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Sample records for lipoprotein scavenger receptor

  1. Effect of human scavenger receptor class A overexpression in bone marrow-derived cells on lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herijgers, N.; Winther, M.P.J. de; Eck, M. van; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Berkel, T.J.C. van

    2000-01-01

    Scavenger receptors, which include various classes, play an important role in atherogenesis by mediating the unrestricted uptake of modified lipoproteins, resulting in the massive accumulation of cholesteryl esters. Because macrophage-derived foam cells are considered to be an important feature in

  2. Expression of scavenger receptor-BI and low-density lipoprotein receptor and differential use of lipoproteins to support early steroidogenesis in luteinizing macaque granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian-Shaw, Mary; Puttabyatappa, Muraly; Greason, Erin; Rodriguez, Annabelle; VandeVoort, Catherine A; Chaffin, Charles L

    2009-02-01

    An ovulatory hCG stimulus to rhesus macaques undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation protocols results in a rapid and sustained increase in progesterone synthesis. The use of lipoproteins as a substrate for progesterone synthesis remains unclear, and the expression of lipoprotein receptors [very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and scavenger receptor-BI (SR-BI)] soon after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) (lipoprotein receptor expression and lipoprotein (VLDL, LDL, and HDL) support of steroidogenesis during luteinization of macaque granulosa cells. Granulosa cells were aspirated from rhesus monkeys undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation before or up to 24 h after an ovulatory hCG stimulus. The expression of VLDLR decreased within 3 h of hCG, whereas LDLR and SR-BI increased at 3 and 12 h, respectively. Granulosa cells isolated before hCG were cultured for 24 h in the presence of FSH or FSH plus hCG with or without VLDL, LDL, or HDL. Progesterone levels increased in the presence of hCG regardless of lipoprotein addition, although LDL, but not HDL, further augmented hCG-induced progesterone. Other cells were cultured with FSH or FSH plus hCG without an exogenous source of lipoprotein for 24 h, followed by an additional 24 h culture with or without lipoproteins. Cells treated with hCG in the absence of any lipoprotein were unable to maintain progesterone levels through 48 h, whereas LDL (but not HDL) sustained progesterone synthesis. These data suggest that an ovulatory stimulus rapidly mobilizes stored cholesterol esters for use as a progesterone substrate and that as these are depleted, new cholesterol esters are obtained through an LDLR- and/or SR-BI-mediated mechanism.

  3. Scavenger Receptor BI-mediated Selective Uptake Is Required for the Remodeling of High Density Lipoprotein by Endothelial Lipase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, Niels; Wiersma, Harmen; Gautier, Thomas; van der Giet, Markus; Maugeais, Cyrille; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is a negative regulator of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol plasma levels, and scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is involved in remodeling of HDL. The present study investigates the requirement of SR-BI for the effects of EL- mediated phospholipid hydrolysis on HDL meta

  4. Identification of the Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Scavenger Receptor CD36 in Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Aase; Levin, Klaus; Højlund, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Macrophage CD36 scavenges oxidized low-density lipoprotein, leading to foam cell formation, and appears to be a key proatherogenic molecule. Increased expression of CD36 has been attributed to hyperglycemia and to defective macrophage insulin signaling in insulin resistance. Premature...... atherosclerosis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes. Here, we report the identification of a soluble form of CD36 (sCD36) in plasma and hypothesize that sCD36 would be elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. METHODS AND RESULTS: sCD36 in plasma...... was demonstrated by immunopurification and Western blotting. We established ELISA assays to determine sCD36 in plasma and measured sCD36 in obese type 2 diabetic patients, obese nondiabetic relatives, and obese and lean control subjects. sCD36 was markedly elevated in type 2 diabetic patients compared with both...

  5. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 facilitates heme scavenging after intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

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    Wang, Gaiqing; Manaenko, Anatol; Shao, Anwen; Ou, Yibo; Yang, Peng; Budbazar, Enkhjargal; Nowrangi, Derek; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2017-04-01

    Heme-degradation after erythrocyte lysis plays an important role in the pathophysiology of intracerebral hemorrhage. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 is a receptor expressed predominately at the neurovascular interface, which facilitates the clearance of the hemopexin and heme complex. In the present study, we investigated the role of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 in heme removal and neuroprotection in a mouse model of intracerebral hemorrhage. Endogenous low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 and hemopexin were increased in ipsilateral brain after intracerebral hemorrhage, accompanied by increased hemoglobin levels, brain water content, blood-brain barrier permeability and neurological deficits. Exogenous human recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 protein reduced hematoma volume, brain water content surrounding hematoma, blood-brain barrier permeability and improved neurological function three days after intracerebral hemorrhage. The expression of malondialdehyde, fluoro-Jade C positive cells and cleaved caspase 3 was increased three days after intracerebral hemorrhage in the ipsilateral brain tissues and decreased with recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1. Intracerebral hemorrhage decreased and recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 increased the levels of superoxide dismutase 1. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 siRNA reduced the effect of human recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 on all outcomes measured. Collectively, our findings suggest that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 contributed to heme clearance and blood-brain barrier protection after intracerebral hemorrhage. The use of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 as supplement provides a novel approach to ameliorating intracerebral hemorrhage brain injury via its pleiotropic neuroprotective effects.

  6. [Lipoprotein receptors. Old acquaintances and newcomers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducobu, J

    1997-02-01

    Lipoprotein receptors are plasma membrane proteins of high affinity which interact with circulating lipoprotein particles. The well characterized LDL receptor continues to be analysed and some new findings on its intracellular mechanisms of action have emerged. New lipoprotein receptors have recently been described: the chylomicron remnant receptor or LDL-related protein (LRP), the lipolysis stimulated receptor (LSR), the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), the HDL receptor (HDLR) and the scavenger receptor (SR). The molecular details of the receptors will facilitate the development of new therapeutic means to improve receptor-mediated clearance of lipoproteins.

  7. Comparative studies of vertebrate scavenger receptor class B type 1: a high-density lipoprotein binding protein

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    Holmes RS

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Roger S Holmes,1,2 Laura A Cox11Department of Genetics and Southwest National Primate Research Center, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX, USA; 2School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Scavenger receptor class B type 1 protein (SCARB1 plays an essential role in cholesterol homeostasis and functions in binding high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL in liver and other tissues of the body. SCARB1 also functions in lymphocyte homeostasis and in the uptake of hepatitis C virus (HCV by the liver. A genetic deficiency of this protein results in autoimmune disorders and significant changes in blood cholesterol phenotype. Comparative SCARB1 amino acid sequences and structures and SCARB1 gene locations were examined using data from several vertebrate genome projects. Vertebrate SCARB1 sequences shared 50%–99% identity as compared with 28%–31% sequence identities with other CD36-like superfamily members, ie, SCARB2 and SCARB3 (also called CD36. At least eight N-glycosylation sites were conserved among most of the vertebrate SCARB1 proteins examined. Sequence alignments, key amino acid residues, and conserved predicted secondary structures were also studied, including: cytoplasmic, transmembrane, and exoplasmic sequences; conserved N-terminal and C-terminal transmembrane glycines which participate in oligomer formation; conserved cystine disulfides and a free SH residue which participates in lipid transport; carboxyl terminal PDZ-binding domain sequences (Ala507-Arg/Lys508-Leu509; and 30 conserved proline and 18 conserved glycine residues, which may contribute to short loop formation within the exoplasmic HDL-binding sequence. Vertebrate SCARB1 genes usually contained 12 coding exons. The human SCARB1 gene contained CpG islands, micro RNA binding sites, and several transcription factor binding sites (including PPARG which may contribute to the high level (13.7 times

  8. Development and application of a nonradioactive binding assay of oxidized low-density lipoprotein to macrophage scavenger receptors

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    Montano, Erica N.; Boullier, Agnès; Almazan, Felicidad; Binder, Christoph J.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Hartvigsen, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a key role in atherogenesis in part through excessive uptake of oxidized LDL (OxLDL) via scavenger receptors. Binding of OxLDL to macrophages has traditionally been assessed using radiolabeled OxLDL. To allow more efficient and convenient measurements, we developed a nonradioactive binding assay in which biotinylated OxLDL (Bt-OxLDL) is added to macrophages in 96-well microtiter culture plates under various conditions and the extent of binding is determined using solid phase chemiluminescent immunoassay techniques. As examples, we show that Bt-OxLDL displayed high and saturable binding to macrophages in contrast to Bt-LDL, which showed very low binding. In competition assays, unlabeled OxLDL and the anti-OxLDL monoclonal antibody E06 inhibited Bt-OxLDL binding to macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Specific binding of Bt-OxLDL to ApoE/SR-A/CD36 triple knockout macrophages was reduced by 80% as compared with binding to macrophages from ApoE knockout mice. Binding of Bt-OxLDL to CD36 transfected COS-7 cells showed enhanced saturable binding compared with mock-transfected cells. This assay avoids the use of radioactivity and uses small amounts of materials. It can be used to study binding of OxLDL to macrophages and factors that influence this binding. The techniques described should be readily adaptable to study of other ligands, receptors, and cell types. PMID:23997238

  9. Restoration of high-density lipoprotein levels by cholesteryl ester transfer protein expression in scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) knockout mice does not normalize pathologies associated with SR-BI deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hildebrand, Reeni B; Lammers, Bart; Meurs, Illiana; Korporaal, Suzanne J A; De Haan, Willeke; Zhao, Ying; Kruijt, J Kar; Praticò, Domenico; Schimmel, Alinda W M; Holleboom, Adriaan G; Hoekstra, Menno; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Van Berkel, Theo J C; Rensen, Patrick C N; Van Eck, Miranda

    OBJECTIVE: Disruption of scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in mice impairs high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (HDL-C) delivery to the liver and induces susceptibility to atherosclerosis. In this study, it was investigated whether introduction of cholesteryl ester transfer protein

  10. Effects of soy pinitol on the pro-inflammatory cytokines and scavenger receptors in oxidized low-density lipoprotein-treated THP-1 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Won-Ha; Kwon, Eun-Young; Kang, Mi Ae; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Park, Yong Bok; Jeon, Seon-Min

    2007-12-01

    Pinitol, a methylated form of D-chiro-inositol, acts as a insulin mediator. We investigated the effects of soy pinitol on the factors involved in foam cell formation using differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Pinitol slightly inhibited the lipid-laden foam cell formation by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) in a dose-dependent manner. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 releases were significantly reduced by pinitol treatment (0.05-0.5 mM), whereas interleukin-1beta and interleukin-8 secretions were significantly reduced in low-dose pinitol (0.05 or 0.1 mM) and 0.5 mM pinitol-treated cells, respectively, compared to no pinitol-treated cells. Gene expressions of CD36 and CD68 were significantly down-regulated by 0.05-0.5 mM pinitol compared to the oxLDL-treated control cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 gene expression was significantly decreased in 0.05-0.5 mM pinitol-treated cells compared to the no pinitol-treated macrophages. We conclude that pinitol has some inhibitory effects on foam cell formation by reducing lipid accumulation, secretion, and expression of some cytokines and macrophage scavenger receptor expression via its insulin-like action.

  11. Scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1) profoundly excludes high density lipoprotein (HDL) apolipoprotein AII as it nibbles HDL-cholesteryl ester.

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    Gillard, Baiba K; Bassett, G Randall; Gotto, Antonio M; Rosales, Corina; Pownall, Henry J

    2017-05-26

    Reverse cholesterol transport (transfer of macrophage-cholesterol in the subendothelial space of the arterial wall to the liver) is terminated by selective high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesteryl ester (CE) uptake, mediated by scavenger receptor class B, type 1 (SR-B1). We tested the validity of two models for this process: "gobbling," i.e. one-step transfer of all HDL-CE to the cell and "nibbling," multiple successive cycles of SR-B1-HDL association during which a few CEs transfer to the cell. Concurrently, we compared cellular uptake of apoAI with that of apoAII, which is more lipophilic than apoAI, using HDL-[(3)H]CE labeled with [(125)I]apoAI or [(125)I]apoAII. The studies were conducted in CHO-K1 and CHO-ldlA7 cells (LDLR(-/-)) with (CHO-SR-B1) and without SR-B1 overexpression and in human Huh7 hepatocytes. Relative to CE, both apoAI and apoAII were excluded from uptake by all cells. However, apoAII was more highly excluded from uptake (2-4×) than apoAI. To distinguish gobbling versus nibbling mechanisms, media from incubations of HDL with CHO-SR-B1 cells were analyzed by non-denaturing PAGE, size-exclusion chromatography, and the distribution of apoAI, apoAII, cholesterol, and phospholipid among HDL species as a function of incubation time. HDL size gradually decreased, i.e. nibbling, with the concurrent release of lipid-free apoAI; apoAII was retained in an HDL remnant. Our data support an SR-B1 nibbling mechanism that is similar to that of streptococcal serum opacity factor, which also selectively removes CE and releases apoAI, leaving an apoAII-rich remnant. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Scavenger Receptors: Emerging Roles in Cancer Biology and Immunology.

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    Yu, Xiaofei; Guo, Chunqing; Fisher, Paul B; Subjeck, John R; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of evolutionally conserved protein molecules that are structurally and functionally diverse. Although scavenger receptors were originally identified based on their capacity to scavenge modified lipoproteins, these molecules have been shown to recognize and bind to a broad spectrum of ligands, including modified and unmodified host-derived molecules or microbial components. As a major subset of innate pattern recognition receptors, scavenger receptors are mainly expressed on myeloid cells and function in a wide range of biological processes, such as endocytosis, adhesion, lipid transport, antigen presentation, and pathogen clearance. In addition to playing a crucial role in maintenance of host homeostasis, scavenger receptors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, e.g., atherosclerosis, neurodegeneration, or metabolic disorders. Emerging evidence has begun to reveal these receptor molecules as important regulators of tumor behavior and host immune responses to cancer. This review summarizes our current understanding on the newly identified, distinct functions of scavenger receptors in cancer biology and immunology. The potential of scavenger receptors as diagnostic biomarkers and novel targets for therapeutic interventions to treat malignancies is also highlighted.

  13. Pathways for Modulating Exosome Lipids Identified By High-Density Lipoprotein-Like Nanoparticle Binding to Scavenger Receptor Type B-1.

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    Angeloni, Nicholas L; McMahon, Kaylin M; Swaminathan, Suchitra; Plebanek, Michael P; Osman, Iman; Volpert, Olga V; Thaxton, C Shad

    2016-03-11

    Exosomes are produced by cells to mediate intercellular communication, and have been shown to perpetuate diseases, including cancer. New tools are needed to understand exosome biology, detect exosomes from specific cell types in complex biological media, and to modify exosomes. Our data demonstrate a cellular pathway whereby membrane-bound scavenger receptor type B-1 (SR-B1) in parent cells becomes incorporated into exosomes. We tailored synthetic HDL-like nanoparticles (HDL NP), high-affinity ligands for SR-B1, to carry a fluorescently labeled phospholipid. Data show SR-B1-dependent transfer of the fluorescent phospholipid from HDL NPs to exosomes. Modified exosomes are stable in serum and can be directly detected using flow cytometry. As proof-of-concept, human serum exosomes were found to express SR-B1, and HDL NPs can be used to label and isolate them. Ultimately, we discovered a natural cellular pathway and nanoparticle-receptor pair that enables exosome modulation, detection, and isolation.

  14. Hypervariable Region 1 Deletion and Required Adaptive Envelope Mutations Confer Decreased Dependency on Scavenger Receptor Class B Type I and Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor for Hepatitis C Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentoe, Jannick; Serre, Stéphanie B N; Ramirez, Santseharay;

    2014-01-01

    Hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) of envelope protein 2 (E2) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) serves important, yet undefined, roles in the viral life cycle. We previously showed that viability of HVR1-deleted JFH1-based recombinants with Core-NS2 of H77 (H77ΔHVR1, genotype 1a) and S52 (S52ΔHVR1, 3a) in Huh7.......5 cells was rescued by E2 substitutions N476D/S733F and E1 substitution A369V, respectively; HVR1-deleted J6 (J6ΔHVR1, 2a) was fully viable. In single-cycle production assays, where HCV RNA was transfected into entry-deficient Huh7-derived S29 cells with low CD81 expression, we found no effect of HVR1...... deletion on replication or particle release for H77 and S52. HCV pseudo-particle assays in Huh7.5 cells showed that HVR1 deletion decreased entry by 20-100 fold for H77, J6, and S52; N476D/S733F restored entry for H77ΔHVR1, but A369V further decreased S52ΔHVR1 entry. We investigated receptor usage...

  15. Salvianolic acid B inhibits macrophage uptake of modified low density lipoprotein (mLDL) in a scavenger receptor CD36-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yi; Wang, Li; Xu, Yanni; Yang, Yuan; Wang, Lifei; Si, Shuyi; Cho, Sunghee; Hong, Bin

    2012-01-01

    CD36, a class B scavenger receptor, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a host of vascular inflammatory diseases. Through a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for CD36 antagonist, we previously identified salvianolic acid B (SAB), a hydrophilic component derived from the herb Danshen, as a potential candidate. Danshen, the dried roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been widely used in China for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis-related disorders. Previous studies showed that SAB acted as an anti-oxidant by preventing lipid peroxidation and oxidized LDL (oxLDL) formation. The present study was to investigate the specificity and efficacy of SAB in the inhibition of CD36-mediated lipid uptake. SAB reduced modified LDL (mLDL) uptake in a dose-dependent manner in phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated THP-1 and RAW 264.7 cells. In the CD36 silenced THP-1 cells, SAB had no effect in reducing mLDL uptake, whereas its over-expression in CHO cells reinstates the effect, indicating a specific involvement of SAB in antagonizing the CD36's function. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis revealed a direct binding of SAB to CD36 with a high affinity (KD =3.74 μM), confirming physical interactions of SAB with the receptor. Additionally, SAB reduced oxLDL-induced CD36 gene expression in the cultured cell lines and primary macrophages. In ApoE KO mice fed a high fat diet, SAB reduced CD36 gene expression and lipid uptake in macrophages, showing its ability to antagonize CD36 pathways in vivo. These results demonstrate that SAB is an effective CD36 antagonist and suggest SAB as a potential anti-atherosclerotic agent. PMID:22658257

  16. Lipoprotein Receptors Redundantly Participate in Entry of Hepatitis C Virus.

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    Satomi Yamamoto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1 and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR are known to be involved in entry of hepatitis C virus (HCV, but their precise roles and their interplay are not fully understood. In this study, deficiency of both SR-B1 and LDLR in Huh7 cells was shown to impair the entry of HCV more strongly than deficiency of either SR-B1 or LDLR alone. In addition, exogenous expression of not only SR-B1 and LDLR but also very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR rescued HCV entry in the SR-B1 and LDLR double-knockout cells, suggesting that VLDLR has similar roles in HCV entry. VLDLR is a lipoprotein receptor, but the level of its hepatic expression was lower than those of SR-B1 and LDLR. Moreover, expression of mutant lipoprotein receptors incapable of binding to or uptake of lipid resulted in no or slight enhancement of HCV entry in the double-knockout cells, suggesting that binding and/or uptake activities of lipid by lipoprotein receptors are essential for HCV entry. In addition, rescue of infectivity in the double-knockout cells by the expression of the lipoprotein receptors was not observed following infection with pseudotype particles bearing HCV envelope proteins produced in non-hepatic cells, suggesting that lipoproteins associated with HCV particles participate in the entry through their interaction with lipoprotein receptors. Buoyant density gradient analysis revealed that HCV utilizes these lipoprotein receptors in a manner dependent on the lipoproteins associated with HCV particles. Collectively, these results suggest that lipoprotein receptors redundantly participate in the entry of HCV.

  17. Lipoprotein Receptors Redundantly Participate in Entry of Hepatitis C Virus.

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    Yamamoto, Satomi; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Ono, Chikako; Uemura, Kentaro; Kawachi, Yukako; Shiokawa, Mai; Mori, Hiroyuki; Wada, Masami; Shima, Ryoichi; Okamoto, Toru; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Chayama, Kazuaki; Wakita, Takaji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2016-05-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) are known to be involved in entry of hepatitis C virus (HCV), but their precise roles and their interplay are not fully understood. In this study, deficiency of both SR-B1 and LDLR in Huh7 cells was shown to impair the entry of HCV more strongly than deficiency of either SR-B1 or LDLR alone. In addition, exogenous expression of not only SR-B1 and LDLR but also very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) rescued HCV entry in the SR-B1 and LDLR double-knockout cells, suggesting that VLDLR has similar roles in HCV entry. VLDLR is a lipoprotein receptor, but the level of its hepatic expression was lower than those of SR-B1 and LDLR. Moreover, expression of mutant lipoprotein receptors incapable of binding to or uptake of lipid resulted in no or slight enhancement of HCV entry in the double-knockout cells, suggesting that binding and/or uptake activities of lipid by lipoprotein receptors are essential for HCV entry. In addition, rescue of infectivity in the double-knockout cells by the expression of the lipoprotein receptors was not observed following infection with pseudotype particles bearing HCV envelope proteins produced in non-hepatic cells, suggesting that lipoproteins associated with HCV particles participate in the entry through their interaction with lipoprotein receptors. Buoyant density gradient analysis revealed that HCV utilizes these lipoprotein receptors in a manner dependent on the lipoproteins associated with HCV particles. Collectively, these results suggest that lipoprotein receptors redundantly participate in the entry of HCV.

  18. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

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    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C l...

  19. The Evolution of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Domain of the Class A Scavenger Receptors

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    Nicholas eYap

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The class A Scavenger Receptor (cA-SR family is a group of five evolutionarily related innate immune receptors. The cA-SRs are known for their promiscuous ligand binding; as they have been shown to bind bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli, as well as different modified forms of low-density lipoprotein. Three of the five family members possess a Scavenger Receptor Cysteine Rich (SRCR domain while the remaining two receptors lack the domain. Previous work has suggested that the Macrophage Associated Receptor with COllagenous structure (MARCO shares a recent common ancestor with the non-SRCR-containing receptors; however the origin of the SRCR domain within the cA-SRs remains unknown. We hypothesize that the SRCR domains of the cA-SRs have a common origin that predates teleost fish. Using the newly available sequence data from sea lamprey and ghost shark genome projects, we have shown that MARCO shares a common ancestor with the SRCR-containing proteins. In addition, we explored the evolutionary relationships within the SRCR domain by reconstructing the ancestral SRCR domains of the cA-SRs. We identified a motif that is highly conserved between the cA-SR SRCR domains and the ancestral SRCR domain that consist of WGTVCDD. We also show that the GRAEVYY motif, a functionally important motif within MARCO, is poorly conserved in the other cA-SRs and in the reconstructed ancestral domain. Further, we identified three sites within MARCO’s SRCR domain which are under positive selection. Two of these sites lie adjacent to the conserved WGTVCDD motif, and may indicate a potential biological function for these sites. Together these findings indicate a common origin of the SRCR domain within the cA-SRs; however different selective pressures between the proteins may have caused MARCOs SRCR domain to evolve to contain different functional motifs when compared to the other SRCR-containing cA-SRs.

  20. The evolution of the class A scavenger receptors

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    Whelan Fiona J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The class A scavenger receptors are a subclass of a diverse family of proteins defined based on their ability to bind modified lipoproteins. The 5 members of this family are strikingly variable in their protein structure and function, raising the question as to whether it is appropriate to group them as a family based on their ligand binding abilities. Results To investigate these relationships, we defined the domain architecture of each of the 5 members followed by collecting and annotating class A scavenger receptor mRNA and amino acid sequences from publicly available databases. Phylogenetic analyses, sequence alignments, and permutation tests revealed a common evolutionary ancestry of these proteins, indicating that they form a protein family. We postulate that 4 distinct gene duplication events and subsequent domain fusions, internal repeats, and deletions are responsible for the diverse protein structures and functions of this family. Despite variation in domain structure, there are highly conserved regions across all 5 members, indicating the possibility that these regions may represent key conserved functional motifs. Conclusions We have shown with significant evidence that the 5 members of the class A scavenger receptors form a protein family. We have indicated that these receptors have a common origin which may provide insight into future functional work with these proteins.

  1. Scavenger receptor BI: A multi-purpose player in cholesterol and steroid metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Menno; Hoekstra; Theo; JC; Van; Berkel; Miranda; Van; Eck

    2010-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type Ⅰ (SR-BI) is an important member of the scavenger receptor family of integral membrane glycoproteins. This review highlights studies in SR-BI knockout mice, which concern the role of SR-BI in cholesterol and steroid metabolism. SR-BI in hepatocytes is the sole molecule involved in selective uptake of cholesteryl esters from high-density lipoprotein (HDL). SR-BI plays a physiological role in binding and uptake of native apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins by hepato...

  2. Scavenger Receptors and Resistance to Inhaled Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    directs mod- ified proteins to antigen presentation. Eur. J. Immunol. 29: 512–521. 30. Granucci, F., F. Petralia, M. Urbano , S. Citterio, F. Di Tota, L...11 Suppl:S32-6. 50. Granucci F, Petralia F, Urbano M, Citterio S, Di Tota F, Santambrogio L, Ricciardi-Castagnoli P: The scavenger receptor MARCO

  3. Roles of lipoprotein receptors in the entry of hepatitis C virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingya; Lyu; Hitomi; Imachi; Kensaku; Fukunaga; Takuo; Yoshimoto; Huanxiang; Zhang; Koji; Murao

    2015-01-01

    Infection by hepatitis C virus(HCV), a plus-stranded RNA virus that can cause cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, is one of the major health problems in the world. HCV infection is considered as a multistep complex process and correlated with abnormal metabolism of lipoprotein. In addition, virus attacks hepatocytes by the initial attaching viral envelop glycoprotein E1/E2 to receptors of lipoproteins on host cells. With the development of HCV model system, mechanisms of HCV cell entry through lipoprotein uptake and its receptor have been extensively studied in detail. Here we summarize recent knowledge about the role of lipoprotein receptors, scavenger receptor class B type Ⅰ and low-density lipoprotein receptor in the entry of HCV, providing a foundation of novel targeting therapeutic tools against HCV infection.

  4. Scavenger Receptors and Their Potential as Therapeutic Targets in the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease

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    Sam L. Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Scavenger receptors act as membrane-bound and soluble proteins that bind to macromolecular complexes and pathogens. This diverse supergroup of proteins mediates binding to modified lipoprotein particles which regulate the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic plaques. In vascular tissues, scavenger receptors are implicated in regulating intracellular signaling, lipid accumulation, foam cell development, and cellular apoptosis or necrosis linked to the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. One approach is using gene therapy to modulate scavenger receptor function in atherosclerosis. Ectopic expression of membrane-bound scavenger receptors using viral vectors can modify lipid profiles and reduce the incidence of atherosclerosis. Alternatively, expression of soluble scavenger receptors can also block plaque initiation and progression. Inhibition of scavenger receptor expression using a combined gene therapy and RNA interference strategy also holds promise for long-term therapy. Here we review our current understanding of the gene delivery by viral vectors to cells and tissues in gene therapy strategies and its application to the modulation of scavenger receptor function in atherosclerosis.

  5. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

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    Sander Kersten

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that mediates the effect of dietary fatty acids and certain drugs on plasma lipoproteins are the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs. Three PPAR isotypes can be distinguished, all of which have a major role in regulating lipoprotein metabolism. PPARα is the molecular target for the fibrate class of drugs. Activation of PPARα in mice and humans markedly reduces hepatic triglyceride production and promotes plasma triglyceride clearance, leading to a clinically significant reduction in plasma triglyceride levels. In addition, plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol levels are increased upon PPARα activation in humans. PPARγ is the molecular target for the thiazolidinedione class of drugs. Activation of PPARγ in mice and human is generally associated with a modest increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol and a decrease in plasma triglycerides. The latter effect is caused by an increase in lipoprotein lipase-dependent plasma triglyceride clearance. Analogous to PPARα, activation of PPARβ/δ leads to increased plasma HDL-cholesterol and decreased plasma triglyceride levels. In this paper, a fresh perspective on the relation between PPARs and lipoprotein metabolism is presented. The emphasis is on the physiological role of PPARs and the mechanisms underlying the effect of synthetic PPAR agonists on plasma lipoprotein levels.

  6. Hypocholesterolemia, foam cell accumulation, but no atherosclerosis in mice lacking ABC-transporter A1 and scavenger receptor BI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Ying; Pennings, Marieke; Vrins, Carlos L. J.; Calpe-Berdiel, Laura; Hoekstra, Menno; Kruijt, J. Kar; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Hildebrand, Reeni B.; van der Sluis, Ronald; Jessup, Wendy; Le Goff, Wilfried; Chapman, M. John; Huby, Thierry; Groen, Albert K.; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Van Eck, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) mediated reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is regarded to be crucial for prevention of foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. ABC-transporter A1 (ABCA1) and scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) are involved in the biogenesis of HDL and the selective delivery of HDL choles

  7. Mycoplasma lipoproteins and Toll-like receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-ling ZUO; Yi-mou WU; Xiao-xing YOU

    2009-01-01

    Mycoplasmas, the smallest free-living, self-replicating bacteria with diameters of 200 to 800 nm, have been reported to be associated with human diseases. It is well known that the mycoplasma lipoprotein/peptide is able to modulate the host immune system, whose N-terminal structure is an important factor in inducing immunity and distinguishing Toll-like receptors (TLRs). However, there is still no clear elucidation about the pathogenic mechanism of mycoplasma lipoprotein/peptide and the signaling pathway. Some researchers have focused on understanding the structures of these proteins and the relationships between their structure and biological function. This review provides an update on the research in this field.

  8. Scavenger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Scavenger is one of the cyber foraging frameworks developed in the Locusts project. It has been released as open source software at http://code.google.com/p/scavenger-cf/......Scavenger is one of the cyber foraging frameworks developed in the Locusts project. It has been released as open source software at http://code.google.com/p/scavenger-cf/...

  9. Modulation of lipoprotein receptor functions by intracellular adaptor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolt, Peggy C; Bock, Hans H

    2006-10-01

    Members of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family are critically involved in a wide range of physiological processes including lipid and vitamin homeostasis, cellular migration, neurodevelopment, and synaptic plasticity, to name a few. Lipoprotein receptors exert these diverse biological functions by acting as cellular uptake receptors or by inducing intracellular signaling cascades. It was discovered that a short sequence in the intracellular region of all lipoprotein receptors, Asn-Pro-X-Tyr (NPXY) is important for mediating either endocytosis or signal transduction events, and that this motif serves as a binding site for phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain containing scaffold proteins. These molecular adaptors connect the transmembrane receptors with the endocytosis machinery and regulate cellular trafficking, or function as assembly sites for dynamic multi-protein signaling complexes. Whereas the LDL receptor represents the archetype of an endocytic lipoprotein receptor, the structurally closely related apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor activate a kinase-dependent intracellular signaling cascade after binding to the neuronal signaling molecule Reelin. This review focuses on two related PTB domain containing adaptor proteins that mediate these divergent lipoprotein receptor responses, ARH (autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) and Dab1 (disabled-1), and discusses the structural and molecular basis of this different behaviour.

  10. Scavenger receptor BI boosts hepatocyte permissiveness to Plasmodium infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yalaoui, S.; Huby, T.; Franetich, J.F.; Gego, A.; Rametti, A.; Moreau, M.; Collet, X.; Siau, A.; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Sauerwein, R.W.; Luty, A.J.F.; Vaillant, J.C.; Hannoun, L.; Chapman, J.; Mazier, D.; Froissard, P.

    2008-01-01

    Infection of hepatocytes by Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites requires the host tetraspanin CD81. CD81 is also predicted to be a coreceptor, along with scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), for hepatitis C virus. Using SR-BI-knockout, SR-BI-hypomorphic and SR-BI-transgenic primary hepatocytes, as well as s

  11. Scavenger receptor AI/II truncation, lung function and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M; Nordestgaard, B G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A

    2011-01-01

    The scavenger receptor A-I/II (SRA-I/II) on alveolar macrophages is involved in recognition and clearance of modified lipids and inhaled particulates. A rare variant of the SRA-I/II gene, Arg293X, truncates the distal collagen-like domain, which is essential for ligand recognition. We tested whet...

  12. Identification of the receptor scavenging hemopexin-heme complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Jacobsen, Christian

    2005-01-01

    and is suggested to facilitate cellular heme metabolism. Using a ligand-affinity approach, we purified the human hemopexin-heme receptor and identified it as the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP)/CD91, a receptor expressed in several cell types including macrophages, hepatocytes, neurons......-heme complex established the ability of LRP/CD91 to mediate hemopexin-heme internalization resulting in cellular heme uptake and lysosomal hemopexin degradation. Uptake of hemopexin-heme complex induced LRP/CD91-dependent heme-oxygenase 1 mRNA transcription in cultured monocytes. In conclusion, hemopexin...

  13. Triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism in unique VLDL receptor, LDL receptor, and LRP triple-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espirito Santo, S.M.S.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Goudriaan, J.R.; Bensadoun, A.; Bovenschen, N.; Voshol, P.J.; Havekes, L.M.; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van

    2005-01-01

    The very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) are the three main apolipoprotein E-recognizing endocytic receptors involved in the clearance of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins from plasma.

  14. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that

  15. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that

  16. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J

    2006-01-01

    CD163 is the monocyte/macrophage-specific receptor for haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb) complexes. The cytoplasmic tail of human CD163 exists as a short tail variant and two long tail variants. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that all three CD163 variants...... are substantially expressed in blood, liver, and spleen, and the short tail variant is the predominant mRNA species. Using cell transfectants in which cDNA encoding the CD163 variants was inserted at the same site in the genome, we evaluated the expression and endocytic properties of the tail variants. Ligand...... uptake analysis showed that cells expressing the CD163 short tail variant exhibited a higher capacity for ligand endocytosis than cells expressing the CD163 long tail variants. The difference in endocytic activity was explained by confocal microscopic analysis, showing marked deviations in subcellular...

  17. SCARB1 Gene Variants Are Associated With the Phenotype of Combined High High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and High Lipoprotein (a)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaoping; Sethi, Amar A; Yanek, Lisa R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: SR-B1 (scavenger receptor class B type 1), encoded by the gene SCARB1, is a lipoprotein receptor that binds both high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein. We reported that SR-B1 is also a receptor for lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)), mediating cellular uptake of Lp(a) in vitro...

  18. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Larach, Daniel B;

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL......-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss......-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from...

  19. Scavenger Receptor Mediates Systemic RNA Interference in Ticks

    OpenAIRE

    Kyaw Min Aung; Damdinsuren Boldbaatar; Rika Umemiya-Shirafuji; Min Liao; Xuan Xuenan; Hiroshi Suzuki; Remil Linggatong Galay; Tetsuya Tanaka; Kozo Fujisaki

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference is an efficient method to silence gene and protein expressions. Here, the class B scavenger receptor CD36 (SRB) mediated the uptake of exogenous dsRNAs in the induction of the RNAi responses in ticks. Unfed female Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks were injected with a single or a combination of H. longicornis SRB (HlSRB) dsRNA, vitellogenin-1 (HlVg-1) dsRNA, and vitellogenin receptor (HlVgR) dsRNA. We found that specific and systemic silencing of the HlSRB, HlVg-1, and HlVgR ge...

  20. Endothelial Expression of Scavenger Receptor Class B, Type I Protects against Development of Atherosclerosis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris L. Vaisman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI in endothelial cells (EC was examined in several novel transgenic mouse models expressing SR-BI in endothelium of mice with normal C57Bl6/N, apoE-KO, or Scarb1-KO backgrounds. Mice were also created expressing SR-BI exclusively in endothelium and liver. Endothelial expression of the Tie2-Scarb1 transgene had no significant effect on plasma lipoprotein levels in mice on a normal chow diet but on an atherogenic diet, significantly decreased plasma cholesterol levels, increased plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C levels, and protected mice against atherosclerosis. In 8-month-old apoE-KO mice fed a normal chow diet, the Tie2-Scarb1 transgene decreased aortic lesions by 24%. Mice expressing SR-BI only in EC and liver had a 1.5 ± 0.1-fold increase in plasma cholesterol compared to mice synthesizing SR-BI only in liver. This elevation was due mostly to increased HDL-C. In EC culture studies, SR-BI was found to be present in both basolateral and apical membranes but greater cellular uptake of cholesterol from HDL was found in the basolateral compartment. In summary, enhanced expression of SR-BI in EC resulted in a less atherogenic lipoprotein profile and decreased atherosclerosis, suggesting a possible role for endothelial SR-BI in the flux of cholesterol across EC.

  1. Scavenger receptor BI: a multi-purpose player in cholesterol and steroid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Menno; Van Berkel, Theo-Jc; Van Eck, Miranda

    2010-12-21

    Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) is an important member of the scavenger receptor family of integral membrane glycoproteins. This review highlights studies in SR-BI knockout mice, which concern the role of SR-BI in cholesterol and steroid metabolism. SR-BI in hepatocytes is the sole molecule involved in selective uptake of cholesteryl esters from high-density lipoprotein (HDL). SR-BI plays a physiological role in binding and uptake of native apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins by hepatocytes, which identifies SR-BI as a multi-purpose player in lipid uptake from the blood circulation into hepatocytes in mice. In adrenocortical cells, SR-BI mediates the selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters, which is efficiently coupled to the synthesis of glucocorticoids (i.e. corticosterone). SR-BI knockout mice suffer from adrenal glucocorticoid insufficiency, which suggests that functional SR-BI protein is necessary for optimal adrenal steroidogenesis in mice. SR-BI in macrophages plays a dual role in cholesterol metabolism as it is able to take up cholesterol associated with HDL and apoB-containing lipoproteins and can possibly facilitate cholesterol efflux to HDL. Absence of SR-BI is associated with thrombocytopenia and altered thrombosis susceptibility, which suggests a novel role for SR-BI in regulating platelet number and function in mice. Transgenic expression of cholesteryl ester transfer protein in humanized SR-BI knockout mice normalizes hepatic delivery of HDL-cholesteryl esters. However, other pathologies associated with SR-BI deficiency, i.e. increased atherosclerosis susceptibility, adrenal glucocorticoid insufficiency, and impaired platelet function are not normalized, which suggests an important role for SR-BI in cholesterol and steroid metabolism in man. In conclusion, generation of SR-BI knockout mice has significantly contributed to our knowledge of the physiological role of SR-BI. Studies using these mice have identified SR-BI as a

  2. Intestinal scavenger receptors are involved in vitamin K1 absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Margier, Marielle; Roi, Stéphanie; Collet, Xavier; Niot, Isabelle; Goupy, Pascale; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2014-10-31

    Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) intestinal absorption is thought to be mediated by a carrier protein that still remains to be identified. Apical transport of vitamin K1 was examined using Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers as a model of human intestinal epithelium and in transfected HEK cells. Phylloquinone uptake was then measured ex vivo using mouse intestinal explants. Finally, vitamin K1 absorption was compared between wild-type mice and mice overexpressing scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in the intestine and mice deficient in cluster determinant 36 (CD36). Phylloquinone uptake by Caco-2 cells was saturable and was significantly impaired by co-incubation with α-tocopherol (and vice versa). Anti-human SR-BI antibodies and BLT1 (a chemical inhibitor of lipid transport via SR-BI) blocked up to 85% of vitamin K1 uptake. BLT1 also decreased phylloquinone apical efflux by ∼80%. Transfection of HEK cells with SR-BI and CD36 significantly enhanced vitamin K1 uptake, which was subsequently decreased by the addition of BLT1 or sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (CD36 inhibitor), respectively. Similar results were obtained in mouse intestinal explants. In vivo, the phylloquinone postprandial response was significantly higher, and the proximal intestine mucosa phylloquinone content 4 h after gavage was increased in mice overexpressing SR-BI compared with controls. Phylloquinone postprandial response was also significantly increased in CD36-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice, but their vitamin K1 intestinal content remained unchanged. Overall, the present data demonstrate for the first time that intestinal scavenger receptors participate in the absorption of dietary phylloquinone.

  3. Intestinal Scavenger Receptors Are Involved in Vitamin K1 Absorption*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Margier, Marielle; Roi, Stéphanie; Collet, Xavier; Niot, Isabelle; Goupy, Pascale; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) intestinal absorption is thought to be mediated by a carrier protein that still remains to be identified. Apical transport of vitamin K1 was examined using Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers as a model of human intestinal epithelium and in transfected HEK cells. Phylloquinone uptake was then measured ex vivo using mouse intestinal explants. Finally, vitamin K1 absorption was compared between wild-type mice and mice overexpressing scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in the intestine and mice deficient in cluster determinant 36 (CD36). Phylloquinone uptake by Caco-2 cells was saturable and was significantly impaired by co-incubation with α-tocopherol (and vice versa). Anti-human SR-BI antibodies and BLT1 (a chemical inhibitor of lipid transport via SR-BI) blocked up to 85% of vitamin K1 uptake. BLT1 also decreased phylloquinone apical efflux by ∼80%. Transfection of HEK cells with SR-BI and CD36 significantly enhanced vitamin K1 uptake, which was subsequently decreased by the addition of BLT1 or sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (CD36 inhibitor), respectively. Similar results were obtained in mouse intestinal explants. In vivo, the phylloquinone postprandial response was significantly higher, and the proximal intestine mucosa phylloquinone content 4 h after gavage was increased in mice overexpressing SR-BI compared with controls. Phylloquinone postprandial response was also significantly increased in CD36-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice, but their vitamin K1 intestinal content remained unchanged. Overall, the present data demonstrate for the first time that intestinal scavenger receptors participate in the absorption of dietary phylloquinone. PMID:25228690

  4. Class A scavenger receptor promotes osteoclast differentiation via the enhanced expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B (RANK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemura, Kenichi [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic and Neuro-Musculoskeletal Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Sakashita, Naomi; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Lei, XiaoFeng; Ohnishi, Koji [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Suzuki, Hiroshi [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Kodama, Tatsuhiko [Department of Molecular Biology and Medicine, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Mizuta, Hiroshi [Department of Orthopaedic and Neuro-Musculoskeletal Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Takeya, Motohiro, E-mail: takeya@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan)

    2010-01-22

    Osteoclasts originate from bone marrow monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, and their differentiation depends on macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) ligand. Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) is one of the principal functional molecules of macrophages, and its level of expression declines during osteoclast differentiation. To investigate the role of SR-A in osteoclastogenesis, we examined pathological changes in femoral bone and the expression levels of osteoclastogenesis-related molecules in SR-A{sup -/-} mice. The femoral osseous density of SR-A{sup -/-} mice was higher than that of SR-A{sup +/+} mice, and the number of multinucleated osteoclasts was significantly decreased. An in vitro differentiation assay revealed that the differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts from bone marrow-derived progenitor cells is impaired in SR-A{sup -/-} mice. Elimination of SR-A did not alter the expression level of the M-CSF receptor, c-fms; however, the expression levels of RANK and RANK-related osteoclast-differentiation molecules such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) significantly decreased. Furthermore, acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL), an SR-A ligand, significantly increased the expression level of RANK and MITF during osteoclast differentiation. These data indicate that SR-A promotes osteoclastogenesis via augmentation of the expression level of RANK and its related molecules.

  5. Functional Roles of the Interaction of APP and Lipoprotein Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlkamp, Theresa; Wasser, Catherine R.; Herz, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    The biological fates of the key initiator of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and a family of lipoprotein receptors, the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related proteins (LRPs) and their molecular roles in the neurodegenerative disease process are inseparably interwoven. Not only does APP bind tightly to the extracellular domains (ECDs) of several members of the LRP group, their intracellular portions are also connected through scaffolds like the one established by FE65 proteins and through interactions with adaptor proteins such as X11/Mint and Dab1. Moreover, the ECDs of APP and LRPs share common ligands, most notably Reelin, a regulator of neuronal migration during embryonic development and modulator of synaptic transmission in the adult brain, and Agrin, another signaling protein which is essential for the formation and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and which likely also has critical, though at this time less well defined, roles for the regulation of central synapses. Furthermore, the major independent risk factors for AD, Apolipoprotein (Apo) E and ApoJ/Clusterin, are lipoprotein ligands for LRPs. Receptors and ligands mutually influence their intracellular trafficking and thereby the functions and abilities of neurons and the blood-brain-barrier to turn over and remove the pathological product of APP, the amyloid-β peptide. This article will review and summarize the molecular mechanisms that are shared by APP and LRPs and discuss their relative contributions to AD.

  6. [Scavenger receptor CD36: its expression, regulation, and role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Part I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuliczkowska-Płaksej, Justyna; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grazyna; Płaksej, Rafał; Filus, Alicja

    2006-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive pathological process based on endothelial dysfunction and chronic inflammation. Monocytes, macrophages, and modified lipoproteins, especially oxidized LDLs (oxLDLs), play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Monocytes evolve into macrophages in the vascular wall and then accumulate oxLDLs, forming foam cells. OxLDLs are toxic and activate foam cells, stimulate the replication of macrophages and their migration into atherosclerotic plaque, and increase the expression of metaloproteinases. Macrophages bind oxLDLs through many types of receptors, among them scavenger receptors. One of these is CD36, a membrane glycoprotein expressed by endothelial cells, adipocytes, smooth and skeletal muscle cells, cardiomiocytes, platelets, monocytes, and macrophages. CD36 recognizes and binds many ligands, such as oxLDLs, long-chain fatty acids, collagen, thrombospondin 1, apoptotic cells, anionic phospholipids, and Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. CD36 is involved in many processes, e.g. inner immune system responses, removal of apoptotic cells and Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes, and the transport of long-chain fatty acids, and it also mediates collagen and thrombospondin action. Recent reports indicate that CD36 may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. An animal model revealed that lack of CD36 expression restrains atheroslerosis. Increased expression of CD36 was shown in atheroslerotic plaque and damaged vascular tissue. Contradictory data about the effects of antiatherosclerotic drugs on CD36 expression indicate the necessity for further investigation of the role of CD36 in the development of atherosclerosis.

  7. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A.; Larach, Daniel B.; Hancock-Cerutti, William F.; Millar, John S.; Cuchel, Marina; DerOhannessian, Stephanie; Kontush, Anatol; Surendran, Praveen; Saleheen, Danish; Trompet, Stella; Jukema, J. Wouter; De Craen, Anton; Deloukas, Panos; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris; Majumder, Abdullah al Shafi; Alam, Dewan S.; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Abecasis, Goncalo; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Erdmann, Jeanette; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schmidt, Ruth Frikke; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Liu, Dajiang J.; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Salomaa, Veikko; Männistö, Satu; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Ferrieres, Jean; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ferrario, Marco; Kee, Frank; Willer, Cristen J.; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Butterworth, Adam S.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Peloso, Gina M.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Danesh, John; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from the homozygous subject, and in mice. Large population-based studies revealed that subjects who are heterozygous carriers of the P376L variant have significantly increased levels of plasma HDL-C. P376L carriers have a profound HDL-related phenotype and an increased risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.79, which is statistically significant). PMID:26965621

  8. Serum lipoproteins attenuate macrophage activation and Toll-Like Receptor stimulation by bacterial lipoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Richard W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydia trachomatis was previously shown to express a lipoprotein, the macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip, exposed at the bacterial surface, and able to stimulate human primary monocytes/macrophages through Toll Like Receptor (TLR2/TLR1/TLR6, and CD14. In PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells the proinflammatory activity of Mip was significantly higher in the absence than in the presence of serum. The present study aims to investigate the ability of different serum factors to attenuate Mip proinflammatory activity in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells and in primary human differentiated macrophages. The study was also extend to another lipoprotein, the Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein (OspA. The proinflammatory activity was studied through Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α and Interleukin (IL-8 release. Finally, TLR1/2 human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293 transfected cells were used to test the ability of the serum factors to inhibit Mip and OspA proinflammatory activity. Results In the absence of any serum and in the presence of 10% delipidated FBS, production of Mip-induced TNF-α and IL-8 in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were similar whereas they were significantly decreased in the presence of 10% FBS suggesting an inhibiting role of lipids present in FBS. In the presence of 10% human serum, the concentrations of TNF-α and IL-8 were 2 to 5 times lower than in the presence of 10% FBS suggesting the presence of more potent inhibitor(s in human serum than in FBS. Similar results were obtained in primary human differentiated macrophages. Different lipid components of human serum were then tested (total lipoproteins, HDL, LDL, VLDL, triglyceride emulsion, apolipoprotein (apoA-I, B, E2, and E3. The most efficient inhibitors were LDL, VLDL, and apoB that reduced the mean concentration of TNF-α release in Mip-induced macrophages to 24, 20, and 2%, respectively (p Conclusions These results demonstrated the ability of

  9. Defective expression of scavenger receptors in celiac disease mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura Cupi

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a gluten sensitive enteropathy characterized by a marked infiltration of the mucosa with immune cells, over-production of inflammatory cytokines and epithelial cell damage. The factors/mechanisms that sustain and amplify the ongoing mucosal inflammation in CD are not however fully understood. Here, we have examined whether in CD there is a defective clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, a phenomenon that helps promote tolerogenic signals thus liming pathogenic responses. Accumulation of apoptotic cells and bodies was more pronounced in the epithelial and lamina propria compartments of active CD patients as compared to inactive CD patients and normal controls. Expression of scavenger receptors, which are involved in the clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, namely thrombospondin (TSP-1, CD36 and CD61, was significantly reduced in active CD as compared to inactive CD and normal mucosal samples. Consistently, lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC of active CD patients had diminished ability to phagocyte apoptotic cells. Interleukin (IL-15, IL-21 and interferon-γ, cytokines over-produced in active CD, inhibited the expression of TSP-1, CD36, and CD61 in normal intestinal LPMC. These results indicate that CD-related inflammation is marked by diminished clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, thus suggesting a role for such a defect in the ongoing mucosal inflammation in this disorder.

  10. Defective expression of scavenger receptors in celiac disease mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupi, Maria Laura; Sarra, Massimiliano; De Nitto, Daniela; Franzè, Eleonora; Marafini, Irene; Monteleone, Ivan; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Paoluzi, Omero Alessandro; Di Fusco, Davide; Gentileschi, Paolo; Ortenzi, Angela; Colantoni, Alfredo; Pallone, Francesco; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a gluten sensitive enteropathy characterized by a marked infiltration of the mucosa with immune cells, over-production of inflammatory cytokines and epithelial cell damage. The factors/mechanisms that sustain and amplify the ongoing mucosal inflammation in CD are not however fully understood. Here, we have examined whether in CD there is a defective clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, a phenomenon that helps promote tolerogenic signals thus liming pathogenic responses. Accumulation of apoptotic cells and bodies was more pronounced in the epithelial and lamina propria compartments of active CD patients as compared to inactive CD patients and normal controls. Expression of scavenger receptors, which are involved in the clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, namely thrombospondin (TSP)-1, CD36 and CD61, was significantly reduced in active CD as compared to inactive CD and normal mucosal samples. Consistently, lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) of active CD patients had diminished ability to phagocyte apoptotic cells. Interleukin (IL)-15, IL-21 and interferon-γ, cytokines over-produced in active CD, inhibited the expression of TSP-1, CD36, and CD61 in normal intestinal LPMC. These results indicate that CD-related inflammation is marked by diminished clearance of apoptotic cells/bodies, thus suggesting a role for such a defect in the ongoing mucosal inflammation in this disorder.

  11. Scavenger receptor BI and HDL regulate thymocyte apoptosis in sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ling; Zheng, Zhong; Ai, Junting; Howatt, Deborah A.; Mittelstadt, Paul R.; Thacker, Seth; Daugherty, Alan; Ashwell, Jonathan D.; Remaley, Alan T.; Li, Xiang-An

    2014-01-01

    Objective Thymocyte apoptosis is a major event in sepsis; however, how this process is regulated remains poorly understood. Approach and Results Septic stress induces glucocorticoids (GC) production which triggers thymocyte apoptosis. Here, we used scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) null mice, which are completely deficient in inducible GC (iGC) in sepsis, to investigate the regulation of thymocyte apoptosis in sepsis. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced profound thymocyte apoptosis in SR-BI+/+ mice, but no thymocyte apoptosis in SR-BI−/− mice due to lack of iGC. Unexpectedly, supplementation of GC only partly restored thymocyte apoptosis in SR-BI−/− mice. We demonstrated that HDL is a critical modulator for thymocyte apoptosis. SR-BI+/+ HDL significantly enhanced GC-induced thymocyte apoptosis but SR-BI−/− HDL had no such activity. Further study revealed that SR-BI+/+ HDL modulates GC-induced thymocyte apoptosis via promoting glucocorticoid receptor translocation, but SR-BI−/− HDL loses such regulatory activity. To understand why SR-BI−/− HDL loses its regulatory activity, we analyzed HDL cholesterol contents. There was 3-fold enrichment of unesterified cholesterol in SR-BI−/− HDL compared with SR-BI+/+ HDL. Normalization of unesterified cholesterol in SR-BI−/− HDL by probucol administration or LCAT expression restored GC-induced thymocyte apoptosis, and incorporating unesterified cholesterol into SR-BI+/+ HDL rendered SR-BI+/+ HDL dysfunctional. Using lckCre-GRfl/fl mice in whom thymocytes lack CLP-induced thymocyte apoptosis, we showed that lckCre-GRfl/fl mice were significantly more susceptible to CLP-induced septic death than GRfl/fl control mice, suggesting that GC-induced thymocyte apoptosis is required for protection against sepsis. Conclusions The findings in this study reveal a novel regulatory mechanism of thymocyte apoptosis in sepsis by SR-BI and HDL. PMID:24603680

  12. The role of scavenger receptor B1 in infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Schäfer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb and host cells is complex and far from being understood. The role of the different receptor(s implicated in the recognition of Mtb in particular remains poorly defined, and those that have been found to have activity in vitro were subsequently shown to be redundant in vivo. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To identify novel receptors involved in the recognition of Mtb, we screened a macrophage cDNA library and identified scavenger receptor B class 1 (SR-B1 as a receptor for mycobacteria. SR-B1 has been well-described as a lipoprotein receptor which mediates both the selective uptake of cholesteryl esters and the efflux of cholesterol, and has also recently been implicated in the recognition of other pathogens. We show here that mycobacteria can bind directly to SR-B1 on transfected cells, and that this interaction could be inhibited in the presence of a specific antibody to SR-B1, serum or LDL. We define a variety of macrophage populations, including alveolar macrophages, that express this receptor, however, no differences in the recognition and response to mycobacteria were observed in macrophages isolated from SR-B1(-/- or wild type mice in vitro. Moreover, when wild type and SR-B1(-/- animals were infected with a low dose of Mtb (100 CFU/mouse there were no alterations in survival, bacterial burdens, granuloma formation or cytokine production in the lung. However, significant reduction in the production of TNF, IFNgamma, and IL10 were observed in SR-B1(-/- mice following infection with a high dose of Mtb (1000 CFU/mouse, which marginally affected the size of inflammatory foci but did not influence bacterial burdens. Deficiency of SR-B1 also had no effect on resistance to disease under conditions of varying dietary cholesterol. We did observe, however, that the presence of high levels of cholesterol in the diet significantly enhanced the bacterial burdens in the lung, but this was

  13. The multiligand α2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliemann, Jørgen; Nykjær, Anders; Petersen, Claus Munck

    1994-01-01

    The fusion of separate lines of research has greatly helped in elucidating the function of the giant members of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) supergene family. The cDNA encoding a large protein structurally closely related to LDLR, and hence named LDLR-related protein (LRP......), was cloned by Herz et al. in 1988.'Evidence was provided demonstrating that LRP can function as a receptor for chylomicron remnants@-migrating very low density lipoproteins (P-VLDL) rich in apolipoprotein E (apoE)?' The a2-macroglobulin (a2M) receptor (a2MR) was purified from rat livep and human p l a~e n t...

  14. Macrophage specific overexpression of the human macrophage scavenger receptor in transgenic mice, using a 180-kb yeast artificial chromosome, leads to enhanced foam cell formation of isolated peritoneal macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winther, M.P.J. de; Dijk, K.W. van; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Heus, J.J.; Wijers, E.R.; Bos, A.C. van den; Breuer, M.; Frants, R.R.; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptors class A (MSR) are thought to play an important role in atherogenesis by mediating the unrestricted uptake of modified lipoproteins by macrophages in the vessel wall leading to foam cell formation. To investigate the in vivo role of the MSR in this process, a transgenic

  15. Distinct Hepatic Receptors for Low Density Lipoprotein and Apolipoprotein E in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeg, Jeffrey M.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Gregg, Richard E.; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Brewer, H. Bryan

    1985-02-01

    Since the liver is a central organ for lipid and lipoprotein synthesis and catabolism, hepatic receptors for specific apolipoproteins on plasma lipoproteins would be expected to modulate lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The role of hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E-containing lipoproteins was evaluated in patients with complementary disorders in lipoprotein metabolism: abetalipoproteinemia and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. In addition, hepatic membranes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia were studied and compared before and after portacaval shunt surgery. The results establish that the human liver has receptors for apolipoproteins B and E. Furthermore, in the human, hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E are genetically distinct and can undergo independent control.

  16. Identification of megalin/gp330 as a receptor for lipoprotein(a) in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeier, A; Willnow, T; Dieplinger, H

    1999-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an atherogenic lipoprotein of unknown physiological function. The mechanism of Lp(a) atherogenicity as well as its catabolic pathways are only incompletely understood at present. In this report, we show that the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene family member ...

  17. Scavenger receptor B1 facilitates macrophage uptake of silver nanoparticles and cellular activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldossari, Abdullah A.; Shannahan, Jonathan H. [The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (United States); Podila, Ramakrishna [Clemson University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States); Brown, Jared M., E-mail: jared.brown@ucdenver.edu [The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Due to increased use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for their antimicrobial activity, concerns have risen regarding potential adverse human health effects. Scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1), a major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL), is expressed by macrophages and has also been reported to play a role in recognition of negatively charged particles. We, therefore, hypothesized that SR-B1 mediates macrophage uptake of AgNPs and inflammatory activation. To test this hypothesis, we exposed a mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 (RAW) and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) to 20 nm citrate-suspended AgNPs. To verify the role of the SR-B1 receptor, we utilized a SR-B1 inhibitor (Blt2). In vitro studies demonstrated uptake of AgNPs and HDL-coated AgNPs by macrophages which were significantly reduced following pretreatment with Blt2. Inflammatory cytokine arrays revealed that macrophages exposed to AgNPs up-regulated expression of Tnf-α, Oncostatin m (OSM), Ccl4, Il17f, Ccl7, and Ccl2, whereas Il16 was found to be down-regulated. Macrophage activation was observed following AgNP and HDL-coated AgNP exposure as measured by OSM protein production and increased surface expression of CD86. These markers of activation were reduced with Blt2 pretreatment. The in vitro findings were confirmed in vivo through pulmonary instillation of AgNPs in mice. Pulmonary instillation of AgNPs resulted in a recruitment of inflammatory cells that were reduced in SR-B1-deficient mice or following Blt2 pretreatment. This study suggests that SR-B1 plays a major role in cellular recognition of AgNPs and the induction of cell responses that could contribute to inflammation caused by AgNP exposure.

  18. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 functions as an innate immune sensor for bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabriek, B.O.; van Bruggen, R.; Deng, D.M.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Nazmi, K.; Schornagel, K.; Vloet, R.P.M.; Dijkstra, C.D.; van den Berg, T.K.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane glycoprotein receptor CD163 is a member of the scavenger receptor cystein-rich (SRCR) superfamily class B that is highly expressed on resident tissue macrophages in vivo. Previously, the molecule has been shown to act as a receptor for hemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes and to medi

  19. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 functions as an innate immune sensor for bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabriek, B.O.; van Bruggen, R.; Deng, D.M.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Nazmi, K.; Schornagel, K.; Vloet, R.P.M.; Dijkstra, C.D.; van den Berg, T.K.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane glycoprotein receptor CD163 is a member of the scavenger receptor cystein-rich (SRCR) superfamily class B that is highly expressed on resident tissue macrophages in vivo. Previously, the molecule has been shown to act as a receptor for hemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes and to medi

  20. Constitutive androstane receptor activation decreases plasma apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sberna, Anne-Laure; Assem, Mahfoud; Xiao, Rui; Ayers, Steve; Gautier, Thomas; Guiu, Boris; Deckert, Valérie; Chevriaux, Angélique; Grober, Jacques; Le Guern, Naig; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Moore, David D; Lagrost, Laurent; Masson, David

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the impact of the nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) on lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) and apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice fed a Western-type diet were treated weekly with the Car agonist 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) or the vehicle only for 8 weeks. In Ldlr(-/-) mice, treatment with TCPOBOP induced a decrease in plasma triglyceride and intermediate-density lipoprotein/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (≈30% decrease in both cases after 2 months, Plipoproteins associated with a decrease in hepatic triglyceride content and the repression of several genes involved in lipogenesis. TCPOBOP treatment also induced a marked increase in the very-low-density lipoprotein receptor in the liver, which probably contributed to the decrease in intermediate-density lipoprotein/low-density lipoprotein levels. Atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic valves of TCPOBOP-treated Ldlr(-/-) mice were also reduced (-60%, Plipoprotein receptor, the effect of TCPOBOP on plasma cholesterol levels and the development of atherosclerotic lesions was markedly attenuated. CAR is a potential target in the prevention and treatment of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis.

  1. Malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde haptenated protein binds macrophage scavenger receptor(s) and induces lysosomal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Monte S; Klassen, Lynell W; Carlson, Deborah L; Brouse, Chad F; Thiele, Geoffrey M

    2004-07-01

    There is evidence that the chemical modification of proteins (haptens) with malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) and the immune response to these haptenated proteins is associated with the initiation and/or progression of alcohol liver disease. Experimentally, proteins modified with MAA induce antibody and T cell responses, which are mediated by scavenger receptor(s). Moreover, macrophages have been shown to play an important role in processing and presenting MAA-haptenated proteins in vitro. In vitro, MAA-modified proteins have been shown to induce both apoptosis and necrosis in a dose- and cell-type-dependent manner. Natural ligands modified by oxidative stress, such as oxidized LDL, similarly initiate not only antibody responses, but also cause cell death by disrupting lysosomes after binding to scavenger receptors and internalization. We therefore investigated the binding, internalization, and lysosomal integrity in a macrophage cell line to a MAA-haptenated protein. We demonstrate for the first time that MAA-haptenated proteins are preferentially bound by scavenger receptors on macrophages, which internalize the ligands and shuttle them to lysosomes. Moreover, MAA-haptenated proteins are demonstrated to be associated with a rapid dose-dependent disruption in lysosomal integrity, resulting in leakage and caspase activation. Similarly, as hen egg lysozyme (HEL)-MAA concentrations increased (>31.3 microg/ml), increased levels of apoptosis and a G1/S cell cycle checkpoint inhibition were identified. This study identifies mechanisms by which MAA-haptenated proteins are taken up by a representative antigen-presenting cell and may delineate steps by which MAA-haptenated proteins induce cell death and induce their immunogenicity to the carrier protein. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ha Young, E-mail: hayoung@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University, Busan 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Doo [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Suk-Hwan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon Hyuk [Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Hyun [School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Zabel, Brian A. [Palo Alto Institute for Research and Education, Veterans Affairs Hospital, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Bae, Yoe-Sik, E-mail: yoesik@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University, Busan 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  3. Segments in the C-terminal folding domain of lipoprotein lipase important for binding to the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and to heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Schallburg; Brejning, Jeanette; García, R.;

    1997-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LpL) can mediate cellular uptake of chylomicron and VLDL remnants via binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) and the endocytic alpha2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (alpha2MR/LRP). Whereas it is established that the C-terminal ......Lipoprotein lipase (LpL) can mediate cellular uptake of chylomicron and VLDL remnants via binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) and the endocytic alpha2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (alpha2MR/LRP). Whereas it is established that the C...

  4. Scavenging ROS dramatically increase NMDA receptor whole-cell currents in painted turtle cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukoff, David James; Hogg, David William; Hawrysh, Peter John; Buck, Leslie Thomas

    2014-09-15

    Oxygen deprivation triggers excitotoxic cell death in mammal neurons through excessive calcium loading via over-activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. This does not occur in the western painted turtle, which overwinters for months without oxygen. Neurological damage is avoided through anoxia-mediated decreases in NMDA and AMPA receptor currents that are dependent upon a modest rise in intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) originating from mitochondria. Anoxia also blocks mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which is another potential signaling mechanism to regulate glutamate receptors. To assess the effects of decreased intracellular [ROS] on NMDA and AMPA receptor currents, we scavenged ROS with N-2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Unlike anoxia, ROS scavengers increased NMDA receptor whole-cell currents by 100%, while hydrogen peroxide decreased currents. AMPA receptor currents and [Ca(2+)]i concentrations were unaffected by ROS manipulation. Because decreases in [ROS] increased NMDA receptor currents, we next asked whether mitochondrial Ca(2+) release prevents receptor potentiation during anoxia. Normoxic activation of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium (mKATP) channels with diazoxide decreased NMDA receptor currents and was unaffected by subsequent ROS scavenging. Diazoxide application following ROS scavenging did not rescue scavenger-mediated increases in NMDA receptor currents. Fluorescent measurement of [Ca(2+)]i and ROS levels demonstrated that [Ca(2+)]i increases before ROS decreases. We conclude that decreases in ROS concentration are not linked to anoxia-mediated decreases in NMDA/AMPA receptor currents but are rather associated with an increase in NMDA receptor currents that is prevented during anoxia by mitochondrial Ca(2+) release.

  5. The conserved scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily in therapy and diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez, Vanesa Gabriela; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Holmskov, Uffe;

    2011-01-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily of soluble or membrane-bound protein receptors is characterized by the presence of one or several repeats of an ancient and highly conserved protein module, the SRCR domain. This superfamily (SRCR-SF) has been in constant and progressive...

  6. A Consensus Definitive Classification of Scavenger Receptors and Their Roles in Health and Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    PrabhuDas, Mercy R; Baldwin, Cynthia L; Bollyky, Paul L

    2017-01-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of proteins that are structurally diverse and participate in a wide range of biological functions. These receptors are expressed predominantly by myeloid cells and recognize a diverse variety of ligands including endogenous and modified host-derived m...

  7. Identification of the hemoglobin scavenger receptor/CD163 as a natural soluble protein in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Peterslund, Niels Anker; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov

    2002-01-01

    The hemoglobin scavenger receptor (HbSR/CD163) is an interleukin-6- and glucocorticoid-regulated macrophage/monocyte receptor for uptake of haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes. Moreover, there are strong indications that HbSR serves an anti-inflammatory function. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting...

  8. Suppression of TLR4-mediated inflammatory response by macrophage class A scavenger receptor (CD204)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Koji; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Yukio; Takemura, Kenichi [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Lei, XiaoFeng [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakagawa, Takenobu [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Sakashita, Naomi [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Human Pathology, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan); Takeya, Motohiro, E-mail: takeya@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} We focused on the interaction between SR-A and TLR4 signaling in this study. {yields} SR-A deletion promoted NF{kappa}B activation in macrophages in septic model mouse. {yields} SR-A suppresses both MyD88-dependent and -independent TLR4 signaling in vitro. {yields} SR-A clears LPS binding to TLR4 which resulting in the suppression of TLR4 signals. -- Abstract: The class A scavenger receptor (SR-A, CD204), one of the principal receptors expressed on macrophages, has been found to regulate inflammatory response and attenuate septic endotoxemia. However, the detailed mechanism of this process has not yet been well characterized. To clarify the regulative mechanisms of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage activation by SR-A, we evaluated the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated signaling molecules in SR-A-deficient (SR-A{sup -/-}) macrophages. In a septic shock model, the blood levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, interleukin (IL)-6 and interferon (IFN)-{beta} were significantly increased in SR-A{sup -/-} mice compared to wild-type mice, and elevated nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) activation was detected in SR-A{sup -/-} macrophages. SR-A deletion increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF{kappa}B in vitro. SR-A deletion also promoted the nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B and IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-3. In addition, a competitive binding assay with acetylated low-density lipoprotein, an SR-A-specific ligand, and anti-SR-A antibody induced significant activation of TLR4-mediated signaling molecules in wild-type macrophages but not in SR-A{sup -/-} macrophages. These results suggest that SR-A suppresses the macrophage activation by inhibiting the binding of LPS to TLR4 in a competitive manner and it plays a pivotal role in the regulation of the LPS-induced inflammatory response.

  9. Improving lipoprotein profiles by liver-directed gene transfer of low density lipoprotein receptor gene in hypercholesterolaemia mice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HAILONG OU; QINGHAI ZHANG; JIA ZENG

    2016-06-01

    The defect of low density lipoprotein receptor disturbs cholesterol metabolism and causes familial hypercholesterolaemia(FH). In this study, we directly delivered exogenousLdlrgene into the liver of FH model mice (Ldlr − / −) by lentiviral genetransfer system. The results showed that theLdlrgene controlled by hepatocyte-specific human thyroxine-binding globulin(TBG) promoter successfully and exclusively expressed in livers. We found that, although, the content of high density lipopro-tein in serum was not significantly affected by theLdlrgene expression, the serum low density lipoprotein level was reducedby 46%, associated with a 30% and 28% decrease in triglyceride and total cholesterol, respectively, compared to uninjectedLdlr − / −mice. Moreover, the TBG directed expression ofLdlrsignificantly decreased the lipid accumulation in liver andreduced plaque burden in aorta (32%). Our results indicated that the hepatocyte-specific expression ofLdlrgene strikinglylowered serum lipid levels and resulted in amelioration of hypercholesterolaemia.

  10. Giardia lamblia low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein is involved in selective lipoprotein endocytosis and parasite replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Maria R; Miras, Silvana L; Quiroga, Rodrigo; Rópolo, Andrea S; Touz, Maria C

    2011-03-01

    As Giardia lamblia is unable to synthesize cholesterol de novo, this steroid might be obtained from the host's intestinal milieu by endocytosis of lipoproteins. In this work, we identified a putative Giardia lamblia low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (GlLRP), a type I membrane protein, which shares the substrate N-terminal binding domain and a FXNPXY-type endocytic motif with human LRPs. Expression of tagged GlLRP showed that it was localized predominantly in the endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomal-like peripheral vacuoles and plasma membrane. However, the FXNPXY-deleted GlLRP was retained at the plasma membrane suggesting that it is abnormally transported and processed. The low-density lipoprotein and chylomicrons interacted with GlLRP, with this interaction being necessary for lipoprotein internalization and cell proliferation. Finally, we show that GlLRP binds directly to the medium subunit of Giardia adaptor protein 2, indicating that receptor-mediated internalization occurs through an adaptin mechanism.

  11. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Varughese, Kottayil I.

    2015-11-01

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential.

  12. Microglial Scavenger Receptors and Their Roles in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Wilkinson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is increasing in prevalence with the aging population. Deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ in the brain of AD patients is a hallmark of the disease and is associated with increased microglial numbers and activation state. The interaction of microglia with Aβ appears to play a dichotomous role in AD pathogenesis. On one hand, microglia can phagocytose and clear Aβ, but binding of microglia to Aβ also increases their ability to produce inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and neurotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS. Scavenger receptors, a group of evolutionally conserved proteins expressed on the surface of microglia act as receptors for Aβ. Of particular interest are SCARA-1 (scavenger receptor A-1, CD36, and RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end products. SCARA-1 appears to be involved in the clearance of Aβ, while CD36 and RAGE are involved in activation of microglia by Aβ. In this review, we discuss the roles of various scavenger receptors in the interaction of microglia with Aβ and propose that these receptors play complementary, nonredundant functions in the development of AD pathology. We also discuss potential therapeutic applications for these receptors in AD.

  13. Scavenger receptor AI/II truncation, lung function and COPD: a large population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M; Nordestgaard, B G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The scavenger receptor A-I/II (SRA-I/II) on alveolar macrophages is involved in recognition and clearance of modified lipids and inhaled particulates. A rare variant of the SRA-I/II gene, Arg293X, truncates the distal collagen-like domain, which is essential for ligand recognition. We tested whet...

  14. Proteolytic shedding of the macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabriek, B.O.; Møller, H.J.; Vloet, R.P.M.; Winsen, L.M. van; Hanemaaijer, R.; Teunissen, C.E.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Berg, T.K. van den; Dijkstra, C.D.

    2007-01-01

    The scavenger receptor CD163 is selectively expressed on tissue macrophages and human monocytes. CD163 has been implicated to play a role in the clearance of hemoglobin and in the regulation of cytokine production by macrophages. Membrane CD163 can be cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) resul

  15. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Dependent and Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Independent Mechanisms of Cyclosporin A-Induced Dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockx, Maaike; Glaros, Elias; Leung, Betty; Ng, Theodore W; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Deswaerte, Virginie; Nawara, Diana; Quinn, Carmel; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Jessup, Wendy; Rensen, Patrick C N; Meikle, Peter J; Kritharides, Leonard

    2016-07-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is an immunosuppressant commonly used to prevent organ rejection but is associated with hyperlipidemia and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Although studies suggest that CsA-induced hyperlipidemia is mediated by inhibition of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr)-mediated lipoprotein clearance, the data supporting this are inconclusive. We therefore sought to investigate the role of the LDLr in CsA-induced hyperlipidemia by using Ldlr-knockout mice (Ldlr(-/-)). Ldlr(-/-) and wild-type (wt) C57Bl/6 mice were treated with 20 mg/kg per d CsA for 4 weeks. On a chow diet, CsA caused marked dyslipidemia in Ldlr(-/-) but not in wt mice. Hyperlipidemia was characterized by a prominent increase in plasma very low-density lipoprotein and intermediate-density lipoprotein/LDL with unchanged plasma high-density lipoprotein levels, thus mimicking the dyslipidemic profile observed in humans. Analysis of specific lipid species by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry suggested a predominant effect of CsA on increased very low-density lipoprotein-IDL/LDL lipoprotein number rather than composition. Mechanistic studies indicated that CsA did not alter hepatic lipoprotein production but did inhibit plasma clearance and hepatic uptake of [(14)C]cholesteryl oleate and glycerol tri[(3)H]oleate-double-labeled very low-density lipoprotein-like particles. Further studies showed that CsA inhibited plasma lipoprotein lipase activity and increased levels of apolipoprotein C-III and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. We demonstrate that CsA does not cause hyperlipidemia via direct effects on the LDLr. Rather, LDLr deficiency plays an important permissive role for CsA-induced hyperlipidemia, which is associated with abnormal lipoprotein clearance, decreased lipoprotein lipase activity, and increased levels of apolipoprotein C-III and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. Enhancing LDLr and lipoprotein lipase activity and decreasing

  16. Berberine promotes the development of atherosclerosis and foam cell formation by inducing scavenger receptor A expression in macrophage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Li; Wenqi Yao; Xiudan Zheng; Kan Liao

    2009-01-01

    Berberine is identified to lower the serum cholesterol level in human and hamster through the induction of low density lipoproteins (LDL) receptor in hepatic cells. To evaluate its potential in preventing atherosclerosis, the effect of berberine on atherosclerosis development in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE-/-) mice was investigated, in apoE-/-mice, berberine induced in vivo foam cell formation and promoted atherosclerosis development. The foam cell for-mation induced by berberine was also observed in mouse RAW264.7 cells, as well as in mouse and human primary macrophages. By inducing scavenger receptor A (SR-A) expression in macrophages, berberine increased the uptake of modified LDL (DiO-Ac-LDL). Berberine-induced SR-A expression was also observed in macrophage foam cells in vivo and in the cells at atherosclerotic lesion. Analysis in RAW264.7 cells indicated that berberine induced SR-A ex-pression by suppressing PTEN expression, which led to sustained Akt activation. Our results suggest that to evaluate the potential of a cholesterol-reducing compound in alleviating atherosclerosis, its effect on the cells involved in ath-erosclerosis development, such as macrophages, should also be considered. Promotion of foam cell formation could counter-balance the beneficial effect of lowering serum cholesterol.

  17. Chitosan oligosaccharides promote reverse cholesterol transport and expression of scavenger receptor BI and CYP7A1 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Chuanlong; Yu, Yang; Song, Guohua; Luo, Tian; Li, Luqin; Wang, Xinnong; Qin, Shucun

    2012-02-01

    Chitosan oligosaccharides (COS) are beneficial in improving plasma lipids and diminishing atherosclerotic risks. In this study, we examined the effects of COS on reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in C57BL/6 mice. (3)H-cholesterol-laden macrophages were injected intraperitoneally into mice fed with various dosage of COS (250, 500, 1000 mg/kg mouse weight, respectively) or vehicle by gastric gavages. Plasma lipid level was determined and (3)H-cholesterol was traced in plasma, liver, bile and feces. The effects of COS on hepatic cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) expression were also investigated. COS administration led to a significant decrease in plasma total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and a significant increase in peritoneal macrophage-derived (3)H-cholesterol in liver and bile as well as in feces. Liver protein expressions of CYP7A1, SR-BI and LDL receptor (LDL-R) were improved in a dosage-dependent manner in COS-administered mice. Our findings provide the first in vivo demonstration of a positive role for COS in RCT pathway and hepatic CYP7A1 and SR-BI expression in mice. Additionally, the LDL cholesterol lowering effect might be relative to hepatic LDL-R expression stimulated by COS in mice.

  18. Consequences of over-expression of rat Scavenger Receptor, SR-BI, in an adrenal cell model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar Salman

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plasma membrane scavenger receptor, SR-BI, mediates the 'selective uptake' process by which cholesteryl esters (CE from exogenously supplied HDL are taken up by target cells. Recent work suggests that dimer and higher order oligomeric forms of the SR-BI protein are important to this process. SR-BI has been shown to be particularly associated with microvilli and microvillar channels found at the cell surface of steroidogenic cells, and a study with the hormone stimulated adrenal gland has shown impressive changes in the size and complexity of the microvillar compartment as the mass of CE uptake (and accompanying steroidogenesis fluctuates. In the present study, we examine a cell line in which we overexpress the SR-BI protein to determine if morphological, biochemical and functional events associated with SR-BI in a controlled cell system are similar to those observed in the intact mammalian adrenal which is responsive to systemic factors. Methods Y1-BS1 mouse adrenocortical cells were transiently transfected using rat SR-BI-pcDNA6-V5-His, rat SR-BI-pcDNA6-cMyc-His or control pcDNA6-V5-His vector construct using a CaPO4 precipitation technique. Twenty four hours after transfection, cells were treated with, or without, Bt2cAMP, and SR-BI expression, CE uptake, and steroidogenesis was measured. SR-BI dimerization and cell surface architectural changes were assessed using immunoelectron microscopic techniques. Results Overexpression of the scavenger receptor protein, SR-BI, in Y1-BS1 cells results in major alterations in cell surface architecture designed to increase uptake of HDL supplied-CEs. Changes include 1 the formation of crater-like erosions of the surface with multiple double membraned channel structures lining the craters, and 2 dimerized formations of SR-BI lining the newly formed craters and associated double membraned channels. Conclusion These data show that overexpression of the scavenger receptor protein, SR

  19. Identification of the receptor scavenging hemopexin-heme complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Maniecki, Maciej B; Jacobsen, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Heme released from heme-binding proteins on internal hemorrhage, hemolysis, myolysis, or other cell damage is highly toxic due to oxidative and proinflammatory effects. Complex formation with hemopexin, the high-affinity heme-binding protein in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid, dampens these effects......, and syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding experiments, including Biacore analysis, showed that hemopexin-heme complex formation elicits the high receptor affinity. Uptake studies of radio-labeled hemopexin-heme complex in LRP/CD91-expressing COS cells and confocal microscopy of the cellular processing of fluorescent hemopexin...

  20. T cell proliferative responses to malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde haptenated protein are scavenger receptor mediated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Monte S; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Tuma, Dean J; Klassen, Lynell W

    2003-10-01

    Malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) haptenated proteins have been described in disease processes related to prolonged oxidative stress (via malondialdehyde production), such as alcohol liver disease (ALD), non-alcoholic non-steatohepatitis (NASH) and atherosclerosis. Experimentally, high titer IgG1 antibody responses are seen after immunization without adjuvant; however, T cell proliferative responses and the role of scavenger receptors in this immunogenicity has not previously been described. In this study, T cell proliferative responses to the carrier protein, but not the MAA hapten itself, were identified in vitro. Moreover, these T proliferative responses were inhibited when MAA-hen egg lysozyme (HEL) was co-immunized with excess scavenger receptor ligand polyG (poly-guanylic acid), implicating the role of (a) scavenger receptor(s) in initiating the T helper cell response. Activated B cells were unable to process and present MAA-HEL preferentially to T cells, while thioglycollate-elicited (but not Con A-elicited) macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) did so with approximately 32-fold less MAA-HEL than native antigen necessary to initiate equal proliferative responses. While this preferential processing and presentation may be related to several factors, preferential binding of MAA haptenated proteins mediated by scavenger receptors may be one mechanism. IL-4 was absent from the supernatants of T proliferative assays despite a strong IgG1 response in vivo, although the TH2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 were expressed. Since the modification of proteins by the MAA have previously been shown to occur after ethanol consumption in vivo, the ability of MAA haptens to experimentally enhance immune responses, specifically humoral and T cell responses, may represent mechanisms by which autoimmune phenomena found in ALD occur.

  1. New Horizons for Lipoprotein ReceptorsCommunication by β-propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Olav Michael; Dagil, Robert; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2013-01-01

    The lipoprotein receptor (LR) family constitutes a large group of structurally closely related receptors with broad ligand-binding specificity. Traditionally, ligand binding to LRs has been anticipated to involve merely the complement type repeat (CR)-domains omnipresent in the family. Recently...

  2. Phenotype of heterozygotes for low-density lipoprotein receptor mutations identified in different background populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Jensen, Henrik Kjaerulf; Benn, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    The effect of mutations on phenotype is often overestimated because of ascertainment bias. We determined the effect of background population on cholesterol phenotype associated with specific mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and the relative importance of background population...... and type of mutation (LDL receptor [LDLR] or APOB R3500Q) for cholesterol phenotype....

  3. Low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 variant interacts with saturated fatty acids in Puerto Ricans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low density lipoprotein related receptor protein 1 (LRP1) is a multi-functional endocytic receptor that is highly expressed in adipocytes and the hypothalamus. Animal models and in vitro studies support a role for LRP1 in adipocyte metabolism and leptin signaling, but genetic polymorphisms have not ...

  4. Low density lipoprotein induces upregulation of vasoconstrictive endothelin type B receptor expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Cang-Bao; Zheng, Jian-Pu; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Vasoconstrictive endothelin type B (ET(B)) receptors promote vasospasm and ischemic cerebro- and cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to examine if low density lipoprotein (LDL) induces upregulation of vasoconstrictive ET(B) receptor expression and if extracellular signal...

  5. Mutation in apolipoprotein B associated with hypobetalipoproteinemia despite decreased binding to the low density lipoprotein receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Jan Skov;

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in apolipoprotein B (APOB) may reduce binding of low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the LDL receptor and cause hypercholesterolemia. We showed that heterozygotes for a new mutation in APOB have hypobetalipoproteinemia, despite a reduced binding of LDL to the LDL receptor. APOB R3480P hete...

  6. Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in pig enterocytes: trafficking from the brush border to lipid droplets during fat absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte W; Immerdal, Lissi

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) is known to mediate cellular uptake of cholesterol from high density lipoprotein particles and is particularly abundant in liver and steroidogenic tissues. In addition, SR-BI expression in the enterocyte brush border has also been reported...... but its role in the small intestine remains unclear. AIM AND METHODS: To gain insight into the possible function of pig SR-BI during uptake of dietary fat, its localisation in enterocytes was studied in the fasting state and during fat absorption by immunogold electron microscopy and subcellular...... fat, SR-BI is endocytosed from the enterocyte brush border and accumulates in cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Internalisation of the receptor occurs mainly by clathrin coated pits rather than by a caveolae/lipid raft based mechanism....

  7. Recent advances in physiological lipoprotein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Indra

    2014-12-01

    Research into lipoprotein metabolism has developed because understanding lipoprotein metabolism has important clinical indications. Lipoproteins are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Recent advances include the identification of factors in the synthesis and secretion of triglyceride rich lipoproteins, chylomicrons (CM) and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). These included the identification of microsomal transfer protein, the cotranslational targeting of apoproteinB (apoB) for degradation regulated by the availability of lipids, and the characterization of transport vesicles transporting primordial apoB containing particles to the Golgi. The lipase maturation factor 1, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein binding protein 1 and an angiopoietin-like protein play a role in lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-mediated hydrolysis of secreted CMs and VLDL so that the right amount of fatty acid is delivered to the right tissue at the right time. Expression of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor is regulated at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has a pivotal role in the degradation of LDL receptor. Plasma remnant lipoproteins bind to specific receptors in the liver, the LDL receptor, VLDL receptor and LDL receptor-like proteins prior to removal from the plasma. Reverse cholesterol transport occurs when lipid free apoAI recruits cholesterol and phospholipid to assemble high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. The discovery of ABC transporters (ABCA1 and ABCG1) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) provided further information on the biogenesis of HDL. In humans HDL-cholesterol can be returned to the liver either by direct uptake by SR-BI or through cholesteryl ester transfer protein exchange of cholesteryl ester for triglycerides in apoB lipoproteins, followed by hepatic uptake of apoB containing particles. Cholesterol content in cells is regulated by several

  8. Mitochondrion-Targeted Peptide SS-31 Inhibited Oxidized Low-Density Lipoproteins-Induced Foam Cell Formation through both ROS Scavenging and Inhibition of Cholesterol Influx in RAW264.7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuangying; Ji, Jiajie; Zhao, Hongting; Shang, Longcheng; Wu, Jing; Li, Huihui; Qiao, Tong; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-12-01

    Foam cell formation as a result of imbalance of modified cholesterol influx and efflux by macrophages is a key to the occurrence and development of atherosclerosis. Oxidative stress is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. SS-31 is a member of the Szeto-Schiller (SS) peptides shown to specifically target the inner mitochondrial membrane to scavenge reactive oxygen species. In this study, we investigated whether SS-31 may provide protective effect on macrophage from foam cell formation in RAW264.7 cells. The results showed that SS-31 inhibited oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL)-induced foam cell formation and cholesterol accumulation, demonstrated by intracellular oil red O staining and measurement of cholesterol content. The mechanism was revealed that SS-31 did not only significantly attenuated ox-LDL-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased the activities of superoxide dismutases, but also dose-dependently inhibited the expression of CD36 and LOX-1, two scavenger receptors of ox-LDL, while the expression of ATP-binding cassette A1 and G1, playing a pivotal role in cholesterol efflux, was not affected. As a result, SS-31 decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha, suggesting the prevention of inflammatory responses. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that SS-31 provides a beneficial effect on macrophages from foam cell formation, likely, through both ROS scavenging and inhibition of cholesterol influx. Therefore, SS-31 may potentially be of therapeutic relevance in prevention of human atherogenesis.

  9. Segments in the C-terminal folding domain of lipoprotein lipase important for binding to the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and to heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Schallburg; Brejning, Jeanette; García, R.

    1997-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LpL) can mediate cellular uptake of chylomicron and VLDL remnants via binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) and the endocytic alpha2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (alpha2MR/LRP). Whereas it is established that the C......L-(347-448) in Escherichia coli. In addition to binding to alpha2MR/LRP, LpL-(313-448) displayed binding to heparin with an affinity similar to that of the LpL monomer, whereas it bound poorly to lipoprotein particles. Moreover, LpL-(313-448) displayed heparin sensitive binding to normal, but not to HSPG...

  10. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  11. HSL-knockout mouse testis exhibits class B scavenger receptor upregulation and disrupted lipid raft microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, María Emilia; Huerta, Lydia; Ortiz, Ana Isabel; Pérez-Crespo, Mirian; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Kraemer, Fredric B; Lasunción, Miguel Ángel; Busto, Rebeca; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia

    2012-12-01

    There is a tight relationship between fertility and changes in cholesterol metabolism during spermatogenesis. In the testis, class B scavenger receptors (SR-B) SR-BI, SR-BII, and LIMP II mediate the selective uptake of cholesterol esters from HDL, which are hydrolyzed to unesterified cholesterol by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). HSL is critical because HSL knockout (KO) male mice are sterile. The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of the lack of HSL in testis on the expression of SR-B, lipid raft composition, and related cell signaling pathways. HSL-KO mouse testis presented altered spermatogenesis associated with decreased sperm counts, sperm motility, and infertility. In wild-type (WT) testis, HSL is expressed in elongated spermatids; SR-BI, in Leydig cells and spermatids; SR-BII, in spermatocytes and spermatids but not in Leydig cells; and LIMP II, in Sertoli and Leydig cells. HSL knockout male mice have increased expression of class B scavenger receptors, disrupted caveolin-1 localization in lipid raft plasma membrane microdomains, and activated phospho-ERK, phospho-AKT, and phospho-SRC in the testis, suggesting that class B scavenger receptors are involved in cholesterol ester uptake for steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis.

  12. The low-density lipoprotein receptor gene family: a cellular Swiss army knife?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykjaer, Anders; Willnow, Thomas E

    2002-06-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor gene family is an evolutionarily conserved group of cell-surface receptors produced by mammals and other organisms. Initially thought to be endocytic receptors that mediate the uptake of lipoproteins, recent findings have shown that these receptors have other roles in a range of cellular processes. Among other activities, members of this family act as signal transducers in neuronal migration processes, regulate synaptic plasticity or control vitamin homeostasis. Such multifunctionality is achieved by interaction with diverse cell-surface proteins including glycolipid-anchored receptors, G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels. Here, we review the molecular interactions of this protein family with other cell-surface proteins that provide specificity and versatility - a versatility that may be reminiscent of a cellular Swiss army knife.

  13. Characterization of a novel human scavenger receptor cysteine-rich molecule SCART1 expressed by lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, D.; Fink, D. R.; Steffensen, M. A.;

    2013-01-01

    of hSCART1 in the small intestine and colon. An antibody raised against an N-terminal hSCART1 peptide stains a subset of cells in the small intestine, stomach, and gall bladder, and it also stains placental villi. In conclusion, the characterization of hSCART1 at the mRNA and protein level suggests......The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily is a group of membrane bound and secreted proteins expressed by cells of the immune system. Several members act as pattern recognition receptors that bind to conserved molecular structures of pathogens. We have previously characterized...

  14. Remnant lipoproteins induced proliferation of human prostate cancer cell, PC-3 but not LNCaP, via low density lipoprotein receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Yoshitaka; Koike, Hidekazu; Nakano, Takamitsu; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Takahashi, Sadao; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2009-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia has been shown to be one of the risk factors for prostate cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of remnant lipoproteins on cell growth in prostate cancer cell lines. Remnant lipoproteins were isolated as remnant like particles (RLP) from human plasma. We used RLP for TG-rich lipoproteins and low density lipoproteins (LDL) for cholesterol-rich lipoproteins respectively and examined the effect of lipoproteins on proliferation of PC-3 and LNCaP cells using MTS assays. Moreover, we studied the effect of RLP and LDL treatment on the regulation of lipoprotein receptors in prostate cancer cells to investigate the relationship between lipoprotein-induced cell proliferation and lipoprotein receptor expression using real-time PCR, Western blotting assays and siRNA. RLP effectively induced PC-3 cell proliferation more than LDL, whereas both RLP and LDL could not induce LNCaP cell proliferation except at a higher concentration of RLP. LDL receptor (LDLr) was expressed in both prostate cancer cells but there was a sharp difference of sterol regulation between two cells. In PC-3 cells, LDL decreased the LDLr expression in some degree, but RLP did not. Meanwhile LDLr expression in LNCaP was easily downregulated by RLP and LDL. Blocking LDLr function significantly inhibited both RLP- and LDL-induced PC-3 cell proliferation. This study demonstrated that RLP-induced PC-3 cell proliferation more than LDL; however, both RLP and LDL hardly induced LNCaP cell proliferation. The differences of proliferation by lipoproteins might be involved in the regulation of LDLr expression.

  15. The macrophage scavenger receptor (CD163): a double-edged sword in treatment of malignant disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan

    2009-01-01

    by the exposition to the toxic effects of high levels of plasma hemoglobin occurring after treatment with CD33-directed therapy with the immunotoxin gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO). The syndrome is characterized by excessive accumulation of plasma hemoglobin despite high haptoglobin levels and was shown to arise due...... in pathophysiological conditions involving the monocyte/macrophage system, as emphasized by the lineage-specific CD163 expression on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. The CD163 expression on tumor-promoting macrophages and malignant cells depicted the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 as a double-edged...... cytotoxic drug delivery may lead to impaired CD163-mediated hemoglobin-scavenging causing MaDS, our data imply that the expected adverse effect profile using CD163 as a target may potentially be clinically insignificant compared with comparable treatments currently available....

  16. The macrophage scavenger receptor (CD163): a double-edged sword in treatment of malignant disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan

    2009-01-01

    -edged sword in the treatment of malignant disease: CD163 may be a putative candidate for targeted drug delivery in hematological malignancies and solid tumors, as well as other diseases involving the monocyte/macrophage system; but its use may also lead to MaDS. However, despite the fact that a CD163-mediated...... cytotoxic drug delivery may lead to impaired CD163-mediated hemoglobin-scavenging causing MaDS, our data imply that the expected adverse effect profile using CD163 as a target may potentially be clinically insignificant compared with comparable treatments currently available....... in inflammatory conditions and as a potential candidate for targeted drug delivery. The present PhD demonstrates that more than 80% of circulatory monocytes express the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163. Assessment of different CD163 mAbs under general test conditions allowed us to explain the discrepancy...

  17. CD163: a signal receptor scavenging haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes from plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Madsen, Mette; Moestrup, Søren K

    2002-01-01

    CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage membrane protein belonging to the scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domain family. The CD163 expression is induced by interleukin-6, interleukin-10 and glucocorticoids. Its function has remained unknown until recently when CD163 was identified...... hemolysis. Besides having a detoxificating effect by removing Hb from plasma, the CD163-mediated endocytosis of the Hp-Hb complex may represent a major pathway for uptake of iron in the tissue macrophages. The novel functional linkage of CD163 and Hp, which both are induced during inflammation, also reveal...... as the endocytic receptor binding hemoglobin (Hb) in complex with the plasma protein haptoglobin (Hp). This specific receptor-ligand interaction leading to removal from plasma of the Hp-Hb complex-but not free Hp or Hb-now explains the depletion of circulating Hp in individuals with increased intravascular...

  18. Scavenger receptor b2 as a receptor for hand, foot, and mouth disease and severe neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamayoshi, Seiya; Fujii, Ken; Koike, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Infection with EV71 is occasionally associated with severe neurological diseases such as acute encephalitis, acute flaccid paralysis, and cardiopulmonary failure. Because cellular receptors for viruses play an important role in cell, tissue, and species tropism, it is important to identify and characterize the receptor molecule. Recently, cellular receptors and host factors that stimulate EV71 infection have been identified. Several lines of evidence suggest that scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2) plays critical roles in efficient EV71 infection and the development of disease in humans. In this review, we will summarize the findings of recent studies on EV71 infection and on the roles of SCARB2.

  19. Hepatic scavenger receptor BI is associated with type 2 diabetes but unrelated to human and murine non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Eisinger, Kristina; Pohl, Rebekka; Meier, Elisabeth M; Weiss, Thomas S; Buechler, Christa

    2015-11-13

    Scavenger receptor, class B type I (SR-BI) is a physiologically relevant regulator of high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Low HDL is a common feature of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Here, hepatic SR-BI expression was analyzed in human and murine NAFLD. In primary human hepatocytes NAFLD relevant factors like inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide and TGF-β did not affect SR-BI protein. Similarly, oleate and palmitate had no effect. The adipokines chemerin, adiponectin, leptin and omentin did not regulate SR-BI expression. Accordingly, hepatic SR-BI was not changed in human and murine fatty liver and non-alcoholic steatohepatits. SR-BI was higher in type 2 diabetes patients but not in those with hypercholesterolemia. The current study indicates a minor if any role of SR-BI in human and murine NAFLD.

  20. Effect of apolipoprotein M on high density lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis in low density lipoprotein receptor knock-out mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christina; Jauhiainen, Matti; Moser, Markus

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the role of apoM in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism and atherogenesis, we generated human apoM transgenic (apoM-Tg) and apoM-deficient (apoM(-/-)) mice. Plasma apoM was predominantly associated with 10-12-nm alpha-migrating HDL particles. Human apoM overexpression (11-fold...... of alpha- to pre-alpha-migrating HDL was delayed in apoM-Tg mice. Moreover, lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase-independent generation of pre-beta-migrating apoA-I-containing particles in plasma was increased in apoM-Tg mice (4.2 +/- 1.1%, p = 0.06) and decreased in apoM(-/-) mice (0.5 +/- 0.3%, p = 0.......03) versus controls (1.8 +/- 0.05%). In the setting of low density lipoprotein receptor deficiency, apoM-Tg mice with approximately 2-fold increased plasma apoM concentrations developed smaller atherosclerotic lesions than controls. The effect of apoM on atherosclerosis may be facilitated by enzymatic...

  1. Phenotype of heterozygotes for low-density lipoprotein receptor mutations identified in different background populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Jensen, Henrik Kjaerulf; Benn, Marianne;

    2005-01-01

    The effect of mutations on phenotype is often overestimated because of ascertainment bias. We determined the effect of background population on cholesterol phenotype associated with specific mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and the relative importance of background population...

  2. Scavenger receptors mediate the role of SUMO and Ftz-f1 in Drosophila steroidogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Talamillo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available SUMOylation participates in ecdysteroid biosynthesis at the onset of metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Silencing the Drosophila SUMO homologue smt3 in the prothoracic gland leads to reduced lipid content, low ecdysone titers, and a block in the larval-pupal transition. Here we show that the SR-BI family of Scavenger Receptors mediates SUMO functions. Reduced levels of Snmp1 compromise lipid uptake in the prothoracic gland. In addition, overexpression of Snmp1 is able to recover lipid droplet levels in the smt3 knockdown prothoracic gland cells. Snmp1 expression depends on Ftz-f1 (an NR5A-type orphan nuclear receptor, the expression of which, in turn, depends on SUMO. Furthermore, we show by in vitro and in vivo experiments that Ftz-f1 is SUMOylated. RNAi-mediated knockdown of ftz-f1 phenocopies that of smt3 at the larval to pupal transition, thus Ftz-f1 is an interesting candidate to mediate some of the functions of SUMO at the onset of metamorphosis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the role of SUMOylation, Ftz-f1, and the Scavenger Receptors in lipid capture and mobilization is conserved in other steroidogenic tissues such as the follicle cells of the ovary. smt3 knockdown, as well as ftz-f1 or Scavenger knockdown, depleted the lipid content of the follicle cells, which could be rescued by Snmp1 overexpression. Therefore, our data provide new insights into the regulation of metamorphosis via lipid homeostasis, showing that Drosophila Smt3, Ftz-f1, and SR-BIs are part of a general mechanism for uptake of lipids such as cholesterol, required during development in steroidogenic tissues.

  3. Apolipoprotein A-V interaction with members of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Stefan K; Lookene, Aivar; Beckstead, Jennifer A;

    2007-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-V is a potent modulator of plasma triacylglycerol levels. To investigate the molecular basis for this phenomenon we explored the ability of apolipoprotein A-V, in most experiments complexed to disks of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, to interact with two members of the low densit...... to receptor-covered sensor chips. Our results indicate that apolipoprotein A-V may influence plasma lipid homeostasis by enhancing receptor-mediated endocytosis of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Mar-27......Apolipoprotein A-V is a potent modulator of plasma triacylglycerol levels. To investigate the molecular basis for this phenomenon we explored the ability of apolipoprotein A-V, in most experiments complexed to disks of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, to interact with two members of the low density...... lipoprotein receptor family, the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and the mosaic type-1 receptor, SorLA. Experiments using surface plasmon resonance showed specific binding of both free and lipid-bound apolipoprotein A-V to both receptors. The binding was calcium dependent and was inhibited...

  4. Protection against inhaled oxidants through scavenging of oxidized lipids by macrophage receptors MARCO and SR-AI/II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Bauer, Alison K; Arredouani, Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) express the class A scavenger receptors (SRAs) macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) and scavenger receptor AI/II (SRA-I/II), which recognize oxidized lipids and provide innate defense against inhaled pathogens and particles. Increased MARCO expression......, consistent with SRA function in binding oxidized lipids. SR-AI/II-/- mice showed similar enhanced acute lung inflammation after beta-epoxide or another inhaled oxidant (aerosolized leachate of residual oil fly ash). In contrast, subacute ozone exposure did not enhance inflammation in SR-AI/II-/- versus SR-AI...

  5. Design and synthesis of a stable oxidized phospholipid mimic with specific binding recognition for macrophage scavenger receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, William W; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Boullier, Agnes;

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptors appear to play a major role in the clearance of oxidized phospholipid (OxPL) products. Discrete peptide-phospholipid conjugates with the phosphatidylcholine headgroup have been shown to exhibit binding affinity for these receptors. We report the preparation of a wat...

  6. Lrp13 is a novel vertebrate lipoprotein receptor that binds vitellogenins in teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, Benjamin J; Hiramatsu, Naoshi; Schilling, Justin; Molloy, Katelyn T; Glassbrook, Norm; Mizuta, Hiroko; Luo, Wenshu; Baltzegar, David A; Williams, Valerie N; Todo, Takashi; Hara, Akihiko; Sullivan, Craig V

    2014-11-01

    Transcripts encoding a novel member of the lipoprotein receptor superfamily, termed LDL receptor-related protein (Lrp)13, were sequenced from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and white perch (Morone americana) ovaries. Receptor proteins were purified from perch ovary membranes by protein-affinity chromatography employing an immobilized mixture of vitellogenins Aa and Ab. RT-PCR revealed lrp13 to be predominantly expressed in striped bass ovary, and in situ hybridization detected lrp13 transcripts in the ooplasm of early secondary growth oocytes. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed peak lrp13 expression in the ovary during early secondary growth. Quantitative mass spectrometry revealed peak Lrp13 protein levels in striped bass ovary during late-vitellogenesis, and immunohistochemistry localized Lrp13 to the oolemma and zona radiata of vitellogenic oocytes. Previously unreported orthologs of lrp13 were identified in genome sequences of fishes, chicken (Gallus gallus), mouse (Mus musculus), and dog (Canis lupus familiaris). Zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) lrp13 loci are discrete and share genomic synteny. The Lrp13 appears to function as a vitellogenin receptor and may be an important mediator of yolk formation in fishes and other oviparous vertebrates. The presence of lrp13 orthologs in mammals suggests that this lipoprotein receptor is widely distributed among vertebrates, where it may generally play a role in lipoprotein metabolism.

  7. Mechanism linking atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes: increased expression of scavenger receptor CD36 in monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-mei; ZHANG Xiao-lian; ZHOU Xin; LI Dong; GU Jin-gang; WU Juan-juan

    2005-01-01

    Background We investigated the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in diabetes, and detected the expression of scavenger receptor CD36 in monocytes in patients with type 2 diabetes.Methods According to the criteria by WHO, diabetic patients were classified into two groups: well controlled diabetic patients (WCP) and poorly controlled diabetic patients (PCP). The expression of CD36 protein and mRNA were evaluated by flow cytometry and reversal transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Plasma levels of accumulution of oxidized LDL (oxLDL) were directly measured by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method.Results Flow cytometry and RT-PCR showed that the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of CD36 in monocyte and CD36 mRNA were significantly higher in the PCP and WCP in comparison with healthy controls (P0.05). The concentrations of plasma oxLDL were higher in the PCP group compared to WCP and control group (P0.05). In the WCP and PCP groups, oxLDL levels were higher in patients with diabetic atherosclerosis than those without diabetic atherosclerosis (P<0.05).Conclusions The increased expression of scavenger receptor CD36 may be one of the mechanism of accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetic. The poorly controlled diabetes patients are at higher risk for the vascular complications than the well controlled diabetic patients.

  8. Pentosan polysulfate regulates scavenger receptor-mediated, but not fluid-phase, endocytosis in immortalized cerebral endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, M A; Abrahám, C S; Takahata, H; Katamine, S; Niwa, M

    2000-12-01

    1. Effects of pentosan polysulfate (PPS) and the structurally related sulfated polyanions dextran sulfate, fucoidan, and heparin on the scavenger receptor-mediated and fluidphase endocytosis in GP8 immortalized rat brain endothelial cells were investigated. 2. Using 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3'-tetramethylindocarboxyamine perchlorate-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-AcLDL), we found a binding site with high affinity and low binding capacity, and another one with low affinity and high binding capacity. Increasing ligand concentrations could not saturate DiI-AcLDL uptake. DiI-AcLDL uptake, but not binding, was sensitive to pretreatment with filipin, an inhibitor of caveola formation. 3. PPS (20-200 microg/ml) significantly reduced the binding of DiI-AcLDL after coincubation for 3 hr, though this effect was less expressed after 18 hr. Among other polyanions, only fucoidan decreased the DiI-AcLDL binding after 3 hr, whereas dextran sulfate significantly increased it after 18 hr. PPS treatment induced an increase in DiI-AcLDL uptake, whereas other polysulfated compounds caused a significant reduction. 4. Fluid-phase endocytosis determined by the accumulation of Lucifer yellow was concentration and time dependent in GP8 cells. Coincubation with PPS or other sulfated polyanions could not significantly alter the rate of Lucifer yellow uptake. 5. In conclusion. PPS decreased the binding and increased the uptake of DiI-AcLDL in cerebral endothelial cells, an effect not mimicked by the other polyanions investigated.

  9. Identification of megalin/gp330 as a receptor for lipoprotein(a) in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeier, A; Willnow, T; Dieplinger, H;

    1999-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an atherogenic lipoprotein of unknown physiological function. The mechanism of Lp(a) atherogenicity as well as its catabolic pathways are only incompletely understood at present. In this report, we show that the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene family member...... megalin/glycoprotein (gp) 330 is capable of binding and mediating the cellular uptake and degradation of Lp(a) in vitro. A mouse embryonic yolk sac cell line with native expression of megalin/gp330 but genetically deficient in LDLR-related protein (LRP) and a control cell line carrying a double knockout...... unlabeled Lp(a) and LDL suggested that Lp(a) uptake is mediated at least partially by apolipoprotein B100. Binding and uptake of DiI-Lp(a) resulted in strong signals on megalin/gp330-expressing cells versus background only on control cells. In addition, we show that purified megalin/gp330, immobilized...

  10. Drosophila Lipophorin Receptors Recruit the Lipoprotein LTP to the Plasma Membrane to Mediate Lipid Uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Míriam Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipophorin, the main Drosophila lipoprotein, circulates in the hemolymph transporting lipids between organs following routes that must adapt to changing physiological requirements. Lipophorin receptors expressed in developmentally dynamic patterns in tissues such as imaginal discs, oenocytes and ovaries control the timing and tissular distribution of lipid uptake. Using an affinity purification strategy, we identified a novel ligand for the lipophorin receptors, the circulating lipoprotein Lipid Transfer Particle (LTP. We show that specific isoforms of the lipophorin receptors mediate the extracellular accumulation of LTP in imaginal discs and ovaries. The interaction requires the LA-1 module in the lipophorin receptors and is strengthened by a contiguous region of 16 conserved amino acids. Lipophorin receptor variants that do not interact with LTP cannot mediate lipid uptake, revealing an essential role of LTP in the process. In addition, we show that lipophorin associates with the lipophorin receptors and with the extracellular matrix through weak interactions. However, during lipophorin receptor-mediated lipid uptake, LTP is required for a transient stabilization of lipophorin in the basolateral plasma membrane of imaginal disc cells. Together, our data suggests a molecular mechanism by which the lipophorin receptors tether LTP to the plasma membrane in lipid acceptor tissues. LTP would interact with lipophorin particles adsorbed to the extracellular matrix and with the plasma membrane, catalyzing the exchange of lipids between them.

  11. Reversal of adipose tissue loss by probucol in mice with deficiency of both scavenger receptor class B type 1 and LDL receptor on high fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin; Liao, Jiawei; Huang, Xiaomin; Wang, Yuhui; Huang, Wei; Liu, George

    2017-05-15

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1(SR-B1) and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) play vital roles in cholesterol homeostasis. Previous studies indicated a strong link between cholesterol and adipose tissue (AT). In this study, adult male SR-B1 and LDLR double knockout (DKO) mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for 3 months. Interestingly, we found severe loss of AT in DKO mice fed with HFD. To reverse the AT loss in DKO mice, 1% probucol was added in HFD. In DKO mice on HFD, plasma total cholesterol (TC) and free cholesterol (FC) levels were increased 6 and 15 folds respectively compared with wild type (WT) mice. We found severe loss of AT in whole body of DKO mice compared with WT or single KO mice. In AT of DKO mice, histology showed the very small size of adipocytes and infiltration of inflammatory cells; Genes expressions related to fatty acid uptake, lipogenesis and adipogenesis were decreased; TUNEL analysis and related genes expressions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation were significantly higher than those of WT or single KO mice. Probucol could reduce increased TC and FC levels, and reverse the loss of fat and apoptosis of AT in DKO mice. AT loss in DKO mice with HFD was probably due to high levels of FC which led to apoptosis induced by ER stress and inflammation of AT. This study provided a novel utility of probucol in rescue of fat loss in DKO mice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Implication of scavenger receptors in the interactions between diesel exhaust particles and immature or mature dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassalle Philippe

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The exposure to pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP is associated with an increased incidence of respiratory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which DEP have an effect on human health are not completely understood. In addition to their action on macrophages and airway epithelial cells, DEP also modulate the functions of dendritic cells (DC. These professional antigen-presenting cells are able to discriminate unmodified self from non-self thanks to pattern recognition receptors such as the Toll like Receptors (TLR and Scavenger Receptors (SR. SR were originally identified by their ability to bind and internalize modified lipoproteins and microorganisms but also particles and TLR agonists. In this study, we assessed the implication of SR in the effects of DEP associated or not with TLR agonists on monocyte-derived DC (MDDC. For this, we studied the regulation of CD36, CXCL16, LOX-1, SR-A1 and SR-B1 expression on MDDC treated with DEP associated or not with TLR2, 3 and 4 ligands. Then, the capacity of SR ligands (dextran sulfate and maleylated-ovalbumin to block the effects of DEP on the function of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated DC has been evaluated. Results Our data demonstrate that TLR2 agonists mainly augmented CXCL16, LOX-1 and SR-B1 expression whereas DEP alone had only a weak effect. Interestingly, DEP modulated the action of TLR2 and TLR4 ligands on the expression of LOX-1 and SR-B1. Pretreatment with the SR ligand maleylated-ovalbumin but not dextran sulfate inhibited the endocytosis of DEP by MDDC. Moreover, this SR ligand blocked the effect by DEP at low dose (1 μg/ml on MDDC phenotype (a decrease of CD86 and HLA-DR expression and on the secretion of CXCL10, IL-12 and TNF-α. In contrast, the decrease of IL-12 and CXCL10 secretion and the generation of oxygen metabolite induced by DEP at 10 μg/ml was not affected by SR ligands Conclusion Our results show for the first time that the modulation of

  13. The alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein binds and internalizes Pseudomonas exotoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounnas, M Z; Morris, R E; Thompson, M R; FitzGerald, D J; Strickland, D K; Saelinger, C B

    1992-06-25

    The alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (alpha 2 MR/LRP) is a large cell-surface glycoprotein consisting of a 515-kDa and an 85-kDa polypeptide; this receptor is thought to be responsible for the binding and endocytosis of activated alpha 2-macroglobulin and apoE-enriched beta-very low density lipoprotein. A similar high molecular weight glycoprotein has been identified as a potential receptor for Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE). We demonstrate that the alpha 2 MR/LRP and the PE-binding glycoprotein have a similar mobility upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and are immunologically indistinguishable. Furthermore, affinity-purified alpha 2 MR/LRP binds specifically to PE but not to a mutant toxin defective in its ability to bind cells. The 39-kDa receptor-associated protein, which blocks binding of ligands to alpha 2 MR/LRP, also prevents binding and subsequent toxicity of PE for mouse fibroblasts. The concentration of receptor-associated protein that was required to reduce binding and toxicity to 50% was approximately 14 nM, a value virtually identical to the KD measured for the interaction of receptor-associated protein with the purified receptor. Overall, the studies strongly suggest that the alpha 2 MR/LRP is responsible for internalizing PE.

  14. Interplay between basic residues of hepatitis C virus glycoprotein E2 with viral receptors, neutralizing antibodies and lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoudakis, George; Dragun, Jakub; Pérez-Del-Pulgar, Sofia; Coto-Llerena, Mairene; Mensa, Laura; Crespo, Gonzalo; González, Patricia; Navasa, Miquel; Forns, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Positively-charged amino acids are located at specific positions in the envelope glycoprotein E2 of the hepatitis C virus (HCV): two histidines (H) and four arginines (R) in two conserved WHY and one RGERCDLEDRDR motifs, respectively. Additionally, the E2 hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) is rich in basic amino acids. To investigate the role(s) of these residues in HCV entry, we subjected to comparative infection and sedimentation analysis cell culture-produced (HCVcc, genotype 2a) wild type virus, a panel of alanine single-site mutants and a HVR1-deletion variant. Initially, we analyzed the effects of these mutations on E2-heparan sulfate (HS) interactions. The positive milieu of the HVR1, formulated by its basic amino acids (key residues the conserved H³⁸⁶ and R⁴⁰⁸), and the two highly conserved basic residues H⁴⁸⁸ and R⁶⁴⁸ contributed to E2-HS interactions. Mutations in these residues did not alter the HCVcc-CD81 entry, but they modified the HCVcc-scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) dependent entry and the neutralization by anti-E2 or patients IgG. Finally, separation by density gradients revealed that mutant viruses abolished partially or completely the infectivity of low density particles, which are believed to be associated with lipoproteins. This study shows that there exists a complex interplay between the basic amino acids located in HVR1 and other conserved E2 motifs with the HS, the SR-BI, and neutralizing antibodies and suggests that HCV-associated lipoproteins are implicated in these interactions.

  15. A regulatory role for macrophage class A scavenger receptors in TLR4-mediated LPS responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunying; Wermeling, Fredrik; Sundqvist, Johanna; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Tryggvason, Karl; Pikkarainen, Timo; Karlsson, Mikael C I

    2010-05-01

    Recognition of microbial components by TLR, key sensors of infection, leads to induction of inflammatory responses. We found that, in vivo, TLR4 engagement by LPS induces up-regulation of the class A scavenger receptors (SR) macrophage receptor with a collagenous structure (MARCO) and SR-A, which occurs, at least in the case of MARCO, via both MyD88-dependent and -independent pathways. When challenging mice with a low dose of LPS followed by a high dose, class A SR-deficient mice showed a higher survival rate than WT mice. This was paired with increased production of IL-10 and anti-LPS Ab, as well as increased activation status of marginal zone B cells. However, the receptors were not crucial for survival when challenging mice i.p. with Neisseria meningitidis or Listeria monocytogenes, but they were found to contribute to microbial capture and clearance. This indicates physiological significance for the up-regulation of class A SR during early stages of bacterial infection. Thus, we believe that we have revealed a mechanism where SR regulate the activation status of the immune system and are involved in balancing a proper immune response to infection. This regulation could also be important in maintaining tolerance since these receptors have been shown to be involved in regulation of self-reactivity.

  16. A green tea catechin extract upregulates the hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursill, Christina A; Roach, Paul D

    2007-07-01

    Green tea extracts have hypocholesterolaemic properties in epidemiological and animal intervention studies. Upregulation of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor may be one mechanism to explain this as it is the main way cholesterol is removed from the circulation. This study aimed to determine if a green tea extract could upregulate the hepatic LDL receptor in vivo in the rat. A green tea extract (GTE) enriched in its anti-oxidant constituents, the catechins, was fed to rats (n = 6) at concentrations of either 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0% (w/w) mixed in with their normal chow along with 0.25% (w/w) cholesterol for 12 days. Administration of the GTE had no effect on plasma total or LDL cholesterol concentrations but high-density lipoprotein significantly increased (41%; p extract was able to increase the efflux of cholesterol from liver cells.

  17. CBLB502, an agonist of Toll-like receptor 5, has antioxidant and scavenging free radicals activities in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiguang; Ge, Changhui; Yang, Liu; Wang, Ruixue; Lu, Yiming; Gao, Yan; Li, Zhihui; Wu, Yonghong; Zheng, Xiaofei; Wang, Zhaoyan; Zhang, Chenggang

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial protein flagellin is the known agonist of Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5). It has been reported that CBLB502, a novel agonist of TLR5 derived from Salmonella flagellin, could reduce radiation toxicity in mouse and primate models, protect mice from dermatitis and oral mucositis caused by radiation, inhibit acute renal ischemic failure, and inhibit the growth of A549 lung cancer cell. The property of CBLB502 is able to bind to TLR5 and activates NF-κB signaling. In this study, we investigated the antioxidant potential and free radicals scavenging properties of CBLB502 in vitro. Interestingly, we found that CBLB502 has a direct and distinct antioxidant capacity and can efficiently scavenge a variety of free radicals, including superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, and ABTS cation (ABTS(+)). Through wave scanning and kinetic evaluation of scavenging ABTS(+), we found that the ABTS(+) scavenging process of CBLB502 is relatively slow, and the ABTS(+) scavenging activity of CBLB502 has a consistently kinetics characteristics. In conclusion, our results suggested that CBLB502 has antioxidant and scavenging free radicals activities in vitro. It is implied that CBLB502 might partially promote the beneficial protective effect through its scavenging free radicals.

  18. Common Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor p.G116S Variant Has a Large Effect on Plasma Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Circumpolar Inuit Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dube, J. B.; Wang, J.; Cao, H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inuit are considered to be vulnerable to cardiovascular disease because their lifestyles are becoming more Westernized. During sequence analysis of Inuit individuals at extremes of lipid traits, we identified 2 nonsynonymous variants in low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), namely p...

  19. DETECTING LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN RECEPTOR MUTANT GENE OF RABBIT BY PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Many factors playi mportant roles inthe devel-opment of human atherosclerotic lesions,the lead-ing risk factor for atherosclerosis is familial hyper-cholesterolaemia(FH)[1-2].FHis a genetic diseasecharacterized by a deficiency of receptors for lowdensity lipoprotein(LDL)on the plas malemma ofendothelial cells,a high level of serum LDL,andearly development of atherosclerosis[3].WatanabeHeritable Hyperlipidaemic(WHHL)rabbits withunprovoked hypercholesterolaemia,increased bloodlevel of LDL,pronounced atheroscl...

  20. Increase of scavenger receptor A-positive monocytes in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emura, Iwao; Usuda, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Toshio; Ebe, Katsuya; Nagai, Tsuneo

    2007-08-01

    To evaluate the utility of the scavenger receptor A (SRA) index (no. SRA(+) monocytes observed in 10 high-power fields of peripheral blood (PB) smear samples, normal upper limit or =30 at hospitalization. The SRA index of 82.4% of AMI, and 75.9% of UA, and 70.3% of SA patients was > or =30 at hospitalization. For 36 AMI patients who initially had an SRA index of <30 at hospitalization, it exceeded 30 within 2 days, and the SRA index rapidly increased in most AMI patients after hospitalization. SRA(+) monocytes were considered to differentiate from SRA(-) monocytes in PB. An abnormally high SRA index is considered to be a useful indication of disrupted or fissured or eroded plaque.

  1. Proteolytic shedding of the macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabriek, Babs O; Møller, Holger J; Vloet, Rianka P M

    2007-01-01

    The scavenger receptor CD163 is selectively expressed on tissue macrophages and human monocytes. CD163 has been implicated to play a role in the clearance of hemoglobin and in the regulation of cytokine production by macrophages. Membrane CD163 can be cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP......) resulting in soluble CD163 (sCD163). In the present report the shedding of CD163 was investigated in multiple sclerosis (MS). An upregulation of plasma sCD163 and a down regulation of membrane CD163 in MS patients compared to healthy controls was observed. The levels of plasma sCD163 correlated with plasma...... MMP-9 levels in controls, but not in MS patients. Moreover, evidence was obtained for CD163-cleaving MMP activity in plasma of MS patients. Finally, the increased proteolytic shedding of CD163 correlated to reduced plasma levels of circulating inflammatory cytokines. Collectively, our results provide...

  2. Molecular characterization of the haptoglobin.hemoglobin receptor CD163. Ligand binding properties of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby

    2004-01-01

    CD163 is the macrophage receptor for endocytosis of haptoglobin.hemoglobin complexes. The extracellular region consisting of nine scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domains also circulates in plasma as a soluble protein. By ligand binding analysis of a broad spectrum of soluble CD163...

  3. Mechanisms of Cellular Uptake of Thrombin-Antithrombin II Complexes Role of the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein as a Serpin-Enzyme Complex Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, D K; Kounnas, M Z

    1997-01-01

    Serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins) such as antithrombin III inhibit target proteinases by forming a stable complexwith the enzyme. Once formed, several serpin-enzyme complexes (SECs) are removed from the circulation by a receptor, termed the SEC receptor, that is present in the liver. Until recently, the identity of this clearance receptor remained unknown; however, data are now available that strongly implicates one member of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family as a candidate for the SEC receptor. This receptor, known as the LDL receptor-related protein (LRP), is a prominent liver receptor that is known to bind numerous ligands that include proteinase-inhibitor complexes, matrix proteins, and certain apolipoprotein E- and lipoprotein lipase-enriched lipoproteins. © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:9-16).

  4. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2/megalin is expressed in oligodendrocytes in the mouse spinal cord white matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wicher, Grzegorz; Larsson, Mårten; Svenningsen, Åsa Fex

    2006-01-01

    Lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 (LRP2)/megalin is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family, and is essential in absorptive epithelia for endocytosis of lipoproteins, low molecular weight proteins, cholesterol and vitamins, as well as in cellular signaling. Previous st...... that spinal cord oligodendrocytes are phenotypically different from those in the brain, and indicate that megalin translocates signals from the cell membrane to the nucleus of oligodendrocytes during the formation and maintenance of myelin of long spinal cord pathways....

  5. Cloning and characterization of SCART1, a novel scavenger receptor cysteine-rich type I transmembrane molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Dorte; Fink, Dorte Rosenbek; Grønlund, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized a novel murine transmembrane molecule, mSCART1 belonging to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily. The cDNA encodes a polypeptide chain of 989 amino acids, organized as a type I transmembrane protein that contains eight extracellular SRCR domains followed...

  6. Effect of Curcumin on the Gene Expression of Low Density Lipoprotein Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the molecular mechanisms and effective target ponits of lipid-lowering drug, Rhizoma Curcumae Longae, and study the effect of curcumin on the expression of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors in macrophages in mice. Methods: Macrophages in mice were treated with curcumin, which was purified from the ethanolly extraction of Rhizoma Curcumae Longae for 24 h. The LDL receptors expressed in the macrophages were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and assay of Dil labeled LDL uptake by flow cytometer. Results: It was found for the first time that 10 μmol/L-50μmol/L curcumin could obviously up-regulate the expression of LDL receptor in macrophages in mice, and a dose-effect relationship was demonstrated. Conclusion: One of the lipid-lowering mechanisms of traditional Chinese medicine, Rhizoma Curcumae Longae, was completed by the effect of curcumin through the up-regulation of the expression of LDL receptor.

  7. Key Role for Scavenger Receptor B-I in the Integrative Physiology of Host Defense during Bacterial Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Gowdy, Kymberly M.; Madenspacher, Jennifer H.; Azzam, Kathleen M.; Kristin A. Gabor; Janardhan, Kyathanahalli S.; Aloor, Jim J.; Fessler, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Scavenger receptor B-I (SR-BI) is a multirecognition receptor that regulates cholesterol trafficking and cardiovascular inflammation. Although it is expressed by neutrophils (PMNs) and lung-resident cells, no role for SR-BI has been defined in pulmonary immunity. Herein, we report that, compared to SR-BI+/+ counterparts, SR-BI−/− mice suffer markedly increased mortality during bacterial pneumonia associated with higher bacterial burden in lung and blood, deficient induction of the stress gluc...

  8. Cellular Recognition and Trafficking of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles by Macrophage Scavenger Receptor A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, Galya; Chrisler, William B.; Cassens, Kaylyn J.; Tan, Ruimin; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Zangar, Richard C.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2011-09-01

    The internalization of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) into cells is known to involve active transport mechanisms, yet the precise biological molecules involved are poorly understood. We demonstrate that the uptake of amorphous silica ENPs (92 nm) by macrophage cells is strongly inhibited by silencing expression of scavenger receptor A (SR-A). In addition, ENP uptake is augmented by introducing SR-A expression into human cells that are normally non-phagocytic. Confocal fluorescent microscopy analyses show that the majority of single or small clusters of silica ENPs co-localize intracellularly with SR-A and are internalized through a pathway characteristic of clathrin-dependent endocytosis. In contrast, larger silica NP agglomerates (>500 nm) are poorly co-localized with the receptor, suggesting independent trafficking or internalization pathways are involved. SR-A silencing also caused decreased cellular secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to silica ENPs. As SR-A is expressed in macrophages throughout the reticulo-endothelial system, this pathway is likely an important determinant of the biodistribution of, and cellular response to ENPs.

  9. The formyl peptide receptor like-1 and scavenger receptor MARCO are involved in glial cell activation in bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Sandra

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have suggested that the scavenger receptor MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure mediates activation of the immune response in bacterial infection of the central nervous system (CNS. The chemotactic G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR formyl-peptide-receptor like-1 (FPRL1 plays an essential role in the inflammatory responses of host defence mechanisms and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD. Expression of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin CRAMP/LL-37 is up-regulated in bacterial meningitis, but the mechanisms underlying CRAMP expression are far from clear. Methods Using a rat meningitis model, we investigated the influence of MARCO and FPRL1 on rCRAMP (rat cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide expression after infection with bacterial supernatants of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP and Neisseria meningitides (NM. Expression of FPRL1 and MARCO was analyzed by immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR in a rat meningitis model. Furthermore, we examined the receptor involvement by real-time RT-PCR, extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement in glial cells (astrocytes and microglia and transfected HEK293 cells using receptor deactivation by antagonists. Receptors were inhibited by small interference RNA and the consequences in NM- and SP-induced Camp (rCRAMP gene expression and signal transduction were determined. Results We show an NM-induced increase of MARCO expression by immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR in glial and meningeal cells. Receptor deactivation by antagonists and small interfering RNA (siRNA verified the importance of FPRL1 and MARCO for NM- and SP-induced Camp and interleukin-1β expression in glial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated a functional interaction between FPRL1 and MARCO in NM-induced signalling by real-time RT-PCR, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement and show differences between

  10. Remodeling of plasma lipoproteins in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Interleukin-6 receptor-alpha inhibition with tocilizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Janet S; Chapman, M John; Piraino, Paolo; Lamerz, Jens; Schindler, Thomas; Cutler, Paul; Dernick, Gregor

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, mediated in part by elevated circulating interleukin-6 levels and proinflammatory changes in plasma lipoproteins. We hypothesized that RA patients acquire inflammation-induced modifications to the protein cargo of circulating lipoproteins that may be reversed by tocilizumab, an interleukin-6 receptor-alpha inhibitor. Size-exclusion chromatography and reverse-phase protein arrays using 29 antibodies against 26 proteins were applied at baseline and after tocilizumab treatment to analyze the distributions of apolipoproteins, enzymes, lipid transfer proteins, and other associated proteins in plasma lipoprotein fractions from 20 women with RA. A 30% reduction in high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated serum amyloid A4 and complement C4 occurred with tocilizumab. Levels of C-reactive protein, associated or comigrating with HDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) peaks, were reduced on treatment by approximately 80% and 24%, respectively. Reductions in lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, lipoprotein (a), and cholesteryl ester transfer protein in the LDL fraction suggest reductions in LDL-associated proatherogenic factors. Elevations in very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) enriched with apolipoprotein E were equally observed. Tocilizumab treatment led to reductions in proinflammatory components and proatherogenic proteins associated with HDL. Whether changes in the proteome of VLDL, LDL, and HDL induced by anti-inflammatory tocilizumab treatment in RA patients modify cardiovascular disease risk requires further investigation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Scavenger receptor A index and coronary thrombus in patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emura, Iwao; Usuda, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Toshio; Ebe, Katsuya; Nagai, Tsuneo

    2011-06-01

    To examine the relationship between the scavenger receptor A (SRA) index (the number of SRA+ cells observed in 10 high power fields of peripheral blood (PB) smear samples; normal upper limit <30) and coronary thrombus, 389 thrombi obtained from 393 patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction were examined. Thrombi were classified into platelets (PT), mixed (MT), fibrin-rich (FT) and organizing thrombi (OT); 387, 269, 57 and 29 cases were detected, respectively. Patients were divided into group A (PT only, 89 cases), B (containing MT and PT but not FT, 243 cases), and C (containing FT, 57 cases). SRA+ cells had infiltrated into all FT cases and 147 of the 269 MT, but no PT. At hospitalization, the SRA index exceeded 30 in 276 patients. PT was observed in 274 cases, and MT and FT (residual mural thrombus; RMT) observed in 230. Infarct-related coronary artery was thought to be totally and rapidly occluded by PT that had formed as a result of severe stenosis due to extrusion of plaque content or growth of RMT. An abnormal increase of SRA+ cells is considered to be a useful finding to detecting the presence of PT and, probably, RMT.

  12. Activated scavenger receptor A promotes glial internalization of aβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Zhang

    Full Text Available Beta-amyloid (Aβ aggregates have a pivotal role in pathological processing of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The clearance of Aβ monomer or aggregates is a causal strategy for AD treatment. Microglia and astrocytes are the main macrophages that exert critical neuroprotective roles in the brain. They may effectively clear the toxic accumulation of Aβ at the initial stage of AD, however, their functions are attenuated because of glial overactivation. In this study, we first showed that heptapeptide XD4 activates the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A on the glia by increasing the binding of Aβ to SR-A, thereby promoting glial phagocytosis of Aβ oligomer in microglia and astrocytes and triggering intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling cascades. Moreover, XD4 enhances the internalization of Aβ monomers to microglia and astrocytes through macropinocytosis or SR-A-mediated phagocytosis. Furthermore, XD4 significantly inhibits Aβ oligomer-induced cytotoxicity to glial cells and decreases the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, in vitro and in vivo. Our findings may provide a novel strategy for AD treatment by activating SR-A.

  13. Micellar lipid composition affects micelle interaction with class B scavenger receptor extracellular loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Gontero, Brigitte; Nowicki, Marion; Margier, Marielle; Masset, Gabriel; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2015-06-01

    Scavenger receptors (SRs) like cluster determinant 36 (CD36) and SR class B type I (SR-BI) play a debated role in lipid transport across the intestinal brush border membrane. We used surface plasmon resonance to analyze real-time interactions between the extracellular protein loops and various ligands ranging from single lipid molecules to mixed micelles. Micelles mimicking physiological structures were necessary for optimal binding to both the extracellular loop of CD36 (lCD36) and the extracellular loop of SR-BI (lSR-BI). Cholesterol, phospholipid, and fatty acid micellar content significantly modulated micelle binding to and dissociation from the transporters. In particular, high phospholipid micellar concentrations inhibited micelle binding to both receptors (-53.8 and -74.4% binding at 0.32 mM compared with 0.04 mM for lCD36 and lSR-BI, respectively, P < 0.05). The presence of fatty acids was crucial for micelle interactions with both proteins (94.4 and 81.3% binding with oleic acid for lCD36 and lSR-BI, respectively, P < 0.05) and fatty acid type substitution within the micelles was the component that most impacted micelle binding to the transporters. These effects were partly due to subsequent modifications in micellar size and surface electric charge, and could be correlated to micellar vitamin D uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our findings show for the first time that micellar lipid composition and micellar properties are key factors governing micelle interactions with SRs.

  14. The role of the class A scavenger receptors, SR-A and MARCO, in the immune system. Part 1. The structure of receptors, their ligand binding repertoires and ability to initiate intracellular signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczepan Józefowski

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available  Recognition of pathogens by innate immune cells is mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRR, which include scavenger receptors (SR. The class A SR, SR-A/CD204 and MARCO, are characterized by the presence of collagenous and SR cysteine-rich domains in their extracellular portions. Both receptors are expressed mainly on macrophages and dendritic cells. Thanks to their ability to bind to a wide range of polyanionic ligands, the class A SR may participate in numerous functions of these cells, such as endocytosis, and adhesion to extracellular matrix and to other cells. Among SR-A ligands are oxidized lipoproteins and β-amyloid fibrils, which link SR-A to the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. Despite the demonstration of class A SR involvement in so many processes, the lack of selective ligands precluded reaching definite conclusions concerning their signaling abilities. Using specific receptor ligation with antibodies, we showed that SR-A and MARCO trigger intracellular signaling, modulating pro-inflammatory and microbicidal activities of macrophages. Surprisingly, despite similarities in structure and ligand binding repertoires, SR-A and MARCO exert opposite effects on interleukin-12 (IL-12 production in macrophages. SR-A ligation also stimulated H2O2 and IL-10 production, but had no effect on the release of several other cytokines. These limited effects of specific SR-A ligation contrast with generalized enhancement of immune responses observed in SR-A-deficient mice. Recent studies have revealed that many of these effects of SR-A deficiency may be caused by compensatory changes in the expression of other receptors and/or disinhibition of signal transduction from receptors belonging to the Toll/IL-1R family, rather than by the loss of the receptor function of SR-A.

  15. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Related Proteins as Regulators of Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Function

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    Loic Auderset

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS is a highly organised structure. Many signalling systems work in concert to ensure that neural stem cells are appropriately directed to generate progenitor cells, which in turn mature into functional cell types including projection neurons, interneurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Herein we explore the role of the low density lipoprotein (LDL receptor family, in particular family members LRP1 and LRP2, in regulating the behaviour of neural stem and progenitor cells during development and adulthood. The ability of LRP1 and LRP2 to bind a diverse and extensive range of ligands, regulate ligand endocytosis, recruit nonreceptor tyrosine kinases for direct signal transduction and signal in conjunction with other receptors, enables them to modulate many crucial neural cell functions.

  16. DETECTING LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN RECEPTOR MUTANT GENE OF RABBIT BY PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Enqi; Zhao Sihai; Chen Zhenglan; Yang Penghui

    2006-01-01

    Objective Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidaemic (WHHL) rabbits with low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) gene mutation have provided unprecedented opportunities for the study of human atherosclerosis, in order to confirm LDL receptor gene status in rabbits, we developed a simple PCR technique to detect LDL mutations in rabbits. Methods Rabbits genomic DNA were extracted from ear biopsy, and amplified by PCR to detect 12 bp deletion mutation in WHHL rabbits. PCR products were directly digested with BglⅠ, and then applied to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results PCR products from homozygous LDLr +/+ rabbits generated 2 bands of 212 and 94 bp after BglⅠ digestion, LDLr +/- rabbits generated 3 bands (294, 212, and 94 bp), LDLr -/- animals, however, generated only 1 product (294 bp). Conclusion This modified PCR method is simple and reliable.

  17. Evidence that the newly cloned low-density-lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP) is the alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, T; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Gliemann, Jørgen;

    1990-01-01

    these polypeptides, and analysis of a 1772 bp cDNA encoding part of the 500 kDa polypeptide provide evidence that the 500 kDa and 85 kDa chains are the alpha- and beta-subunits, respectively, of a recently cloned hepatic membrane protein, termed the low density lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP) (Herz, J......The human placental receptor (alpha 2MR) for alpha 2-macroglobulin-proteinase complexes contains 3 polypeptides of approx. 500 kDa, 85 kDa, and 40 kDa. N-terminal sequence analysis of the 500 kDa and 85 kDa polypeptides, analysis of a random selection of peptides convering 536 residues from...

  18. Functional analysis of low-density lipoprotein receptor in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia patients with novel 1439 C→T mutation of low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Jie; JIANG Zhi-sheng; WANG Lu-ya; LIU Shu; XIA Jun-hui; YONG Qiang; DU Lan-ping; PAN Xiao-dong; XUE Hong; CHEN Bao-sheng

    2008-01-01

    Background Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), caused by low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDL-R) gene mutations, is associated with increased risk of premature coronary heart disease. Until now, limited molecular data concerning FH are available in China. The present study described the clinical profiles and cell biological defects of a Chinese FH kindred with novel LDL-R gene mutation.Methods The patient's LDL-R gene coding region was sequenced. The patient's lymphocytes were isolated and the LDL-R expression, binding and up-take functions were observed by immunohistochemistry staining and flow cytometry detection. The patient's heart and the major large vessels were detected by vessel ultrasound examination and myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI).Results The patient's LDL-R expression, LDL binding and up-take functions were significantly lower than normal control (39%, 63% and 76% respectively). A novel homozygous 1439 C→T mutation of the LDL-R gene was detected in the patient and his family. ECG showed atypical angina pectoris. Echocardiogram showed stenosis of the coronary artery and calcification of the aortic valve and its root. Blood vessel ultrasound examination showed the thickness of large vessel intima, and the vessel lumen was narrowed by 71%. MPI showed ischemic changes.Conclusions The LDL-R synthesis dysfunction of FH patients leads to arterial stenosis and calcification, which are the major phenotype of the clinical disorder. The mutation of the LDL-R gene is determined. These data increase the mutational spectrum of FH in China.

  19. The dual role of scavenger receptor class A in development of diabetes in autoimmune NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mami Shimizu

    Full Text Available Human type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results from the autoreactive destruction of pancreatic β cells by T cells. Antigen presenting cells including dendritic cells and macrophages are required to activate and suppress antigen-specific T cells. It has been suggested that antigen uptake from live cells by dendritic cells via scavenger receptor class A (SR-A may be important. However, the role of SR-A in autoimmune disease is unknown. In this study, SR-A-/- nonobese diabetic (NOD mice showed significant attenuation of insulitis, lower levels of insulin autoantibodies, and suppression of diabetes development compared with NOD mice. We also found that diabetes progression in SR-A-/- NOD mice treated with low-dose polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C was significantly accelerated compared with that in disease-resistant NOD mice treated with low-dose poly(I:C. In addition, injection of high-dose poly(I: C to mimic an acute RNA virus infection significantly accelerated diabetes development in young SR-A-/- NOD mice compared with untreated SR-A-/- NOD mice. Pathogenic cells including CD4+CD25+ activated T cells were increased more in SR-A-/- NOD mice treated with poly(I:C than in untreated SR-A-/- NOD mice. These results suggested that viral infection might accelerate diabetes development even in diabetes-resistant subjects. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that diabetes progression was suppressed in SR-A-/- NOD mice and that acceleration of diabetes development could be induced in young mice by poly(I:C treatment even in SR-A-/- NOD mice. These results suggest that SR-A on antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells may play an unfavorable role in the steady state and a protective role in a mild infection. Our findings imply that SR-A may be an important target for improving therapeutic strategies for type 1 diabetes.

  20. Cubilin, the endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B(12) complex, mediates high-density lipoprotein holoparticle endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, S M; Stefansson, S; Twal, W O; Drake, C J; Fleming, P; Remaley, A; Brewer, H B; Argraves, W S

    1999-08-31

    Receptors that endocytose high-density lipoproteins (HDL) have been elusive. Here yolk-sac endoderm-like cells were used to identify an endocytic receptor for HDL. The receptor was isolated by HDL affinity chromatography and identified as cubilin, the recently described endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B(12). Cubilin antibodies inhibit HDL endocytosis by the endoderm-like cells and in mouse embryo yolk-sac endoderm, a prominent site of cubilin expression. Cubilin-mediated HDL endocytosis is inhibitable by HDL(2), HDL(3), apolipoprotein (apo)A-I, apoA-II, apoE, and RAP, but not by low-density lipoprotein (LDL), oxidized LDL, VLDL, apoC-I, apoC-III, or heparin. These findings, coupled with the fact that cubilin is expressed in kidney proximal tubules, suggest a role for this receptor in embryonic acquisition of maternal HDL and renal catabolism of filterable forms of HDL.

  1. α-Tocopherol modulates the low density lipoprotein receptor of human HepG2 cells

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    Bottema Cynthia DK

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the effects of vitamin E (α-tocopherol on the low density lipoprotein (LDL receptor, a cell surface protein which plays an important role in controlling blood cholesterol. Human HepG2 hepatoma cells were incubated for 24 hours with increasing amounts of α, δ, or γ-tocopherol. The LDL receptor binding activity, protein and mRNA, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase mRNA, cell cholesterol and cell lathosterol were measured. The effect of α-tocopherol was biphasic. Up to a concentration of 50 μM, α-tocopherol progressively increased LDL receptor binding activity, protein and mRNA to maximum levels 2, 4 and 6-fold higher than control, respectively. The HMG-CoA reductase mRNA and the cell lathosterol concentration, indices of cholesterol synthesis, were also increased by 40% over control by treatment with 50 μM α-tocopherol. The cell cholesterol concentration was decreased by 20% compared to control at 50 μM α-tocopherol. However, at α-tocopherol concentrations higher than 50 μM, the LDL receptor binding activity, protein and mRNA, the HMG-CoA reductase mRNA and the cell lathosterol and cholesterol concentrations all returned to control levels. The biphasic effect on the LDL receptor was specific for α-tocopherol in that δ and γ-tocopherol suppressed LDL receptor binding activity, protein and mRNA at all concentrations tested despite the cells incorporating similar amounts of the three homologues. In conclusion, α-tocopherol, exhibits a specific, concentration-dependent and biphasic "up then down" effect on the LDL receptor of HepG2 cells which appears to be at the level of gene transcription. Cholesterol synthesis appears to be similarly affected and the cell cholesterol concentration may mediate these effects.

  2. TmSR-C, scavenger receptor class C, plays a pivotal role in antifungal and antibacterial immunity in the coleopteran insect Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Gon; Jo, Yong Hun; Seong, Jeong Hwan; Park, Ki Beom; Noh, Mi Young; Cho, Jun Ho; Ko, Hye Jin; Kim, Chang Eun; Tindwa, Hamisi; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Bang, In Seok; Lee, Yong Seok; Han, Yeon Soo

    2017-10-01

    Scavenger receptors (SRs) constitute a family of membrane-bound receptors that bind to multiple ligands. The SR family of proteins is involved in removing cellular debris, oxidized low-density lipoproteins, and pathogens. Specifically, class C scavenger receptors (SR-C) have also been reported to be involved in phagocytosis of gram-positive and -negative bacteria in Drosophila and viruses in shrimp. However, reports are unavailable regarding the role of SR-C in antifungal immune mechanisms in insects. In this study, a full-length Tenebrio molitor SR-C (TmSR-C) sequence was obtained by 5'- and 3'-Rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR). The TmSR-C full-length cDNA comprised 1671 bp with 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions of 23- and 107-bp, respectively. TmSR-C encodes a putative protein of 556 amino acid residues that is constitutively expressed in all tissues of late instar larvae and 2-day-old adults, with the highest transcript levels observed in hemocytes of larvae and adults. TmSR-C mRNA showed a 2.5-fold and 3-fold increase at 24 and 6 h after infection with Candida albicans and β-glucan, respectively. Immunoassay with TmSR-C polyclonal antibody showed induction of the putative protein in the cytosols of hemocytes at 3 h after inoculation of C. albicans. RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene silencing and phagocytosis assays were used to understand the role of TmSR-C in antifungal immunity. Silencing of TmSR-C transcripts reduced the survivability of late instar larvae at 2 days post-inoculation of C. albicans, Escherichia coli, or Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, in TmSR-C-silenced larvae, there was a decline in the rate of microorganism phagocytosis. Taken together, results of this study suggest that TmSR-C plays a pivotal role in phagocytosing not only fungi but also gram-negative and -positive bacteria in T. molitor. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Sleeve gastrectomy prevents lipoprotein receptor-1 expression in aortas of obese rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Bai; Yong Wang; Yuan Liu; Dong-Hua Geng; Jin-Gang Liu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of sleeve gastrectomy on adipose tissue infiltration and lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) expression in rat aortas.METHODS: Twenty-four rats were randomized into three groups: normal chow (control), high fat diet (HD) and high fat diet with sleeve gastrectomy (SG). After surgery, the HD and SG groups were fed a high fat diet. Animals were sacrificed and plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) lev-els were determined. LOX-1 protein and LOX-1 mRNA expression was also measured. Aortas were stained with Nile red to visualize adipose tissue.RESULT: Body weights were higher in the HD group compared to the other groups. HDL levels in control, HD, and SG groups were 32.9 ± 6.2 mg/dL, 43.4 ± 4.0 mg/dL and 37.5 ± 4.3 mg/dL, respectively. LDL levels in control, HD, and SG groups were 31.8 ± 4.5 mg/dL, 53.3 ± 5.1 mg/dL and 40.5 ± 3.7 mg/dL, respectively. LOX-1 protein and LOX-1 mRNA expression was greater in the HD group versus the other groups. Staining for adipose tissue in aortas was greater in the HD group in comparison to the other groups. Thus, a high fat diet elevates LOX-1 protein and mRNA expression in aorta. CONCLUSION: Sleeve gastrectomy decreases plasma LDL levels, and downregulates LOX-1 protein and mRNA expression.

  4. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptor in locally advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, L.A. [Laboratório de Metabolismo de Lípides, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Ginecologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hegg, R. [Departamento de Ginecologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Freitas, F.R.; Tavares, E.R.; Almeida, C.P. [Laboratório de Metabolismo de Lípides, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Baracat, E.C. [Departamento de Ginecologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Maranhão, R.C. [Laboratório de Metabolismo de Lípides, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-04

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors are overexpressed in most neoplastic cell lines and provide a mechanism for the internalization and concentration of drug-laden nanoemulsions that bind to these receptors. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the administration of standard chemotherapeutic schemes can alter the expression of LDL and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptors in breast carcinoma. Fragments of tumoral and normal breast tissue from 16 consecutive volunteer women with breast cancer in stage II or III were obtained from biopsies before the beginning of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after chemotherapy, from fragments excised during mastectomy. Tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for both receptors. Because complete response to treatment was achieved in 4 patients, only the tumors from 12 were analyzed. Before chemotherapy, there was overexpression of LDL receptor in the tumoral tissue compared to normal breast tissue in 8 of these patients. LRP-1 receptor overexpression was observed in tumors of 4 patients. After chemotherapy, expression of both receptors decreased in the tumors of 6 patients, increased in 4 and was unchanged in 2. Nonetheless, even when chemotherapy reduced receptors expression, the expression was still above normal. The fact that chemotherapy does not impair LDL receptors expression supports the use of drug carrier systems that target neoplastic cells by the LDL receptor endocytic pathway in patients on conventional chemotherapy.

  5. Meta-Analysis of Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR rs2228671 Polymorphism and Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huadan Ye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR can regulate cholesterol metabolism by removing the excess low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C in blood. Since cholesterol metabolism is often disrupted in coronary heart disease (CHD, LDLR as a candidate gene of CHD has been intensively studied. The goal of our study is to evaluate the overall contribution of LDLR rs2228671 polymorphism to the risk of CHD by combining the genotyping data from multiple case-control studies. Our meta-analysis is involved with 8 case-control studies among 7588 cases and 9711 controls to test the association between LDLR rs2228671 polymorphism and CHD. In addition, we performed a case-control study of LDLR rs2228671 polymorphism with the risk of CHD in Chinese population. Our meta-analysis showed that rs2228671-T allele was significantly associated with a reduced risk of CHD (P=0.0005, odds ratio (OR = 0.83, and 95% confidence interval (95% CI = 0.75–0.92. However, rs2228671-T allele frequency was rare (1% and was not associated with CHD in Han Chinese (P=0.49, suggesting an ethnic difference of LDLR rs2228671 polymorphism. Meta-analysis has established rs2228671 as a protective factor of CHD in Europeans. The lack of association in Chinese reflects an ethnic difference of this genetic variant between Chinese and European populations.

  6. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 determines plasma remnant lipoproteins and accelerates atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Saito, Ryo; Sekiya, Motohiro; Igarashi, Masaki; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Miyahara, Shoko; Koyasu, Saori; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Ishii, Kiyoaki; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yahagi, Naoya; Takekoshi, Kazuhiro; Sone, Hirohito; Yatoh, Shigeru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2011-08-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) is nutritionally regulated and is known to be a key transcription factor regulating lipogenic enzymes. The goal of this study was to evaluate the roles of SREBP-1 in dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis. Transgenic mice that overexpress SREBP-1c in the liver and SREBP-1-deficient mice were crossed with low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice, and the plasma lipids and atherosclerosis were analyzed. Hepatic SREBP-1c overexpression in LDLR-deficient mice caused postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, increased very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, and decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in plasma, which resulted in accelerated aortic atheroma formation. Conversely, absence of SREBP-1 suppressed Western diet-induced hyperlipidemia in LDLR-deficient mice and ameliorated atherosclerosis. In contrast, bone marrow-specific SREBP-1 deficiency did not alter the development of atherosclerosis. The size of nascent VLDL particles secreted from the liver was increased in SREBP-1c transgenic mice and reduced in SREBP-1-deficient mice, accompanied by upregulation and downregulation of phospholipid transfer protein expression, respectively. Hepatic SREBP-1c determines plasma triglycerides and remnant cholesterol and contributes to atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic states. Hepatic SREBP-1c also regulates the size of nascent VLDL particles.

  7. Expression of very low density lipoprotein receptor in the vascular wall. Analysis of human tissues by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H A; Gåfvels, M E; Kariko, K

    1996-01-01

    for the uptake and transport of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and perhaps facilitate the development of atherosclerosis in hypertriglyceridemic individuals, we used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to determine whether VLDL receptor mRNA and protein was expressed in human vascular tissue. We......The recently cloned very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor binds triglyceride-rich, apolipoprotein-E-containing lipoproteins with high affinity. The observation that VLDL receptor mRNA is abundantly expressed in extracts of tissues such as skeletal muscle and heart, but not liver, has led...... tissue suggests a potentially important role for this receptor in normal and pathophysiological vascular processes....

  8. [New mutations in low-density lipoprotein receptor gene in familial hypercholesterolemia patients from Petrozavodsk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, T Yu; Golovina, A S; Grudinina, N A; Zakharova, F M; Korneva, V A; Lipovetsky, B M; Serebrenitskaya, M P; Konstantinov, V O; Vasilyev, V B; Mandelshtam, M Yu

    2013-06-01

    Using an automated fluorescent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the entire coding region, promoter zone, and exon-intron junctions of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene, we examined 80 DNA samples of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) from Petrozavodsk. We revealed mutations that might cause FH in five probands, including FH-North Karelia (c.925-931del7) mutation and four previously unknown mutations. These novel mutations included a transversion (c.618T>G (p.S206R), one nucleotide insertion c.195_196insT (p.FsV66:D129X), a complex gene rearrangement c.192del10/ins8 (p.FsS65:D129X), and a single nucleotide deletion c.2191delG (p.FsV731:V736X). Three out of four novel mutations produce an open reading frame shift and the premature termination of translation. An analysis of the cDNA sequence of the LDL receptor showed that this might result in the formation of a transmembrane-domain-deficient receptor that is unable to bind and internalize the ligand. Our results suggest the absence of a strong founder effect associated with FH in the Petrozavodsk population.

  9. Roles oflow-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 intumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PeipeiXing; ZhichaoLiao; ZhiwuRen; JunZhao; FengjuSong; GuowenWang; KexinChen; Jilong Yang

    2016-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1, also known as CD91), a multifunctional endocytic and cell signaling receptor, is widely expressed on the surface of multiple cell types such as hepatocytes, ifbroblasts, neu-rons, astrocytes, macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and malignant cells. Emerging invitro and invivo evidence demonstrates that LRP1 is critically involved in many processes that drive tumorigenesis and tumor progression. For example, LRP1 not only promotes tumor cell migration and invasion by regulating matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression and functions but also inhibits cell apoptosis by regulating the insulin receptor, the serine/threonine protein kinase signaling pathway, and the expression of Caspase-3. LRP1-mediated phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway and c-jun N-terminal kinase are also involved in tumor cell proliferation and invasion. In addition, LRP1 has been shown to be down-regulated by microRNA-205 and methylation ofLRP1 CpG islands. Furthermore, a novel fusion gene,LRP1-SNRNP25, promotes osteosarcoma cell invasion and migration. Only by understanding the mechanisms of these effects can we develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for cancers mediated by LRP1.

  10. Activated human mast cells induce LOX-1-specific scavenger receptor expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervi Alanne-Kinnunen

    Full Text Available Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs.Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1 mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1, which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell -induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages.Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis.

  11. Soluble hemoglobin-haptoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 as a lineage-specific marker in the reactive hemophagocytic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaer, Dominik J; Schleiffenbaum, Boris; Kurrer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    .1 mg/L), acute mononucleosis (median 8.2 mg/L), Leishmania infection (median 6.7 mg/L) and healthy controls (median 1.8 mg/L). Follow-up of patients with a relapsing course of the disease revealed close correlations of sCD163 with clinical disease activity, serum ferritin and other markers...... and thus specificity. Serum levels of the macrophage specific scavenger receptor CD163 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and were found to be highly increased in patients with RHS (median 39.0 mg/L). Significantly lower levels were determined in patients with sepsis (median 9...

  12. Metallothionein and a peptide modeled after metallothionein, EmtinB, induce neuronal differentiation and survival through binding to receptors of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Malene; Asmussen, Johanne W; Lindstam, Mats;

    2007-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metallothionein (MT)-I and -II promote neuronal survival and regeneration in vivo. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation and survival-promoting effects of MT and a peptide modeled after MT, EmtinB. Both MT...... and EmtinB directly stimulated neurite outgrowth and promoted survival in vitro using primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons. In addition, expression and surface localization of megalin, a known MT receptor, and the related lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP) are demonstrated in cerebellar...... granule neurons. By means of surface plasmon resonance MT and EmtinB were found to bind to both megalin and LRP. The bindings were abrogated in the presence of receptor-associated protein-1, an antagonist of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, which also inhibited MT- and EmtinB-induced neurite...

  13. Ghrelin receptor deficiency does not affect diet-induced atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk M. Habegger

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ghrelin, a stomach-derived, secreted peptide, and its receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor, GHSR are known to modulate food intake and energy homeostasis. The ghrelin system is also expressed broadly in cardiovascular tissues. Since ghrelin has been associated with anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties, but is also well known to promote obesity and impair glucose metabolism, we investigated whether ghrelin has any impact on the development of atherosclerosis. The hypothesis that endogenous ghrelin signaling may be involved in atherosclerosis has not been tested previously Methods and Results: We crossed ghrelin receptor knockout mice (GHSr-/- into a low-density lipoprotein receptor-null (Ldlr-/- mouse line. In this model, atherosclerotic lesions were promoted by feeding a high-fat, high-cholesterol Western-type diet for 13 months, following a standard protocol. Body composition and glucose homeostasis were similar between Ldlr-/- and Ldlr/GHSR -/- ko mice throughout the study. Absence or presence of GHSr did not alter the apolipoprotein profile changes in response to diet exposure on an LDLRko background. Atherosclerotic plaque volume in the aortic arch and thoracic aorta were also not affected differentially in mice without ghrelin signaling due to GHSR gene disruption as compared to control LDLRko littermates. In light of the associations reported for ghrelin with cardiovascular disease in humans, the lack of a phenotype in these loss-of- function studies in mice suggests no directly functional role for endogenous ghrelin in either the inhibition or the promotion of diet-induced atherosclerosis.Conclusions: These data indicate that, surprisingly, the complex and multifaceted actions of endogenous ghrelin signaling on the cardiovascular system have minimal direct impact on atherosclerotic plaque progression as based on loss-of-function in a mouse model of the disease.

  14. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M; Brown, Robert J

    2014-09-05

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  15. Evidence that the newly cloned low-density-lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP) is the alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Gliemann, Jørgen;

    1990-01-01

    The human placental receptor (α2MR) for α2-macroglobulin-proteinase complexes contains 3 polypeptides of approx. 500 kDa, 85 kDa, and 40 kDa. N-terminal sequence analysis of the 500 kDa and 85 kDa polypeptides, analysis of a random selection of peptides covering 536 residues from these polypeptides......, and analysis of a 1772 bp cDNA encoding part of the 500 kDa polypeptide provide evidence that the 500 kDa and 85 kDa chains are the α- and β-subunits, respectively, of a recently cloned hepatic membrane protein, termed the low density lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP) (Herz, J., Hamann, U., Rogne, S......., Myklebost, O., Gausepohl, H. and Stanley, K.K. (1988) EMBO J. 7, 4119-4127; Herz, J., Kowal, R.C., Goldstein, J.L. and Brown, M.S. (1990) EMBO J. 9, 1769-1776). N-terminal sequence analysis of the 40 kDa polypeptide shows that it is of distinct genetic origin. It is suggested that LRP is the functional...

  16. Evidence that the newly cloned low-density-lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP) is the alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, T; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Gliemann, Jørgen;

    1990-01-01

    The human placental receptor (alpha 2MR) for alpha 2-macroglobulin-proteinase complexes contains 3 polypeptides of approx. 500 kDa, 85 kDa, and 40 kDa. N-terminal sequence analysis of the 500 kDa and 85 kDa polypeptides, analysis of a random selection of peptides convering 536 residues from...... these polypeptides, and analysis of a 1772 bp cDNA encoding part of the 500 kDa polypeptide provide evidence that the 500 kDa and 85 kDa chains are the alpha- and beta-subunits, respectively, of a recently cloned hepatic membrane protein, termed the low density lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP) (Herz, J......., Hamann, U., Rogne, S., Myklebost, O., Gausepohl, H. and Stanley, K.K. (1988) EMBO J. 7, 4119-4127; Herz, J., Kowal, R.C., Goldstein, J.L. and Brown, M.S. (1990) EMBO J. 9, 1769-1776). N-terminal sequence analysis of the 40 kDa polypeptide shows that it is of distinct genetic origin. It is suggested...

  17. Role of leptin on the expression of low density lipoprotein receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naval Kishor Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Leptin resistance oriented hyperleptinaemia is a common problem in obese subjects in association with hypercholesterolaemia. The most common target for hypercholesterolaemia is impaired low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR. This study was carried out to investigate whether any alteration in LDLR expression could explain the occurrence of hypercholesterolaemia in the event of hyperleptinaemia. Methods: Expression of LDLR and SREBP2 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 were examined in HepG2 cells by RT-PCR and Western blotting. JAK2 inhibitor II was used to verify the effect of JAK-STAT (Janus Kinase-Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription pathway (common mediator for cytokine signaling. Co-localization of LDLR and insulin receptor (IR was examined by confocal microscopy. Results: Leptin was found to reduce the expression of LDLR and its transcription factor SREBP2. On the other hand, a weak signal for stimulation of LDLR by leptin was noted to be mediated by JAK2 pathway. But the joint effect of the two signaling pathways kept LDLR only in depressed mode in presence of leptin. Confocal microscopy showed that LDLR made an intensively co-localized complex with insulin receptor in presence of leptin. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results show that though leptin stimulates LDLR expression very weakly through JAK-STAT signaling pathway, it mainly imposes inhibition on LDLR expression by inhibiting transcription factor SREBP2. The inter-association between LDLR and IR may be a reason to render LDLR functionally inactive in presence of leptin.

  18. In LDL receptor-deficient mice, catabolism of remnant lipoproteins requires a high level of apoE but is inhibited by excess apoE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, K.W. van; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Hof, H.B. van 't; Zee, A. van der; Santamarina-Fojo, S.; Berkel, T.J.C. van; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the quantitative requirement for apolipoprotein (apo) E in the clearance of lipoproteins via the non-low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor mediated pathway, human APOE was overexpressed at various levels in the livers of mice deficient for both the endogenous Apoe and Ldlr genes

  19. Apolipoprotein E mediates enhanced plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol clearance by low-dose streptococcal serum opacity factor via hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Corina; Tang, Daming; Gillard, Baiba K; Courtney, Harry S; Pownall, Henry J

    2011-08-01

    Recombinant streptococcal serum opacity factor (rSOF) mediates the in vitro disassembly of human plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) into lipid-free apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, a neo-HDL that is cholesterol poor, and a cholesteryl ester-rich microemulsion (CERM) containing apoE. Given the occurrence of apoE on the CERM, we tested the hypothesis that rSOF injection into mice would reduce total plasma cholesterol clearance via apoE-dependent hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR). rSOF (4 μg) injection into wild-type C57BL/6J mice formed neo-HDL, CERM, and lipid-free apoA-I, as observed in vitro, and reduced plasma total cholesterol (-43%, t(1/2)=44±18 minutes) whereas control saline injections had a negligible effect. Similar experiments with apoE(-/-) and LDLR(-/-) mice reduced plasma total cholesterol ≈0% and 20%, respectively. rSOF was potent; injection of 0.18 μg of rSOF produced 50% of maximum reduction of plasma cholesterol 3 hours postinjection, corresponding to a ≈0.5-mg human dose. Most cholesterol was cleared hepatically (>99%), with rSOF treatment increasing clearance by 65%. rSOF injection into mice formed a CERM that was cleared via hepatic LDLR that recognize apoE. This reaction could provide an alternative mechanism for reverse cholesterol transport.

  20. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J., E-mail: rbrown@mun.ca

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  1. The Scavenger Receptor SSc5D Physically Interacts with Bacteria through the SRCR-Containing N-Terminal Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa Pereira, Catarina; Bocková, Markéta; Santos, Rita F.; Santos, Ana Mafalda; Martins de Araújo, Mafalda; Oliveira, Liliana; Homola, Jiří; Carmo, Alexandre M.

    2016-01-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) family comprises a group of membrane-attached or secreted proteins that contain one or more modules/domains structurally similar to the membrane distal domain of type I macrophage scavenger receptor. Although no all-inclusive biological function has been ascribed to the SRCR family, some of these receptors have been shown to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP) of bacteria, fungi, or other microbes. SSc5D is a recently described soluble SRCR receptor produced by monocytes/macrophages and T lymphocytes, consisting of an N-terminal portion, which contains five SRCR modules, and a large C-terminal mucin-like domain. Toward establishing a global common role for SRCR domains, we interrogated whether the set of five SRCR domains of SSc5D displayed pattern recognition receptor (PRR) properties. For that purpose, we have expressed in a mammalian expression system the N-terminal SRCR-containing moiety of SSc5D (N-SSc5D), thus excluding the mucin-like domain likely by nature to bind microorganisms, and tested the capacity of the SRCR functional groups to physically interact with bacteria. Using conventional protein–bacteria binding assays, we showed that N-SSc5D had a superior capacity to bind to Escherichia coli strains RS218 and IHE3034 compared with that of the extracellular domains of the SRCR proteins CD5 and CD6 (sCD5 and sCD6, respectively), and similar E. coli-binding properties as Spα, a proven PRR of the SRCR family. We have further designed a more sensitive, real-time, and label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based assay and examined the capacity of N-SSc5D, Spα, sCD5, and sCD6 to bind to different bacteria. We demonstrated that N-SSc5D compares with Spα in the capacity to bind to E. coli and Listeria monocytogenes, and further that it can distinguish between pathogenic E. coli RS218 and IHE3034 strains and the non-pathogenic laboratory E. coli strain BL21(DE3). Our work thus advocates the

  2. The scavenger receptor SSc5D physically interacts with bacteria through the SRCR-containing N-terminal domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Bessa-Pereira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR family comprises a group of membrane-attached or secreted proteins that contain one or more modules/domains structurally similar to the membrane distal domain of type I macrophage scavenger receptor. Although no all-inclusive biological function has been ascribed to the SRCR family, some of these receptors have been shown to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP of bacteria, fungi or other microbes. SSc5D is a recently described soluble SRCR receptor produced by monocytes/macrophages and T lymphocytes, consisting of an N-terminal portion which contains five SRCR modules, and a large C-terminal mucin-like domain. Towards establishing a global common role for SRCR domains, we interrogated whether the set of five SRCR domains of SSc5D displayed pattern recognition receptor (PRR properties. For that purpose, we have expressed in a mammalian expression system the N-terminal SRCR-containing moiety of SSC5D (N-SSc5D, thus excluding the mucin-like domain likely by nature to bind microorganisms, and tested the capacity of the SRCR functional groups to physically interact with bacteria. Using conventional protein-bacteria binding assays, we showed that N-SSc5D had a superior capacity to bind to E. coli strains RS218 and IHE3034 compared with that of the extracellular domains of the SRCR proteins CD5 and CD6 (sCD5 and sCD6, respectively, and similar E. coli-binding properties as Spα, a proven PRR of the SRCR family. We have further designed a more sensitive, real-time and label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR-based assay, and examined the capacity of N-SSc5D, Spα, sCD5 and sCD6 to bind to different bacteria. We demonstrated that the N-SSc5D compares with Spα in the capacity to bind to E. coli and L. monocytogenes, and further that it can distinguish between pathogenic E. coli RS218 and IHE3034 strains and the non-pathogenic laboratory E. coli strain BL21(DE3. Our work thus advocates the

  3. Increased expression of low-density lipoprotein receptors in a Smith-Lemli-Opitz infant with elevated bilirubin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, G C; Lopez, D; Borrego, O; Gilbert-Barness, E

    1997-01-31

    We report on an infant girl with severe RSH or Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome with hyperbilirubinemia. The infant died at age 2 months. Sterol analysis of liver and brain tissues showed marked elevations of 7-dehydrocholesterol with decreased levels of cholesterol. Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated remarkable increases in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors in these tissues, indicative of a deficiency in available cholesterol for tissue needs.

  4. Disruption of low-density lipoprotein receptor pathway induced by inflammation contributes to podocyte injury in diabetic nephropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洋

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of low density lipoprotein receptor(LDLr)pathway on podocyte injury in diabetic nephropathy(DN)under inflammatory stress.Methods Male db/db mice and db/m mice were randomly divided into four groups(8 mice in each group):db/m group(control),casein injected db/m group(db/m+casein),db/db group(db/db),and casein injected

  5. Targeting low-density lipoprotein receptors with protein-only nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhikun; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Unzueta, Ugutz; Álamo, Patricia; Pesarrodona, Mireia; Mangues, Ramón; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2015-03-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR) are appealing cell surface targets in drug delivery, as they are expressed in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) endothelium and are able to mediate transcytosis of functionalized drugs for molecular therapies of the central nervous system (CNS). On the other hand, brain-targeted drug delivery is currently limited, among others, by the poor availability of biocompatible vehicles, as most of the nanoparticles under development as drug carriers pose severe toxicity issues. In this context, protein nanoparticles offer functional versatility, easy and cost-effective bioproduction, and full biocompatibility. In this study, we have designed and characterized several chimerical proteins containing different LDLR ligands, regarding their ability to bind and internalize target cells and to self-organize as viral mimetic nanoparticles of about 18 nm in diameter. While the self-assembling of LDLR-binding proteins as nanoparticles positively influences cell penetration in vitro, the nanoparticulate architecture might be not favoring BBB crossing in vivo. These findings are discussed in the context of the use of nanostructured materials as vehicles for the systemic treatment of CNS diseases.

  6. Polymorphism of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene and fracture risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Gang; Gu, Mingyong; Zhou, Zhenyu; Cao, Xuecheng

    2014-01-01

    Several molecular epidemiological studies have been conducted to examine the association between low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (LRP5) Ala1330Val polymorphism and fracture; however, the conclusions remained controversial. We therefore performed an extensive meta-analysis on 10 published studies with 184479 subjects. Electronic databases, including PubMed, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, Elsevier Science Direct and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases were searched. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using random-effects models. LRP5 Ala1330Val polymorphism was associated with a significantly increased risk of fracture (OR = 1.10; 95% CI, 1.06-1.14; I(2) = 29%). We also found that this polymorphism increased fracture risk in Caucasians. In the subgroup analysis according to gender, women was significantly associated with risk of fracture. In the subgroup analysis by type of fracture, LRP5 Ala1330Val polymorphism showed increased osteoporotic fracture risk. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that an increased risk of fracture was associated with the LRP5 Ala1330Val polymorphism.

  7. Targeting low-density lipoprotein receptors with protein-only nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhikun [Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (Spain); Céspedes, María Virtudes [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Unzueta, Ugutz [Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (Spain); Álamo, Patricia [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Pesarrodona, Mireia [Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (Spain); Mangues, Ramón [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio, E-mail: antoni.villaverde@uab.cat; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus, E-mail: neus.ferrer@uab.cat [Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    Low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR) are appealing cell surface targets in drug delivery, as they are expressed in the blood–brain barrier (BBB) endothelium and are able to mediate transcytosis of functionalized drugs for molecular therapies of the central nervous system (CNS). On the other hand, brain-targeted drug delivery is currently limited, among others, by the poor availability of biocompatible vehicles, as most of the nanoparticles under development as drug carriers pose severe toxicity issues. In this context, protein nanoparticles offer functional versatility, easy and cost-effective bioproduction, and full biocompatibility. In this study, we have designed and characterized several chimerical proteins containing different LDLR ligands, regarding their ability to bind and internalize target cells and to self-organize as viral mimetic nanoparticles of about 18 nm in diameter. While the self-assembling of LDLR-binding proteins as nanoparticles positively influences cell penetration in vitro, the nanoparticulate architecture might be not favoring BBB crossing in vivo. These findings are discussed in the context of the use of nanostructured materials as vehicles for the systemic treatment of CNS diseases.

  8. Mutations in low-density lipoprotein receptor gene as a cause of hypercholesterolemia in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chih-Yang; Wu, Yi-Chi; Jenq, Shwu-Fen; Jap, Tjin-Shing

    2005-08-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait that has been associated with more than 920 different mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene. To characterize LDLR gene mutations in the Chinese of Han descent with FH, we isolated genomic DNA from peripheral blood samples of 20 affected subjects and 50 healthy subjects with no family history of hypercholesterolemia. We used polymerase chain reaction and long polymerase chain reaction to amplify the 18 coding exons and the minimal promoter of the LDLR gene, and subjected amplicons to direct sequence analysis. We identified 6 mutations in LDLR gene, including heterozygous missense mutations I420T (ATC-->ACC), C660W (TGC-->TGG), H562Y (CAC-->TAC), and A606T (GCC-->ACC), and a heterozygous and a homozygous mutation in codon P664L (CCG-->CTG) as well as a homozygous large deletion of exons 6 to 8. The FH homozygotes manifested generalized xanthomatosis. One of the mutations we identified (C660W) was novel. In conclusion, we identified 5 missense mutations and 1 large deletion in LDLR gene, including 1 novel mutation in Han Chinese with FH in Taiwan.

  9. Dietary corn fractions reduce atherogenesis in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masisi, Kabo; Le, Khuong; Ghazzawi, Nora; Moghadasian, Mohammed H; Beta, Trust

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has suggested that intake of whole grains is a protective factor against pathogenesis of coronary artery disease. The exact mechanisms, however, are still not clearly understood. In this study, we hypothesized that adequate intake of corn fractions (aleurone, endosperm and germ) can modify lipid profiles in relation to atherosclerotic lesion development in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr-KO) mice. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential cardiovascular benefits of corn fractions in LDLr-KO mice through a number of biomarkers including lipid profile, and morphologic and morphometrical analysis of atherosclerotic lesions in aortic root. Four groups of male LDLr-KO mice were fed with the experimental diets supplemented with (3 treated) or without (control) 5% (wt/wt) of each of corn fractions for 10 weeks. All diets were supplemented with 0.06% (wt/wt) cholesterol. Compared with mice in the control group, atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic roots were significantly reduced (P=.003) in the mice that were fed diet supplemented with aleurone and germ fractions. This effect was associated with significant reductions in plasma total (P=.02) and LDL (P=.03) cholesterol levels, and an increase in fecal cholesterol excretion (P=.04). Furthermore, abdominal fat mass was significantly reduced by consumption of aleurone (P=.03). In summary, the consumption of aleurone and germ may help attenuate atherosclerosis by reducing plasma total and LDL cholesterol levels.

  10. Phospholipase A2-modified low-density lipoprotein activates macrophage peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgaladze, Dmitry; Morbitzer, Daniel; von Knethen, Andreas; Brüne, Bernhard

    2010-02-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors modulating metabolic and inflammatory responses of phagocytes to stimuli such as fatty acids and their metabolites. We studied the role of PPARs in macrophages exposed to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) modified by secretory phospholipase A(2) (PLA). By analyzing PPAR ligand-binding domain luciferase reporter activation, we observed that PLA-LDL transactivates PPARalpha and PPARdelta, but not PPARgamma. We confirmed that PLA-LDL induced PPAR response element reporter activation by endogenous PPARalpha and PPARdelta in human THP-1 macrophages. By using THP-1 cells with a stable knockdown of PPARalpha and PPARdelta, we showed that PLA-LDL-activated PPARdelta altered macrophage gene expression related to lipid metabolism and lipid droplet formation. Although PPARalpha/delta silencing did not affect cholesterol and triglyceride accumulation in PLA-LDL-treated macrophages, PPARdelta activation by PLA-LDL attenuated macrophage inflammatory gene expression induced by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide. PPARdelta activation by PLA-LDL does not influence lipid accumulation in PLA-LDL-treated macrophages. However, it attenuates macrophage inflammatory responses, thus contributing to an anti-inflammatory cell phenotype.

  11. A role for the high-density lipoprotein receptor SR-B1 in synovial inflammation via serum amyloid-A.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullan, Ronan Hugh

    2012-02-01

    Acute phase apoprotein Serum Amyloid A (A-SAA), which is strongly expressed in rheumatoid arthritis synovial membrane (RA SM), induces angiogenesis, adhesion molecule expression, and matrix metalloproteinase production through the G-coupled receptor FPRL-1. Here we report alternative signaling through the high-density lipoprotein receptor scavenger receptor-class B type 1 (SR-B1). Quantitative expression\\/localization of SR-B1 in RA SM, RA fibroblast-like cells (FLCs), and microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) was assessed by Western blotting and immunohistology\\/fluorescence. A-SAA-mediated effects were examined using a specific antibody against SR-B1 or amphipathic alpha-Helical Peptides (the SR-B1 antagonists L-37pA and D-37pA), in RA FLCs and ECs. Adhesion molecule expression and cytokine production were quantified using flow cytometry and ELISA. SR-B1 was strongly expressed in the RA SM lining layer and endothelial\\/perivascular regions compared with osteoarthritis SM or normal control synovium. Differential SR-B1 expression in RA FLC lines (n = 5) and ECs correlated closely with A-SAA, but not tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 upregulation. A-SAA-induced interleukin-6 and -8 production was inhibited in the presence of anti-SR-B1 in human microvascular endothelial cells and RA FLCs. Moreover, D-37pA and L-37pA inhibited A-SAA-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule expression from ECs in a dose-dependent manner. As SR-B1 is expressed in RA synovial tissue and mediates A-SAA-induced pro-inflammatory pathways, a better understanding of A-SAA-mediated inflammatory pathways may lead to novel treatment strategies for RA.

  12. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-1 Protects Against Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinyuan Ding

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1 is a multifunctional uptake receptor for chylomicron remnants in the liver. In vascular smooth muscle cells LRP1 controls reverse cholesterol transport through platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFR-β trafficking and tyrosine kinase activity. Here we show that LRP1 regulates hepatic energy homeostasis by integrating insulin signaling with lipid uptake and secretion. Somatic inactivation of LRP1 in the liver (hLRP1KO predisposes to diet-induced insulin resistance with dyslipidemia and non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis. On a high-fat diet, hLRP1KO mice develop a severe Metabolic Syndrome secondary to hepatic insulin resistance, reduced expression of insulin receptors on the hepatocyte surface and decreased glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2 translocation. While LRP1 is also required for efficient cell surface insulin receptor expression in the absence of exogenous lipids, this latent state of insulin resistance is unmasked by exposure to fatty acids. This further impairs insulin receptor trafficking and results in increased hepatic lipogenesis, impaired fatty acid oxidation and reduced very low density lipoprotein (VLDL triglyceride secretion.

  13. Nicotine-induced expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor in oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Satoshi; Gojoubori, Takahiro; Tsunoda, Kou; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Asano, Masatake; Goke, Eiji; Koshi, Ryosuke; Sugano, Naoyuki; Yoshinuma, Naoto; Komiyama, Kazuo; Ito, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine use is one of the most important risk factors for the development of cardiovascular and periodontal diseases. Numerous reports have suggested the possible contribution of disturbed lipid metabolism for the development of both disease groups. Despite these observations, little is known about the relationship between tobacco smoking and the development of these diseases. Our previous microarray data revealed that nicotine induced low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) expression in oral epithelial cells (OECs). The aim of the present study was to confirm nicotine-mediated LDLR induction and to elucidate the signaling mechanisms leading to the augmented expression of LDLR in OECs. LDLR and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit expression was detected by real-time PCR. The production of LDLR was demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining. nAChR-mediated LDLR induction was examined by pre-incubation of the cells with its specific inhibitor, α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX). The functional importance of transcription factor specific protein 1 (Sp1) was examined by luciferase assay, mithramycin pre-incubation or by small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection. The specific binding of Sp1 to R3 region of LDLR 5'-untranslated region was demonstrated with electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and streptavidin-agarose precipitation assay followed by western blotting. The results confirmed that nicotine induced LDLR expression at the transcriptional level. Nicotine was sensed by nAChR and the signal was transduced by Sp1 which bound to the R3 region of LDLR gene. Augmented production of LDLR in the gingival epithelial cells was further demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining using the gingival tissues obtained from the smoking patients. Taken together, the results suggested that nicotine might contribute to the development of both cardiovascular and periodontal diseases by inducing the LDLR in OECs thereby disturbing lipid metabolism.

  14. Nicotine-induced expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor in oral epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nicotine use is one of the most important risk factors for the development of cardiovascular and periodontal diseases. Numerous reports have suggested the possible contribution of disturbed lipid metabolism for the development of both disease groups. Despite these observations, little is known about the relationship between tobacco smoking and the development of these diseases. Our previous microarray data revealed that nicotine induced low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR expression in oral epithelial cells (OECs. The aim of the present study was to confirm nicotine-mediated LDLR induction and to elucidate the signaling mechanisms leading to the augmented expression of LDLR in OECs. METHODS AND RESULTS: LDLR and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR subunit expression was detected by real-time PCR. The production of LDLR was demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining. nAChR-mediated LDLR induction was examined by pre-incubation of the cells with its specific inhibitor, α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX. The functional importance of transcription factor specific protein 1 (Sp1 was examined by luciferase assay, mithramycin pre-incubation or by small interfering RNA (siRNA transfection. The specific binding of Sp1 to R3 region of LDLR 5'-untranslated region was demonstrated with electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and streptavidin-agarose precipitation assay followed by western blotting. The results confirmed that nicotine induced LDLR expression at the transcriptional level. Nicotine was sensed by nAChR and the signal was transduced by Sp1 which bound to the R3 region of LDLR gene. Augmented production of LDLR in the gingival epithelial cells was further demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining using the gingival tissues obtained from the smoking patients. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, the results suggested that nicotine might contribute to the development of both cardiovascular and periodontal diseases by inducing the LDLR in

  15. Characterization of a disease-causing Glu119-Lys mutation in the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene in two Danish families with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H K; Jensen, T G; Jensen, L G

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the gene for the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL receptor) cause the autosomal dominant inherited disease familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). In 15 Danish patients with heterozygous FH we have screened exon 4 of the LDL receptor gene for point mutations and small rearrangements...

  16. Rapid characterization of disease-causing mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene by overexpression in COS cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T G; Andresen, B S; Jensen, H K;

    1996-01-01

    To characterize disease-causing mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene, COS cells are transfected with the mutant gene in an EBV-based expression vector and characterized by flow cytometry. Using antibodies against the LDL-receptor the amount of receptor protein on the cell...

  17. Novel Bacterial Lipoprotein Structures Conserved in Low-GC Content Gram-positive Bacteria Are Recognized by Toll-like Receptor 2*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Kenji; Ryu, Kyoung-Hwa; Ichikawa, Rie; Masuda, Akiko; Kim, Min-Su; Lee, Hanna; Chae, Jun-Ho; Shimizu, Takashi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Kuwano, Koichi; Akira, Shizuo; Dohmae, Naoshi; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Lee, Bok Luel

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins/lipopeptides inducing host innate immune responses are sensed by mammalian Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). These bacterial lipoproteins are structurally divided into two groups, diacylated or triacylated lipoproteins, by the absence or presence of an amide-linked fatty acid. The presence of diacylated lipoproteins has been predicted in low-GC content Gram-positive bacteria and mycoplasmas based on the absence of one modification enzyme in their genomes; however, we recently determined triacylated structures in low-GC Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, raising questions about the actual lipoprotein structure in other low-GC content Gram-positive bacteria. Here, through intensive MS analyses, we identified a novel and unique bacterial lipoprotein structure containing an N-acyl-S-monoacyl-glyceryl-cysteine (named the lyso structure) from low-GC Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus cereus, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Lactobacillus bulgaricus. Two of the purified native lyso-form lipoproteins induced proinflammatory cytokine production from mice macrophages in a TLR2-dependent and TLR1-independent manner but with a different dependence on TLR6. Additionally, two other new lipoprotein structures were identified. One is the “N-acetyl” lipoprotein structure containing N-acetyl-S-diacyl-glyceryl-cysteine, which was found in five Gram-positive bacteria, including Bacillus subtilis. The N-acetyl lipoproteins induced the proinflammatory cytokines through the TLR2/6 heterodimer. The other was identified in a mycoplasma strain and is an unusual diacyl lipoprotein structure containing two amino acids before the lipid-modified cysteine residue. Taken together, our results suggest the existence of novel TLR2-stimulating lyso and N-acetyl forms of lipoproteins that are conserved in low-GC content Gram-positive bacteria and provide clear evidence for the presence of yet to be identified key enzymes involved in the bacterial lipoprotein biosynthesis

  18. Chlamydial Lipoproteins Stimulate Toll-Like Receptors 1/2 Mediated Inflammatory Responses through MyD88-Dependent Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Qiong; Chen, Ding; Guan, Jie; Ma, Linghui; Zhong, Guangming; Shu, Hengping; Wu, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydiae are very important pathogens which could cause several types of diseases in human, but little is known about its pathogenic mechanism. In order to elucidate host inflammatory response and the signal pathway induced by Chlamydial lipoproteins, the predicted lipoproteins of Chlamydia trachomatis were tested for their ability to induce the release of proinflammatory cytokines by mouse macrophages or human TLR (Toll-Like Receptor) expressing cell lines. The results showed that recombinant proteins of C. trachomatis D381, D541, D067, and D775 displayed a strong ability to induce the release of IL-8 in TLR expressing cell line. The signal pathways involved TLR1/2 and TLR2/CD14 but not TLR4. Moreover, except D067, the proinflammatory cytokine induction by D381, D541, and D775 required the thioacylation site (cysteine) for lipid modification and the induction was through MyD88-mediated pathway. Our data supported that lipoproteins played a vital role in pathogenesis of C. trachomatis-induced inflammatory responses via TLR pathway. It was the first study to characterize other chlamydial lipoproteins after identifying the role of MIP (D541) on pathogenesis of Chlamydial diseases. PMID:28184217

  19. Modulation of β-amyloid precursor protein trafficking and processing by the low density lipoprotein receptor family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cam Judy A

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amyloid-β peptide (Aβ accumulation in the brain is an early, toxic event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Aβ is produced by proteolytic processing of a transmembrane protein, β-amyloid precursor protein (APP, by β- and γ-secretases. Mounting evidence has demonstrated that alterations in APP cellular trafficking and localization directly impact its processing to Aβ. Recent studies have shown that members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, including LRP, LRP1B, SorLA/LR11, and apolipoprotein E (apoE receptor 2, interact with APP and regulate its endocytic trafficking. Another common feature of these receptors is their ability to bind apoE, which exists in three isoforms in humans and the presence of the ε4 allele represents a genetic risk factor for AD. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the function of these apoE receptors with a focus on their role in APP trafficking and processing. Knowledge of the interactions between these distinct low-density lipoprotein receptor family members and APP may ultimately influence future therapies for AD.

  20. Targeting the Hemoglobin Scavenger receptor CD163 in Macrophages Highly Increases the Anti-inflammatory Potency of Dexamethasone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas H; Svendsen, Pia; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    on the suppressed release of tumor-necrosis factor-α and other cytokines by macrophages at the sites of inflammation. We have now developed a new biodegradable anti-CD163 antibody-drug conjugate that specifically targets the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone to the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 in macrophages....... The conjugate, that in average contains four dexamethasone molecules per antibody, exhibits retained high functional affinity for CD163. In vitro studies in rat macrophages and in vivo studies of Lewis rats showed a strong anti-inflammatory effect of the conjugate measured as reduced lipopolysaccharide...... apoptosis, body weight loss, and suppression of endogenous cortisol levels. In conclusion, the study shows antibody-drug conjugates as a future approach in anti-inflammatory macrophage-directed therapy. Furthermore, the data demonstrate CD163 as an excellent macrophage target for anti-inflammatory drug...

  1. Identification of roles for H264, H306, H439, and H635 in acid-dependent lipoprotein release by the LDL receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongyun; Zhao, Zhenze; LeBrun, Drake G; Michaely, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Lipoproteins internalized by the LDL receptor (LDLR) are released from this receptor in endosomes through a process that involves acid-dependent conformational changes in the receptor ectodomain. How acidic pH promotes this release process is not well understood. Here, we assessed roles for six histidine residues for which either genetic or structural data suggested a possible role in the acid-responsiveness of the LDLR. Using assays that measured conformational change, acid-dependent lipoprotein release, LDLR recycling, and net lipoprotein uptake, we show that H635 plays important roles in acid-dependent conformational change and lipoprotein release, while H264, H306, and H439 play ancillary roles in the response of the LDLR to acidic pH. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. High density lipoprotein suppresses lipoprotein associated phospholipase A2 in human monocytes-derived macrophages through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Guan-ping; REN Jing-yi; QIN Li; SONG Jun-xian; WANG Lan; CHEN Hong

    2012-01-01

    Background Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is mainly secreted by macrophages,serving as a specific marker of atherosclerotic plaque and exerting pro-atherogenic effects.It is known that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) plays an important role against atherosclerosis by inhibiting pro-inflammatory factors,however,the relationship between HDL and Lp-PLA2 remains elusive.Methods In this study,reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR),Western blotting,and a platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase assay were performed to determine the Lp-PLA2 mRNA level,protein expression and activity in human monocyte-derived macrophages upon HDL treatment of different concentrations and durations.To investigate the underlying mechanism of HDL-induced Lp-PLA2 action,pioglitazone,a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-y (PPARy) ligand,was introduced to human monocyte-derived macrophages and mRNA and protein levels of Lp-PLA2,as well as its activity,were determined.Results Lp-PLA2 mRNA levels,protein expression and activity were significantly inhibited in response to HDL treatment in a dose and time dependent manner in human monocyte-derived macrophages.Pioglitazone treatment (1-10 ng/ml) upregulated the Lp-PLA2 mRNA level,protein expression and activity in human monocyte-derived macrophages,while the effects were markedly reversed by HDL.In addition,pioglitazone resulted in a significant increase in PPARY phosphorylation in human monocyte-derived macrophages,which could be inhibited by HDL.Conclusion These findings indicate that HDL suppresses the expression and activity of Lp-PLA2 in human monocyte-derived macrophages,and the underlying mechanisms may be mediated through the PPARY pathway.

  3. Low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 and 6 gene variants and ischaemic stroke risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriott, A M; Heckman, M G; Rayaprolu, S; Soto-Ortolaza, A I; Diehl, N N; Kanekiyo, T; Liu, C-C; Bu, G; Malik, R; Cole, J W; Meschia, J F; Ross, O A

    2015-08-01

    Low density lipoprotein receptor related proteins (LRPs) 1 and 6 have been implicated in cerebral ischaemia. In addition, genetic variation in LRP1 and LRP6 has been linked with various factors that are related to risk of ischaemic stroke. The aim of this study was to examine the association of LRP1 and LRP6 gene variants with risk of ischaemic stroke as part of the Ischemic Stroke Genetics Study (ISGS). A Caucasian series (434 stroke patients, 319 controls) and an African American series (161 stroke patients, 116 controls) were included. Fourteen LRP6 variants and three LRP1 variants were genotyped and assessed for association with ischaemic stroke. In the Caucasian series, significant associations with ischaemic stroke were observed for LRP6 rs2075241 [odds ratio (OR) 0.42, P = 0.023], rs2302685 (OR 0.44, P = 0.049), rs7975614 (OR 0.07, P = 0.017), rs10492120 (OR 0.62, P = 0.036) and rs10743980 (OR 0.66, P = 0.037). Risk of ischaemic stroke was significantly lower for carriers of any of these five protective LRP6 variants (24.0% of subjects) compared to non-carriers (OR 0.57, P = 0.003). The protective association for LRP6 rs2075241 was observed at a similar magnitude across ischaemic stroke subtypes, whilst the effects of rs23022685, rs10492120 and rs10743980 were most apparent for cardioembolic and large vessel stroke. In the African American series, LRP1 rs11172113 was associated with an increased risk of stroke (OR 1.89, P = 0.006). The results of our preliminary study provide evidence that LRP6 and LRP1 variants may be associated with risk of ischaemic stroke. Validation in larger studies is warranted. © 2015 EAN.

  4. Induction of bacterial lipoprotein tolerance is associated with suppression of toll-like receptor 2 expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Jiang Huai

    2012-02-03

    Tolerance to bacterial cell wall components including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may represent an essential regulatory mechanism during bacterial infection. Two members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, TLR2 and TLR4, recognize the specific pattern of bacterial cell wall components. TLR4 has been found to be responsible for LPS tolerance. However, the role of TLR2 in bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) tolerance and LPS tolerance is unclear. Pretreatment of human THP-1 monocytic cells with a synthetic bacterial lipopeptide induced tolerance to a second BLP challenge with diminished tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 production, termed BLP tolerance. Furthermore, BLP-tolerized THP-1 cells no longer responded to LPS stimulation, indicating a cross-tolerance to LPS. Induction of BLP tolerance was CD14-independent, as THP-1 cells that lack membrane-bound CD14 developed tolerance both in serum-free conditions and in the presence of a specific CD14 blocking monoclonal antibody (MEM-18). Pre-exposure of THP-1 cells to BLP suppressed mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and nuclear factor-kappaB activation in response to subsequent BLP and LPS stimulation, which is comparable with that found in LPS-tolerized cells, indicating that BLP tolerance and LPS tolerance may share similar intracellular pathways. However, BLP strongly enhanced TLR2 expression in non-tolerized THP-1 cells, whereas LPS stimulation had no effect. Furthermore, a specific TLR2 blocking monoclonal antibody (2392) attenuated BLP-induced, but not LPS-induced, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 production, indicating BLP rather than LPS as a ligand for TLR2 engagement and activation. More importantly, pretreatment of THP-1 cells with BLP strongly inhibited TLR2 activation in response to subsequent BLP stimulation. In contrast, LPS tolerance did not prevent BLP-induced TLR2 overexpression. These results demonstrate that BLP tolerance develops through down-regulation of TLR2

  5. Identification of transition bias in oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 gene in buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Shabir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Though transition bias has been previously demonstrated in cattle, however, there has not been any study that has explored transition bias in buffalo nuclear genome. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the nucleotide substitution pattern in the Intron I of Oxidised Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor 1 (OLR1 gene in four breeds of Indian buffalo using 24 different nucleotide substitution models and evaluate their association with DNA methylation. Materials and Methods: Transition/transversion bias (R was estimated by 24 different nucleotide substitution models available in MEGA 5.0. The transition/transversion bias (R was estimated under the Kimura 2-parameter model. Substitution patterns and the transitions/transversions rates (r were then estimated by Tamura-Nei-I and Tamura-Nei-II models. The CpG Island search was done by using CpG Plot Island online Software available at European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI website. Results: The frequency of transition was found to be 3.5 times higher than that of the transversion mutation frequency. Out of 9 nucleotide substitutions, 7 transitions and 2 transversions were found. Among all the nucleotide substitutions, thymine to cytosine substitutions was observed to be very high. CpG Island search tool revealed that IntronI of OLR1 genes is a CpG rich region, thus prone to methylation. Conclusions: Higher transition frequency was found in the intronI of OLR1 gene, however due to the richness of methylated CpGs in the evaluated stretch of genome, the higher T↔C transitions could likely be a result of frequent deaminations of the methylated cytosines into thymines during the evolution of four buffalo breeds.

  6. Streptococcus gordonii induces nitric oxide production through its lipoproteins stimulating Toll-like receptor 2 in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Young; Baik, Jung Eun; Ahn, Ki Bum; Seo, Ho Seong; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, a Gram-positive commensal in the oral cavity, is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause endodontic and systemic infections resulting in infective endocarditis. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and lipoprotein are major virulence factors of Gram-positive bacteria that are preferentially recognized by Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) on immune cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of S. gordonii LTA and lipoprotein on the production of the representative inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO) by the mouse macrophages. Heat-killed S. gordonii wild-type and an LTA-deficient mutant (ΔltaS) but not a lipoprotein-deficient mutant (Δlgt) induced NO production in mouse primary macrophages and the cell line, RAW 264.7. S. gordonii wild-type and ΔltaS also induced the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) at the mRNA and protein levels. In contrast, the Δlgt mutant showed little effect under the same condition. Furthermore, S. gordonii wild-type and ΔltaS induced NF-κB activation, STAT1 phosphorylation, and IFN-β expression, which are important for the induction of iNOS gene expression, with little activation by Δlgt. S. gordonii wild-type and ΔltaS showed an increased adherence and internalization to RAW 264.7 cells compared to Δlgt. In addition, S. gordonii wild-type and ΔltaS, but not Δlgt, substantially increased TLR2 activation while none of these induced NO production in TLR2-deficient macrophages. Triton X-114-extracted lipoproteins from S. gordonii were sufficient to induce NO production. Collectively, we suggest that lipoprotein is an essential cell wall component of S. gordonii to induce NO production in macrophages through TLR2 triggering NF-κB and STAT1 activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. FERM-dependent E3 ligase recognition is a conserved mechanism for targeted degradation of lipoprotein receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkin, Anna C; Goult, Benjamin T; Zhang, Li; Fairall, Louise; Hong, Cynthia; Schwabe, John W R; Tontonoz, Peter

    2011-12-13

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL (inducible degrader of the LDL receptor) regulates LDL receptor (LDLR)-dependent cholesterol uptake, but its mechanism of action, including the molecular basis for its stringent specificity, is poorly understood. Here we show that IDOL uses a singular strategy among E3 ligases for target recognition. The IDOL FERM domain binds directly to a recognition sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of lipoprotein receptors. This physical interaction is independent of IDOL's really interesting new gene (RING) domain E3 ligase activity and its capacity for autoubiquitination. Furthermore, IDOL controls its own stability through autoubiquitination of a unique FERM subdomain fold not present in other FERM proteins. Key residues defining the IDOL-LDLR interaction and IDOL autoubiquitination are functionally conserved in their insect homologs. Finally, we demonstrate that target recognition by IDOL involves a tripartite interaction between the FERM domain, membrane phospholipids, and the lipoprotein receptor tail. Our data identify the IDOL-LDLR interaction as an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for the regulation of lipid uptake and suggest that this interaction could potentially be exploited for the pharmacologic modulation of lipid metabolism.

  8. Design and synthesis of novel 3-substituted-indole derivatives as selective H3 receptor antagonists and potent free radical scavengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Li; Zhao, Liying; Hong, Lingjuan; Yang, Fenyan; Sheng, Rong; Chen, Jianzhong; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naimin; Hu, Yongzhou

    2013-10-01

    A series of novel 3-substituted-indole derivatives with a benzyl tertiary amino moiety were designed, synthesized and evaluated as H3 receptor antagonists and free radical scavengers for Alzheimer's disease therapy. Most of these synthesized compounds exhibited moderate to potent antagonistic activities in CREs driven luciferase assay. In particular, compound 2d demonstrated the most favorable H3 receptor antagonistic activity with the IC50 value of 0.049μM. Besides, it also displayed high binding affinity to H3 receptor (Ki=4.26±2.55nM) and high selectivity over other three histamine receptors. Moreover, 2d and other two 3-substituted indole derivatives 1d and 3d exerted potent ABTS radical cation scavenging capacities similar to melatonin. Above results illustrate that 2d is an interesting lead for extensive optimization to explore new drug candidate for AD therapy.

  9. Enzymatically Modified Low-Density Lipoprotein Promotes Foam Cell Formation in Smooth Muscle Cells via Macropinocytosis and Enhances Receptor-Mediated Uptake of Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellan, Bijoy; Reardon, Catherine A; Getz, Godfrey S; Hofmann Bowman, Marion A

    2016-06-01

    Enzyme-modified nonoxidized low-density lipoprotein (ELDL) is present in human atherosclerotic lesions. Our objective is to understand the mechanisms of ELDL uptake and its effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Transformation of murine aortic SMCs into foam cells in response to ELDL was analyzed. ELDL, but not acetylated or oxidized LDL, was potent in inducing SMC foam cell formation. Inhibitors of macropinocytosis (LY294002, wortmannin, amiloride) attenuated ELDL uptake. In contrast, inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis (dynasore, sucrose) and inhibitor of caveolae-/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis (filipin) had no effect on ELDL uptake in SMC, suggesting that macropinocytosis is the main mechanism of ELDL uptake by SMC. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is not obligatory for ELDL-induced SMC foam cell formation, but primes SMC for the uptake of oxidized LDL in a RAGE-dependent manner. ELDL increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, cytosolic calcium, and expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in wild-type SMC but not in RAGE(-/-) SMC. The macropinocytotic uptake of ELDL is regulated predominantly by intracellular calcium because ELDL uptake was completely inhibited by pretreatment with the calcium channel inhibitor lacidipine in wild-type and RAGE(-/-) SMC. This is in contrast to pretreatment with PI3 kinase inhibitors which completely prevented ELDL uptake in RAGE(-/-) SMC, but only partially in wild-type SMC. ELDL is highly potent in inducing foam cells in murine SMC. ELDL endocytosis is mediated by calcium-dependent macropinocytosis. Priming SMC with ELDL enhances the uptake of oxidized LDL. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Expression of the very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL-r), an apolipoprotein-E receptor, in the central nervous system and in Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie, R.H.; Chung, Haeyong; Rebeck, G.W.; Hyman, B.T. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL-r) is a cell-surface molecule specialized for the internalization of multiple diverse ligands, including apolipoprotein E (apoE)-containing lipoprotein particles, via clathrin-coated pits. Its structure is similar to the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-r), although the two have substantially different systemic distributions and regulatory pathways. The present work examines the distribution of VLDL-r in the central nervous system (CNS) and in relation to senile plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD). VLDL-r is present on resting and activated microglia, particularly those associated with senile plaques (SPs). VLDL-r immunoreactivity is also found in cortical neurons. Two exons of VLDL-r mRNA are differentially spliced in the mature receptor mRNA. One set of splice forms gives rise to receptors containing (or lacking) an extracellular O-linked glycosylation domain near the transmembrane portion of the molecule. The other set of splice forms appears to be brain-specific, and is responsible for the presence or absence of one of the cysteine-rich repeat regions in the binding region of the molecule. Ratios of the receptor variants generated from these splice forms do not differ substantially across different cortical areas or in AD. We hypothesize that VLDL-r might contribute to metabolism of apoE and apoE/A{beta} complexes in the brain. Further characterization of apoE receptors in Alzheimer brain may help lay the groundwork for understanding the role of apoE in the CNS and in the pathophysiology of AD. 43 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Comparative reactivity of the myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants HOCl and HOSCN with low-density lipoprotein (LDL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ismael, Fahd O; Proudfoot, Julie M; Brown, Bronwyn E;

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterised by the accumulation of lipids within macrophages in the artery wall. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is the source of this lipid, owing to the uptake of oxidised LDL by scavenger receptors. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) released by leukocytes during inflammation produces...

  12. Plant carbohydrate scavenging through tonB-dependent receptors: a feature shared by phytopathogenic and aquatic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanvillain, Servane; Meyer, Damien; Boulanger, Alice; Lautier, Martine; Guynet, Catherine; Denancé, Nicolas; Vasse, Jacques; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Arlat, Matthieu

    2007-02-21

    TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs) are outer membrane proteins mainly known for the active transport of iron siderophore complexes in Gram-negative bacteria. Analysis of the genome of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), predicts 72 TBDRs. Such an overrepresentation is common in Xanthomonas species but is limited to only a small number of bacteria. Here, we show that one Xcc TBDR transports sucrose with a very high affinity, suggesting that it might be a sucrose scavenger. This TBDR acts with an inner membrane transporter, an amylosucrase and a regulator to utilize sucrose, thus defining a new type of carbohydrate utilization locus, named CUT locus, involving a TBDR for the transport of substrate across the outer membrane. This sucrose CUT locus is required for full pathogenicity on Arabidopsis, showing its importance for the adaptation to host plants. A systematic analysis of Xcc TBDR genes and a genome context survey suggested that several Xcc TBDRs belong to other CUT loci involved in the utilization of various plant carbohydrates. Interestingly, several Xcc TBDRs and CUT loci are conserved in aquatic bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus, Colwellia psychrerythraea, Saccharophagus degradans, Shewanella spp., Sphingomonas spp. or Pseudoalteromonas spp., which share the ability to degrade a wide variety of complex carbohydrates and display TBDR overrepresentation. We therefore propose that TBDR overrepresentation and the presence of CUT loci designate the ability to scavenge carbohydrates. Thus CUT loci, which seem to participate to the adaptation of phytopathogenic bacteria to their host plants, might also play a very important role in the biogeochemical cycling of plant-derived nutrients in marine environments. Moreover, the TBDRs and CUT loci identified in this study are clearly different from those characterized in the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, which allow glycan foraging, suggesting a convergent

  13. Plant carbohydrate scavenging through tonB-dependent receptors: a feature shared by phytopathogenic and aquatic bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servane Blanvillain

    Full Text Available TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs are outer membrane proteins mainly known for the active transport of iron siderophore complexes in Gram-negative bacteria. Analysis of the genome of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc, predicts 72 TBDRs. Such an overrepresentation is common in Xanthomonas species but is limited to only a small number of bacteria. Here, we show that one Xcc TBDR transports sucrose with a very high affinity, suggesting that it might be a sucrose scavenger. This TBDR acts with an inner membrane transporter, an amylosucrase and a regulator to utilize sucrose, thus defining a new type of carbohydrate utilization locus, named CUT locus, involving a TBDR for the transport of substrate across the outer membrane. This sucrose CUT locus is required for full pathogenicity on Arabidopsis, showing its importance for the adaptation to host plants. A systematic analysis of Xcc TBDR genes and a genome context survey suggested that several Xcc TBDRs belong to other CUT loci involved in the utilization of various plant carbohydrates. Interestingly, several Xcc TBDRs and CUT loci are conserved in aquatic bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus, Colwellia psychrerythraea, Saccharophagus degradans, Shewanella spp., Sphingomonas spp. or Pseudoalteromonas spp., which share the ability to degrade a wide variety of complex carbohydrates and display TBDR overrepresentation. We therefore propose that TBDR overrepresentation and the presence of CUT loci designate the ability to scavenge carbohydrates. Thus CUT loci, which seem to participate to the adaptation of phytopathogenic bacteria to their host plants, might also play a very important role in the biogeochemical cycling of plant-derived nutrients in marine environments. Moreover, the TBDRs and CUT loci identified in this study are clearly different from those characterized in the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, which allow glycan foraging

  14. Allele-specific expression of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minnich, A.; Lussier-Cacan, S.; Roy, M. [Clincial Research Institute of Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 60% of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in French Canadians is due to a > 10 kb deletion of the promoter region of the gene encoding the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDL-R), allowing determination of the influence of a single LDL-R allele on phenotypic expression of FH. Normal allele haplotypes of approximately 250 heterozygotes were determined with 7 RFLPs. In vitro maximal LDL-R activity of blood lymphocytes from a subset of approximately 150 heterozygotes, measured by immunocytofluorometry, was significantly higher (20 to 30%) in subjects with LDL-R normal allele haplotype G (n=11), and O (n=7) compared to the most frequent haplotype F (n=43), while no differences were observed among F, E (n=11), and the 2 other most prevalent haplotypes (n=43). LDL-R mRNA in these lymphocytes was significantly elevated 2.3-, 1.7-, and 1.8- fold, in G, O, and E, respectively, compared to F, while no significant differences were apparent between F and the other two most frequent haplotyes. Large interindividual variability in lymphocyte LDL-R mRNA levels and activity was observed even among subjects with the same LDL-R normal allele haplotype. However, maximally induced lymphocyte LDL-R mRNA levels correlated poorly with levels measured in freshly isolated cells (n=14). Relative to haplotype F (n=47 women (W), 39 men (M)), mean plasma LDL cholesterol levels adjusted for age and apolipoprotein E genotype were 5-10% lower in men and women with haplotypes G (n=16 W, 12 M) and O (n=8 W, 6 M), and 20% lower in 7 W with haplotype E. These results suggest that (1) normal LDL-R allele haplotype G and O may contain sequence variations which confer relatively high gene expression and (2) environmental and genetic influences other than the LDL-R gene contribute substantially to variability in LDL-R expression and plasma LDL cholesterol levels in French Canadian FH heterozygotes.

  15. The scavenger receptor repertoire in six cnidarian species and its putative role in cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie F. Neubauer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Many cnidarians engage in a mutualism with endosymbiotic photosynthetic dinoflagellates that forms the basis of the coral reef ecosystem. Interpartner interaction and regulation includes involvement of the host innate immune system. Basal metazoans, including cnidarians have diverse and complex innate immune repertoires that are just beginning to be described. Scavenger receptors (SR are a diverse superfamily of innate immunity genes that recognize a broad array of microbial ligands and participate in phagocytosis of invading microbes. The superfamily includes subclades named SR-A through SR-I that are categorized based on the arrangement of sequence domains including the scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR, the C-type lectin (CTLD and the CD36 domains. Previous functional and gene expression studies on cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis have implicated SR-like proteins in interpartner communication and regulation. In this study, we characterized the SR repertoire from a combination of genomic and transcriptomic resources from six cnidarian species in the Class Anthozoa. We combined these bioinformatic analyses with functional experiments using the SR inhibitor fucoidan to explore a role for SRs in cnidarian symbiosis and immunity. Bioinformatic searches revealed a large diversity of SR-like genes that resembled SR-As, SR-Bs, SR-Es and SR-Is. SRCRs, CTLDs and CD36 domains were identified in multiple sequences in combinations that were highly homologous to vertebrate SRs as well as in proteins with novel domain combinations. Phylogenetic analyses of CD36 domains of the SR-B-like sequences from a diversity of metazoans grouped cnidarian with bilaterian sequences separate from other basal metazoans. All cnidarian sequences grouped together with moderate support in a subclade separately from bilaterian sequences. Functional experiments were carried out on the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida that engages in a symbiosis with Symbiodinium minutum

  16. The scavenger receptor repertoire in six cnidarian species and its putative role in cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Emilie F.; Poole, Angela Z.; Davy, Simon K.

    2016-01-01

    Many cnidarians engage in a mutualism with endosymbiotic photosynthetic dinoflagellates that forms the basis of the coral reef ecosystem. Interpartner interaction and regulation includes involvement of the host innate immune system. Basal metazoans, including cnidarians have diverse and complex innate immune repertoires that are just beginning to be described. Scavenger receptors (SR) are a diverse superfamily of innate immunity genes that recognize a broad array of microbial ligands and participate in phagocytosis of invading microbes. The superfamily includes subclades named SR-A through SR-I that are categorized based on the arrangement of sequence domains including the scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR), the C-type lectin (CTLD) and the CD36 domains. Previous functional and gene expression studies on cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis have implicated SR-like proteins in interpartner communication and regulation. In this study, we characterized the SR repertoire from a combination of genomic and transcriptomic resources from six cnidarian species in the Class Anthozoa. We combined these bioinformatic analyses with functional experiments using the SR inhibitor fucoidan to explore a role for SRs in cnidarian symbiosis and immunity. Bioinformatic searches revealed a large diversity of SR-like genes that resembled SR-As, SR-Bs, SR-Es and SR-Is. SRCRs, CTLDs and CD36 domains were identified in multiple sequences in combinations that were highly homologous to vertebrate SRs as well as in proteins with novel domain combinations. Phylogenetic analyses of CD36 domains of the SR-B-like sequences from a diversity of metazoans grouped cnidarian with bilaterian sequences separate from other basal metazoans. All cnidarian sequences grouped together with moderate support in a subclade separately from bilaterian sequences. Functional experiments were carried out on the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida that engages in a symbiosis with Symbiodinium minutum (clade B1

  17. Cholesterol-lowering drugs inhibit lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein-1 receptor function by membrane raft disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarazzo, Sara; Quitadamo, Maria Chiara; Mango, Ruggiero; Ciccone, Sarah; Novelli, Giuseppe; Biocca, Silvia

    2012-08-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LOX-1), the primary receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in endothelial cells, is up-regulated in atherosclerotic lesions. Statins are the principal therapeutic agents for cardiovascular diseases and are known to down-regulate LOX-1 expression. Whether the effect on the LOX-1 receptor is related to statin-mediated cholesterol-lowering activity is unknown. We investigate the requirement of cholesterol for LOX-1-mediated lipid particle internalization, trafficking, and processing and the role of statins as inhibitors of LOX-1 function. Disruption of cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains by acute exposure of cells to methyl-β-cyclodextrin or chronic exposure to different statins (lovastatin and atorvastatin) led to a spatial disorganization of LOX-1 in plasma membranes and a marked loss of specific LOX-1 function in terms of ox-LDL binding and internalization. Subcellular fractionation and immunochemical studies indicate that LOX-1 is naturally present in caveolae-enriched lipid rafts and, by cholesterol reduction, the amount of LOX-1 in this fraction is highly decreased (≥60%). In contrast, isoprenylation inhibition had no effect on the distribution and function of LOX-1 receptors. Furthermore, in primary cultures from atherosclerotic human aorta lesions, we confirm the presence of LOX-1 in caveolae-enriched lipid rafts and demonstrate that lovastatin treatment led to down-regulation of LOX-1 in lipid rafts and rescue of the ox-LDL-induced apoptotic phenotype. Taken together, our data reveal a previously unrecognized essential role of membrane cholesterol for LOX-1 receptor activity and suggest that statins protect vascular endothelium against the adverse effect of ox-LDL by disruption of membrane rafts and impairment of LOX-1 receptor function.

  18. Development of a New High-throughput Screening Model for Human High Density Lipoprotein Receptor (CLA-1) Agonists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To develop a new high-throughput screening model for human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor (CD36 and LIMPII analogous-1, CLA-1) agonists using CLA-1-expressing insect cells. Methods With the total RNA of human hepatoma cells BEL-7402 as template, the complementary DNA (cDNA) of CLA-1 was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system was used to express CLA-1 in insect cells. CLA-1 cDNA was cloned downstream of polyhedrin promoter of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) into donor vector pFastBac1 and recombinant pFastBac1-CLA-1 was transformed into E. coli DH10Bac to transpose CLA-1 cDNA to bacmid DNA. Recombinant bacmid-CLA-1 was transfected into Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells to produce recombinant baculovirus particles. Recombinant CLA-1 was expressed on the membrane of Sf9 cells infected with the recombinant baculoviruses. A series of parameters of DiI-lipoprotein binding assays of CLA-1-expressing Sf9 cells in 96-well plates were optimized. Results Western blot analysis and DiI-lipoprotein binding assays confirmed that CLA-1 expressed in insect cells had similar immunoreactivity and ligand binding activity as its native counterpart. A reliable and sensitive in vitro cell-based assay was established to assess the activity of CLA-1 and used to screen agonists from different sample libraries. Conclusion Human HDL receptor CLA-1 was successfully expressed in Sf9 insect cells and a novel high-throughput screening model for CLA-1 agonists was developed. Utilization of this model allows us to identify potent and selective CLA-1 agonists which might possibly be used as therapeutics for atherosclerosis.

  19. Targeting the Hemoglobin Scavenger receptor CD163 in Macrophages Highly Increases the Anti-inflammatory Potency of Dexamethasone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graversen, Jonas H; Svendsen, Pia; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Dal, Jakob; Anton, Gabriele; Etzerodt, Anders; Petersen, Mikkel D; Christensen, Peter A; Møller, Holger J; Moestrup, Søren K

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids are potent anti-inflammatory drugs but serious side effects such as bone mobilization, muscle mass loss, immunosuppression, and metabolic alterations make glucocorticoid therapy a difficult balance. The therapeutic anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids relies largely on the suppressed release of tumor-necrosis factor-α and other cytokines by macrophages at the sites of inflammation. We have now developed a new biodegradable anti-CD163 antibody-drug conjugate that specifically targets the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone to the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 in macrophages. The conjugate, that in average contains four dexamethasone molecules per antibody, exhibits retained high functional affinity for CD163. In vitro studies in rat macrophages and in vivo studies of Lewis rats showed a strong anti-inflammatory effect of the conjugate measured as reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced secretion of tumor-necrosis factor-α. The in vivo potency of conjugated dexamethasone was about 50-fold that of nonconjugated dexamethasone. In contrast to a strong systemic effect of nonconjugated dexamethasone, the equipotent dose of the conjugate had no such effect, measured as thymus lymphocytes apoptosis, body weight loss, and suppression of endogenous cortisol levels. In conclusion, the study shows antibody-drug conjugates as a future approach in anti-inflammatory macrophage-directed therapy. Furthermore, the data demonstrate CD163 as an excellent macrophage target for anti-inflammatory drug delivery. PMID:22643864

  20. A monomeric G protein-coupled receptor isolated in a high-density lipoprotein particle efficiently activates its G protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whorton, Matthew R; Bokoch, Michael P; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup;

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to a diverse array of ligands, mediating cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters, as well as the senses of smell and taste. The structures of the GPCR rhodopsin and several G proteins have been determined by x-ray crystallography, yet...... the organization of the signaling complex between GPCRs and G proteins is poorly understood. The observations that some GPCRs are obligate heterodimers, and that many GPCRs form both homo- and heterodimers, has led to speculation that GPCR dimers may be required for efficient activation of G proteins. However......, technical limitations have precluded a definitive analysis of G protein coupling to monomeric GPCRs in a biochemically defined and membrane-bound system. Here we demonstrate that a prototypical GPCR, the beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR), can be incorporated into a reconstituted high-density lipoprotein...

  1. CD36 is not involved in scavenger receptor-mediated endocytic uptake of glycolaldehyde- and methylglyoxal-modified proteins by liver endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajou, Keisuke; Horiuchi, Seikoh; Sakai, Masakazu; Hirata, Kenshiro; Tanaka, Makiko; Takeya, Motohiro; Kai, Toshiya; Otagiri, Masaki

    2005-05-01

    Circulating proteins modified by advanced glycation end-products (AGE) are mainly taken up by liver endothelial cells (LECs) via scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis. Endocytic uptake of chemically modified proteins by macrophages and macrophage-derived cells is mediated by class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) and CD36. In a previous study using SR-A knockout mice, we demonstrated that SR-A is not involved in endocytic uptake of AGE proteins by LECs [Matsumoto et al. (2000) Biochem. J. 352, 233-240]. The present study was conducted to determine the contribution of CD36 to this process. Glycolaldehyde-modified BSA (GA-BSA) and methylglyoxal-modified BSA (MG-BSA) were used as AGE proteins. 125I-GA-BSA and 125I-MG-BSA underwent endocytic degradation by these cells at 37 degrees C, and this process was inhibited by several ligands for the scavenger receptors. However, this endocytic uptake of 125I-GA-BSA by LECs was not inhibited by a neutralizing anti-CD36 antibody. Similarly, hepatic uptake of (111)In-GA-BSA after its intravenous injection was not significantly attenuated by co-administration of the anti-CD36 antibody. These results clarify that CD36 does not play a significant role in elimination of GA-BSA and MG-BSA from the circulation, suggesting that the receptor involved in endocytic uptake of circulating AGE proteins by LEC is not SR-A or CD36.

  2. Vertebrate scavenger receptor class B member 2 (SCARB2: comparative studies of a major lysosomal membrane glycoprotein

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    Roger Stephen Holmes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Scavenger receptor class B member 2 (SCARB2 (also LIMP-2, CD36L2 or LGP85 is a major lysosomal membrane glycoprotein involved in endosomal and lysosomal biogenesis and maintenance. SCARB2 acts as a receptor for the lysosomal mannose-6-phosphate independent targeting of β-glucuronidase and enterovirus 71 and influences Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy. Genetic deficiency of this protein causes deafness and peripheral neuropathy in mice as well as myoclonic epilepsy and nephrotic syndrome in humans. Comparative SCARB2 amino acid sequences and structures and SCARB2 gene locations were examined using data from several vertebrate genome projects. Vertebrate SCARB2 sequences shared 43-100% identity as compared with 30-36% sequence identities with other CD36-like superfamily members, SCARB1 and CD36. At least 10 N-glycosylation sites were conserved among most vertebrate SCARB2 proteins examined. Sequence alignments, key amino acid residues and conserved predicted secondary structures were examined, including cytoplasmic, transmembrane and external lysosomal membrane sequences: cysteine disulfide residues, thrombospondin (THP1 binding sites and 16 proline and 20 glycine conserved residues, which may contribute to short loop formation within the exomembrane SCARB2 sequences. Vertebrate SCARB2 genes contained 12 coding exons. The human SCARB2 gene contained a CpG island (CpG100, ten microRNA-binding sites and several transcription factor binding sites (including PPARA which may contribute to a higher level (2.4 times average of gene expression. Phylogenetic analyses examined the relationships and potential evolutionary origins of the vertebrate SCARB2 gene with vertebrate SCARB1 and CD36 genes. These suggested that SCARB2 originated from duplications of the CD36 gene in an ancestral genome forming three vertebrate CD36 gene family members: SCARB1, SCARB2 and CD36.

  3. Class A Scavenger Receptor Exacerbates Osteoclastogenesis by an Interleukin-6-Mediated Mechanism through ERK and JNK Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuyu; Ni, Yuanyuan; Ben, Jingjing; Xia, Yang; Zhou, Tingting; Wang, Dongyue; Ni, Jieli; Bai, Hui; Wang, Lin; Ma, Junqing; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts originate from bone marrow monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, which are important for bone health. Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) is a multifunctional molecule that functions during differentiation of monocyte into macrophages and osteoclasts. To further characterize the role of SR-A in osteoclasts, we used the murine tooth movement model (TM) and the murine anterior cruciate ligament transection model of osteoarthritis (ACLT OA). In these two models the bones involved are of different origin and have different properties. Bone resorption was decreased in SR-A-/- mice compared to SR-A+/+ mice. Further evaluation showed that the number of multinucleated osteoclasts in SR-A-/- mice, compared to SR-A+/+ mice, was significantly decreased both in vivo and in vitro. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) produced by osteoclasts were reduced in SR-A-/- mice compared to SR-A+/+ mice. In the in vitro marrow-derived osteoclast formation assay and in both mouse models, osteoclastogenesis was restored to normal in SR-A-/- mice by administration of recombinant murine IL-6. Moreover, neutralization of IL-6 reduced the number of osteoclasts formed in SR-A+/+ mice of TM model. Both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK), but not p38, signaling pathways were downregulated in receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated SR-A-/- osteoclasts. Importantly, when treated with either ERK or JNK inhibitor, the numbers of osteoclasts generated from RANKL-induced bone marrow derived-macrophages of SR-A+/+ mice, and their IL-6 production, were significantly decreased. This suggests that SR-A activates the ERK and JNK signaling pathways, and promotes production of IL-6 by osteoclasts to further stimulate osteoclast formation. PMID:27766031

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detection of Tumor Cells by Targeting Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptors with Gd-Loaded Low-Density Lipoprotein Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta Geninatti Crich

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Gd-DO3A-diph and Gd-AAZTAC17 are lipophilic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI agents that display high affinity for low-density lipoprotein (LDL particles. However, on binding to LDL, Gd-DO3A-diph shows a decreased hydration that results in a lower enhancement of water proton relaxation rate. Conversely, GdAAZTAC17 displays a strong relaxation enhancement at the imaging fields. Each LDL particle can load up to 100 and 400 UNITS of Gd-DO3A-diph and Gd-AAZTAC17, respectively. Their LDL adducts are taken up by human hepatoblastoma G2 (HepG2 and melanoma B16 tumor cells when added to the incubation medium. T, measurements of the labeled cells indicate that Gd-AAZTAC17 is significantly more efficient than Gd-DO3A-diph. Furthermore, it has been found that HepG2 hepatoma cells can internalize higher amounts of Gd-AAZTAC17 than B16 cells and the involvement of LDL receptors (LDLRs has been demonstrated in competition assays with free LDL. Gd-AAZTAC17/LDL adduct proved to be an efficient probe in the magnetic resonance (MR visualization of subcutaneous tumors in animal models obtained by injecting B16 melanoma cells into the right flank of mice. Finally, confocal microscopy validation of the distribution of LDL-based probes in the tumor has been obtained by doping the Gd-AAZTAC17/LDL adduct with a fluorescent phospholipid moiety.

  5. Retinal pigment epithelial acid lipase activity and lipoprotein receptors: effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids.

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show that fish oil-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, delivered to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by circulating low-density lipoproteins (LDL), enhance already considerable RPE lysosomal acid lipase activity, providing for more efficient hydrolysis of intralysosomal RPE lipids, an effect that may help prevent development of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). METHODS: Colorimetric biochemical and histochemical techniques were used to demonstrate RPE acid lipa...

  6. Analysis of sequence variations in low-density lipoprotein receptor gene among Malaysian patients with familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khateeb, Alyaa; Zahri, Mohd K; Mohamed, Mohd S; Sasongko, Teguh H; Ibrahim, Suhairi; Yusof, Zurkurnai; Zilfalil, Bin A

    2011-03-19

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a genetic disorder mainly caused by defects in the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene. Few and limited analyses of familial hypercholesterolemia have been performed in Malaysia, and the underlying mutations therefore remain largely unknown.We studied a group of 154 unrelated FH patients from a northern area of Malaysia (Kelantan). The promoter region and exons 2-15 of the LDLR gene were screened by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography to detect short deletions and nucleotide substitutions, and by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to detect large rearrangements. A total of 29 gene sequence variants were reported in 117(76.0%) of the studied subjects. Eight different mutations (1 large rearrangement, 1 short deletion, 5 missense mutations, and 1 splice site mutation), and 21 variants. Eight gene sequence variants were reported for the first time and they were noticed in familial hypercholesterolemic patients, but not in controls (p.Asp100Asp, p.Asp139His, p.Arg471Gly, c.1705+117 T>G, c.1186+41T>A, 1705+112C>G, Dup exon 12 and p.Trp666ProfsX45). The incidence of the p.Arg471Gly variant was 11%. Patients with pathogenic mutations were younger, had significantly higher incidences of cardiovascular disease, xanthomas, and family history of hyperlipidemia, together with significantly higher total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels than patients with non-pathogenic variants. Twenty-nine gene sequence variants occurred among FH patients; those with predicted pathogenicity were associated with higher incidences of cardiovascular diseases, tendon xanthomas, and higher total and low density lipoprotein levels compared to the rest. These results provide preliminary information on the mutation spectrum of this gene among patients with FH in Malaysia.

  7. Analysis of sequence variations in low-density lipoprotein receptor gene among Malaysian patients with familial hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusof Zurkurnai

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial hypercholesterolemia is a genetic disorder mainly caused by defects in the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene. Few and limited analyses of familial hypercholesterolemia have been performed in Malaysia, and the underlying mutations therefore remain largely unknown. We studied a group of 154 unrelated FH patients from a northern area of Malaysia (Kelantan. The promoter region and exons 2-15 of the LDLR gene were screened by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography to detect short deletions and nucleotide substitutions, and by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to detect large rearrangements. Results A total of 29 gene sequence variants were reported in 117(76.0% of the studied subjects. Eight different mutations (1 large rearrangement, 1 short deletion, 5 missense mutations, and 1 splice site mutation, and 21 variants. Eight gene sequence variants were reported for the first time and they were noticed in familial hypercholesterolemic patients, but not in controls (p.Asp100Asp, p.Asp139His, p.Arg471Gly, c.1705+117 T>G, c.1186+41T>A, 1705+112C>G, Dup exon 12 and p.Trp666ProfsX45. The incidence of the p.Arg471Gly variant was 11%. Patients with pathogenic mutations were younger, had significantly higher incidences of cardiovascular disease, xanthomas, and family history of hyperlipidemia, together with significantly higher total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels than patients with non-pathogenic variants. Conclusions Twenty-nine gene sequence variants occurred among FH patients; those with predicted pathogenicity were associated with higher incidences of cardiovascular diseases, tendon xanthomas, and higher total and low density lipoprotein levels compared to the rest. These results provide preliminary information on the mutation spectrum of this gene among patients with FH in Malaysia.

  8. Serum levels of the soluble haemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 in MPO-ANCA-associated renal vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, M; Hirayama, K; Ebihara, I; Higuchi, T; Shimohata, H; Kobayashi, M

    2016-10-01

    The contribution of infections to the mortality of patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is important, and early and careful infection control is necessary. We investigated the usefulness of the serum-soluble haemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 for detecting the presence of infectious complications regardless of disease activity. Soluble CD163 in serum obtained from 45 Japanese patients with myeloperoxidase (MPO)-AAV was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We evaluated 36 samples from active-vasculitis patients, 36 samples from inactive-vasculitis patients without infection, and 19 samples from inactive-vasculitis patients with infectious complications. Serum-soluble CD163 was also measured in 15 infectious patients without vasculitis and in 30 normal controls. The mean serum-soluble CD163 level was higher in the patients with infectious complications than in the active-vasculitis patients, inactive-vasculitis patients, and normal controls. There were significant positive correlations between serum-soluble CD163 levels and white blood cell (WBC) count, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and serum albumin levels, but only serum CRP levels were correlated with serum-soluble CD163 levels in a multiple regression analysis. On the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve, serum-soluble CD163 levels had 80.6% sensitivity and 86.7% specificity for differentiating patients with infection from those without infection. Among the active-vasculitis patients, the mean serum-soluble CD163 level of the patients with alveolar haemorrhage was significantly lower than that of the patients with interstitial lung diseases and that of the patients without pulmonary lesions. The serum-soluble CD163 level may be a useful marker for the detection of infectious complications in MPO-AAV patients.

  9. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced foam cell formation is mediated by formyl peptide receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ha Young; Oh, Eunseo; Kim, Sang Doo; Seo, Jeong Kon; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2014-01-17

    The increased level of LDL and its modification into oxLDL has been regarded as an important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Although some scavenger receptors including CD36 and RAGE have been considered as target receptors for oxLDL, involvement of other receptors should be investigated for oxLDL-induced pathological responses. In this study, we found that oxLDL-induced foam cell formation was inhibited by formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) antagonist WRW(4). oxLDL also stimulated calcium signaling and chemotactic migration in FPR2-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not in vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. Moreover, oxLDL stimulated TNF-α production, which was also almost completely inhibited by FPR2 antagonist. Our findings therefore suggest that oxLDL stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration, TNF-α production, and foam cell formation via FPR2 signaling, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Class A scavenger receptor 1 (MSR1 restricts hepatitis C virus replication by mediating toll-like receptor 3 recognition of viral RNAs produced in neighboring cells.

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    Hiromichi Dansako

    Full Text Available Persistent infections with hepatitis C virus (HCV may result in life-threatening liver disease, including cirrhosis and cancer, and impose an important burden on human health. Understanding how the virus is capable of achieving persistence in the majority of those infected is thus an important goal. Although HCV has evolved multiple mechanisms to disrupt and block cellular signaling pathways involved in the induction of interferon (IFN responses, IFN-stimulated gene (ISG expression is typically prominent in the HCV-infected liver. Here, we show that Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 expressed within uninfected hepatocytes is capable of sensing infection in adjacent cells, initiating a local antiviral response that partially restricts HCV replication. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon the expression of class A scavenger receptor type 1 (MSR1. MSR1 binds extracellular dsRNA, mediating its endocytosis and transport toward the endosome where it is engaged by TLR3, thereby triggering IFN responses in both infected and uninfected cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of MSR1 expression blocks TLR3 sensing of HCV in infected hepatocyte cultures, leading to increased cellular permissiveness to virus infection. Exogenous expression of Myc-MSR1 restores TLR3 signaling in MSR1-depleted cells with subsequent induction of an antiviral state. A series of conserved basic residues within the carboxy-terminus of the collagen superfamily domain of MSR1 are required for binding and transport of dsRNA, and likely facilitate acidification-dependent release of dsRNA at the site of TLR3 expression in the endosome. Our findings reveal MSR1 to be a critical component of a TLR3-mediated pattern recognition receptor response that exerts an antiviral state in both infected and uninfected hepatocytes, thereby limiting the impact of HCV proteins that disrupt IFN signaling in infected cells and restricting the spread of HCV within the liver.

  11. Antagonism of Secreted PCSK9 Increases Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Expression in HepG2 Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNutt, Markey C.; Kwon, Hyock Joo; Chen, Chiyuan; Chen, Justin R.; Horton, Jay D.; Lagace, Thomas A.; (USMC); (UTSMC)

    2009-07-10

    PCSK9 is a secreted protein that degrades low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) in liver by binding to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A (EGF-A) domain of the LDLR. It is not known whether PCSK9 causes degradation of LDLRs within the secretory pathway or following secretion and reuptake via endocytosis. Here we show that a mutation in the LDLR EGF-A domain associated with familial hypercholesterolemia, H306Y, results in increased sensitivity to exogenous PCSK9-mediated cellular degradation because of enhanced PCSK9 binding affinity. The crystal structure of the PCSK9-EGF-A(H306Y) complex shows that Tyr-306 forms a hydrogen bond with Asp-374 in PCSK9 at neutral pH, which strengthens the interaction with PCSK9. To block secreted PCSK9 activity, LDLR (H306Y) subfragments were added to the medium of HepG2 cells stably overexpressing wild-type PCSK9 or gain-of-function PCSK9 mutants associated with hypercholesterolemia (D374Y or S127R). These subfragments blocked secreted PCSK9 binding to cell surface LDLRs and resulted in the recovery of LDLR levels to those of control cells. We conclude that PCSK9 acts primarily as a secreted factor to cause LDLR degradation. These studies support the concept that pharmacological inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR interaction extracellularly will increase hepatic LDLR expression and lower plasma low density lipoprotein levels.

  12. Adipose tissue deficiency results in severe hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in the low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyu; Gao, Mingming; Liao, Jiawei; Qi, Yanfei; Du, Ximing; Wang, Yuhui; Li, Ling; Liu, George; Yang, Hongyuan

    2016-05-01

    Adipose tissue can store over 50% of whole-body cholesterol; however, the physiological role of adipose tissue in cholesterol metabolism and atherogenesis has not been directly assessed. Here, we examined lipoprotein metabolism and atherogenesis in a unique mouse model of severe lipodystrophy: the Seipin(-/-) mice, and also in mice deficient in both low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr) and Seipin: the Ldlr(-/-)Seipin(-/-) mice. Plasma cholesterol was moderately increased in the Seipin(-/-) mice when fed an atherogenic diet. Strikingly, plasma cholesterol reached ~6000 mg/dl in the Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice on an atherogenic diet, as compared to ~1000 mg/dl in the Ldlr(-/-) mice on the same diet. The Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice also developed spontaneous atherosclerosis on chow diet and severe atherosclerosis on an atherogenic diet. Rosiglitazone treatment significantly reduced the hypercholesterolemia of the Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice, and also alleviated the severity of atherosclerosis. Our results provide direct evidence, for the first time, that the adipose tissue plays a critical role in the clearance of plasma cholesterol. Our results also reveal a previously unappreciated strong link between adipose tissue and LDLR in plasma cholesterol metabolism.

  13. Piperine Induces Hepatic Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Expression through Proteolytic Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayasa Ochiai

    Full Text Available Elevated plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol is considered as a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Because the hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR uptakes plasma lipoproteins and lowers plasma LDL cholesterol, the activation of LDLR is a promising drug target for atherosclerosis. In the present study, we identified the naturally occurring alkaloid piperine, as an inducer of LDLR gene expression by screening the effectors of human LDLR promoter. The treatment of HepG2 cells with piperine increased LDLR expression at mRNA and protein levels and stimulated LDL uptake. Subsequent luciferase reporter gene assays revealed that the mutation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP-binding element abolished the piperine-mediated induction of LDLR promoter activity. Further, piperine treatments increased mRNA levels of several SREBP targets and mature forms of SREBPs. However, the piperine-mediated induction of the mature forms of SREBPs was not observed in SRD-15 cells, which lack insulin-induced gene-1 (Insig-1 and Insig-2. Finally, the knockdown of SREBPs completely abolished the piperine-meditated induction of LDLR gene expression in HepG2 cells, indicating that piperine stimulates the proteolytic activation of SREBP and subsequent induction of LDLR expression and activity.

  14. Piperine Induces Hepatic Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Expression through Proteolytic Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Ayasa; Miyata, Shingo; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is considered as a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Because the hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR) uptakes plasma lipoproteins and lowers plasma LDL cholesterol, the activation of LDLR is a promising drug target for atherosclerosis. In the present study, we identified the naturally occurring alkaloid piperine, as an inducer of LDLR gene expression by screening the effectors of human LDLR promoter. The treatment of HepG2 cells with piperine increased LDLR expression at mRNA and protein levels and stimulated LDL uptake. Subsequent luciferase reporter gene assays revealed that the mutation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-binding element abolished the piperine-mediated induction of LDLR promoter activity. Further, piperine treatments increased mRNA levels of several SREBP targets and mature forms of SREBPs. However, the piperine-mediated induction of the mature forms of SREBPs was not observed in SRD-15 cells, which lack insulin-induced gene-1 (Insig-1) and Insig-2. Finally, the knockdown of SREBPs completely abolished the piperine-meditated induction of LDLR gene expression in HepG2 cells, indicating that piperine stimulates the proteolytic activation of SREBP and subsequent induction of LDLR expression and activity.

  15. The intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin, is a high-affinity apolipoprotein A-I receptor facilitating endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyraki, R; Fyfe, J; Kristiansen, M; Gerdes, C; Jacobsen, C; Cui, S; Christensen, E I; Aminoff, M; de la Chapelle, A; Krahe, R; Verroust, P J; Moestrup, S K

    1999-06-01

    Cubilin is the intestinal receptor for the endocytosis of intrinsic factor-vitamin B12. However, several lines of evidence, including a high expression in kidney and yolk sac, indicate it may have additional functions. We isolated apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), the main protein of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), using cubilin affinity chromatography. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated a high-affinity binding of apoA-I and HDL to cubilin, and cubilin-expressing yolk sac cells showed efficient 125I-HDL endocytosis that could be inhibited by IgG antibodies against apoA-I and cubilin. The physiological relevance of the cubilin-apoA-I interaction was further emphasized by urinary apoA-I loss in some known cases of functional cubilin deficiency. Therefore, cubilin is a receptor in epithelial apoA-I/HDL metabolism.

  16. Pathophysiology of myasthenia gravis with antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor, muscle-specific kinase and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Huijbers, Maartje G; Plomp, Jaap J; Niks, Erik H; Molenaar, Peter C; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar; Gomez, Alejandro M; De Baets, Marc H; Losen, Mario

    2013-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis is caused by antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor, muscle-specific kinase, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4, or possibly yet unidentified antibodies. The mechanisms by which these antibodies interfere with the function of postsynaptic proteins include complement activation, antigenic modulation by crosslinking of the target proteins, competition with ligand binding sites, or steric hindrance which inhibits conformational changes or binding to associated proteins. Screening for auto-antibodies to different postsynaptic targets, and also for low-affinity antibodies, is contributing to a more accurate diagnosis of MG patients. Further studies into the specific pathophysiological pathways of the several MG subforms might help to develop new, more antigen specific, therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical expression in heterozygotes of two frequent low density lipoprotein receptor gene mutations in the French Canadian population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, M.; Minnich, A.; Davignon, J. [Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Five mutations in the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (R) gene account for approximately 83% of cases of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (hFH) in French Canadians in Quebec. The two most prevalent mutations are a >10kb deletion (10kb) of the promoter region resulting in a null allele (60.5% of cases) and a trp{sub 66}{r_arrow}gly missense mutation in exon 3 (ex3) resulting in a binding-defective R (11.7%). We have compared the phenotypic expression of these two mutations in 427 10kb hFH patients, 239 women (age 37.5 {plus_minus} 14.2 years) and 188 men (33.7 {plus_minus} 11.7) and 69 ex3 hFH patients, 42 women (40.6 {plus_minus} 14.3) and 27 men (36.8 {plus_minus}13.2). All data were analyzed separately for women and men. Tendon xanthomas were more prevalent in the 10kb (women 63%, men 68%) than in the ex3 patients (48%,48%). Total and LDL cholesterol were significantly higher in the 10kb patients with than without xanthomas but similar in ex3 patients. There were no significant differences in plasma lipoprotein concentrations between 10kb and ex3 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) or between 10kb and ex3 patients without CAD. Among men with CAD, those with 10kb were significantly younger than those with ex3 (39.6 {plus_minus} 9.8, n=93 and 46.4 {plus_minus} 7.0, n=9, respectively). In both sexes, high plasma lipoprotein concentrations conferred an increased risk of CAD in 10kb but not in ex3 patients. Thus, as in homozygotes (previous study), the >10kb deletion is associated with more severe expression of FH than is the exon 3 mutation, although the plasma lipoprotein concentrations are not significantly different between the 10kb and ex3 heterozygotes. Since in homozygotes plasma cholesterol levels in 10kb are 60% higher than in ex3 patients, these observations suggest that the expression of the normal LDL-R allele compensates for the lack of a second allele in 10kb heterozygotes.

  18. Mechanisms of dysregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor expression in HepG2 cells induced by inflammatory cytokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ya-xi; RUAN Xiong-zhong; HUANG Ai-long; LI Qiu; John F. Moorhead; Zac Varghese

    2007-01-01

    Background Low-density lipoprotein(LDL)receptor is normally regulated via a feedback system that is dependent on intracellular cholesterol levels.We have demonstrated that cytokines disrupt cholesterol-mediated LDL receptor feedback regulation causing intracellular accumulation of unmodified LDL in peripheral cells.Liver is the centraI organ for lipid homeostasis.The aim of this study was to investigate the regulation of cholesterol exogenous uptake via LDL receptor and its underlying mechanisms in human hepatic cell line(HepG2)cells under physiological and inflammatory conditions.Methods Intracellular total cholesterol(TC),free cholesterol(FC)and cholesterol ester(CE)were measured by an enzymic assay.Oil Red O staining was used to visualize lipid droplet accumulation in cells.Total cellular RNA was isolated from cells for detecting LDL receptor,sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-2 and SREBP cleavage-activating protein(SCAP)mRNA levels using real-time quantitative PCR.LDL receptor and SREBP-2 protein expression were examined by Western blotting.Confocal microscopy was used to investigate the translocation of SCAP-SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum(ER)to the Golgi by dual staining with anti-human SCAP and anti-Golgin antibodies.Results LDL loading increased intracellular cholesterol level,thereby reduced LDL receptor mRNA and protein expression in HepG2 cells under physiological conditions.However,interleukin 1β(IL-1β)further increased intracellular cholesterol level in the presence of LDL by increasing both LDL receptor mRNA and protein expression in HepG2.LDL also reduced the SREBP and SCAP mRNA level under physiological conditions.Exposure to IL-1β caused Over-expression of SREBP-2 and also disrupted normal distribution of SCAP-SREBP complex in HepG2 by enhancing translocation of SCAP-SREBP from the ER to the Golgi despite a high concentration of LDL in the culture medium.Conclusions IL-1β disrupts cholesterol-mediated LDL receptor

  19. CNTO736, a novel glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, ameliorates insulin resistance and inhibits very low-density lipoprotein production in high-fat-fed mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parlevliet, E.T.; Schröder-van der Elst, J.P.; Corssmit, E.P.M.; Picha, K.; O'Neil, K.; Stojanovic-Susulic, V.; Ort, T.; Havekes, L.M.; Romijn, J.A.; Pijl, H.

    2009-01-01

    CNTO736 is a glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 1 receptor agonist that incorporates a GLP-1 peptide analog linked to the Mimeti-body platform. We evaluate the potential of acute and chronic CNTO736 treatment on insulin sensitivity and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) metabolism. For acute studies, diet

  20. Polymorphisms in the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 5 (LRP5) Gene Are Associated with Peak Bone Mass in Non-sedentary Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixen, K; Beckers, S; Peeters, A

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the impact of the Ala1330Val (rs3736228, exon 18) and Val667Met (rs4988321, exon 9) polymorphisms of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene on peak bone mass in young men. METHODS: The Odense Androgen Study (OAS) is a population-based study...

  1. Silent exonic mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene that cause familial hypercholesterolemia by affecting mRNA splicing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Defesche, J.C.; Schuurman, E.J.M.; Klaaijsen, L.N.; Khoo, K.L.; Wiegman, A.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2008-01-01

    In a large group of patients with the clinical phenotype of familial hypercholesterolemia, such as elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and premature atherosclerosis, but without functional mutations in the genes coding for the LDL receptor and apolipoprotein B, we examined the effect

  2. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN RECEPTOR-RELATED PROTEIN GENE, BUTYRYLCHOLINESTERASE GENE AND ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE IN CHINESE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕胜; 张昱; 吴江; 王德生; 赵庆杰

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To research the relations between low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein gene (LRP)polymorphism, butyrylcholinesterase gene (BchE) polymorphism and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in Chinese. Methods. The gene polymorphisms of LRP and BchE were genotyped in 38 AD eases and 40 controls withpolymerase chain reaction-restrictian fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods. AD groups were classi-fled according to the LRP C/C genotype and compared with matched controls. Resu/ts. AD group had higher frequencies ofC/C homozygote (81.6% vs 60. 0%, P <0. 05) and of C allele (89.5% vs 76. 3%, P < 0. 05), with no significant difference between any of these LRP genotypes classi-fied AD groups and their respective control groups. Conclusions. A positive correlation was found between LRP gene polymorphism and AD, but not betweenBchE gene polymorphism and AD in Chinese AD cases.

  3. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN RECEPTOR-RELATED PROTEIN GENE, BUTYRYLCHOLINESTERASE GENE AND ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE IN CHINESE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To research the relations between low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein gene (LRP) polymorphism, butyrylcholinesterase gene (BchE) polymorphism and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in Chinese. Methods. The gene polymorphisms of LRP and BchE were genotyped in 38 AD cases and 40 controls with polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods. AD groups were classified according to the LRP C/C genotype and compared with matched controls. Results. AD group had higher frequencies of C/C homozygote (81.6% vs 60.0% , P<0.05) and of C allele (89.5% vs 76.3% , P< 0.05),with no significant difference between any of these LRP genotypes classified AD groups and their respective control groups.? Conclusions. A positive correlation was found between LRP gene polymorphism and AD, but not between BchE gene polymorphism and AD in Chinese AD cases.

  4. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1: protein,ligands, expression and pathophysiological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiu-ping; DU Guan-hua

    2007-01-01

    Objective To review the recent research progress in lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1)including its protein, ligands, expression and pathophysiological significance.Data sources Information included in this article was identified by searching of PUBMED (1997-2006) online resources using the key term LOX-1.Study selection Mainly original milestone articles and critical reviews written by major pioneer investigators of the field were selected.Results The key issues related to the LOX-1 protein as well as ligands for LOX-1. Factors regulating the expression of LOX-1 were summarized. The pathophysiological functions of LOX-1 in several diseases were discussed.Conclusions Identification of LOX-1 and a definition of its biological role in pathophysiologic states provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of some cardiovascular diseases especially in atherosclerosis and provide a potential selective therapeutic approach. LOX-1 is unlocking and drugs targeting LOX-1 might be a promising direction to explore.

  5. A bovine papillomavirus-1 based vector restores the function of the low-density lipoprotein receptor in the receptor-deficient CHO-ldlA7 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ustav Mart

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rationale of using bovine papillomavirus-1 (BPV-1 derived vectors in gene therapy protocols lies in their episomal maintenance at intermediate to high copy number, and stable, high-level expression of the gene products. We constructed the BPV-1 based vector harbouring the human low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR gene cDNA and tested its ability to restore the function of the LDLR in the receptor-deficient cell line CHO-ldlA7. Results The introduced vector p3.7LDL produced functionally active LDL receptors in the receptor-deficient cell line CHO-ldlA7 during the 32-week period of observation as determined by the internalisation assay with the labelled LDL particles. Conclusion Bovine papillomavirus type-1 (BPV-1-derived vectors could be suitable for gene therapy due to their episomal maintenance at intermediate to high copy number and stable, high-level expression of the gene products. The constructed BPV-1 based vector p3.7LDL produced functionally active LDL receptors in the LDLR-deficient cell line CHO-ldlA7 during the 32-week period of observation. In vivo experiments should reveal, whether 1–5% transfection efficiency obtained in the current work is sufficient to bring about detectable and clinically significant lowering of the amount of circulating LDL cholesterol particles.

  6. High-density lipoprotein and apolipoprotein A-I inhibit palmitate-induced translocation of toll-like receptor 4 into lipid rafts and inflammatory cytokines in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hodaka; Umemoto, Tomio; Kawano, Mikihiko; Kawakami, Masanobu; Kakei, Masafumi; Momomura, Shin-Ichi; Ishikawa, San-E; Hara, Kazuo

    2017-03-04

    Saturated fatty acids (SFAs) activate toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signal transduction in macrophages and are involved in the chronic inflammation accompanying obesity. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) produce anti-inflammatory effects via reverse cholesterol transport. However, the underlying mechanisms by which HDL and apoA-I inhibit inflammatory responses in adipocytes remain to be determined. Here we examined whether palmitate increases the translocation of TLR4 into lipid rafts and whether HDL and apoA-I inhibit inflammation in adipocytes. Palmitate exposure (250 μM, 24 h) increased interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α gene expressions and translocation of TLR4 into lipid rafts in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Pretreatment with HDL and apoA-I (50 μg/mL, 6 h) suppressed palmitate-induced inflammatory cytokine expression and TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts. Moreover, HDL and apoA-I inhibited palmitate-induced phosphorylation of nuclear factor-kappa B. HDL showed an anti-inflammatory effect via ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 and scavenger receptor class B, member 1, whereas apoA-I showed an effect via ATP-binding cassette transporter A1. These results demonstrated that HDL and apoA-I reduced palmitate-potentiated TLR4 trafficking into lipid rafts and its related inflammation in adipocytes via these specific transporters.

  7. Pseudomonas exotoxin-mediated selection yields cells with altered expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, D J; Fryling, C M; Zdanovsky, A; Saelinger, C B; Kounnas, M; Winkles, J A; Strickland, D; Leppla, S

    1995-06-01

    The alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) receptor/low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is important for the clearance of proteases, protease-inhibitor complexes, and various ligands associated with lipid metabolism. While the regulation of receptor function is poorly understood, the addition of high concentrations of the 39-kD receptor-associated protein (RAP) to cells inhibits the binding and/or uptake of many of these ligands. Previously, we (Kounnas, M.Z., R.E. Morris, M.R. Thompson, D.J. FitzGerald, D.K. Strickland, and C.B. Saelinger. 1992. J. Biol. Chem. 267:12420-12423) [corrected] showed that Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE) could bind immobilized LRP. Also, the addition of RAP blocked toxin-mediated cell killing. These findings suggested that PE might use LRP to gain entry into toxin-sensitive cells. Here we report on a strategy to select PE-resistant lines of Chinese hamster ovary cells that express altered amounts of LRP. An important part of this strategy is to screen PE-resistant clones for those that retain sensitivity to both diphtheria toxin and to a fusion protein composed of lethal factor (from anthrax toxin) fused to the adenosine diphosphate-ribosylating domain of PE. Two lines, with obvious changes in their expression of LRP, were characterized in detail. The 14-2-1 line had significant amounts of LRP, but in contrast to wild-type cells, little or no receptor was displayed on the cell surface. Instead, receptor protein was found primarily within cells, much of it apparently in an unprocessed state. The 14-2-1 line showed no uptake of chymotrypsin-alpha 2M and was 10-fold resistant to PE compared with wild-type cells. A second line, 13-5-1, had no detectable LRP mRNA or protein, did not internalize alpha 2M-chymotrypsin, and exhibited a 100-fold resistance to PE. Resistance to PE appeared to be due to receptor-specific defects, since these mutant lines showed no resistance to a PE chimeric toxin that was internalized via the transferrin

  8. Association of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor single-nucleotide polymorphisms and gene-gene interactions with the lipoprotein(a)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解惠坚

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations of 10 singlenucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs)in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor(PPARs)gene with lipoprotein(a)level,and to investigate if there is gene-gene interaction among the SNPs on lipoprotein(a)level.Methods Totally 644 subjects(234 men and 410 women)were enrolled from Prevention of Multiple Metabolic Disorders and Metabolic Syndrome Study Cohort,which was an urban community survey study conducted in Jiangsu province.Ten SNPs in PPARα(rs135539,rs4253778,

  9. MicroRNA-144 regulates hepatic ATP binding cassette transporter A1 and plasma high-density lipoprotein after activation of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q; Tarling, Elizabeth J; Kim, Tammy; Civelek, Mete; Baldán, Ángel; Esau, Christine; Edwards, Peter A

    2013-06-07

    The bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates many aspects of lipid metabolism by variouscomplex and incompletely understood molecular mechanisms. We set out to investigate the molecular mechanisms for FXR-dependent regulation of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. To identify FXR-regulated microRNAs that were subsequently involved in regulating lipid metabolism. ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a major determinant of plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels. Here, we show that activation of the nuclear receptor FXR in vivo increases hepatic levels of miR-144, which in turn lowers hepatic ABCA1 and plasma HDL levels. We identified 2 complementary sequences to miR-144 in the 3' untranslated region of ABCA1 mRNA that are necessary for miR-144-dependent regulation. Overexpression of miR-144 in vitro decreased both cellular ABCA1 protein and cholesterol efflux to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I protein, whereas overexpression in vivo reduced hepatic ABCA1 protein and plasma HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, silencing miR-144 in mice increased hepatic ABCA1 protein and HDL-cholesterol. In addition, we used tissue-specific FXR-deficient mice to show that induction of miR-144 and FXR-dependent hypolipidemia requires hepatic, but not intestinal, FXR. Finally, we identified functional FXR response elements upstream of the miR-144 locus, consistent with direct FXR regulation. We have identified a novel pathway involving FXR, miR-144, and ABCA1 that together regulate plasma HDL-cholesterol.

  10. Very low density lipoprotein receptor promotes adipocyte differentiation and mediates the proadipogenic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Huan; Hajri, Tahar

    2011-12-15

    Very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) is a member of the low density receptor family, expressed mostly in adipose tissue, heart, and skeletal muscles. VLDLR binds apolipoprotein-E-triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and plays a key role in lipid metabolism. In adipocytes, VLDLR expression increases with differentiation but it is not known whether it plays a role in the adipogenesis. Here we report that VLDLR expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes is upregulated by PPARγ agonist 15-deoxy-delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) in dose- and time-dependant manners. Knockdown of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) with siRNA abolished pioglitazone- and 15d-PGJ(2)-induced VLDLR expression and simultaneously reduced VLDL uptake in adipocytes. In addition, PPARγ-agonist treatment of control mouse adipocytes (vldlr(+/+)) enhanced adipogenesis and VLDL uptake concurrently with the induction of VLDLR expression. However, vldlr deficiency (vldlr(-/-)) significantly blunted the proadipogenic effects of PPARγ agonists. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of a putative PPARγ responsive sequence (PPRE) within the vldlr promoter, which is responsive to natural (15d-PGJ(2)) and synthetic (pioglitazone) PPARγ agonists. Reporter gene assays using serial deletion of the 5'-flanking region showed that this putative PPRE site induced promoter transactivation, while a site-targeted mutation abolished transactivation. Moreover, electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatic immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed the specific binding of PPARγ to the PPRE sequence. Together, these results support a crucial function for VLDLR in adipocyte differentiation and mediation of the proadipogenic effect of PPARγ. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) is involved in vitamin E transport across the enterocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Emmanuelle; Klein, Alexis; Bietrix, Florence; Gleize, Béatrice; Malezet-Desmoulins, Christiane; Schneider, Martina; Margotat, Alain; Lagrost, Laurent; Collet, Xavier; Borel, Patrick

    2006-02-24

    Although cellular uptake of vitamin E was initially described as a passive process, recent studies in the liver and brain have shown that SR-BI (scavenger receptor class B type I) is involved in this phenomenon. As SR-BI is expressed at high levels in the intestine, the present study addressed the involvement of SR-BI in vitamin E trafficking across enterocytes. Apical uptake and efflux of the main dietary forms of vitamin E were examined using Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers as a model of human intestinal epithelium. (R,R,R)-gamma-tocopherol bioavailability was compared between wild-type mice and mice overexpressing SR-BI in the intestine. The effect of vitamin E on enterocyte SR-BI mRNA levels was measured by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Concentration-dependent curves for vitamin E uptake were similar for (R,R,R)-alpha-, (R,R,R)-gamma-, and dl-alpha-tocopherol. (R,R,R)-alpha-tocopherol transport was dependent on incubation temperature, with a 60% reduction in absorption at 4 degrees C compared with 37 degrees C (p < 0.05). Vitamin E flux in enterocytes was directed from the apical to the basal side, with a relative 10-fold reduction in the transfer process when measured in the opposite direction (p < 0.05). Co-incubation with cholesterol, gamma-tocopherol, or lutein significantly impaired alpha-tocopherol absorption. Anti-human SR-BI antibodies and BLT1 (a chemical inhibitor of lipid transport via SR-BI) blocked up to 80% of vitamin E uptake and up to 30% of apical vitamin E efflux (p < 0.05), and similar results were obtained for (R,R,R)-gamma-tocopherol. SR-BI mRNA levels were not significantly modified after a 24-h incubation of Caco-2 cells with vitamin E. Finally, (R,R,R)-gamma-tocopherol bioavailability was 2.7-fold higher in mice overexpressing SR-BI than in wild-type mice (p < 0.05). The present data show for the first time that vitamin E intestinal absorption is, at least in part, mediated by SR-BI.

  12. Characterisation of a novel paralog of scavenger receptor class B member I (SCARB1 in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omholt Stig W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Red flesh colour is a unique trait found in some salmonid genera. Carotenoid pigments are not synthesized de novo in the fish, but are provided by dietary uptake. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular uptake and deposition of carotenoids could potentially be used to improve the low muscle deposition rate that is typically found in farmed Atlantic salmon. In addition, from an evolutionary point of view, the establishment and maintenance of this trait is still poorly understood. It has been demonstrated in several species that scavenger receptor class B, member 1 (SCARB1 is involved in intestinal absorption of carotenoids, which makes this gene a possible source of genetic variation in salmonid flesh pigmentation. Results In this study, a novel paralog of SCARB1 (SCARB1-2 was detected through screening for genetic variation in Atlantic salmon SCARB1. Full length SCARB1-2 encodes a protein with 89% identity to Atlantic salmon SCARB1, except for the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail that shows only 12% identity. The most prominent site of SCARB1 mRNA expression was in the mid gut, while a five-fold lower level was detected in Atlantic salmon skeletal muscle and liver. The SCARB1-2 mRNA was equally expressed in liver, muscle and mid gut, and at a lower level than SCARB1 mRNA. A total of seven different SCARB1-2 alleles comprising repetitive enhancer of zeste motifs (EZH2 were identified in the founding parents of a resource Atlantic salmon population. We mapped the SCARB1-2 paralog to a region on Atlantic salmon chromosome 1, containing a putative QTL for flesh colour. Addition of the SCARB1-2 marker increased the significance of this QTL, however the large confidence interval surrounding the QTL precludes confirmation of SCARB1-2 as a causative gene underlying variation in this trait. Conclusion We have characterised a novel paralog of SCARB1 (SCARB1-2, have mapped it to Atlantic salmon chromosome 1

  13. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor inhibition by an apolipoprotein E-derived peptide relies on low-density lipoprotein receptor-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Zhenyu; Prorok, Mary; Brown, Brigid E; Castellino, Francis J

    2008-08-01

    The effects of a synthetic apoE peptide, viz., residues 133-149 (apoE[133-149]), a mimetic that comprises the apoE receptor binding domain, on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)/glycine-induced ion flow through NMDA receptor (NMDAR) channels, have been investigated. The activity of apoE[133-149] was found to depend on the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP). Competition experiments with receptor-associated protein (RAP) and activated alpha(2)-macroglobulin (alpha(2)M*), two proteins that compete for apoE binding to LRP, demonstrate that apoE[133-149] inhibition of NMDAR function is mediated at a locus in LRP that overlaps with the binding sites of RAP and alpha(2)M*. A coreceptor of LRP, cell surface heparin sulfate proteoglycan, did not function in this system. Additional electrophysiology experiments demonstrated that the inhibitory potency of apoE[133-149] was threefold greater for NMDAR-transfected wild-type Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells compared with NMDAR-transfected CHO cells deficient in LRP. Studies with truncation and replacement variants of the apoE peptide demonstrated that the NMDAR inhibitory properties of these peptides correlate with their binding affinities for LRP. These novel results indicate that apoE functions as an inhibitor of NMDAR ion channels indirectly via LRP, and are suggestive of a participatory role for LRP in NMDAR-based neuropathies.

  14. A Library of Infectious Hepatitis C Viruses with Engineered Mutations in the E2 Gene Reveals Growth-Adaptive Mutations That Modulate Interactions with Scavenger Receptor Class B Type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiani, Adam; Chen, Kevin; Schwarz, Megan C; White, James P; Luca, Vincent C; Fremont, Daved H; Wang, David; Evans, Matthew J; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    While natural hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results in highly diverse quasispecies of related viruses over time, mutations accumulate more slowly in tissue culture, in part because of the inefficiency of replication in cells. To create a highly diverse population of HCV particles in cell culture and identify novel growth-enhancing mutations, we engineered a library of infectious HCV with all codons represented at most positions in the ectodomain of the E2 gene. We identified many putative growth-adaptive mutations and selected nine highly represented E2 mutants for further study: Q412R, T416R, S449P, T563V, A579R, L619T, V626S, K632T, and L644I. We evaluated these mutants for changes in particle-to-infectious-unit ratio, sensitivity to neutralizing antibody or CD81 large extracellular loop (CD81-LEL) inhibition, entry factor usage, and buoyant density profiles. Q412R, T416R, S449P, T563V, and L619T were neutralized more efficiently by anti-E2 antibodies and T416R, T563V, and L619T by CD81-LEL. Remarkably, all nine variants showed reduced dependence on scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) for infection. This shift from SR-BI usage did not correlate with a change in the buoyant density profiles of the variants, suggesting an altered E2-SR-BI interaction rather than changes in the virus-associated lipoprotein-E2 interaction. Our results demonstrate that residues influencing SR-BI usage are distributed across E2 and support the development of large-scale mutagenesis studies to identify viral variants with unique functional properties. Characterizing variant viruses can reveal new information about the life cycle of HCV and the roles played by different viral genes. However, it is difficult to recapitulate high levels of diversity in the laboratory because of limitations in the HCV culture system. To overcome this limitation, we engineered a library of mutations into the E2 gene in the context of an infectious clone of the virus. We used this library of viruses

  15. Kaempferol suppresses lipid accumulation in macrophages through the downregulation of cluster of differentiation 36 and the upregulation of scavenger receptor class B type I and ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-Ying; Kong, Ling-Xi; Li, Juan; He, Hai-Xia; Zhou, Yuan-Da

    2013-02-01

    The accumulation of foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions is a hallmark of early-stage atherosclerosis. Kaempferol has been shown to inhibit oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake by macrophages; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully investigated. In this study, we shown that treatment with kaempferol markedly suppresses oxLDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation, which occurs due to a decrease in lipid accumulation and an increase in cholesterol efflux from THP-1-derived macrophages. Additionally, the kaempferol treatment of macrophages led to the downregulation of cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) protein levels, the upregulation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter A1 (ABCA1), scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) and ABCG1 protein levels, while no effects on scavenger receptor A (SR-A) expression were observed. Kaempferol had similar effects on the mRNA and protein expression of ABCA1, SR-BI, SR-A, CD36 and ABCG1. The reduced CD36 expression following kaempferol treatment involved the inhibition of c-Jun-activator protein-1 (AP-1) nuclear translocation. The inhibition of AP-1 using the inhibitor, SP600125, confirmed this involvement, as the AP-1 inhibition significantly augmented the kaempferol-induced reduction in CD36 expression. Accordingly, the kaempferol-mediated suppression of lipid accumulation in macrophages was also augmented by SP600125. The increased expression of ABCA1, SR-BI and ABCG1 following kaempferol treatment was accompanied by the enhanced protein expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This increase was reversed following the knockdown of the HO-1 gene using small hairpin RNA (shRNA). Moreover, the kaempferol-mediated attenuation of lipid accumulation and the promotion of cholesterol efflux was also inhibited by HO-1 shRNA. In conclusion, the c-Jun-AP‑1-dependent downregulation of CD36 and the HO-1-dependent upregulation of ABCG1, SR-BI and ABCA1 may mediate the beneficial effects of

  16. Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Proteins in a Novel Mechanism of Axon Guidance and Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landowski, Lila M; Pavez, Macarena; Brown, Lachlan S; Gasperini, Robert; Taylor, Bruce V; West, Adrian K; Foa, Lisa

    2016-01-15

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein receptors 1 and 2 (LRP1 and LRP2) are emerging as important cell signaling mediators in modulating neuronal growth and repair. We examined whether LRP1 and LRP2 are able to mediate a specific aspect of neuronal growth: axon guidance. We sought to identify LRP1 and LRP2 ligands that could induce axonal chemoattraction, which might have therapeutic potential. Using embryonic sensory neurons (rat dorsal root ganglia) in a growth cone turning assay, we tested a range of LRP1 and LRP2 ligands for the ability to guide growth cone navigation. Three ligands were chemorepulsive: α-2-macroglobulin, tissue plasminogen activator, and metallothionein III. Conversely, only one LRP ligand, metallothionein II, was found to be chemoattractive. Chemoattraction toward a gradient of metallothionein II was calcium-dependent, required the expression of both LRP1 and LRP2, and likely involves further co-receptors such as the tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) receptor. The potential for LRP-mediated chemoattraction to mediate axonal regeneration was examined in vivo in a model of chemical denervation in adult rats. In these in vivo studies, metallothionein II was shown to enhance epidermal nerve fiber regeneration so that it was complete within 7 days compared with 14 days in saline-treated animals. Our data demonstrate that both LRP1 and LRP2 are necessary for metallothionein II-mediated chemotactic signal transduction and that they may form part of a signaling complex. Furthermore, the data suggest that LRP-mediated chemoattraction represents a novel, non-classical signaling system that has therapeutic potential as a disease-modifying agent for the injured peripheral nervous system.

  17. Steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone regulation of the very-high-density lipoprotein (VHDL) receptor phosphorylation for VHDL uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Du-Juan; Liu, Wen; Cai, Mei-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2013-04-01

    During the metamorphic stage of holometabolous insects, the biosynthetic precursors needed for the synthesis of a large number of adult proteins are acquired from the selective absorption of storage proteins. The very-high-density lipoprotein (VHDL), a non-hexameric storage protein, is consumed by the fat body from the hemolymph through VHDL receptor (VHDL-R)-mediated endocytosis. However, the mechanism of the uptake of VHDL by a VHDL-R remains unclear. In this study, a VHDL-R from Helicoverpa armigera was found to be involved in 20E-regulated VHDL uptake through the regulation of steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). The transcripts of VHDL-R were detected mainly in the fat body and integument during the wandering stage. The transcription of VHDL-R was upregulated by 20E through the ecdysteroid receptor (EcRB1) and Ultraspiracle (USP1). In addition, 20E stimulates the phosphorylation of VHDL-R through protein kinase C for ligand binding. VHDL-R knockdown in larvae results the inhibition of development to adulthood. These data imply that 20E regulates VHDL-R on both transcriptional and posttranslational levels for VHDL absorption.

  18. Recombinant hepatitis C virus-envelope protein 2 interactions with low-density lipoprotein/CD81 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Urbaczek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV envelope protein 2 (E2 is involved in viral binding to host cells. The aim of this work was to produce recombinant E2B and E2Y HCV proteins in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris, respectively, and to study their interactions with low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr and CD81 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and the ECV304 bladder carcinoma cell line. To investigate the effects of human LDL and differences in protein structure (glycosylated or not on binding efficiency, the recombinant proteins were either associated or not associated with lipoproteins before being assayed. The immunoreactivity of the recombinant proteins was analysed using pooled serum samples that were either positive or negative for hepatitis C. The cells were immunophenotyped by LDLr and CD81 using flow cytometry. Binding and binding inhibition assays were performed in the presence of LDL, foetal bovine serum (FCS and specific antibodies. The results revealed that binding was reduced in the absence of FCS, but that the addition of human LDL rescued and increased binding capacity. In HUVEC cells, the use of antibodies to block LDLr led to a significant reduction in the binding of E2B and E2Y. CD81 antibodies did not affect E2B and E2Y binding. In ECV304 cells, blocking LDLr and CD81 produced similar effects, but they were not as marked as those that were observed in HUVEC cells. In conclusion, recombinant HCV E2 is dependent on LDL for its ability to bind to LDLr in HUVEC and ECV304 cells. These findings are relevant because E2 acts to anchor HCV to host cells; therefore, high blood levels of LDL could enhance viral infectivity in chronic hepatitis C patients.

  19. Molecular and Functional Characterization of Mouse S5D-SRCRB: A New Group B Member of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miró-Julià, Cristina; Roselló, Sandra; Martínez, Vanesa G;

    2011-01-01

    endogenous extracellular matrix proteins (laminin and galectin-1), as well as PAMPs present on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. PAMP binding by S5D-SRCRB induced microbial aggregation and subsequent inhibition of PAMP-induced cytokine release. These abilities suggest that S5D-SRCRB might......The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily (SRCR-SF) members are transmembrane and/or secreted receptors exhibiting one or several repeats of a cysteine-rich protein module of ∼100 aa, named scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR). Two types of SRCR domains (A or B) have been reported, which...... of mouse S5D-SRCRB, a new group B member of the SRCR-SF. The s5d-srcrb gene maps at mouse chromosome 7 and encompasses 14 exons extending over 15 kb. The longest cDNA sequence found is 4286 bp in length and encodes a mature protein of 1371 aa, with a predicted M(r) of 144.6 kDa. Using an episomal mammalian...

  20. Glycosaminoglycan-lipoprotein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, U; Ostergren-Lundén, G; Moses, J

    2001-10-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) bound to various proteoglycans (PGs) present in the cardiovascular system have been proposed to perform a wide range of functions. These include conferring viscoelastic properties; interacting with and modulating growth factors and enzymes; and as receptors and co-receptors in lipoprotein metabolism. Binding of apoB-100 lipoproteins, particularly low density lipoproteins (LDL), to GAGs of extracellular matrix PGs in arteries has been proposed to be an initiating event in development of atherosclerosis. This study was initiated with the aim of getting an overview of the binding patterns of different lipoprotein subclasses with individual GAG categories. We thus evaluated the interaction of lipoproteins with GAGs commonly found in the cardiovascular system using a gel mobility-shift assay developed for this purpose. The same procedure was used to measure lipoproteins binding to metabolically [(35)S]-labeled whole PGs prepared from three cell types, arterial smooth muscle cells, THP-1 macrophages and from HepG2 cells. The effect of GAG composition on PGs on lipoprotein binding was evaluated by enzymatic degradation of the carbohydrate chains. Heparan sulfate was found to bind beta very low density lipoproteins (beta-VLDL) and a chylomicron remnant model (beta-VLDL+apoE), but not LDL. Dermatan sulfate was found to bind LDL, but not beta-VLDL or the chylomicron remnant model. Chondroitin sulfate and heparin were found to bind all lipoproteins tested (LDL, beta-VLDL and beta-VLDL+apoE) although with different affinities. We can conclude that each lipoprotein subclass tested binds a specific assortment of the GAGs tested. The observations made contribute to the understanding of new and complex mechanisms by which carbohydrate and lipid metabolism may be linked.

  1. [The receptor-mediated endocytosis of influenza viruses and low-density lipoproteins by tissue cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleskov, V M; Bannikov, A I; Zaĭtsev, Iu V

    1994-01-01

    The experimental data obtained by immunological, immunomorphological, biochemical, and virological methods are presented which substantiate a concept that various strains of influenza virus under study may penetrate tissue cells at sites of high affinity usually meant for low-density lipoproteins (LDLP) providing the cells with cholesterol for construction of outer and inner membranes. A computer analysis of a bank of data on the primary structure of proteins (the package of GENBER programme) revealed significant similarity of amino acid sequences between the area of viral hemagglutinin site attachment to cells and corresponding amino acids comprising apoB LDLP. The presented proofs are a convincing example of virus particles mimicry realized at the molecular level and give new concepts concerning the mechanisms of virus penetration into body cells which are important for the development of a principally new approach to creation of highly effective antiviral compounds. Moreover, the observed phenomenon may serve for explanation of the nature and mechanism of action of the so-called thermostable virus-neutralizing blood serum inhibitor.

  2. What are lipoproteins doing in the brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Eckel, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Lipoproteins in plasma transport lipids between tissues, however, only high-density lipoproteins (HDL) appear to traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB); thus, lipoproteins found in the brain must be produced within the central nervous system. Apolipoproteins E (ApoE) and ApoJ are the most abundant apolipoproteins in the brain, are mostly synthesized by astrocytes, and are found on HDL. In the hippocampus and other brain regions, lipoproteins help to regulate neurobehavioral functions by processes that are lipoprotein receptor-mediated. Moreover, lipoproteins and their receptors also have roles in the regulation of body weight and energy balance, acting through lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (LRP). Thus, understanding lipoproteins and their metabolism in the brain provides a new opportunity with potential therapeutic relevance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The physiological expression of scavenger receptor SR-B1 in canine endometrial and placental epithelial cells and its potential involvement in pathogenesis of pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, C; Becher-Deichsel, A; Hlavaty, J; Mair, G; Walter, I

    2016-06-01

    Pyometra, the purulent inflammation of the uterus, is a common uterine disease of bitches that has potentially life-threatening consequences. The opportunistic bacterial infection of the uterus often progresses into the serious systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In a previous study, we characterized epithelial foam cells in the canine endometrial surface occurring in metestrus, and we regularly observed pronounced epithelial foam-cell formations in pyometra-affected uteri. Therefore, it was assumed that the mechanism behind lipid droplet accumulation in surface epithelial cells might even increase bacterial binding capacity and promote pyometra development. Lipid droplet accumulation in epithelial cells is accomplished via specialized lipid receptors called scavenger receptors (SR). Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) is an important receptor for lipid accumulation in diverse cell types, but it is also a strong binding partner for bacteria, and thereby enhances bacterial adhesion and clinical signs of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In the present study, after the isolation of metestrous surface epithelial cells from canine uteri by laser capture microdissection, SR-B1 was identified at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and also at the protein level by means of immunohistochemistry. In pyometra-affected uteri, SR-B1 mRNA expression was higher than that in the healthy control samples, and SR-B1 protein was expressed in the surface and crypt epithelial cells. Furthermore, to understand the physiological role of SR-B1 expression in the metestrus surface epithelial cells, we investigated its expression in the epithelial cells of the glandular chambers of canine placenta in different stages of gestation because these cells are also characterized by lipid droplet accumulation. SR-B1 was present in the placental epithelial cells of the glandular chambers from 25 to 30 and 45 to 50 days of gestation

  4. Combination of body mass index and oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 in prognosis prediction of patients with squamous non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Long; Jiang, Shanshan; Lin, Yongbin; Yang, Han; Zhao, Zerui; Xie, Zehua; Lin, Yaobin; Long, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer, especially non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), represents enormous challenges in continuously achieving treatment improvements. Besides cancer, obesity is becoming ever more prevalent. Obesity is increasingly acknowledged as a major risk factor for several types of common cancers. Significant mechanisms overlap in the pathobiology of obesity and tumorigenesis. One of these mechanisms involves oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 (OLR1), as a link between obesity and cancer...

  5. Analysis of low-density lipoprotein receptor gene mutations in a Chinese patient with clinically homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹守春; 王绿娅; 秦彦文; 蔺洁; 吴邦俊; 刘舒; 潘晓冬; 杜兰平; 陈保生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To screen the point mutation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene in Chinese familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients, characterize the relationship between the genotype and the phenotype and discuss the molecular pathological mechanism of FH. Methods A patient with clinical phenotype of homozygous FH and her parents were investigated for mutations in the promoter and all eighteen exons of the LDL-R gene. Screening was carried out using Touch-down PCR and direct DNA sequencing; multiple alignment analysis by DNASIS 2.5 was used to find base alteration, and the LDL-R gene mutation database was searched to identify the alteration. In addition, the apolipoprotein B gene (apo B) was screened for known mutations (R3500Q) that cause familial defective apo B100 (FDB) by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP).Results Two new heterozygous mutations in exons 4 and 9 of the LDL-R gene were identified in the proband (C122Y and T383I) as well as her parents. Both of the mutations have not been published in the LDL-R gene mutation database. No mutation of apo B100 (R3500Q) was observed. Conclusion Two new mutations (C112Y and T383I) were found in the LDL-R gene, which may result in FH and may be particularly pathogenetic genotypes in Chinese people.

  6. Variations of very low-density lipoprotein receptor subtype expression in gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma cells with various differentiations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Chen; Fan Wu; Feng-Ming Chen; Jun Tian; Shen Qu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: This study is aimed at investigating the expression and possible significances of very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) subtypes in gastroenteric adenocarcinoma tissues and cells with various differentiations. METHODS: Thirty-one cases of gastroenteric carcinoma/ adjacent normal tissues were enrolled in the study, which were diagnosed and classified by the clinicopathological diagnosis. The expression of VLDLR subtypes was detected in gastroenteric carcinoma/adjacent normal tissues and three various differentiated human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines (MKN28, SGC7901 and MKN45) by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis.RE,SULTS: Two VLDLR subtypes, namely, type Ⅱ VLDLR and type Ⅰ VLDLR, were found to express changes in gastroenteric carcinoma tissues, their adjacent normal tissue, and gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines as well. Type Ⅱ VLDLR is predominantly expressed in poorly- or moderately-differentiated gastroenteric carcinoma tissues and gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines, whereas type ⅠVLDLR is mainly detected in well-differentiated intestinal carcinoma tissues and gastric adenocarcinoma cells compared with the adjacent normal tissues. CONCLUSION: The results suggested that the variations of the VLDLR subtype expression might be correlated with the progress and differentiation of gastroenteric carcinoma.

  7. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates inflammatory cytokine secretion in smooth muscle cells induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Yang

    Full Text Available Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL-regulated secretion of inflammatory cytokines in smooth muscle cells (SMCs is regarded as an important step in the progression of atherosclerosis; however, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the role of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 in oxLDL-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines in SMCs both in vivo and in vitro. We found that the levels of TLR4, interleukin 1-β (IL1-β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 expression were increased in the SMCs of atherosclerotic plaques in patients with femoral artery stenosis. In cultured primary arterial SMCs from wild type mice, oxLDL caused dose- and time-dependent increase in the expression levels of TLR4 and cytokines. These effects were significantly weakened in arterial SMCs derived from TLR4 knockout mice (TLR4-/-. Moreover, the secretion of inflammatory cytokines was blocked by TLR4-specific antibodies in primary SMCs. Ox-LDL induced activation of p38 and NFκB was also inhibited in TLR4-/- primary SMCs or when treated with TLR4-specific antibodies. These results demonstrated that TLR4 is a crucial mediator in oxLDL-induced inflammatory cytokine expression and secretion, and p38 and NFκB activation.

  8. Protein interactions among Fe65, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein, and the amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Melinda M; Guttman, Miklos; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2011-07-19

    The adapter protein Fe65 has been proposed to be the link between the intracellular domains of the amyloid precursor protein, APP (AICD), and the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP-CT). Functional linkage between these two proteins has been established, and mutations within LRP-CT affect the amount of Aβ produced from APP. Previous work showed that AICD binds to protein interaction domain 2 (PID2) of Fe65. Although the structure of PID1 was determined recently, all attempts to demonstrate LRP-CT binding to this domain failed. We used biophysical experiments and binding studies to investigate the binding among these three proteins. Full-length Fe65 bound more weakly to AICD than did N-terminally truncated forms; however, the intramolecular domain-domain interactions that had been proposed to inhibit binding could not be observed using amide H-D exchange. Surprisingly, when LRP-CT is phosphorylated at Tyr4507, it bound to Fe65 PID1 despite the fact that this domain belongs to the Dab-like subclass of PIDs that are not supposed to be phosphorylation-dependent. Mutation of a critical arginine abolished binding, providing further proof of the phosphorylation dependence. Fe65 PID1 thus provides a link between the Dab-like class and the IRS-like class of PIDs and is the first Dab-like family member to show phosphorylation-dependent binding.

  9. Intermittent hypoxia and hypercapnia induce pulmonary artery atherosclerosis and ventricular dysfunction in low density lipoprotein receptor deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Robert M; Bowden, Karen; Pattison, Jennifer; Peterson, Alexander B; Juliano, Joseph; Dalton, Nancy D; Gu, Yusu; Alvarez, Erika; Imamura, Toshihiro; Peterson, Kirk L; Witztum, Joseph L; Haddad, Gabriel G; Li, Andrew C

    2013-12-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea, who experience episodic hypoxia and hypercapnia during sleep, often demonstrate increased inflammation, oxidative stress, and dyslipidemia. We hypothesized that sleep apnea patients would be predisposed to the development of atherosclerosis. To dissect the mechanisms involved, we developed an animal model in mice whereby we expose mice to intermittent hypoxia/hypercapnia (IHH) in normobaric environments. Two- to three-month-old low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice were fed a high-fat diet for 8 or 16 wk while being exposed to IHH for either 10 h/day or 24 h/day. Plasma lipid levels, pulmonary artery and aortic atherosclerotic lesions, and cardiac function were then assayed. Surprisingly, atherosclerosis in the aorta of IHH mice was similar compared with controls. However, in IHH mice, atherosclerosis was markedly increased in the trunk and proximal branches of the pulmonary artery of exposed mice; even though plasma cholesterol and triglycerides were lower than in controls. Hemodynamic analysis revealed that right ventricular maximum pressure and isovolumic relaxation constant were significantly increased in IHH exposed mice and left ventricular % fractional shortening was reduced. In conclusion, 1) Intermittent hypoxia/hypercapnia remarkably accelerated atherosclerotic lesions in the pulmonary artery of Ldlr(-/-) mice and 2) increased lesion formation in the pulmonary artery was associated with right and left ventricular dysfunction. These findings raise the possibility that patients with obstructive sleep apnea may be susceptible to atherosclerotic disease in the pulmonary vasculature, an observation that has not been previously recognized.

  10. A novel peroxisome proliferator response element modulates hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor gene transcription in response to PPARδ activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, Vikram R; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-12-15

    The hepatic expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) gene is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level by a sterol-regulatory element (SRE) in its proximal promoter region which is the site of action of SRE-binding protein 2 (SREBP2). However whether additional cis-regulatory elements contribute to LDLR transcription has not been fully explored. We investigated the function of a putative peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-response element (PPRE) sequence motif located at -768 to -752 bases upstream of the transcription start site of human LDLR gene in response to PPARδ activation. Promoter luciferase reporter analyses showed that treating HepG2 cells with PPARδ agonist L165041 markedly increased the activity of a full-length LDLR promoter construct (pLDLR-1192) without any effects on the shorter promoter reporter pLDLR-234 that contains only the core regulatory elements SRE-1 and SP1 sites. Importantly, mutation of the PPRE sequence greatly attenuated the induction of the full-length LDLR promoter activity by L165041 without affecting rosuvastatin (RSV)-mediated transactivation. EMSA and ChIP assay further confirmed the binding of PPARδ to the LDLR-PPRE site. Treating HepG2 cells with L165041 elevated the mRNA and protein expressions of LDLR without affecting the LDLR mRNA decay rate. The induction of LDLR expression by PPARδ agonist was further observed in liver tissue of mice and hamsters treated with L165041. Altogether, our studies identify a novel PPRE-mediated regulatory mechanism for LDLR transcription and suggest that combined treatment of statin with PPARδ agonists may have advantageous effects on LDLR expression.

  11. Helicobacter pylori-induced activation of β-catenin involves low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 and Dishevelled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lendeckel Uwe

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human microbial pathogen Helicobacter pylori resides in the stomach of about fifty percent of the world's population and represents a risk factor for chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers and, in rare cases, gastric cancer. Alterations of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway have been described in almost every human cancer disease, due to the regulation of target genes being involved in cell cycle control, differentiation, cell migration or stem cell control. Our study aimed to elucidate the role of proximal Wnt signaling components low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6 and Dishevelled (Dvl in the activation of β-catenin early after infection of gastric epithelial cells with H. pylori. Results Infection of gastric epithelial NCI-N87 cells with H. pylori induces rapid phosphorylation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway co-receptor LRP6 independent of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA or vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA. However, bacteria lacking a functional type 4 secretion system (T4SS failed to induce LRP6 phosphorylation. Further, we identified proteins of the Dvl family, namely Dvl2 and Dvl3, which are involved in LRP6 phosphorylation. H. pylori-induced nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and its transcriptional activation, and expression of Wnt target genes are strongly reduced in stable knockdown cell lines deficient for LRP6, Dvl2 or Dvl3. Conclusion We analysed the H. pylori-induced activation of Wnt-signaling factors and demonstrate for the first time that the canonical Wnt-signaling proteins LRP6 and Dvl2 and Dvl3 are involved in the regulation of β-catenin.

  12. Effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis infection on post-transcriptional regulation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyazawa Haruna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontal disease is suggested to increase the risk of atherothrombotic disease by inducing dyslipidemia. Recently, we demonstrated that proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9, which is known to play a critical role in the regulation of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol levels, is elevated in periodontitis patients. However, the underlying mechanisms of elevation of PCSK9 in periodontitis patients are largely unknown. Here, we explored whether Porphyromonas gingivalis, a representative periodontopathic bacterium, -induced inflammatory response regulates serum PCSK9 and cholesterol levels using animal models. Methods We infected C57BL/6 mice intraperitoneally with Porphyromonas gingivalis, a representative strain of periodontopathic bacteria, and evaluated serum PCSK9 levels and the serum lipid profile. PCSK9 and LDL receptor (LDLR gene and protein expression, as well as liver X receptors (Lxrs, inducible degrader of the LDLR (Idol, and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor (Srebf2 gene expression, were examined in the liver. Results P. gingivalis infection induced a significant elevation of serum PCSK9 levels and a concomitant elevation of total and LDL cholesterol compared with sham-infected mice. The LDL cholesterol levels were significantly correlated with PCSK9 levels. Expression of the Pcsk9, Ldlr, and Srebf2 genes was upregulated in the livers of the P. gingivalis-infected mice compared with the sham-infected mice. Although Pcsk9 gene expression is known to be positively regulated by sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP2 (human homologue of Srebf2, whereas Srebf2 is negatively regulated by cholesterol, the elevated expression of Srebf2 found in the infected mice is thought to be mediated by P. gingivalis infection. Conclusions P. gingivalis infection upregulates PCSK9 production via upregulation of Srebf2, independent of cholesterol levels. Further studies

  13. Novel mechanism by which probucol lowers low density lipoprotein levels demonstrated in the LDL receptor-deficient rabbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naruszewicz, M.; Carew, T.E.; Pittman, R.C.; Witztum, J.L.; Steinberg, D.

    1984-11-01

    Treatment of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-deficient rabbits (WHHL rabbits) with probucol (1% w/w in a chow diet) lowered their LDL-cholesterol levels by 36%, consonant with the reported effectiveness of the drug in patients deficient in the LDL receptor. Initial studies of LDL fractional catabolic rate (FCR) using /sup 125/I-labeled LDL prepared from the serum of untreated WHHL rabbits showed no difference between probucol-treated WHHL rabbits and untreated WHHL rabbits. When, however, /sup 125/I-labeled LDL was prepared from donor WHHL rabbits under treatment with probucol and injected back into them, the FCR was found to be increased by about 50% above that measured simultaneously using /sup 131/I-labeled LDL prepared from untreated WHHL donors. The labeled LDL from probucol-treated donors was also metabolized more rapidly than that from untreated donors when injected into untreated WHHL rabbits or into untreated wild-type New Zealand White rabbits. Finally, it was shown that rabbit skin fibroblasts in culture degraded labeled LDL prepared from probucol-treated WHHL rabbits more rapidly than that prepared from untreated WHHL donors. This was true both for normal rabbit fibroblasts and also for WHHL skin fibroblasts, although the absolute degradation rates in the latter were, of course, much lower for both forms of LDL. The data indicate that a major mechanism by which probucol lowers LDL levels relates not to changes in the cellular mechanisms for LDL uptake or to changes in LDL production but rather to intrinsic changes in the structure and metabolism of the plasma LDL of the probucol-treated animal.

  14. Effects of High Fat Feeding and Diabetes on Regression of Atherosclerosis Induced by Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Therapy in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Willecke

    Full Text Available We tested whether a high fat diet (HFD containing the inflammatory dietary fatty acid palmitate or insulin deficient diabetes altered the remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques in LDL receptor knockout (Ldlr-/- mice. Cholesterol reduction was achieved by using a helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd carrying the gene for the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr; HDAd-LDLR. After injection of the HDAd-LDLR, mice consuming either HFD, which led to insulin resistance but not hyperglycemia, or low fat diet (LFD, showed regression compared to baseline. However there was no difference between the two groups in terms of atherosclerotic lesion size, or CD68+ cell and lipid content. Because of the lack of effects of these two diets, we then tested whether viral-mediated cholesterol reduction would lead to defective regression in mice with greater hyperglycemia. In both normoglycemic and streptozotocin (STZ-treated hyperglycemic mice, HDAd-LDLR significantly reduced plasma cholesterol levels, decreased atherosclerotic lesion size, reduced macrophage area and lipid content, and increased collagen content of plaque in the aortic sinus. However, reductions in anti-inflammatory and ER stress-related genes were less pronounced in STZ-diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated Ldlr gene therapy is an effective and simple method to induce atherosclerosis regression in Ldlr-/- mice in different metabolic states.

  15. The osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is a novel receptor regulated by oxidized low-density lipoprotein in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goettsch, Claudia; Rauner, Martina; Sinningen, Kathrin; Helas, Susann; Al-Fakhri, Nadia; Nemeth, Katharina; Hamann, Christine; Kopprasch, Steffi; Aikawa, Elena; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schoppet, Michael; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2011-12-01

    Cross talks between the vascular and immune system play a critical role in vascular diseases, in particular in atherosclerosis. The osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is a regulator of osteoclast differentiation and dendritic cell maturation. Whether OSCAR plays a role in vascular biology and has an impact on atherogenic processes provoked by proinflammatory stimuli is yet unknown. We identified OSCAR on the surface of human primary endothelial cells. Stimulation of endothelial cells with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) caused a time- and dose-dependent induction of OSCAR, which was lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor 1 and Ca(2+) dependent. OSCAR was transcriptionally regulated by oxLDL as shown by OSCAR promoter analysis. Specific inhibition of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway prevented the oxLDL-mediated increase of endothelial OSCAR expression. As assessed by EMSA, oxLDL induced binding of NFATc1 to the OSCAR promoter. Notably, in vivo-modified LDL from patients with diabetes mellitus stimulated OSCAR mRNA expression in human endothelial cells. Furthermore, apolipoprotein E knockout mice fed a high-fat diet showed an enhanced aortic OSCAR expression associated with increased expression of NFATc1. In summary, OSCAR is expressed in vascular endothelial cells and is regulated by oxLDL involving NFATc1. Our data suggest that OSCAR, originally described in bone as immunological mediator and regulator of osteoclast differentiation, may be involved in cell activation and inflammation during atherosclerosis.

  16. Neuronal low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 binds and endocytoses prion fibrils via receptor cluster 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jen, Angela; Parkyn, Celia J; Mootoosamy, Roy C

    2010-01-01

    clusters 2 and 4, PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) fibrils bind only to receptor cluster 4. PrP(Sc) fibrils out-compete PrP(C) for internalization. When endocytosed, PrP(Sc) fibrils are routed to lysosomes, rather than recycled to the cell surface with PrP(C). Thus, although LRP1 binds both forms of PrP, it traffics...

  17. Lectin-like Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor (LOX-1): A Chameleon Receptor for Oxidized LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeya, Bushra; Arjuman, Albina; Chandra, Nimai Chand

    2016-08-16

    LOX-1, one of the main receptors for oxLDL, is found mainly on the surface of endothelial cells. It is a multifacet 52 kDa type II transmembrane protein that structurally belongs to the C-type lectin family. It exists with short intracellular N-terminal and long extracellular C-terminal hydrophilic domains separated by a hydrophobic domain of 26 amino acids. LOX-1 acts like a bifunctional receptor either showing pro-atherogenicity by activating the NFκB-mediated down signaling cascade for gene activation of pro-inflammatory molecules or playing an atheroprotective agent by receptor-mediated uptake of oxLDL in the presence of an anti-inflammatory molecule like IL-10. Mildly, moderately, and highly oxidized LDL show their characteristic features upon LOX-1 activation and its ligand binding indenture. The polymorphic LOX-1 genes are intensively associated with increased susceptibility to myocardial diseases. The splicing variant LOX IN dimerizes with the native form of LOX-1 and protects cells from damage by oxidized LDL. In the developing field of regenerating medicine, LOX-1 is a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Association of advanced glycation end products with A549 cells, a human pulmonary epithelial cell line, is mediated by a receptor distinct from the scavenger receptor family and RAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Nahoko; Fukuhara-Takaki, Kaori; Jono, Tadashi; Nakajou, Keisuke; Eto, Nobuaki; Horiuchi, Seikoh; Takeya, Motohiro; Nagai, Ryoji

    2006-05-01

    Cellular interactions with advanced glycation end products (AGE)-modified proteins are known to induce several biological responses, not only endocytic uptake and degradation, but also the induction of cytokines and growth factors, combined responses that may be linked to the development of diabetic vascular complications. In this study we demonstrate that A549 cells, a human pulmonary epithelial cell line, possess a specific binding site for AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) (K(d) = 27.8 nM), and additionally for EN-RAGE (extracellular newly identified RAGE binding protein) (K(d) = 118 nM). Western blot and RT-PCR analysis showed that RAGE (receptor for AGE) is highly expressed on A549 cells, while the expression of other known AGE-receptors such as galectin-3 and SR-A (class A scavenger receptor), are below the level of detection. The binding of (125)I-AGE-BSA to these cells is inhibited by unlabeled AGE-BSA, but not by EN-RAGE. In contrast, the binding of (125)I-EN-RAGE is significantly inhibited by unlabeled EN-RAGE and soluble RAGE, but not by AGE-BSA. Our results indicate that A549 cells possess at least two binding sites, one specific for EN-RAGE and the other specific for AGE-BSA. The latter receptor on A549 cells is distinct from the scavenger receptor family and RAGE.

  19. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Class A Repeats Are O-Glycosylated in Linker Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nis Borbye; Wang, Shengjun; Narimatsu, Yoshiki;

    2014-01-01

    , which in wild-type CHO cells is glycosylated with the typical sialylated core 1 structure. The glycosites in linker regions of LDLR class A repeats are conserved in LDLR from man to Xenopus and found in other homologous receptors. O-Glycosylation is controlled by a large family of polypeptide GalNAc...... transferases. Probing into which isoform(s) contributed to glycosylation of the linker regions of the LDLR class A repeats by in vitro enzyme assays suggested a major role of GalNAc-T11. This was supported by expression of LDLR in HEK293 cells, where knock-out of the GalNAc-T11 isoform resulted in the loss...

  20. A randomized trial and novel SPR technique identifies altered lipoprotein-LDL receptor binding as a mechanism underlying elevated LDL-cholesterol in APOE4s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabuig-Navarro, M. V.; Jackson, K. G.; Kemp, C. F.; Leake, D. S.; Walden, C. M.; Lovegrove, J. A.; Minihane, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    At a population level APOE4 carriers (~25% Caucasians) are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases. The penetrance of genotype is however variable and influenced by dietary fat composition, with the APOE4 allele associated with greater LDL-cholesterol elevation in response to saturated fatty acids (SFA). The etiology of this greater responsiveness is unknown. Here a novel surface plasmon resonance technique (SPR) is developed and used, along with hepatocyte (with the liver being the main organ modulating lipoprotein metabolism and plasma lipid levels) uptake studies to establish the impact of dietary fatty acid composition on, lipoprotein-LDL receptor (LDLR) binding, and hepatocyte uptake, according to APOE genotype status. In men prospectively recruited according to APOE genotype (APOE3/3 common genotype, or APOE3/E4), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) were isolated at fasting and 4–6 h following test meals rich in SFA, unsaturated fat and SFA with fish oil. In APOE4s a greater LDLR binding affinity of postprandial TRL after SFA, and lower LDL binding and hepatocyte internalization, provide mechanisms for the greater LDL-cholesterol raising effect. The SPR technique developed may be used for the future study of the impact of genotype, and physiological and behavioral variables on lipoprotein metabolism. Trial registration number NCT01522482. PMID:28276521

  1. Distinct Functional Domains Contribute to Degradation of the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) by the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Inducible Degrader of the LDLR (IDOL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Scheer, Lilith; Santos, Ana; Reits, Eric; Bleijlevens, Boris; Zelcer, Noam

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified the liver X receptor-regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the LDL receptor (IDOL) as a modulator of lipoprotein metabolism. Acting as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, IDOL triggers ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). We demonstrate here that this outcome requires the conserved FERM and RING domains present in IDOL. The RING domain promotes ubiquitination in vitro and Lys-63-specific ubiquitination of the LDLR in vivo in response to IDOL or liver X receptor activation. We further identify RING residues that differentially influence ubiquitination of the LDLR or stability of IDOL. The FERM domain interacts with the LDLR and in living cells co-localizes with the receptor at the plasma membrane. Homology modeling revealed a phosphotyrosine-binding element embedded in the FERM domain. Mutating residues within this region or residues in the LDLR preceding the NPVY endocytosis motif abrogate LDLR degradation by IDOL. Collectively, our results indicate that both the FERM and RING domains are required for promoting lysosomal degradation of the LDLR by IDOL. Our findings may facilitate development of structure-based IDOL inhibitors aimed at increasing LDLR abundance in therapeutic strategies to treat cardiovascular disease. PMID:21734303

  2. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 6 (LRP6 Is a Novel Nutritional Therapeutic Target for Hyperlipidemia, Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwang-woong Go

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6 is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family and has a unique structure, which facilitates its multiple functions as a co-receptor for Wnt/β-catenin signaling and as a ligand receptor for endocytosis. The role LRP6 plays in metabolic regulation, specifically in the nutrient-sensing pathway, has recently garnered considerable interest. Patients carrying an LRP6 mutation exhibit elevated levels of LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose, which cooperatively constitute the risk factors of metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Since the discovery of this mutation, the general role of LRP6 in lipid homeostasis, glucose metabolism, and atherosclerosis has been thoroughly researched. These studies have demonstrated that LRP6 plays a role in LDL receptor-mediated LDL uptake. In addition, when the LRP6 mutant impaired Wnt-LRP6 signaling, hyperlipidemia, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis developed. LRP6 regulates lipid homeostasis and body fat mass via the nutrient-sensing mechanistic target of the rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Furthermore, the mutant LRP6 triggers atherosclerosis by activating platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-dependent vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation. This review highlights the exceptional opportunities to study the pathophysiologic contributions of LRP6 to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases, which implicate LRP6 as a latent regulator of lipid metabolism and a novel therapeutic target for nutritional intervention.

  3. Altered hepatic lipid metabolism in mice lacking both the melanocortin type 4 receptor and low density lipoprotein receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garten, Antje; Popkova, Yulia; Penke, Melanie; Franke, Christin; Ricken, Albert; Schulz, Angela; Kiess, Wieland; Huster, Daniel; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schiller, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is often associated with dyslipidemia and hepatosteatosis. A number of animal models of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are established but they significantly differ in the molecular and biochemical changes depending on the genetic modification and diet used. Mice deficient for melanocortin type 4 receptor (Mc4rmut) develop hyperphagia, obesity, and subsequently NAFLD already under regular chow and resemble more closely the energy supply-driven obesity found in humans. This animal model was used to assess the molecular and biochemical consequences of hyperphagia-induced obesity on hepatic lipid metabolism. We analyzed transcriptome changes in Mc4rmut mice by RNA sequencing and used high resolution 1H magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to assess changes in the lipid composition. On the transcriptomic level we found significant changes in components of the triacylglycerol metabolism, unsaturated fatty acids biosynthesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathways, and lipid transport and storage compared to the wild-type. These findings were supported by increases in triacylglycerol, monounsaturated fatty acid, and arachidonic acid levels. The transcriptome signatures significantly differ from those of other NAFLD mouse models supporting the concept of hepatic subphenotypes depending on the genetic background and diet. Comparative analyses of our data with previous studies allowed for the identification of common changes and genotype-specific components and pathways involved in obesity-associated NAFLD. PMID:28207798

  4. Salidroside Decreases Atherosclerotic Plaque Formation in Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu-Chun Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Salidroside is isolated from Rhodiola rosea and is one of the main active components in Rhodiola species. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of Salidroside on atherosclerotic plaque formation in high-fat diet-(HFD- fed female LDL receptor knockout (LDLr-/- mice. LDLr-/- mice fed an atherogenic HFD for 12 weeks were divided into two groups. One group was administered Salidroside (50 mg/kg/oral gavage daily for 8 weeks, while the control group was administered saline. Salidroside treatment reduced serum lipids levels and the plaque area through the arch to the abdominal aorta. Furthermore, Salidroside improved macrophage content and enhanced collagen and smooth muscle cells contents in the aortic sinus. These changes were associated with reduced MCP-1, VCAM-1, and VCAM-1 protein expression in atherosclerotic aortas. All these results suggest that Salidroside decreases atherosclerotic plaques formation via effects on lipid lowering and anti-inflammation in HFD-fed LDLr−/− mice.

  5. Differential effect on TCR:CD3 stimulation of a 90-kD glycoprotein (gp90/Mac-2BP), a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain protein family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestri, B; Calderazzo, F; Coppola, V;

    1998-01-01

    We studied the effects of a 90-kD glycoprotein (gp90/Mac-2BP) belonging to the scavenger receptor family, present in normal serum and at increased levels in inflammatory disease and cancer patients, on some T cell function parameters. Whereas the lymphocyte proliferative response to non-specific ......We studied the effects of a 90-kD glycoprotein (gp90/Mac-2BP) belonging to the scavenger receptor family, present in normal serum and at increased levels in inflammatory disease and cancer patients, on some T cell function parameters. Whereas the lymphocyte proliferative response to non...

  6. Activation of intestinal peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α increases high-density lipoprotein production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Sophie; Briand, Olivier; Touche, Véronique; Wouters, Kristiaan; Baron, Morgane; Pattou, François; Hanf, Rémy; Tailleux, Anne; Chinetti, Giulia; Staels, Bart; Lestavel, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Aims Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) α is a transcription factor controlling lipid metabolism in liver, heart, muscle and macrophages. PPARα-activation increases plasma HDL-cholesterol and exerts hypotriglyceridemic actions via the liver. However, the intestine expresses PPARα, produces HDL and chylomicrons and is exposed to diet-derived PPARα ligands. Therefore, we examined the effects of PPARα-activation on intestinal lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Methods and Results The impact of PPARα-activation was evaluated in term of HDL-related gene expression in mice, ex-vivo in human jejunal biopsies and in Caco-2/TC7 cells. ApoAI/HDL secretion, cholesterol esterification and trafficking were also studied in-vitro. In parallel to improving plasma lipid profiles and increasing liver and intestinal expression of fatty-acid-oxidation genes, treatment with the dual PPARα/δ-ligand GFT505 resulted in a more pronounced increase of plasma HDL compared to fenofibrate in mice. GFT505, but not fenofibrate, increased the expression of HDL-production genes such as apolipoprotein-AI and ATP-Binding-Cassette-A1 transporter in murine intestines. A similar increase was observed upon PPARα-activation of human biopsies and Caco-2/TC7 cells. Additionally, HDL secretion by Caco-2/TC7 cells increased. Moreover, PPARα-activation decreased the cholesterol-esterification capacity of Caco-2/TC7 cells, modified cholesterol trafficking and reduced apolipoprotein-B secretion. Conclusions PPARα-activation reduces cholesterol esterification, suppresses chylomicron- and increases HDL-secretion by enterocytes. These results identify the intestine as a target organ of PPARα-ligands with entero-hepatic tropism to reduce atherogenic dyslipidemia. PMID:22843443

  7. Association of the Lipoprotein Receptor SCARB1 Common Missense Variant rs4238001 with Incident Coronary Heart Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Manichaikul

    Full Text Available Previous studies in mice and humans have implicated the lipoprotein receptor SCARB1 in association with atherosclerosis and lipid levels. In the current study, we sought to examine association of SCARB1 missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs4238001 with incident coronary heart disease (CHD.Genotypes for rs4238001 were imputed for 2,319 White, 1,570 African American, and 1,292 Hispanic-American MESA participants using the 1,000 Genomes reference set. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine association of rs4238001 with incident CHD, with adjustments for age, sex, study site, principal components of ancestry, body mass index, diabetes status, serum creatinine, lipid levels, hypertension status, education and smoking exposure. Meta-analysis across race/ethnic groups within MESA showed statistically significant association of the T allele with higher risk of CHD under a consistent and formally adjudicated definition of CHD events in this contemporary cohort study (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.49, 95% CI [1.04, 2.14], P = 0.028. Analyses combining MESA with additional population-based cohorts expanded our samples in Whites (total n = 11,957 with 871 CHD events and African Americans (total n = 5,962 with 355 CHD events and confirmed an increased risk of CHD overall (HR of 1.19 with 95% CI [1.04, 1.37], P = 0.013, in African Americans (HR of 1.49 with 95% CI [1.07, 2.06], P = 0.019, in males (HR of 1.29 with 95% CI [1.08, 1.54], P = 4.91 x 10(-3 and in White males (HR of 1.24 with 95% CI [1.03, 1.51], P = 0.026.SCARB1 missense rs4238001 is statistically significantly associated with incident CHD across a large population of multiple race/ethnic groups.

  8. Transcriptional Activation of Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene by DJ-1 and Effect of DJ-1 on Cholesterol Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Kato, Izumi; Niki, Takeshi; Goldberg, Matthew S.; Shen, Jie; Ishimoto, Kenji; Doi, Takefumi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2012-01-01

    DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and also causative gene for familial Parkinson’s disease park7. DJ-1 has multiple functions that include transcriptional regulation, anti-oxidative reaction and chaperone and mitochondrial regulation. For transcriptional regulation, DJ-1 acts as a coactivator that binds to various transcription factors, resulting in stimulation or repression of the expression of their target genes. In this study, we found the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene is a transcriptional target gene for DJ-1. Reduced expression of LDLR mRNA and protein was observed in DJ-1-knockdown cells and DJ-1-knockout mice and this occurred at the transcription level. Reporter gene assays using various deletion and point mutations of the LDLR promoter showed that DJ-1 stimulated promoter activity by binding to the sterol regulatory element (SRE) with sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) and that stimulating activity of DJ-1 toward LDLR promoter activity was enhanced by oxidation of DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, gel-mobility shift and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that DJ-1 made a complex with SREBP on the SRE. Furthermore, it was found that serum LDL cholesterol level was increased in DJ-1-knockout male, but not female, mice and that the increased serum LDL cholesterol level in DJ-1-knockout male mice was cancelled by administration with estrogen, suggesting that estrogen compensates the increased level of serum LDL cholesterol in DJ-1-knockout female mice. This is the first report that DJ-1 participates in metabolism of fatty acid synthesis through transcriptional regulation of the LDLR gene. PMID:22666465

  9. Transcriptional activation of low-density lipoprotein receptor gene by DJ-1 and effect of DJ-1 on cholesterol homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiori Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and also causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease park7. DJ-1 has multiple functions that include transcriptional regulation, anti-oxidative reaction and chaperone and mitochondrial regulation. For transcriptional regulation, DJ-1 acts as a coactivator that binds to various transcription factors, resulting in stimulation or repression of the expression of their target genes. In this study, we found the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR gene is a transcriptional target gene for DJ-1. Reduced expression of LDLR mRNA and protein was observed in DJ-1-knockdown cells and DJ-1-knockout mice and this occurred at the transcription level. Reporter gene assays using various deletion and point mutations of the LDLR promoter showed that DJ-1 stimulated promoter activity by binding to the sterol regulatory element (SRE with sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP and that stimulating activity of DJ-1 toward LDLR promoter activity was enhanced by oxidation of DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, gel-mobility shift and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that DJ-1 made a complex with SREBP on the SRE. Furthermore, it was found that serum LDL cholesterol level was increased in DJ-1-knockout male, but not female, mice and that the increased serum LDL cholesterol level in DJ-1-knockout male mice was cancelled by administration with estrogen, suggesting that estrogen compensates the increased level of serum LDL cholesterol in DJ-1-knockout female mice. This is the first report that DJ-1 participates in metabolism of fatty acid synthesis through transcriptional regulation of the LDLR gene.

  10. Association between low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 gene polymorphisms and bone mineral density variation in Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Wang

    Full Text Available Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 gene (LRP2 is located next to the genomic region showing suggestive linkage with both hip and wrist bone mineral density (BMD phenotypes. LRP2 knockout mice showed severe vitamin D deficiency and bone disease, indicating the involvement of LRP2 in the preservation of vitamin D metabolites and delivery of the precursor to the kidney for the generation of 1α,25(OH(2D(3. In order to investigate the contribution of LRP2 gene polymorphisms to the variation of BMD in Chinese population, a total of 330 Chinese female-offspring nuclear families with 1088 individuals and 400 Chinese male-offspring nuclear families with 1215 individuals were genotyped at six tagSNPs of the LRP2 gene (rs2389557, rs2544381, rs7600336, rs10210408, rs2075252 and rs4667591. BMD values at the lumbar spine 1-4 (L1-4 and hip sites were measured by DXA. The association between LRP2 polymorphisms and BMD phenotypes was assessed by quantitative transmission disequilibrium tests (QTDTs in female- and male-offspring nuclear families separately. In the female-offspring nuclear families, rs2075252 and haplotype GA of rs4667591 and rs2075252 were identified in the nominally significant total association with peak BMD at L1-4; however, no significant within-family association was found between peak BMD at the L1-4 and hip sites and six tagSNPs or haplotypes. In male-offspring nuclear families, neither the six tagSNPs nor the haplotypes was in total association or within-family association with the peak BMD variation at the L1-4 and hip sites by QTDT analysis. Our findings suggested that the polymorphisms of LRP2 gene is not a major factor that contributes to the peak BMD variation in Chinese population.

  11. Low-density lipoprotein receptor genetic polymorphism in chronic hepatitis C virus Egyptian patients affects treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naga, Mazen; Amin, Mona; Algendy, Dina; Elbadry, Ahmed; Fawzi, May; Foda, Ayman; Esmat, Serag; Sabry, Dina; Rashed, Laila; Gabal, Samia; Kamal, Manal

    2015-10-21

    To correlate a genetic polymorphism of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor with antiviral responses in Egyptian chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. Our study included 657 HCV-infected patients with genotype 4 who received interferon-based combination therapy. Patients were divided into two groups based on their response to therapy: 356 were responders, and 301 were non-responders. Patients were compared to 160 healthy controls. All patients and controls underwent a thorough physical examination, measurement of body mass index (BMI) and the following laboratory tests: serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, albumin, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, prothrombin time, prothrombin concentration, INR, complete blood count, serum creatinine, fasting blood sugar, HCV antibody, and hepatitis B surface antigen. All HCV patients were further subjected to the following laboratory tests: HCV-RNA using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), antinuclear antibodies, thyroid-stimulating hormone, an LDL receptor (LDLR) genotype study of LDLR exon8c.1171G>A and exon10c.1413G>A using real-time PCR-based assays, abdominal ultrasonography, ultrasonographic-guided liver biopsy, and histopathological examination of liver biopsies. Correlations of LDL receptor polymorphisms with HAI, METAVIR score, presence of steatosis, and BMI were performed in all cases. There were no statistically significant differences in response rates between the different types of interferon used or LDLR exon10c.1413G>A. However, there was a significant difference in the frequency of the LDL receptor exon8c.1171G>A genotype between cases (AA: 25.9%, GA: 22.2%, GG: 51.9%) and controls (AA: 3.8%, GA: 53.1% and GG: 43.1%) (P A polymorphism between responders (AA: 3.6%, GA: 15.2%, GG: 81.2%) and non-responders (AA: 52.2%, GA: 30.6%, GG: 17.2%) (P A predominated in cases and controls over the A allele, and a statistically significant association with

  12. Identification of the bacteria-binding peptide domain on salivary agglutinin (gp-340/DMBT1), a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikker, Floris J; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Nazmi, Kamran

    2002-01-01

    Salivary agglutinin is encoded by DMBT1 and identical to gp-340, a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily. Salivary agglutinin/DMBT1 is known for its Streptococcus mutans agglutinating properties. This 300-400 kDa glycoprotein is composed of conserved peptide motifs: 14...... SRCR domains that are separated by SRCR-interspersed domains (SIDs), 2 CUB (C1r/C1s Uegf Bmp1) domains, and a zona pellucida domain. We have searched for the peptide domains of agglutinin/DMBT1 responsible for bacteria binding. Digestion with endoproteinase Lys-C resulted in a protein fragment...... for the first time that the polymorphic SRCR domains of salivary agglutinin/DMBT1 mediate ligand interactions....

  13. Bacteria binding by DMBT1/SAG/gp-340 is confined to the VEVLXXXXW motif in its scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikker, Floris J; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; End, Caroline

    2004-01-01

    for group B. The protein DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumors 1), which is identical to salivary agglutinin and lung gp-340, belongs to the group B SRCR proteins and is considered to be involved in tumor suppression and host defense by pathogen binding. In a previous study we used nonoverlapping......The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) proteins form an archaic group of metazoan proteins characterized by the presence of SRCR domains. These proteins are classified in group A and B based on the number of conserved cysteine residues in their SRCR domains, i.e. six for group A and eight...... synthetic peptides covering the SRCR consensus sequence to identify a 16-amino acid bacteria-binding protein loop (peptide SRCRP2; QGRVEVLYRGSWGTVC) within the SRCR domains. In this study, using overlapping peptides, we pinpointed the minimal bacteria-binding site on SRCRP2, and thus DMBT1, to an 11-amino...

  14. A Novel Anti-Inflammatory Effect for High Density Lipoprotein.

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    Scott J Cameron

    Full Text Available High density lipoprotein has anti-inflammatory effects in addition to mediating reverse cholesterol transport. While many of the chronic anti-inflammatory effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL are attributed to changes in cell adhesion molecules, little is known about acute signal transduction events elicited by HDL in endothelial cells. We now show that high density lipoprotein decreases endothelial cell exocytosis, the first step in leukocyte trafficking. ApoA-I, a major apolipoprotein of HDL, mediates inhibition of endothelial cell exocytosis by interacting with endothelial scavenger receptor-BI which triggers an intracellular protective signaling cascade involving protein kinase C (PKC. Other apolipoproteins within the HDL particle have only modest effects upon endothelial exocytosis. Using a human primary culture of endothelial cells and murine apo-AI knockout mice, we show that apo-AI prevents endothelial cell exocytosis which limits leukocyte recruitment. These data suggest that high density lipoprotein may inhibit diseases associated with vascular inflammation in part by blocking endothelial exocytosis.

  15. Generation of a Potent Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Antagonist by Engineering a Stable Form of the Receptor-associated Protein (RAP) D3 Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Joni M; Migliorini, Mary; Galisteo, Rebeca; Strickland, Dudley K

    2015-07-10

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family and plays important roles in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Expression of LRP1 requires the receptor-associated protein (RAP), a molecular chaperone that binds LRP1 and other low density lipoprotein receptor family members in the endoplasmic reticulum and traffics with them to the Golgi where the acidic environment causes its dissociation. Exogenously added RAP is a potent LRP1 antagonist and binds to LRP1 on the cell surface, preventing ligands from binding. Following endocytosis, RAP dissociates in the acidic endosome, allowing LRP1 to recycle back to the cell surface. The acid-induced dissociation of RAP is mediated by its D3 domain, a relatively unstable three-helical bundle that denatures at pH RAP D3 domain. By combining this disulfide bond with elimination of key histidine residues, we generated a stable RAP molecule that is resistant to both pH- and heat-induced denaturation. This molecule bound to LRP1 with high affinity at both neutral and acidic pH and proved to be a potent inhibitor of LRP1 function both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that our stable RAP molecule may be useful in multiple pathological settings where LRP1 blockade has been shown to be effective. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Generation of a Potent Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Antagonist by Engineering a Stable Form of the Receptor-associated Protein (RAP) D3 Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Joni M.; Migliorini, Mary; Galisteo, Rebeca; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2015-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family and plays important roles in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Expression of LRP1 requires the receptor-associated protein (RAP), a molecular chaperone that binds LRP1 and other low density lipoprotein receptor family members in the endoplasmic reticulum and traffics with them to the Golgi where the acidic environment causes its dissociation. Exogenously added RAP is a potent LRP1 antagonist and binds to LRP1 on the cell surface, preventing ligands from binding. Following endocytosis, RAP dissociates in the acidic endosome, allowing LRP1 to recycle back to the cell surface. The acid-induced dissociation of RAP is mediated by its D3 domain, a relatively unstable three-helical bundle that denatures at pH RAP D3 domain. By combining this disulfide bond with elimination of key histidine residues, we generated a stable RAP molecule that is resistant to both pH- and heat-induced denaturation. This molecule bound to LRP1 with high affinity at both neutral and acidic pH and proved to be a potent inhibitor of LRP1 function both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that our stable RAP molecule may be useful in multiple pathological settings where LRP1 blockade has been shown to be effective. PMID:26013822

  17. Ethanol extract of propolis protects endothelial cells from oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced injury by inhibiting lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1-mediated oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yongqi; Li, Jinguo; Ding, Mingde; Xu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jiajun; Jiao, Peng; Han, Ping; Wang, Jiafu; Yao, Shutong

    2014-12-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), as the primary oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) receptor on endothelial cells, plays a crucial role in endothelial injury, which is a driving force in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. Our previous studies have shown that ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) promotes reverse cholesterol transport and inhibits atherosclerotic lesion development. However, the protective effects of EEP against ox-LDL-induced injury in endothelial cells and the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that EEP attenuates ox-LDL-induced endothelial oxidative injury via modulation of LOX-1-mediated oxidative stress. Our results showed that exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to ox-LDL (100 mg/L) led to the decrease in cell viability and increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, caspase-3 activation, and apoptosis, whereas pretreatment with EEP (7.5, 15 and 30 mg/L) protected against such damages in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, EEP mitigated ox-LDL uptake by HUVECs and attenuated ox-LDL-upregulated LOX-1 expression both at the mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, EEP suppressed the ox-LDL-induced oxidative stress as assessed by decreased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and malondialdehyde (MDA) generation as well as increased antioxidant enzyme activities. Similar results were observed in the anti-LOX-1 antibody or diphenyleneiodonium (DPI)-pretreated HUVECs. These data indicate that EEP may protect HUVECs from ox-LDL-induced injury and that the mechanism at least partially involves its ability to inhibit endothelial LOX-1 upregulation and subsequent oxidative stress. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  18. 25(OH) vitamin D suppresses macrophage adhesion and migration by downregulation of ER stress and scavenger receptor A1 in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riek, Amy E; Oh, Jisu; Darwech, Isra; Moynihan, Clare E; Bruchas, Robin R; Bernal-Mizrachi, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Vitamin D deficiency is not only more prevalent in diabetics but also doubles the risk of developing CVD. However, it is unknown whether 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D3] replacement slows monocyte adhesion and migration, critical mechanisms involved in atherosclerosis progression. In this study, monocytes from vitamin D-deficient diabetic patients were cultured either in the patient's serum or in vitamin D-deficient media with or without 25(OH)D3 treatment. Adding 25(OH)D3 to monocytes cultured in vitamin D-deficient serum or media decreased monocyte adhesion to fibronectin and migration stimulated by monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1). Accordingly, 25(OH)D3 decreased adhesion marker β1- and β2-integrin expression and migration receptor chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) expression. 25(OH)D3 treatment downregulated monocyte endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and scavenger receptor class A, type 1 (SR-A1) expression. The absence of SR-A1 prevented the increased macrophage adhesion and migration induced by vitamin D deficiency. Moreover, the absence of SR-A1 prevented the induction of adhesion and migration and expression of their associated membrane receptors by Thapsigargin, an ER stress inducer. These results identify cellular activation of monocyte/macrophage vitamin D signaling through 25(OH)D3 as a potential mechanism that could modulate adhesion and migration in diabetic subjects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '16th Vitamin D Workshop'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Interactions among the glucocorticoid receptor, lipoprotein lipase and adrenergic receptor genes and abdominal fat in the Québec Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukkola, O; Pérusse, L; Chagnon, Y C; Després, J P; Bouchard, C

    2001-09-01

    To investigate whether interactions between glucocorticoid receptor (GRL), lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and adrenergic receptor (ADR) gene markers contribute to individual differences in indicators of adiposity and abdominal obesity, including visceral fat level. Cross-sectional study; 742 individuals from the phase 2 of the Québec Family Study cohort. Total body fat assessed by hydrodensitometry and the sum of six skinfolds. Abdominal fat areas measured by computed tomography and adjusted for age, sex and total fat mass in all analyses. GRL Bcl I, alpha 2A-ADR Dra I and beta 2-ADR Ban I markers were typed by Southern blot, and other markers by polymerase chain reaction technique. It is confirmed that the 4.5 kb allele of the GRL BclI polymorphism is associated with a higher amount of abdominal visceral fat (AVF) depot (P for trend<0.001) independent of the level of total body fat. Furthermore, the alpha 2-ADR Dra I variant is associated with lower cross-sectional areas of abdominal total (P=0.003) and subcutaneous (P=0.012) adipose tissue. Gene-gene interactions between GRL and alpha 2-ADR genes affecting overall adiposity (P=0.016) as well as between GRL and beta 2-ADR genes (P=0.049) having influence on total abdominal fat levels were observed. When the three genes were considered together in the same analysis, significant interactions having influence on overall adiposity (P=0.017), abdominal total (P=0.032) and visceral fat (P=0.002) were observed. About 1-2% of the total variation in total fatness and abdominal fat was explained by these gene-gene interactions. There is an association between the GRL BclI polymorphism and increased AVF levels independent of the level of total body fat. The alpha 2-ADR DraI variant is associated with a lower cross-sectional area of abdominal total fat. Numerous interactions between GRL and ADR markers on overall adiposity and total abdominal fat as well as between GRL, LPL and ADR genes on overall adiposity, abdominal total and

  20. Role of sphingosine 1-phosphate in anti-atherogenic actions of high-density lipoprotein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koichi; Sato; Fumikazu; Okajima

    2010-01-01

    The reverse cholesterol transport mediated by highdensity lipoprotein(HDL)is an important mechanism for maintaining body cholesterol,and hence,the crucial anti-atherogenic action of the lipoprotein.Recent studies,however,have shown that HDL exerts a variety of anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic actions independently of cholesterol metabolism.The present review provides an overview of the roles of sphingosine 1-phosphate(S1P)/S1P receptor and apolipoprotein A-I/ scavenger receptor class B typeⅠsystems in the antiatherogenic HDL actions.In addition,the physiological significance of the existence of S1P in the HDL particles is discussed.

  1. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein/Apolipoprotein E receptor and assignment of the gene to chromosome 9pter-p23[sup 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gafvels, M.E.; Strauss, J.F. III (Univ. of Pennyslvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Caird, M.; Patterson, D. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, Denver, CO (United States)); Britt, D.; Jackson, C.L. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

    1993-11-01

    The authors report the cloning of a 3656-bp cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)/apolipoprotein E (ApoE) receptor. The gene encoding this protein was mapped to chromosome 9pter-p23. Northern analysis of human RNA identified cognate mRNAs of 6.0 and 3.8 kb with most abundant expression in heart and skeletal muscle, followed by kidney, placenta, pancreas, and brain. The pattern of expression generally paralleled that of lipoprotein lipase mRNA but differed from that of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/[alpha][sub 2]-macroglobulin receptor (LRP), which are members of the same gene family. VLDL/ApoE receptor message was not detected in liver, whereas mRNAs for both LDL receptor and LRP were found in hepatic tissue. In mouse 3T3-L1 cells, VLDL/ApoE receptor mRNA was induced during the transformation of the cells into adipocytes. Expression was also detected in human choriocarcinoma cells, suggesting that at least part of the expression observed in placenta may be in trophoblasts, cells which would be exposed to maternal blood. Expression in brain may be related to high levels of ApoE expression in that organ, an observation of potential relevance to the recently hypothesized role for ApoE in late onset Alzheimer disease. The results suggest that the putative VLDL/ApoE receptor could play a role in the uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles by specific organs including striated and cardiac muscle and adipose tissue and in the transport of maternal lipids across the placenta. The findings presented here, together with recent observations from other laboratories, bring up the possibility that a single gene, the VLDL/ApoE receptor, may play a role in the pathogenesis of certain forms of atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and obesity.

  2. Lipoprotein-Free Mitotane Exerts High Cytotoxic Activity in Adrenocortical Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hescot, Ségolène; Seck, Atmane; Guerin, Maryse; Cockenpot, Florence; Huby, Thierry; Broutin, Sophie; Young, Jacques; Paci, Angelo; Baudin, Eric; Lombès, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Mitotane (o,p'-DDD), the only approved drug for advanced adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC), is a lipophilic agent that accumulates into circulating lipoprotein fractions and high-lipid-containing tissues. The aim of our study was to evaluate the in vivo and in vitro biological implication of serum lipoproteins on pharmacological action of mitotane. Distribution and concentration of mitotane were studied in plasma and adrenal tissue samples from mitotane-treated patients. The effect of lipoprotein-bound or lipoprotein-free (LP-F) mitotane was analyzed on proliferation and apoptosis of human adrenocortical H295R cells. A retrospective study of patients with ACC treated or not with statins was also performed. o,p'-DDD distribution among very low-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and LP-F fractions obtained after plasma ultracentrifugation of 23 of mitotane-treated patients was widely distributed in each subfraction. A positive correlation was observed between mitotane levels in plasma and in LDL, HDL, but also LP-F compartment. Intratumor o,p'-DDD concentrations in five ACC samples of mitotane-treated patients were found to be independent of cholesterol transporter expression, scavenger receptors, and LDL receptors. In vitro studies showed significant higher antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects and higher cell and mitochondrial uptake of mitotane when H295R cells were grown in LP-F medium. Finally, retrospective study of an ACC cohort of 26 mitotane-treated patients revealed that statin therapy was significantly associated with a higher rate of tumor control. Altogether, our in vitro and in vivo studies provided compelling evidence for a greater efficacy of LP-F mitotane. Patients with ACC may thus benefit from therapeutic strategies that aim to increase LP-F mitotane fraction.

  3. Antagonism of scavenger receptor CD36 by 5A peptide prevents chronic kidney disease progression in mice independent of blood pressure regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Ana Carolina P; Bocharov, Alexander V; Baranova, Irina N; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G; Huang, Yuning G; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Hu, Xuzhen; Street, Jonathan M; Alvarez-Prats, Alejandro; Mullick, Adam E; Patterson, Amy P; Remaley, Alan T; Eggerman, Thomas L; Yuen, Peter S T; Star, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Scavenger receptor CD36 participates in lipid metabolism and inflammatory pathways important for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Few pharmacological agents are available to slow the progression of CKD. However, apolipoprotein A-I-mimetic peptide 5A antagonizes CD36 in vitro. To test the efficacy of 5A, and to test the role of CD36 during CKD, we compared wild-type to CD36 knockout mice and wild-type mice treated with 5A, in a progressive CKD model that resembles human disease. Knockout and 5A-treated wild-type mice were protected from CKD progression without changes in blood pressure and had reductions in cardiovascular risk surrogate markers that are associated with CKD. Treatment with 5A did not further protect CD36 knockout mice from CKD progression, implicating CD36 as its main site of action. In a separate model of kidney fibrosis, 5A-treated wild-type mice had less macrophage infiltration and interstitial fibrosis. Peptide 5A exerted anti-inflammatory effects in the kidney and decreased renal expression of inflammasome genes. Thus, CD36 is a new therapeutic target for CKD and its associated cardiovascular risk factors. Peptide 5A may be a promising new agent to slow CKD progression.

  4. Enhanced expression of hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 in accumulated macrophages within filtered debris between acute coronary syndromes and stable angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takao; Kameyama, Tomoki; Noto, Takahisa; Ueno, Hiroshi; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Coronary intraplaque hemorrhage up-regulates hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 expression on macrophages, and has an association with vulnerable plaque development. During percutaneous coronary intervention, mechanical plaque disruption exposes potentially embolic atheromatous contents from culprit plaque.In 37 patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP, n = 20) or acute coronary syndrome (ACS, n = 17), atherothrombotic debris was collected using a filter-based distal embolic protection device. We immunohistochemically determined CD14-positive macrophages and CD163-positive macrophages in filtered debris. We also examined the relation of CD14- and CD163-positive macrophages with culprit plaque volume and components evaluated with ultrasonic tissue characterization (VH-IVUS).The only significant difference in clinical characteristics between the two groups was in hs-CRP. In ACS, the percentage of CD14- and CD163-positive macrophages to the whole cells (%CD14 and %CD163, respectively) was significantly higher than that in SAP (20.1 ± 8.2 versus 8.8 ± 6.8%, P CD163 had a significant positive correlation with %NC (%CD14: r = 0.40, P = 0.01 and %CD163: r = 0.45, P = 0.01), but only %CD163 was negatively correlated with %Fibrous (%CD163: r = -0.48, P = 0.01).These findings suggest that the presence of CD14- and CD163-positive macrophages may reflect plaque inflammation, NC expansion, and plaque vulnerability in patients with coronary heart disease.

  5. Decreased infiltration of macrophage scavenger receptor-positive cells in initial negative biopsy specimens is correlated with positive repeat biopsies of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonomura, Norio; Takayama, Hitoshi; Kawashima, Atsunari; Mukai, Masatoshi; Nagahara, Akira; Nakai, Yasutomo; Nakayama, Masashi; Tsujimura, Akira; Nishimura, Kazuo; Aozasa, Katsuyuki; Okuyama, Akihiko

    2010-06-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptor (MSR)-positive inflammatory cells and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been reported to regulate the growth of various cancers. In this study, the infiltration of MSR-positive cells and TAMs was analyzed to predict the outcome of repeat biopsy in men diagnosed as having no malignancy at the first prostate biopsy. Repeat biopsy of the prostate was carried out in 92 patients who were diagnosed as having no malignancy at the first biopsy. Of these, 30 patients (32.6%) were positive for prostate cancer at the repeat biopsy. Tumor-associated macrophages and MSR-positive cells were immunohistochemically stained with mAbs CD68 and CD204, respectively. Six ocular measuring fields were chosen randomly under a microscope at x400 power in the initial negative biopsy specimens, and the mean TAM and MSR counts for each case were determined. No difference in TAM count was found between the cases with or without prostate cancer. By contrast, the MSR count in patients with cancer was significantly lower than that in patients without cancer at the repeat biopsy (P biopsies, or TAM count. Decreased infiltration of MSR-positive cells in negative first biopsy specimens was correlated with positive findings in the repeat biopsy. The MSR count might be a good indicator for avoiding unnecessary repeat biopsies.

  6. Familial hypercholesterolemia in St-Petersburg: the known and novel mutations found in the low density lipoprotein receptor gene in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, Faina M; Damgaard, Dorte; Mandelshtam, Michail Y; Golubkov, Valery I; Nissen, Peter H; Nilsen, Gitte G; Stenderup, Anette; Lipovetsky, Boris M; Konstantinov, Vladimir O; Denisenko, Alexander D; Vasilyev, Vadim B; Faergeman, Ole

    2005-02-08

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a human monogenic disease caused by population-specific mutations in the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene. Despite thirteen different mutations of the LDL receptor gene were reported from Russia prior to 2003, the whole spectrum of disease-causing gene alterations in this country is poorly known and requires further investigation provided by the current study. Forty-five patients with clinical diagnosis of FH were tested for the apolipoprotein B (apoB) mutation R3500Q by restriction fragment length analysis. After exclusion of R3500Q mutation high-sensitive fluorescent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and automatic DNA sequencing were used to search for mutations in the LDL receptor gene. We found twenty one rare sequence variations of the LDL receptor gene. Nineteen were probably pathogenic mutations, and two (P518P, T705I) were considered as neutral ones. Among the mutations likely to be pathogenic, eight were novel (c.670-671insG, C249X, c.936-940del5, c.1291-1331del41, W422X, c.1855-1856insA, D601N, C646S), and eleven (Q12X, IVS3+1G>A, c.651-653del3, E207X, c.925-931del7, C308Y, L380H, c.1302delG, IVS9+1G>A, V776M, V806I) have already been described in other populations. None of the patients had the R3500Q mutation in the apoB gene. Nineteen pathogenic mutations in the LDL receptor gene in 23 probands were identified. Two mutations c.925-931del7 and L380H are shared by St.-Petersburg population with neighbouring Finland and several other mutations with Norway, Sweden or Denmark, i.e. countries from the Baltic Sea region. Only four mutations (c.313+1G>A, c.651-653del3, C308Y and W422X) were recurrent as all those were found in two unrelated families. By this study the number of known mutations in the LDL receptor gene in St.-Petersburg area was increased nearly threefold. Analysis of all 34 low density lipoprotein receptor gene mutations found in St.-Petersburg argues against strong founder

  7. Familial hypercholesterolemia in St.-Petersburg: the known and novel mutations found in the low density lipoprotein receptor gene in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinov Vladimir O

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial hypercholesterolemia is a human monogenic disease caused by population-specific mutations in the low density lipoprotein (LDL receptor gene. Despite thirteen different mutations of the LDL receptor gene were reported from Russia prior to 2003, the whole spectrum of disease-causing gene alterations in this country is poorly known and requires further investigation provided by the current study. Methods Forty-five patients with clinical diagnosis of FH were tested for the apolipoprotein B (apoB mutation R3500Q by restriction fragment length analysis. After exclusion of R3500Q mutation high-sensitive fluorescent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP analysis and automatic DNA sequencing were used to search for mutations in the LDL receptor gene. Results We found twenty one rare sequence variations of the LDL receptor gene. Nineteen were probably pathogenic mutations, and two (P518P, T705I were considered as neutral ones. Among the mutations likely to be pathogenic, eight were novel (c.670-671insG, C249X, c.936-940del5, c.1291-1331del41, W422X, c.1855-1856insA, D601N, C646S, and eleven (Q12X, IVS3+1G>A, c.651-653del3, E207X, c.925-931del7, C308Y, L380H, c.1302delG, IVS9+1G>A, V776M, V806I have already been described in other populations. None of the patients had the R3500Q mutation in the apoB gene. Conclusions Nineteen pathogenic mutations in the LDL receptor gene in 23 probands were identified. Two mutations c.925-931del7 and L380H are shared by St.-Petersburg population with neighbouring Finland and several other mutations with Norway, Sweden or Denmark, i.e. countries from the Baltic Sea region. Only four mutations (c.313+1G>A, c.651-653del3, C308Y and W422X were recurrent as all those were found in two unrelated families. By this study the number of known mutations in the LDL receptor gene in St.-Petersburg area was increased nearly threefold. Analysis of all 34 low density lipoprotein receptor gene

  8. Brain ischaemia induces shedding of a BDNF-scavenger ectodomain from TrkB receptors by excitotoxicity activation of metalloproteinases and γ-secretases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda, Gonzalo S; Ayuso-Dolado, Sara; Arbeteta, Raquel; Esteban-Ortega, Gema M; Vidaurre, Oscar G; Díaz-Guerra, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    Stroke remains a leading cause of death and disability in the world with limited therapies available to restrict brain damage or improve functional recovery after cerebral ischaemia. A promising strategy currently under investigation is the promotion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling through tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptors, a pathway essential for neuronal survival and function. However, TrkB and BDNF-signalling are impaired by excitotoxicity, a primary pathological process in stroke also associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Pathological imbalance of TrkB isoforms is critical in neurodegeneration and is caused by calpain processing of BDNF high affinity full-length receptor (TrkB-FL) and an inversion of the transcriptional pattern of the Ntrk2 gene, to favour expression of the truncated isoform TrkB-T1 over TrkB-FL. We report here that both TrkB-FL and neuronal TrkB-T1 also undergo ectodomain shedding by metalloproteinases activated after ischaemic injury or excitotoxic damage of cortical neurons. Subsequently, the remaining membrane-bound C-terminal fragments (CTFs) are cleaved by γ-secretases within the transmembrane region, releasing their intracellular domains (ICDs) into the cytosol. Therefore, we identify TrkB-FL and TrkB-T1 as new substrates of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), a mechanism that highly contributes to TrkB-T1 regulation in ischaemia but is minor for TrkB-FL which is mainly processed by calpain. However, since the secreted TrkB ectodomain acts as a BDNF scavenger and significantly alters BDNF/TrkB signalling, the mechanism of RIP could contribute to neuronal death in excitotoxicity. These results are highly relevant since they reveal new targets for the rational design of therapies to treat stroke and other pathologies with an excitotoxic component.

  9. Extra-epitopic hepatitis C virus polymorphisms confer resistance to broadly neutralizing antibodies by modulating binding to scavenger receptor B1

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Diwany, Ramy; Mankowski, Madeleine C.; Wasilewski, Lisa N.; Brady, Jillian K.; Snider, Anna E.; Osburn, William O.; Murrell, Ben; Ray, Stuart C.

    2017-01-01

    Broadly-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) may guide vaccine development for highly variable viruses including hepatitis C virus (HCV), since they target conserved viral epitopes that could serve as vaccine antigens. However, HCV resistance to bNAbs could reduce the efficacy of a vaccine. HC33.4 and AR4A are two of the most potent anti-HCV human bNAbs characterized to date, binding to highly conserved epitopes near the amino- and carboxy-terminus of HCV envelope (E2) protein, respectively. Given their distinct epitopes, it was surprising that these bNAbs showed similar neutralization profiles across a panel of natural HCV isolates, suggesting that some viral polymorphisms may confer resistance to both bNAbs. To investigate this resistance, we developed a large, diverse panel of natural HCV envelope variants and a novel computational method to identify bNAb resistance polymorphisms in envelope proteins (E1 and E2). By measuring neutralization of a panel of HCV pseudoparticles by 10 μg/mL of each bNAb, we identified E1E2 variants with resistance to one or both bNAbs, despite 100% conservation of the AR4A binding epitope across the panel. We discovered polymorphisms outside of either binding epitope that modulate resistance to both bNAbs by altering E2 binding to the HCV co-receptor, scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1). This study is focused on a mode of neutralization escape not addressed by conventional analysis of epitope conservation, highlighting the contribution of extra-epitopic polymorphisms to bNAb resistance and presenting a novel mechanism by which HCV might persist even in the face of an antibody response targeting multiple conserved epitopes. PMID:28235087

  10. Extra-epitopic hepatitis C virus polymorphisms confer resistance to broadly neutralizing antibodies by modulating binding to scavenger receptor B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Diwany, Ramy; Cohen, Valerie J; Mankowski, Madeleine C; Wasilewski, Lisa N; Brady, Jillian K; Snider, Anna E; Osburn, William O; Murrell, Ben; Ray, Stuart C; Bailey, Justin R

    2017-02-01

    Broadly-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) may guide vaccine development for highly variable viruses including hepatitis C virus (HCV), since they target conserved viral epitopes that could serve as vaccine antigens. However, HCV resistance to bNAbs could reduce the efficacy of a vaccine. HC33.4 and AR4A are two of the most potent anti-HCV human bNAbs characterized to date, binding to highly conserved epitopes near the amino- and carboxy-terminus of HCV envelope (E2) protein, respectively. Given their distinct epitopes, it was surprising that these bNAbs showed similar neutralization profiles across a panel of natural HCV isolates, suggesting that some viral polymorphisms may confer resistance to both bNAbs. To investigate this resistance, we developed a large, diverse panel of natural HCV envelope variants and a novel computational method to identify bNAb resistance polymorphisms in envelope proteins (E1 and E2). By measuring neutralization of a panel of HCV pseudoparticles by 10 μg/mL of each bNAb, we identified E1E2 variants with resistance to one or both bNAbs, despite 100% conservation of the AR4A binding epitope across the panel. We discovered polymorphisms outside of either binding epitope that modulate resistance to both bNAbs by altering E2 binding to the HCV co-receptor, scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1). This study is focused on a mode of neutralization escape not addressed by conventional analysis of epitope conservation, highlighting the contribution of extra-epitopic polymorphisms to bNAb resistance and presenting a novel mechanism by which HCV might persist even in the face of an antibody response targeting multiple conserved epitopes.

  11. The use of low density lipoprotein receptor activity of lymphocytes to determine the prevalence of familial hypercholesterolaemia in a rural South African community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, K; Weight, M J; Dando, B R; Christopher, K J; Rossouw, J E

    1989-01-01

    The diagnosis of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia in three rural South African communities in which hypercholesterolaemia is very prevalent could be confirmed by the measurement of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor activity in circulating lymphocytes. A nominal cut off point could be proposed which separated the LDL receptor activity of 24 clinically diagnosed heterozygous FH patients and 31 healthy people. LDL receptor activity was measured as total degradation of 125I-LDL and expressed as ng LDL/mg cell protein/6 hours. The cut off point was set at 970 ng/mg protein/6 hours. This proposed cut off point was tested by assaying the LDL receptor of three homozygous FH patients and seven of their obligate heterozygous FH first degree relatives. The three homozygous FH patients showed no receptor activity and the activity of the seven obligate heterozygous first degree relatives fell below the proposed cut off point. To determine the prevalence of FH in the study population, all persons aged 15 to 24 years whose total cholesterol levels fell above the 80th centile for their age and sex, as well as their families, were approached (n = 114). The LDL receptor activity in lymphocytes of 77 of these persons aged 15 to 24 years was determined after applying the exclusion criteria. Ten of the 77 participants had LDL receptor activity below 970 ng LDL/mg protein/6 hours and were therefore diagnosed as being heterozygous FH patients. The calculation of the prevalence (corrected for exclusions) revealed that one in 71 of the 15 to 24 year old permanent residents in the predominantly Afrikaans speaking community suffered from heterozygous FH. This is higher than any FH prevalence previously reported for any group. PMID:2918524

  12. Central nervous system neuropeptide Y signaling via the Y1 receptor partially dissociates feeding behavior from lipoprotein metabolism in lean rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Jennifer M; Stafford, John M; Saadat, Sanaz; Printz, Richard L; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Niswender, Kevin D

    2012-12-15

    Elevated plasma triglyceride (TG) levels contribute to an atherogenic dyslipidemia that is associated with obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Numerous models of obesity are characterized by increased central nervous system (CNS) neuropeptide Y (NPY) tone that contributes to excess food intake and obesity. Previously, we demonstrated that intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of NPY in lean fasted rats also elevates hepatic production of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG. Thus, we hypothesize that elevated CNS NPY action contributes to not only the pathogenesis of obesity but also dyslipidemia. Here, we sought to determine whether the effects of NPY on feeding and/or obesity are dissociable from effects on hepatic VLDL-TG secretion. Pair-fed, icv NPY-treated, chow-fed Long-Evans rats develop hypertriglyceridemia in the absence of increased food intake and body fat accumulation compared with vehicle-treated controls. We then modulated CNS NPY signaling by icv injection of selective NPY receptor agonists and found that Y1, Y2, Y4, and Y5 receptor agonists all induced hyperphagia in lean, ad libitum chow-fed Long-Evans rats, with the Y2 receptor agonist having the most pronounced effect. Next, we found that at equipotent doses for food intake NPY Y1 receptor agonist had the most robust effect on VLDL-TG secretion, a Y2 receptor agonist had a modest effect, and no effect was observed for Y4 and Y5 receptor agonists. These findings, using selective agonists, suggest the possibility that the effect of CNS NPY signaling on hepatic VLDL-TG secretion may be relatively dissociable from effects on feeding behavior via the Y1 receptor.

  13. Human serum amyloid A3 (SAA3 protein, expressed as a fusion protein with SAA2, binds the oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Tomita

    Full Text Available Serum amyloid A3 (SAA3 possesses characteristics distinct from the other serum amyloid A isoforms, SAA1, SAA2, and SAA4. High density lipoprotein contains the latter three isoforms, but not SAA3. The expression of mouse SAA3 (mSAA3 is known to be up-regulated extrahepatically in inflammatory responses, and acts as an endogenous ligand for the toll-like receptor 4/MD-2 complex. We previously reported that mSAA3 plays an important role in facilitating tumor metastasis by attracting circulating tumor cells and enhancing hyperpermeability in the lungs. On the other hand, human SAA3 (hSAA3 has long been regarded as a pseudogene, which is in contrast to the abundant expression levels of the other isoforms. Although the nucleotide sequence of hSAA3 is very similar to that of the other SAAs, a single oligonucleotide insertion in exon 2 causes a frame-shift to generate a unique amino acid sequence. In the present study, we identified that hSAA3 was transcribed in the hSAA2-SAA3 fusion transcripts of several human cell lines. In the fusion transcript, hSAA2 exon 3 was connected to hSAA3 exon 1 or hSAA3 exon 2, located approximately 130kb downstream from hSAA2 exon 3 in the genome, which suggested that it is produced by alternative splicing. Furthermore, we succeeded in detecting and isolating hSAA3 protein for the first time by an immunoprecipitation-enzyme linked immune assay system using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies that recognize the hSAA3 unique amino acid sequence. We also demonstrated that hSAA3 bound oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor (oxLDL receptor, LOX-1 and elevated the phosphorylation of ERK, the intracellular MAP-kinase signaling protein.

  14. Lipoprotein binding preference of CD36 is altered by filipin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Wuying

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The class B scavenger receptor CD36 binds multiple ligands, including oxidized and native lipoprotein species. CD36 and the related receptor SR-B1 have been localized to caveolae, domains that participate in cell signaling, transcytosis, and regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis. Previous work has indicated that the ligand preference of CD36 may depend on the cell type in which it is expressed. To determine if the presence or absence of caveolae is the determining factor for lipoprotein preference, we treated CHO-CD36 and C32 cells with filipin. Filipin treatment rapidly increased the binding capacity of CD36 for the native lipoproteins HDL and LDL, but did not affect the binding capacity of CD36 for oxidized LDL. Filipin treatment affected the distribution of caveolin and CD36 suggesting that the presence caveolae may modulate the ligand preference of CD36. However, its molecular mechanism how CD36 and caveolin interaction in regulating lipoprotein transport remains to be further studied.

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysm is associated with a variant in low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bown, Matthew J; Jones, Gregory T; Harrison, Seamus C

    2011-01-01

    additional cases and 32,687 controls and performed further follow-up in 1491 AAA and 11,060 controls. In the discovery study, nine loci demonstrated association with AAA (p lipoprotein...... p = 4.52 × 10(-10), odds ratio 1.15 [1.10-1.21]). No associations were seen for either rs1466535 or the 12q13.3 locus in independent association studies of coronary artery disease, blood pressure, diabetes, or hyperlipidaemia, suggesting that this locus is specific to AAA. Gene-expression studies...

  16. Interference of phenol during quantification of a bacterial lipoprotein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interference of phenol during quantification of a bacterial lipoprotein. ... bacterial Braun liporotein (BLP) from E. coli (a Toll-2 receptor ligand) is purified via phenol extraction on the basis of selective extraction of the lipoprotein. ... Article Metrics.

  17. Exon organization of the mouse entactin gene corresponds to the structural domains of the polypeptide and has regional homology to the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Wewer, U M; Chung, A E

    1995-01-01

    Entactin is a widespread basement membrane protein of 150 kDa that binds to type IV collagen and laminin. The complete exon-intron structure of the mouse entactin gene has been determined from lambda genomic DNA clones. The gene spans at least 65 kb and contains 20 exons. The exon organization...... of the mouse entactin gene closely corresponds to the organization of the polypeptide into distinct structural and functional domains. The two amino-terminal globular domains are encoded by three exons each. Single exons encode the two protease-sensitive, O-glycosylated linking regions. The six EGF......-like repeats and the single thyroglobulin-type repeat are each encoded by separate exons. The carboxyl-terminal half of entactin displays sequence homology to the growth factor-like region of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, and in both genes this region is encoded by eight exons. The positions of four...

  18. Genetic deletion of low density lipoprotein receptor impairs sterol-induced mouse macrophage ABCA1 expression. A new SREBP1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoye; He, Wei; Huang, Zhiping; Gotto, Antonio M; Hajjar, David P; Han, Jihong

    2008-01-25

    Low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) mutations cause familial hypercholesterolemia and early atherosclerosis. ABCA1 facilitates free cholesterol efflux from peripheral tissues. We investigated the effects of LDLR deletion (LDLR(-/-)) on ABCA1 expression. LDLR(-/-) macrophages had reduced basal levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, and cholesterol efflux. A high fat diet increased cholesterol in LDLR(-/-) macrophages but not wild type cells. A liver X receptor (LXR) agonist induced expression of ABCA1, ABCG1, and cholesterol efflux in both LDLR(-/-) and wild type macrophages, whereas expression of LXRalpha or LXRbeta was similar. Interestingly, oxidized LDL induced more ABCA1 in wild type macrophages than LDLR(-/-) cells. LDL induced ABCA1 expression in wild type cells but inhibited it in LDLR(-/-) macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner. However, lipoproteins regulated ABCG1 expression similarly in LDLR(-/-) and wild type macrophages. Cholesterol or oxysterols induced ABCA1 expression in wild type macrophages but had little or inhibitory effects on ABCA1 expression in LDLR(-/-) macrophages. Active sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1a (SREBP1a) inhibited ABCA1 promoter activity in an LXRE-dependent manner and decreased both macrophage ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux. Expression of ABCA1 in animal tissues was inversely correlated to active SREBP1. Oxysterols inactivated SREBP1 in wild type macrophages but not in LDLR(-/-) cells. Oxysterol synergized with nonsteroid LXR ligand induced ABCA1 expression in wild type macrophages but blocked induction in LDLR(-/-) cells. Taken together, our studies suggest that LDLR is critical in the regulation of cholesterol efflux and ABCA1 expression in macrophage. Lack of the LDLR impairs sterol-induced macrophage ABCA1 expression by a sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1-dependent mechanism that can result in reduced cholesterol efflux and lipid accumulation in macrophages under hypercholesterolemic conditions.

  19. Reductions in serum levels of LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, triglycerides and lipoprotein(a) in hypercholesterolaemic patients treated with the liver-selective thyroid hormone receptor agonist eprotirome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelin, Bo; Kristensen, Jens D; Eriksson, Mats; Carlsson, Bo; Klein, Irwin; Olsson, Anders G; Chester Ridgway, E; Ladenson, Paul W

    2015-03-01

    Liver-selective thyromimetic agents could provide a new approach for treating dyslipidaemia. We performed a multicentre, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of eprotirome, a liver-selective thyroid hormone receptor agonist, in 98 patients with primary hypercholesterolaemia. After previous drug wash-out and dietary run-in, patients received 100 or 200 μg day(-1) eprotirome or placebo for 12 weeks. The primary end-point was change in serum LDL cholesterol; secondary end-points included changes in other lipid parameters and safety measures. Eprotirome treatment at 100 and 200 μg daily reduced serum LDL cholesterol levels by 23 ± 5% and 31 ± 4%, respectively, compared with 2 ± 6% for placebo (P cholesterol and apolipoprotein (apo) B, whereas serum levels of HDL cholesterol and apo A-I were unchanged. There were also considerable reductions in serum triglycerides and lipoprotein(a), in particular in patients with elevated levels at baseline. There was no evidence of adverse effects on heart or bone and no changes in serum thyrotropin or triiodothyronine, although the thyroxine level decreased. Low-grade increases in liver enzymes were evident in most patients. In hypercholesterolaemic patients, the liver-selective thyromimetic eprotirome decreased serum levels of atherogenic lipoproteins without signs of extra-hepatic side effects. Selective stimulation of hepatic thyroid hormone receptors may be an attractive way to modulate lipid metabolism in hyperlipidaemia. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  20. Apolipoprotein E competitively inhibits receptor-dependent low density lipoprotein uptake by the liver but has no effect on cholesterol absorption or synthesis in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollett, L A; Osono, Y; Herz, J; Dietschy, J M

    1995-01-01

    This study examines the question of whether apolipoprotein E (apoE) alters steady-state concentrations of plasma cholesterol carried in low density lipoproteins (LDL-C) by acting as a competitive inhibitor of hepatic LDL uptake or by altering the rate of net cholesterol delivery from the intestinal lumen to the liver. To differentiate between these two possibilities, rates of cholesterol absorption and synthesis and the kinetics of hepatic LDL-C transport were measured in vivo in mice with either normal (apoE+/+) or zero (apoE-/-) levels of circulating apoE. Rates of cholesterol absorption were essentially identical in both genotypes and equaled approximately 44% of the daily dietary load of cholesterol. This finding was consistent with the further observation that the rates of cholesterol synthesis in the liver (approximately 2,000 nmol/h) and extrahepatic tissues (approximately 3,000 nmol/h) were also essentially identical in the two groups of mice. However, the apparent Michaelis constant for receptor-dependent hepatic LDL-C uptake was markedly lower in the apoE-/- mice (44 +/- 4 mg/dl) than in the apoE+/+ animals (329 +/- 77 mg/dl) even though the maximal transport velocity for this uptake process was essentially the same (approximately 400 micrograms/h per g) in the two groups of mice. These studies, therefore, demonstrate that apoE-containing lipoproteins can act as potent competitive inhibitors of hepatic LDL-C transport and so can significantly increase steady-state plasma LDL-C levels. This apolipoprotein plays no role, however, in the regulation of cholesterol absorption, sterol biosynthesis, or hepatic LDL receptor number, at least in the mouse. PMID:8618929

  1. Increased DNA methylation of scavenger receptor class B type I contributes to inhibitory effects of prenatal caffeine ingestion on cholesterol uptake and steroidogenesis in fetal adrenals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dong-Mei; He, Zheng; Ma, Liang-Peng; Wang, Lin-Long [Department of Pharmacology, Wuhan University School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Ping, Jie, E-mail: pingjie@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Wuhan University School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Hui [Department of Pharmacology, Wuhan University School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2015-06-01

    Steroid hormones synthesized from cholesterol in the fetal adrenal are crucial for fetal development. We have observed the inhibited fetal adrenal corticosterone synthesis and increased intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rate in rats under prenatal caffeine ingestion. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of prenatal caffeine ingestion on cholesterol supply in fetal adrenal steroidogenesis in rats and explore the underlying epigenetic mechanisms. Pregnant Wistar rats were treated with 60 mg/kg·d caffeine from gestational day (GD) 7 to GD17. Histological changes of fetal adrenals and increased IUGR rates were observed in the caffeine group. There were significantly decreased steroid hormone contents and cholesterol supply in caffeine-treated fetal adrenals. Data from the gene expression array suggested that prenatal caffeine ingestion caused increased expression of genes related to DNA methylation and decreased expression of genes related to cholesterol uptake. The following conjoint analysis of DNA methylation array with these differentially expressed genes suggested that scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) may play an important role in caffeine-induced cholesterol supply deficiency. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical detection certified the inhibitory effects of caffeine on both mRNA expression and protein expression of SR-BI in the fetal adrenal. And the increased DNA methylation frequency in the proximal promoter of SR-BI was confirmed by bisulfite-sequencing PCR. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine ingestion can induce DNA hypermethylation of the SR-BI promoter in the rat fetal adrenal. These effects may lead to decreased SR-BI expression and cholesterol uptake, which inhibits steroidogenesis in the fetal adrenal. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits steroid hormone production in the fetal adrenal. • Prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits cholesterol uptake in the fetal adrenal. • Prenatal caffeine

  2. Heat shock protein-27 attenuates foam cell formation and atherogenesis by down-regulating scavenger receptor-A expression via NF-κB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizman, Joshua E; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Seibert, Tara; Hibbert, Benjamin; Cuerrier, Charles M; Salari, Samira; Zhao, Xiaoling; Hu, Tieqiang; Shi, Chunhua; Ma, Xiaoli; Simard, Trevor; Caravaggio, Justin; Rayner, Katey; Bowdish, Dawn; Moore, Kathryn; O'Brien, Edward R

    2013-12-01

    Previously, we showed an inverse correlation between HSP27 serum levels and experimental atherogenesis in ApoE(-/-) mice that over-express HSP27 and speculated that the apparent binding of HSP27 to scavenger receptor-A (SR-A) was of mechanistic importance in attenuating foam cell formation. However, the nature and importance of the interplay between HSP27 and SR-A in atheroprotection remained unclear. Treatment of THP-1 macrophages with recombinant HSP27 (rHSP27) inhibited acLDL binding (-34%; p<0.005) and uptake (-38%, p<0.05). rHSP27 reduced SR-A mRNA (-39%, p=0.02), total protein (-56%, p=0.01) and cell surface (-53%, p<0.001) expression. The reduction in SR-A expression by rHSP27 was associated with a 4-fold increase in nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling (p<0.001 versus control), while an inhibitor of NF-κB signaling, BAY11-7082, attenuated the negative effects of rHSP27 on both SR-A expression and lipid uptake. To determine if SR-A is required for HSP27 mediated atheroprotection in vivo, ApoE(-/-) and ApoE(-/-) SR-A(-/-) mice fed with a high fat diet were treated for 3weeks with rHSP25. Compared to controls, rHSP25 therapy reduced aortic en face and aortic sinus atherosclerotic lesion size in ApoE(-/-) mice by 39% and 36% (p<0.05), respectively, but not in ApoE(-/-)SR-A(-/-) mice. In conclusion, rHSP27 diminishes SR-A expression, resulting in attenuated foam cell formation in vitro. Regulation of SR-A by HSP27 may involve the participation of NF-κB signaling. Lastly, SR-A is required for HSP27-mediated atheroprotection in vivo.

  3. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase IDOL Induces the Degradation of the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Family Members VLDLR and ApoER2*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Cynthia; Duit, Sarah; Jalonen, Pilvi; Out, Ruud; Scheer, Lilith; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Boyadjian, Rima; Rodenburg, Kees W.; Foley, Edan; Korhonen, Laura; Lindholm, Dan; Nimpf, Johannes; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Tontonoz, Peter; Zelcer, Noam

    2010-01-01

    We have previously identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase-inducible degrader of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) (Idol) as a post-translational modulator of LDLR levels. Idol is a direct target for regulation by liver X receptors (LXRs), and its expression is responsive to cellular sterol status independent of the sterol-response element-binding proteins. Here we demonstrate that Idol also targets two closely related LDLR family members, VLDLR and ApoE receptor 2 (ApoER2), proteins implicated in both neuronal development and lipid metabolism. Idol triggers ubiquitination of the VLDLR and ApoER2 on their cytoplasmic tails, leading to their degradation. We further show that the level of endogenous VLDLR is sensitive to cellular sterol content, Idol expression, and activation of the LXR pathway. Pharmacological activation of the LXR pathway in mice leads to increased Idol expression and to decreased Vldlr levels in vivo. Finally, we establish an unexpected functional link between LXR and Reelin signaling. We demonstrate that LXR activation results in decreased Reelin binding to VLDLR and reduced Dab1 phosphorylation. The identification of VLDLR and ApoER2 as Idol targets suggests potential roles for this LXR-inducible E3 ligase in the central nervous system in addition to lipid metabolism. PMID:20427281

  4. Acceleration of Lung Regeneration by Platelet-Rich Plasma Extract through the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 5-Tie2 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammoto, Tadanori; Chen, Zhao; Jiang, Amanda; Jiang, Elisabeth; Ingber, Donald E; Mammoto, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, plays a key role in organ development, homeostasis, and regeneration. The cooperation of multiple angiogenic factors, rather than a single factor, is required for physiological angiogenesis. Recently, we have reported that soluble platelet-rich plasma (PRP) extract, which contains abundant angiopoietin-1 and multiple other angiogenic factors, stimulates angiogenesis and maintains vascular integrity in vitro and in vivo. In this report, we have demonstrated that mouse PRP extract increases phosphorylation levels of the Wnt coreceptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) and thereby activates angiogenic factor receptor Tie2 in endothelial cells (ECs) and accelerates EC sprouting and lung epithelial cell budding in vitro. PRP extract also increases phosphorylation levels of Tie2 in the mouse lungs and accelerates compensatory lung growth and recovery of exercise capacity after unilateral pneumonectomy in mice, whereas soluble Tie2 receptor or Lrp5 knockdown attenuates the effects of PRP extract. Because human PRP extract is generated from autologous peripheral blood and can be stored at -80°C, our findings may lead to the development of novel therapeutic interventions for various angiogenesis-related lung diseases and to the improvement of strategies for lung regeneration.

  5. Serum Amyloid A Receptor Blockade and Incorporation into High-Density Lipoprotein Modulates Its Pro-Inflammatory and Pro-Thrombotic Activities on Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belal Chami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA, a marker of inflammation, induces expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic mediators including ICAM-1, VCAM-1, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and tissue factor (TF in both monocytes/macrophages and endothelial cells, and induces endothelial dysfunction—a precursor to atherosclerosis. In this study, we determined the effect of pharmacological inhibition of known SAA receptors on pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic activities of SAA in human carotid artery endothelial cells (HCtAEC. HCtAEC were pre-treated with inhibitors of formyl peptide receptor-like-1 (FPRL-1, WRW4; receptor for advanced glycation-endproducts (RAGE, (endogenous secretory RAGE; esRAGE and toll-like receptors-2/4 (TLR2/4 (OxPapC, before stimulation by added SAA. Inhibitor activity was also compared to high-density lipoprotein (HDL, a known inhibitor of SAA-induced effects on endothelial cells. SAA significantly increased gene expression of TF, NFκB and TNF and protein levels of TF and VEGF in HCtAEC. These effects were inhibited to variable extents by WRW4, esRAGE and OxPapC either alone or in combination, suggesting involvement of endothelial cell SAA receptors in pro-atherogenic gene expression. In contrast, HDL consistently showed the greatest inhibitory action, and often abrogated SAA-mediated responses. Increasing HDL levels relative to circulating free SAA may prevent SAA-mediated endothelial dysfunction and ameliorate atherogenesis.

  6. Kinetic studies of atherogenic lipoproteins in hemodialysis patients: do they tell us more about their pathology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Florian; Ikewaki, Katsunori; Schaefer, Juergen R; König, Paul; Dieplinger, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease have one of the highest risks for atherosclerotic complications. Several large epidemiological studies described an opposite association of total and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol with cardiovascular complications and total mortality compared to the general population, a circumstance often called "reverse epidemiology." Many factors might contribute to this reversal such as interaction with malnutrition/inflammation, pronounced fluctuations of atherogenic lipoproteins during the course of renal disease, heterogeneity of lipoprotein particles with preponderance of remnant particles, and chemical modification of lipoproteins caused by the uremic environment. A vicious cycle has been suggested in uremia in which the decreased catabolism of atherogenic lipoproteins such as LDL, IDL and Lp(a) leads to their increased plasma residence time and further modification of these lipoproteins by oxidation, carbamylation, and glycation. Using stable isotope techniques, it has been shown recently that the plasma residence time of these particles is more than twice as long in hemodialysis patients as in nonuremic subjects. This reduced catabolism, however, is masked by the decreased production of LDL, resulting in near-normal plasma levels of LDL. The production rate of Lp(a) in hemodialysis patients is similar to that in controls which together with the doubled residence time results in elevated Lp(a) levels. An increased clearance of these altered lipoproteins via the scavenger receptors of macrophages leads to the transformation of macrophages into foam cells in the vascular wall and might contribute to the pronounced risk for cardiovascular complications of these patients. These observations suggest that the real danger of these particles is not reflected by the measured concentrations but by their metabolic qualities.

  7. Low level of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 predicts an unfavorable prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma after curative resection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yong Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1 is a multifunctional receptor involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis and cell signaling. The aim of this study was to elucidate the expression and mechanism of LRP1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. METHODS: LRP1 expression in 4 HCC cell lines and 40 HCC samples was detected. After interruption of LRP1 expression in a HCC cell line either with specific lentiviral-mediated shRNA LRP1 or in the presence of the LRP1-specific chaperone, receptor-associated protein (RAP, the role of LRP1 in the migration and invasion of HCC cells was assessed in vivo and in vitro, and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP 9 in cells and the bioactivity of MMP9 in the supernatant were assayed. The expression and prognostic value of LRP1 were investigated in 327 HCC specimens. RESULTS: Low LRP1 expression was associated with poor HCC prognosis, with low expression independently related to shortened overall survival and increased tumor recurrence rate. Expression of LRP1 in non-recurrent HCC samples was significantly higher than that in early recurrent samples. LRP1 expression in HCC cell lines was inversely correlated with their metastatic potential. After inhibition of LRP1, low-metastatic SMCC-7721 cells showed enhanced migration and invasion and increased expression and bioactivity of MMP9. Correlation analysis showed a negative correlation between LRP1 and MMP9 expression in HCC patients. The prognostic value of LRP1 expression was validated in the independent data set. CONCLUSIONS: LRP1 modulated the level of MMP9 and low level of LRP1 expression was associated with aggressiveness and invasiveness in HCCs. LRP1 offered a possible strategy for tumor molecular therapy.

  8. High-density lipoprotein metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport: strategies for raising HDL cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosheska Trajkovska, Katerina; Topuzovska, Sonja

    2017-08-01

    A key to effective treatment of cardiovascular disease is to understand the body's complex lipoprotein transport system. Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is the process of cholesterol movement from the extrahepatic tissues back to the liver. Lipoproteins containing apoA-I [highdensity lipoprotein (HDL)] are key mediators in RCT, whereas non-high-density lipoproteins (non-HDL, lipoproteins containing apoB) are involved in the lipid delivery pathway. HDL particles are heterogeneous; they differ in proportion of proteins and lipids, size, shape, and charge. HDL heterogeneity is the result of the activity of several factors that assemble and remodel HDL particles in plasma: ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), hepatic lipase (HL), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), endothelial lipase (EL), and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). The RCT pathway consists of the following steps: 1. Cholesterol efflux from peripheral tissues to plasma, 2. LCAT-mediated esterification of cholesterol and remodeling of HDL particles, 3. direct pathway of HDL cholesterol delivery to the liver, and 4. indirect pathway of HDL cholesterol delivery to the liver via CETP-mediated transfer There are several established strategies for raising HDL cholesterol in humans, such as lifestyle changes; use of drugs including fibrates, statins, and niacin; and new therapeutic approaches. The therapeutic approaches include CETP inhibition, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists, synthetic farnesoid X receptor agonists, and gene therapy. Results of clinical trials should be awaited before further clinical management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  9. The P2Y2 receptor mediates uptake of matrix-retained and aggregated low density lipoprotein in primary vascular smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissmore, Tixieanna; Seye, Cheikh I.; Medeiros, Denis M.; Weisman, Gary A.; Bardford, Barry; Mamedova, Laman

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The internalization of aggregated low-density lipoproteins (agLDL) mediated by low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP1) may involve the actin cytoskeleton in ways that differ from the endocytosis of soluble LDL by the LDL receptor (LDLR). This study aims to define novel mechanisms of agLDL uptake through modulation of the actin cytoskeleton, to identify molecular targets involved in foam cell formation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The critical observation that formed the basis for these studies is that under pathophysiological conditions, nucleotide release from blood-derived and vascular cells activates SMC P2Y2 receptors (P2Y2Rs) leading to rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton and cell motility. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that P2Y2R activation mediates agLDL uptake by VSMCs. Methods Primary VSMCs were isolated from aortas of wild type (WT) C57BL/6 and.P2Y2R−/− mice to investigate whether P2Y2R activation modulates LRP1 expression. Cells were transiently transfected with cDNA encoding a hemagglutinin-tagged (HA-tagged) WT P2Y2R, or a mutant P2Y2R that unlike the WT P2Y2R does not bind the cytoskeletal actin-binding protein filamin-A (FLN-A). Results P2Y2R activation significantly increased agLDL uptake, and LRP1 mRNA expression decreased in P2Y2R−/− VSMCs versus WT. SMCs, expressing P2Y2R defective in FLN-A binding, exhibit 3-fold lower LDLR expression levels than SMCs expressing WT P2Y2R, while cells transfected with WT P2Y2R show greater agLDL uptake in both WT and P2Y2R−/− VSMCs versus cells transfected with the mutant P2Y2R. Conclusions Together, these results show that both LRP1 and LDLR expression and agLDL uptake are regulated by P2Y2R in VSMCs, and that agLDL uptake due to P2Y2R activation is dependent upon cytoskeletal reorganization mediated by P2Y2R binding to FLN-A. PMID:27522265

  10. Association of polymorphisms in genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism with plasma concentrations of remnant lipoproteins and HDL subpopulations before and after hormone therapy in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Asztalos, Bela F; Howard, Timothy D; Reboussin, David M; Horvath, Katalin V; Schaefer, Ernst J; Herrington, David M

    2010-02-01

    A high degree of inter-individual variability in plasma lipid level response to hormone therapy (HT) has been reported. Variations in the oestrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1) and in genes involved in lipid metabolism may explain some of the variability in response to HT. Subjects Postmenopausal Caucasian women (n = 208) participating in a placebo-controlled randomized trial of 3.2 years of hormone therapy (HT). Plasma triglyceride (TG), remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RLP-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and HDL subpopulations were assessed at baseline and at follow up. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ESR1 and in the ATP binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), hepatic lipase (LIPC), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and scavenger receptor class B type I (SRB1) genes were assessed for their association with baseline plasma levels and HT-related changes in levels of RLP-C and HDL subpopulations. Carriers of the ESR1 PvuII or IVS1-1505 variants had lower plasma TG concentrations and higher plasma HDL-C and alpha-1 and prealpha-1 HDL particle levels at baseline and showed greater increases in HDL-C, apo A-I and alpha-1 particle levels after HT than wild-type carriers. Carriers of the N291S and D9N variants in the LPL gene had significantly higher remnant lipoproteins and lower alpha-2 HDL particle levels at baseline. The CETP TaqIB SNP was a significant determinant of baseline plasma HDL-C and HDL subpopulation profile. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in ESR1, CETP and LPL had significant effects on baseline plasma levels of TG-rich and HDL subpopulations. With the exception of ESR1 SNPs, variation in genes involved in lipid metabolism has a very modest effect on lipoprotein response to HT.

  11. Lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1(LOX-1 levels and endothelial dysfunction in patients with primary essential hyperhidrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Nur Rifaioglu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Primary essential hyperhidrosis (PEH is adisorder characterized by excessive sweating of palms,soles and axilla. Although its etiology was not fully understand,increased activity of the autonomic nervoussystem may play a role in the pathogenesis of PEH. Inthe study we aimed to investigate flow mediated dilatationand lectin like oxide LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1 levels as anindicator of endothelial dysfunction in patient with PEH.Methods: Thirty-three PEH patients diagnosed withstarch-iodine test and age- and sex-matched 19 healthycontrols were included in the study. Flow-mediated dilatationwas performed by ultrasonographical measurementof brachial artery. Serum LOX-1 levels were analyzedwith Enzyme-Linked Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA kit.Results: Brachial artery FMD diameters and post-nitratedilatation diameters were not different between patientsand the controls. There was no difference between patientand control groups when compared for LOX-1 levels.Conclusion: Larger studies are needed to understand,indeed, whether excessive hyperhidrosis in PEH is onlya peripheral excessive response to normal sympatheticactivity or a systemic sympathetic hyperactivity with cardiovasculareffects, which is disguised by compensatorymechanisms, such as nitric oxide (NO.Key words: endothelial dysfunction, flow mediated dilatation,lectin like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1, primary essential hyperhidrosis

  12. NMR structure of a concatemer of the first and second ligand-binding modules of the human low-density lipoprotein receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, N D; Atkins, A R; Bieri, S; Brown, C J; Brereton, I M; Kroon, P A; Smith, R

    2000-07-01

    The ligand-binding domain of the human low-density lipoprotein receptor consists of seven modules, each of 40-45 residues. In the presence of calcium, these modules adopt a common polypeptide fold with three conserved disulfide bonds. A concatemer of the first and second modules (LB(1-2)) folds efficiently in the presence of calcium ions, forming the same disulfide connectivities as in the isolated modules. The three-dimensional structure of LB(1-2) has now been solved using two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy and restrained molecular dynamics calculations. No intermodule nuclear Overhauser effects were observed, indicating the absence of persistent interaction between them. The near random-coil NH and H alpha chemical shifts and the low phi and psi angle order parameters of the four-residue linker suggest that it has considerable flexibility. The family of LB(1-2) structures superimposed well over LB1 or LB2, but not over both modules simultaneously. LB1 and LB2 have a similar pattern of calcium ligands, but the orientations of the indole rings of the tryptophan residues W23 and W66 differ, with the latter limiting solvent access to the calcium ion. From these studies, it appears that although most of the modules in the ligand-binding region of the receptor are joined by short segments, these linkers may impart considerable flexibility on this region.

  13. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 10 is a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Sekiya, Manami; Hirata, Michiko; Ye, Mingjuan; Yamagishi, Azumi [Department of Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition, Graduate School of Human Life Science, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Lee, Sang-Mi; Kang, Man-Jong [Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Hosoda, Akemi; Fukumura, Tomoe; Kim, Dong-Ho [Department of Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition, Graduate School of Human Life Science, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Saeki, Shigeru, E-mail: saeki@life.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition, Graduate School of Human Life Science, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)

    2010-02-19

    Wnt signaling pathways play fundamental roles in the differentiation, proliferation and functions of many cells as well as developmental, growth, and homeostatic processes in animals. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP) 5 and LRP6 serve as coreceptors of Wnt proteins together with Frizzled receptors, triggering activation of canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Here, we found that LRP10, a new member of the LDLR gene family, inhibits the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. The {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity in HEK293 cells was activated by transfection with Wnt3a or LRP6, which was then inhibited by co-transfection with LRP10. Deletion of the extracellular domain of LRP10 negated its inhibitory effect. The inhibitory effect of LRP10 was consistently conserved in HEK293 cells even when GSK3{beta} phosphorylation was inhibited by incubation with lithium chloride and co-transfection with constitutively active S33Y-mutated {beta}-catenin. Nuclear {beta}-catenin accumulation was unaffected by LRP10. The present studies suggest that LRP10 may interfere with the formation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF complex and/or its binding to target DNA in the nucleus, and that the extracellular domain of LRP10 is critical for inhibition of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  14. Inhibitory Effects of North American Wild Rice on Monocyte Adhesion and Inflammatory Modulators in Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Knockout Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadasian, Mohammed H; Zhao, Ruozhi; Ghazawwi, Nora; Le, Khuong; Apea-Bah, Franklin B; Beta, Trust; Shen, Garry X

    2017-10-04

    The present study examined the effects of wild rice on monocyte adhesion, inflammatory and fibrinolytic mediators in low-density lipoprotein receptor-knockout (LDLr-KO) mice. Male LDLr-KO mice received a cholesterol (0.06%, w/w)-supplemented diet with or without white or wild rice (60%, w/w) for 20 weeks. White rice significantly increased monocyte adhesion and abundances of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tissue necrosis factor-α, intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), and uPA receptor in aortae and hearts of LDLr-KO mice compared to the control diet. Wild rice inhibited monocyte adhesion to the aorta, atherosclerosis, and abundances of the inflammatory and fibrinolytic regulators in the cardiovascular tissue of LDLr-KO mice compared to white rice. White or wild rice did not significantly alter the levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, or antioxidant enzymes in plasma. The anti-atherosclerotic effect of wild rice may result from its inhibition on monocyte adhesion and inflammatory modulators in LDLr-KO mice.

  15. Silent exonic mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene that cause familial hypercholesterolemia by affecting mRNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defesche, J C; Schuurman, E J M; Klaaijsen, L N; Khoo, K L; Wiegman, A; Stalenhoef, A F H

    2008-06-01

    In a large group of patients with the clinical phenotype of familial hypercholesterolemia, such as elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and premature atherosclerosis, but without functional mutations in the genes coding for the LDL receptor and apolipoprotein B, we examined the effect of 128 seemingly neutral exonic and intronic DNA variants, discovered by routine sequencing of these genes. Two variants, G186G and R385R, were found to be associated with altered splicing. The nucleotide change leading to G186G resulted in the generation of new 3'-splice donor site in exon 4 and R385R was associated with a new 5'-splice acceptor site in exon 9 of the LDL receptor gene. Splicing of these alternate splice sites leads to an in-frame 75-base pair deletion in a stable mRNA of exon 4 in case of G186G and R385R resulted in a 31-base pair frame-shift deletion in exon 9 and non-sense-mediated mRNA decay.

  16. Apolipoprotein E LDL receptor-binding domain-containing high-density lipoprotein: a nanovehicle to transport curcumin, an antioxidant and anti-amyloid bioflavonoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumsupan, Panupon; Ramirez, Ricardo; Khumsupan, Darin; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory bioflavonoid that has been recently identified as an anti-amyloid agent as well. To make it more available in its potent form as a potential amyloid disaggregation agent, we employed high-density lipoproteins (HDL), which are lipid-protein complexes that transport plasma cholesterol, to transport curcumin. The objective of this study was to employ reconstituted HDL containing human apoE3 N-terminal (NT) domain, as a vehicle to transport curcumin. The NT domain serves as a ligand to mediate binding and uptake of lipoprotein complexes via the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) family of proteins located at the cell surface. Reconstituted HDL was prepared with phospholipids and recombinant apoE3-NT domain in the absence or presence of curcumin. Non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the molecular mass and Stokes' diameter of HDL bearing curcumin were ~670kDa and ~17nm, respectively, while electron microscopy revealed the presence of discoidal particles. Fluorescence emission spectra of HDL bearing (the intrinsically fluorescent) curcumin indicated that the wavelength of maximal fluorescence emission (λ(max)) of curcumin was ~495nm, which is highly blue-shifted compared to λ(max) of curcumin in solvents of varying polarity (λ(max) ranging from 515-575nm) or in aqueous buffers. In addition, an enormous enhancement in fluorescence emission intensity was noted in curcumin-containing HDL compared to curcumin in aqueous buffers. Curcumin fluorescence emission was quenched to a significant extent by lipid-based quenchers but not by aqueous quenchers. These observations indicate that curcumin has partitioned efficiently into the hydrophobic milieu of the phospholipid bilayer of HDL. Functional assays indicated that the LDLr-binding ability of curcumin-containing HDL with apoE3-NT is similar to that of HDL without curcumin. Taken together, we report that apoE-containing HDL has a tremendous

  17. Coordinate up-regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and cyclo-oxygenase-2 gene expression in human colorectal cells and in colorectal adenocarcinoma biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, D. F.; McQuaid, K. R.; Gilbertson, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many colorectal cancers have high levels of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), an enzyme that metabolizes the essential fatty acids into prostaglandins. Since the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) is involved in the uptake of essential fatty acids, we studied the effect of LDL on growth and gene regulation in colorectal cancer cells. DiFi cells grown in lipoprotein-deficient sera (LPDS) grew more slowly than cells with LDL. LDLr antibody caused significant inhibition of tumor cell growth but did not affect controls. In addition, LDL uptake did not change in the presence of excess LDL, suggesting that ldlr mRNA lacks normal feedback regulation in some colorectal cancers. Analysis of the ldlr mRNA showed that excess LDL in the medium did not cause down-regulation of the message even after 24 hr. The second portion of the study examined the mRNA expression of ldlr and its co-regulation with cox-2 in normal and tumor specimens from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. The ratio of tumor:paired normal mucosa of mRNA expression of ldlr and of cox-2 was measured in specimens taken during colonoscopy. ldlr and cox-2 transcripts were apparent in 11 of 11 carcinomas. There was significant coordinate up-regulation both of ldlr and of cox-2 in 6 of 11 (55%) tumors compared with normal colonic mucosa. There was no up-regulation of cox-2 without concomitant up-regulation of ldlr. These data suggest that the LDLr is abnormally regulated in some colorectal tumors and may play a role in the up-regulation of cox-2. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Lutein transport by Caco-2 TC-7 cells occurs partly by a facilitated process involving the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Emmanuelle; Abou, Lydia; Mikail, Céline; Ghiringhelli, Odette; André, Marc; Portugal, Henri; Jourdheuil-Rahmani, Dominique; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Lairon, Denis; Borel, Patrick

    2005-04-15

    The carotenoid lutein is thought to play a role in the human eye and to protect against age-related macular degeneration. Lutein transport in the human intestine has not been characterized. We examined lutein transport processes using Caco-2 TC-7 monolayers as a model for human intestinal epithelium. Purified lutein was mixed with phospholipids, lysophospholipids, cholesterol, mono-olein, oleic acid and taurocholate to obtain lutein-rich mixed micelles that mimicked those found under physiological conditions. The micelles were added to the apical side of Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers for 30 min or 3 h at 37 degrees C. Absorbed lutein, i.e. the sum of lutein recovered in the scraped cells and in the basolateral chamber, was quantified by HPLC. Transport rate was measured (i) as a function of time (from 15 to 60 min), (ii) as a function of micellar lutein concentration (from 1.5 to 15 microM), (iii) at 4 degrees C, (iv) in the basolateral to apical direction, (v) after trypsin pretreatment, (vi) in the presence of beta-carotene and/or lycopene, (vii) in the presence of increasing concentrations of antibody against SR-BI (scavenger receptor class B type 1) and (viii) in the presence of increasing concentrations of a chemical inhibitor of the selective transfer of lipids mediated by SR-BI, i.e. BLT1 (blocks lipid transport 1). The rate of transport of lutein as a function of time and as a function of concentration was saturable. It was significantly lower at 4 degrees C than at 37 degrees C (approx. 50%), in the basal to apical direction than in the opposite direction (approx. 85%), and after trypsin pretreatment (up to 45%). Co-incubation with beta-carotene, but not lycopene, decreased the lutein absorption rate (approx. 20%) significantly. Anti-SR-BI antibody and BLT1 significantly impaired the absorption rate (approx. 30% and 57% respectively). Overall, these results indicate that lutein absorption is, at least partly, protein-mediated and that some lutein is taken up

  19. Serum levels of TWEAK and scavenger receptor CD163 in type 1 diabetes mellitus: relationship with cardiovascular risk factors. a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Llauradó

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To test the usefulness of serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (sTWEAK and soluble scavenger receptor CD163 (sCD163 as markers of subtle inflammation in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM without clinical cardiovascular (CV disease and to evaluate their relationship with arterial stiffness (AS. METHODS: Sixty-eight patients with T1DM and 68 age and sex-matched, healthy subjects were evaluated. Anthropometrical variables and CV risk factors were recorded. Serum concentrations of sTWEAK and sCD163 were measured. AS was assessed by aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV. All statistical analyses were stratified by gender. RESULTS: T1DM patients showed lower serum concentrations of sTWEAK (Men: 1636.5 (1146.3-3754.8 pg/mL vs. 765.9 (650.4-1097.1 pg/mL; p<0.001. Women: 1401.0 (788.0-2422.2 pg/mL vs. 830.1 (562.6-1175.9 pg/mL; p = 0.011 compared with their respective controls. Additionally, T1DM men had higher serum concentrations of sCD163 (285.0 (247.7-357.1 ng/mL vs. 224.8 (193.3-296.5 ng/mL; p = 0.012 compared with their respective controls. sTWEAK correlated negatively with aPWV in men (r = -0.443; p<0.001. However, this association disappeared after adjusting for potential confounders. In men, the best multiple linear regression model showed that the independent predictors of sTWEAK were T1DM and WHR (R(2 = 0.640; p<0.001. In women, T1DM and SBP were the independent predictors for sTWEAK (R(2 = 0.231; p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: sTWEAK is decreased in T1DM patients compared with age and sex-matched healthy subjects after adjusting for classic CV risk factors, although sTWEAK levels may be partially influenced by some of them. Additionally, T1DM men have higher serum concentrations of sCD163. These results point out an association between the inflammatory system and CV risk in T1DM.

  20. Apolipoprotein E – Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Interaction Affects Spatial Memory Retention and Brain ApoE Levels in an Isoform-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lance A.; Olsen, Reid H.J.; Merkens, Louise S.; DeBarber, Andrea; Steiner, Robert D.; Sullivan, Patrick M.; Maeda, Nobuyo; Raber, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) exists in three isoforms: apoE2, apoE3 and apoE4. APOE ε4 (E4) is a major genetic risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). ApoE mediates cholesterol metabolism by binding various receptors. The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) has a high affinity for apoE, and is the only member of its receptor family to demonstrate an apoE isoform specific binding affinity (E4>E3>>E2). Evidence suggests that a functional interaction between apoE and LDLR influences the risk of CVD and AD. We hypothesize that the differential cognitive effects of the apoE isoforms are a direct result of their varying interactions with LDLR. To test this hypothesis, we have employed transgenic mice that express human apoE2, apoE3, or apoE4, and either human LDLR (hLDLR) or no LDLR (LDLR−/−). Our results show that plasma and brain apoE levels, cortical cholesterol, and spatial memory are all regulated by isoform-dependent interactions between apoE and LDLR. Conversely, both anxiety-like behavior and cued associative memory are strongly influenced by APOE genotype, but these processes appear to occur via an LDLR-independent mechanism. Both the lack of LDLR and the interaction between E4 and the LDLR were associated with significant impairments in the retention of long term spatial memory. Finally, levels of hippocampal apoE correlate with long term spatial memory retention in mice with human LDLR. In summary, we demonstrate that the apoE-LDLR interaction affects regional brain apoE levels, brain cholesterol, and cognitive function in an apoE isoform-dependent manner. PMID:24412220

  1. Apolipoprotein E-low density lipoprotein receptor interaction affects spatial memory retention and brain ApoE levels in an isoform-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lance A; Olsen, Reid H J; Merkens, Louise S; DeBarber, Andrea; Steiner, Robert D; Sullivan, Patrick M; Maeda, Nobuyo; Raber, Jacob

    2014-04-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) exists in three isoforms: apoE2, apoE3 and apoE4. APOE ε4 is a major genetic risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). ApoE mediates cholesterol metabolism by binding various receptors. The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) has a high affinity for apoE, and is the only member of its receptor family to demonstrate an apoE isoform specific binding affinity (E4>E3>E2). Evidence suggests that a functional interaction between apoE and LDLR influences the risk of CVD and AD. We hypothesize that the differential cognitive effects of the apoE isoforms are a direct result of their varying interactions with LDLR. To test this hypothesis, we have employed transgenic mice that express human apoE2, apoE3, or apoE4, and either human LDLR (hLDLR) or no LDLR (LDLR(-/-)). Our results show that plasma and brain apoE levels, cortical cholesterol, and spatial memory are all regulated by isoform-dependent interactions between apoE and LDLR. Conversely, both anxiety-like behavior and cued associative memory are strongly influenced by APOE genotype, but these processes appear to occur via an LDLR-independent mechanism. Both the lack of LDLR and the interaction between E4 and the LDLR were associated with significant impairments in the retention of long term spatial memory. Finally, levels of hippocampal apoE correlate with long term spatial memory retention in mice with human LDLR. In summary, we demonstrate that the apoE-LDLR interaction affects regional brain apoE levels, brain cholesterol, and cognitive function in an apoE isoform-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Leptospiral outer membrane lipoprotein LipL32 binding on toll-like receptor 2 of renal cells as determined with an atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shen-Hsing; Lo, Yueh-Yu; Tung, Jung-Yu; Ko, Yi-Ching; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chih-Wei; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Fu, Chien-Chung; Pan, Rong-Long

    2010-07-06

    Leptopirosis is a renal disease caused by pathogenic Leptospira that primarily infects the renal proximal tubules, consequently resulting in severe tubular injuries and malfunctions. The protein extracted from the outer membrane of this pathogenic strain contains a major component of a 32 kDa lipoprotein (LipL32), which is absent in the counter membrane of nonpathogenic strains and has been identified as a crucial factor for host cell infection. Previous studies showed that LipL32 induced inflammatory responses and interacted with the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the host cell. However, the exact relationship between LipL32-mediated inflammatory responses and ECM binding is still unknown. In this study, an atomic force microscope with its tip modified by purified LipL32 was used to assess the interaction between LipL32 and cell surface receptors. Furthermore, an antibody neutralization technique was employed to identify Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) but not TLR4 as the major target of LipL32 attack. The interaction force between LipL32 and TLR2 was measured as approximately 59.5 +/- 8.7 pN, concurring with the theoretical value for a single-pair molecular interaction. Moreover, transformation of a TLR deficient cell line with human TLR2 brought the interaction force from the basal level to approximately 60.4 +/- 11.5 pN, confirming unambiguously TLR2 as counter receptor for LipL32. The stimulation of CXCL8/IL-8 expression by full-length LipL32 as compared to that without the N-terminal signal peptide domain suggests a significant role of the signal peptide of the protein in the inflammatory responses. This study provides direct evidence that LipL32 binds to TLR2, but not TLR4, on the cell surface, and a possible mechanism for the virulence of leptospirosis is accordingly proposed.

  3. Up-regulation of hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: a possible novel mechanism of antiatherogenic activity of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor Atorvastatin and hepatic LRP1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jae Hoon; Kang, Saet Byol; Park, Jong Suk; Lee, Byung Wan; Kang, Eun Seok; Ahn, Chul Woo; Lee, Hyun Chul; Cha, Bong Soo

    2011-07-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) binds to apolipoprotein E and serves as a receptor for remnant lipoproteins in the liver, thus playing an important role in clearing these atherogenic particles. In this study, we investigated the effect of atorvastatin, a hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, on hepatic LRP1 expression. We used HepG2 and Hep3B cells for in vitro study, and Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty and Sprague-Dawley rats for in vivo study. We used relatively high pharmacologic dose of atorvastatin in this study (in vitro, 0.5 μmol/L in culture media, for 48 hours; in vivo, 20 mg/[kg d], for 6 weeks). Atorvastatin increased LRP1 and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in HepG2 and Hep3B cells and induced hepatic LRP1 and LDL receptor expression in chow diet-fed Sprague-Dawley rats and high-fat diet-fed Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty rats. Atorvastatin decreased intracellular sterol level and increased the amount of the nuclear form of sterol response element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) in both HepG2 and Hep3B cells as well as in two animal models. Treatment of HepG2 cells with LDL increased intracellular sterol level and reduced LRP1, LDL receptor, and SREBP-2. When SREBP-2 in HepG2 cells was knocked down by small interfering RNA, the induction of LRP1 expression by atorvastatin did not take place. In conclusion, up-regulation of hepatic LRP1 might be a novel mechanism by which statin treatment decreases remnant lipoproteins. In addition, SREBP-2 acts as a mediator of atorvastatin-induced up-regulation of hepatic LRP1. Future studies using standard doses of atorvastatin in humans are needed to elucidate clinical relevance of these findings.

  4. Alpha macroglobulins and the low-density-lipoprotein-related protein alpha-2-macroglobulin receptor in experimental renal fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, H; Diamond, [No Value; Ding, GH; Kaysen, GA

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the location of non-specific proteinase inhibitors and their receptor in experimental glomerular and interstitial fibrosis. The alpha macroglobulins alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) and alpha-1-inhibitor 3 (alpha 1I3) are proteinase inhibitors, including metalloproteinase

  5. Exenatide, a Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist, Acutely Inhibits Intestinal Lipoprotein Production in Healthy Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Changting; Bandsma, Robert H. J.; Dash, Satya; Szeto, Linda; Lewis, Gary F.

    Objective-Incretin-based therapies for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus improve plasma lipid profiles and postprandial lipemia, but their exact mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we examined the acute effect of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, exenatide, on intestinal

  6. Hepatic Farnesoid X-Receptor Isoforms α2 and α4 Differentially Modulate Bile Salt and Lipoprotein Metabolism in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesjes, Marije; Bloks, Vincent W.; Hageman, Jurre; Bos, Trijnie; van Dijk, Theo H.; Havinga, Rick; Wolters, Henk; Jonker, Johan W.; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor FXR acts as an intracellular bile salt sensor that regulates synthesis and transport of bile salts within their enterohepatic circulation. In addition, FXR is involved in control of a variety of crucial metabolic pathways. Four FXR splice variants are known, i.e. FXR alpha 1-4.

  7. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and lipoprotein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Yoshio; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Nagano, Tomohisa; Abe, Hiroshi

    2015-09-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a hepatotrophic virus and a major cause of chronic liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma, worldwide. The life cycle of HCV is closely associated with the metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins. The main function of lipoproteins is transporting lipids throughout the body. Triglycerides, free cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and phospholipids are the major components of the transported lipids. The pathway of HCV assembly and secretion is closely linked to lipoprotein production and secretion, and the infectivity of HCV particles largely depends on the interaction of lipoproteins. Moreover, HCV entry into hepatocytes is strongly influenced by lipoproteins. The key lipoprotein molecules mediating these interactions are apolipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are amphipathic proteins on the surface of a lipoprotein particle, which help stabilize lipoprotein structure. They perform a key role in lipoprotein metabolism by serving as receptor ligands, enzyme co-factors, and lipid transport carriers. Understanding the association between the life cycle of HCV and lipoprotein metabolism is important because each step of the life cycle of HCV that is associated with lipoprotein metabolism is a potential target for anti-HCV therapy. In this article, we first concisely review the nature of lipoprotein and its metabolism to better understand the complicated interaction of HCV with lipoprotein. Then, we review the outline of the processes of HCV assembly, secretion, and entry into hepatocytes, focusing on the association with lipoproteins. Finally, we discuss the clinical aspects of disturbed lipid/lipoprotein metabolism and the significance of dyslipoproteinemia in chronic HCV infection with regard to abnormal apolipoproteins.

  8. Association between Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 5 Polymorphisms and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Han Chinese:a Case-control Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Hai Fei; WANG Yan; WANG Qian; WANG Bing Yuan; REN Yong Cheng; HU Dong Sheng; ZHAO Jing Zhi; ZHAI Yu Jia; YIN Lei; PANG Chao; LUO Xin Ping; ZHANG Ming; WANG Jin Jin; LI Lin Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) variants (rs12363572 and rs4930588) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Han Chinese. Methods A total of 1842 T2DM cases (507 newly diagnosed cases and 1335 previously diagnosed cases) and 7777 controls were included in this case-control study. PCR-RFLP was conducted to detect the genotype of the two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95%confidence intervals (95%CIs) were calculated to describe the strength of the association by logistic regression. Results In the study subjects, neither rs12363572 nor rs4930588 was significantly associated with T2DM, even after adjusting for relevant covariates. When stratified by body mass index (BMI), the two SNPs were also not associated with T2DM. Among the 3 common haplotypes, only haplotype TT was associated with reduced risk of T2DM (OR 0.820, 95% CI 0.732-0.919). In addition, rs12363572 was associated with BMI (P Conclusion No LRP5 variant was found to be associated with T2DM in Han Chinese, but haplotype TT was found to be associated with T2DM.

  9. Lupin Peptides Modulate the Protein-Protein Interaction of PCSK9 with the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor in HepG2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammi, Carmen; Zanoni, Chiara; Aiello, Gilda; Arnoldi, Anna; Grazioso, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has been recently identified as a new useful target for hypercholesterolemia treatment. This work demonstrates that natural peptides, deriving from the hydrolysis of lupin protein and absorbable at intestinal level, are able to inhibit the protein-protein interaction between PCSK9 and the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). In order to sort out the best potential inhibitors among these peptides, a refined in silico model of the PCSK9/LDLR interaction was developed. Docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and peptide binding energy estimations, by MM-GBSA approach, permitted to select the two best candidates among tested peptides that were synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity. The most active was P5 that induced a concentration dependent inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR binding, with an IC50 value equal to 1.6 ± 0.33 μM. Tested at a 10 μM concentration, this peptide increased by 66 ± 21.4% the ability of HepG2 cells to take up LDL from the extracellular environment.

  10. The association of very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR haplotypes with egg production indicates VLDLR is a candidate gene for modulating egg production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZhePeng Wang

    Full Text Available Abstract The very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR transports egg yolk precursors into oocytes. However, our knowledge of the distribution patterns of VLDLR variants among breeds and their relationship to egg production is still incomplete. In this study, eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that account for 87% of all VLDLR variants were genotyped in Nick Chick (NC, n=91, Lohmann Brown (LohB, n=50 and Lueyang (LY, n=381 chickens, the latter being an Chinese indigenous breed. Egg production by NC and LY chickens was recorded from 17 to 50 weeks. Only four similar haplotypes were found in NC and LohB, of which two accounted for 100% of all NC haplotypes and 92.5% of LohB haplotypes. In contrast, there was considerable haplotypic diversity in LY. Comparison of egg production in LY showed that hens with NC-like haplotypes had a significantly higher production (p < 0.05 than those without the haplotypes. However, VLDLR expression was not significantly different between the haplotypes. These findings indicate a divergence in the distribution of VLDLR haplotypes between selected and non-selected breeds and suggest that the near fixation of VLDLR variants in NC and LohB is compatible with signature of selection. These data also support VLDLR as a candidate gene for modulating egg production.

  11. Exploration of the Relationship between Phlegm-Dampness Constitution and Polymorphism of Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Genes Pvu Ⅱ and Ava Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the polymorphism of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) genes Pvu Ⅱ and Ava Ⅱ in a population with phlegm-dampness constitution (PDC). Methods:Polymorphism of LDL-R genes at Pvu Ⅱ and Ava Ⅱ of 48 persons with gentle constitution (GC) and 61 with PDC were analyzed with PCR-RELP technique, and their serum contents of lipids and glucose were determined and compared as well. Results: The A+ allelic and P- allelic frequency were higher and the P+ allelic frequency was lower in subjects with PDC than those in subjects with GC, which were 0.3083 vs 0.1771, 0.9098 vs 0.7708 and 0.0902 vs 0.2292, respectively, all showing significant difference between the two groups (P<0.05). Comparison of the two groups in serum levels of triglyceride (TG), fasting blood glucose, 2 h postprandial blood glucose, and 2 h postprandial insulin showed that all the parameters were higher in subjects with PDC than in subjects with GC respectively,showing significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusion: PDC is related with the P- and A+ allelic frequency of higher LDL-R genes at Pvu Ⅱ and AvaⅡ, therefore, the polymorphism of LDL-R genes could be taken as one of the genetic markers for PDC, and humans with PDC are more liable to suffer from blood lipids and glucose disorder than those with GC.

  12. The Hypocholesterolemic Effect of Germinated Brown Rice Involves the Upregulation of the Apolipoprotein A1 and Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Umar Imam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Germinated brown rice (GBR is rich in bioactive compounds, which confer GBR with many functional properties. Evidence of its hypocholesterolemic effects is emerging, but the exact mechanisms of action and bioactive compounds involved have not been fully documented. Using type 2 diabetic rats, we studied the effects of white rice, GBR, and brown rice (BR on lipid profile and on the regulation of selected genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. Our results showed that the upregulation of apolipoprotein A1 and low-density lipoprotein receptor genes was involved in the hypocholesterolemic effects of GBR. Additionally, in vitro studies using HEPG2 cells showed that acylated steryl glycoside, gamma amino butyric acid, and oryzanol and phenolic extracts of GBR contribute to the nutrigenomic regulation of these genes. Transcriptional and nontranscriptional mechanisms are likely involved in the overall hypocholesterolemic effects of GBR suggesting that it may have an impact on the prevention and/or management of hypercholesterolemia due to a wide variety of metabolic perturbations. However, there is need to conduct long-term clinical trials to determine the clinical relevance of the hypocholesterolemic effects of GBR determined through animal studies.

  13. Combination of body mass index and oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 in prognosis prediction of patients with squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Long; Jiang, Shanshan; Lin, Yongbin; Yang, Han; Zhao, Zerui; Xie, Zehua; Lin, Yaobin; Long, Hao

    2015-09-08

    Lung cancer, especially non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), represents enormous challenges in continuously achieving treatment improvements. Besides cancer, obesity is becoming ever more prevalent. Obesity is increasingly acknowledged as a major risk factor for several types of common cancers. Significant mechanisms overlap in the pathobiology of obesity and tumorigenesis. One of these mechanisms involves oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 (OLR1), as a link between obesity and cancer. Additionally, body mass index (BMI) has been widely used in exploiting the role of obesity on a series of diseases, including cancer. Significantly, squamous NSCLC revealed to be divergent clinical and molecular phenotypes compared with non-squamous NSCLC. Consequently, OLR1 immunostaining score and BMI were assessed by Fisher's linear discriminant analysis to discriminate if progression-free survival (PFS) would exceed 2 years. In addition, the final model was utilized to calculate the discriminant score in each study participant. Finally, 131 patients with squamous NCSLC were eligible for analysis. And a prediction model was established for PFS based on these 2 markers and validated in a second set of squamous NCSLC patients. The model offers a novel tool for survival prediction and could establish a framework for future individualized therapy for patients with squamous NCSLC.

  14. Pregnancy Followed by Delivery May Affect Circulating Soluble Lectin-Like Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-1 Levels in Women of Reproductive Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Balin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective. It is known that menopause or lack of endogenous estrogen is a risk factor for endothelial dysfunction and CAD. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1 is involved inmultiple phases of vascular dysfunction.The purpose of the current study was to determine the association between soluble LOX-1 (sLOX-1 and pregnancy followed by delivery in women of reproductive age. Materials/Methods. Sixty-eight subjects with pregnancy followed by delivery (group 1 and 57 subjects with nongravidity (group 2 were included in this study. Levels of sLOX-1 were measured in serum by EL SA. Results. Plasma levels of sLOX-1 were significantly lower in Group 1 than Group 2 in women of reproductive age (0.52±0.18 ng/mL and 0.78±0.13, resp., <0.001. There were strong correlations between sLOX-1 levels and the number of gravida (=−0.645, <0.001. The levels of sLOX-1 highly correlated with the number of parous (=−0.683, <0.001. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that serum sLOX-1 levels were associated with pregnancy followed by delivery that might predict endothelial dysfunction. We conclude that pregnancy followed by delivery may delay the beginning and progress of arteriosclerosis and its clinical manifestations in women of reproductive age.

  15. Inhibition of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 reduces cardiac fibroblast proliferation by suppressing GATA Binding Protein 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Ning-Ning; Liu, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Shuang-Wei; Zhang, Jing-Zhi; Li, Ai-Qun [Department of Cardiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Guangzhou Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Shi-Ming, E-mail: gzliushiming@126.com [Department of Cardiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Guangzhou Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Guangzhou (China)

    2016-07-08

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) and GATA Binding Protein 4 (GATA4) are important for the growth of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). When deregulated, LOX-1 and GATA4 can cause cardiac remodeling. In the present study, we found novel evidence that GATA4 was required for the LOX-1 regulation of CF proliferation. The inhibition of LOX-1 by RNA interference LOX-1 lentivirus resulted in the loss of PI3K/Akt activation and GATA4 protein expression. The overexpression of LOX-1 by lentivirus rescued CF proliferation, PI3K/Akt activation, and GATA4 protein expression. Moreover, GATA4 overexpression enhanced CF proliferation with LOX-1 inhibition. We also found that the inhibition of PI3K/Akt activation by LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, reduced cell proliferation and protein level of GATA4. In summary, GATA4 may play an important role in the LOX-1 and PI3K/Akt regulation of CF proliferation. -- Highlights: •GATA4 is regulated by LOX-1 signaling in CFs. •GATA4 is involved in LOX-1 regulating CF proliferation. •GATA4 is regulated by PI3K/Akt signaling in CFs.

  16. Association between Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 5 Polymorphisms and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Han Chinese: a Case-control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hai Fei; Zhao, Jing Zhi; Zhai, Yu Jia; Yin, Lei; Pang, Chao; Luo, Xin Ping; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Jin Jin; Li, Lin Lin; Wang, Yan; Wang, Qian; Wang, Bing Yuan; Ren, Yong Cheng; Hu, Dong Sheng

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the association between low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) variants (rs12363572 and rs4930588) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Han Chinese. A total of 1842 T2DM cases (507 newly diagnosed cases and 1335 previously diagnosed cases) and 7777 controls were included in this case-control study. PCR-RFLP was conducted to detect the genotype of the two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated to describe the strength of the association by logistic regression. In the study subjects, neither rs12363572 nor rs4930588 was significantly associated with T2DM, even after adjusting for relevant covariates. When stratified by body mass index (BMI), the two SNPs were also not associated with T2DM. Among the 3 common haplotypes, only haplotype TT was associated with reduced risk of T2DM (OR 0.820, 95% CI 0.732-0.919). In addition, rs12363572 was associated with BMI (P<0.001) and rs4930588 was associated with triglyceride levels (P=0.043) in 507 newly diagnosed T2DM cases but not in healthy controls. No LRP5 variant was found to be associated with T2DM in Han Chinese, but haplotype TT was found to be associated with T2DM. Copyright © 2015 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  17. Danhong inhibits oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced immune maturation of dentritic cells via a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongying; Wang, Shijun; Sun, Aijun; Huang, Dong; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Chunyu; Shi, Dazhuo; Chen, Keji; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2012-01-01

    Danhong injection (DHI), a Chinese Materia Medica standardized product extracted from Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae and Flos Carthami tinctorii, is effective in the treatment of atherosclerosis (AS)-related diseases. It is widely recognized that AS is a complex inflammatory disease of the arterial wall and the dendritic cells (DCs) is a major player in the pathogenesis of AS via mediating atherosclerotic antigen presenting and T lymphocytes. Here, we determined the effect and possible mechanism of DHI on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced maturation and immune function of DCs. Human monocyte-derived DCs were incubated with DHI or ciglitazone and were subsequently stimulated with ox-LDL to induce maturation. Similar to ciglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) γ agonist, DHI, could significantly reduce ox-LDL-induced expressions of mature markers, enhance the endocytotic function, and inhibit secretions of cytokine on DCs. These effects of DHI could be partly reversed by silencing the PPARγ. In conclusion, DHI could inhibit ox-LDL-induced maturation of DCs partly through activating a PPARγ-mediated signaling pathway.

  18. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-1 (LRP1) C4408R Mutant Promotes Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) α-Cleavage in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Huayan; Habib, Ahsan; Zi, Dan; Tian, Kathy; Tian, Jun; Giunta, Brian; Sawmiller, Darrell; Tan, Jun

    2017-06-13

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) plays conflicting roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, clearing β-amyloid (Aβ) from the brain while also enhancing APP endocytosis and resultant amyloidogenic processing. We have recently discovered that co-expression of mutant LRP1 C-terminal domain (LRP1-CT C4408R) with Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (APPswe) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells decreases Aβ production, while also increasing sAPPα and APP α-C-terminal fragment (α-CTF), compared with CHO cells expressing APPswe alone. Surprisingly, the location of this mutation on LRP1 corresponded with the α-secretase cleavage site of APP. Further experimentation confirmed that in CHO cells expressing APPswe or wild-type APP (APPwt), co-expression of LRP1-CT C4408R decreases Aβ and increases sAPPα and α-CTF compared with co-expression of wild-type LRP1-CT. In addition, LRP1-CT C4408R enhanced the unglycosylated form of LRP1-CT and reduced APP endocytosis as determined by flow cytometry. This finding identifies a point mutation in LRP1 which slows LRP1-CT-mediated APP endocytosis and amyloidogenic processing, while enhancing APP α-secretase cleavage, thus demonstrating a potential novel target for slowing AD pathogenesis.

  19. Inducible Apoe Gene Repair in Hypomorphic ApoE Mice Deficient in the LDL Receptor Promotes Atheroma Stabilization with a Human-like Lipoprotein Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlé, Delphine; Luk, Fu Sang; Kim, Roy Y.; Olivas, Victor R.; Kumar, Nikit; Posada, Jessica M.; Li, Kang; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Rapp, Joseph H.; Raffai, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study atherosclerosis regression in mice following plasma lipid reduction to moderately elevated apolipoprotein B (apoB)-lipoprotein levels. Approach and Results Chow-fed hypomorphic Apoe mice deficient in LDL receptor expression (Apoeh/hLdlr−/−Mx1-cre mice) develop hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. These mice were studied before and after inducible cre-mediated Apoe gene repair. By 1 week, induced mice displayed a 2-fold reduction in plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels and a decrease in the non-HDL:HDL-cholesterol ratio from 87%:13% to 60%:40%. This halted atherosclerotic lesion growth and promoted macrophage loss and accumulation of thick collagen fibers for up to 8 weeks. Concomitantly, blood Ly-6Chi monocytes were decreased by 2-fold but lesional macrophage apoptosis was unchanged. The expression of several genes involved in extra-cellular matrix remodeling and cell migration were changed in lesional macrophages 1 week after Apoe gene repair. However, mRNA levels of numerous genes involved in cholesterol efflux and inflammation were not significantly changed at this time point. Conclusions Restoring apoE expression in Apoeh/hLdlr−/−Mx1-cre mice resulted in lesion stabilization in the context of a human-like ratio of non-HDL:HDL-cholesterol. Our data suggest that macrophage loss derived in part from reduced blood Ly-6Chi monocytes levels and genetic reprogramming of lesional macrophages. PMID:23788760

  20. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways promote low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1-mediated internalization of beta-amyloid protein in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei-Na; Ma, Kai-Ge; Qian, Yi-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Shui; Feng, Gai-Feng; Shi, Li-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Zhao-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by the intraneuronal accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (Aβ). Reuptake of extracellular Aβ is believed to contribute significantly to the intraneuronal Aβ pool in the early stages of AD. Published reports have claimed that the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) mediates Aβ1-42 uptake and lysosomal trafficking in GT1-7 neuronal cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast non-neuronal cells. However, there is no direct evidence supporting the role of LRP1 in Aβ internalization in primary neurons. Our recent study indicated that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways are involved in regulating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR)-mediated Aβ1-42 uptake in SH-SY5Y cells. This study was designed to explore the regulation of MAPK signaling pathways on LRP1-mediated Aβ internalization in neurons. We found that extracellular Aβ1-42 oligomers could be internalized into endosomes/lysosomes and mitochondria in cortical neurons. Aβ1-42 and LRP1 were also found co-localized in neurons during Aβ1-42 internalization, and they could form Aβ1-42-LRP1 complex. Knockdown of LRP1 expression significantly decreased neuronal Aβ1-42 internalization. Finally, we identified that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways regulated the internalization of Aβ1-42 via LRP1. Therefore, these results demonstrated that LRP1, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 mediated the internalization of Aβ1-42 in neurons and provided evidence that blockade of LRP1 or inhibitions of MAPK signaling pathways might be a potential approach to lowering brain Aβ levels and served a potential therapeutic target for AD.

  1. Taurine suppresses oxidative stress-potentiated expression of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor and restenosis in balloon-injured rabbit iliac artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, G; Ozsarlak-Sozer, G; Oran, I; Oktay, G; Ozkal, S; Kerry, Z

    2011-12-01

    1. In endothelial cells, the major receptor for the binding and internalization of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is the lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of taurine on intimal thickening and LOX-1 expression under normal and oxidative conditions. 2. The iliac artery of rabbits were subjected to balloon injury and oxidative stress was induced by 14 days treatment of rabbits with 75 mg/kg, s.c., buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), a specific inhibitor of glutathione synthesis. Taurine was administered in drinking water (1%, w/v) for 14 days in the presence (BSO + Taurine group) and in the absence of BSO treatment (Taurine group). In taurine and placebo groups, rabbits were injected with 4 mL, s.c., 0.9% NaCl (vehicle for BSO) for 14 days. 3. Taurine (1% in drinking water, w/v) preserved plasma levels of anti-oxidants and lowered the increased blood pressure induced by BSO. The stenosis rate of 29.92% in the placebo group increased to 72.20% in the BSO group, which was significantly reduced to 42.21% by taurine (P treatment reduced the BSO-induced increase in LOX-1 expression at both the protein and mRNA levels (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). 4. The results demonstrate that the stenosis rate and LOX-1 expression correlate well with oxidative status. Manipulation of LOX-1 expression by taurine may have therapeutic benefits in preventing restenosis.

  2. Detection of a novel mutation Y468X in exon 10 of the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene causing heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia among French Canadians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, P.; Simard, J.; Moorjani, S. [Laval Univ., Quebec (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is caused by mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene and characterized by raised plasma LDL-cholesterol (C) and premature coronary heart disease. FH has higher frequency among French Canadians (FC) in northeastern Quebec than in most other populations, 1:154 vs. 1:500. In FC, five mutations account for all the mutant alleles in homozygous FH and 81% in heterozygous FH; thus 19% are uncharacterized at the molecular level. We investigated the possibility of additional mutations(s), and direct sequencing of asymmetric PCR fragments showed a novel mutation (468 stop-codon) in the heterozygous form in exon 10 of the LDL receptor gene. This mutation results from cytosine to guanine transversion, converting codon 468 (TAC) encoding tyrosine into TAG stop-codon (Y468X). This nonsense mutation will result in a truncated protein shortened by 371 amino acids which will be rapidly degraded. However, we did not ascertain the functional aspects. We rather assessed its effects on the extent of elevation of LDL-C in heterozygous FH children. The Y468X mutation resulted in raised LDL-C levels which were comparable to subjects with a non-functional `null` allele due to deletion of the promoter region and exon 1 (237{plus_minus}49 vs. 248 {plus_minus}41 mg/dl; mean{plus_minus}SD, p<0.05). The relative frequency of the Y468X mutation in a cohort of 343 children suspected for FH is 4.1% and it ranks number 4 in term of its prevalence. High frequency of FH among FC is attributed to a founder effect due to a high prevalence of one mutation; it is suggested that this novel mutation with low prevalence may be of later entry in this population.

  3. Streptococcal Serum Opacity Factor Increases Hepatocyte Uptake of Human Plasma High Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, Baiba K.; Rosales, Corina; Pillai, Biju K.; Lin, Hu Yu; Courtney, Harry S.; Pownall, Henry J.

    2010-01-01

    Serum opacity factor (SOF), a virulence determinant of Streptococcus pyogenes, converts plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) to three distinct species: lipid-free apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, neo HDL, a small discoidal HDL-like particle, and a large cholesteryl ester-rich microemulsion (CERM), that contains the cholesterol esters (CE) of up to ~400,000 HDL particles and apo E as its major protein. Similar SOF reaction products are obtained with HDL, total plasma lipoproteins and whole plasma. We hypothesized that hepatic uptake of CERM-CE via multiple apo E dependent receptors would be faster than that of HDL-CE. We tested our hypothesis using human hepatoma cells and lipoprotein receptor-specific Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. [3H]CE uptake by HepG2 and Huh7 cells from HDL after SOF treatment, which transfers >90% of HDL-CE to CERM, was respectively 2.4 and 4.5 times faster than from control HDL. CERM-[3H]CE uptake was inhibited by LDL and HDL, suggestive of uptake by both the LDL receptor (LDL-R) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Studies in CHO cells specifically expressing LDL-R and SR-BI confirmed CERM-[3H]CE uptake by both receptors. RAP and heparin inhibit CERM-[3H]CE but not HDL-[3H]CE uptake thereby implicating LRP-1 and cell surface proteoglycans in this process. These data demonstrate that SOF treatment of HDL increases CE uptake via multiple hepatic apo E receptors. In so doing, SOF might increase hepatic disposal of plasma cholesterol in a way that is therapeutically useful. PMID:20879789

  4. Lipoprotein(a) levels in familial hipercholesterolaemia: an important predictor for cardiovascular disease independent of the type of LDL-receptor mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine the relationship between lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a large cohort of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients. Lipoprotein(a) is considered a cardiovascular risk factor. Nevertheless, the role of Lp(a) as a predictor of CVD in FH has been...

  5. Development and characterization of hepatitis C virus genotype 1-7 cell culture systems: role of CD81 and scavenger receptor class B type I and effect of antiviral drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Scheel, Troels K H; Jensen, Tanja B

    2009-01-01

    Six major hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes and numerous subtypes have been described, and recently a seventh major genotype was discovered. Genotypes show significant molecular and clinical differences, such as differential response to combination therapy with interferon-alpha and ribavirin...... against the putative coreceptors CD81 and scavenger receptor class B type I in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, neutralizing antibodies in selected chronic phase HCV sera had differential effects against genotype 1-7 viruses. Conclusion: We completed and characterized a panel of JFH1-based cell culture...... systems of all seven major HCV genotypes and important subtypes and used these viruses in comparative studies of antivirals, HCV receptor interaction, and neutralizing antibodies....

  6. Transendothelial lipoprotein exchange and microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jan Skov; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Jensen, Kurt Svarre

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Microalbuminuria associates with increased risk of atherosclerosis in individuals without diabetes. We hypothesized that transendothelial lipoprotein exchange is elevated among such individuals, possibly explaining increased intimal lipoprotein accumulation and thus atherosclerosis....... METHODS: Using an in vivo isotope technique, transendothelial exchange of low density lipoprotein (LDL) was measured in 77 non-diabetic individuals. Autologous 131-iodinated LDL was reinjected intravenously, and the 1-h fractional escape rate was calculated as index of transendothelial exchange. RESULTS...... transformed) plasma insulin: beta=0.6 (95% CI: 0.1-1.1); R=0.22; Plipoproteins, LDL size, body mass index, plasma volume, and use of medicine, and it was unlikely caused by altered hepatic LDL receptor expression...

  7. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Chlordecone, a mixed pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) agonist, alters cholesterol homeostasis and lipoprotein metabolism in C57BL/6 mice

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Chlordecone (CD) is one of many banned organochlorine (OC) insecticides that are widespread persistent organic pollutants. OC insecticides alter lipid homeostasis in rodents at doses that are not neurotoxic or carcinogenic. Pretreatment of mice or rats with CD altered tissue distribution of a subsequent dose of [14C]CD or [14C]cholesterol (CH). Nuclear receptors regulate expression of genes important in the homeostasis of CH and other lipids. In this study, we report that CD suppresses in vit...

  9. Different Effects of Homocysteine and Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein on Methylation Status in the Promoter Region of the Estrogen Receptor α Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yushan HUANG; Kejun PENG; Juan SU; Yuping HUANG; Yizhou XU; Shuren WANG

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effects of homocysteine (Hcy) and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) on DNA methylation in the promoter region of the estrogen receptor α (ERα) gene, and its potential mechanism in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Cultured smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of humans were treated by Hcy and ox-LDL with different concentrations for different periods of time. The DNA methylation status was assayed by nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction, the lipids that accumulated in the SMCs and foam cell formations were examined with Oil red O staining. The proliferation of SMCs was assayed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. The results showed that ox-LDL in moderate concentrations (10-40 mg/L) induced de novo methylation in the promoter region of the ERα gene of SMCs. However, high concentrations (50 mg/L) of ox-LDL, resulted in demethylation of ERα. The Hcy treatment resulted in de novo methylation in the promoter region of the ERα gene with a concentration- and treating time-dependent manner, and a dose-dependent promoting effect on SMC proliferation. These data indicated that the two risk factors for atherosclerosis had the function of inducing de novo methylation in the promoter region of the ERα gene of SMCs. However, high concentrations (50mg/L) of ox-LDL induced demethylation, indicating that different risk factors of atherosclerosis with different potency might cause different aberrant methylation patterns in the promoter region of the ERα gene. The atherogenic mechanism of Hcy might involve the hypermethylation of the ERα gene, leading to the proliferation of SMCs in atherosclerotic lesions.

  10. High density lipoprotein promotes proliferation of adipose-derived stem cells via S1P1 receptor and Akt, ERK1/2 signal pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haitao; Zhou, Enchen; Wei, Xiujing; Fu, Zhiwei; Niu, Chenguang; Li, Yang; Pan, Bing; Mathew, Anna V; Wang, Xu; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Zheng, Lemin; Wang, Yongyu

    2015-05-15

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) are non-hematopoietic mesenchymal stem cells that have shown great promise in their ability to differentiate into multiple cell lineages. Their ubiquitous nature and the ease of harvesting have attracted the attention of many researchers, and they pose as an ideal candidate for applications in regenerative medicine. Several reports have demonstrated that transplanting ADSC can promote repair of injured tissue and angiogenesis in animal models. Survival of these cells after transplant remains a key limiting factor for the success of ADSC transplantation. Circulating factors like High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) has been known to promote survival of other stems cells like bone marrow derived stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells, both by proliferation and by inhibiting cell apoptosis. The effect of HDL on transplanted adipose-derived stem cells in vivo is largely unknown. This study focused on exploring the effects of plasma HDL on ADSC and delineating the mechanisms involved in their proliferation after entering the bloodstream. Using the MTT and BrdU assays, we tested the effects of HDL on ADSC proliferation. We probed the downstream intracellular Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and expression of cyclin proteins in ADSC using western blot. Our study found that HDL promotes proliferation of ADSC, by binding to sphingosine-1- phosphate receptor-1(S1P1) on the cell membrane. This interaction led to activation of intracellular Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, resulting in increased expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and simultaneous reduction in expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27, therefore promoting cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. These studies raise the possibility that HDL may be a physiologic regulator of stem cells and increasing HDL concentrations may be valuable strategy to promote ADSC transplantation.

  11. Effect of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1 gene polymorphism on high density lipoprotein levels in response to hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.C. Nogueira-de-Souza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that estrogen replacement therapy and estrogen plus progestin replacement therapy alter serum levels of total, LDL and HDL cholesterol levels. However, HDL cholesterol levels in women vary considerably in response to hormone replacement therapy (HRT. A significant portion of the variability of these levels has been attributed to genetic factors. Therefore, we investigated the influence of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1 gene polymorphisms on HDL levels in response to postmenopausal HRT. We performed a prospective cohort study on 54 postmenopausal women who had not used HRT before the study and had no significant general medical illness. HRT consisted of conjugated equine estrogen and medroxyprogesterone acetate continuously for 1 year. The lipoprotein levels were measured from blood samples taken before the start of therapy and after 1 year of HRT. ESR1 polymorphism (MspI C>T, HaeIII C>T, PvuII C>T, and XbaI A>G frequencies were assayed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. A general linear model was used to describe the relationships between HDL levels and genotypes after adjusting for age. A significant increase in HDL levels was observed after HRT (P = 0.029. Women with the ESR1 PvuII TT genotype showed a statistically significant increase in HDL levels after HRT (P = 0.032. No association was found between other ESR1 polymorphisms and HDL levels. According to our results, the ESR1 PvuII TT genotype was associated with increased levels of HDL after 1 year of HRT.

  12. Cholesterol reduction ameliorates glucose-induced calcium handling and insulin secretion in islets from low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, J C; Vanzela, E C; Ribeiro, R A; Rezende, L F; de Oliveira, C A; Carneiro, E M; Oliveira, H C F; Boschero, A C

    2013-04-01

    Changes in cellular cholesterol level may contribute to beta cell dysfunction. Islets from low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR(-/-)) mice have higher cholesterol content and secrete less insulin than wild-type (WT) mice. Here, we investigated the association between cholesterol content, insulin secretion and Ca(2+) handling in these islets. Isolated islets from both LDLR(-/-) and WT mice were used for measurements of insulin secretion (radioimmunoassay), cholesterol content (fluorimetric assay), cytosolic Ca(2+) level (fura-2AM) and SNARE protein expression (VAMP-2, SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1A). Cholesterol was depleted by incubating the islets with increasing concentrations (0-10mmol/l) of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD). The first and second phases of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) were lower in LDLR(-/-) than in WT islets, paralleled by an impairment of Ca(2+) handling in the former. SNAP-25 and VAMP-2, but not syntaxin-1A, were reduced in LDLR(-/-) compared with WT islets. Removal of excess cholesterol from LDLR(-/-) islets normalized glucose- and tolbutamide-induced insulin release. Glucose-stimulated Ca(2+) handling was also normalized in cholesterol-depleted LDLR(-/-) islets. Cholesterol removal from WT islets by 0.1 and 1.0mmol/l MβCD impaired both GSIS and Ca(2+) handling. In addition, at 10mmol/l MβCD WT islet showed a loss of membrane integrity and higher DNA fragmentation. Abnormally high (LDLR(-/-) islets) or low cholesterol content (WT islets treated with MβCD) alters both GSIS and Ca(2+) handling. Normalization of cholesterol improves Ca(2+) handling and insulin secretion in LDLR(-/-) islets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Binding of thyroglobulin (Tg) to the low-density lipoprotein receptor-associated protein (RAP) during the biosynthetic pathway prevents premature Tg interactions with sortilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, R; Lisi, S; Rotondo Dottore, G; Vitti, P; Marinò, M

    2017-04-05

    Sortilin, a Vps10p family member, is expressed by thyroid epithelial cells (TEC), where it binds to internalized thyroglobulin (Tg) molecules. Premature binding of Tg to sortilin during biosynthesis may cause intracellular retention of Tg. Such a premature interaction may be prevented by one or more inhibitor/s. Because both sortilin and Tg bind to the low-density lipoprotein receptor-associated protein (RAP), we investigated whether RAP serves such a function. Immunofluorescence staining for sortilin, Tg, and RAP was performed in FRTL-5 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments were performed in extracts from FRTL-5 or COS-7 cells, the former co-transfected with Tg and/or RAP and/or sortilin, or in thyroid extracts from RAP KO mice. Tg and sortilin did not co-localize in FRTL-5 cells following inhibition of protein synthesis, suggesting that newly synthesized, endogenous sortilin and Tg do not interact, in confirmation of which an anti-sortilin antibody did not co-precipitate Tg in FRTL-5 cells. In contrast, Tg co-localized with RAP in FRTL-5 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation of Tg with an anti-sortilin antibody in COS-7 cells transfected with sortilin and Tg was abolished when cells were co-transfected with RAP, indicating that RAP prevents binding of Tg to sortilin during biosynthesis, in confirmation of which an anti-sortilin antibody co-precipitated Tg in thyroid extracts from RAP KO mice to a greater extent than in thyroid extracts from WT mice. Tg does not bind prematurely to sortilin because of its interaction with RAP during protein biosynthesis. These findings add new information to the knowledge of thyroid physiology.

  14. Blood Glutamate Scavenging: Insight into Neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zlotnik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain insults are characterized by a multitude of complex processes, of which glutamate release plays a major role. Deleterious excess of glutamate in the brain’s extracellular fluids stimulates glutamate receptors, which in turn lead to cell swelling, apoptosis, and neuronal death. These exacerbate neurological outcome. Approaches aimed at antagonizing the astrocytic and glial glutamate receptors have failed to demonstrate clinical benefit. Alternatively, eliminating excess glutamate from brain interstitial fluids by making use of the naturally occurring brain-to-blood glutamate efflux has been shown to be effective in various animal studies. This is facilitated by gradient driven transport across brain capillary endothelial glutamate transporters. Blood glutamate scavengers enhance this naturally occurring mechanism by reducing the blood glutamate concentration, thus increasing the rate at which excess glutamate is cleared. Blood glutamate scavenging is achieved by several mechanisms including: catalyzation of the enzymatic process involved in glutamate metabolism, redistribution of glutamate into tissue, and acute stress response. Regardless of the mechanism involved, decreased blood glutamate concentration is associated with improved neurological outcome. This review focuses on the physiological, mechanistic and clinical roles of blood glutamate scavenging, particularly in the context of acute and chronic CNS injury. We discuss the details of brain-to-blood glutamate efflux, auto-regulation mechanisms of blood glutamate, natural and exogenous blood glutamate scavenging systems, and redistribution of glutamate. We then propose different applied methodologies to reduce blood and brain glutamate concentrations and discuss the neuroprotective role of blood glutamate scavenging.

  15. The iron-regulated staphylococcal lipoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eSheldon

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipoproteins fulfill diverse roles in antibiotic resistance, adhesion, protein secretion, signaling and sensing, and many also serve as the substrate binding protein (SBP partner to ABC transporters for the acquisition of a diverse array of nutrients including peptides, sugars, and scarcely abundant metals. In the staphylococci, the iron-regulated SBPs are significantly upregulated during iron starvation and function to sequester and deliver iron into the bacterial cell, enabling staphylococci to circumvent iron restriction imposed by the host environment. Accordingly, this subset of lipoproteins has been implicated in staphylococcal pathogenesis and virulence. Lipoproteins also activate the host innate immune response, triggered through Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2 and, notably, the iron-regulated subset of lipoproteins are particularly immunogenic. In this review, we discuss the iron-regulated staphylococcal lipoproteins with regard to their biogenesis, substrate specificity, and impact on the host innate immune response.

  16. Salivary agglutinin and lung scavenger receptor cysteine-rich glycoprotein 340 have broad anti-influenza activities and interactions with surfactant protein D that vary according to donor source and sialylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L.; Ligtenberg, Antoon; White, Mitchell R.

    2006-01-01

    and salivary gp-340 are identical in protein sequence, salivary gp-340 from one donor had significantly greater antiviral activity against avian-like IAV strains which preferentially bind sialic acids in alpha(2,3) linkage. A greater density of alpha(2,3)-linked sialic acids was present on the salivary gp-340...... from this donor as compared with salivary gp-340 from another donor or several preparations of lung gp-340. Hence, the specificity of sialic acid linkages on gp-340 is an important determinant of anti-IAV activity. Gp-340 binds to SP-D (surfactant protein D), and we previously showed that lung gp-340......We previously found that scavenger receptor cysteine-rich gp-340 (glycoprotein-340), isolated from lung or saliva, directly inhibits human IAVs (influenza A viruses). We now show that salivary gp-340 has broad antiviral activity against human, equine and porcine IAV strains. Although lung...

  17. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000408.htm Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency is a group of rare genetic ...

  18. Lipoprotein-a

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007262.htm Lipoprotein-a To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lipoproteins are molecules made of proteins and fat. They ...

  19. Circulating lipoproteins are a crucial component of host defense against invasive Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netea, M.G.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Keuter, M.; Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Kullberg, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Circulating lipoproteins improve the outcome of severe Gram-negative infections through neutralizing lipopolysaccharides (LPS), thus inhibiting the release of proinflammatory cytokines. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Low density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDLR-/-) mice, with a 7-fold i

  20. Association of polymorphisms in low-density lipoprotein receptor- related protein 5 gene with bone mineral density in postmenopausal Chinese women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-lin ZHANG; Yue-juan QIN; Jin-wei HE; Qi-ren HUANG; Miao LI; Yun-qiu HU; Yu-juan LIU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the possible association of Q89R, N740N and A1330V polymorphisms in low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene with bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal Chinese women. Methods: Q89R,N740N and A1330V genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reactionrestriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in 647 unrelated healthy postmenopausal Han Chinese women aged 43-76 years in Shanghai. BMD at lumbar spine 1-4 and the left proximal femur including the femoral neck, trochanter and Ward's triangle were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptionmetry in all subjects. Results: The distribution of the Q89R, N740N and A1330V genotypes in this population was as follows: QQ 80.5%, QR 18.7%, and RR 0.8%; TT 66.9%,TC 31.1%, and CC 2.0%; AA 68.0%, AV 29.7%, and VV 2.3%. The frequencies of the Q89R, N740N and A1330V genotypes and alleles did not deviate from the HardyWeinberg equilibrium. We found that the Q89R and A1330V polymorphisms were in linkage disequilibrium in our population (x2= 13.50, P<0.01). Both before and after adjusting for age, years since menopause, height, and weight, the Q89R or N740N genotypes were significantly associated with BMD at the femoral neck (P<0.05).Subjects with the Q89R QQ genotype or the N740N TT genotype had a significantly higher BMD at the femoral neck, compared with those with the QR/RR or TC/CC genotypes, respectively. No significant association was found between A1330V polymorphism and BMD at any site. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the LRP5 gene is a candidate for the genetic determination of BMD in postmenopausal Chinese women.

  1. Low density lipoprotein receptor targeted doxorubicin/DNA-Gold Nanorods as a chemo- and thermo-dual therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Li, Shasha; Hua, Haiying; Liu, Dan; Song, Lili; Sun, Pengchao; Huang, Weiwei; Tang, Yafang; Zhao, Yongxing

    2016-11-20

    As drug vehicles and therapeutics, Gold Nanorods (GNRs) have various merits such as easy preparation and modification, passive accumulation to tumor tissues, effective intracellular delivery of therapeutics, and thermal responses to laser radiation. Doxorubicin (DOX) has been the standard chemotherapy for cancer. To enhance the anti-cancer efficacy, chemotherapy and thermotherapy were combined in the present study. To load sufficient DOX, DOX was first intercalated into DNA double strands and then absorbed to GNRs. PEG (polyethylene glycol) was used to modify DOX/DNA-GNRs to prolong circulation in vivo and to enhance its stability. Low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) targeted peptide-RLT (R) was also bound to DOX/DNA-GNRs to increase their specificity to LDLR over-expressed cancer cells. DNA-GNRs-PEG/R was successfully prepared with high in vitro stability in this study and DOX was loaded sufficiently to obtain DOX/DNA-GNRs-PEG/R. DOX/DNA-GNRs-PEG/R with near infrared (NIR) laser treatment showed higher inhibition to MCF-7 cells and PC-3 cells and both DOX/DNA-GNRs-PEG/R with/without NIR laser treatment were more potent than free DOX. Cell uptake experiment indicated that DOX loaded in DNA-GNRs-PEG/R was taken by PC-3 cells much faster than free DOX. With DOX/DNA-GNRs-PEG/R, the apoptosis rate and necrosis rate of PC-3 cells increased 1.7 and 6.4 folds respectively compared to free DOX. Additional NIR laser treatment caused significantly increases in PC-3 cell necrosis. DOX/DNA-GNRs-PEG/R+laser also enhanced the inhibition of S phase of PC-3 cells by DOX. ROS (reactive oxygen species) assay showed that DOX/DNA-GNRs-PEG/R produced much more ROS than free DOX. With additional laser treatment, further increase in ROS was detected. Prostate cancer model was achieved by injecting PC-3 cells into nude mice and the results showed that more DNA-GNRs-PEG/R was observed in tumor cells and higher tumor inhibition rate was achieved in vivo with R modification. Conclusively

  2. Differences in lipid distribution and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and lipoprotein lipase genes in torafugu and red seabream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Gen; Yamada, Toshihiro; Han, Yuna; Hirano, Yuki; Khieokhajonkhet, Anurak; Shirakami, Hirohito; Nagasaka, Reiko; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Ushio, Hideki; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-04-01

    Lipid content is one of the major determinants of the meat quality in fish. However, the mechanisms underlying the species-specific distribution of lipid are still poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanisms associated with lipid accumulation in two species of fish: torafugu (a puffer fish) and red seabream. The lipid content of liver and carcass were 67.0% and 0.8% for torafugu, respectively, and 8.8% and 7.3% for red seabream, respectively. Visceral adipose tissue was only apparent in the red seabream and accounted for 73.3% of its total lipid content. Oil red O staining confirmed this species-specific lipid distribution, and further demonstrated that the lipid in the skeletal muscle of the red seabream was mainly localized in the myosepta. We subsequently cloned cDNAs from torafugu encoding lipoprotein lipase 1 (LPL1) and LPL2, important enzymes for the uptake of lipids from blood circulation system into various tissues. The relative mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and the LPLs of torafugu were determined by quantitative real-time PCR together with their counterparts in red seabream previously reported. The relative mRNA levels of PPARγ and LPL1 correlated closely to the lipid distribution of both fish, being significantly higher in liver than skeletal muscle in torafugu, whereas the highest in the adipose tissue, followed by liver and skeletal muscle in red seabream. However, the relative mRNA levels of LPL2 were tenfold lower than LPL1 in both species and only correlated to lipid distribution in torafugu, suggesting that LPL2 has only a minor role in lipid accumulation. In situ hybridization revealed that the transcripts of LPL1 co-localized with lipids in the adipocytes located along the myosepta of the skeletal muscle of red seabream. These results suggest that the transcriptional regulation of PPARγ and LPL1 is responsible for the species-specific lipid distribution of torafugu

  3. Detection of early stage atherosclerotic plaques using PET and CT fusion imaging targeting P-selectin in low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Ikuko, E-mail: nakamuri@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Hasegawa, Koki [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Wada, Yasuhiro [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Hirase, Tetsuaki; Node, Koichi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Watanabe, Yasuyoshi, E-mail: yywata@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► P-selectin regulates leukocyte recruitment as an early stage event of atherogenesis. ► We developed an antibody-based molecular imaging probe targeting P-selectin for PET. ► This is the first report on successful PET imaging for delineation of P-selectin. ► P-selectin is a candidate target for atherosclerotic plaque imaging by clinical PET. -- Abstract: Background: Sensitive detection and qualitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaques are in high demand in cardiovascular clinical settings. The leukocyte–endothelial interaction mediated by an adhesion molecule P-selectin participates in arterial wall inflammation and atherosclerosis. Methods and results: A {sup 64}Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid conjugated anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody ({sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb) probe was prepared by conjugating an anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody with DOTA followed by {sup 64}Cu labeling. Thirty-six hours prior to PET and CT fusion imaging, 3 MBq of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb was intravenously injected into low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient Ldlr-/- mice. After a 180 min PET scan, autoradiography and biodistribution of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody was examined using excised aortas. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet for promotion of atherosclerotic plaque development, PET and CT fusion imaging revealed selective and prominent accumulation of the probe in the aortic root. Autoradiography of aortas that demonstrated probe uptake into atherosclerotic plaques was confirmed by Oil red O staining for lipid droplets. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a chow diet to develop mild atherosclerotic plaques, probe accumulation was barely detectable in the aortic root on PET and CT fusion imaging. Probe biodistribution in aortas was 6.6-fold higher in Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet than in those fed with a normal chow diet. {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin m

  4. Polymorphisms at cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, apolipoproteins B and E and low density lipoprotein receptor genes in patients with gallbladder stone disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Yan Jiang; Yu Jiang; Sheng-Dao Zhang; Tian-Quan Han; Guang-Jun Suo; Dian-Xu Feng; Sheng Chen; Xing-Xing Cai; Zhi-Hong Jiang; Jun Shang; Yi Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between gallbladder stone disease (GSD) and single nucleotide polymorphisms of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A) gene promoter,apolipoprotein (4PO) B gene exon 26, 4POEgene exon 4 or microsatellite polymorphism of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene exon 18.METHODS: Genotypes of CYP7A, APOB, APOE and LDLR genes were determined in 105 patients with GSD diagnosed by B-mode ultrasonography and 274 control subjects.Serum lipids were analyzed with HITACHI 7060 automaiC biochemical analyzer.RESULTS: Body mass index (BMI) was significantly higher in patients with GSD (24.47±3.09) than in controls (23.50±2.16).Plasma total cholesterol was lower in patients with GSD (4.66±0.92 mmol/L) than in controls (4.91±0.96 mmol/L),P<0.01 after adjusted for age, sex and BMI. The significantly higher frequency of A allele of CYP7,4 gene polymorphism and X+ allele of APOBgene polymorphism was seen in GSD patients. Percentages of A allele in patients and controls were 62.86% and 54.38% (P <0.05) and those of X+ allele 8.57% and 4.01% (P<0.01). Subjects with A allele had significantly lower plasma total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol than subjects with CC homozygote. In a multiple variable logistic regression model, the BMI (OR=1.13, 95% CI: 1.05-1.22), A allele (OR=1.48, 95% CI: 1.05-2.09) and X+ allele (OR=2.28, 95% CI: 1.14-4.59) were positively associated with GSD (P <0.05). Plasma total cholesterol (OR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.64-0.74) was negatively related to SSD (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: With an association analysis, it was determined that A allele of CYP74 gene and X+ allele of 4POBgene might be considered as risk genes for GSD. These alleles are related with differences of serum lipids among subjects.Multiple-variable logistic regression model analysis showed that besides BMI, GSD was affected by polygenetic factors.But the mechanism for these two alleles responsible for GSD requires further investigations.

  5. Lipoprotein(a) metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an atherogenic lipoprotein. The metabolism of this lipoprotein is still not well understood. It has long been known that the plasma concentration of Lp(a) is highly heritable, with its genetic determinants located in the apo(a) locus and regulating the rate of hepatic apo(a...

  6. The Crystal Structure of the Fifth Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Domain of Porcine CD163 Reveals an Important Residue Involved in Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongfang; Jiang, Longguang; Qiao, Songlin; Zhi, Yubao; Chen, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yanyan; Huang, Xiaojing; Huang, Mingdong; Li, Rui; Zhang, Gai-Ping

    2017-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has become an economically critical factor in swine industry since its worldwide spread in the 1990s. Infection by its causative agent, PRRS virus (PRRSV), was proven to be mediated by an indispensable receptor, porcine CD163 (pCD163), and the fifth scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain (SRCR5) is essential for virus infection. However, the structural details and specific residues of pCD163 SRCR5 involved in infection have not been defined yet. In this study, we prepared recombinant pCD163 SRCR5 in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells and determined its crystal structure at a high resolution of 2.0 Å. This structure includes a markedly long loop region and shows a special electrostatic potential, and these are significantly different from those of other members of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily (SRCR-SF). Subsequently, we carried out structure-based mutational studies to identify that the arginine residue at position 561 (Arg561) in the long loop region is important for PRRSV infection. Further, we showed Arg561 probably takes effect on the binding of pCD163 to PRRSV during virus invasion. Altogether the current work provides the first view of the CD163 SRCR domain, expands our knowledge of the invasion mechanism of PRRSV, and supports a molecular basis for prevention and control of the virus. PRRS has caused huge economic losses to pig farming. The syndrome is caused by PRRSV, and PRRSV infection has been shown to be mediated by host cell surface receptors. One of them, pCD163, is especially indispensable, and its SRCR5 domain has been further demonstrated to play a significant role in virus infection. However, its structural details and the residues involved in infection are unknown. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of pCD163 SRCR5 and then carried out site-directed mutational studies based on the crystal structure to elucidate which residue is important. Our

  7. Receptor-associated protein (RAP) has two high-affinity binding sites for the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP): consequences for the chaperone functions of RAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jan K; Dolmer, Klavs; Schar, Christine; Gettins, Peter G W

    2009-06-26

    RAP (receptor-associated protein) is a three domain 38 kDa ER (endoplasmic reticulum)-resident protein that is a chaperone for the LRP (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein). Whereas RAP is known to compete for binding of all known LRP ligands, neither the location, the number of binding sites on LRP, nor the domains of RAP involved in binding is known with certainty. We have systematically examined the binding of each of the three RAP domains (D1, D2 and D3) to tandem and triple CRs (complement-like repeats) that span the principal ligand-binding region, cluster II, of LRP. We found that D3 binds with low nanomolar affinity to all (CR)2 species examined. Addition of a third CR domain increases the affinity for D3 slightly. A pH change from 7.4 to 5.5 gave only a 6-fold increase in Kd for D3 at 37 degrees C, whereas temperature change from 22 degrees C to 37 degrees C has a similar small effect on affinity, raising questions about the recently proposed D3-destabilization mechanism of RAP release from LRP. Surprisingly, and in contrast to literature suggestions, D1 and D2 also bind to most (CR)2 and (CR)3 constructs with nanomolar affinity. Although this suggested that there might be three high-affinity binding sites in RAP for LRP, studies with intact RAP showed that only two binding sites are available in the intact chaperone. These findings suggest a new model for RAP to function as a folding chaperone and also for the involvement of YWTD domains in RAP release from LRP in the Golgi.

  8. [Plasma lipoproteins as drug carriers. Effect of phospholipid formulations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkhovskaia, T I; Ipatova, O M; Medvedeva, N V; Ivanov, V S; Ivanova, L I

    2010-01-01

    The extensive development of nanotechnologies in the last two decades has brought about new understanding of plasma lipoproteins (LP) as natural drug nanocarriers that escape interaction with immune and reticuloendothelial systems. Drugs bound to LP (especially LDL) can more actively penetrate into cells of many cancer and inflammation tissues with enhanced expression or/and dysregulation of B,E receptors or possibly scavenger SR-BI receptors. Relevant studies are focused on the development of new dosage forms by conjugating lipophilic drugs either with isolated plasma LP or with their model formulations, such as nanoemulsions, mimetics, lipid nanospheres, etc. Some authors include in these particles serum or recombinant apoproteins, peptides, and modified polymer products. As shown recently, protein-free lipid nanoemulsions in plasma take up free apoA and apoE. Complexes with various LP also form after direct administration of lypophilic drugs into blood especially those enclosed in phospholipid formulations, e.g. liposomes. Results of evaluation of some lipophilic dugs (mainly cytostatics, amphotericin B, cyclosporine A, etc.) are discussed. Original data are presented on the influence of phospholipid formulations on the distribution of doxorubicin and indomethacin between LP classes after in vitro incubation in plasma. On the whole, the review illustrates the importance of research on LP and phospholi pid forms as drug nanocarriers to be used to enhance effect of therapy.

  9. Streptococcal serum opacity factor increases the rate of hepatocyte uptake of human plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, Baiba K; Rosales, Corina; Pillai, Biju K; Lin, Hu Yu; Courtney, Harry S; Pownall, Henry J

    2010-11-16

    Serum opacity factor (SOF), a virulence determinant of Streptococcus pyogenes, converts plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to three distinct species: lipid-free apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, neo HDL, a small discoidal HDL-like particle, and a large cholesteryl ester-rich microemulsion (CERM) that contains the cholesterol esters (CE) of up to ∼400000 HDL particles and apo E as its major protein. Similar SOF reaction products are obtained with HDL, total plasma lipoproteins, and whole plasma. We hypothesized that hepatic uptake of CERM-CE via multiple apo E-dependent receptors would be faster than that of HDL-CE. We tested our hypothesis using human hepatoma cells and lipoprotein receptor-specific Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The uptake of [(3)H]CE by HepG2 and Huh7 cells from HDL after SOF treatment, which transfers >90% of HDL-CE to CERM, was 2.4 and 4.5 times faster, respectively, than from control HDL. CERM-[(3)H]CE uptake was inhibited by LDL and HDL, suggestive of uptake by both the LDL receptor (LDL-R) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Studies in CHO cells specifically expressing LDL-R and SR-BI confirmed CERM-[(3)H]CE uptake by both receptors. RAP and heparin inhibit CERM-[(3)H]CE but not HDL-[(3)H]CE uptake, thereby implicating LRP-1 and cell surface proteoglycans in this process. These data demonstrate that SOF treatment of HDL increases the rate of CE uptake via multiple hepatic apo E receptors. In so doing, SOF might increase the level of hepatic disposal of plasma cholesterol in a way that is therapeutically useful.

  10. A Computational Model for the Analysis of Lipoprotein Distributions in the Mouse: Translating FPLC Profiles to Lipoprotein Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sips, Fianne L. P.; Tiemann, Christian A.; Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Groen, Albert K.; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; van Riel, Natal A. W.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances of lipoprotein metabolism are recognized as indicators of cardiometabolic disease risk. Lipoprotein size and composition, measured in a lipoprotein profile, are considered to be disease risk markers. However, the measured profile is a collective result of complex metabolic interactions, which complicates the identification of changes in metabolism. In this study we aim to develop a method which quantitatively relates murine lipoprotein size, composition and concentration to the molecular mechanisms underlying lipoprotein metabolism. We introduce a computational framework which incorporates a novel kinetic model of murine lipoprotein metabolism. The model is applied to compute a distribution of plasma lipoproteins, which is then related to experimental lipoprotein profiles through the generation of an in silico lipoprotein profile. The model was first applied to profiles obtained from wild-type C57Bl/6J mice. The results provided insight into the interplay of lipoprotein production, remodelling and catabolism. Moreover, the concentration and metabolism of unmeasured lipoprotein components could be determined. The model was validated through the prediction of lipoprotein profiles of several transgenic mouse models commonly used in cardiovascular research. Finally, the framework was employed for longitudinal analysis of the profiles of C57Bl/6J mice following a pharmaceutical intervention with a liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. The multifaceted regulatory response to the administration of the compound is incompletely understood. The results explain the characteristic changes of the observed lipoprotein profile in terms of the underlying metabolic perturbation and resultant modifications of lipid fluxes in the body. The Murine Lipoprotein Profiler (MuLiP) presented here is thus a valuable tool to assess the metabolic origin of altered murine lipoprotein profiles and can be applied in preclinical research performed in mice for analysis of lipid fluxes and

  11. A computational model for the analysis of lipoprotein distributions in the mouse: translating FPLC profiles to lipoprotein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sips, Fianne L P; Tiemann, Christian A; Oosterveer, Maaike H; Groen, Albert K; Hilbers, Peter A J; van Riel, Natal A W

    2014-05-01

    Disturbances of lipoprotein metabolism are recognized as indicators of cardiometabolic disease risk. Lipoprotein size and composition, measured in a lipoprotein profile, are considered to be disease risk markers. However, the measured profile is a collective result of complex metabolic interactions, which complicates the identification of changes in metabolism. In this study we aim to develop a method which quantitatively relates murine lipoprotein size, composition and concentration to the molecular mechanisms underlying lipoprotein metabolism. We introduce a computational framework which incorporates a novel kinetic model of murine lipoprotein metabolism. The model is applied to compute a distribution of plasma lipoproteins, which is then related to experimental lipoprotein profiles through the generation of an in silico lipoprotein profile. The model was first applied to profiles obtained from wild-type C57Bl/6J mice. The results provided insight into the interplay of lipoprotein production, remodelling and catabolism. Moreover, the concentration and metabolism of unmeasured lipoprotein components could be determined. The model was validated through the prediction of lipoprotein profiles of several transgenic mouse models commonly used in cardiovascular research. Finally, the framework was employed for longitudinal analysis of the profiles of C57Bl/6J mice following a pharmaceutical intervention with a liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. The multifaceted regulatory response to the administration of the compound is incompletely understood. The results explain the characteristic changes of the observed lipoprotein profile in terms of the underlying metabolic perturbation and resultant modifications of lipid fluxes in the body. The Murine Lipoprotein Profiler (MuLiP) presented here is thus a valuable tool to assess the metabolic origin of altered murine lipoprotein profiles and can be applied in preclinical research performed in mice for analysis of lipid fluxes and

  12. N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist MK-801 and Radical Scavengers Protect Cholinergic Nucleus Basalis Neurons against β-Amyloid Neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T.; Mulder, J.; Sasvári, M.; Ábrahám, I.; Kónya, C.; Zarándi, M.; Penke, B.; Luiten, P.G.M.; Nyakas, C.

    1999-01-01

    Previous experimental data indicate the involvement of Ca2+-related excitotoxic processes, possibly mediated by N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptors, in β-amyloid (βA) neurotoxicity. On the other hand, other lines of evidence support the view that free radical generation is a critical step in the β

  13. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 and radical scavengers protect cholinergic nucleus basalis neurons against beta-amyloid neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T; Mulder, J; Sasvari, M; Abraham, [No Value; Konya, C; Zarandi, M; Penke, B; Luiten, PGM; Nyakas, C

    1999-01-01

    Previous experimental data indicate the involvement of Ca2+-related excitotoxic processes, possibly mediated by N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptors, in beta-amyloid (beta A) neurotoxicity. On the other hand, other lines of evidence support the view that free radical generation is a critical step i

  14. Unique cellular events occurring during the initial interaction of macrophages with matrix-retained or methylated aggregated low density lipoprotein (LDL). Prolonged cell-surface contact during which ldl-cholesteryl ester hydrolysis exceeds ldl protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buton, X; Mamdouh, Z; Ghosh, R; Du, H; Kuriakose, G; Beatini, N; Grabowski, G A; Maxfield, F R; Tabas, I

    1999-11-05

    A critical event in atherogenesis is the interaction of arterial wall macrophages with subendothelial lipoproteins. Although most studies have investigated this interaction by incubating cultured macrophages with monomeric lipoproteins dissolved in media, arterial wall macrophages encounter lipoproteins that are mostly bound to subendothelial extracellular matrix, and these lipoproteins are often aggregated or fused. Herein, we utilize a specialized cell-culture system to study the initial interaction of macrophages with aggregated low density lipoprotein (LDL) bound to extracellular matrix. The aggregated LDL remains extracellular for a relatively prolonged period of time and becomes lodged in invaginations in the surface of the macrophages. As expected, the degradation of the protein moiety of the LDL was very slow. Remarkably, however, hydrolysis of the cholesteryl ester (CE) moiety of the LDL was 3-7-fold higher than that of the protein moiety, in stark contrast to the situation with receptor-mediated endocytosis of acetyl-LDL. Similar results were obtained using another experimental system in which the degradation of aggregated LDL protein was delayed by LDL methylation rather than by retention on matrix. Additional experiments indicated the following properties of this interaction: (a) LDL-CE hydrolysis is catalyzed by lysosomal acid lipase; (b) neither scavenger receptors nor the LDL receptor appear necessary for the excess LDL-CE hydrolysis; and (c) LDL-CE hydrolysis in this system is resistant to cellular potassium depletion, which further distinguishes this process from receptor-mediated endocytosis. In summary, experimental systems specifically designed to mimic the in vivo interaction of arterial wall macrophages with subendothelial lipoproteins have demonstrated an initial period of prolonged cell-surface contact in which CE hydrolysis exceeds protein degradation.

  15. The effect of albumin on podocytes: The role of the fatty acid moiety and the potential role of CD36 scavenger receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawluczyk, I.Z.A., E-mail: izap1@le.ac.uk [Department of Infection, Immunity and inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); John Walls Renal Unit, Leicester General Hospital Leicester (United Kingdom); Pervez, A.; Ghaderi Najafabadi, M. [Department of Infection, Immunity and inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Saleem, M.A. [Academic and Children' s Renal Unit, University of Bristol, Southmead Hospital, Bristol (United Kingdom); Topham, P.S. [Department of Infection, Immunity and inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); John Walls Renal Unit, Leicester General Hospital Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Evidence is emerging that podocytes are able to endocytose proteins such as albumin using kinetics consistent with a receptor-mediated process. To date the role of the fatty acid moiety on albumin uptake kinetics has not been delineated and the receptor responsible for uptake is yet to be identified. Albumin uptake studies were carried out on cultured human podocytes exposed to FITC-labelled human serum albumin either carrying fatty acids (HSA{sub +FA}) or depleted of them (HSA{sub −FA}). Receptor-mediated endocytosis of FITC-HSA{sub +FA} over 60 min was 5 times greater than that of FITC-HSA{sub −FA}. 24 h exposure of podocytes to albumin up-regulated nephrin expression and induced the activation of caspase-3. These effects were more pronounced in response to HSA{sub −FA.} Individually, anti-CD36 antibodies had no effect upon endocytosis of FITC-HSA. However, a cocktail of 2 antibodies reduced uptake by nearly 50%. Albumin endocytosis was enhanced in the presence of the CD36 specific inhibitor sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (SSO) while knock-down of CD36 using CD36siRNA had no effect on uptake. These data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by podocytes is regulated by the fatty acid moiety, although, some of the detrimental effects are induced independently of it. CD36 does not play a direct role in the uptake of albumin. - Highlights: • The fatty acid moiety is essential for receptor mediated endocytosis of albumin. • Fatty acid depleted albumin is more pathogenic to podocytes. • CD36 is not directly involved in albumin uptake by podocytes.

  16. B类1型清道夫受体表达调控与信号转导通路%Expression Regulation and Signal Transduction of Scavenger Receptor Class B Type 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张青海; 易光辉; 李媛彬; 阮长耿

    2009-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) is a membrane glycoprotein with multiple biological functions and a high homology to scavenger receptor CD36. A variety of factors may affect SR-B1 expression at the transcription or post-transcriptional level in vivo and in vitro . PPARα/γ agonists, certain LXR agonists, LH/HCG and estrogen up-regulate the SR-B1 expression, whereas vitamin E, INFa, lipopolysaccharide, IGF-1, bile acid, PXR agonist and hyperglycemia down-regulate its expression. Angiotensin II affects regulates the expression of SR-B1 in a bidirectional manner, as the specific mechanism involved is highly complicated. As a multi-ligand-binding membrane receptor, distinct intracellular signaling events and biological effects id mediated by different ligands, for instance, HDL-activated PI3K/Akt and MAPKs signaling pathway is responsible to increase the phosphorylation of eNOS and promote the migration of endothelial cell and endothelial reconstruction. Furthermore, SR-B1 is also involved in LDL-activated p38MAPK pathway, apoptotic cells and serum amyloid. The recent progress on the understanding of SR-B1 expression regulation and signal transduction is reviewed.%B类1型清道夫受体(scavenger receptor class B type 1,SR-B1)是一种与清道夫受体CD36具有高度同源性的膜糖蛋白,其表达相对广泛且有着众多生物学作用.体内外多种因素可从转录或转录后水平对SR-B1表达进行调控:PPARα/γ激动剂、部分LXR激动剂、LH/HCG、雌激素等能上调SR-B1的表达;维生素E、INFα、脂多糖、IGF-1、胆酸、PXR激动剂及高糖水平等能下调SR-B1的表达;而血管紧张素Ⅱ则可对SR-B1的表达进行双向调节,且它们具体的调节机制复杂.SR-B1作为一种具有多配体结合特性的膜受体,不同配体与其结合后可介导细胞内不同信号事件及生物学效应,如介导HDL激活细胞内P13K/Akt及MAPK信号途径,增加内皮型一氧化氮合酶的磷酸化

  17. Targeted Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Using Reconstituted High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian M.K. Shahzad

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference holds tremendous potential as a therapeutic approach, especially in the treatment of malignant tumors. However, efficient and biocompatible delivery methods are needed for systemic delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA. To maintain a high level of growth, tumor cells scavenge high-density lipoprotein (HDL particles by overexpressing its receptor: scavenger receptor type B1 (SR-B1. In this study, we exploited this cellular characteristic to achieve efficient siRNA delivery and established a novel formulation of siRNA by incorporating it into reconstituted HDL (rHDL nanoparticles. Here, we demonstrate that rHDL nanoparticles facilitate highly efficient systemic delivery of siRNA in vivo, mediated by the SR-B1. Moreover, in therapeutic proof-of-concept studies, these nanoparticles were effective in silencing the expression of two proteins that are key to cancer growth and metastasis (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and focal adhesion kinase in orthotopic mouse models of ovarian and colorectal cancer. These data indicate that an rHDL nanoparticle is a novel and highly efficient siRNA carrier, and therefore, this novel technology could serve as the foundation for new cancer therapeutic approaches.

  18. Increased serum soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 levels in patients with biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Oguzhan; Colak, Yasar; Senates, Ebubekir; Yilmaz, Yusuf; Ulasoglu, Celal; Doganay, Levent; Ozkanli, Seyma; Oltulu, Yasemin Musteri; Coskunpinar, Ender; Tuncer, Ilyas

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the relationship between the serum lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) levels and clinical and histopathological features of biopsy-confirmed nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients. METHODS: Fifty-three consecutive, biopsy-proven NAFLD patients (31 males and 22 females, mean age 42.5 ± 9.6 years) and 26 age- and gender-matched, healthy controls (14 males and 12 females, mean age 39 ± 10.7 years) were included. The patients with NAFLD were consecutive patients who had been admitted to the hepatology outpatient clinic within the last year and had been diagnosed with NAFLD as the result of liver biopsy. The healthy controls were individuals who attended the outpatient clinic for routine health control and had no known chronic illnesses. The histological evaluation was conducted according to the NAFLD activity scoring system recommended by The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network. The serum LOX-1 levels were measured using an ELISA kit (Life Science Inc. USCN. Wuhan, Catalog No. E1859Hu) in both patients and healthy controls. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to identify the optimal cutoff value of LOX-1 and thereby distinguish between patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and healthy controls. A P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: NAFLD and healthy control groups were similar in terms of age and sex. NAFLD patients consisted of 8 patients with simple steatosis (15%), 27 with borderline NASH (51%) and 18 with definitive NASH (34%). Metabolic syndrome was found in 62.2% of the patients with NAFLD. The mean serum LOX-1 level in biopsy-proven NAFLD patients was 8.49 ± 6.43 ng/mL compared to 4.08 ± 4.32 ng/mL in healthy controls (P = 0.001). The LOX-1 levels were significantly different between controls, simple steatosis and NASH (borderline+definite) cases (4

  19. Lipoproteins of Bacterial Pathogens▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs-Simon, A.; Titball, R. W.; Michell, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are a set of membrane proteins with many different functions. Due to this broad-ranging functionality, these proteins have a considerable significance in many phenomena, from cellular physiology through cell division and virulence. Here we give a general overview of lipoprotein biogenesis and highlight examples of the roles of lipoproteins in bacterial disease caused by a selection of medically relevant Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Neisseria meningitidis. Lipoproteins have been shown to play key roles in adhesion to host cells, modulation of inflammatory processes, and translocation of virulence factors into host cells. As such, a number of lipoproteins have been shown to be potential vaccines. This review provides a summary of some of the reported roles of lipoproteins and of how this knowledge has been exploited in some cases for the generation of novel countermeasures to bacterial diseases. PMID:20974828

  20. Lipoprotein(a)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, Anne; Kamstrup, Pia R; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    tested whether normal food intake or inflammation influenced lipoprotein(a)'s ability to predict ischemic heart disease. METHODS: We studied 34 829 individuals from the Danish general population using the Copenhagen General Population Study and the Copenhagen City Heart Study. RESULTS: Lipoprotein......(a) levels did not change in response to normal food intake: median fasting levels were 17.3 mg/dL, while median levels at 3-4 h since last meal were 19.4 mg/dL(p = 0.38). Lipoprotein(a) levels increased minimally with increasing levels of C-reactive protein(CRP): median lipoprotein(a) levels at CRP

  1. The majority of lipoprotein lipase in plasma is bound to remnant lipoproteins: A new definition of remnant lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu; Miyashita, Kazuya; Imamura, Shigeyuki; Kobayashi, Junji; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J; Machida, Tetsuo; Sumino, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Masami; Schaefer, Ernst; Nakajima, Katsuyuki

    2016-10-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a multifunctional protein and a key enzyme involved in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism. We determined the lipoproteins to which LPL is bound in the pre-heparin and post-heparin plasma. Tetrahydrolipstatin (THL), a potent inhibitor of serine lipases, was used to block the lipolytic activity of LPL, thereby preventing changes in the plasma lipoproteins due to ex vivo lipolysis. Gel filtration was performed to obtain the LPL elution profiles in plasma and the isolated remnant lipoproteins (RLP). When ex vivo lipolytic activity was inhibited by THL in the post-heparin plasma, majority of the LPL was found in the VLDL elution range, specifically in the RLP as inactive dimers. However, in the absence of THL, most of the LPL was found in the HDL elution range as active dimers. Furthermore, majority of the LPL in the pre-heparin plasma was found in the RLP as inactive form, with broadly diffused lipoprotein profiles in the presence and absence of THL. It is suggested that during lipolysis in vivo, the endothelial bound LPL dimers generates RLP, forming circulating RLP-LPL complexes in an inactive form that subsequently binds and initiates receptor-mediated catabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. High-density lipoprotein endocytosis in endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stefanie; Fruhwürth; Margit; Pavelka; Robert; Bittman; Werner; J; Kovacs; Katharina; M; Walter; Clemens; Rhrl; Herbert; Stangl

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To describe the way stations of high-density lipoprotein(HDL) uptake and its lipid exchange in endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: A combination of fluorescence microscopy using novel fluorescent cholesterol surrogates and electron microscopy was used to analyze HDL endocytosis in great detail in primary human endothelial cells. Further, HDL uptake was quantified using radio-labeled HDL particles. To validate the in vitro findings mice were injected with fluorescently labeled HDL and particle uptake in the liver was analyzed using fluorescencemicroscopy. RESULTS: HDL uptake occurred via clathrin-coated pits, tubular endosomes and multivesicular bodies in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. During uptake and resecretion, HDL-derived cholesterol was exchanged at a faster rate than cholesteryl oleate, resembling the HDL particle pathway seen in hepatic cells. In addition, lysosomes were not involved in this process and thus HDL degradation was not detectable. In vivo, we found HDL mainly localized in mouse hepatic endothelial cells. HDL was not detected in parenchymal liver cells, indicating that lipid transfer from HDL to hepatocytes occurs primarily via scavenger receptor, class B, type Ⅰ mediated selective uptake without concomitant HDL endocytosis. CONCLUSION: HDL endocytosis occurs via clathrincoated pits, tubular endosomes and multivesicular bodies in human endothelial cells. Mouse endothelial cells showed a similar HDL uptake pattern in vivo indicating that the endothelium is one major site of HDL endocytosis and transcytosis.

  3. Echium Oil Reduces Plasma Triglycerides by Increasing Intravascular Lipolysis in apoB100-Only Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL Receptor Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Parks

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Echium oil (EO, which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3, reduces plasma triglyceride (TG concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%, EO (10% EO + 10% PO, or FO (10% FO + 10% PO. Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm > EO (55 ± 3 nm > FO (40 ± 2 nm. Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model.

  4. Echium oil reduces plasma triglycerides by increasing intravascular lipolysis in apoB100-only low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Lolita M; Lough, Christopher M; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y; Gebre, Abraham K; Smith, Thomas L; Colvin, Perry L; Parks, John S

    2013-07-12

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model.

  5. SR-BI: Linking Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Metabolism with Breast and Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. Gutierrez-Pajares

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies have demonstrated the significant role of cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism in the progression of cancer. The SCARB1 gene encodes the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI, which is an 82-kDa glycoprotein with two transmembrane domains separated by a large extracellular loop. SR-BI plays an important role in the regulation of cholesterol exchange between cells and high-density lipoproteins. Accordingly, hepatic SR-BI has been shown to play an essential role in the regulation of the reverse cholesterol transport pathway, which promotes the removal and excretion of excess body cholesterol. In the context of atherosclerosis, SR-BI has been implicated in the regulation of intracellular signaling, lipid accumulation, foam cell formation, and cellular apoptosis. Furthermore, since lipid metabolism is a relevant target for cancer treatment, recent studies have focused on examining the role of SR-BI in this pathology. While signaling pathways have initially been explored in non-tumoral cells, studies with cancer cells have now demonstrated SR-BI’s function in tumor progression. In this review, we will discuss the role of SR-BI during tumor development and malignant progression. In addition, we will provide insights into the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the SCARB1 gene. Overall, studying the role of SR-BI in tumor development and progression should allow us to gain useful information for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  6. Antioxidative activity of high-density lipoprotein (HDL): Mechanistic insights into potential clinical benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brites, Fernando; Martin, Maximiliano; Guillas, Isabelle; Kontush, Anatol

    2017-12-01

    Uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles by macrophages represents a key step in the development of atherosclerotic plaques, leading to the foam cell formation. Chemical modification of LDL is however necessary to induce this process. Proatherogenic LDL modifications include aggregation, enzymatic digestion and oxidation. LDL oxidation by one-electron (free radicals) and two-electron oxidants dramatically increases LDL affinity to macrophage scavenger receptors, leading to rapid LDL uptake and fatty streak formation. Circulating high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles, primarily small, dense, protein-rich HDL3, provide potent protection of LDL from oxidative damage by free radicals, resulting in the inhibition of the generation of pro-inflammatory oxidized lipids. HDL-mediated inactivation of lipid hydroperoxides involves their initial transfer from LDL to HDL and subsequent reduction to inactive hydroxides by redox-active Met residues of apolipoprotein A-I. Several HDL-associated enzymes are present at elevated concentrations in HDL3 relative to large, light HDL2 and can be involved in the inactivation of short-chain oxidized phospholipids. Therefore, HDL represents a multimolecular complex capable of acquiring and inactivating proatherogenic lipids. Antioxidative function of HDL can be impaired in several metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Structural and compositional anomalies in the HDL proteome and lipidome underlie such functional deficiency. Concomitant normalization of the metabolism, circulating levels, composition and biological activities of HDL particles, primarily those of small, dense HDL3, can constitute future therapeutic target.

  7. SR-BI: Linking Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Metabolism with Breast and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Pajares, Jorge L.; Ben Hassen, Céline; Chevalier, Stéphan; Frank, Philippe G.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated the significant role of cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism in the progression of cancer. The SCARB1 gene encodes the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), which is an 82-kDa glycoprotein with two transmembrane domains separated by a large extracellular loop. SR-BI plays an important role in the regulation of cholesterol exchange between cells and high-density lipoproteins. Accordingly, hepatic SR-BI has been shown to play an essential role in the regulation of the reverse cholesterol transport pathway, which promotes the removal and excretion of excess body cholesterol. In the context of atherosclerosis, SR-BI has been implicated in the regulation of intracellular signaling, lipid accumulation, foam cell formation, and cellular apoptosis. Furthermore, since lipid metabolism is a relevant target for cancer treatment, recent studies have focused on examining the role of SR-BI in this pathology. While signaling pathways have initially been explored in non-tumoral cells, studies with cancer cells have now demonstrated SR-BI's function in tumor progression. In this review, we will discuss the role of SR-BI during tumor development and malignant progression. In addition, we will provide insights into the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the SCARB1 gene. Overall, studying the role of SR-BI in tumor development and progression should allow us to gain useful information for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  8. A novel putative lipoprotein receptor (CasLpR) in the hemocytes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus: cloning and up-regulated expression after the injection of LPS and LTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Naoaki; Chung, J Sook

    2012-03-01

    The full-length cDNA encoding a putative lipoprotein receptor (CasLpR) was isolated from the hemocytes of Callinectes sapidus using 5' and 3' RACEs. The open reading frame for CasLpR contains a precursor of putative CasLpR consisting of 1710 amino acid residues including 22 amino acid residues of the signal peptide (22 amino acids). Mature CasLpR (1688 amino acids with 5.6% of phosphorylation sites) has multiple, putative functional domains: five low-density lipoprotein receptor domains in the N-terminus, and a G-protein-coupled receptor proteolysis site domain and a 7 transmembrane receptor (secretin family) domain in the C-terminus. To date, there are no proteins with a similar domain structure in the GenBank. The expression pattern of CasLpR was exclusive in hemocytes among all tested tissues obtained from a juvenile female at intermolt stage: brain, eyestalk ganglia, pericardial organs, and thoracic ganglia complex (nervous system); hepatopancreas (digestive system); heart, artery and hemocytes (circulatory system); gill and antennal gland (excretory system), hypodermis; and Y-organ (endocrine organ). There was no CasLpR expression in the ovary of an adult female. A putative function of CasLpR was examined after challenges of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in vivo using qRT-PCR assays. Animals at 24 h after injection of LPS or LTA up-regulated the expression of CasLpR in hemocytes by ∼3.5 and 1.4 folds, respectively, compared to the controls that received saline injection. LPS challenge also caused the greatest increment (∼55 folds) of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) expression in these samples. These data indicate that putative CasLpR and CasHsp90 may be involved in the defense system or the stress response of C. sapidus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sortilins: new players in lipoprotein metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willnow, Thomas; Kjølby, Mads Fuglsang; Nykjær, Anders

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Sortilins are sorting receptors that direct proteins through secretory and endocytic pathways of the cell. Previously, these receptors have been shown to play important roles in regulating protein transport in neurons and to control neuronal viability and death in many diseases...... of the nervous system. Recent data, including genome-wide association studies, now suggest equally important functions for sortilins in control of systemic lipoprotein metabolism and risk of cardiovascular disease. This review discusses the evidence implicating two members of this gene family, sortilin and SORLA...... on the importance of sorting receptors in control of cellular and systemic lipoprotein metabolism and how altered trafficking pathways may represent a major risk factor for dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis in the human population....

  10. Impact of gene variants on sex-specific regulation of human Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-BI expression in liver and association with lipid levels in a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrett-Connor Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have noted that genetic variants of SCARB1, a lipoprotein receptor involved in reverse cholesterol transport, are associated with serum lipid levels in a sex-dependent fashion. However, the mechanism underlying this gene by sex interaction has not been explored. Methods We utilized both epidemiological and molecular methods to study how estrogen and gene variants interact to influence SCARB1 expression and lipid levels. Interaction between 35 SCARB1 haplotype-tagged polymorphisms and endogenous estradiol levels was assessed in 498 postmenopausal Caucasian women from the population-based Rancho Bernardo Study. We further examined associated variants with overall and SCARB1 splice variant (SR-BI and SR-BII expression in 91 human liver tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Results Several variants on a haplotype block spanning intron 11 to intron 12 of SCARB1 showed significant gene by estradiol interaction affecting serum lipid levels, the strongest for rs838895 with HDL-cholesterol (p = 9.2 × 10-4 and triglycerides (p = 1.3 × 10-3 and the triglyceride:HDL cholesterol ratio (p = 2.7 × 10-4. These same variants were associated with expression of the SR-BI isoform in a sex-specific fashion, with the strongest association found among liver tissue from 52 young women Conclusions Estrogen and SCARB1 genotype may act synergistically to regulate expression of SCARB1 isoforms and impact serum levels of HDL cholesterol and triglycerides. This work highlights the importance of considering sex-dependent effects of gene variants on serum lipid levels.

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist attenuates oxidized-low density lipoprotein induced immune maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Hong-yu; CAO Xue-tao; GE Jun-bo; FANG Wei-yi; YAO Kang; SUN Ai-jun; HUANG Rong-chong; JIA Qing-zhe; WANG Ke-qiang; ZOU Yun-zeng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Accumulating evidence suggests that the Th1 immune response induced by various antigens such as oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and heat shock proteins (HSPs) play a key role in the process of atherosclerosis.1 Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the body with the unique ability to initiate a primary immune response to certain antigens by the activation of "naive" T cells.2 The maturation of DC with the upregulation of costimulatory molecules such as CD83,CD40,CD86,and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class molecules such as human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR,is required for DC to activate T cells.

  12. Bilirubin inhibits the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase by scavenging reactive oxygen species generated by the toll-like receptor 4-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idelman, Gila; Smith, Darcey L H; Zucker, Stephen D

    2015-08-01

    It has been previously shown that bilirubin prevents the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in response to LPS. The present study examines whether this effect is exerted through modulation of Toll-Like Receptor-4 (TLR4) signaling. LPS-stimulated iNOS and NADPH oxidase (Nox) activity in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages was assessed by measuring cellular nitrate and superoxide ( [Formula: see text] ) production, respectively. The generation of both nitrate and [Formula: see text] in response to LPS was suppressed by TLR4 inhibitors, indicating that activation of iNOS and Nox is TLR4-dependent. While treatment with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and bilirubin effectively abolished LPS-mediated [Formula: see text] production, hydrogen peroxide and nitrate release were inhibited by bilirubin and PEG-catalase, but not SOD, supporting that iNOS activation is primarily dependent upon intracellular H2O2. LPS treatment increased nuclear translocation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α), an effect that was abolished by bilirubin. Cells transfected with murine iNOS reporter constructs in which the HIF-1α-specific hypoxia response element was disrupted exhibited a blunted response to LPS, supporting that HIF-1α mediates Nox-dependent iNOS expression. Bilirubin, but not SOD, blocked the cellular production of interferon-β, while interleukin-6 production remained unaffected. These data support that bilirubin inhibits the TLR4-mediated up-regulation of iNOS by preventing activation of HIF-1α through scavenging of Nox-derived reactive oxygen species. Bilirubin also suppresses interferon-β release via a ROS-independent mechanism. These findings characterize potential mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of bilirubin.

  13. Replacement of Porcine CD163 Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Domain 5 with a CD163-Like Homolog Confers Resistance of Pigs to Genotype 1 but Not Genotype 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kevin D; Bardot, Rachel; Whitworth, Kristin M; Trible, Benjamin R; Fang, Ying; Mileham, Alan; Kerrigan, Maureen A; Samuel, Melissa S; Prather, Randall S; Rowland, Raymond R R

    2017-01-15

    CD163 knockout (KO) pigs are resistant to infection with genotype 2 (type 2) porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Furthermore, the substitution of CD163 scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain 5 with a homolog of human CD163-like (hCD163L1) SRCR 8 domain confers resistance of transfected HEK cells to type 1 PRRSV. As a means to understand the role of domain 5 in PRRSV infection with both type 1 and type 2 viruses, pigs were genetically modified (GM) to possess one of the following genotypes: complete knockout (KO) of CD163, deletions within SRCR domain 5, or replacement (domain swap) of SRCR domain 5 with a synthesized exon encoding a homolog of hCD163L1 SRCR domain 8. Immunophenotyping of porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) showed that pigs with the KO or SRCR domain 5 deletion did not express CD163. When placed in culture, PAMs from pigs with the CD163 KO phenotype were completely resistant to a panel consisting of six type 1 and nine type 2 isolates. PAMs from pigs that possessed the hCD163L1 domain 8 homolog expressed CD163 and supported the replication of all type 2 isolates, but no type 1 viruses. Infection of CD163-modified pigs with representative type 1 and type 2 viruses confirmed the in vitro results. The results confirm that CD163 is the likely receptor for all PRRS viruses. Even though type 1 and type 2 viruses are considered phenotypically similar at several levels, there is a distinct difference between the viral genotypes in the recognition of CD163. Genetic modification of the CD163 gene creates the opportunity to develop production animals that are resistant to PRRS, the costliest viral disease to ever face the swine industry. The results create further opportunities to develop refinements in the modification of CD163 with the goal of making pigs refractory to infection while retaining important CD163 functions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Identification and characterization of a cell surface scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein of Sciaenops ocellatus: bacterial interaction and its dependence on the conserved structural features of the SRCR domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Reng; Sun, Bo-Guang; Li, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Li

    2013-03-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) proteins are secreted or membrane-bound receptors with one or multiple SRCR domains. Members of the SRCR superfamily are known to have diverse functions that include pathogen recognition and immunoregulation. In teleost, although protein sequences with SRCR structure have been identified in some species, very little functional investigation has been carried out. In this study, we identified and characterized a teleost SRCR protein from red drum Sciaenops ocellatus. The protein was named S. ocellatus SRCR1 (SoSRCRP1). SoSRCRP1 is 410-residue in length and was predicted to be a transmembrane protein, with the extracellular region containing a collagen triple helix repeat and a SRCR domain. The SRCR domain has six conserved cysteines, of which, C338 and C399, C351 and C409, and C379 and C389 were predicted to form three disulfide bonds. SoSRCRP1 expression was detected mainly in immune-relevant tissues and upregulated by bacterial and viral infection. In head kidney leukocytes, bacterial infection stimulated the expression of SoSRCRP1, and the expressed SoSRCRP1 was localized on cell surface. Recombinant SoSRCRP1 (rSoSRCRP1) corresponding to the SRCR domain was purified from Escherichia coli and found to be able to bind Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. To examine the structure-function relationship of SoSRCRP1, the mutant proteins SoSRCRP1M1, SoSRCRP1M2, SoSRCRP1M3, and SoSRCRP1M4 were created, which bear C351S and C409S, C338S, C379S, and R325A mutations respectively. Compared to rSoSRCRP1, all mutants were significantly reduced in the ability of bacterial interaction, with the highest reduction observed with SoSRCRP1M4. Taken together, these results indicate that SoSRCRP1 is a cell surface-localized SRCR protein that binds bacterial ligands in a manner that depends on the conserved structural features of the SRCR domain.

  15. Conformation of apolipoprotein E both in free and in lipid-bound form may determine the avidity of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins to the LDL receptor: structural and kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergunov, A D; Smirnova, E A; Merched, A; Visvikis, S; Siest, G; Yakushkin, V V; Tsibulsky, V

    2000-02-24

    Slow refolding of human apolipoprotein E (apoE) in solution after guanidine- or cholate-induced denaturation followed by dialysis under controlled conditions was investigated using various spectroscopic properties of fluorescein- and dansyl-labeled apolipoprotein molecules. The results suggest that the last phase(s) of apoE refolding in solution include a slow (several hours at 24 degrees C) interconversion of a self-associated 'open' conformer into a more dense 'closed' conformer. The hydrophobic interactions are primarily responsible for the formation of this more compact apoE structure. To visualize the contribution of apolipoprotein conformation and/or the number of 'active' lipid-bound apoE molecules in the reaction of binding to the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) by solid-phase binding assay, the complexes of human plasma apolipoprotein or recombinant (rec) apoE3 with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) varying in size were used. For seven complexes with plasma protein (four DPPC and three POPC complexes), the final phosphatidylcholine (PC)/protein mole ratio ranged from 117 to 279; affinity constant K(a) averaged for both PCs and plotted against this ratio abruptly increased from 3.8 x 10(7) to 3.8 x 10(8) M(-1) with a transition midpoint of 150-180 PC/apoE, mole ratio. Two DPPC complexes with rec protein bind much more efficiently. Complexes with both plasma and rec apoE were able to compete with very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) or low density lipoproteins (LDL) isolated from patients with E3/3 phenotype, for binding to the LDLr. Again, the competition efficiency abruptly increased at the increase in PC content with a transition midpoint of 130 PC/apoE, mole ratio. The transitions observed both in direct and competitive binding assay probably correspond to the abrupt increase in the number of 'active' apoE molecules on the complex surface accompanying the change in the size and/or in the shape of

  16. Specificity of binding of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein to different conformational states of the clade E serpins plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and proteinase nexin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jan K; Dolmer, Klavs; Gettins, Peter G W

    2009-07-03

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is the principal clearance receptor for serpins and serpin-proteinase complexes. The ligand binding regions of LRP consist of clusters of cysteine-rich approximately 40-residue complement-like repeats (CR), with cluster II being the principal ligand-binding region. To better understand the specificity of binding at different sites within the cluster and the ability of LRP to discriminate in vivo between uncomplexed and proteinase-complexed serpins, we have systematically examined the affinities of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and proteinase nexin-1 (PN-1) in their native, cleaved, and proteinase-complexed states to (CR)(2) and (CR)(3) fragments of LRP cluster II. A consistent blue shift of the CR domain tryptophan fluorescence suggested a common mode of serpin binding, involving lysines on the serpin engaging the acidic region around the calcium binding site of the CR domain. High affinity binding of non-proteinase-complexed PAI-1 and PN-1 occurred to all fragments containing three CR domains (3-59 nm) and most that contain only two CR domains, although binding energies to different (CR)(3) fragments differed by up to 18% for PAI-1 and 9% for PN-1. No detectable difference in affinity was seen between native and cleaved serpin. However, the presence of proteinase in complex with the serpin enhanced affinity modestly and presumably nonspecifically. This may be sufficient to give preferential binding of such complexes in vivo at the relevant physiological concentrations.

  17. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 facilitates metastasis of gastric cancer through driving epithelial-mesenchymal transition and PI3K/Akt/GSK3β activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Can; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Hao; Li, Lili; Yang, Caiting; Song, Shushu; Peng, Peike; Shao, Miaomiao; Zhang, Mingming; Zhao, Junjie; Zhao, Ran; Wu, Weicheng; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Lan; Gu, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a pattern recognition receptor that plays a critical role in vascular diseases and host immune response. Recently, our research discovered that LOX-1 could facilitate the uptake of dying cells and cross-presentation of cellular antigen via binding with heat shock proteins, which have a close relationship with gastric neoplasia. Therefore, we speculated that LOX-1 may serve as an oncogene in gastric cancer (GC) development and progression. In this study, through immunohistochemistry staining assay and cancer-related databases, we found that LOX-1 expression was up-regulated in GC tissues and correlated with a poor prognosis in GC patients. The expression of LOX-1 was an independent prognostic factor for OS in GC patients, and the incorporation of LOX-1 with TNM stage is more accurate for predicting prognosis. Additionally, in vitro study by transwell assay and western blot analysis confirmed that LOX-1 could promote the migration and invasion of GC cells by driving epithelial-mesenchymal transition and PI3K/Akt/GSK3β activation. Taken together, we first explored the expression profiles, clinical significance and biological function of LOX-1 in GC, and these data suggest that LOX-1 may represent a promising prognostic biomarker for GC and offer a novel molecular target for GC therapies. PMID:28345638

  18. Intervention of Tongxinluo Capsule (通心络胶囊) against Vascular Lesion of Atherosclerosis and Its Effect on Lectin-like Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-1 Expression in Rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevention by Tongxinluo capsule ( 通心络胶囊, TXL) of vascular lesions and its effect on the levels of protein and gene expression of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) of vascular wall in rabbits with atherosclerosis (AS), and to explore its possible mechanism against AS. Methods: AS models were established by feeding New Zealand white rabbits with high-cholesterol diet, and 24 immature rabbits were randomly divided into the control group, model group and treated group (treated with TXL capsule). The indexes of total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels were measured at the 16th week. The intima thickness and the plaque area of abdominal aorta were quantitatively analyzed by pathological morphological analysis, the expression of macrophage and smooth muscle cell (SMC) in intima were detected by immunohistochemical method and histologic segments were stained by Hematoxilin-Eosin (HE) to identify the degree of atherosclerotic lesion in the model group and the prevention by TXL. The LOX-1 gene and protein expression in abdominal aorta was detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: In the model group, the levels of TC and LDL were significantly elevated, aortic intima thickened extensively, the intima area enhanced,and macrophages expression increased; the levels of LOX-1 gene and protein expression was up-regulated in endothelium and neo-intima of the abdominal aorta. The treatment with TXL reduced blood lipids, attenuated arterial intimal proliferation, markedly inhibited the expression of macrophage and excessively expressed the level of LOX-1. Conclusion:TXL has an inhibitory effect on blood lipids, and it can prevent the occurrence of vascular lesion and cure its development , and its protection against AS was possibly associated with a crucial endothelial protective action through lowering the expression of LOX-1 in vascular walls.

  19. Cyclic tensile stretch load and oxidized low density lipoprotein synergistically induce lectin-like oxidized ldl receptor-1 in cultured bovine chondrocytes, resulting in decreased cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Masao; Nishimura, Shunji; Yoshida, Kohji; Kakinuma, Takumi; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Munakata, Hiroshi; Hamanishi, Chiaki

    2006-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation is known to be an essential factor in the regulation of cartilage metabolism. We tested the hypothesis that expression of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) can be modulated by cyclic tensile stretch load in chondrocytes. Cyclic loading of repeated stretch stress at 10 cycles per minute with 10 kPa of stress for 6 h induced expression of LOX-1 to 2.6 times control in cultured bovine articular chondrocytes, equivalent to the addition of 10 microg/mL oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) (2.4 times control). Application of the cyclic load to the chondrocytes along with 10 microg/mL ox-LDL resulted in synergistically increased LOX-1 expression to 6.3 times control. Individual application of cyclic loading and 10 microg/mL ox-LDL significantly suppressed chondrocytes viability (84.6% +/- 3.4% and 80.9% +/- 3.2% of control at 24 h, respectively; n = 3; p LDL (n = 3)]. Cyclic loading and 10 microg/mL ox-LDL synergistically affected cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis, which were significantly suppressed to 45.6% +/- 4.9% and 48.7% +/- 6.7% of control at 24 h, respectively (n = 3; p LDL). In this study, we demonstrated synergistic effects of cyclic tensile stretch load and ox-LDL on cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes, which may be mediated through enhanced expression of LOX-1 and which has important implications in the progression of cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis.

  20. Identification of the haemoglobin scavenger receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, M; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Jacobsen, C

    2001-01-01

    Intravascular haemolysis is a physiological phenomenon as well as a severe pathological complication when accelerated in various autoimmune, infectious (such as malaria) and inherited (such as sickle cell disease) disorders. Haemoglobin released into plasma is captured by the acute phase protein...... of haemoglobin and dimeric haptoglobin (the 1-1 phenotype). Specific CD163-mediated endocytosis of haptoglobin-haemoglobin complexes is measurable in cells transfected with CD163 complementary DNA and in CD163-expressing myelo-monocytic lymphoma cells....

  1. Scavenger Receptors and Resistance to Inhaled Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    groups of MARCO-/-, SR-AI/II-/- and C57BL/6 WT control mice were sensitized i.p. with 8 µg OVA in 1 mg of alum gel in 0.5 ml of PBS on days 0 and 7...analysis. In BALB/c mice, 10 µg OVA in 2 mg of Alum powder were administered i.p. at days 0 and 7, followed by aerosol challenge with either PBS or...balanced salt solution (Cellgro®, Mediatech) and 2% EDTA-treated fetal bovine serum (FBS, HyClone) supplemented with 2.5 mg/ml collagenase type IV

  2. Triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins protect lipoprotein lipase from inactivation by ANGPTL3 and ANGPTL4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Stefan K; Anderson, Fredrick; Ericsson, Madelene; Larsson, Mikael; Makoveichuk, Elena; Lookene, Aivar; Heeren, Joerg; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2012-10-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is important for clearance of triacylglycerols (TG) from plasma both as an enzyme and as a bridging factor between lipoproteins and receptors for endocytosis. The amount of LPL at the luminal side of the capillary endothelium determines to what extent lipids are taken up. Mechanisms to control both the activity of LPL and its transport to the endothelial sites are regulated, but poorly understood. Angiopoietin-like proteins (ANGPTLs) 3 and 4 are potential control proteins for LPL, but plasma concentrations of ANGPTLs do not correlate with plasma TG levels. We investigated the effects of recombinant human N-terminal (NT) ANGPTLs3 and 4 on LPL-mediated bridging of TG-rich lipoproteins to primary mouse hepatocytes and found that the NT-ANGPTLs, in concentrations sufficient to cause inactivation of LPL in vitro, were unable to prevent LPL-mediated lipoprotein uptake. We therefore investigated the effects of lipoproteins (chylomicrons, VLDL and LDL) on the inactivation of LPL in vitro by NT-ANGPTLs3 and 4 and found that LPL activity was protected by TG-rich lipoproteins. In vivo, postprandial TG protected LPL from inactivation by recombinant NT-ANGPTL4 injected to mice. We conclude that lipoprotein-bound LPL is stabilized against inactivation by ANGPTLs. The levels of ANGPTLs found in blood may not be sufficient to overcome this stabilization. Therefore it is likely that the prime site of action of ANGPTLs on LPL is in subendothelial compartments where TG-rich lipoprotein concentration is lower than in blood. This could explain why the plasma levels of TG and ANGPTLs do not correlate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Glycyrrhizic Acid on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ, Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL, Serum Lipid and HOMA-IR in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Yoke Yin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on ligand binding potential of glycyrrhizic acid, a potential agonist to PPARγ, displayed encouraging results in amelioration of metabolic syndrome. The regulation of gene cassettes by PPARγ affects glucose homeostasis, lipid, lipoprotein metabolism and adipogenesis. This study was performed to determine the effects of GA on total PPARγ and LPL expression levels, lipid parameters and HOMA-IR. Oral administration of 100 mg/kg GA for 24 hours resulted in an increase in insulin sensitivity with decreases in blood glucose, serum insulin and HOMA-IR. Improvement in serum lipid parameters was also observed with a decrease in triacylglycerol, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol and an elevation in HDL-cholesterol. GA administration also resulted in up-regulation of total PPARγ and LPL expression levels in the visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues, abdominal and quadriceps femoris muscles, as well as liver and kidney, with a significant up-regulation only in the visceral adipose tissue, abdominal and quadriceps femoris muscles. Thus, oral administration of 100 mg/kg GA for 24 hours improved insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles and induced upregulation of total PPARγ and LPL expression levels in all studied tissues.

  4. The High Affinity Binding Site on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) for the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Is Composed of Four Basic Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettins, Peter G W; Dolmer, Klavs

    2016-01-08

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serpin inhibitor of the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator, which binds tightly to the clearance and signaling receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in both proteinase-complexed and uncomplexed forms. Binding sites for PAI-1 within LRP1 have been localized to CR clusters II and IV. Within cluster II, there is a strong preference for the triple CR domain fragment CR456. Previous mutagenesis studies to identify the binding site on PAI-1 for LRP1 have given conflicting results or implied small binding contributions incompatible with the high affinity PAI-1/LRP1 interaction. Using a highly sensitive solution fluorescence assay, we have examined binding of CR456 to arginine and lysine variants of PAI-1 and definitively identified the binding site as composed of four basic residues, Lys-69, Arg-76, Lys-80, and Lys-88. These are highly conserved among mammalian PAI-1s. Individual mutations result in a 13-800-fold increase in Kd values. We present evidence that binding involves engagement of CR4 by Lys-88, CR5 by Arg-76 and Lys-80, and CR6 by Lys-69, with the strongest interactions to CR5 and CR6. Collectively, the individual binding contributions account quantitatively for the overall PAI-1/LRP1 affinity. We propose that the greater efficiency of PAI-1·uPA complex binding and clearance by LRP1, compared with PAI-1 alone, is due solely to simultaneous binding of the uPA moiety in the complex to its receptor, thereby making binding of the PAI-1 moiety to LRP1 a two-dimensional surface-localized association.

  5. Respective contributions of intestinal Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 and scavenger receptor class B type I to cholesterol and tocopherol uptake: in vivo v. in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Emmanuelle; Soayfane, Zeina; Goncalves, Aurélie; Cantiello, Michela; Bott, Romain; Nauze, Michel; Tercé, François; Collet, Xavier; Coméra, Christine

    2012-05-01

    The intestinal absorption of cholesterol and lipid micronutrients such as vitamin E has been shown to share some common pathways. The present study aims to further compare the uptake of cholesterol ([3H]cholesterol v. 22-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3-ol (NBD-cholesterol)) and tocopherol in Caco-2 TC-7 cells and in mouse intestine, with special focus on the respective roles of scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) and Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1). Conversely to NBD-cholesterol, the uptakes of [3H]cholesterol and tocopherol by Caco-2 cells were impaired by both block lipid transport-1 and ezetimibe, which inhibit SR-BI and NPC1L1, respectively. These inhibitions occurred only when cholesterol or tocopherol was delivered to cells included in micelles that contained biliary acid and at least oleic acid as a lipid. In vivo, after 2 h of digestion in mice, the uptake of the two cholesterol analogues and of tocopherol all showed distinct patterns along the duodenum-jejunum axis. [3H]Cholesterol uptake, which correlated closely to NPC1L1 mRNA expression in wild-type (wt) mice, was strongly inhibited by ezetimibe. Intestinal SR-BI overexpression did not change NPC1L1 expression and led to a significant increase in [3H]cholesterol uptake in the distal jejunum. Conversely, neither ezetimibe treatment nor SR-BI overexpression had an effect on NBD-cholesterol uptake. However, in contrast with SR-BI mRNA expression, tocopherol absorption increased strongly up to the distal jejunum in wt mice where it was specifically inhibited by ezetimibe, and was increased in the proximal intestine of intestinal SR-BI-overexpressing mice. Thus, cholesterol and tocopherol uptakes share common pathways in cell culture models, but display different in vivo absorption patterns associated with distinct contributions of SR-BI and NPC1L1.

  6. Cellular uptake of lipoproteins and Persistent Organic Compounds - An update and new data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmborg, Philip Sebastian; Andreassen, Thomas Kjærgaard; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2008-01-01

    including the pesticide DDT (p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane), and especially its metabolite DDE (p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene), interacts with nuclear hormone receptors causing these to malfunction, which in turn results in a range of deleterious health effects in humans. The aim of the present...... study was to determine the role of lipoprotein receptors in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells in conjunction with uptake of DDT-lipoprotein complexes from supplemented media in vitro. Uptake of DDT by MEF cells was investigated using MEF1 cells carrying the receptors LRP (low-density lipoprotein...... receptor-related protein) and LDLR (low density lipoprotein receptor) present and MEF4 cells with no LRP and LDLR expression. Cells were incubated together with the complex of LDL and [14C]DDT. The receptor function was further evaluated by adding the 40 kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP) which blocks...

  7. Sex steroids and lipoprotein metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gevers Leuven, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lipoprotein metabolism is involved in atherogenesis. Female sex-hormones have substantial effects on both lipoprotein metabolism and the vessel wall. Cholesterol, one of the major lipids in lipoproteins, is both the substrate for, and the target of, the steroidal sex hormones.

  8. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE) uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other.

  9. Lipoproteins and lipoprotein mimetics for imaging and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaxton, C Shad; Rink, Jonathan S; Naha, Pratap C; Cormode, David P

    2016-11-15

    Lipoproteins are a set of natural nanoparticles whose main role is the transport of fats within the body. While much work has been done to develop synthetic nanocarriers to deliver drugs or contrast media, natural nanoparticles such as lipoproteins represent appealing alternatives. Lipoproteins are biocompatible, biodegradable, non-immunogenic and are naturally targeted to some disease sites. Lipoproteins can be modified to act as contrast agents in many ways, such as by insertion of gold cores to provide contrast for computed tomography. They can be loaded with drugs, nucleic acids, photosensitizers or boron to act as therapeutics. Attachment of ligands can re-route lipoproteins to new targets. These attributes render lipoproteins attractive and versatile delivery vehicles. In this review we will provide background on lipoproteins, then survey their roles as contrast agents, in drug and nucleic acid delivery, as well as in photodynamic therapy and boron neutron capture therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of type 2 diabetes mellitus with the interaction between low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) polymorphisms and overweight and obesity in rural Chinese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, Jinjin; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Guo'an; Shen, Yanxia; Wu, Dongting; Wang, Chongjian; Li, Linlin; Ren, Yongcheng; Wang, Bingyuan; Zhang, Hongyan; Yang, Xiangyu; Zhao, Yang; Han, Chengyi; Zhou, Junmei; Pang, Chao; Yin, Lei; Zhao, Jingzhi; Luo, Xinping; Hu, Dongsheng

    2017-01-09

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) plays an important role in glucose and cholesterol metabolism. The present cohort study evaluated associations of LRP5 variants with the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a rural adult Chinese population. In all, 7751 subjects aged ≥18 years without T2DM underwent genotyping at baseline; 6326 subjects (81.62%) were followed-up, and 5511 with a clear disease outcome were eligible for analysis. The same questionnaire was administered and the same anthropometric and blood biochemical examinations were performed at baseline and follow-up. Association analysis was performed for five single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes of LRP5. Cox proportional hazards testing of three different genetic models found no significant association between T2DM and LRP5 after adjusting for potential risk factors (P > 0.05). However, the incidence of T2DM in subjects with LRP5 mutational genotypes was higher in the overweight/obese than normal weight population. Under the dominant model, the risk of T2DM was increased with an interaction between rs11228303 and the waist-to-height ratio adjusted for baseline age, sex, and family history of T2DM (synergy index [SI] = 4.172; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.014-17.166)], and body mass index (SI = 3.237; 95% CI 1.102-9.509). Furthermore, the A allele of rs3758644 was related to decreased fasting plasma insulin and homeostatic model assessment of β-cell function levels, whereas the T allele of rs12363572 was related to increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in new-onset diabetes patients (P < 0.05). The risk of T2DM may be associated with interactions between the LRP5 gene and overweight and obesity. Polymorphisms of LRP5 are related to β-cell function and lipid metabolism. © 2017 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Aspirin and pravastatin reduce lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 expression, adhesion molecules and oxidative stress in human coronary artery endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jia-wei; ZHOU Shi-bei; TAN Zhi-ming

    2010-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress and inflammation are important steps in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We postulated that therapeutic concentrations of aspirin and pravastatin, especially in combination, may suppress oxidative stress and inflammation in endothelial cells, and this concept was examined in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs).Methods Human coronary artery endothelial cells were cultured and treated with oxidized-low density iipoprotein (ox-LDL, 60 μg/ml for 24 hours) alone, or pre-treated with aspirin (1, 2 or 5 mmol/L), pravastatin (1, 5 or 10 μmol/L) or their combination (1 mmol/L aspirin and 5 μmol/L pravastatin), followed by ox-LDL treatment. After respective treatment,superoxide anion production, p38 mitogen activated protein kinase and transcription factor NF-κB activation, protein expression of lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) and adhesion molecules, and monocyte adhesion were measured.Results Ox-LDL treatment greatly elicited its receptor LOX-1 expression, superoxide anion production and inflammatory response, which were minimally affected by low concentration of aspidn (1 mmol/L) or pravastatin (5 μmol/L), but were markedly decreased by their combination. Activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase and NF-κB, the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, which were only mildly affected by aspirin or pravastatin alone, were significantly attenuated by their combination. As a consequence, monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells was markedly attenuated by the combination of the two agents. Well-known anti-oxidants α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol had similar inhibitory effects on ox-LDL-mediated oxidative stress and LOX-1 expression as well as monocyte adhesion as did the combination of aspirin and pravastatin.Conclusions These studies point to a positive interaction between aspidn and pravastatin with regard to endothelial biology. Anti-oxidant and subsequent anti

  12. Melatonin scavenges phenylglyoxylic ketyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sersen, F; Vencel, T; Annus, J

    2004-12-01

    The antioxidant properties of melatonin were tested in this work by EPR technique. It was found that melatonin scavenges phenylglyoxylic ketyl radicals. Its effectiveness was 10-times lower than that of vitamin C. A new method of generation of phenylglyoxylic ketyl radicals by spontaneous decomposition of D,L-2,3-diphenyltartaric acid in propan-2-ol was used.

  13. Lipoprotein marker for hypertriglyceridemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubicciotti, Roger S. (El Cerrito, CA); Karu, Alexander E. (Kensington, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA)

    1986-01-01

    Methods and compositions are provided for the detection of a particular low density lipoprotein which has been found to be a marker for patients suffering from type IV hypertriglyceridemia. A monoclonal antibody capable of specifically binding to a characteristic epitopic site on this LDL subspecies can be utilized in a wide variety of immunoassays. Hybridoma cell line SPL.IVA5A1 was deposited at the American Type Culture Collection on Mar. 29, 1984, and granted accession no. HB 8535.

  14. Quantitative fluorescence imaging reveals point of release for lipoproteins during LDLR-dependent uptake[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompey, Shanica; Zhao, Zhenze; Luby-Phelps, Kate; Michaely, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The LDL receptor (LDLR) supports efficient uptake of both LDL and VLDL remnants by binding lipoprotein at the cell surface, internalizing lipoprotein through coated pits, and releasing lipoprotein in endocytic compartments before returning to the surface for further rounds of uptake. While many aspects of lipoprotein binding and receptor entry are well understood, it is less clear where, when, and how the LDLR releases lipoprotein. To address these questions, the current study employed quantitative fluorescence imaging to visualize the uptake and endosomal processing of LDL and the VLDL remnant β-VLDL. We find that lipoprotein release is rapid, with most release occurring prior to entry of lipoprotein into early endosomes. Published biochemical studies have identified two mechanisms of lipoprotein release: one that involves the β-propeller module of the LDLR and a second that is independent of this module. Quantitative imaging comparing uptake supported by the normal LDLR or by an LDLR variant incapable of β-propeller-dependent release shows that the β-propeller-independent process is sufficient for release for both lipoproteins but that the β-propeller process accelerates both LDL and β-VLDL release. Together these findings define where, when, and how lipoprotein release occurs and provide a generalizable methodology for visualizing endocytic handling in situ. PMID:23296879

  15. Quantitative fluorescence imaging reveals point of release for lipoproteins during LDLR-dependent uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompey, Shanica; Zhao, Zhenze; Luby-Phelps, Kate; Michaely, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The LDL receptor (LDLR) supports efficient uptake of both LDL and VLDL remnants by binding lipoprotein at the cell surface, internalizing lipoprotein through coated pits, and releasing lipoprotein in endocytic compartments before returning to the surface for further rounds of uptake. While many aspects of lipoprotein binding and receptor entry are well understood, it is less clear where, when, and how the LDLR releases lipoprotein. To address these questions, the current study employed quantitative fluorescence imaging to visualize the uptake and endosomal processing of LDL and the VLDL remnant β-VLDL. We find that lipoprotein release is rapid, with most release occurring prior to entry of lipoprotein into early endosomes. Published biochemical studies have identified two mechanisms of lipoprotein release: one that involves the β-propeller module of the LDLR and a second that is independent of this module. Quantitative imaging comparing uptake supported by the normal LDLR or by an LDLR variant incapable of β-propeller-dependent release shows that the β-propeller-independent process is sufficient for release for both lipoproteins but that the β-propeller process accelerates both LDL and β-VLDL release. Together these findings define where, when, and how lipoprotein release occurs and provide a generalizable methodology for visualizing endocytic handling in situ.

  16. [Basic mechanisms: structure, function and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errico, Teresa L; Chen, Xiangyu; Martin Campos, Jesús M; Julve, Josep; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present basic information on the lipoprotein physiology. The protein fraction of lipoproteins consists of several apolipoproteins and enzymes whose functions are lipid transport and metabolism. Classification of lipoproteins is based on their density. Chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL can be isolated by ultracentrifugation. Both chylomicrons- and VLDL-triglycerides are transported from the intestine and liver, respectively, to the peripheral tissues. The metabolism of VLDL originates IDL and LDL. LDL is the main transporter of cholesterol to extrahepatic tissues. HDL mobilizes cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver where it is secreted to bile as free cholesterol or bile salts, a process termed reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein metabolism can be regulated by nuclear receptors that regulate the expression of genes involved in triglyceride and apolipoprotein metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEA. All rights reserved.

  17. Cholesterol efflux and metabolic abnormalities associated with low high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol and high triglycerides in statin-treated coronary men with low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol <70 mg/dl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadas-Sánchez, Rosalinda; Posadas-Romero, Carlos; Mendoza-Pérez, Enrique; Caracas-Portilla, Nacú Aureo; Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo; Medina-Urrutia, Aída; Jorge-Galarza, Esteban; Juárez-Rojas, Juan Gabriel

    2012-03-01

    In 69 statin-treated male coronary patients with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol at goal levels (cholesterol (triglyceride (>150 mg/dl) are associated with dysfunctional HDL particles and abnormal insulin, adiponectin, C-reactive protein serum levels. Thirty-four patients with low HDL cholesterol and high triglyceride (dyslipidemia) and 35 patients with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglyceride at target levels (normolipidemia) were studied. Twenty healthy men were also studied. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured using immunonephelometry, insulin using a radioimmunometric assay, and total adiponectin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cell cholesterol efflux to serum and total isolated HDL was assayed using rat hepatoma Fu5AH cells for scavenger receptor class B type 1-mediated efflux. Compared to the normolipidemia and healthy groups, and after adjustment for age and waist circumference, patients with dyslipidemia showed higher fasting insulin (14, 9.9, and 8.5 μU/ml, respectively), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance values (3.4, 2.3, and 1.8, respectively), lower adiponectin concentrations (5.1, 8.1, and 11 μg/ml, respectively), and reduced cholesterol efflux to serum (14%, 15%, and 19%, respectively) and to HDL fractions (4.4%, 4.6%, and 5.6%, respectively) (p cholesterol efflux. In conclusion, the decreased cholesterol efflux and metabolic abnormalities found in the dyslipidemia group may contribute to the residual risk observed in the large statin trials and the higher morbidity and mortality in statin-treated coronary patients with low HDL cholesterol even when attaining low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <70 mg/dl. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Softness of atherogenic lipoproteins: a comparison of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikl, Christian; Peters, Judith; Trapp, Marcus; Kornmueller, Karin; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Prassl, Ruth

    2011-08-31

    Apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100)-containing plasma lipoproteins (LDL and VLDL) supply tissues and cells with cholesterol and fat. During lipolytic conversion from VLDL to LDL the size and chemical composition of the particles change, but the apoB100 molecule remains bound to the lipids and regulates the receptor mediated uptake. The molecular physical parameters which control lipoprotein remodeling and enable particle stabilization by apoB100 are largely unknown. Here, we have compared the molecular dynamics and elasticities of VLDL and LDL derived by elastic neutron scattering temperature scans. We have determined thermal motions, dynamical transitions, and molecular fluctuations, which reflect the temperature-dependent motional coupling between lipid and protein. Our results revealed that lipoprotein particles are extremely soft and flexible. We found substantial differences in the molecular resiliences of lipoproteins, especially at higher temperatures. These discrepancies not only can be explained in terms of lipid composition and mobility but also suggest that apoB100 displays different dynamics dependent on the lipoprotein it is bound to. Hence, we suppose that the inherent conformational flexibility of apoB100 permits particle stabilization upon lipid exchange, whereas the dynamic coupling between protein and lipids might be a key determinant for lipoprotein conversion and atherogenicity.

  19. Molecular characterisation of tumour necrosis factor alpha and its potential connection with lipoprotein lipase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Man; Mi, Hai-Feng; Liu, Wen-Bin; Wu, Ye-Yang; Wang, Kai-Zhou; Jiang, Guang-Zhen

    2017-08-01

    Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is one kind of cytokines which is related to inflammation and lipid metabolism. TNF-α cDNA was cloned from the liver of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) through real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) methods. The full-length cDNA of TNF-α covered 1467 bp, with an open reading frame (ORF) of 723 bp, which encodes 240 amino acids. It possessed the TNF family signature IIIPDDGIYFVYSQ. After the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge test, a graded tissue-specific expression pattern of TNF-α was observed and there was high expression abundance in the kidney, brain and liver. After 8 weeks feeding trial, liver samples, two groups fed with 6% and 11% lipid levels, were collected. The results showed that, for fish fed with high-fat diet, the triglyceride of serum and lipid content of liver were elevated. Furthermore, TNF-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα, β) mRNA expression of fish fed 11% lipid diet were significantly up-regulated (p PPARγ mRNA expression of fish fed 11% lipid lever diet were significantly decreased compared to those of fish fed 6% (p < 0.05). The differences between the various expression of related genes in the high and low fat groups demonstrated that TNF-α played a key role in lipid metabolism, which may have an influence on fat metabolism through reducing fat synthesis and strengthening the β-oxidation of fatty acid. These discrepancies warrant further research.

  20. Modulators of hepatic lipoprotein metabolism identified in a search for small-molecule inducers of tribbles pseudokinase 1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek M Nagiec

    Full Text Available Recent genome wide association studies have linked tribbles pseudokinase 1 (TRIB1 to the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD. Based on the observations that increased expression of TRIB1 reduces secretion of VLDL and is associated with lower plasma levels of LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, higher plasma levels of HDL cholesterol and reduced risk for myocardial infarction, we carried out a high throughput phenotypic screen based on quantitative RT-PCR assay to identify compounds that induce TRIB1 expression in human HepG2 hepatoma cells. In a screen of a collection of diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS-derived compounds, we identified a series of benzofuran-based compounds that upregulate TRIB1 expression and phenocopy the effects of TRIB1 cDNA overexpression, as they inhibit triglyceride synthesis and apoB secretion in cells. In addition, the compounds downregulate expression of MTTP and APOC3, key components of the lipoprotein assembly pathway. However, CRISPR-Cas9 induced chromosomal disruption of the TRIB1 locus in HepG2 cells, while confirming its regulatory role in lipoprotein metabolism, demonstrated that the effects of benzofurans persist in TRIB1-null cells indicating that TRIB1 is sufficient but not necessary to transmit the effects of the drug. Remarkably, active benzofurans, as well as natural products capable of TRIB1 upregulation, also modulate hepatic cell cholesterol metabolism by elevating the expression of LDLR transcript and LDL receptor protein, while reducing the levels of PCSK9 transcript and secreted PCSK9 protein and stimulating LDL uptake. The effects of benzofurans are not masked by cholesterol depletion and are independent of the SREBP-2 regulatory circuit, indicating that these compounds represent a novel class of chemically tractable small-molecule modulators that shift cellular lipoprotein metabolism in HepG2 cells from lipogenesis to scavenging.

  1. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane.

  2. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway is involved in regulating low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1-mediated β-amyloid protein internalization in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kai-Ge; Lv, Jia; Hu, Xiao-Dan; Shi, Li-Li; Chang, Ke-Wei; Chen, Xin-Lin; Qian, Yi-Hua; Yang, Wei-Na; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, increasing evidence suggests that intracellular β-amyloid protein (Aβ) alone plays a pivotal role in the progression of AD. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway and proteins that control Aβ internalization may provide new insight for regulating Aβ levels. In the present study, the regulation of Aβ internalization by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) through low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) was analyzed in vivo. The data derived from this investigation revealed that Aβ1-42 were internalized by neurons and astrocytes in mouse brain, and were largely deposited in mitochondria and lysosomes, with some also being found in the endoplasmic reticulum. Aβ1-42-LRP1 complex was formed during Aβ1-42 internalization, and the p38 MAPK signaling pathway was activated by Aβ1-42 via LRP1. Aβ1-42 and LRP1 were co- localized in the cells of parietal cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, the level of LRP1-mRNA and LRP1 protein involved in Aβ1-42 internalization in mouse brain. The results of this investigation demonstrated that Aβ1-42 induced an LRP1-dependent pathway that related to the activation of p38 MAPK resulting in internalization of Aβ1-42. These results provide evidence supporting a key role for the p38 MAPK signaling pathway which is involved in the regulation of Aβ1-42 internalization in the parietal cortex and hippocampus of mouse through LRP1 in vivo.

  3. 低密度脂蛋白受体与代谢综合征的相关性研究进展%Progress on association between low-density lipoprotein receptor and metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金文媛; 赵正言

    2015-01-01

    低密度脂蛋白受体(LDLR)与代谢综合征(MS)关系密切。LDLR的表达量、反馈调节水平和降解水平的变化,LDLR缺陷对血脂水平的影响,LDLR在胰岛β细胞损伤和胆固醇稳态失调中的作用, LDLR基因核转录因子的表达以及基因片段的多态性等均与MS特定组分的发生、发展存在一定的相关性。近年来,多个与LDLR及MS相关的靶点和干预机制得到了广泛研究。了解LDLR与MS的相关性,对MS的防治具有十分重要的意义。本文就LDLR与MS的相关性研究进展作一综述。%Low-density lipoprotein receptor ( LDLR) and metabolic syndrome ( MS) are closely correlated . Changes in LDLR expression , feedback regulation and degradation , impacts of LDLR deficiency on blood lipid levels , roles of LDLR in islet βcell dysfunction and cholesterol homeostasis dysregulation , expression of LDLR gene nuclear transcription factors and polymorphism of LDLR gene segments are all involved in the development of specific components of MS .In recent years , a variety of targets and intervention mechanisms in relation to LDLR and MS have been extensively studied .Knowledge about association between LDLR and MS may contribute to the development of strategies for prevention and treatment of MS .This article reviews the update on the association between LDLR and MS .

  4. Polymorphisms in Toll-like receptor 4 are associated with factors of the metabolic syndrome and modify the association between dietary saturated fat and fasting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuda, Cristina; Badawi, Alaa; Karmali, Mohamed; El-Sohemy, Ahmed

    2011-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a protein of the innate immune system hypothesized to mediate some of the effects of a high-fat diet on inflammation and insulin resistance. As both these factors are associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS), genetic variation in TLR4 may affect the relationship between dietary lipids and MetS. The objective of the study was to determine whether 2 polymorphisms in TLR4 (rs4986790 Asp299Gly and rs5030728 G>A) modify the relationship between dietary fat and markers of the MetS. Participants were healthy young men and women of various ethnocultural backgrounds. Dietary intake was estimated using a 1-month semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, and fasting blood samples were taken for genotyping and biomarker measurement. The Asp299Gly polymorphism in TLR4 was associated with increased insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (P < .05), and homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function (P < .05) and family history of diabetes (P = .0002). The intronic polymorphism rs5030728 modified the relationship between dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (P = .003 for interaction). The SFA intake was inversely associated with HDL cholesterol among individuals homozygous for the G allele (β = -0.015 ± 0.007 mmol/L, P = .04), whereas a positive relationship was observed for heterozygotes (β = 0.025 ± 0.01 mmol/L, P = .02). There was no association between dietary SFAs and HDL cholesterol among individuals homozygous for the A allele. These observations suggest that both diet and innate immunity may interact to influence components of the MetS.

  5. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) affects hyaluronan synthesis in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Manuela; Bartolini, Barbara; Vigetti, Davide; Karousou, Evgenia; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Wight, Thomas N; Hascall, Vincent C; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2013-10-11

    Thickening of the vessel in response to high low density lipoprotein(s) (LDL) levels is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, characterized by increased hyaluronan (HA) deposition in the neointima. Human native LDL trapped within the arterial wall undergoes modifications such as oxidation (oxLDL). The aim of our study is to elucidate the link between internalization of oxLDL and HA production in vitro, using human aortic smooth muscle cells. LDL were used at an effective protein concentration of 20-50 μg/ml, which allowed 80% cell viability. HA content in the medium of untreated cells was 28.9 ± 3.7 nmol HA-disaccharide/cell and increased after oxLDL treatment to 53.9 ± 5.6. OxLDL treatments doubled the transcripts of HA synthase HAS2 and HAS3. Accumulated HA stimulated migration of aortic smooth muscle cells and monocyte adhesiveness to extracellular matrix. The effects induced by oxLDL were inhibited by blocking LOX-1 scavenger receptor with a specific antibody (10 μg/ml). The cholesterol moiety of LDL has an important role in HA accumulation because cholesterol-free oxLDL failed to induce HA synthesis. Nevertheless, cholesterol-free oxLDL and unmodified cholesterol (20 μg/ml) induce only HAS3 transcription, whereas 22,oxysterol affects both HAS2 and HAS3. Moreover, HA deposition was associated with higher expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (CHOP and GRP78). Our data suggest that HA synthesis can be induced in response to specific oxidized sterol-related species delivered through oxLDL.

  6. Oxidized lipoprotein lipids and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahotupa, Markku

    2017-04-01

    Plasma lipoproteins contain variable amounts of lipid oxidation products (LOP), which are known to impair normal physiological functions and stimulate atherosclerotic processes. Recent evidence indicates that plasma lipoproteins are active carriers of LOP, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) directing transport toward peripheral tissues, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) being active in the reverse transport. It has been proposed that the lipoprotein-specific transport of LOP could play a role in atherosclerosis-related effects of LDL and HDL. This article gives an overview of the present knowledge of lipoprotein LOP transport and its association with the risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Evidence of the significance of lipoprotein LOP transport comes mainly from studies of physiological oxidative stress and is supported by studies of the functionality apolipoprotein A-1 mimetic peptides. A large body of data has accumulated indicating that lipoprotein LOP transport is connected to the risk of atherosclerosis. While high levels of LOP carried by LDL are indicative of elevated risk, high LOP level in HDL appears to associate with protection. If confirmed, the proposed lipoprotein LOP transport function would affect conception of the etiology of atherosclerosis, but would not conflict current views of the pathophysiological mechanisms. It could open new perspectives, such as the dietary origin of LOP, and the protective function of HDL in clearance of LOP. Focusing on LOP could give additional tools especially for prevention and diagnosis, but would not radically change the management of atherosclerosis and CVD.

  7. Diet × genotype interactions in hepatic cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in response to replacement of dietary fish oil with vegetable oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Sofia; Pratoomyot, Jarunan; Torstensen, Bente E; Taggart, John B; Guy, Derrick R; Bell, J Gordon; Tocher, Douglas R

    2011-11-01

    The present study investigates the effects of genotype on responses to alternative feeds in Atlantic salmon. Microarray analysis of the liver transcriptome of two family groups, lean or fat, fed a diet containing either a fish oil (FO) or a vegetable oil (VO) blend indicated that pathways of cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism might be differentially affected by the diet depending on the genetic background of the fish, and this was further investigated by real-time quantitative PCR, plasma and lipoprotein biochemical analysis. Results indicate a reduction in VLDL and LDL levels, with no changes in HDL, when FO is replaced by VO in the lean family group, whereas in fat fish fed FO, levels of apoB-containing lipoproteins were low and comparable with those fed VO in both family groups. Significantly lower levels of plasma TAG and LDL-TAG were measured in the fat group that was independent of diet, whereas plasma cholesterol was significantly higher in fish fed the FO diet in both groups. Hepatic expression of genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis, β-oxidation and lipoprotein metabolism showed relatively subtle changes. A significantly lower expression of genes considered anti-atherogenic in mammals (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1, apoAI, scavenger receptor class B type 1, lipoprotein lipase (LPL)b (TC67836) and LPLc (TC84899)) was found in lean fish, compared with fat fish, when fed VO. Furthermore, the lean family group appeared to show a greater response to diet composition in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, mediated by sterol-responsive element-binding protein 2. Finally, the presence of three different transcripts for LPL, with differential patterns of nutritional regulation, was demonstrated.

  8. Lipoprotein Apheresis for Lipoprotein(a)-Associated Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roeseler, Eberhard; Julius, Ulrich; Heigl, Franz

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lipoprotein(a)-hyperlipoproteinemia (Lp(a)-HLP) along with progressive cardiovascular disease has been approved as indication for regular lipoprotein apheresis (LA) in Germany since 2008. We aimed to study the long-term preventive effect of LA and to assess hypothetical clinical correl...

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein promotes neutrophil activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufert, C; Pai, R K; Noss, E H; Berger, M; Boom, W H; Harding, C V

    2001-08-01

    Certain microbial substances, e.g., LPS, can activate neutrophils or prime them to enhance their response to other activating agents, e.g., fMLP. We investigated the role of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) 19-kDa lipoprotein in activation of human neutrophils. MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein initiated phenotypic changes characteristic of neutrophil activation, including down-regulation of CD62 ligand (L-selectin) and up-regulation of CD35 (CR1) and CD11b/CD18 (CR3, Mac-1). In addition, exposure of neutrophils to MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein enhanced the subsequent oxidative burst in response to fMLP as assessed by oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (determined by flow cytometry). LPS also produced these effects with similar kinetics, but an oligodeoxynucleotide containing a CpG motif failed to induce any priming or activation response. Although the effects of LPS required the presence of serum, neutrophil activation by MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein occurred independently of serum factors, suggesting the involvement of different receptors and signaling mechanisms for LPS and MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein. Thus, MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein serves as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern that promotes neutrophil priming and activation.

  10. Cellular uptake of a dexamethasone palmitate-low density lipoprotein complex by macrophages and foam cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauchi, Yoshihiko; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the utility of a dexamethasone palmitate (DP)-low density lipoprotein (LDL) complex to transport drug into foam cells, the cellular uptake of DP-LDL complex by macrophages and foam cells was examined. The DP-LDL complex was prepared by incubation with DP and LDL, and the DP-LDL complex and murine macrophages were incubated. No cellular uptake of the DP-LDL complex by macrophages was found until 6 h after the start of incubation, but this gradually increased from 12 to 48 h. On the other hand, the cellular uptake of the oxidized DP-LDL complex was already apparent at 3 h after the start incubation, and then markedly increased until 48 h incubation along with that of the lipid emulsion (LE) containing DP (DP-LE). The cellular uptake of DP-LE by foam cells was significantly lower than that by macrophages. However, the cellular uptake of DP-LDL complex by foam cells was similar to that by macrophages. These findings suggest that the DP-LDL complex is oxidatively modified, and then incorporated into macrophages and foam cells through the scavenger receptor pathway. Since selective delivery of drugs into foam cells in the early stage of atherosclerosis is a useful protocol for antiatherosclerosis treatment, the DP-LDL complex appears to be a potentially useful drug-carrier complex for future antiatherosclerotic therapy.

  11. [Nicotinic acid increases cellular transport of high density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients with hypoalphalipoproteinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Catalina; Droppelmann, Katherine; Quiñones, Verónica; Amigo, Ludwig; Mendoza, Camila; Serrano, Valentina; Véjar, Margarita; Maiz, Alberto; Rigotti, Attilio

    2015-09-01

    Plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) are involved in reverse cholesterol transport mediated by the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Nicotinic acid increases HDL cholesterol levels, even though its specific impact on SR-BI dependent-cellular cholesterol transport remains unknown. To determine the effect of nicotinic acid on HDL particle functionality in cholesterol efflux and uptake mediated by SR-BI in cultured cells in hypoalphalipoproteinemic patients. In a pilot study, eight patients with low HDL (≤ 40 mg/dL) were treated with extended release nicotinic acid. HDL cholesterol and phospholipid levels, HDL2 and HDL3 fractions and HDL particle sizes were measured at baseline and post-therapy. Before and after nicotinic acid treatment, HDL particles were used for cholesterol transport studies in cells transfected with SR-BI. Nicotinic acid treatment raised total HDL cholesterol and phospholipids, HDL2 levels as well as HDL particle size. Nicotinic acid significantly increased HDL cholesterol efflux and uptake capacity mediated by SR-BI in cultured cells. Nicotinic acid therapy increases SR-BI-dependent HDL cholesterol transport in cultured cells, establishing a new cellular mechanism by which this lipid-lowering drug appears to modulate HDL metabolism in patients with hypoalphalipoproteinemia.

  12. High-Density Lipoprotein-Mediated Transcellular Cholesterol Transport in Mouse Aortic Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, LiXia; Okoro, Emmanuel U.; Cao, ZhiJan; Yang, Hong; Motley-Johnson, Evangeline; Guo, Zhongmao

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of unesterified cholesterol-rich lipid vesicles in the subendothelial space contributes to atherogenesis. Transport of cholesterol from the subendothelial intima back to the circulating blood inhibits atherosclerosis development; however, the mechanism for this process has not been fully defined. Using cultured mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs), we observed that unesterified cholesterol can be transported across the endothelial cell monolayer from the basolateral to the apical compartment. Administration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) to the apical compartment enhanced transendothelial cholesterol transport in a concentration-dependent manner. Knockdown of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) or scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1), or inhibition of SR-B1 diminished HDL-induced transendothelial cholesterol transport; while knockdown of ABCA1 reduced apoAI-mediated cholesterol transport. HDL enhanced phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt in MAECs. However, inhibition PI3K or Akt did not reduce HDL-induced transendothelial cholesterol transport. These results suggest that HDL enhances transendothelial cholesterol transport by activation of a mechanism involving ABCA1, ABCA1 and SR-B1 but not involving PI3K and Akt. PMID:26255968

  13. Lipoprotein metabolism indicators improve cardiovascular risk prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Cardiovascular disease risk increases when lipoprotein metabolism is dysfunctional. We have developed a computational model able to derive indicators of lipoprotein production, lipolysis, and uptake processes from a single lipoprotein profile measurement. This is the first study to inves...

  14. Lipoprotein metabolism indicators improve cardiovascular risk prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, D.B. van; Graaf, A.A. de; Tsivtsivadze, E.; Parnell, L.D.; Werff-van der Vat, B.J.C. van der; Ommen, B. van; Greef, J. van der; Ordovás, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease risk increases when lipoprotein metabolism is dysfunctional. We have developed a computational model able to derive indicators of lipoprotein production, lipolysis, and uptake processes from a single lipoprotein profile measurement. This is the first study to inves

  15. Genetics of non-conventional lipoprotein fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipoprotein subclass measures associate with cardiometabolic disease risk. Currently the information that lipoproteins convey on disease risk over that of traditional demographic and lipid measures is minimal, and so their use is clinics is limited. However, lipoprotein subclass perturbations repres...

  16. Structure of the LDL receptor extracellular domain at endosomalpH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, Gabby; Henry, Lisa; Henderson, Keith; Ichtchenko,Konstantin; Brown, Michael S.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2002-09-05

    The structure of the low-density lipoprotein receptor extracellular portion has been determined. The document proposes a mechanism for the release of lipoprotein in the endosome. Without this release, the mechanism of receptor recycling cannot function.

  17. Structure of the LDL receptor extracellular domain at endosomalpH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, Gabby; Henry, Lisa; Henderson, Keith; Ichtchenko,Konstantin; Brown, Michael S.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2002-09-05

    The structure of the low-density lipoprotein receptor extracellular portion has been determined. The document proposes a mechanism for the release of lipoprotein in the endosome. Without this release, the mechanism of receptor recycling cannot function.

  18. Physiological regulation of lipoprotein lipase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme lipoprotein lipase (LPL), originally identified as the clearing factor lipase, hydrolyzes triglycerides present in the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins VLDL and chylomicrons. LPL is primarily expressed in tissues that oxidize or store fatty acids in large quantities such as the heart, skele

  19. Congenital β-lipoprotein deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchem, F.S.P. van; Pol, G.; Gier, J. de; Böttcher, C.J.F.; Pries, C.

    1966-01-01

    There are several degrees of β-lipoprotein deficiency. If there is no β-lipoprotein present, or if there are only traces of it, the Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome develops. A constant feature of this syndrome is disturbed fat absorption with accumulation of fat in the epithelium of intestinal mucosa and

  20. 桔梗皂苷对高胆固醇血大鼠低密度脂蛋白受体的调节%Regulation of PlatycodonGrandiflorumSaponin on Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor in High Blood Cholesterol Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨桂英; 吴敬涛

    2015-01-01

    以高脂乳剂诱导高胆固醇血大鼠模型,研究肝脏胆固醇代谢相关的低密度脂蛋白受体( LDL-r)的活性.灌喂SD大鼠高脂乳剂饮食42d,建立高胆固醇血模型;随机将高胆固醇血大鼠分成4组:空白组、高脂组、低皂苷剂量组、高皂苷剂量组,分别按每千克体质量30、100 mg给以桔梗皂苷降胆固醇,连续21d;分别利用免疫组织化学方法和免疫印迹方法检测LDL-r的蛋白变化,利用PCR方法检测LDL-r基因表达水平.结果表明,低、高剂量桔梗皂苷均能显著降低( P<0.01)高脂乳剂诱导的高胆固醇血大鼠的LDL-r,提示桔梗皂苷降低血胆固醇的作用是通过LDL-r转运胆固醇的作用实现的.%The high cholesterol blood model of the rats induced by high fat emulsion was established to study the activity of platycodongrandiflorumsaponin on cholesterol metabolism -related low density lipoprotein receptor ( LDL-r) in liver.After SD rats were fed foods with high fat emulsion 42 d, high cholesterol blood model was set up .Random , high cholesterol blood rats were divided into 4 groups:Blank group , High fat and Low saponin dose group .Respectively , according to 30 or 100 mg of saponin per kilogram of body to drop cho-lesterol , continuous 21 d.Immunohistochemical method and Western blot method to detect changes of LDL -rprotein expression levels in liver , Polymerase chain reaction ( PCR) to detect of LDL-r gene expression lev-els were used.The results show that the low and high dose of saponin can significantly (P<0.01) reduce the LDL-r of high cholesterol blood rats induced by high fat emulsion , which prompt that the action of platyc-odongrandiflorumsaponin on highcholesterol blood rats can be come true is the modulatory role of LDL -r transporting cholesterol .

  1. Model of mouth-to-mouth transfer of bacterial lipoproteins through inner membrane LolC, periplasmic LolA, and outer membrane LolB

    OpenAIRE

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in Escherichia coli are released from the inner membrane by an ATP-binding cassette transporter, the LolCDE complex, which causes the formation of a soluble complex with a periplasmic molecular chaperone, LolA. LolA then transports lipoproteins to the outer membrane where an outer membrane receptor, LolB, incorporates lipoproteins into the outer membrane. The molecular mechanisms underlying the Lol-dependent lipoprotein sorting have been clarified in detai...

  2. Leukocyte activation by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Arash; van Oostrom, Antonie J H H M; Izraeljan, Alisa; Verseyden, Caroline; Collins, Jennifer M; Frayn, Keith N; Plokker, Thijs W M; Elte, Jan Willem F; Castro Cabezas, Manuel

    2008-04-01

    Postprandial lipemia has been linked to atherosclerosis and inflammation. Because leukocyte activation is obligatory for atherogenesis, leukocyte activation by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) was investigated. The expression of CD11b and CD66b after incubation with glucose and native and artificial TRLs (NTRL and ATRL) in vivo and in vitro was evaluated by flowcytometry. Oral fat loading tests showed an increased expression of CD11b on monocytes and neutrophils and CD66b on neutrophils. In 11 volunteers, postprandial leukocytes became enriched with meal-derived fatty acids ([1-(13)C]16:0) suggesting uptake of exogenous fat. ApoB binding on leukocytes measured by flowcytometry in 65 subjects was highest on neutrophils and monocytes suggesting adherence of apoB-containing lipoproteins. Physiological concentrations of TRLs showed 62% increased neutrophil CD11b and a dose-dependent increased monocyte CD11b up to 84% in vitro. Incubations with lipid emulsions in the hypertriglyceridemic range showed a 5-fold increased monocyte CD11b expression, which was higher than the positive control (fMLP), and a dose-dependent 2- to 3-fold increased neutrophil CD11b and CD66b. The oxidative scavenger DMTU decreased the neutrophil CD66b expression by 36%. Acute hypertriglyceridemia is a leukocyte activator most likely by direct interaction between TRLs and leukocytes and uptake of fatty acids. TG-mediated leukocyte activation is an alternative proinflammatory and proatherogenic mechanism of hypertriglyceridemia in part associated to the generation of oxidative stress.

  3. High-density lipoprotein inhibits ox-LDL-induced adipokine secretion by upregulating SR-BI expression and suppressing ER Stress pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guohua; Wu, Xia; Zhang, Pu; Yu, Yang; Yang, Mingfeng; Jiao, Peng; Wang, Ni; Song, Haiming; Wu, You; Zhang, Xiangjian; Liu, Huaxia; Qin, Shucun

    2016-07-29

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) in adipocytes can modulate adipokines secretion. The aim of this study was to explore the protective effect of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced ERS-C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) pathway-mediated adipokine secretion. Our results showed that serum adipokines, including visfatin, resistin and TNF-α, correlated inversely with serum HDL cholesterol level in patients with abdominal obesity. In vitro, like ERS inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA), HDL inhibited ox-LDL- or tunicamycin (TM, an ERS inducer)-induced increase in visfatin and resistin secretion. Moreover, HDL inhibited ox-LDL-induced free cholesterol (FC) accumulation in whole cell lysate and in the endoplasmic reticulum. Additionally, like PBA, HDL inhibited ox-LDL- or TM-induced activation of ERS response as assessed by the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase-like ER kinase and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α and reduced nuclear translocation of activating transcription factor 6 as well as the downregulation of Bip and CHOP. Furthermore, HDL increased scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) expression and SR-BI siRNA treatment abolished the inhibitory effects of HDL on ox-LDL-induced FC accumulation and CHOP upregulation. These data indicate that HDL may suppress ox-LDL-induced FC accumulation in adipocytes through upregulation of SR-BI, subsequently preventing ox-LDL-induced ER stress-CHOP pathway-mediated adipocyte inflammation.

  4. Scavenging nucleic acid debris to combat autoimmunity and infectious disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Eda K.; Shumansky, Kara L.; Borst, Luke B.; Burnette, Angela D.; Sample, Christopher J.; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A.; Sullenger, Bruce A.

    2016-08-01

    Nucleic acid-containing debris released from dead and dying cells can be recognized as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or pattern-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by the innate immune system. Inappropriate activation of the innate immune response can engender pathological inflammation and autoimmune disease. To combat such diseases, major efforts have been made to therapeutically target the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize such DAMPs and PAMPs, or the downstream effector molecules they engender, to limit inflammation. Unfortunately, such strategies can limit the ability of the immune system to combat infection. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleic acid-binding polymers can act as molecular scavengers and limit the ability of artificial nucleic acid ligands to activate PRRs. Herein, we demonstrate that nucleic acid scavengers (NASs) can limit pathological inflammation and nucleic acid-associated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice. Moreover, we observe that such NASs do not limit an animal’s ability to combat viral infection, but rather their administration improves survival when animals are challenged with lethal doses of influenza. These results indicate that molecules that scavenge extracellular nucleic acid debris represent potentially safer agents to control pathological inflammation associated with a wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases.

  5. Phytosterols, Phytostanols, and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Gylling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of phytosterols and phytostanols added to foods and food supplements to obtain significant non-pharmacologic serum and low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol reduction is well documented. Irrespective of age, gender, ethnic background, body weight, background diet, or the cause of hypercholesterolemia and, even added to statin treatment, phytosterols and phytostanols at 2 g/day significantly lower LDL cholesterol concentration by 8%–10%. They do not affect the concentrations of high density lipoprotein cholesterol, lipoprotein (a or serum proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. In some studies, phytosterols and phytostanols have modestly reduced serum triglyceride levels especially in subjects with slightly increased baseline concentrations. Phytosterols and phytostanols lower LDL cholesterol by displacing cholesterol from mixed micelles in the small intestine so that cholesterol absorption is partially inhibited. Cholesterol absorption and synthesis have been carefully evaluated during phytosterol and phytostanol supplementation. However, only a few lipoprotein kinetic studies have been performed, and they revealed that LDL apoprotein B-100 transport rate was reduced. LDL particle size was unchanged, but small dense LDL cholesterol concentration was reduced. In subjects with metabolic syndrome and moderate hypertriglyceridemia, phytostanols reduced not only non- high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol concentration but also serum triglycerides by 27%, and reduced the large and medium size very low density lipoprotein particle concentrations. In the few postprandial studies, the postprandial lipoproteins were reduced, but detailed studies with apoprotein B-48 are lacking. In conclusion, more kinetic studies are required to obtain a more complete understanding of the fasting and postprandial lipoprotein metabolism caused by phytosterols and phytostanols. It seems obvious, however, that the most atherogenic lipoprotein

  6. Energy scavenging from environmental vibration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galchev, Tzeno (University of Michigan); Apblett, Christopher Alan; Najafi, Khalil (University of Michigan)

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an efficient energy scavenger for converting ambient low-frequency vibrations into electrical power. In order to achieve this a novel inertial micro power generator architecture has been developed that utilizes the bi-stable motion of a mechanical mass to convert a broad range of low-frequency (< 30Hz), and large-deflection (>250 {micro}m) ambient vibrations into high-frequency electrical output energy. The generator incorporates a bi-stable mechanical structure to initiate high-frequency mechanical oscillations in an electromagnetic scavenger. This frequency up-conversion technique enhances the electromechanical coupling and increases the generated power. This architecture is called the Parametric Frequency Increased Generator (PFIG). Three generations of the device have been fabricated. It was first demonstrated using a larger bench-top prototype that had a functional volume of 3.7cm3. It generated a peak power of 558{micro}W and an average power of 39.5{micro}W at an input acceleration of 1g applied at 10 Hz. The performance of this device has still not been matched by any other reported work. It yielded the best power density and efficiency for any scavenger operating from low-frequency (<10Hz) vibrations. A second-generation device was then fabricated. It generated a peak power of 288{micro}W and an average power of 5.8{micro}W from an input acceleration of 9.8m/s{sup 2} at 10Hz. The device operates over a frequency range of 20Hz. The internal volume of the generator is 2.1cm{sup 3} (3.7cm{sup 3} including casing), half of a standard AA battery. Lastly, a piezoelectric version of the PFIG is currently being developed. This device clearly demonstrates one of the key features of the PFIG architecture, namely that it is suitable for MEMS integration, more so than resonant generators, by incorporating a brittle bulk piezoelectric ceramic. This is the first micro-scale piezoelectric generator capable of <10Hz operation. The

  7. Recent advances in lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 and atherosclerosis%血凝素样氧化低密度脂蛋白受体-1与动脉粥样硬化的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱惠莲; 凌文华

    2004-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1 } is a type-Ⅱ membrane protein belonging to the C-type lectin family molecules, which acts as a cell surface endocytosis receptor for atherogenic oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL). LOX-1 supports the binding internalization and proteolytic degradation of oxidized LDL, but not of significant amounts of acetylated LDL. LOX-1 is initially synthesized as a 40 kD precursor protein with N-linked high mannose-type carbohydrate, which is further glycosylated and processed into a 48-kD mature form. In vivo, endothelial cells that cover early therosclerotic lesions, intimal macrophages and smooth muscle cells in advanced atherosclerotic plaques express LOX-1. LOX-1 is cleaved at membrane proximal extracellular domain and released from the cell surface. Measurement of soluble LOX-1 in vivo may provide novel diagnostic strategy for the evaluation and prediction of atherosclerosis and vascular diseases.

  8. Macrophage uptake of a lipoprotein-sequestered toxicant: a potential route of immunotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, N E; Wells, D S; Dauterman, W C; Roberts, J F; Guthrie, F E

    1986-03-15

    An experimental system was chosen to investigate the bioactivity of a lipoprotein-sequestered toxicant at the cellular level based on recent studies demonstrating receptor-mediated uptake of lipoproteins by macrophages. Rat peritoneal exudate cell suspensions (PEC) were exposed to DDT and lipoprotein-sequestered DDT, followed by measurement of DDT uptake, metabolism, and cellular toxicity. In vitro uptake assays demonstrated that PEC suspensions treated for 10, 20, and 30 min with 2.5 microM lipoprotein-sequestered DDT had approximately a twofold increase over the amount of DDT associated with PEC treated with 2.5 microM free DDT. PEC were assayed for DDT metabolites to serve as a measure of the cellular internalization of the toxicant after treatment in vitro for 18 hr with either 1.5 microM DDT or lipoprotein-sequestered DDT. Evidence of DDT metabolism was only observed with PEC which had been treated with lipoprotein-sequestered DDT. These cells contained significantly higher amounts of DDT metabolites as compared to cells treated with unsequestered DDT (over an eightfold difference). Assays measuring macrophage phagocytic activity indicated that macrophages treated for 4.5 hr in vitro with 2.5 microM lipoprotein-sequestered DDT showed significant inhibition in their ability to phagocytize yeast particles. These results suggest that serum lipoproteins may facilitate the cellular uptake of lipoprotein-sequestered toxicants leading to altered cellular function (phagocytosis).

  9. Regulatory effect and significance of hydrogen sulfide on low-density lipoprotein receptor%硫化氢对低密度脂蛋白受体的调节作用及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王圆; 金红芳; 杜军保

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the regulatory effect and significance of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S)on low -density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR).Methods Mouse primary hepatocytes were divided into control group,low -den-sity lipoprotein (LDL)group and LDL +sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS,the donor of H2 S)group.The cells in LDL group were treated with LDL (50 mg/L)and the cells in LDL +NaHS group were pretreated with NaHS (100 μmol/L)for 0.5 hours and then treated with LDL (50 mg/L).Real -time PCR and Western blot were used to detect the expres-sions of LDLR mRNA and protein,respectively.Mouse primary hepatocytes were divided into control group,1,1′-dioctadecyl -3,3,3′,3′-tetramethyl -indocarbocyanine perchlorate low -density lipoprotein (DiI -LDL)group and DiI -LDL +NaHS group.The cells in DiI -LDL group were incubated with DiI -LDL (10 mg/L)for 3 hours.The cells in DiI -LDL +NaHS group were pretreated with NaHS (100 μmol/L)for 1 hour before DiI -LDL (10 mg/L) was added.Confocal method was used to measure the uptake of DiI -LDL by mouse primary hepatocytes,and fluores-cent quantitative method was performed to detect the content of DiI -LDL in the supernatant of mouse primary hepato-cytes.Results The levels of LDLR mRNA and protein in the mouse primary hepatocytes were significantly downregu-lated compared with those in the control group (t =5.733,P <0.01;t =2.527,P <0.05);after NaHS was adminis-tered,LDLR mRNA and protein level in the mouse primary hepatocytes were significantly upregulated (t =-7.639, P <0.01;t =2.388,P <0.05).In the mouse primary hepatocytes,compared with that in the control group,the uptake of DiI -LDL by cells in DiI -LDL group was increased;the uptake of DiI -LDL by mouse primary hepatocytes in DiI -LDL +NaHS group was significantly increased in comparison with that in the DiI -LDL group.Compared with that in the control group,the DiI -LDL content of culture supernatant in the DiI -LDL group was significantly increased (t =-39.156,P <0.01);after treatment

  10. 氧化低密度脂蛋白及其受体与子痫前期发病的关系%Correlation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 with pre-eclampsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张妍; 叶元华; 彭伟; 詹瑛

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-I) in pre-ecalmpsia. Methods From June 2007 to January 2008,73 women with pre-eelampsia who delivered in the Department of Obstetrics, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College,were recruited, including 35 women with mild pre-eclampsia (MPE group) and 38 women with severe pre-eclampsia(SPE group). And 45 healthy pregnant women were taken as control group. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure the plasma concentrations of oxLDL in these women. Semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot were used to investigate the expression of LOX-1 mRNA and protein in placenta. The expression of caspase-3 mRNA in placenta was determined using Semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results (1) The plasma concentrations of oxLDL in MPE group ( 0.42 ± 0.11 ) mg/L, SPE group ( 0.68 ± 0.12 ) mg/L, were significantly higher compared with control group (0.35 ± 0.14 )mg/L( P < 0.01 ) and the concentrations of oxLDL in MPE group were significantly higher compared with SPE group (P<0.01 ). (2) The expression of LOX-1 mRNA in placenta of MPE group(0.70 ±0.10) and SPE group(0.84 ±0.08) were significantly higher than that in control group(0.58 ± 0.11 ) ( P<0.01 ) and the expression of LOX-1 mRNA in MPE group was significantly higher than that of SPE group (P<0.01 ). (3) The expression of LOX-1 protein in placenta of MPE group (0.79±0.15 )and SPE group(0.90±0.12) were significantly higher compared with control group(0.68 ±0.11)( P<0.01 ), while the expression of LOX-1 protein of MPE group was significantly higher compared with SPE group (P <0.01 ). (4) The expression of caspase-3 mRNA in placenta of MPE group(3.82± 0.18) and SPE group(5.39±0.14) were significantly higher than that in control group(2.19±0.20) (P <0.01 ), and the expression of caspase-3 mRNA in MPE group was significantly higher than that of SPE group (P

  11. Role of Brown Fat in Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeke, Geerte; Kooijman, Sander; Boon, Mariëtte R; Rensen, Patrick C N; Berbée, Jimmy F P

    2016-01-08

    Atherosclerosis, for which hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western society, and new therapeutic strategies are highly warranted. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is metabolically active in human adults. Although positron emission tomography-computed tomography using a glucose tracer is the golden standard to visualize and quantify the volume and activity of BAT, it has become clear that activated BAT combusts fatty acids rather than glucose. Here, we review the role of brown and beige adipocytes in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis, with evidence derived from both animal and human studies. On the basis of mainly data from animal models, we propose a model in which activated brown adipocytes use their intracellular triglyceride stores to generate fatty acids for combustion. BAT rapidly replenishes these stores by internalizing primarily lipoprotein triglyceride-derived fatty acids, generated by lipoprotein lipase-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides, rather than by holoparticle uptake. As a consequence, BAT activation leads to the generation of lipoprotein remnants that are subsequently cleared via the liver provided that an intact apoE-low-density lipoprotein receptor pathway is present. Through these mechanisms, BAT activation reduces plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels and attenuates diet-induced atherosclerosis development. Initial studies suggest that BAT activation in humans may also reduce triglyceride and cholesterol levels, but potential antiatherogenic effects should be assessed in future studies. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Low density lipoproteins mediated nanoplatforms for cancer targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Kesharwani, Prashant, E-mail: prashant_pharmacy04@rediffmail.com; Jain, Narendra K., E-mail: jnarendr@yahoo.co.in [Dr. H. S. Gour University, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-09-15

    Chemotherapy is a foremost remedial approach for the treatment of localized and metastasized tumors. In order to explore new treatment modalities for cancer, it is important to identify qualitative or quantitative differences in metabolic processes between normal and malignant cells. One such difference may be that of increased receptor-mediated cellular uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDLs) by cancer cells. Lipoproteins in general and specifically LDL are ideal candidates for loading and delivering cancer therapeutic and diagnostic agents due to their biocompatibility. By mimicking the endogenous shape and structure of lipoproteins, the reconstituted lipoproteins can remain in circulation for an extended period of time, while largely evading the reticuloendothelial cells in the body's defenses. In this account, we review the field of low density inspired nanoparticles in relation to the delivery of cancer imaging and therapeutic agents. LDL has instinctive cancer targeting potential and has been used to incorporate various lipophillic molecules to transport them to tumors. Nature's method of rerouting LDL provides a strategy to extend the cancer targeting potential of lipoproteins far off its constricted purview. In this review, we have discussed the various aspects of LDL including its role in cancer imaging and chemotherapy in retrospect and prospect and current efforts aimed to further improve the delivery efficacy of LDL-drug complexes with reduced chances of drug resistance leading to optimal drug delivery. This review provides a strong support for the concept of using LDL as a drug carrier.

  13. Influence of Valsartan on Expression of Lectin-like Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-1 in Renal Cortex%缬沙坦对血凝素样氧化低密度脂蛋白受体-1基因在肾皮质中表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋智敏; 历风元

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1 ) in renal cortex ,and to analyze the relationship of LOX-1 to renal injury and vascular disease .Methods Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were intragastrically administered with 0 .9/0 normal saline 10 mL · kg · d (control group ) ,adenine 300 mg · kg · d (experimental group ) ,or a combination of adenine 300 mg · kg · d and valsartan 10 mg · kg · d (treatment group ) .After 21 days ,blood and urine samples were collected and examined to confirm the successful induction of chronic renal failure and rats in treatment group were intra -gastrically given valsartan 10 mg · kg · d .After 8 weeks,blood pressure (BP) was measured via internal jugular vein cannulation .After decapitation , blood samples were collected to detect serum levels of creatinine ,low density lipoprotein (LDL ),lipoprotein (a) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) .In addition ,the expression of LOX-1 in renal cortex was measured by real-time PCR .Results Animal model of adenine-induced chronic renal failure was established successfully in rats .Compared with control group ,LOX-1 expression ,BP ,creatinine ,LDL , lipo-protein (a) and hs-CRP significantly increased in experimental group ( P0 .05 ), except for BP and lipoprotein (a) levels ( P0.05).BP、Crea、LDL、Lp(a)、hs-CRP在慢性肾衰竭大鼠中明显升高,与对照组和治疗组比较差异有统计学意义(P0.05),BP、Lp(a)有统计学意义(P<0.05).LOX-1在肾皮质中的表达上调与BP、Crea、LDL、Lp(a)、hs-CRP有相关性(r分别为0.816、0.698、0.829、0.724、0.740).结论 慢性肾衰竭大鼠肾皮质中LOX-1的表达是明显上调的,缬沙坦能明显抑制LOX-1在肾皮质中的表达.LOX-1在肾皮质中的表达上调与BP、Crea、LDL、Lp(a)、hs-CRP呈正相关,提示LOX-1参与了慢性肾衰竭的发生和发展.

  14. Synthetic Lipoproteins as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gangliang; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hualiang

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lipoprotein is an effective carrier of targeted delivery for drugs. It has the very small size, good biocompatibility, suitable half-life, and specific lipoprotein receptorbinding capacity. Compared with the traditional natural lipoprotein, synthetic lipoprotein not only retains the original biological characteristics and functions, but also exhibits the excellent characteristics in drug delivery. Herein, the advantages, development, applications, and prospect of synthetic lipoproteins as drug carriers were summarized.

  15. The effects of low density lipoproteins modified by incubation with chondroitin 6-sulfate on human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîrziu, D; Jinga, V V; Serban, G; Simionescu, M

    1999-11-01

    One of the first changes that take place within the artery intima at the inception of atherosclerosis is the accumulation of LDL-derived modified lipoproteins which appear as subendothelial lipid droplets and vesicles. With time, the LDL retention and interaction with intimal chondroitin sulfate-proteoglycans may induce further structural and functional modification of the lipoproteins. The aim of this study was to produce 'in vitro' modified lipoproteins by LDL incubation with chondroitin 6-sulfate (CS, at 37 degrees C, for 48 h, in the absence of antioxidants) and to test their effects on cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs). CS induced LDL modification (CS-mLDL) consisted in formation of a mixture of fused particles (up to 150 nm diameter) and monomers with a small content of lipid peroxides and a partially degraded apo B-100, corresponding to a mild oxidation. Upon incubation with SMCs, CS-mLDL produced a concentration-dependent stimulation of 3H-thymidine incorporation, that, at low concentration (25 microg/ml), was 2-3-fold higher than that obtained when native LDL was used; this increase correlates well with the level of CS-mLDL uptake at the same concentration. Besides the mitogenic effect, CS-mLDL induced a significant stimulation of SMCs migration, comparable with that reported for oxidized LDL. Upon incubation with CS-mLDL, SMCs accumulated lipid droplets of various number and dimension, as revealed by Nile red staining and electron microscopy. Competition studies performed in the presence of 20-fold excess of native LDL and acetyl LDL showed that 125I-CS-mLDL were taken up both by LDL receptor and scavenger receptor. At high concentration (200 microg/ml), CS-mLDL had a cytotoxic effect that was not significantly different from that of native LDL. Together these results provide evidence of (i) the direct alteration produced by CS on LDL and (ii) the effect of CS-mLDL on SMCs migration, proliferation and transformation in lipid-laden cells

  16. Lipoprotein Nanoplatform for Targeted Delivery of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Glickson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein (LDL provides a highly versatile natural nanoplatform for delivery of visible or near-infrared fluorescent optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents and photodynamic therapy and chemotherapeutic agents to normal and neoplastic cells that overexpress low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs. Extension to other lipoproteins ranging in diameter from about 10 nm (high-density lipoprotein [HDL] to over a micron (chylomicrons is feasible. Loading of contrast or therapeutic agents onto or into these particles has been achieved by protein loading (covalent attachment to protein side chains, surface loading (intercalation into the phospholipid monolayer, and core loading (extraction and reconstitution of the triglyceride/cholesterol ester core. Core and surface loading of LDL have been used for delivery of optical imaging agents to tumor cells in vivo and in culture. Surface loading was used for delivery of gadolinium-bis-stearylamide contrast agents for in vivo MRI detection in tumor-bearing mice. Chlorin and phthalocyanine near-infrared photodynamic therapy agents (≤ 400/LDL have been attached by core loading. Protein loading was used to reroute the LDL from its natural receptor (LDLR to folate receptors and could be used to target other receptors. A semisynthetic nanoparticle has been constructed by coating magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles with carboxylated cholesterol and overlaying a monolayer of phospholipid to which apolipoprotein A1 or E was adsorbed for targeting HDL or adsorbing synthetic amphipathic helical peptides ltargeting LDL or folate receptors. These particles can be used for in situ loading of magnetite into cells for MRI-monitored cell tracking or gene expression.

  17. Ganglioside embedded in reconstituted lipoprotein binds cholera toxin with elevated affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricarello, Daniel A; Mills, Emily J; Petrlova, Jitka; Voss, John C; Parikh, Atul N

    2010-09-01

    The ability to exogenously present cell-surface receptors in high-affinity conformations in a synthetic system offers an opportunity to provide host cells with protection from pathogenic toxins. This strategy requires improvement of the synthetic receptor binding affinity against its native counterpart, particularly with polyvalent toxins where clustering of membrane receptors can hinder binding. Here we demonstrate that reconstituted lipoprotein, nanometer-sized discoidal lipid bilayers bounded by apolipoprotein and functionalized by incorporation of pathogen receptors, provides a means to enhance toxin-receptor binding through molecular-level control over the receptor microenvironment (specifically, its rigidity, composition, and heterogeneity). Using a Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based assay, we found that reconstituted lipoprotein incorporating low concentrations of ganglioside monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1) binds polymeric cholera toxin with significantly higher affinity than liposomes or supported lipid bilayers, most likely a result of the enhanced control over receptor clustering provided by the lipoprotein platform. Using wide-area epifluorescence, we found that this enhanced binding capacity can be effectively utilized to divert cholera toxin away from populations of healthy mammalian cells. In summary, we found that reconstitutions of high-density lipoprotein can be engineered to include specific pathogen receptors; that their pathogen binding affinity is altered, presumably due to attenuation of receptor aggregation; and that these assemblies are effective at protecting cells from biological toxins.

  18. A Splice Region Variant in LDLR Lowers Non-high Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Protects against Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Helgason, Hannes; Helgadottir, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Through high coverage whole-genome sequencing and imputation of the identified variants into a large fraction of the Icelandic population, we found four independent signals in the low density lipoprotein receptor gene (LDLR) that associate with levels of non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol...

  19. Sort1, encoded by the cardiovascular risk locus 1p13.3, is a regulator of hepatic lipoprotein export

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølby, Mads Fuglsang; Andersen, Olav Michael; Breiderhoff, Tilman

    2010-01-01

    receptor for apolipoprotein (apo) B100. It interacts with apoB100 in the Golgi and facilitates the formation and hepatic export of apoB100-containing lipoproteins, thereby regulating plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Absence of sortilin in gene-targeted mice reduces secretion...

  20. Melatonin and its precursors scavenge nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Y.; Mori, A.; Liburdy, R.; Packer, L.

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of melatonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan and L-tryptophan was examined by the Griess reaction using flow injection analysis. 1-Hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-3-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene(NOC-7) was used as NO generator. The Griess reagent stoichiometrically reacts with NO2-, which was converted by a cadmium-copper reduction column from the stable end products of NO oxidation. Except for tryptophan, all the compounds examined scavenged NO in a dose-dependent manner. Melatonin, which has a methoxy group in the 5-position and an acetyl side chain, exhibited the most potent scavenging activity among the compounds tested. Serotonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, and 5-hydro