must be calibrated for each individual isotope analyzer. These results suggest that the

  4. Measurement and modeling of high-pressure (vapor + liquid) equilibria of (CO{sub 2} + alkanol) binary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejarano, Arturo; Gutierrez, Jorge E. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Ambiental, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Avda. Espana 1680, Valparaiso (Chile); Araus, Karina A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Bioprocesos, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Avda. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Macul, Santiago (Chile); Fuente, Juan C. de la, E-mail: juan.delafuente@usm.c [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Ambiental, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Avda. Espana 1680, Valparaiso (Chile); Centro Regional de Estudios en Alimentos Saludables, Blanco 1623, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: (Vapor + liquid) equilibria of three (CO{sub 2} + C{sub 5} alcohol) binary systems were measured. Complementary data are reported at (313, 323 and 333) K and from (2 to 11) MPa. No liquid immiscibility was observed at the temperatures and pressures studied. Experimental data were correlated with the PR-EoS and the van de Waals mixing rules. Correlation results showed relative deviations {<=}8 % (liquid) and {<=}2 % (vapor). - Abstract: Complementary isothermal (vapor + liquid) equilibria data are reported for the (CO{sub 2} + 3-methyl-2-butanol), (CO{sub 2} + 2-pentanol), and (CO{sub 2} + 3-pentanol) binary systems at temperatures of (313, 323, and 333) K, and at pressure range of (2 to 11) MPa. For all (CO{sub 2} + alcohol) systems, it was visually monitored that there was no liquid immiscibility at the temperatures and pressures studied. The experimental data were correlated with the Peng-Robinson equation of state using the quadratic mixing rules of van der Waals with two adjustable parameters. The calculated (vapor + liquid) equilibria compositions were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data with deviations for the mole fractions <8% and <2% for the liquid and vapor phase, respectively.

  5. In-fiber liquid-level probe based on Michelson interferometer via dual-mode elliptical multilayer-core fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Ren, Guobin; Li, Yang; Liu, Zhibo; Wei, Huai; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-07-01

    An in-fiber liquid-level probe fabricated from homemade dual-mode elliptical multilayer-core fiber (EMCF) was proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The proposed sensor simply consists of a segment of the EMCF with one end coated with silver film, and a Michelson interferometer is roughly established when light from single-mode fiber incident from the other end. The detected interference patterns, rather clean due to the few-mode property, shift as the liquid level due to strong interaction between high-order modes and measurands through evanescent waves. Both the propagation characteristics and operation principle of such a sensor were demonstrated in detail, and sensitivities of 33.48, 43.35, and 48.93 pm/mm corresponding to liquid indices of 1.333, 1.353, and 1.373 were successfully achieved with a 50-mm EMCF probe, respectively. Moreover, the proposed sensor had the potential to discriminate measurand index after proper calibration.

  6. Carotenoid levels in human lymphocytes, measured by Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramanauskaite, R B; SegersNolten, IGMJ; DeGrauw, K J; Sijtsema, N M; VanderMaas, L; Greve, J; Otto, C; Figdor, C G

    1997-01-01

    Carotenoid levels in lymphocytes obtained from peripheral blood of healthy people have been investigated by Raman microspectroscopy. We observed that carotenoids are concentrated in so-called ''Gall bodies''. The level of carotenoids in living human lymphocytes was found to be age-dependent and to d

  7. Peltier heat measurements at a junction between materials exhibiting Fermi gas and Fermi liquid behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, V L; Kuznetsova, L A; Rowe, D M [Division of Electronic Engineering, Cardiff University, Queen' s Buildings, 5 The Parade, PO Box 925, Cardiff CF24 0YE (United Kingdom)

    2003-11-07

    The feasibility of improving the conversion efficiency of a thermoelectric converter by employing interfaces between materials exhibiting Fermi gas (FG) and Fermi liquid (FL) behaviour has been studied. Thermocouples consisting of a semiconductor and a strongly correlated material have been fabricated and the Peltier heat measured over the temperature range 15 deg 330 K. A number of materials possessing different types of strong electron correlation have been synthesized including the heavy fermion compound YbAl{sub 3}, manganite La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and high-T{sub c} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{delta}}. n- and p-Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-based solid solutions as well as n-Bi{sub 0.85}Sb{sub 0.15} solid solution have also been synthesized and used as materials exhibiting FG properties. Experimental measurements of the Peltier heat were compared to the results of calculations based on preliminary measured thermoelectric properties of materials and electrical contact resistance at the interfaces. The potential of employing FG/FL interfaces in thermoelectric energy conversion is discussed.

  8. The MAREDAT global database of high performance liquid chromatography marine pigment measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloquin, J.; Swan, C.; Gruber, N.; Vogt, M.; Claustre, H.; Ras, J.; Uitz, J.; Barlow, R.; Behrenfeld, M.; Bidigare, R.; Dierssen, H.; Ditullio, G.; Fernandez, E.; Gallienne, C.; Gibb, S.; Goericke, R.; Harding, L.; Head, E.; Holligan, P.; Hooker, S.; Karl, D.; Landry, M.; Letelier, R.; Llewellyn, C. A.; Lomas, M.; Lucas, M.; Mannino, A.; Marty, J.-C.; Mitchell, B. G.; Muller-Karger, F.; Nelson, N.; O'Brien, C.; Prezelin, B.; Repeta, D.; Smith, W. O., Jr.; Smythe-Wright, D.; Stumpf, R.; Subramaniam, A.; Suzuki, K.; Trees, C.; Vernet, M.; Wasmund, N.; Wright, S.

    2013-03-01

    A global pigment database consisting of 35 634 pigment suites measured by high performance liquid chromatography was assembled in support of the MARine Ecosytem DATa (MAREDAT) initiative. These data originate from 136 field surveys within the global ocean, were solicited from investigators and databases, compiled, and then quality controlled. Nearly one quarter of the data originates from the Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche (LOV), with an additional 17% and 19% stemming from the US JGOFS and LTER programs, respectively. The MAREDAT pigment database provides high quality measurements of the major taxonomic pigments including chlorophylls a and b, 19'-butanoyloxyfucoxanthin, 19'-hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin, alloxanthin, divinyl chlorophyll a, fucoxanthin, lutein, peridinin, prasinoxanthin, violaxanthin and zeaxanthin, which may be used in varying combinations to estimate phytoplankton community composition. Quality control measures consisted of flagging samples that had a total chlorophyll a concentration of zero, had fewer than four reported accessory pigments, or exceeded two standard deviations of the log-linear regression of total chlorophyll a with total accessory pigment concentrations. We anticipate the MAREDAT pigment database to be of use in the marine ecology, remote sensing and ecological modeling communities, where it will support model validation and advance our global perspective on marine biodiversity. The original dataset together with quality control flags as well as the gridded MAREDAT pigment data may be downloaded from PANGAEA: http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.793246.

  9. Dielectric and electro-optic measurements of nematic liquid crystals doped with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Matthew; Georgiev, Georgi; Atherton, Timothy; Cebe, Peggy

    We studied the effects of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the dielectric and electro-optic properties of nematic 5CB liquid crystals (LCs). Samples containing 0.01%, 0.10% and 1.00% CNTs by weight were prepared. Anti- parallel rubbed cells with a nominal thickness of 10 μm were prepared using indium tin oxide coated glass cells and a polyimide alignment layer. The capacitance and dissipation factor were measured using an Agilent 4284A precision LCR meter. From these measurements, the complex dielectric permittivity was determined as a function of frequency. Analysis of the low frequency regime (f <1000 Hz) indicates that 5CB samples containing CNTs have a higher conductance than neat samples. The Fréedericksz transition critical voltage was noted by a sharp increase in capacitance after an initial plateau. Numerical simulations of CNT-facilitated switching show that polarization induced on the nanotubes from capacitive effects can significantly reduce the critical voltage in DC electric fields, in agreement with experimental results. Measurements of the critical voltage over a range of frequencies will also be presented. Research was supported by the National Science Foundation, DMR1206010.

  10. A Noncontact Measurement Technique for the Density and Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Solid and Liquid Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sang K.; Thiessen, David B.; Rhim, Won-Kyu

    1996-01-01

    A noncontact measurement technique for the density and the thermal expansion refractory materials in their molten as well as solid phases is presented. This technique is based on the video image processing of a levitated sample. Experiments were performed using the high-temperature electrostatic levitator (HTESL) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in which 2-3 mm diameter samples can be levitated, melted, and radiatively cooled in a vacuum. Due to the axisymmetric nature of the molten samples when levitated in the HTESL, a rather simple digital image analysis can be employed to accurately measure the volumetric change as a function of temperature. Density and the thermal expansion coefficient measurements were made on a pure nickel sample to test the accuracy of the technique in the temperature range of 1045-1565 C. The result for the liquid phase density can be expressed by p = 8.848 + (6.730 x 10(exp -4)) x T (degC) g/cu cm within 0.8% accuracy, and the corresponding thermal expansion coefficient can be expressed by Beta=(9.419 x 10(exp -5)) - (7.165 x 10(exp -9) x T (degC)/K within 0.2% accuracy.

  11. Improvements of the experimental apparatus for measurement of the surface tension of supercooled liquids using horizontal capillary tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinš Václav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental apparatus with a horizontal capillary tube for measurement of the surface tension of supercooled liquids, i.e. liquids in a metastable state below the equilibrium freezing point, was designed and tested in the previous study [V. Vinš et al., EPJ Web Conf. 92, 02108 (2015]. In this work, recent modifications of both the experimental setup and the measurement analysis are described. The main aim is to improve the accuracy and the reproducibility of measured surface tension and to achieve higher degrees of supercooling. Temperature probes measuring the temperature of cooling medium near the horizontal capillary tube were calibrated in the relevant temperature range from – 31 °C to + 45 °C. An additional pressure transducer was installed in the helium distribution setup at the position close to the capillary tube. The optical setup observing the liquid meniscus at the open end of the horizontal capillary tube together with the video analysis were thoroughly revised. The red laser illuminating the liquid meniscus, used at the original apparatus, was replaced by a fiber optic light source, which significantly improved the quality of the meniscus image. The modified apparatus was used for the measurement of surface tension of supercooled water at temperatures down to – 11 °C. The new data have a lower scatter compared to the previous horizontal measurements and show a good agreement with the other data obtained with a different measurement technique based on the modified capillary rise method.

  12. Measurement of activity coefficients at infinite dilution for hydrocarbons in imidazolium-based ionic liquids and QSPR model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jiqin; YU Yanmei; CHEN Jian; FEI Weiyang

    2007-01-01

    The separations of olefin/paraffin,aromatic/aliphatic hydrocarbons or olefin isomers using ionic liquids instead of volatile solvents have interested many researchers.Activity coefficients γ∞ at infinite dilution of a solute in ionic liquid are generally used in the selection of solvents for extraction or extractive distillation.In fact,the measurement of γ∞ by gas-liquid chromatography is a speedy and costsaving method.Activity coefficients at infinite dilution of hydrocarbon solutes,such as alkanes,hexenes,alkylbenzenes,styrene,in 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([AMIM][BF4]) and 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF6]), 1-isobutenyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([MPMIM][BF4]) and [MPMIM][BF4]-AgBF4 have been determined by gas-liquid chromatography using ionic liquids as stationary phase.The measurements were carried out at different temperatures from 298 to 318 K.The separating effects of these ionic liquids for alkanes/hexane,aliphatic hydrocarbons/benzene and hexene isomers have been discussed.The hydrophobic parameter,dipole element,frontier molecular orbital energy gap and hydration energy of these hydrocarbons were calculated with the PM3 semi-empirical quantum chemistry method.The quantitative relations among the computed structure parameters and activity coefficients at infinite dilution were also developed.The experimental activity coefficient data are consistent with the correlated and predicted results using QSPR models.

  13. Simultaneous Measurement of Antenna Gain and Complex Permittivity of Liquid in Near-Field Region Using Weighted Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Nozomu; Shiga, Hiroki; Ikarashi, Naoto; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Hamada, Lira; Watanabe, Soichi

    As a technique for calibrating electric-field probes used in standardized SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) assessment, we have studied the technique using the Friis transmission formula in the tissue-equivalent liquid. It is difficult to measure power transmission between two reference antennas in the far-field region due to large attenuation in the liquid. This means that the conventional Friis transmission formula cannot be applied to our measurement so that we developed an extension of this formula that is valid in the near-field region. In this paper, the method of weighted least squares is introduced to reduce the effect of the noise in the measurement system when the gain of the antenna operated in the liquid is determined by the curve-fitting technique. And we examine how to choose the fitting range to reduce the uncertainty of the estimated gain.

  14. Velocity field measurement in gas-liquid metal two-phase flow with use of PIV and neutron radiography techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Y.; Mishima, K. [Kyoto Univ. Kumatori, Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan); Tobita, Y.; Suzuki, T. [O-arai Engineering Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (Japan); Matsubayashi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Institute, Tokai Research Establishment (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Neutron radiography and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) techniques were applied to measurements of velocity field in gas-liquid metal two-phase flow. Visualization and measurements of two-phase flow were conducted using molten lead bismuth and nitrogen gas as working fluids and particles made of gold-cadmium (AuCd{sub 3}) inter-metallic alloy were employed as the tracer. Discrimination method between bubble and tracer images in two-phase flow was developed based on the {sigma}-scaling method. Time-averaged liquid velocity fields, gas velocity fields and void profile were calculated from discriminated images, respectively. From these measurements, the basic characteristics of gas-liquid metal two-phase mixture were clarified. (author)

  15. Measurement and Correlation of Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium for Binary System 1,2-Epoxycyclohexane+1,2-Dichloroethane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周彩荣; 王海峰; 石晓华; 蒋登高

    2013-01-01

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data (T, x, y) of binary system 1,2-epoxycyclohexane+1,2-dichloroethane were determined experimentally by using a modified ROSE-Williams equilibrium vaporization system at 101.33 kPa. The results show that this binary system does not have azeotropic point. The vapor-liquid equilibrium data are in thermodynamic consistency. The binary interaction parameters in the Wilson equation are presented with the correlation of vapor-liquid equilibrium data. The measurements of liquid phase composition and bubble point tem-perature are well represented by the Wilson equation. Values of vapor molecular fractions and activity coefficients from the Wilson equation are presented. This work provides important engineering data for the separation of 1,2-dichloroethane and 1,2-epoxycyclohexane .

  16. Measurement and correlation of supercritical CO2 and ionic liquid systems for design of advanced unit operations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi MACHIDA; Ryosuke TAGUCHI; Yoshiyuki SATO; Louw J.FLORUSSE; Cor J.PETERS; Richard L.SMITH,Jr

    2009-01-01

    Ionic liquids combined with supercritical fluid technology hold great promise as working solvents for developing compact processes. Ionic liquids, which are organic molten salts, typically have extremely low volatility and high functionality, but possess high viscos-ities, surface tensions and low diffusion coefficients, which can limit their applicability. CO2, on the other hand,especially in its supercritical state, is a green solvent that can be used advantageously when combined with the ionic liquid to provide viscosity and surface tension reduction and to promote mass transfer. The solubility of CO2 in the ionic liquid is key to estimating the important physical properties that include partition coefficients, viscosities,densities, interfacial tensions, thermal conductivities and heat capacities needed in contactor design. In this work, we examine a subset of available high pressure pure component ionic liquid PVT data and high pressure CO2-ionic liquid solubility data and report new correlations for CO2-ionic liquid systems with equations of state that have some industrial applications including: (1) general, (2) fuel desulfurization, (3) CO2 capture, and (4) chiral separation.New measurements of solubility data for the CO2 and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium octyl sulfate, [bmim][OcSO4] system are reported and correlated. In the correlation of the CO2 ionic liquid phase behavior, the Peng-Robinson and the Sanchez-Lacombe equations of state were considered and are compared. It is shown that excellent correlation of CO2 solubility can be obtained with either equation and they share some common characteristics regarding inter-action parameters. In the Sanchez-Lacombe equation,parameters that are derived from the supercritical region were found to be important for obtaining good correlation of the CO2-ionic liquid solubility data.

  17. The measurement of tritium in water samples with electrolytic enrichment using liquid scintillation counter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Marija M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tritium (3H present in the environment decreased in the last decades and nowadays it has low activity concentrations. Measurement of low-level tritium activities in natural waters, e. g. in precipitation, groundwater, and river water requires special techniques for water pretreatment and detection of low-level radioactivity. In order to increase the tritium concentration to an easily measurable level, electrolytic enrichment must be applied. This paper presents the enrichment method performed by electrolysis in a battery of 18 cells, giving an enrichment factor of 5.84 (calculated from 59 electrolyses. The calculated mean values of the separation factor and enrichment parameter were 4.10 and 0.84, respectively. Results for tritium activity in precipitation and surface water collected in Belgrade during 2008 and 2009 are presented. The Radiation and Environmental Protection Department of the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, participated in the IAEA TRIC2008 international intercomparison exercise. The participation in the intercomparisons for any laboratory doing low-level 3H measurements in the waters is very important and useful. It is considered the best way to check the entire procedure and methods of the measurements and the reliability of the standard used. The analysis of the reported 3H activity results showed that all results for five intercomparison samples, for which electrolytic enrichment were applied prior to the 3H measurement, are acceptable.

  18. A new contactless impedance sensor for void fraction measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Haifeng; Chang, Ya; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing

    2016-12-01

    With impedance elimination principle and phase sensitive demodulation (PSD) technique, this work aims to develop a new contactless impedance sensor, which is suitable for the void fraction measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow. The impedance elimination principle is used to overcome the unfavorable influences of the coupling capacitances, i.e. the capacitive reactances of the coupling capacitances are eliminated by the inductive reactance of an introduced inductor. PSD technique is used to implement the impedance