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Sample records for lipidic pore formation

  1. Investigating Hydrophilic Pores in Model Lipid Bilayers Using Molecular Simulations: Correlating Bilayer Properties with Pore-Formation Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan; Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-06-23

    Cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides show a remarkable ability to translocate across physiological membranes. Along with factors such as electric-potential-induced perturbations of membrane structure and surface tension effects, experiments invoke porelike membrane configurations during the solute transfer process into vesicles and cells. The initiation and formation of pores are associated with a nontrivial free-energy cost, thus necessitating a consideration of the factors associated with pore formation and the attendant free energies. Because of experimental and modeling challenges related to the long time scales of the translocation process, we use umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulations with a lipid-density-based order parameter to investigate membrane-pore-formation free energy employing Martini coarse-grained models. We investigate structure and thermodynamic features of the pore in 18 lipids spanning a range of headgroups, charge states, acyl chain lengths, and saturation. We probe the dependence of pore-formation barriers on the area per lipid, lipid bilayer thickness, and membrane bending rigidities in three different lipid classes. The pore-formation free energy in pure bilayers and peptide translocating scenarios are significantly coupled with bilayer thickness. Thicker bilayers require more reversible work to create pores. The pore-formation free energy is higher in peptide-lipid systems than in peptide-free lipid systems due to penalties to maintain the solvation of charged hydrophilic solutes within the membrane environment.

  2. Pore formation in lipid membrane I: Continuous reversible trajectory from intact bilayer through hydrophobic defect to transversal pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, Sergey A; Volynsky, Pavel E; Galimzyanov, Timur R; Kuzmin, Peter I; Pavlov, Konstantin V; Batishchev, Oleg V

    2017-09-22

    Lipid membranes serve as effective barriers allowing cells to maintain internal composition differing from that of extracellular medium. Membrane permeation, both natural and artificial, can take place via appearance of transversal pores. The rearrangements of lipids leading to pore formation in the intact membrane are not yet understood in details. We applied continuum elasticity theory to obtain continuous trajectory of pore formation and closure, and analyzed molecular dynamics trajectories of pre-formed pore reseal. We hypothesized that a transversal pore is preceded by a hydrophobic defect: intermediate structure spanning through the membrane, the side walls of which are partially aligned by lipid tails. This prediction was confirmed by our molecular dynamics simulations. Conversion of the hydrophobic defect into the hydrophilic pore required surmounting some energy barrier. A metastable state was found for the hydrophilic pore at the radius of a few nanometers. The dependence of the energy on radius was approximately quadratic for hydrophobic defect and small hydrophilic pore, while for large radii it depended on the radius linearly. The pore energy related to its perimeter, line tension, thus depends of the pore radius. Calculated values of the line tension for large pores were in quantitative agreement with available experimental data.

  3. Simulations of Pore Formation in Lipid Membranes: Reaction Coordinates, Convergence, Hysteresis, and Finite-Size Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Neha; Hub, Jochen S

    2016-07-12

    Transmembrane pores play an important role in various biophysical processes such as membrane permeation, membrane fusion, and antimicrobial peptide activity. In principal, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide an accurate model of pore formation in lipid membranes. However, the free energy landscape of transmembrane pore formation remains poorly understood, partly because potential of mean force (PMF) calculations of pore formation strongly depend on the choice of the reaction coordinate. In this study, we used umbrella sampling to compute PMFs for pore formation using three different reaction coordinates, namely, (i) a coordinate that steers the lipids in the lateral direction away from the pore center, (ii) the distance of a single lipid phosphate group from the membrane center, and (iii) the average water density inside a membrane-spanning cylinder. Our results show that while the three reaction coordinates efficiently form pores in membranes, they suffer from strong hysteresis between pore-opening and pore-closing simulations, suggesting that they do not restrain the systems close to the transition state for pore formation. The two reaction coordinates that act via restraining the lipids lead to more pronounced hysteresis compared with the coordinate acting on the water molecules. By comparing PMFs computed from membranes with different numbers of lipids, we observed significant artifacts from the periodic boundary conditions in small simulation systems. Further analysis suggests that the formation and disruption of a continuous hydrogen-bonding network across the membrane corresponds to the transition state for pore formation. Our study provides molecular insights into the critical steps of transmembrane pore formation, and it may guide the development of efficient reaction coordinates for pore formation.

  4. Physical understanding of pore formation on supported lipid bilayer by bacterial toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, R.; Agrawal, A.; Ayappa, K. G.; Visweswariah, S. S.; Basu, J. K.

    2013-02-01

    Pore forming toxins are being classified in the protein community based on their ability of forming pores in living cell membranes. Some initial study has apparently pointed out the crystallographic pathway rather can be viewed as a structural as well as morphological changes of proteins in terms of self assembly before and during the pore formation process in surfactant medium. Being a water soluble compound, it changes its conformation and originates some pre-pore complex, which later partially goes inside the cell membrane causing a pore. The physical mechanism for this whole process is still unknown. In this study we have tried to understand these types of biological processes from physical point of view by using supported lipid bilayer as a model system.

  5. Deciphering How Pore Formation Causes Strain-Induced Membrane Lysis of Lipid Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Joshua A; Goh, Haw Zan; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Knoll, Wolfgang; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-02-01

    Pore formation by membrane-active antimicrobial peptides is a classic strategy of pathogen inactivation through disruption of membrane biochemical gradients. It remains unknown why some membrane-active peptides also inhibit enveloped viruses, which do not depend on biochemical gradients. Here, we employ a label-free biosensing approach based on simultaneous quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation and ellipsometry measurements in order to investigate how a pore-forming, virucidal peptide destabilizes lipid vesicles in a surface-based experimental configuration. A key advantage of the approach is that it enables direct kinetic measurement of the surface-bound peptide-to-lipid (P:L) ratio. Comprehensive experiments involving different bulk peptide concentrations and biologically relevant membrane compositions support a unified model that membrane lysis occurs at or above a critical P:L ratio, which is at least several-fold greater than the value corresponding to the onset of pore formation. That is consistent with peptide-induced pores causing additional membrane strain that leads to lysis of highly curved membranes. Collectively, the work presents a new model that describes how peptide-induced pores may destabilize lipid membranes through a membrane strain-related lytic process, and this knowledge has important implications for the design and application of membrane-active peptides.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Permeation of Bisphenol A and Pore Formation in a Lipid Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Chen, Junlang; Zhou, Guoquan; Wang, Yu; Xu, Can; Wang, Xiaogang

    2016-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is particularly considered as one of the most suspicious endocrine disruptors. Exposure to BPA may bring about possible human toxicities, such as cancerous tumors, birth defects and neoteny. One of the key issues to understand its toxicities is how BPA enters cells. In this paper, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions between BPA and a phospholipid membrane (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC bilayer). The simulation results show that BPA can easily enter the membrane from the aqueous phase. With the increasing concentrations of BPA in the membrane, BPA tends to aggregate and form into cluster. Meanwhile, several DPPC lipids are pulled out from each leaflet and adsorbed on the cluster surface, leading to pore formation. Detailed observations indicate that the lipid extraction results mainly from the dispersion interactions between BPA cluster and lipid tails, as well as weak electrostatic attractions between lipid headgroups and the two hydroxyl groups on BPA. The lipid extraction and pore formation may cause cell membrane damage and are of great importance to uncover BPA’s cytotoxicity.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Water Pore Formation in Lipid Bilayer Induced by Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshiyama, Ken-ichiro; Kodama, Tetsuya; Yano, Takeru; Fujikawa, Shigeo

    2006-05-01

    Water molecule penetration into a bilayer hydrophobic region with a shock wave impulse has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations [Koshiyama et al., AIP Conference Proceedings, 754, 104-106, (2005)]. Here we report results of simulation of spontaneous water pore formation in a bilayer that contains water molecules in the hydrophobic region in an initial state. The bilayers of 128 DPPC lipid and 3655 water molecules with insertion of 392, 784, and 1176 water molecules in the hydrophobic region are simulated. A water pore is spontaneously formed when 1176 water molecules exist in the hydrophobic region. The water pore diameter is estimated to be c.a. 1.9 nm, which is three times larger than that of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) used in cancer treatment.

  8. Molecular aspects of polyene- and sterol-dependent pore formation in thin lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, V W; Stead, N W; Andreoli, T E

    1970-03-01

    Amphotericin B modifies the permeability properties of thin lipid membranes formed from solutions containing sheep red cell phospholipids and cholesterol. At 10(-6)M amphotericin B, the DC membrane resistance fell from approximately 10(8) to approximately 10(2) ohm-cm(2), and the membranes became Cl(-)-, rather than Na(+)-selective; the permeability coefficients for hydrophilic nonelectrolytes increased in inverse relationship to solute size, and the rate of water flow during osmosis increased 30-fold. These changes may be rationalized by assuming that the interaction of amphotericin B with membrane-bound sterol resulted in the formation of aqueous pores. N-acetylamphotericin B and the methyl ester of N-acetylamphotericin B, but not the smaller ring compounds, filipin, rimocidin, and PA-166, produced comparable permeability changes in identical membranes, and amphotericin B and its derivatives produced similar changes in the properties of membranes formed from phospholipid-free sterol solutions. However, amphotericin B did not affect ionic selectivity or water and nonelectrolyte permeability in membranes formed from solutions containing phospholipids and no added cholesterol, or when cholesterol was replaced by either cholesterol palmitate, dihydrotachysterol, epicholesterol, or Delta5-cholesten-3-one. Phospholipid-free sterol membranes exposed to amphotericin B or its derivatives were anion-selective, but the degree of Cl(-) selectivity varied among the compounds, and with the aqueous pH. The data are discussed with regard to, first, the nature of the polyene-sterol interactions which result in pore formation, and second, the functional groups on amphotericin B responsible for membrane anion selectivity.

  9. Syringotoxin pore formation and inactivation in human red blood cell and model bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Zsófia; Gróf, Pál; Schagina, Ludmila V; Gurnev, Philip A; Takemoto, Jon Y; Mátyus, Edit; Blaskó, Katalin

    2002-12-23

    The effect of syringotoxin (ST), a member of the cyclic lipodepsipeptides family (CLPs) produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae on the membrane permeability of human red blood cells (RBCs) and model bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) was studied and compared to that of two recently investigated CLPs, syringomycin E (SRE) and syringopeptin 22A (SP22A) [Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1466 (2000) 79 and Bioelectrochemistry 52 (2000) 161]. The permeability-increasing effect of ST on RBCs was the least among the three CLPs. A time-dependent ST pore inactivation was observed on RBCs at 20 and 37 degrees C but not at 8 degrees C. From the kinetic model worked out parameters as permeability coefficient of RBC membrane for 86Rb(+) and pores mean lifetime were calculated. A shorter pores mean lifetime was calculated at 37 degrees C then at 20 degrees C, which gave us an explanation for the unusual slower rate of tracer efflux measured at 37 degrees C then that at 20 degrees C. The results obtained on BLM showed that the pore inactivation was due to a decrease in the number of pores but not to a change of their dwell time or conductance.

  10. Specific binding of nisin to the peptidoglycan precursor lipid II combines pore formation and inhibition of cell wall biosynthesis for potent antibiotic activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiedemann, [No Value; Breukink, E; van Kraaij, C; Kuipers, OP; Bierbaum, G; de Kruijff, B; Sahl, HA

    2001-01-01

    Unlike numerous pore-forming amphiphilic peptide antibiotics, the lantibiotic nisin is active in nanomolar concentrations, which results from its ability to use the Lipid-bound cell wall precursor lipid II as a docking molecule for subsequent pore formation. Here we use genetically engineered nisin

  11. The single-giant unilamellar vesicle method reveals lysenin-induced pore formation in lipid membranes containing sphingomyelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Jahangir Md; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2012-06-26

    Lysenin is a sphingomyelin (SM)-binding pore-forming toxin. To reveal the interaction of lysenin with lipid membranes, we investigated lysenin-induced membrane permeation of a fluorescent probe, calcein, through dioleoylphosphatidylcholine(DOPC)/SM, DOPC/SM/cholesterol(chol), and SM/chol membranes, using the single-giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) method. The results clearly show that lysenin formed pores in all the membranes, through which membrane permeation of calcein occurred without disruption of GUVs. The membrane permeation began stochastically, and the membrane permeability coefficient increased over time to reach a maximum, steady value, Ps, which persisted for a long time(100--500 s), indicating that the pore concentration increases over time and finally reaches its steady value, NP s . The Ps values increased as the SM/lysenin ratio decreased, and at low concentrations of lysenin, the Ps values of SM/DOPC/chol (42/30/28)GUVs were much larger than those of SM/DOPC (58/42) GUVs. The dependence of Ps on the SM/lysenin ratio for these membranes was almost the same as that of the fraction of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-resistant lysenin oligomers, indicating that NP s increases as the SDS-resistant oligomer fraction increases. On the other hand, lysenin formed pores in GUVs of SM/chol(60/40) membrane, which is in a homogeneous liquid-ordered phase, indicating that the phase boundary is not necessary for pore formation. The Ps values of SM/chol (60/40) GUVs were smaller than those of SM/DOPC/chol (42/30/28) GUVs even though the SDS-resistant oligomer fractions were similar for both membranes, suggesting that not all of the oligomers can convert into a pore. On the basis of these results, we discuss the elementary processes of lysenin-induced pore formation.

  12. Pore dynamics in lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozen, I.; Dommersnes, P.

    2014-09-01

    Transient circular pores can open in plasma membrane of cells due to mechanical stress, and failure to repair such pores lead to cell death. Similar pores in the form of defects also exist among smectic membranes, such as in myelin sheaths or mitochondrial membranes. The formation and growth of membrane defects are associated with diseases, for example multiple sclerosis. A deeper understanding of membrane pore dynamics can provide a more refined picture of membrane integrity-related disease development, and possibly also treatment options and strategies. Pore dynamics is also of great importance regarding healthcare applications such as drug delivery, gene or as recently been implied, cancer therapy. The dynamics of pores significantly differ in stacks which are confined in 2D compared to those in cells or vesicles. In this short review, we will summarize the dynamics of different types of pores that can be observed in biological membranes, which include circular transient, fusion and hemi-fusion pores. We will dedicate a section to floral and fractal pores which were discovered a few years ago and have highly peculiar characteristics. Finally, we will discuss the repair mechanisms of large area pores in conjunction with the current cell membrane repair hypotheses.

  13. Bilayer Deformation, Pores, and Micellation Induced by Oxidized Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonnoy, Phansiri; Jarerattanachat, Viwan; Karttunen, Mikko; Wong-Ekkabut, Jirasak

    2015-12-17

    The influence of different oxidized lipids on lipid bilayers was investigated with 16 individual 1 μs atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Binary mixtures of lipid bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PLPC) and its peroxide and aldehyde products were performed at different concentrations. In addition, an asymmetrical short chain lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PDPC), was used to compare the effects of polar/apolar groups in the lipid tail on lipid bilayer. Although water defects occurred with both aldehyde and peroxide lipids, full pore formation was observed only for aldehyde lipids. At medium concentrations the pores were stable. At higher concentrations, however, the pores became unstable and micellation occurred. Data analysis shows that aldehyde lipids' propensity for pore formation is due to their shorter and highly mobile tail. The highly polar peroxide lipids are stabilized by strong hydrogen bonds with interfacial water.

  14. Effect of temperature on the formation and inactivation of syringomycin E pores in human red blood cells and bimolecular lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agner, G; Kaulin, Y A; Schagina, L V; Takemoto, J Y; Blasko, K

    2000-06-01

    The effects of temperature on the formation and inactivation of syringomycin E (SRE) pores were investigated with human red blood cells (RBCs) and lipid bilayer membranes (BLMs). SRE enhanced the RBC membrane permeability of 86Rb and monomeric hemoglobin in a temperature dependent manner. The kinetics of 86Rb and hemoglobin effluxes were measured at different temperatures and pore formation was found to be only slightly affected, while inactivation was strongly influenced by temperature. At 37 degrees C, SRE pore inactivation began 15 min after and at 20 degrees C, 40 min after SRE addition. At 6 degrees C, below the phase transition temperature of the major lipid components of the RBC membrane, no inactivation occurred for as long as 90 min. With BLMs, SRE induced a large current that remained stable at 14 degrees C, but at 23 degrees C it decreased over time while the single channel conductance and dwell time did not change. The results show that the temperature dependent inactivation of SRE pores is due to a decrease in the number of open pores.

  15. How Lipid Membranes Affect Pore Forming Toxin Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojko, Nejc; Anderluh, Gregor

    2015-12-15

    , events associated with pore formation can modulate properties of the lipid membrane and affect its organization. Model membranes do not necessarily reproduce the physicochemical properties of the native cellular membrane, and caution is needed when transferring results from model to native lipid membranes. In this context, the utilization of novel approaches that enable studying PFTs on living cells at a single molecule level should reveal complex protein-lipid membrane interactions in greater detail.

  16. Pore formation by Cry toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soberón, Mario; Pardo, Liliana; Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Sánchez, Jorge; Gómez, Isabel; Porta, Helena; Bravo, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria produce insecticidal Cry and Cyt proteins used in the biological control of different insect pests. In this review, we will focus on the 3d-Cry toxins that represent the biggest group of Cry proteins and also on Cyt toxins. The 3d-Cry toxins are pore-forming toxins that induce cell death by forming ionic pores into the membrane of the midgut epithelial cells in their target insect. The initial steps in the mode of action include ingestion of the protoxin, activation by midgut proteases to produce the toxin fragment and the interaction with the primary cadherin receptor. The interaction of the monomeric CrylA toxin with the cadherin receptor promotes an extra proteolytic cleavage, where helix alpha-1 of domain I is eliminated and the toxin oligomerization is induced, forming a structure of 250 kDa. The oligomeric structure binds to a secondary receptor, aminopeptidase N or alkaline phosphatase. The secondary receptor drives the toxin into detergent resistant membrane microdomains formingpores that cause osmotic shock, burst of the midgut cells and insect death. Regarding to Cyt toxins, these proteins have a synergistic effect on the toxicity of some Cry toxins. Cyt proteins are also proteolytic activated in the midgut lumen of their target, they bind to some phospholipids present in the mosquito midgut cells. The proposed mechanism of synergism between Cry and Cyt toxins is that Cyt1Aa function as a receptor for Cry toxins. The Cyt1A inserts into midgut epithelium membrane and exposes protein regions that are recognized by Cry11Aa. It was demonstrated that this interaction facilitates the oligomerization of Cry11Aa and also its pore formation activity.

  17. Peptaibol antiamoebin I: spatial structure, backbone dynamics, interaction with bicelles and lipid-protein nanodiscs, and pore formation in context of barrel-stave model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Paramonov, Alexander S; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Gizatullina, Albina K; Zhuravleva, Anastasia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Telezhinskaya, Irina N; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2013-05-01

    Antiamoebin I (Aam-I) is a membrane-active peptaibol antibiotic isolated from fungal species belonging to the genera Cephalosporium, Emericellopsis, Gliocladium, and Stilbella. In comparison with other 16-amino acid-residue peptaibols, e.g., zervamicin IIB (Zrv-IIB), Aam-I possesses relatively weak biological and channel-forming activities. In MeOH solution, Aam-I demonstrates fast cooperative transitions between right-handed and left-handed helical conformation of the N-terminal (1-8) region. We studied Aam-I spatial structure and backbone dynamics in the membrane-mimicking environment (DMPC/DHPC bicelles)(1) ) by heteronuclear (1) H,(13) C,(15) N-NMR spectroscopy. Interaction with the bicelles stabilizes the Aam-I right-handed helical conformation retaining significant intramolecular mobility on the ms-μs time scale. Extensive ms-μs dynamics were also detected in the DPC and DHPC micelles and DOPG nanodiscs. In contrast, Zrv-IIB in the DPC micelles demonstrates appreciably lesser mobility on the μs-ms time scale. Titration with Mn(2+) and 16-doxylstearate paramagnetic probes revealed Aam-I binding to the bicelle surface with the N-terminus slightly immersed into hydrocarbon region. Fluctuations of the Aam-I helix between surface-bound and transmembrane (TM) state were observed in the nanodisc membranes formed from the short-chain (diC12 : 0) DLPC/DLPG lipids. All the obtained experimental data are in agreement with the barrel-stave model of TM pore formation, similarly to the mechanism proposed for Zrv-IIB and other peptaibols. The observed extensive intramolecular dynamics explains the relatively low activity of Aam-I.

  18. On the edge energy of lipid membranes and the thermodynamic stability of pores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M., E-mail: Frans.leermakers@wur.nl [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science, W ageningen University, Dreijenplein 6, 6307 HB Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2015-01-21

    To perform its barrier function, the lipid bilayer membrane requires a robust resistance against pore formation. Using a self-consistent field (SCF) theory and a molecularly detailed model for membranes composed of charged or zwitterionic lipids, it is possible to predict structural, mechanical, and thermodynamical parameters for relevant lipid bilayer membranes. We argue that the edge energy in membranes is a function of the spontaneous lipid monolayer curvature, the mean bending modulus, and the membrane thickness. An analytical Helfrich-like model suggests that most bilayers should have a positive edge energy. This means that there is a natural resistance against pore formation. Edge energies evaluated explicitly in a two-gradient SCF model are consistent with this. Remarkably, the edge energy can become negative for phosphatidylglycerol (e.g., dioleoylphosphoglycerol) bilayers at a sufficiently low ionic strength. Such bilayers become unstable against the formation of pores or the formation of lipid disks. In the weakly curved limit, we study the curvature dependence of the edge energy and evaluate the preferred edge curvature and the edge bending modulus. The latter is always positive, and the former increases with increasing ionic strength. These results point to a small window of ionic strengths for which stable pores can form as too low ionic strengths give rise to lipid disks. Higher order curvature terms are necessary to accurately predict relevant pore sizes in bilayers. The electric double layer overlap across a small pore widens the window of ionic strengths for which pores are stable.

  19. Alpha-tocopherol inhibits pore formation in the oxidized bilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Boonnoy, Phansiri; Wong-ekkabut, Jirasak

    2016-01-01

    In biological membranes, alpha-tocopherols ({\\alpha}-toc; vitamin E) protect polyunsaturated lipids from free radicals. Although the interactions of {\\alpha}-toc with non-oxidized lipid bilayers have been studied, their on oxidized bilayers remain unknown. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of oxidized lipid bilayers were performed with varying concentrations of {\\alpha}-toc. Bilayers with 1-palmitoyl-2-lauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PLPC) lipids and its aldehyde derivatives at 1:1 ratio were studied. Our simulations show that oxidized lipids self-assemble into aggregates with a water pore rapidly developing across the lipid bilayer. The free energy of transporting an {\\alpha}-toc molecule in a lipid bilayer suggests that {\\alpha}-tocs can passively adsorb into the bilayer. When {\\alpha}-toc molecules were present at low concentrations in bilayers containing oxidized lipids, the formation of water pores was slowed down. At high {\\alpha}-toc concentra-tions, no pores were observ...

  20. Effects of cholesterol on pore formation in lipid bilayers induced by human islet amyloid polypeptide fragments: A coarse-grained molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weixin; Wei, Guanghong; Su, Haibin; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Mu, Yuguang

    2011-11-01

    Disruption of the cellular membrane by the amyloidogenic peptide, islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), has been considered as one of the mechanisms of β-cell death during type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal region (residues 1-19) of the human version of IAPP is suggested to be primarily responsible for the membrane-disrupting effect of the full-length hIAPP peptide. However, the detailed assembly mode of hIAPP1-19 with membrane remains unclear. To gain insight into the interactions of hIAPP1-19 oligomer with the model membrane, we have employed coarse-grained molecular dynamics self-assembly simulations to study the aggregation of hIAPP1-19 fragments in the binary lipid made of zwitterionic dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and anionic dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine (DPPS) in the presence and absence of different levels of cholesterol content. The membrane-destabilizing effect of hIAPP1-19 is found to be modulated by the presence of cholesterol. In the absence of cholesterol, hIAPP1-19 aggregates prefer to locate inside the bilayer, forming pore-like assemblies. While in the presence of cholesterol molecules, the lipid bilayer becomes more ordered and stiff, and the hIAPP1-19 aggregates are dominantly positioned at the bilayer-water interface. The action of cholesterol may suggest a possible way to maintain the membrane integrity by small molecule interference.

  1. Membrane Pore Formation by Amyloid beta (25-35) Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Nabin; Tatulian, Suren

    Amyloid (A β) peptide contributes to Alzheimer's disease by a yet unidentified mechanism. One of the possible mechanisms of A β toxicity is formation of pores in cellular membranes. We have characterized the formation of pores in phospholipid membranes by the Aβ25 - 35 peptide (GSNKGAIIGLM) using fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) techniques. CD and FTIR identified formation of β-sheet structure upon incubation of the peptide in aqueous buffer for 2 hours. Unilamellar vesicles composed of a zwitterionic lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), and 70 % POPC plus 30 % of an acidic lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), are made in 30 mM CaCl2. Quin-2, a fluorophore that displays increased fluorescence upon Ca2+ binding, is added to the vesicles externally. Peptide addition results in increased Quin-2 fluorescence, which is interpreted by binding of the peptide to the vesicles, pore formation, and Ca2+ leakage. The positive and negative control measurements involve addition of a detergent, Triton X-100, which causes vesicle rupture and release of total calcium, and blank buffer, respectively.

  2. JNK3 phosphorylates Bax protein and induces ability to form pore on bilayer lipid membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Gupta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bax is a pro-apoptotic cytosolic protein. In this work native (unphosphorylated and JNK3 phosphorylated Bax proteins are studied on artificial bilayer membranes for pore formation. Phosphorylated Bax formed pore on the bilayer lipid membrane whereas native one does not. In cells undergoing apoptosis the pore formed by the phosphorylated Bax could be important in cytochrome c release from the mitochondrial intermembrane space to the cytosol. The low conductance (1.5 nS of the open state of the phosphorylated Bax pore corresponds to pore diameter of 0.9 nm which is small to release cytochrome c (∼3.4 nm. We hypothesized that JNK3 phosphorylated Bax protein can form bigger pores after forming complexes with other mitochondrial proteins like VDAC, t-Bid etc. to release cytochrome c.

  3. Graphene-Induced Pore Formation on Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Guangxin; Zhang, Yuanzhao; Luan, Binquan; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Zhou, Royce W.; Yang, Zaixing; Zhao, Lin; Xu, Jiaying; Luo, Judong; Zhou, Ruhong

    2017-01-01

    Examining interactions between nanomaterials and cell membranes can expose underlying mechanisms of nanomaterial cytotoxicity and guide the design of safer nanomedical technologies. Recently, graphene has been shown to exhibit potential toxicity to cells; however, the molecular processes driving its lethal properties have yet to be fully characterized. We here demonstrate that graphene nanosheets (both pristine and oxidized) can produce holes (pores) in the membranes of A549 and Raw264.7 cells, substantially reducing cell viability. Electron micrographs offer clear evidence of pores created on cell membranes. Our molecular dynamics simulations reveal that multiple graphene nanosheets can cooperate to extract large numbers of phospholipids from the membrane bilayer. Strong dispersion interactions between graphene and lipid-tail carbons result in greatly depleted lipid density within confined regions of the membrane, ultimately leading to the formation of water-permeable pores. This cooperative lipid extraction mechanism for membrane perforation represents another distinct process that contributes to the molecular basis of graphene cytotoxicity. PMID:28218295

  4. Effects of antimicrobial peptide revealed by simulations: translocation, pore formation, membrane corrugation and euler buckling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Licui; Jia, Nana; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2013-04-11

    We explore the effects of the peripheral and transmembrane antimicrobial peptides on the lipid bilayer membrane by using the coarse grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations. We study peptide/lipid membrane complexes by considering peptides with various structure, hydrophobicity and peptide/lipid interaction strength. The role of lipid/water interaction is also discussed. We discuss a rich variety of membrane morphological changes induced by peptides, such as pore formation, membrane corrugation and Euler buckling.

  5. Pore Scale Dynamics of Microemulsion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsal, Evren; Broens, Marc; Armstrong, Ryan T

    2016-07-19

    Experiments in various porous media have shown that multiple parameters come into play when an oleic phase is displaced by an aqueous solution of surfactant. In general, the displacement efficiency is improved when the fluids become quasi-miscible. Understanding the phase behavior oil/water/surfactant systems is important because microemulsion has the ability to generate ultralow interfacial tension (formation and the resulting properties under equilibrium conditions. However, the majority of applications where microemulsion is present also involve flow, which has received relatively less attention. It is commonly assumed that the characteristics of an oil/water/surfactant system under flowing conditions are identical to the one under equilibrium conditions. Here, we show that this is not necessarily the case. We studied the equilibrium phase behavior of a model system consisting of n-decane and an aqueous solution of olefin sulfonate surfactant, which has practical applications for enhanced oil recovery. The salt content of the aqueous solution was varied to provide a range of different microemulsion compositions and oil-water interfacial tensions. We then performed microfluidic flow experiments to study the dynamic in situ formation of microemulsion by coinjecting bulk fluids of n-decane and surfactant solution into a T-junction capillary geometry. A solvatochromatic fluorescent dye was used to obtain spatially resolved compositional information. In this way, we visualized the microemulsion formation and the flow of it along with the excess phases. A complex interaction between the flow patterns and the microemulsion properties was observed. The formation of microemulsion influenced the flow regimes, and the flow regimes affected the characteristics of the microemulsion formation. In particular, at low flow rates, slug flow was observed, which had profound consequences on the pore scale mixing behavior and resulting microemulsion properties.

  6. Role of heparan sulfates and glycosphingolipids in the pore formation of basic polypeptides of cobra cardiotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Guey; Tjong, Siu-Cin; Wu, Po-Long; Kuo, Je-Hung; Wu, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Cobra venom contains cardiotoxins (CTXs) that induce tissue necrosis and systolic heart arrest in bitten victims. CTX-induced membrane pore formation is one of the major mechanisms responsible for the venom's designated cytotoxicity. This chapter examines how glycoconjugates such as heparan sulfates (HS) and glycosphingolipids, located respectively in the extracellular matrix and lipid bilayers of the cell membranes, facilitate CTX pore formation. Evidences for HS-facilitated cell surface retention and glycosphingolipid-facilitated membrane bilayer insertion of CTX are reviewed. We suggest that similar physical steps could play a role in the mediation of other pore forming toxins (PFT). The membrane pores formed by PFT are expected to have limited lifetime on biological cell surface as a result of membrane dynamics during endocytosis and/or rearrangement of lipid rafts.

  7. In vivo cluster formation of nisin and lipid II is correlated with membrane depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Menno B; Morales Angeles, Danae; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Nisin and related lantibiotics kill bacteria by pore formation or by sequestering lipid II. Some lantibiotics sequester lipid II into clusters, which were suggested to kill cells through delocalized peptidoglycan synthesis. Here, we show that cluster formation is always concomitant with (i) membrane pore formation and (ii) membrane depolarization. Nisin variants that cluster lipid II kill L-form bacteria with similar efficiency, suggesting that delocalization of peptidoglycan synthesis is not the primary killing mechanism of these lantibiotics.

  8. Chemotherapy Drugs Thiocolchicoside and Taxol Permeabilize Lipid Bilayer Membranes by Forming Ion Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Duszyk, M.; Tuszynski, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    We report ion channel formation by chemotherapy drugs: thiocolchicoside (TCC) and taxol (TXL) which primarily target tubulin but not only. For example, TCC has been shown to interact with GABAA, nuclear envelope and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. TXL interferes with the normal breakdown of microtubules inducing mitotic block and apoptosis. It also interacts with mitochondria and found significant chemotherapeutic applications for breast, ovarian and lung cancer. In order to better understand the mechanisms of TCC and TXL actions, we examined their effects on phospholipid bilayer membranes. Our electrophysiological recordings across membranes constructed in NaCl aqueous phases consisting of TCC or TXL under the influence of an applied transmembrane potential (V) indicate that both molecules induce stable ion flowing pores/channels in membranes. Their discrete current versus time plots exhibit triangular shapes which is consistent with a spontaneous time-dependent change of the pore conductance in contrast to rectangular conductance events usually induced by ion channels. These events exhibit conductance (~0.01-0.1 pA/mV) and lifetimes (~5-30 ms) within the ranges observed in e.g., gramicidin A and alamethicin channels. The channel formation probability increases linearly with TCC/TXL concentration and V and is not affected by pH (5.7 - 8.4). A theoretical explanation on the causes of chemotherapy drug induced ion pore formation and the pore stability has also been found using our recently discovered binding energy between lipid bilayer and the bilayer embedded ion channels using gramicidin A channels as tools. This picture of energetics suggests that as the channel forming agents approach to the lipids on bilayer the localized charge properties in the constituents of both channel forming agents (e.g., chemotherapy drugs in this study) and the lipids determine the electrostatic drug-lipid coupling energy through screened Coulomb interactions between the drug

  9. Conformational Heterogeneity of Bax Helix 9 Dimer for Apoptotic Pore Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chenyi; Zhang, Zhi; Kale, Justin; Andrews, David W.; Lin, Jialing; Li, Jianing

    2016-07-01

    Helix α9 of Bax protein can dimerize in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) and lead to apoptotic pores. However, it remains unclear how different conformations of the dimer contribute to the pore formation on the molecular level. Thus we have investigated various conformational states of the α9 dimer in a MOM model — using computer simulations supplemented with site-specific mutagenesis and crosslinking of the α9 helices. Our data not only confirmed the critical membrane environment for the α9 stability and dimerization, but also revealed the distinct lipid-binding preference of the dimer in different conformational states. In our proposed pathway, a crucial iso-parallel dimer that mediates the conformational transition was discovered computationally and validated experimentally. The corroborating evidence from simulations and experiments suggests that, helix α9 assists Bax activation via the dimer heterogeneity and interactions with specific MOM lipids, which eventually facilitate proteolipidic pore formation in apoptosis regulation.

  10. Role of transmembrane pH gradient and membrane binding in nisin pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, G N; Clark, J; Chan, W C; Bycroft, B W; Roberts, G C; Konings, W N; Driessen, A J

    1997-01-01

    Nisin is a cationic antimicrobial peptide that belongs to the group of lantibiotics. It is thought to form oligomeric pores in the target membrane by a mechanism that requires the transmembrane electrical potential delta psi and that involves local pertubation of the lipid bilayer structure. Here we show that nisin does not form exclusively voltage-dependent pores: even in the absence of a delta psi, nisin is able to dissipate the transmembrane pH gradient (delta pH) in sensitive Lactococcus lactis cells and proteoliposomes. The rate of dissipation increases with the magnitude of the delta pH. Nisin forms pores only when the delta pH is inside alkaline. The efficiency of delta psi-induced pore formation is strongly affected by the external pH, whereas delta pH-induced pore formation is rather insensitive to the external pH. Nisin(1-12), an amino-terminal fragment of nisin, and (des-deltaAla5)-(nisin(1-32) amide have a strongly reduced capacity to dissipate the delta psi and delta pH in cytochrome c oxidase proteoliposomes and L. lactis cells. Both variants bind with reduced efficiency to liposomes containing negatively charged phospholipids, suggesting that both ring A and rings C to E play a role in membrane binding. Nisin(1-12) competes with nisin for membrane binding and antagonizes pore formation. These findings are consistent with the wedge model of nisin-induced pore formation.

  11. Formation of protein induced micro-pores in Chitosan membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, S. N. Suraiya; Aswal, V. K.; Ramasamy, Radha Perumal

    2017-05-01

    Polymer based nanocomposites are important class of materials and have wide applications. Blending two biopolymers can lead to the development of new materials with tailored properties. Chitosan is a naturally occurring polysaccharide with useful properties such as biodegradability and excellent film forming capacity. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) is a abundantly available globular protein. In our research the interaction of chitosan with BSA and the effect of formation of Au nanoparticles on chitosan-BSA system were investigated. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) of the films showed formation of micron sized pores and these pores were hindered with formation of Au nanoparticles. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis showed that BSA interacts with chitosan chain and affects the Rg value of chitosan. The formation of micro pores decreases the conductivity values (σ'), while the formation of Au nanoparticles increases σ'.

  12. Cu(II) promotes amyloid pore formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hangyu, E-mail: hangyuz@uw.edu [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Rochet, Jean-Christophe [Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Stanciu, Lia A. [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    The aggregation of α-synuclein is associated with dopamine neuron death in Parkinson's disease. There is controversy in the field over the question of which species of the aggregates, fibrils or protofibrils, are toxic. Moreover, compelling evidence suggested the exposure to heavy metals to be a risk of PD. Nevertheless, the mechanism of metal ions in promoting PD remains unclear. In this research, we investigated the structural basis of Cu(II) induced aggregation of α-synuclein. Using transmission electron microscopy experiments, Cu(II) was found to promote in vitro aggregation of α-synuclein by facilitating annular protofibril formation rather than fibril formation. Furthermore, neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils accompanied by considerable decrease of β-sheet content. These results strongly support the hypothesis that annular protofibrils are the toxic species, rather than fibrils, thereby inspiring us to search novel therapeutic strategies for the suppression of the toxic annular protofibril formation. - Highlights: • Cu(II) promoted the annular protofibril formation of α-synuclein in vitro. • Cu(II) postponed the in vitro fibrillization of α-synuclein. • Neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils.

  13. Single channel evidence for innate pore-formation by Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct haemolysin (TDH) in phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Simon P; Nakano, Masayuki; Iida, Tetsuya

    2004-11-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct haemolysin (TDH) is widely considered to be a pore-forming toxin. The protein has no significant homology to other known pore-forming toxins and its mechanism of action in vivo remains undefined. We demonstrate single channel pore-forming activity of V. parahaemolyticus TDH in planar lipid bilayers. Channel conductance ranged between 30-450 pS in 0.5 M KCl with a calculated cation selectivity (P(K)/P(Cl)) of 2.7. Channels were formed in NaCl and choline-Cl with and without cholesterol present and in the presence of neutral or negatively charged phospholipids. Zinc ions did not block pore formation. Whilst various techniques have previously suggested that TDH is a pore-forming toxin, the data in this study provide direct single channel evidence and indicate several features of pore formation in synthetic phospholipid membranes.

  14. In vivo cluster formation of nisin and Lipid II is correlated with membrane depolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Menno B; Angeles, Danae Morales; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Nisin and related lantibiotics kill bacteria by pore formation, or by sequestering Lipid II. Some lantibiotics sequester Lipid II into clusters, which were suggested to kill cells through delocalized peptidoglycan synthesis. Here, we show that cluster formation is always concomitant with (i)

  15. Electrophoretic separation method for membrane pore-forming proteins in multilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tsujimoto, Yusuke; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report on a novel electrophoretic separation and analysis method for membrane pore-forming proteins in multilayer lipid membranes (MLMs) in order to overcome the problems related to current separation and analysis methods of membrane proteins, and to obtain a high-performance separation method on the basis of specific properties of the lipid membranes. We constructed MLMs, and subsequently characterized membrane pore-forming protein behavior in MLMs. Through the use of these MLMs, we were able to successfully separate and analyze membrane pore-forming proteins in MLMs. To the best of our knowledge, this research is the first example of membrane pore-forming protein separation in lipid membranes. Our method can be expected to be applied for the separation and analysis of other membrane proteins including intrinsic membrane proteins and to result in high-performance by utilizing the specific properties of lipid membranes.

  16. Structural determinants for membrane insertion, pore formation and translocation of Clostridium difficile toxin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genisyuerek, Selda; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Guttenberg, Gregor; Schubert, Rolf; Benz, Roland; Aktories, Klaus

    2011-03-01

    Clostridium difficile toxins A and B bind to eukaryotic target cells, are endocytosed and then deliver their N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain after processing into the cytosol. Whereas glucosyltransferase, autoprocessing and cell-binding domains are well defined, structural features involved in toxin delivery are unknown. Here, we studied structural determinants that define membrane insertion, pore formation and translocation of toxin B. Deletion analyses revealed that a large region, covering amino acids 1501-1753 of toxin B, is dispensable for cytotoxicity in Vero cells. Accordingly, a chimeric toxin, consisting of amino acids 1-1550 and the receptor-binding domain of diphtheria toxin, caused cytotoxic effects. A large N-terminal part of toxin B (amino acids 1-829) was not essential for pore formation (measured by (86) Rb(+) release in mammalian cells). Studies using C-terminal truncation fragments of toxin B showed that amino acid residues 1-990 were still capable of inducing fluorescence dye release from large lipid vesicles and led to increased electrical conductance in black lipid membranes. Thereby, we define the minimal pore-forming region of toxin B within amino acid residues 830 and 990. Moreover, we identify within this region a crucial role of the amino acid pair glutamate-970 and glutamate-976 in pore formation of toxin B.

  17. Wafer-scale nanostructure formation inside vertical nano-pores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berenschot, Johan W.; Sun, Xingwu; Le The, Hai; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; de Boer, Meint J.; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Sarajlic, Edin

    We propose a wafer-scale technique for nanostructure formation inside vertically oriented, through-membrane nano-pores. It uses 50 nm monocrystalline silicon pillars as a mold, embedded in a silicon nitride membrane formed in an innovative step. The proposed technique paves the way towards advanced

  18. Wafer-scale nanostructure formation inside vertical nano-pores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berenschot, Johan W.; Sun, Xingwu; Le The, Hai; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; de Boer, Meint J.; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Sarajlic, Edin

    2017-01-01

    We propose a wafer-scale technique for nanostructure formation inside vertically oriented, through-membrane nano-pores. It uses 50 nm monocrystalline silicon pillars as a mold, embedded in a silicon nitride membrane formed in an innovative step. The proposed technique paves the way towards advanced

  19. Structural basis for self-assembly of a cytolytic pore lined by protein and lipid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Koji; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Morante, Koldo; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-02-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFT) are water-soluble proteins that possess the remarkable ability to self-assemble on the membrane of target cells, where they form pores causing cell damage. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of action of the haemolytic protein fragaceatoxin C (FraC), a α-barrel PFT, by determining the crystal structures of FraC at four different stages of the lytic mechanism, namely the water-soluble state, the monomeric lipid-bound form, an assembly intermediate and the fully assembled transmembrane pore. The structure of the transmembrane pore exhibits a unique architecture composed of both protein and lipids, with some of the lipids lining the pore wall, acting as assembly cofactors. The pore also exhibits lateral fenestrations that expose the hydrophobic core of the membrane to the aqueous environment. The incorporation of lipids from the target membrane within the structure of the pore provides a membrane-specific trigger for the activation of a haemolytic toxin.

  20. Formation and decay of rudimentary penumbra around a pore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Hiroko [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8417 (Japan); Kitai, Reizaburo [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8417 (Japan); Otsuji, Kenichi, E-mail: watanabe@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Solar Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the evolution of a pore in the active region NOAA 10940 using the data obtained by the Hinode satellite on 2007 February 3. The pore we analyzed showed the formation of a rudimentary penumbra structure, succeeded by an abrupt disappearance after about 5 hr. The pore had an approximate radius of 3.5 Mm and a total magnetic flux of 3.0 × 10{sup 19} Mx, which is a little smaller than the necessary magnetic flux for penumbral formation supposed by Rucklidge et al. (1-1.5 × 10{sup 20} Mx). Our observation describes a rare phenomenon which was in the unstable phase between a pore and a sunspot. The area of the dark umbra gradually decreased when the rudimentary penumbral filaments formed the penumbral structure, meaning that the penumbra develops at the expense of the umbral magnetic flux. This statement was confirmed by a rough estimation of the magnetic flux variation observed by the Hinode Fe I magnetogram. Five hours after the formation phase, the decay phase began. In this decaying phase, multiple opposite polarity patches are found to appear in the exterior of the pore (a different location from the penumbra formation site). We interpret these opposite polarities as signatures of the horizontal magnetic field, which preferably appears in the course of the unstable reconfiguration of the magnetic field structure. During the course of the disappearance of the penumbra, the horizontal penumbral field seems to become vertical because of the dark umbral area that recovered by about 10%.

  1. Structural Insights into Clostridium perfringens Delta Toxin Pore Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyet, Jessica; Naylor, Claire E; Savva, Christos G; Gibert, Maryse; Popoff, Michel R; Basak, Ajit K

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysin-like proteins produced by C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. One of the others, NetB, has been shown to be the major cause of Avian Nectrotic Enteritis, which following the reduction in use of antibiotics as growth promoters, has become an emerging disease of industrial poultry. Delta toxin itself is cytotoxic to the wide range of human and animal macrophages and platelets that present GM2 ganglioside on their membranes. It has sequence similarity with Staphylococcus aureus β-pore forming toxins and is expected to heptamerize and form pores in the lipid bilayer of host cell membranes. Nevertheless, its exact mode of action remains undetermined. Here we report the 2.4 Å crystal structure of monomeric Delta toxin. The superposition of this structure with the structure of the phospholipid-bound F component of S. aureus leucocidin (LukF) revealed that the glycerol molecules bound to Delta toxin and the phospholipids in LukF are accommodated in the same hydrophobic clefts, corresponding to where the toxin is expected to latch onto the membrane, though the binding sites show significant differences. From structure-based sequence alignment with the known structure of staphylococcal α-hemolysin, a model of the Delta toxin pore form has been built. Using electron microscopy, we have validated our model and characterized the Delta toxin pore on liposomes. These results highlight both similarities and differences in the mechanism of Delta toxin (and by extension NetB) cytotoxicity from that of the staphylococcal pore-forming toxins.

  2. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET between Heterogeneously Distributed Probes: Application to Lipid Nanodomains and Pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Šachl

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of membrane heterogeneities, e.g., lipid domains and pores, leads to a redistribution of donor (D and acceptor (A molecules according to their affinity to the structures formed and the remaining bilayer. If such changes sufficiently influence the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET efficiency, these changes can be further analyzed in terms of nanodomain/pore size. This paper is a continuation of previous work on this theme. In particular, it is demonstrated how FRET experiments should be planned and how data should be analyzed in order to achieve the best possible resolution. The limiting resolution of domains and pores are discussed simultaneously, in order to enable direct comparison. It appears that choice of suitable donor/acceptor pairs is the most crucial step in the design of experiments. For instance, it is recommended to use DA pairs, which exhibit an increased affinity to pores (i.e., partition coefficients KD,A > 10 for the determination of pore sizes with radii comparable to the Förster radius R0. On the other hand, donors and acceptors exhibiting a high affinity to different phases are better suited for the determination of domain sizes. The experimental setup where donors and acceptors are excluded from the domains/pores should be avoided.

  3. Track-etched membrane: dynamics of pore formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferain, E.; Legras, R.

    1994-02-01

    The dynamics of pore formation during etching of heavy ion (Ar 9+ - 4.5 MeV/amu) irradiated bisphenol-A polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films is determined by a conductivity cell. This work presents the theoretical basis of this method and describes the experimental procedure. The obtained results allow the determination of the track ( Vt) and bulk ( Vg) etch rates, and an estimate of the damage zone diameter in PC before etching.

  4. Formation of Anodic Aluminum Oxide with Branched and Meshed Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeol; Lee, Jin Seok

    2016-06-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), with a self-ordered hexagonal array, is important for various applications in nanofabrication including as the fabrication of nanotemplates and other nanostructures. With the consideration, there have been many efforts to control the characteristic parameters of porous anodic alumina by adjustment of the anodizing conditions such as the electrolyte, temperature, applied potential, and Al purity. In particular, impurities in Al are changing the morphology of an alumina film; however, the formation mechanism has not yet been explained. In this work, we anodized a high purity (99.999%, Al(high)) and low purity (99.8%, Al(low)) aluminum foil by a two-step anodization process in an oxalic acid solution or phosphoric acid. It was found that the purity of aluminum foil has influenced the morphology of the alumina film resulting in branched and meshed pores. Also, electrochemical analysis indicated that the branched and meshed pores in the low-purity Al foil formed by the presence of impurities. Impurities act as defects and change the general growth mechanism for pore formation by inducing an electric field imbalance during anodization. This work contributes to the research field of topographical chemistry and applied fields including nanofabrication.

  5. Punching Holes in Membranes: How Oligomeric Pore-Forming Proteins and Lipids Cooperate to Form Aqueous Channels in Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradin, Cécile; Satsoura, Dmitri; Andrews, David W.

    Many important biological processes are carried out by a small number of proteins working together as a team to accomplish a specific task. Cooperation between the different proteins is often accomplished through the formation of a supramolecular complex, comprised of either identical or different subunits. Although the formation of protein assemblies is a favored mechanism throughout the cell, it becomes especially important in lipid membranes, as evidenced by the numerous cellular events that are either triggered by or result in the formation of protein complexes in membranes. However, due to the difficulties associated with the study of membrane proteins, the formation of oligomers in lipid membranes is perhaps one of the least understood cellular processes. In this chapter we focus our attention on a subset of membrane complexes — namely, those formed by proteins that are able to pass from a water-soluble to a transmembrane form in order to create a water-filled channel through the lipid membrane. These pore-forming proteins (PFPs) are found in many organisms throughout different kingdoms of life, from bacteria to human. They are often involved in cell death mechanisms through their capacity to break membrane permeability barriers, which can lead to dissipation of the membrane potential as well as introduction or leakage of enzymatic proteins. In fact, a large subset of the PFPs are toxins, and referred to in the literature as pore-forming toxins (PFTs). The association of several monomers into an oligomer is almost always an important aspect of the modus operandi of these proteins. Oligomerization can be useful in several ways: it results in structures large enough to delineate nanometer-size water-filled channels in lipid bilayers, it ensures the presence of large hydrophobic surfaces that can support insertion in the membrane, and it permits cooperative formation and insertion mechanisms.

  6. Lantibiotic immunity: inhibition of nisin mediated pore formation by NisI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab AlKhatib

    Full Text Available Nisin, a 3.4 kDa antimicrobial peptide produced by some Lactococcus lactis strains is the most prominent member of the lantibiotic family. Nisin can inhibit cell growth and penetrates the target Gram-positive bacterial membrane by binding to Lipid II, an essential cell wall synthesis precursor. The assembled nisin-Lipid II complex forms pores in the target membrane. To gain immunity against its own-produced nisin, Lactococcus lactis is expressing two immunity protein systems, NisI and NisFEG. Here, we show that the NisI expressing strain displays an IC50 of 73 ± 10 nM, an 8-10-fold increase when compared to the non-expressing sensitive strain. When the nisin concentration is raised above 70 nM, the cells expressing full-length NisI stop growing rather than being killed. NisI is inhibiting nisin mediated pore formation, even at nisin concentrations up to 1 µM. This effect is induced by the C-terminus of NisI that protects Lipid II. Its deletion showed pore formation again. The expression of NisI in combination with externally added nisin mediates an elongation of the chain length of the Lactococcus lactis cocci. While the sensitive strain cell-chains consist mainly of two cells, the NisI expressing cells display a length of up to 20 cells. Both results shed light on the immunity of lantibiotic producer strains, and their survival in high levels of their own lantibiotic in the habitat.

  7. Lantibiotic immunity: inhibition of nisin mediated pore formation by NisI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKhatib, Zainab; Lagedroste, Marcel; Fey, Iris; Kleinschrodt, Diana; Abts, André; Smits, Sander H J

    2014-01-01

    Nisin, a 3.4 kDa antimicrobial peptide produced by some Lactococcus lactis strains is the most prominent member of the lantibiotic family. Nisin can inhibit cell growth and penetrates the target Gram-positive bacterial membrane by binding to Lipid II, an essential cell wall synthesis precursor. The assembled nisin-Lipid II complex forms pores in the target membrane. To gain immunity against its own-produced nisin, Lactococcus lactis is expressing two immunity protein systems, NisI and NisFEG. Here, we show that the NisI expressing strain displays an IC50 of 73 ± 10 nM, an 8-10-fold increase when compared to the non-expressing sensitive strain. When the nisin concentration is raised above 70 nM, the cells expressing full-length NisI stop growing rather than being killed. NisI is inhibiting nisin mediated pore formation, even at nisin concentrations up to 1 µM. This effect is induced by the C-terminus of NisI that protects Lipid II. Its deletion showed pore formation again. The expression of NisI in combination with externally added nisin mediates an elongation of the chain length of the Lactococcus lactis cocci. While the sensitive strain cell-chains consist mainly of two cells, the NisI expressing cells display a length of up to 20 cells. Both results shed light on the immunity of lantibiotic producer strains, and their survival in high levels of their own lantibiotic in the habitat.

  8. Polystyrene nanoparticle exposure induces ion-selective pores in lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoda, Alexander; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D.; Worden, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    A diverse range of molecular interactions can occur between engineered nanomaterials (ENM) and biomembranes, some of which could lead to toxic outcomes following human exposure to ENM. In this study, we adapted electrophysiology methods to investigate the ability of 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (PNP) to induce pores in model bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) that mimic biomembranes. PNP charge was varied using PNP decorated with either positive (amidine) groups or negative (carboxyl) groups, and BLM charge was varied using dioleoyl phospholipids having cationic (ethylphosphocholine), zwitterionic (phosphocholine), or anionic (phosphatidic acid) headgroups. Both positive and negative PNP induced BLM pores for all lipid compositions studied, as evidenced by current spikes and integral conductance. Stable PNP-induced pores exhibited ion selectivity, with the highest selectivity for K+ (PK/PCl ~ 8.3) observed when both the PNP and lipids were negatively charged, and the highest selectivity for Cl− (PK/PCl ~ 0.2) observed when both the PNP and lipids were positively charged. This trend is consistent with the finding that selectivity for an ion in channel proteins is imparted by oppositely charged functional groups within the channel’s filter region. The PK/PCl value was unaffected by the voltage-ramp method, the pore conductance, or the side of the BLM to which the PNP were applied. These results demonstrate for the first time that PNP can induce ion-selective pores in BLM, and that the degree of ion selectivity is influenced synergistically by the charges of both the lipid headgroups and functional groups on the PNP. PMID:23747366

  9. Bax and Bif-1 proteins interact on Bilayer Lipid Membrane and form pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajeev; Ghosh, Subhendu

    2015-08-07

    Bax and Bax interacting factor-1(Bif-1) are cytosolic proteins, which translocate towards mitochondria during mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Bif-1 has been identified to co-immunoprecipitate with Bax in apoptotic cells. We have studied the interaction of Bax and Bif-1 on Bilayer Lipid Membrane (BLM) through electrophysiological experiments. It has been observed that Bax-Bif-1 equimolar mixture can form a pore. The pore conductance is in the range of 4.96-5.41 nS. It also displays a sub-state with a conductance of 2.6 nS. No pore activity is observed on BLM when monomeric Bax and Bif-1 proteins are tested independently. The above-mentioned pore forming activity could be relevant in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell-fusion method to visualize interphase nuclear pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Funakoshi, Tomoko; Imamoto, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the nucleus is a complex and sophisticated organelle that organizes genomic DNA to support essential cellular functions. The nuclear surface contains many nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), channels for macromolecular transport between the cytoplasm and nucleus. It is well known that the number of NPCs almost doubles during interphase in cycling cells. However, the mechanism of NPC formation is poorly understood, presumably because a practical system for analysis does not exist. The most difficult obstacle in the visualization of interphase NPC formation is that NPCs already exist after nuclear envelope formation, and these existing NPCs interfere with the observation of nascent NPCs. To overcome this obstacle, we developed a novel system using the cell-fusion technique (heterokaryon method), previously also used to analyze the shuttling of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, to visualize the newly synthesized interphase NPCs. In addition, we used a photobleaching approach that validated the cell-fusion method. We recently used these methods to demonstrate the role of cyclin-dependent protein kinases and of Pom121 in interphase NPC formation in cycling human cells. Here, we describe the details of the cell-fusion approach and compare the system with other NPC formation visualization methods.

  11. Pore formation by human stefin B in its native and oligomeric states and the consequent amyloid induced toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor eAnderluh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well documented that amyloid forming peptides and proteins interact with membranes and that this correlates with cytotoxicity. To introduce the theme we give a brief description of some amyloidogenic proteins and note their similarities with pore forming toxins and cell penetrating peptides. Human stefin B, a member of the family of cystatins, is an amyloidogenic protein in vitro. This review describes our studies of the interaction of stefin B oligomers and prefibrillar aggregates with model membranes leading to pore formation. We have studied the interaction between human stefin B and artificial membranes of various compositions. We also have prepared distinct sizes and morphologies of stefin B prefibrillar states and assessed their toxicity. Furthermore, we have measured electrical currents through pores formed by stefin B prefibrillar oligomers in a planar lipid bilayer setup. We finally discuss the possible functional and pathological significance of such pores formed by human stefin B.

  12. Phosphatidylserine-Dependent Catalysis of Stalk and Pore Formation by Synaptobrevin JMR-TMD Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafdar, Pradip K; Chakraborty, Hirak; Bruno, Michael J; Lentz, Barry R

    2015-11-03

    Although the importance of a SNARE complex in neurotransmitter release is widely accepted, there exist different views on how the complex promotes fusion. One hypothesis is that the SNARE complex's ability to bring membranes into contact is sufficient for fusion, another points to possible roles of juxtamembrane regions (JMRs) and transmembrane domains (TMDs) in catalyzing lipid rearrangement, and another notes the complex's presumed ability to bend membranes near the point of contact. Here, we performed experiments with highly curved vesicles brought into contact using low concentrations of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to investigate the influence of the synaptobrevin (SB) TMD with an attached JMR (SB-JMR-TMD) on the rates of stalk and pore formation during vesicle fusion. SB-JMR-TMD enhanced the rates of stalk and fusion pore (FP) formation in a sharply sigmoidal fashion. We observed an optimal influence at an average of three peptides per vesicle, but only with phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing vesicles. Approximately three SB-JMR-TMDs per vesicle optimally ordered the bilayer interior and excluded water in a similar sigmoidal fashion. The catalytic influences of hexadecane and SB-JMR-TMD on fusion kinetics showed little in common, suggesting different mechanisms. Both kinetic and membrane structure measurements support the hypotheses that SB-JMR-TMD 1) catalyzes initial intermediate formation as a result of its basic JMR disrupting ordered interbilayer water and permitting closer interbilayer approach, and 2) catalyzes pore formation by forming a membrane-spanning complex that increases curvature stress at the circumference of the hemifused diaphragm of the prepore intermediate state. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cyclotides insert into lipid bilayers to form membrane pores and destabilize the membrane through hydrophobic and phosphoethanolamine-specific interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Conan K; Wacklin, Hanna P; Craik, David J

    2012-12-21

    Cyclotides are a family of plant-derived circular proteins with potential therapeutic applications arising from their remarkable stability, broad sequence diversity, and range of bioactivities. Their membrane-binding activity is believed to be a critical component of their mechanism of action. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we studied the binding of the prototypical cyclotides kalata B1 and kalata B2 (and various mutants) to dodecylphosphocholine micelles and phosphoethanolamine-containing lipid bilayers. Although binding is predominantly an entropy-driven process, suggesting that hydrophobic forces contribute significantly to cyclotide-lipid complex formation, specific binding to the phosphoethanolamine-lipid headgroup is also required, which is evident from the enthalpic changes in the free energy of binding. In addition, using a combination of dissipative quartz crystal microbalance measurements and neutron reflectometry, we elucidated the process by which cyclotides interact with bilayer membranes. Initially, a small number of cyclotides bind to the membrane surface and then insert first into the outer membrane leaflet followed by penetration through the membrane and pore formation. At higher concentrations of cyclotides, destabilization of membranes occurs. Our results provide significant mechanistic insight into how cyclotides exert their bioactivities.

  14. Bacteriocins : mechanism of membrane insertion and pore formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, Gert N.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria produce several types of pore forming peptides. Class I bacteriocins are lantibiotics that contain (methyl)lanthionine residues that may form intramolecular thioether rings. These peptides generally have a broad spectrum of activity and form unstable pores. Class II bacteriocins

  15. Bacteriocins : mechanism of membrane insertion and pore formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, G.N.; Konings, W.N; Driessen, A.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria produce several types of pore forming peptides. Class I bacteriocins are lantibiotics that contain (methyl)lanthionine residues that may form intramolecular thioether rings. These peptides generally have a broad spectrum of activity and form unstable pores. Class II bacteriocins

  16. Rapid topology probing using fluorescence spectroscopy in planar lipid bilayer: the pore-forming mechanism of the toxin Cry1Aa of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groulx, Nicolas; Juteau, Marc; Blunck, Rikard

    2010-11-01

    Pore-forming toxins, many of which are pathogenic to humans, are highly dynamic proteins that adopt a different conformation in aqueous solution than in the lipid environment of the host membrane. Consequently, their crystal structures obtained in aqueous environment do not reflect the active conformation in the membrane, making it difficult to deduce the molecular determinants responsible for pore formation. To obtain structural information directly in the membrane, we introduce a fluorescence technique to probe the native topology of pore-forming toxins in planar lipid bilayers and follow their movement during pore formation. Using a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) approach between site-directedly labeled proteins and an absorbing compound (dipicrylamine) in the membrane, we simultaneously recorded the electrical current and fluorescence emission in horizontal planar lipid bilayers formed in plastic chips. With this system, we mapped the topology of the pore-forming domain of Cry1Aa, a biological pesticide from Bacillus thuringiensis, by determining the location of the loops between its seven α helices. We found that the majority of the toxins initially traverse from the cis to the trans leaflet of the membrane. Comparing the topologies of Cry1Aa in the active and inactive state in order to identify the pore-forming mechanism, we established that only the α3-α4 hairpin translocates through the membrane from the trans to the cis leaflet, whereas all other positions remained constant. As toxins are highly dynamic proteins, populations that differ in conformation might be present simultaneously. To test the presence of different populations, we designed double-FRET experiments, where a single donor interacts with two acceptors with very different kinetics (dipicrylamine and oxonol). Due to the nonlinear response of FRET and the dynamic change of the acceptor distribution, we can deduce the distribution of the acceptors in the membrane from the time

  17. Formation of spherical stomatocyte of high-genus vesicle under pore-size constraint

    CERN Document Server

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear pores have an approximately uniform distribution in the nuclear envelope of most living cells. Hence, the morphology of the nuclear envelope is a spherical stomatocyte with a high genus. We have investigated the morphology of high-genus vesicles under pore-size constraint using dynamically triangulated membrane simulations. Bending-energy minimization without volume or other constraints produces a circular-cage stomatocyte, where the pores are aligned in a circular line on an oblate inner bud. As the pore radius is reduced, the circular-pore alignment is more stabilized than a random pore distribution on a spherical bud. However, we have clarified the conditions for the formation of a spherical stomatocyte: a small reduced volume, osmotic pressure within the inner bud, and repulsion between the pores. When area-difference elasticity is taken into account, the formation of cylindrical or budded tubules from the stomatocyte and discoidal stomatocyte is found.

  18. A Pore Idea: the ion conduction pathway of TMEM16/ANO proteins is composed partly of lipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Jarred M; Hartzell, H Criss

    2016-03-01

    Since their first descriptions, ion channels have been conceived as proteinaceous conduits that facilitate the passage of ionic cargo between segregated environments. This concept is reinforced by crystallographic structures of cation channels depicting ion conductance pathways completely lined by protein. Although lipids are sometimes present in fenestrations near the pore or may be involved in channel gating, there is little or no evidence that lipids inhabit the ion conduction pathway. Indeed, the presence of lipid acyl chains in the conductance pathway would curse the design of the channel's aqueous pore. Here, we make a speculative proposal that anion channels in the TMEM16/ANO superfamily have ion conductance pathways composed partly of lipids. Our reasoning is based on the idea that TMEM16 ion channels evolved from a kind of lipid transporter that scrambles lipids between leaflets of the membrane bilayer and the modeled structural similarity between TMEM16 lipid scramblases and TMEM16 anion channels. This novel view of the TMEM16 pore offers explanation for the biophysical and pharmacological oddness of TMEM16A. We build upon the recent X-ray structure of nhTMEM16 and develop models of both TMEM16 ion channels and lipid scramblases to bolster our proposal. It is our hope that this model of the TMEM16 pore will foster innovative investigation into TMEM16 function.

  19. The Role of Signaling via Aqueous Pore Formation in Resistance Responses to Amphotericin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B Eleazar

    2016-09-01

    Drug resistance studies have played an important role in the validation of antibiotic targets. In the case of the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B (AmB), such studies have demonstrated the essential role that depletion of ergosterol plays in the development of AmB-resistant (AmB-R) organisms. However, AmB-R strains also occur in fungi and parasitic protozoa that maintain a normal level of ergosterol at the plasma membrane. Here, I review evidence that shows not only that there is increased protection against the deleterious consequences of AmB-induced ion leakage across the membrane in these resistant pathogens but also that a set of events are activated that block the cell signaling responses that trigger the oxidative damage produced by the antibiotic. Such signaling events appear to be the consequence of a membrane-thinning effect that is exerted upon lipid-anchored Ras proteins by the aqueous pores formed by AmB. A similar membrane disturbance effect may also explain the activity of AmB on mammalian cells containing Toll-like receptors. These resistance mechanisms expand our current understanding of the role that the formation of AmB aqueous pores plays in triggering signal transduction responses in both pathogens and host immune cells.

  20. Membrane Core-Specific Antimicrobial Action of Cathelicidin LL-37 Peptide Switches Between Pore and Nanofibre Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmiri, Mahdi; Enciso, Marta; Adda, Christopher G.; Smith, Brian J.; Perugini, Matthew A.; Mechler, Adam

    2016-11-01

    Membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides provide broad-spectrum defence against localized bacterial invasion in a range of hosts including humans. The most generally held consensus is that targeting to pathogens is based on interactions with the head groups of membrane lipids. Here we show that the action of LL-37, a human antimicrobial peptide switches the mode of action based on the structure of the alkyl chains, and not the head groups of the membrane forming lipids. We demonstrate that LL-37 exhibits two distinct interaction pathways: pore formation in bilayers of unsaturated phospholipids and membrane modulation with saturated phospholipids. Uniquely, the membrane modulation yields helical-rich fibrous peptide-lipid superstructures. Our results point at alternative design strategies for peptide antimicrobials.

  1. Size Dependent Pore Formation in Germanium Nanowires Undergoing Reversible Delithiation Observed by In Situ TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaotang; He, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chong-min; Korgel, Brian A.

    2016-12-22

    Germanium (Ge) nanowires coated with an amorphous silicon (Si) shell undergoing lithiation and delithiation were studied using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Delithiation creates pores in nanowires with diameters larger than ~25 nm, but not in smaller diameter nanowires. The formation of pores in Ge nanowires undergoing delithiation has been observed before in in situ TEM experiments, but there has been no indication that a critical diameter exists below which pores do not form. Pore formation occurs as a result of fast lithium diffusion compared to vacancy migration. We propose that a short diffusion path for vacancies to the nanowire surface plays a role in limiting pore formation even when lithium diffusion is fast.

  2. Crystal structure of listeriolysin O reveals molecular details of oligomerization and pore formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Stefan; van Pee, Katharina; Hudel, Martina; Leustik, Martin; Rhinow, Daniel; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Chakraborty, Trinad; Yildiz, Özkan

    2014-04-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is an essential virulence factor of Listeria monocytogenes that causes listeriosis. Listeria monocytogenes owes its ability to live within cells to the pH- and temperature-dependent pore-forming activity of LLO, which is unique among cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. LLO enables the bacteria to cross the phagosomal membrane and is also involved in activation of cellular processes, including the modulation of gene expression or intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. Neither the pore-forming mechanism nor the mechanisms triggering the signalling processes in the host cell are known in detail. Here, we report the crystal structure of LLO, in which we identified regions important for oligomerization and pore formation. Mutants were characterized by determining their haemolytic and Ca2+ uptake activity. We analysed the pore formation of LLO and its variants on erythrocyte ghosts by electron microscopy and show that pore formation requires precise interface interactions during toxin oligomerization on the membrane.

  3. Optimization of hybrid laser arc welding of 42CrMo steel to suppress pore formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Genyu; Mao, Shuai; Zhou, Cong; Chen, Fei

    2017-06-01

    The hybrid laser arc welding (HLAW) of 42CrMo quenched and tempered steel was conducted. The effect of the processing parameters, such as the relative positions of the laser and the arc, the shielding gas flow rate, the defocusing distance, the laser power, the wire feed rate and the welding speed, on the pore formation was analyzed, the morphological characteristics of the pores were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the majority of the pores were invasive. The pores formed at the leading a laser (LA) welding process were fewer than those at the leading a arc (AL) welding process. Increasing the shielding gas flow rate could also facilitate the reduction of pores. The laser power and the welding speed were two key process parameters to reduce the pores. The flow of the molten pool, the weld cooling rate and the pore escaping rate as a result of different parameters could all affect pore formation. An ideal pore-free weld was obtained for the optimal welding process parameters.

  4. Role of transmembrane pH gradient and membrane binding in nisin pore formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, Gert N.; Clark, Jonathan; Chan, Weng C.; Bycroft, Barrie W.; Roberts, Gordon C.K.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Nisin is a cationic antimicrobial peptide that belongs to the group of lantibiotics. It is thought to form oligomeric pores in the target membrane by a mechanism that requires the transmembrane electrical potential (Delta psi) and that involves local pertubation of the lipid bilayer structure. Here

  5. Bax Activation Initiates the Assembly of a Multimeric Catalyst that Facilitates Bax Pore Formation in Mitochondrial Outer Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnareva, Yulia; Andreyev, Alexander Y.; Kuwana, Tomomi; Newmeyer, Donald D.

    2012-01-01

    Bax/Bak-mediated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) is essential for “intrinsic” apoptotic cell death. Published studies used synthetic liposomes to reveal an intrinsic pore-forming activity of Bax, but it is unclear how other mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) proteins might facilitate this function. We carefully analyzed the kinetics of Bax-mediated pore formation in isolated MOMs, with some unexpected results. Native MOMs were more sensitive than liposomes to added Bax, and MOMs displayed a lag phase not observed with liposomes. Heat-labile MOM proteins were required for this enhanced response. A two-tiered mathematical model closely fit the kinetic data: first, Bax activation promotes the assembly of a multimeric complex, which then catalyzes the second reaction, Bax-dependent pore formation. Bax insertion occurred immediately upon Bax addition, prior to the end of the lag phase. Permeabilization kinetics were affected in a reciprocal manner by [cBid] and [Bax], confirming the “hit-and-run” hypothesis of cBid-induced direct Bax activation. Surprisingly, MOMP rate constants were linearly related to [Bax], implying that Bax acts non-cooperatively. Thus, the oligomeric catalyst is distinct from Bax. Moreover, contrary to common assumption, pore formation kinetics depend on Bax monomers, not oligomers. Catalyst formation exhibited a sharp transition in activation energy at ∼28°C, suggesting a role for membrane lipid packing. Furthermore, catalyst formation was strongly inhibited by chemical antagonists of the yeast mitochondrial fission protein, Dnm1. However, the mammalian ortholog, Drp1, was undetectable in mitochondrial outer membranes. Moreover, ATP and GTP were dispensable for MOMP. Thus, the data argue that oligomerization of a catalyst protein, distinct from Bax and Drp1, facilitates MOMP, possibly through a membrane-remodeling event. PMID:23049480

  6. Formation of small transmembrane pores: An intermediate stage on the way to Bacillus cereus non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe) full pores in the absence of NheA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kui; Didier, Andrea; Dietrich, Richard; Heilkenbrinker, Uta; Waltenberger, Eva; Jessberger, Nadja; Märtlbauer, Erwin; Benz, Roland

    2016-01-15

    The non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe) of Bacillus cereus is a three-partite toxin formed of the components NheA, -B and -C. Pore formation and subsequent lysis of target cells caused by Nhe is an orchestrated process comprising three steps: (i) formation of NheB/C oligomers in solution, (ii) attachment of the oligomers to the cell membrane, (iii) binding of NheA to the oligomers. The present study aimed to characterize the properties of the NheB/C complex and the fate of the target cell upon binding. An enzyme immunoassay allowing kinetic measurements and surface plasmon resonance revealed the fast and high affinity formation of the NheB/C oligomers. The benefit of these complexes is a more stable cell binding as well as stronger and earlier cytotoxic effect. High molecular mass hetero-oligomers (620 kDa) probably consisting of one NheC and up to 15 NheB were detected by size-exclusion chromatography and on native PAGE immunoblots. Due to the NheBC application the morphology and membrane permeability of Vero cells is partly disturbed. Formation of stable transmembrane channels with a conductance of about 870 pS and a diameter of about 2 nm due to the application of NheBC could be demonstrated in lipid bilayer experiments. Thus, the NheBC complex itself has a tendency to increase the membrane permeability prior to the emergence of full pores containing also NheA.

  7. Stepwise visualization of membrane pore formation by suilysin, a bacterial cholesterol-dependent cytolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Carl; Dudkina, Natalya V; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Hodel, Adrian W; Farabella, Irene; Pandurangan, Arun P; Jahan, Nasrin; Pires Damaso, Mafalda; Osmanović, Dino; Reboul, Cyril F; Dunstone, Michelle A; Andrew, Peter W; Lonnen, Rana; Topf, Maya; Saibil, Helen R; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2014-12-02

    Membrane attack complex/perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) proteins constitute a major superfamily of pore-forming proteins that act as bacterial virulence factors and effectors in immune defence. Upon binding to the membrane, they convert from the soluble monomeric form to oligomeric, membrane-inserted pores. Using real-time atomic force microscopy (AFM), electron microscopy (EM), and atomic structure fitting, we have mapped the structure and assembly pathways of a bacterial CDC in unprecedented detail and accuracy, focussing on suilysin from Streptococcus suis. We show that suilysin assembly is a noncooperative process that is terminated before the protein inserts into the membrane. The resulting ring-shaped pores and kinetically trapped arc-shaped assemblies are all seen to perforate the membrane, as also visible by the ejection of its lipids. Membrane insertion requires a concerted conformational change of the monomeric subunits, with a marked expansion in pore diameter due to large changes in subunit structure and packing.

  8. Lipid Oxidation Promotes Acrylamide Formation in Fat-Rich Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capuano, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from model systems suggests that lipid oxidation can contribute to acrylamide (AA) formation through the generation of secondary lipid oxidation carbonyl products, mainly aldehydes, which are able to degrade asparagine to AA. In this respect, factors affecting the extent of lipid

  9. Lipid Oxidation Promotes Acrylamide Formation in Fat-Rich Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capuano, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from model systems suggests that lipid oxidation can contribute to acrylamide (AA) formation through the generation of secondary lipid oxidation carbonyl products, mainly aldehydes, which are able to degrade asparagine to AA. In this respect, factors affecting the extent of lipid oxidati

  10. Lipid Oxidation Promotes Acrylamide Formation in Fat-Rich Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capuano, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from model systems suggests that lipid oxidation can contribute to acrylamide (AA) formation through the generation of secondary lipid oxidation carbonyl products, mainly aldehydes, which are able to degrade asparagine to AA. In this respect, factors affecting the extent of lipid oxidati

  11. Vinpocetine attenuates lipid accumulation and atherosclerosis formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yujun [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Li, Jian-Dong [Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection, and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Yan, Chen, E-mail: Chen_Yan@urmc.rochester.edu [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Vinpocetine attenuates hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. •Vinpocetine antagonizes ox-LDL uptake and accumulation in macrophages. •Vinpocetine blocks the induction of ox-LDL receptor LOX-1 in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis, the major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is a chronic arterial disease characterized by lipid deposition and inflammation in the vessel wall. Cholesterol, in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. Recent study indicated that vinpocetine is a potent anti-inflammatory agent. However, its role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In the present study, we show that vinpocetine significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in ApoE knockout mice fed with a high-fat diet. In cultured murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, vinpocetine markedly attenuated oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) uptake and foam cell formation. Moreover, vinpocetine greatly blocked the induction of ox-LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages as well as in the LOX-1 level in atherosclerotic lesions. Taken together, our data reveal a novel role of vinpocetine in reduction of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, at least partially through suppressing LOX-1 signaling pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of vinpocetine, this study suggests vinpocetine may be a therapeutic candidate for treating atherosclerosis.

  12. IFITM3 restricts influenza A virus entry by blocking the formation of fusion pores following virus-endosome hemifusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanay M Desai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs inhibit infection of diverse enveloped viruses, including the influenza A virus (IAV which is thought to enter from late endosomes. Recent evidence suggests that IFITMs block virus hemifusion (lipid mixing in the absence of viral content release by altering the properties of cell membranes. Consistent with this mechanism, excess cholesterol in late endosomes of IFITM-expressing cells has been reported to inhibit IAV entry. Here, we examined IAV restriction by IFITM3 protein using direct virus-cell fusion assay and single virus imaging in live cells. IFITM3 over-expression did not inhibit lipid mixing, but abrogated the release of viral content into the cytoplasm. Although late endosomes of IFITM3-expressing cells accumulated cholesterol, other interventions leading to aberrantly high levels of this lipid did not inhibit virus fusion. These results imply that excess cholesterol in late endosomes is not the mechanism by which IFITM3 inhibits the transition from hemifusion to full fusion. The IFITM3's ability to block fusion pore formation at a post-hemifusion stage shows that this protein stabilizes the cytoplasmic leaflet of endosomal membranes without adversely affecting the lumenal leaflet. We propose that IFITM3 interferes with pore formation either directly, through partitioning into the cytoplasmic leaflet of a hemifusion intermediate, or indirectly, by modulating the lipid/protein composition of this leaflet. Alternatively, IFITM3 may redirect IAV fusion to a non-productive pathway, perhaps by promoting fusion with intralumenal vesicles within multivesicular bodies/late endosomes.

  13. Graphene Induces Formation of Pores That Kill Spherical and Rod-Shaped Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Vy T H; Truong, Vi Khanh; Quinn, Matthew D J; Notley, Shannon M; Guo, Yachong; Baulin, Vladimir A; Al Kobaisi, Mohammad; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2015-08-25

    Pristine graphene, its derivatives, and composites have been widely reported to possess antibacterial properties. Most of the studies simulating the interaction between bacterial cell membranes and the surface of graphene have proposed that the graphene-induced bacterial cell death is caused either by (1) the insertion of blade-like graphene-based nanosheets or (2) the destructive extraction of lipid molecules by the presence of the lipophilic graphene. These simulation studies have, however, only take into account graphene-cell membrane interactions where the graphene is in a dispersed form. In this paper, we report the antimicrobial behavior of graphene sheet surfaces in an attempt to further advance the current knowledge pertaining to graphene cytotoxicity using both experimental and computer simulation approaches. Graphene nanofilms were fabricated to exhibit different edge lengths and different angles of orientation in the graphene sheets. These substrates were placed in contact with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, where it was seen that these substrates exhibited variable bactericidal efficiency toward these two pathogenic bacteria. It was demonstrated that the density of the edges of the graphene was one of the principal parameters that contributed to the antibacterial behavior of the graphene nanosheet films. The study provides both experimental and theoretical evidence that the antibacterial behavior of graphene nanosheets arises from the formation of pores in the bacterial cell wall, causing a subsequent osmotic imbalance and cell death.

  14. Pre-pore oligomer formation by Vibrio cholerae cytolysin: insights from a truncated variant lacking the pore-forming pre-stem loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Karan; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2014-01-03

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC), a β-barrel pore-forming toxin (β-PFT), induces killing of the target eukaryotic cells by forming heptameric transmembrane β-barrel pores. Consistent with the β-PFT mode of action, binding of the VCC toxin monomers with the target cell membrane triggers formation of pre-pore oligomeric intermediates, followed by membrane insertion of the β-strands contributed by the pre-stem motif within the central cytolysin domain of each protomer. It has been shown previously that blocking of membrane insertion of the VCC pre-stem motif arrests conversion of the pre-pore state to the functional transmembrane pore. Consistent with the generalized β-PFT mechanism, it therefore appears that the VCC pre-stem motif plays a critical role toward forming the structural scaffold of the transmembrane β-barrel pore. It is, however, still not known whether the pre-stem motif plays any role in the membrane interaction process, and subsequent pre-pore structure formation by VCC. In this direction, we have constructed a recombinant variant of VCC deleting the pre-stem region, and have characterized the effect(s) of physical absence of the pre-stem motif on the distinct steps of the membrane pore-formation process. Our results show that the deletion of the pre-stem segment does not affect membrane binding and pre-pore oligomer formation by the toxin, but it critically abrogates the functional pore-forming activity of VCC. Present study extends our insights regarding the structure-function mechanism associated with the membrane pore formation by VCC, in the context of the β-PFT mode of action.

  15. Positron lifetimes at the initial stage of pore formation in Vycor glass

    CERN Document Server

    Jasinska, B; Goworek, T

    2000-01-01

    The formation of narrow pores during leaching of Vycor glass by sulphuric acid was investigated using the positron lifetime technique. During the leaching process the pore diameter remained roughly constant (except for the case of cold leaching). The time of processing changed the total length of capillaries, but not their number; at the temperature 50 deg. C during 20 min of leaching the average leaching depth was 24 mu m.

  16. Oncogenic Mutations Differentially Affect Bax Monomer, Dimer, and Oligomeric Pore Formation in the Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Zheng, Jie; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-09-01

    Dysfunction of Bax, a pro-apoptotic regulator of cellular metabolism is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. We have constructed the first atomistic models of the Bax oligomeric pore consisting with experimental residue-residue distances. The models are stable, capturing well double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy measurements and provide structural details in line with the DEER data. Comparison with the latest experimental results revealed that our models agree well with both Bax and Bak pores, pointed to a converged structural arrangement for Bax and Bak pore formation. Using multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we probed mutational effects on Bax transformation from monomer → dimer → membrane pore formation at atomic resolution. We observe that two cancer-related mutations, G40E and S118I, allosterically destabilize the monomer and stabilize an off-pathway swapped dimer, preventing productive pore formation. This observation suggests a mechanism whereby the mutations may work mainly by over-stabilizing the monomer → dimer transformation toward an unproductive off-pathway swapped-dimer state. Our observations point to misfolded Bax states, shedding light on the molecular mechanism of Bax mutation-elicited cancer. Most importantly, the structure of the Bax pore facilitates future study of releases cytochrome C in atomic detail.

  17. Pore pressure prediction and well bore stability analysis in Lower Paleozoic shale formation, N Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słota-Valim, Małgorzata

    2017-04-01

    Pore pressure and wellbore stability sometimes pose a serious challenge while drilling, especially through rock formations of reduced strength or through intervals where abnormally high pore pressure was formed. Lack of prediction of pore pressure and lack of wellbore stability analysis introduce an element of uncertainty in selection of drilling fluid density. Too low density of drilling fluid can lead to uncontrolled flow of the reservoir fluid to the wellbore (kicks), washouts and occurrence of cavern like structures called breakouts. On the other hand too high density can lead to formation fracturing and further fluid loss. Therefore wellbore stability loss frequently prolongs the operating time, rising the costs of the drilling and in severe cases may end up well abandons loss. The above mentioned complications can be avoided or greatly reduced by reliable analysis of drilling conditions with the aspects to geomechanical characteristics of drilled rock formations. This study presents the results of analysis of pore pressure performed with the use of commonly used in oil industry methods. The analysis of pore pressure was carried out in almost entire profile of four boreholes drilled through lower Paleozoic shales, deposited in the southern part of the Baltic Basin. In addition wellbore stability analysis was performed in the well with most complete geomechanical input data base. Obtained results helped identifying intervals with elevated pore pressure could pose a risk during drilling operation. Elaborated 1D geomechanical model provides safe mud weight window helping to reduce the instabilities risk and constitute a great tool for geomechanical model validation.

  18. Low pH-Induced Pore Formation by the T Domain of Botulinum Toxin Type A is Dependent upon NaCl Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, B.; Swaminathan, S.; Agarwal, R.; Nelson, L. D.; London, E.

    2010-07-19

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) undergo low pH-triggered membrane insertion, resulting in the translocation of their light (catalytic) chains into the cytoplasm. The T (translocation) domain of the BoNT heavy chain is believed to carry out translocation. Here, the behavior of isolated T domain from BoNT type A has been characterized, both in solution and when associated with model membranes. When BoNT T domain prepared in the detergent dodecylmaltoside was diluted into aqueous solution, it exhibited a low pH-dependent conformational change below pH 6. At low pH the T domain associated with, and formed pores within, model membrane vesicles composed of 30 mol% dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol/70 mol% dioleoylphosphatidylcholine. Although T domain interacted with vesicles at low (50 mM) and high (400 mM) NaCl concentrations, the interaction required much less lipid at low salt. However, even at high lipid concentrations pore formation was much more pronounced at low NaCl concentrations than at high NaCl concentration. Increasing salt concentration after insertion in the presence of 50 mM NaCl did not decrease pore formation. A similar effect of NaCl concentration upon pore formation was observed in vesicles composed solely of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, showing that the effect of NaCl did not solely involve modulation of electrostatic interactions between protein and anionic lipids. These results indicate that some feature of membrane-bound T domain tertiary structure critical for pore formation is highly dependent upon salt concentration.

  19. Effect of Processing Pressure on Isolated Pore Formation during Controlled Directional Solidification in Small Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Matthew C.; Anilkumar, Amrutur V.; Grugel, RIchard N.; Lee, Chun P.

    2008-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments were performed, using succinonitrile saturated with nitrogen gas, to examine the effects of in-situ processing pressure changes on the formation growth, and evolution of an isolated, cylindrical gaseous pore. A novel solidification facility, capable of processing thin cylindrical samples (I.D. < 1.0 mm), under controlled pressure conditions, was used for the experiments. A new experimental method for growing the isolated pore from a seed bubble is introduced. The experimental results indicate that an in-situ processing pressure change will result in either a transient change in pore diameter or a complete termination of pore growth, indicating that pressure changes can be used as a control parameter to terminate bubble growth. A simple analytical model has been introduced to explain the experimental observations.

  20. Formation of Pores Associated with the Inflow of Moving Magnetic Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobo; Yang, Zhiliang; Zhang, Hongqi

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the formation of pores in NOAA AR 10930 associated with the inflow of moving magnetic features (MMFs) using simultaneous Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope filtergrams and magnetograms. The main results are outlined as follows: (1) the existence of MMFs around pores is a fairly common phenomenon. Around the four innate and one residue pores investigated, there are obvious inflows of MMFs during the pores’ growth phase. (2) The observed magnetic flux transport conveyed by MMFs is strongly correlated with the change in the pore’s flux content, and therefore reflects the pore’s growth and decay. The concentration and dissolution of the pores are direct results of the local convergence and convection of sunspots’ magnetic outflow. (3) The most common source of MMF flows into pores are produced near sunspots and move along the connection lines between the sunspots’ penumbrae and the pores. These monopolar and bipolar magnetic elements are either fragments from the penumbra or continuations of penumbral fibrils. Pores also merge dissociated elements and receive flows produced by small-scale bipolar emergence. MMF inflows that diminish a pore’s magnetic flux often trigger chromospheric bright points. (4) In their decay phase, the pores release outflows of magnetic elements. The distribution of flows around pores is asymmetrical: the inflow is concentrated on the side facing the parent sunspot, while the outflow is generally concentrated on the opposite side. A pore’s outflow is also part of the process of decomposing and removing of the active region’s magnetic field.

  1. FORMATION OF PORES ASSOCIATED WITH THE INFLOW OF MOVING MAGNETIC FEATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaobo; Yang, Zhiliang [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, No. 19, XinJieKouWai St., HaiDian District, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhang, Hongqi, E-mail: zlyang@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2015-07-10

    We investigate the formation of pores in NOAA AR 10930 associated with the inflow of moving magnetic features (MMFs) using simultaneous Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope filtergrams and magnetograms. The main results are outlined as follows: (1) the existence of MMFs around pores is a fairly common phenomenon. Around the four innate and one residue pores investigated, there are obvious inflows of MMFs during the pores’ growth phase. (2) The observed magnetic flux transport conveyed by MMFs is strongly correlated with the change in the pore’s flux content, and therefore reflects the pore’s growth and decay. The concentration and dissolution of the pores are direct results of the local convergence and convection of sunspots’ magnetic outflow. (3) The most common source of MMF flows into pores are produced near sunspots and move along the connection lines between the sunspots’ penumbrae and the pores. These monopolar and bipolar magnetic elements are either fragments from the penumbra or continuations of penumbral fibrils. Pores also merge dissociated elements and receive flows produced by small-scale bipolar emergence. MMF inflows that diminish a pore’s magnetic flux often trigger chromospheric bright points. (4) In their decay phase, the pores release outflows of magnetic elements. The distribution of flows around pores is asymmetrical: the inflow is concentrated on the side facing the parent sunspot, while the outflow is generally concentrated on the opposite side. A pore’s outflow is also part of the process of decomposing and removing of the active region’s magnetic field.

  2. STUDIES ON THE PORE FORMATION MECHANISM OF β-CRYSTALLINE POLYPROPYLENE UNDER STRETCHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-feng Ran; Mao Xu

    2004-01-01

    The pore formation mechanism of β-crystalline polypropylene under stretching was investigated. The porosity of the samples increases rapidly with stretching, having a maximum at draw ratios around 2 and then decreases monotonically.An abrupt formation process of initial micropores at very low draw ratios was evidenced by in situ SAXS measurements. At the same time the phase transition from β-crystal to a-crystal proceeds slowly in the whole deformation process up to large draw ratios around 5. Comparative studies of a- and β-crystalline polypropylene samples before stretching indicate that in addition to difference in crystal forms the a- and β-crystalline polypropylene samples exhibit quite different morphological features. There are a lot of interfaces in β-crystalline polypropylene samples, which may have a lower density value and can be easily etched by argon ions and penetrated by small molecules. It was concluded from these experimental facts that the pore formation and crystal transition are two independent phenomena during the deformation of β-crystalline polypropylene samples, and phase transition from β-crystal to a-crystal could hardly be the origin of pore formation. A defect initiation mechanism was proposed to understand the pore formation behavior of β-crystalline polypropylenes.

  3. The Solvent-Exposed C-Terminus of the Cytolysin A Pore-Forming Toxin Directs Pore Formation and Channel Function in Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayana, Pradeep; Desikan, Rajat; Ayappa, K Ganapathy; Visweswariah, Sandhya S

    2016-10-13

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) bind to cell membranes and form nanoscale pores that allow leakage of cellular components, resulting in cell death. The water-soluble, monomeric form of these toxins shows a dramatic conformational change during pore formation, as exemplified by crystal structures of the monomer and functional pore of cytolysin A (ClyA). The solvent-exposed, C-terminal residues of the protein are essential for activity, but the mechanism by which this region regulates pore formation remains unknown. We show here that deletion of the C-terminus of ClyA did not alter its ability to bind to the membrane or oligomerize in detergent. However, the truncated toxin lysed erythrocytes poorly, was more susceptible to proteolysis and thermal unfolding, and showed low calcein leakage from small unilamellar vesicles. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we find that deletion of C-terminal residues from the ClyA monomer significantly altered stability and unfolding trajectories in the transmembrane N-terminal helix, a region that is pivotal in maintaining the structural integrity of the helical bundle. MD simulations of pores with or without the C-terminus showed minor differences, implying that if oligomerization could be induced prior to the addition to vesicles, then an active pore could be generated. Via generation of oligomers in a detergent prior to the addition to vesicles, the truncated toxin could induce calcein leakage from vesicles, albeit to a lower extent. Therefore, regions of pore-forming toxins, not directly involved in the pore structure, are not passive players but have important roles in undergoing the transition through intermediary steps leading to successful pore formation in a membrane environment.

  4. Formation of individual protein channels in lipid bilayers suspended in nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, André; Han, Xiaojun; Winkler, Fritz K; Tiefenauer, Louis X

    2009-10-15

    Free-standing lipid bilayers are formed in regularly arranged nanopores of 200, 400 and 800 nm in a 300 nm thin hydrophobic silicon nitride membrane separating two fluid compartments. The extraordinary stability of the lipid bilayers allows us to monitor channel formation of the model peptide melittin and alpha-hemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronoamperometry. We observed that melittin channel formation is voltage-dependent and transient, whereas transmembrane heptameric alpha-hemolysin channels in nano-BLMs persist for hours. The onset of alpha-hemolysin-mediated conduction depends on the applied protein concentration and strongly on the diameter of the nanopores. Heptameric channel formation from adsorbed alpha-hemolysin monomers needs more time in bilayers suspended in 200 nm pores compared to bilayers in pores of 400 and 800 nm diameters. Diffusion of sodium ions across alpha-hemolysin channels present in a sufficiently high number in the bilayers was quantitatively and specifically determined using ion selective electrodes. The results demonstrate that relatively small variations of nano-dimensions have a tremendous effect on observable dynamic biomolecular processes. Such nanopore chips are potentially useful as supports for stable lipid bilayers to establish functional assays of membrane proteins needed in basic research and drug discovery.

  5. Perfringolysin O structure and mechanism of pore formation as a paradigm for cholesterol-dependent cytolysins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Benjamin B; Heuck, Alejandro P

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) constitute a family of pore forming toxins secreted by Gram-positive bacteria. These toxins form transmembrane pores by inserting a large β-barrel into cholesterol-containing membrane bilayers. Binding of water-soluble CDCs to the membrane triggers the formation of oligomers containing 35-50 monomers. The coordinated insertion of more than seventy β-hairpins into the membrane requires multiple structural conformational changes. Perfringolysin O (PFO), secreted by Clostridium perfringens, has become the prototype for the CDCs. In this chapter, we will describe current knowledge on the mechanism of PFO cytolysis, with special focus on cholesterol recognition, oligomerization, and the conformational changes involved in pore formation.

  6. Pore Formation Process of Porous Ti3SiC2 Fabricated by Reactive Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibin Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Porous Ti3SiC2 was fabricated with high purity, 99.4 vol %, through reactive sintering of titanium hydride (TiH2, silicon (Si and graphite (C elemental powders. The reaction procedures and the pore structure evolution during the sintering process were systematically studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscope (SEM. Our results show that the formation of Ti3SiC2 from TiH2/Si/C powders experienced the following steps: firstly, TiH2 decomposed into Ti; secondly, TiC and Ti5Si3 intermediate phases were generated; finally, Ti3SiC2 was produced through the reaction of TiC, Ti5Si3 and Si. The pores formed in the synthesis procedure of porous Ti3SiC2 ceramics are derived from the following aspects: interstitial pores left during the pressing procedure; pores formed because of the TiH2 decomposition; pores formed through the reactions between Ti and Si and Ti and C powders; and the pores produced accompanying the final phase synthesized during the high temperature sintering process.

  7. A comparison of coarse-grained and continuum models for membrane bending in lipid bilayer fusion pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Jackson, Meyer B; Cui, Qiang

    2013-02-19

    To establish the validity of continuum mechanics models quantitatively for the analysis of membrane remodeling processes, we compare the shape and energies of the membrane fusion pore predicted by coarse-grained (MARTINI) and continuum mechanics models. The results at these distinct levels of resolution give surprisingly consistent descriptions for the shape of the fusion pore, and the deviation between the continuum and coarse-grained models becomes notable only when the radius of curvature approaches the thickness of a monolayer. Although slow relaxation beyond microseconds is observed in different perturbative simulations, the key structural features (e.g., dimension and shape of the fusion pore near the pore center) are consistent among independent simulations. These observations provide solid support for the use of coarse-grained and continuum models in the analysis of membrane remodeling. The combined coarse-grained and continuum analysis confirms the recent prediction of continuum models that the fusion pore is a metastable structure and that its optimal shape is neither toroidal nor catenoidal. Moreover, our results help reveal a new, to our knowledge, bowing feature in which the bilayers close to the pore axis separate more from one another than those at greater distances from the pore axis; bowing helps reduce the curvature and therefore stabilizes the fusion pore structure. The spread of the bilayer deformations over distances of hundreds of nanometers and the substantial reduction in energy of fusion pore formation provided by this spread indicate that membrane fusion can be enhanced by allowing a larger area of membrane to participate and be deformed. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The role of lipids in activated sludge floc formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Liza Kretzschmar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Activated sludge is widely used to treat municipal and industrial wastewater globally and the formation of activated sludge flocculates (flocs underpins the ability to separate sludge from treated water. Despite the importance of activated sludge flocs to human civilization there have been precious few attempts to rationally design fit for purpose flocs using a bottom-up approach based on a solid scientific foundation. Recently we have been developing experimental models for activated sludge floc formation based on the colonization and consumption of particulate organic matter (chitin and cellulose. In this study we lay the foundation for investigation of activated sludge floc formation based on biofilm formation around spheres of the lipid glycerol trioleate (GT that form spontaneously when GT is introduced into activated sludge incubations. Sludge biomass was observed to associate tightly with the lipid spheres. An increase in extracellular lipase activity was associated with a decrease in size of the colonized lipid spheres over a 25 day incubation. Bacterial community composition shifted from predominantly Betaproteobacteria to Alphaproteobacteria in GT treated sludge. Four activated sludge bacteria were isolated from lipid spheres and two of them were shown to produce AHL like quorum sensing signal activity, suggesting quorum sensing may play a role in lipid spheres colonization and biodegradation in activated sludge. The development of this experimental model of activated sludge floc formation lays the foundation for rational production of flocs for wastewater treatment using lipids as floc nuclei and further development of the flocculate life-cycle concept.

  9. Thermodynamics and dynamics of the formation of spherical lipidic vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Zapata, E Hernandez; Santamaría-Holek, I

    2009-01-01

    We propose a free energy expression accounting for the formation of spherical vesicles from planar lipidic membranes and derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the probability distribution describing the dynamics of vesicle formation. We found that formation may occur as an activated process for small membranes and as a transport process for sufficiently large membranes. We give explicit expressions for the transition rates and the characteristic time of vesicle formation in terms of the relevant physical parameters.

  10. Formation of layer-shaped pores in TiC-Fe cermet by combustion synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To study the formation of layer-shaped pores in TiC-Fe cermet, two Ti-C-Fe powder compacts containing Ti powders with two size ranges (<44?μm and 135~154?μm) respectively were ignited in a special ignition mode. The combustion temperatures of the reactions were measured, the phase constituents of the combustion-synthesized products were inspected by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and the structures of the products were observed with scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the case of the finer Ti powder used, TiC-Fe cermet and pore rank in an alternately laminar shape, and the shape of the pore is the same as that of the combustion wavefront, implying that the layer-shaped pore results from a gather of the retained gas into the combustion wavefront. While in the case of the coarser Ti powder used, the lower combustion temperature causes the gather of the retained gas to be difficult, the pore being present in an arbitrary shape and distributing randomly.

  11. The Presence of Sterols Favors Sticholysin I-Membrane Association and Pore Formation Regardless of Their Ability to Form Laterally Segregated Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrera, Lohans; Gomide, Andreza B; Sánchez, Rafael E; Ros, Uris; Wilke, Natalia; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, María E; Itri, Rosangela; Fanani, María Laura; Alvarez, Carlos

    2015-09-15

    Sticholysin I (St I) is a pore-forming toxin (PFT) produced by the Caribbean Sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus belonging to the actinoporin protein family, a unique class of eukaryotic PFT. As for actinoporins, it has been proposed that the presence of cholesterol (Chol) and the coexistence of lipid phases increase binding to the target membrane and pore-forming ability. However, little is known about the role of membrane structure and dynamics (phase state, fluidity, and the presence of lipid domains) on the activity of actinoporins or which regions of the membrane are the most favorable for protein insertion, oligomerization, and eventually pore formation. To gain insight into the role of membrane properties on the functional activity of St I, we studied its binding to monolayers and vesicles of phosphatidylcholine (PC), sphingomyelin (SM), and sterols inducing (ergosterol -Erg and cholesterol -Chol) or not (cholestenone - Cln) membrane phase segregation in liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains. This study revealed that St I binds and permeabilizes with higher efficiency sterol-containing membranes independently of their ability to form domains. We discuss the results in terms of the relevance of different membrane properties for the actinoporins mechanism of action, namely, molecular heterogeneity, specially potentiated in membranes with sterols inducers of phase separation (Chol or Erg) or Cln, a sterol noninducer of phase separation but with a high propensity to induce nonlamellar phase. The role of the Ld phase is pointed out as the most suitable platform for pore formation. In this regard, such regions in Chol-containing membranes seem to be the most favored due to its increased fluidity; this property promotes toxin insertion, diffusion, and oligomerization leading to pore formation.

  12. Anthrax toxin receptor 2 determinants that dictate the pH threshold of toxin pore formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M Scobie

    Full Text Available The anthrax toxin receptors, ANTXR1 and ANTXR2, act as molecular clamps to prevent the protective antigen (PA toxin subunit from forming pores until exposure to low pH. PA forms pores at pH approximately 6.0 or below when it is bound to ANTXR1, but only at pH approximately 5.0 or below when it is bound to ANTXR2. Here, structure-based mutagenesis was used to identify non-conserved ANTXR2 residues responsible for this striking 1.0 pH unit difference in pH threshold. Residues conserved between ANTXR2 and ANTXR1 that influence the ANTXR2-associated pH threshold of pore formation were also identified. All of these residues contact either PA domain 2 or the neighboring edge of PA domain 4. These results provide genetic evidence for receptor release of these regions of PA as being necessary for the protein rearrangements that accompany anthrax toxin pore formation.

  13. Conformational changes during pore formation by the perforin-related protein pleurotolysin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Lukoyanova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Membrane attack complex/perforin-like (MACPF proteins comprise the largest superfamily of pore-forming proteins, playing crucial roles in immunity and pathogenesis. Soluble monomers assemble into large transmembrane pores via conformational transitions that remain to be structurally and mechanistically characterised. Here we present an 11 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM structure of the two-part, fungal toxin Pleurotolysin (Ply, together with crystal structures of both components (the lipid binding PlyA protein and the pore-forming MACPF component PlyB. These data reveal a 13-fold pore 80 Å in diameter and 100 Å in height, with each subunit comprised of a PlyB molecule atop a membrane bound dimer of PlyA. The resolution of the EM map, together with biophysical and computational experiments, allowed confident assignment of subdomains in a MACPF pore assembly. The major conformational changes in PlyB are a ∼70° opening of the bent and distorted central β-sheet of the MACPF domain, accompanied by extrusion and refolding of two α-helical regions into transmembrane β-hairpins (TMH1 and TMH2. We determined the structures of three different disulphide bond-trapped prepore intermediates. Analysis of these data by molecular modelling and flexible fitting allows us to generate a potential trajectory of β-sheet unbending. The results suggest that MACPF conformational change is triggered through disruption of the interface between a conserved helix-turn-helix motif and the top of TMH2. Following their release we propose that the transmembrane regions assemble into β-hairpins via top down zippering of backbone hydrogen bonds to form the membrane-inserted β-barrel. The intermediate structures of the MACPF domain during refolding into the β-barrel pore establish a structural paradigm for the transition from soluble monomer to pore, which may be conserved across the whole superfamily. The TMH2 region is critical for the release of

  14. Conformational changes during pore formation by the perforin-related protein pleurotolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoyanova, Natalya; Kondos, Stephanie C; Farabella, Irene; Law, Ruby H P; Reboul, Cyril F; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T; Spicer, Bradley A; Kleifeld, Oded; Traore, Daouda A K; Ekkel, Susan M; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Trapani, Joseph A; Hatfaludi, Tamas; Oliver, Katherine; Hotze, Eileen M; Tweten, Rodney K; Whisstock, James C; Topf, Maya; Saibil, Helen R; Dunstone, Michelle A

    2015-02-01

    Membrane attack complex/perforin-like (MACPF) proteins comprise the largest superfamily of pore-forming proteins, playing crucial roles in immunity and pathogenesis. Soluble monomers assemble into large transmembrane pores via conformational transitions that remain to be structurally and mechanistically characterised. Here we present an 11 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the two-part, fungal toxin Pleurotolysin (Ply), together with crystal structures of both components (the lipid binding PlyA protein and the pore-forming MACPF component PlyB). These data reveal a 13-fold pore 80 Å in diameter and 100 Å in height, with each subunit comprised of a PlyB molecule atop a membrane bound dimer of PlyA. The resolution of the EM map, together with biophysical and computational experiments, allowed confident assignment of subdomains in a MACPF pore assembly. The major conformational changes in PlyB are a ∼70° opening of the bent and distorted central β-sheet of the MACPF domain, accompanied by extrusion and refolding of two α-helical regions into transmembrane β-hairpins (TMH1 and TMH2). We determined the structures of three different disulphide bond-trapped prepore intermediates. Analysis of these data by molecular modelling and flexible fitting allows us to generate a potential trajectory of β-sheet unbending. The results suggest that MACPF conformational change is triggered through disruption of the interface between a conserved helix-turn-helix motif and the top of TMH2. Following their release we propose that the transmembrane regions assemble into β-hairpins via top down zippering of backbone hydrogen bonds to form the membrane-inserted β-barrel. The intermediate structures of the MACPF domain during refolding into the β-barrel pore establish a structural paradigm for the transition from soluble monomer to pore, which may be conserved across the whole superfamily. The TMH2 region is critical for the release of both TMH clusters

  15. Marine sponge cyclic peptide theonellamide A disrupts lipid bilayer integrity without forming distinct membrane pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espiritu, Rafael Atillo; Cornelio, Kimberly; Kinoshita, Masanao; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Murata, Michio; Nishimura, Shinichi; Kakeya, Hideaki; Yoshida, Minoru; Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2016-06-01

    Theonellamides (TNMs) are antifungal and cytotoxic bicyclic dodecapeptides derived from the marine sponge Theonella sp. These peptides specifically bind to 3β-hydroxysterols, resulting in 1,3-β-D-glucan overproduction and membrane damage in yeasts. The inclusion of cholesterol or ergosterol in phosphatidylcholine membranes significantly enhanced the membrane affinity of theonellamide A (TNM-A) because of its direct interaction with 3β-hydroxyl groups of sterols. To better understand TNM-induced membrane alterations, we investigated the effects of TNM-A on liposome morphology. (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements revealed that the premixing of TNM-A with lipids induced smaller vesicle formation. When giant unilamellar vesicles were incubated with exogenously added TNM-A, confocal micrographs showed dynamic changes in membrane morphology, which were more frequently observed in cholesterol-containing than sterol-free liposomes. In conjunction with our previous data, these results suggest that the membrane action of TNM-A proceeds in two steps: 1) TNM-A binds to the membrane surface through direct interaction with sterols and 2) accumulated TNM-A modifies the local membrane curvature in a concentration-dependent manner, resulting in dramatic membrane morphological changes and membrane disruption.

  16. Lipid Microdomains: Structural Correlations, Fluctuations, and Formation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jun; Sammalkorpi, Maria; Haataja, Mikko

    2010-03-01

    Compositional lipid microdomains (“lipid rafts”) in mammalian plasma membranes are believed to facilitate many important cellular processes. While several physically distinct scenarios predicting the presence of finite-sized microdomains in vivo have been proposed in the past, direct experimental verification or falsification of model predictions has remained elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that the combination of the spatial correlation and temporal fluctuation spectra of the lipid domains can be employed to unambiguously differentiate between the existing theoretical scenarios. Furthermore, the differentiation of the raft formation mechanisms using this methodology can be achieved by collecting data at physiologically relevant conditions without the need to tune control parameters.

  17. Aspirin inhibits formation of cholesterol rafts in fluid lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Richard J; Toppozini, Laura; Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Harroun, Thad A; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-03-01

    Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have a high affinity for phospholipid membranes, altering their structure and biophysical properties. Aspirin has been shown to partition into the lipid head groups, thereby increasing membrane fluidity. Cholesterol is another well known mediator of membrane fluidity, in turn increasing membrane stiffness. As well, cholesterol is believed to distribute unevenly within lipid membranes leading to the formation of lipid rafts or plaques. In many studies, aspirin has increased positive outcomes for patients with high cholesterol. We are interested if these effects may be, at least partially, the result of a non-specific interaction between aspirin and cholesterol in lipid membranes. We have studied the effect of aspirin on the organization of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) membranes containing cholesterol. Through Langmuir-Blodgett experiments we show that aspirin increases the area per lipid and decreases compressibility at 32.5 mol% cholesterol, leading to a significant increase of fluidity of the membranes. Differential scanning calorimetry provides evidence for the formation of meta-stable structures in the presence of aspirin. The molecular organization of lipids, cholesterol and aspirin was studied using neutron diffraction. While the formation of rafts has been reported in binary DPPC/cholesterol membranes, aspirin was found to locally disrupt membrane organization and lead to the frustration of raft formation. Our results suggest that aspirin is able to directly oppose the formation of cholesterol structures through non-specific interactions with lipid membranes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An inverse-source problem for maximization of pore-fluid oscillation within poroelastic formations

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, C.

    2016-07-04

    This paper discusses a mathematical and numerical modeling approach for identification of an unknown optimal loading time signal of a wave source, atop the ground surface, that can maximize the relative wave motion of a single-phase pore fluid within fluid-saturated porous permeable (poroelastic) rock formations, surrounded by non-permeable semi-infinite elastic solid rock formations, in a one-dimensional setting. The motivation stems from a set of field observations, following seismic events and vibrational tests, suggesting that shaking an oil reservoir is likely to improve oil production rates. This maximization problem is cast into an inverse-source problem, seeking an optimal loading signal that minimizes an objective functional – the reciprocal of kinetic energy in terms of relative pore-fluid wave motion within target poroelastic layers. We use the finite element method to obtain the solution of the governing wave physics of a multi-layered system, where the wave equations for the target poroelastic layers and the elastic wave equation for the surrounding non-permeable layers are coupled with each other. We use a partial-differential-equation-constrained-optimization framework (a state-adjoint-control problem approach) to tackle the minimization problem. The numerical results show that the numerical optimizer recovers optimal loading signals, whose dominant frequencies correspond to amplification frequencies, which can also be obtained by a frequency sweep, leading to larger amplitudes of relative pore-fluid wave motion within the target hydrocarbon formation than other signals.

  19. The E1 protein is mandatory for pore formation by Semliki Forest virus spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, M; Barth, B U; Kempf, C

    1996-06-01

    Insect cells (Aedes albopictus, clone C6/36) were infected with various variants of Semliki Forest virus including the wild type using the SFV replicon system. The variants included deletion mutants lacking one of the structural proteins and a mutant with a point mutation in p62 (SQL). The latter mutation results in a failure to process p62 to E2 and E3. After infection of the cells with different variant viruses and subsequent expression of viral proteins in the host cell plasma membrane low pH-induced pore formation was detected by measuring the efflux of a radiolabeled compound. The results of these experiments clearly showed that the E1 protein is mandatory for the acid-induced pore formation. A participation of the 6K or C-protein could be excluded. Furthermore, results obtained with the SQL mutant suggest that dissociation of the E1/E2 heterodimer and subsequent homooligomerization of E1 are required for pore formation.

  20. Onsager's irreversible thermodynamics of the dynamics of transient pores in spherical lipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Balbuena, L; Hernández-Zapata, E; Santamaría-Holek, I

    2015-09-01

    Onsager's irreversible thermodynamics is used to perform a systematic deduction of the kinetic equations governing the opening and collapse of transient pores in spherical vesicles. We show that the edge tension has to be determined from the initial stage of the pore relaxation and that in the final state the vesicle membrane is not completely relaxed, since the surface tension and the pressure difference are about 25% of its initial value. We also show that the pore life-time is controlled by the solution viscosity and its opening is driven by the solution leak-out and the surface tension drop. The final collapse is due to a non-linear interplay between the edge and the surface tensions together with the pressure difference. We also discuss the connection with previous models.

  1. A new model for pore formation by cholesterol-dependent cytolysins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril F Reboul

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol Dependent Cytolysins (CDCs are important bacterial virulence factors that form large (200-300 Å membrane embedded pores in target cells. Currently, insights from X-ray crystallography, biophysical and single particle cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM experiments suggest that soluble monomers first interact with the membrane surface via a C-terminal Immunoglobulin-like domain (Ig; Domain 4. Membrane bound oligomers then assemble into a prepore oligomeric form, following which the prepore assembly collapses towards the membrane surface, with concomitant release and insertion of the membrane spanning subunits. During this rearrangement it is proposed that Domain 2, a region comprising three β-strands that links the pore forming region (Domains 1 and 3 and the Ig domain, must undergo a significant yet currently undetermined, conformational change. Here we address this problem through a systematic molecular modeling and structural bioinformatics approach. Our work shows that simple rigid body rotations may account for the observed collapse of the prepore towards the membrane surface. Support for this idea comes from analysis of published cryo-EM maps of the pneumolysin pore, available crystal structures and molecular dynamics simulations. The latter data in particular reveal that Domains 1, 2 and 4 are able to undergo significant rotational movements with respect to each other. Together, our data provide new and testable insights into the mechanism of pore formation by CDCs.

  2. A new model for pore formation by cholesterol-dependent cytolysins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Cyril F; Whisstock, James C; Dunstone, Michelle A

    2014-08-01

    Cholesterol Dependent Cytolysins (CDCs) are important bacterial virulence factors that form large (200-300 Å) membrane embedded pores in target cells. Currently, insights from X-ray crystallography, biophysical and single particle cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) experiments suggest that soluble monomers first interact with the membrane surface via a C-terminal Immunoglobulin-like domain (Ig; Domain 4). Membrane bound oligomers then assemble into a prepore oligomeric form, following which the prepore assembly collapses towards the membrane surface, with concomitant release and insertion of the membrane spanning subunits. During this rearrangement it is proposed that Domain 2, a region comprising three β-strands that links the pore forming region (Domains 1 and 3) and the Ig domain, must undergo a significant yet currently undetermined, conformational change. Here we address this problem through a systematic molecular modeling and structural bioinformatics approach. Our work shows that simple rigid body rotations may account for the observed collapse of the prepore towards the membrane surface. Support for this idea comes from analysis of published cryo-EM maps of the pneumolysin pore, available crystal structures and molecular dynamics simulations. The latter data in particular reveal that Domains 1, 2 and 4 are able to undergo significant rotational movements with respect to each other. Together, our data provide new and testable insights into the mechanism of pore formation by CDCs.

  3. Suilysin-induced Platelet-Neutrophil Complexes Formation is Triggered by Pore Formation-dependent Calcium Influx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengwei; Zheng, Yuling; Chen, Shaolong; Huang, Shujing; Liu, Keke; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Yongqiang; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation and platelet–neutrophil interactions have been found to be involved in inflammation, organ failure and soft-tissue necrosis in bacterial infections. Streptococcus suis, an emerging human pathogen, can cause streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome (STSS) similarly to Streptococcus pyogenes. Currently, S. suis–platelet interactions are poorly understood. Here, we found that suilysin (SLY), the S. suis cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC), was the sole stimulus of S. suis that induced platelet-neutrophil complexes (PNC) formation. Furthermore, P-selectin released in α-granules mediated PNC formation. This process was triggered by the SLY-induced pore forming-dependent Ca2+ influx. Moreover, we demonstrated that the Ca2+ influx triggered an MLCK-dependent pathway playing critical roles in P-selectin activation and PNC formation, however, PLC-β-IP3/DAG-MLCK and Rho-ROCK-MLCK signalling were not involved. Additionally, the “outside-in” signalling had a smaller effect on the SLY-induced P-selectin release and PNC formation. Interestingly, other CDCs including pneumolysin and streptolysin O have also been found to induce PNC formation in a pore forming-dependent Ca2+ influx manner. It is possible that the bacterial CDC-mediated PNC formation is a similar response mechanism used by a wide range of bacteria. These findings may provide useful insight for discovering potential therapeutic targets for S. suis-associated STSS. PMID:27830834

  4. Micelle and bilayer formation of amphiphilic janus particles in a slit-pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Gerald; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2012-01-01

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the self-assembly of amphiphilic Janus particles in a slit-pore consisting of two plane-parallel, soft walls. The Janus particles are modeled as soft spheres with an embedded unit vector pointing from the hydrophobic to the hydrophilic hemisphere. The structure formation is analyzed via cluster size distributions, density and polarization profiles, and in-plane correlation functions. At low temperatures and densities, the dominating structures are spherical micelles, whereas at higher densities we also observe wall-induced bilayer formation. Finally, we compare the MD results with those from a previous density functional study.

  5. Micelle and Bilayer Formation of Amphiphilic Janus Particles in a Slit-Pore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine H. L. Klapp

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We employ molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the self-assembly of amphiphilic Janus particles in a slit-pore consisting of two plane-parallel, soft walls. The Janus particles are modeled as soft spheres with an embedded unit vector pointing from the hydrophobic to the hydrophilic hemisphere. The structure formation is analyzed via cluster size distributions, density and polarization profiles, and in-plane correlation functions. At low temperatures and densities, the dominating structures are spherical micelles, whereas at higher densities we also observe wall-induced bilayer formation. Finally, we compare the MD results with those from a previous density functional study.

  6. Electrochemical characterization of pore formation by bacterial protein toxins on hybrid supported membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkop, Thomas; Xu, Danke; Cheng, Quan

    2008-05-20

    The interaction of pore-forming streptolysin O (SLO) with biomimetic lipid membranes has been studied by electrochemical methods. Phosphatidylcholine lipid vesicles were deposited onto gold electrodes modified with supporting layers of hexyl thioctate (HT) or thioctic acid tri(ethylene glycol) ester (TA-TEGE), and integrity and permeability of the resulting membranes were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. Both positively and negatively charged electrochemical probes, potassium ferrocyanide, hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride, and ferrocene carboxylic acid (FCA), were employed to evaluate their suitability to probe the membrane permeability properties, with FCA exhibiting ideal behavior and thus employed throughout the work. Fusion of vesicles incubated with SLO on the electrodes yielded membranes that showed a distinctive response pattern for FCA as a function of SLO concentration. A direct dependence of both the currents and peak separation of FCA in the cyclic voltammograms was observed over a concentration range of 0-10 hemolytic units (HU)/microL of the toxin. The interaction of SLO with preformed supported lipid membranes was also investigated, and much lower response was observed, suggesting a different extent of membrane-toxin interactions on such an interface. Nonionic surfactant Triton was found to disrupt the vesicle structure but could not completely remove a preformed membrane to fully restore the electrode response. The information reported here offers some unique insight into toxin-surface interactions on a hybrid membrane, facilitating the development of electrochemically based sensing platforms for detecting trace amounts of bacterial toxins via the perforation process.

  7. Enhanced membrane pore formation through high-affinity targeted antimicrobial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Arnusch

    Full Text Available Many cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs target the unique lipid composition of the prokaryotic cell membrane. However, the micromolar activities common for these peptides are considered weak in comparison to nisin, which follows a targeted, pore-forming mode of action. Here we show that AMPs can be modified with a high-affinity targeting module, which enables membrane permeabilization at low concentration. Magainin 2 and a truncated peptide analog were conjugated to vancomycin using click chemistry, and could be directed towards specific membrane embedded receptors both in model membrane systems and whole cells. Compared with untargeted vesicles, a gain in permeabilization efficacy of two orders of magnitude was reached with large unilamellar vesicles that included lipid II, the target of vancomycin. The truncated vancomycin-peptide conjugate showed an increased activity against vancomycin resistant Enterococci, whereas the full-length conjugate was more active against a targeted eukaryotic cell model: lipid II containing erythrocytes. This study highlights that AMPs can be made more selective and more potent against biological membranes that contain structures that can be targeted.

  8. Study of Diagenesis and Pore Evolution of Triassic Jialingjiang Formation in Southern Puguang Gasfield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The second member of Jialingjiang formation is considered to be an important gas reservoir with good exploration prospects in the southern Puguang gasfield. The diagenesis types are analyzed and different diagenetic stages are divided by analyzing carbon and oxygen isotopes as well as observing the slices. The widespread forms of diagenesis in the research area principally include compaction, cementation, pressure solution, dolomitization, recrystallization, dissolution, and tectonic disruption, among which cementation, dissolution, dolomitization, and recrystallization contribute greatly to the development of porosity in the reservoir. The reservoir has experienced four diagenetic stages: syndiagenetic stage, early stage of diagenesis, diagenetic stage, and late diagenetic stage. Most of the primary pores were destroyed in the diagenetic evolution stages of reservoir; the present porosity mainly belongs to the secondary pores.

  9. Cryo-EM structure of aerolysin variants reveals a novel protein fold and the pore-formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovache, Ioan; de Carlo, Sacha; Cirauqui, Nuria; Dal Peraro, Matteo; van der Goot, F. Gisou; Zuber, Benoît

    2016-07-01

    Owing to their pathogenical role and unique ability to exist both as soluble proteins and transmembrane complexes, pore-forming toxins (PFTs) have been a focus of microbiologists and structural biologists for decades. PFTs are generally secreted as water-soluble monomers and subsequently bind the membrane of target cells. Then, they assemble into circular oligomers, which undergo conformational changes that allow membrane insertion leading to pore formation and potentially cell death. Aerolysin, produced by the human pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, is the founding member of a major PFT family found throughout all kingdoms of life. We report cryo-electron microscopy structures of three conformational intermediates and of the final aerolysin pore, jointly providing insight into the conformational changes that allow pore formation. Moreover, the structures reveal a protein fold consisting of two concentric β-barrels, tightly kept together by hydrophobic interactions. This fold suggests a basis for the prion-like ultrastability of aerolysin pore and its stoichiometry.

  10. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jian; Ping, Ling-Yan; Duong, Duc M; Gao, Xiao-Yan; He, Chun-Yan; Wei, Lei; Wu, Jun-Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Oxidized low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell‑mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native‑LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl‑β‑cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL‑stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label‑free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native‑LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native‑LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation.

  11. Change in membrane permeability induced by protegrin 1: implication of disulphide bridges for pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangoni, M E; Aumelas, A; Charnet, P; Roumestand, C; Chiche, L; Despaux, E; Grassy, G; Calas, B; Chavanieu, A

    1996-03-25

    Protegrin 1 (PG-1) is a naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial peptide that is 18 residues long, has an aminated carboxy terminus and contains two disulphide bridges. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial activity of PG-1 and three linear analogues. Then, the membrane permeabilisation induced by these peptides was studied upon Xenopus laevis oocytes by electrophysiological methods. From the results obtained, we concluded that protegrin is able to form anion channels. Moreover, it seems clear that the presence of disulphide bridges is a prerequisite for the pore formation at the membrane level and not for the antimicrobial activity.

  12. Spontaneous Formation of Lipid Nanotubes and Lipid Nanofibers from Giant Charged Dendrimer Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidovska, Alexandra; Ewert, Kai K.; Safinya, Cyrus R.; Quispe, Joel; Carragher, Bridgett; Potter, Clinton S.

    2007-03-01

    Liposomes have attracted much scientific interest due to their applications in model cells studies and in drug encapsulation. We report on the discovery of new vesicle phases formed in mixtures of MVLBG2, DOPC and water. MVLBG2 is a newly synthesized highly charged (16+) lipid (K. Ewert et al., JACS, 2006) with giant dendrimer headgroup thus leading to a high spontaneous curvature of the molecule. In combination with zero-curvature DOPC, MVLBG2 exhibits a rich phase diagram showing novel vesicle morphologies such as bones, lipid nanotubes and nanofibers as revealed by differential contrast microscopy (DIC) and cryo-TEM. At the micron scale DIC reveals a new phase consisting of bone-like vesicles. This novel morphology persists down to the nanometer scale as shown by cryo-TEM. The nanotubes are of diameter 10-50 nm, length > 1μm and consist of a single lipid bilayer. A surprising new morphology arises resulting from a spontaneous topological transition from tubes to lipid nanorods. Funded by DOE DE-FG-02-06ER46314, NIH GM-59288, NSF DMR-0503347.

  13. Formation factor in Bentheimer and Fontainebleau sandstones: Theory compared with pore-scale numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Berg, Carl F.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate quantification of formation resistivity factor F (also called formation factor) provides useful insight into connectivity and pore space topology in fully saturated porous media. In particular the formation factor has been extensively used to estimate permeability in reservoir rocks. One of the widely applied models to estimate F is Archie's law (F = ϕ- m in which ϕ is total porosity and m is cementation exponent) that is known to be valid in rocks with negligible clay content, such as clean sandstones. In this study we compare formation factors determined by percolation and effective-medium theories as well as Archie's law with numerical simulations of electrical resistivity on digital rock models. These digital models represent Bentheimer and Fontainebleau sandstones and are derived either by reconstruction or directly from micro-tomographic images. Results show that the universal quadratic power law from percolation theory accurately estimates the calculated formation factor values in network models over the entire range of porosity. However, it crosses over to the linear scaling from the effective-medium approximation at the porosity of 0.75 in grid models. We also show that the effect of critical porosity, disregarded in Archie's law, is nontrivial, and the Archie model inaccurately estimates the formation factor in low-porosity homogeneous sandstones.

  14. The second transmembrane domain of P2X7 contributes to dilated pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chengqun; Heid, Michelle E; Keyel, Peter A; Salter, Russell D

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the purinergic receptor P2X7 leads to the cellular permeability of low molecular weight cations. To determine which domains of P2X7 are necessary for this permeability, we exchanged either the C-terminus or portions of the second transmembrane domain (TM2) with those in P2X1 or P2X4. Replacement of the C-terminus of P2X7 with either P2X1 or P2X4 prevented surface expression of the chimeric receptor. Similarly, chimeric P2X7 containing TM2 from P2X1 or P2X4 had reduced surface expression and no permeability to cationic dyes. Exchanging the N-terminal 10 residues or C-terminal 14 residues of the P2X7 TM2 with the corresponding region of P2X1 TM2 partially restored surface expression and limited pore permeability. To further probe TM2 structure, we replaced single residues in P2X7 TM2 with those in P2X1 or P2X4. We identified multiple substitutions that drastically changed pore permeability without altering surface expression. Three substitutions (Q332P, Y336T, and Y343L) individually reduced pore formation as indicated by decreased dye uptake and also reduced membrane blebbing in response to ATP exposure. Three others substitutions, V335T, S342G, and S342A each enhanced dye uptake, membrane blebbing and cell death. Our results demonstrate a critical role for the TM2 domain of P2X7 in receptor function, and provide a structural basis for differences between purinergic receptors.

  15. The second transmembrane domain of P2X7 contributes to dilated pore formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengqun Sun

    Full Text Available Activation of the purinergic receptor P2X7 leads to the cellular permeability of low molecular weight cations. To determine which domains of P2X7 are necessary for this permeability, we exchanged either the C-terminus or portions of the second transmembrane domain (TM2 with those in P2X1 or P2X4. Replacement of the C-terminus of P2X7 with either P2X1 or P2X4 prevented surface expression of the chimeric receptor. Similarly, chimeric P2X7 containing TM2 from P2X1 or P2X4 had reduced surface expression and no permeability to cationic dyes. Exchanging the N-terminal 10 residues or C-terminal 14 residues of the P2X7 TM2 with the corresponding region of P2X1 TM2 partially restored surface expression and limited pore permeability. To further probe TM2 structure, we replaced single residues in P2X7 TM2 with those in P2X1 or P2X4. We identified multiple substitutions that drastically changed pore permeability without altering surface expression. Three substitutions (Q332P, Y336T, and Y343L individually reduced pore formation as indicated by decreased dye uptake and also reduced membrane blebbing in response to ATP exposure. Three others substitutions, V335T, S342G, and S342A each enhanced dye uptake, membrane blebbing and cell death. Our results demonstrate a critical role for the TM2 domain of P2X7 in receptor function, and provide a structural basis for differences between purinergic receptors.

  16. Solid-Supported Lipid Membranes: Formation, Stability and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Haw Zan

    This thesis presents a comprehensive investigation of the formation of supported lipid membranes with vesicle hemifusion, their stability under detergents and organic solvents and their applications in molecular biology. In Chapter 3, we describe how isolated patches of DOPC bilayers supported on glass surfaces are dissolved by various detergents (decyl maltoside, dodecyl maltoside, CHAPS, CTAB, SDS, TritonX-100 and Tween20) at their CMC, as investigated by fluorescence video microscopy. In general, detergents partition into distal leaflets of bilayers and lead to the expansion of the bilayers through a rolling motion of the distal over the proximal leaflets, in agreement with the first stage of the established 3-stage model of lipid vesicle solubilization by detergents. Subsequently, we study the partitioning of organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, propanol, acetone and chloroform) into isolated bilayer patches on glass in Chapter 4 with fluorescence microscopy. The area expansion of bilayers due to the partitioning of organic solvents is measured. From the titration of organic solvents, we measured the rate of area expansion as a function of the volume fraction of organic solvents, which is proposed to be a measure of strength of interactions between solvents and membranes. From the same experiments, we also measure the maximum expansion of bilayers (or the maximum binding stoichiometry between organic solvents and lipids) before structural breakdown, which depends on the depth of penetration of solvents to the membranes. In Chapter 5, we investigate the formation of sparsely-tethered bilayer lipid membranes (stBLMs) with vesicle hemifusion. In vesicle hemifusion, lipid vesicles in contact with a hydrophobic alkyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) deposit a lipid monolayer to the SAM surface, thus completing the bilayer. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy and Neutron Reflectivity are used to probe the integrity of stBLMs in terms of their

  17. Stable silicon isotope signatures of marine pore waters - Biogenic opal dissolution versus authigenic clay mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Claudia; Doering, Kristin; Wallmann, Klaus; Scholz, Florian; Sommer, Stefan; Grasse, Patricia; Geilert, Sonja; Frank, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved silicon isotope compositions have been analysed for the first time in pore waters (δ30SiPW) of three short sediment cores from the Peruvian margin upwelling region with distinctly different biogenic opal content in order to investigate silicon isotope fractionation behaviour during early diagenetic turnover of biogenic opal in marine sediments. The δ30SiPW varies between +1.1‰ and +1.9‰ with the highest values occurring in the uppermost part close to the sediment-water interface. These values are of the same order or higher than the δ30Si of the biogenic opal extracted from the same sediments (+0.3‰ to +1.2‰) and of the overlying bottom waters (+1.1‰ to +1.5‰). Together with dissolved silicic acid concentrations well below biogenic opal saturation, our collective observations are consistent with the formation of authigenic alumino-silicates from the dissolving biogenic opal. Using a numerical transport-reaction model we find that approximately 24% of the dissolving biogenic opal is re-precipitated in the sediments in the form of these authigenic phases at a relatively low precipitation rate of 56 μmol Si cm-2 yr-1. The fractionation factor between the precipitates and the pore waters is estimated at -2.0‰. Dissolved and solid cation concentrations further indicate that off Peru, where biogenic opal concentrations in the sediments are high, the availability of reactive terrigenous material is the limiting factor for the formation of authigenic alumino-silicate phases.

  18. Hydrostatic Pressure Promotes Domain Formation in Model Lipid Raft Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, David L; Weinrich, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements demonstrate that hydrostatic pressure promotes liquid-ordered (Lo) domain formation in lipid membranes prepared as both oriented multilayers and unilamellar vesicles made of a canonical ternary lipid mixture for which demixing transitions have been extensively studied. The results demonstrate an unusually large dependence of the mixing transition on hydrostatic pressure. Additionally, data at 28 °C show that the magnitude of increase in Lo caused by 10 MPa pressure is much the same as the decrease in Lo produced by twice minimum alveolar concentrations (MAC) of general anesthetics such as halothane, nitrous oxide, and xenon. Therefore, the results may provide a plausible explanation for the reversal of general anesthesia by hydrostatic pressure.

  19. Effect of Oxide Level on Pore Formation in A356 Alloy by X-Ray Imaging and Directional Solidification Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hengcheng; Song, Wan; Wang, Qigui; Zhao, Lei; Fan, Ran

    Effect of oxide level on porosity formation in an A356 alloy was investigated using micro-focus X-ray imaging and directional solidification technology. The increase of oxide level in liquid aluminum was achieved by violently stirring molten metal at elevated temperature. During solidification, the increased oxide content in melt significantly increases the amount of active nucleation sites for porosity and thus raises the nucleation temperature of pores. The fast growth of those early formed pores further restrains the succeeding nucleation operations of new pores in local regions and results in a considerable reduction in pore density. It was also found that the melt with high oxide content shows less dependency of growth rate reduction with local temperature.

  20. Visualization of Lipid Membrane Reorganization Induced by a Pore-Forming Toxin Using High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Neval; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2015-08-25

    We examined the effect of a sphingomyelin (SM)-binding pore-forming toxin (PFT), lysenin, on the dynamics of a phase-separated membrane of SM, where SM formed liquid-ordered (Lo) domains with cholesterol (Chol) within a phosphatidylcholine-rich liquid-disordered (Ld) phase. We visualized the lysenin-induced membrane reorganization using high-speed atomic force microscope (HS-AFM). Lysenin oligomerized on the SM-rich Lo domain and simultaneously its oligomers assembled into a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure. The phase boundary was stable during the assembling of lysenin on the SM-rich domain, indicating that lysenin did not affect the line tension between Lo and Ld phases. After the full coverage of the SM-rich domain by oligomers, their hcp assembly gradually expanded into the Ld phase and eventually covered the entire membrane. Our results suggest that pore formation, i.e., insertion of lysenin into the membrane in its oligomeric state, induced the exclusion of SM and Chol from the SM-rich domain, which was followed by further binding and oligomerization of lysenin.

  1. Optical study of the ultrasonic formation process of noble metal nanoparticles dispersed inside the pores of monolithic mesoporous silica

    CERN Document Server

    Fu Gan Hua; Kan Cai Xia; Li Cun Cheng; Fang Qi

    2003-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles dispersed inside the pores of monolithic mesoporous silica were prepared by soaking the silica in a gold (III) ion solution and subsequent ultrasound irradiation. The formation process of gold nanoparticles in the pores of mesoporous silica was investigated based on optical measurements of wrapped and naked soaked silica after ultrasonic irradiation, and the reduction rate effect in solution and pre-soaking effect. It has been shown that acoustic cavitation cannot occur in nano-sized pores. The gold nanoparticles in silica are not formed in situ within the pores but produced mainly by diffusion of the gold clusters formed in the solution during irradiation into the pores. The radicals formed in solution are exhausted before entering the pores of silica. There exists a critical reduction rate in solution, at which the yield of gold nanoparticles in silica reaches a maximum, and above which there is a decrease in the yield. This is attributed to too quick a growth or aggregation of gold clust...

  2. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies of lipid domain formation in normal and ceramide deficient stratum corneum lipid models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorcea, Mihaela; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Moore, David J; Lane, Majella E

    2012-10-01

    The current work describes thermotropic and kinetic Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of lipid dynamics and domain formation in normal and ceramide (CER) deficient lipid samples designed as simple models of the stratum corneum (SC). For the first time, this work focuses on the time dependence of lipid reorganization and domain formation in CER deficient models. By utilizing deuterated fatty acid (FA) and simultaneously monitoring the methylene vibrational modes of both CER and FA chains these experiments follow the time evolution of lipid organization in these SC lipid models following an external stress. Kinetic and thermotropic experiments demonstrate differences in both CER and FA chain fluidity and ordered domain formation with decreased levels of CER. In the CER deficient model, the formation of CER orthorhombic domains is retarded compared to the normal model. Furthermore, there is little evidence of hexongally packed (or mixed) FA domains in the CER deficient model compared to the models of normal SC. These data demonstrate that barrier lipid organization, in terms of ceramide domain formation, is altered in the ceramide deficient model. This work highlights the successful development of an experimental methodology to study time dependent changes in lipid biophysics in simple SC model membranes and suggests this approach will prove useful for understanding some of the biophysical changes that underlie impaired physiological barrier function in diseased skin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of a key residue for oligomerisation and pore-formation of Clostridium perfringens NetB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P; Savva, Christos G; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Naylor, Claire E; Moss, David S; Basak, Ajit K; Titball, Richard W

    2014-03-12

    Necrotic enteritis toxin B (NetB) is a β-pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens and has been identified as a key virulence factor in the pathogenesis of avian necrotic enteritis, a disease causing significant economic damage to the poultry industry worldwide. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was used to identify amino acids that play a role in NetB oligomerisation and pore-formation. NetB K41H showed significantly reduced toxicity towards LMH cells and human red blood cells relative to wild type toxin. NetB K41H was unable to oligomerise and form pores in liposomes. These findings suggest that NetB K41H could be developed as a genetic toxoid vaccine to protect against necrotic enteritis.

  4. Exploring Pore Formation of Atomic Layer Deposited Overlayers by In Situ Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tao; Karwal, Saurabh; Aoun, Bachir; Zhao, Haiyan; Ren, Yang; Canlas, Christian; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Winans, Randall E.

    2016-10-11

    In this work, we explore the pore structure of overcoated materials by in situ synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)/(WAXS). Thin films of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) with thicknesses of 4.9 and 2.5 nm, respectively, are prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on non-porous nanoparticles. In situ X-ray measurements reveal that porosity is induced in the ALD films by annealing the samples at high temperature. Moreover, this pore formation can be attributed to densification resulting from an amorphous to crystalline phase transition of the ALD films as confirmed by high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) and pair distribution function (PDF). Simultaneous SAXS/WAXS results not only show that the porosity is formed by this phase transition but also that the pore size increases with temperature.

  5. Formation of silica nanotubes with spring-like pore channels in the walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yuanli; Li Yi; Zhuang Wei; Li Jie; Wang Sibing; Li Baozong [Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Renai Road 199, Suzhou 215123 (China); Yang Yonggang, E-mail: ygyang@suda.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Renai Road 199, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} A single-templating approach was developed. {yields} Silica nanotubes with spring-like pore channels in the walls were prepared. {yields} A cooperation mechanism was revealed. Nanoworms with concentric circular pore channels were prepared. {yields} Nanoflakes with vertical pore channels were prepared. - Abstract: A chiral low-molecular-weight amphiphile, L-16Val6PyBr, was synthesized from L-valine, which can cause physical gels in water, benzene and nitrobenzene. Silica nanotubes with spring-like pore channels in the walls were prepared using the self-assemblies of it as templates via a single-templating approach. The morphologies and pore architectures of the silica nanotubes were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and N{sub 2} sorptions. The TEM images taken after different reaction times indicated a cooperation mechanism. Moreover, nanoworms with concentric circular pore channels and nanoflakes with vertical pore channels were prepared by changing the concentration of the catalyst.

  6. Structure and mechanism of peptide-induced membrane pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shuo

    This thesis reports the studies of the structure and mechanism of peptide-induced membrane pores by antimicrobial peptide alamethicin and by a peptide named Baxalpha5, which is derived from Bax protein. Alamethicin is one of best known antimicrobial peptides, which are ubiquitous throughout the biological world. Bax-alpha5 peptide is the pore-forming domain of apoptosis regulator protein Bax, which activates pore formation on outer mitochondrial membrane to release cytochrome c to initiate programmed cell death. Both peptides as well as many other pore-forming peptides, induce pores in membrane, however the structure and mechanism of the pore formation were unknown. By utilizing grazing angle x-ray diffraction, I was able to reconstruct the electron density profile of the membrane pores induced by both peptides. The fully hydrated multiple bilayers of peptide-lipid mixture on solid substrate were prepared in the condition that pores were present, as established previously by neutron in-plane scattering and oriented circular dichroism. At dehydrated conditions, the inter bilayer distance of the sample shortened and the interactions between bilayers caused the membrane pores to become long-ranged correlated and formed a periodically ordered lattice of rhombohedral symmetry, so that x-ray diffraction can be applied. To help solving the phase problem of diffraction, a brominated lipid was used and multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction was performed below the bromine K-edge. The reconstructed electron density profiles unambiguously revealed that the alamethicin-induced membrane pore is of barrel-stave type, while the Bax-alpha5 induced pore is of lipidic toroidal (wormhole) type. The underlying mechanism of pore formation was resolved by observing the time-dependent process of pore formation in vesicles exposed to Bax-alpha5 solutions, as well as the membrane thinning experiment. This demonstrated that Bax-alpha5 exhibited the same sigmoidal concentration dependence as

  7. Perilipin1 promotes unilocular lipid droplet formation through the activation of Fsp27 in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiqi; Gong, Jingyi; Wu, Han; Xu, Wenyi; Wu, Lizhen; Xu, Dijin; Gao, Jinlan; Wu, Jia-Wei; Yang, Hongyuan; Yang, Maojun; Li, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Mature white adipocytes contain a characteristic unilocular lipid droplet. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying unilocular lipid droplet formation are poorly understood. We previously showed that Fsp27, an adipocyte-specific lipid droplet-associated protein, promotes lipid droplet growth by initiating lipid exchange and transfer. Here, we identify Perilipin1 (Plin1), another adipocyte-specific lipid droplet-associated protein, as an Fsp27 activator. Plin1 interacts with the CIDE-N domain of Fsp27 and markedly increases Fsp27-mediated lipid exchange, lipid transfer and lipid droplet growth. Functional cooperation between Plin1 and Fsp27 is required for efficient lipid droplet growth in adipocytes, as depletion of either protein impairs lipid droplet growth. The CIDE-N domain of Fsp27 forms homodimers and disruption of CIDE-N homodimerization abolishes Fsp27-mediated lipid exchange and transfer. Interestingly, Plin1 can restore the activity of CIDE-N homodimerization-defective mutants of Fsp27. We thus uncover a novel mechanism underlying lipid droplet growth and unilocular lipid droplet formation that involves the cooperative action of Fsp27 and Plin1 in adipocytes.

  8. Influence of nickel-phosphorus surface roughness on wettability and pores formation in solder joints for high power electronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivet, L.; Joudrier, A.-L.; Tan, K.-L.; Morelle, J.-M.; Etcheberry, A.; Chalumeau, L.

    2013-12-01

    Electroless nickel-high-phosphorus Ni-P plating is used as substrate coating in the electronic component technology. The ability to minimize pores formation in solder joints and the wettability of the Ni-P layer remain points of investigation. The qualities and the control of the physical and chemical properties of the deposits are essential for the reliability of the products. In this contribution it has been measured how a controlled change of one property of the Ni-P surface, its average roughness, changes the wettability of this surface before soldering completion, at ambient temperature and under ambient air, and how it contribute to change the amount and size of pores inside solder joints, after soldering completion. Before all, observations of the Ni-P surfaces using scanning electron microscopy have been achieved. Then the wettability has been measured through the determination of both the disperse and the polar fractions of the substrate surface tension, based on the measurements of the wetting angle for droplets of four different liquids, under ambient air and at room temperature (classical sessile drop technique). Finally the X-ray micro-radiography measurements of both the area fraction of pores and the size of the largest pore inside the solder joint of dice laser soldered on the studied substrate, using high melting temperature solder (300 °C, PbSnAg) have been achieved. This study clearly demonstrates that both the ability to minimize pores formation in solder joints and the wettability under ambient conditions of the Ni-P substrate decrease and become more variable when its average roughness increases. These effects can be explained considering the Cassie-Baxter model for rough surface wetting behaviour, completed by the model of heterogeneous nucleation and growth for gas bubbles inside a liquid.

  9. Influence of nickel–phosphorus surface roughness on wettability and pores formation in solder joints for high power electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivet, L., E-mail: laurent.vivet@valeo.com [Valeo, Group Electronic Expertise and Development Services, 2 rue André Boulle, 94046 Créteil (France); Joudrier, A.-L. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR CNRS 8180, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Tan, K.-L.; Morelle, J.-M. [Valeo, Group Electronic Expertise and Development Services, 2 rue André Boulle, 94046 Créteil (France); Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR CNRS 8180, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Chalumeau, L. [Egide, Site industriel du Sactar, 85500 Bollène (France)

    2013-12-15

    Electroless nickel-high-phosphorus Ni–P plating is used as substrate coating in the electronic component technology. The ability to minimize pores formation in solder joints and the wettability of the Ni–P layer remain points of investigation. The qualities and the control of the physical and chemical properties of the deposits are essential for the reliability of the products. In this contribution it has been measured how a controlled change of one property of the Ni–P surface, its average roughness, changes the wettability of this surface before soldering completion, at ambient temperature and under ambient air, and how it contribute to change the amount and size of pores inside solder joints, after soldering completion. Before all, observations of the Ni–P surfaces using scanning electron microscopy have been achieved. Then the wettability has been measured through the determination of both the disperse and the polar fractions of the substrate surface tension, based on the measurements of the wetting angle for droplets of four different liquids, under ambient air and at room temperature (classical sessile drop technique). Finally the X-ray micro-radiography measurements of both the area fraction of pores and the size of the largest pore inside the solder joint of dice laser soldered on the studied substrate, using high melting temperature solder (300 °C, PbSnAg) have been achieved. This study clearly demonstrates that both the ability to minimize pores formation in solder joints and the wettability under ambient conditions of the Ni–P substrate decrease and become more variable when its average roughness increases. These effects can be explained considering the Cassie–Baxter model for rough surface wetting behaviour, completed by the model of heterogeneous nucleation and growth for gas bubbles inside a liquid.

  10. Anomalous or regular capacitance? The influence of pore size dispersity on double-layer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäckel, N.; Rodner, M.; Schreiber, A.; Jeongwook, J.; Zeiger, M.; Aslan, M.; Weingarth, D.; Presser, V.

    2016-09-01

    The energy storage mechanism of electric double-layer capacitors is governed by ion electrosorption at the electrode surface. This process requires high surface area electrodes, typically highly porous carbons. In common organic electrolytes, bare ion sizes are below one nanometer but they are larger when we consider their solvation shell. In contrast, ionic liquid electrolytes are free of solvent molecules, but cation-anion coordination requires special consideration. By matching pore size and ion size, two seemingly conflicting views have emerged: either an increase in specific capacitance with smaller pore size or a constant capacitance contribution of all micro- and mesopores. In our work, we revisit this issue by using a comprehensive set of electrochemical data and a pore size incremental analysis to identify the influence of certain ranges in the pore size distribution to the ion electrosorption capacity. We see a difference in solvation of ions in organic electrolytes depending on the applied voltage and a cation-anion interaction of ionic liquids in nanometer sized pores.

  11. Formation and Optical Absorption of Photo-reduced Gold Nanoparticles Inside Pores of Mesoporous Silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Hua-Zhong; YAO Bao-Dian; ZHANG Li-De; BI Hui-Juan; CAI Wei-Ping; WU Yu-Cheng

    2000-01-01

    Mesoporous silica with gold nanoparticles inside its pores was synthesized by soaking and photo-reduction method. This new material was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller techniques. The results showed that gold nanoparticles were isolated from each other and uniformly dispersed inside the pores of silica, most of which were less than 4 nm in diameter. It was found that in optical absorption spectrum, surface plasma resonance peak of nanosized gold particles assumed a significant redshift (about 55nm) with respect to that predicted by Mie theory. This can be explained in terms of interface interaction (boundary coupling) between gold particles and pore walls of porous silica.

  12. Toward Understanding Pore Formation and Mobility during Controlled Directional Solidification in a Microgravity Environment Investigation (PFMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Anilkumar, A. V.; Luz, Paul; Jeter, Linda; Volz, Martin P.; Spivey, Reggie; Smith, G.

    2003-01-01

    The generation and inclusion of detrimental porosity, e.g., pipes and rattails can occur during controlled directional solidification processing. The origin of these defects is generally attributed to gas evolution and entrapment during solidification of the melt. On Earth, owing to buoyancy, an initiated bubble can rapidly rise through the liquid melt and pop at the surface; this is obviously not ensured in a low gravity or microgravity environment. Clearly, porosity generation and inclusion is detrimental to conducting any meaningful solidification-science studies in microgravity. Thus it is essential that model experiments be conducted in microgravity, to understand the details of the generation and mobility of porosity, so that methods can be found to eliminate it. In hindsight, this is particularly relevant given the results of the previous directional solidification experiments conducted in Space. The current International Space Station (ISS) Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) investigation addresses the central issue of porosity formation and mobility during controlled directional solidification processing in microgravity. The study will be done using a transparent metal-analogue material, succinonitrile (SCN) and succinonitrile-water 'alloys', so that direct observation and recording of pore generation and mobility can be made during the experiments. Succinonitrile is particularly well suited for the proposed investigation because it is transparent, it solidifies in a manner analogous to most metals, it has a convenient melting point, its material properties are well characterized and, it has been successfully used in previous microgravity experiments. The PFMI experiment will be launched on the UF-2, STS-111 flight. Highlighting the porosity development problem in metal alloys during microgravity processing, the poster will describe: (i) the intent of the proposed experiments, (ii) the theoretical rationale behind using SCN as the study material for

  13. Relation between Quick Clay Formation by Salt Leaching and Pore-water Ion Composition

    OpenAIRE

    安部, 宏; ヘ, パニー; 大坪, 政美; 東, 孝寛; 金山, 素平

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have reported that quick clay can be formed artificially by salt-leaching treatment on undisturbed Ariake clay. In the present study, however, artificial salt-leaching on the undisturbed clay taken from a site in Shiroishi-cho of Saga Prefecture failed to produce quick clay. To identify the cause, pore-water chemistry of the clay was assessed and the predominance of divalent cation in pore water was found to be responsible for the poor development of quick clay. Assuming that ...

  14. Quantitative Studies of Antimicrobial Peptide Pore Formation in Large Unilamellar Vesicles by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2013-01-01

    leakage of fluorescent probes of different sizes through transmembrane pores formed by each of the three representative antimicrobial peptides: melittin, magainin 2, and mastoparan X. The experimental results demonstrate that leakage assays based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy offer new...... and detailed insight into the size and cooperative nature of transmembrane pores formed by antimicrobial peptides that is not available from the conventional quenching-based leakage assays....... highly warranted. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is a biophysical technique that can be used to quantify leakage of fluorescent probes of different sizes from large unilamellar vesicle, thereby potentially becoming such a new tool. However, the usage of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy...

  15. Lxr-driven enterocyte lipid droplet formation delays transport of ingested lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Garcia, Lourdes; Schlegel, Amnon

    2014-09-01

    Liver X receptors (Lxrs) are master regulators of cholesterol catabolism, driving the elimination of cholesterol from the periphery to the lumen of the intestine. Development of pharmacological agents to activate Lxrs has been hindered by synthetic Lxr agonists' induction of hepatic lipogenesis and hypertriglyceridemia. Elucidating the function of Lxrs in regulating enterocyte lipid handling might identify novel aspects of lipid metabolism that are pharmacologically amenable. We took a genetic approach centered on the single Lxr gene nr1h3 in zebrafish to study the role of Lxr in enterocyte lipid metabolism. Loss of nr1h3 function causes anticipated gene regulatory changes and cholesterol intolerance, collectively reflecting high evolutionary conservation of zebrafish Lxra function. Intestinal nr1h3 activation delays transport of absorbed neutral lipids, with accumulation of neutral lipids in enterocyte cytoplasmic droplets. This delay in transport of ingested neutral lipids protects animals from hypercholesterolemia and hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet. On a gene regulatory level, Lxra induces expression of acsl3a, which encodes acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 3a, a lipid droplet-anchored protein that directs fatty acyl chains into lipids. Forced overexpression of acls3a in enterocytes delays, in part, the appearance of neutral lipids in the vasculature of zebrafish larvae. Activation of Lxr in the intestine cell-autonomously regulates the rate of delivery of absorbed lipids by inducting a temporary lipid intestinal droplet storage depot.

  16. Mechanism of voltage-gated channel formation in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidelli, Rolando; Becucci, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    Although several molecular models for voltage-gated ion channels in lipid membranes have been proposed, a detailed mechanism accounting for the salient features of experimental data is lacking. A general treatment accounting for peptide dipole orientation in the electric field and their nucleation and growth kinetics with ion channel formation is provided. This is the first treatment that explains all the main features of the experimental current-voltage curves of peptides forming voltage-gated channels available in the literature. It predicts a regime of weakly voltage-dependent conductance, followed by one of strong voltage-dependent conductance at higher voltages. It also predicts values of the parameters expressing the exponential dependence of conductance upon voltage and peptide bulk concentration for both regimes, in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Most importantly, the only two adjustable parameters involved in the kinetics of nucleation and growth of ion channels can be varied over broad ranges without affecting the above predictions to a significant extent. Thus, the fitting of experimental current-voltage curves stems naturally from the treatment and depends only slightly upon the choice of the kinetic parameters.

  17. Counterion-mediated pattern formation in membranes containing anionic lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slochower, David R; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Tourdot, Richard W; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Janmey, Paul A

    2014-06-01

    Most lipid components of cell membranes are either neutral, like cholesterol, or zwitterionic, like phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. Very few lipids, such as sphingosine, are cationic at physiological pH. These generally interact only transiently with the lipid bilayer, and their synthetic analogs are often designed to destabilize the membrane for drug or DNA delivery. However, anionic lipids are common in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell membranes. The net charge per anionic phospholipid ranges from -1 for the most abundant anionic lipids such as phosphatidylserine, to near -7 for phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5 trisphosphate, although the effective charge depends on many environmental factors. Anionic phospholipids and other negatively charged lipids such as lipopolysaccharides are not randomly distributed in the lipid bilayer, but are highly restricted to specific leaflets of the bilayer and to regions near transmembrane proteins or other organized structures within the plane of the membrane. This review highlights some recent evidence that counterions, in the form of monovalent or divalent metal ions, polyamines, or cationic protein domains, have a large influence on the lateral distribution of anionic lipids within the membrane, and that lateral demixing of anionic lipids has effects on membrane curvature and protein function that are important for biological control. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Water Pore Formation in Lipid Bilayer Induced by Shock Waves

    OpenAIRE

    小玉, 哲也

    2006-01-01

    科研費報告書収録論文(課題番号:17300168/研究代表者:小玉哲也/マイクロ気泡と超音波を用いた高効率型分子導入法の開発とがん治療法への応用)730, AIP Conference Proceedings Volume 829

  19. Monte Carlo study of receptor-lipid raft formation on a cell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-Yang, Paul; Srinivas Reddy, A.; Raychaudhuri, Subhadip

    2012-02-01

    Receptors are cell surface molecules that bind with extracellular ligand molecules leading to propagation of downstream signals and cellular activation. Even though ligand binding-induced formation of receptor-lipid rafts has been implicated in such a process, the formation mechanism of such large stable rafts is not understood. We present findings from our Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving (i) receptor interaction with the membrane lipids and (ii) lipid-lipid interactions between raft forming lipids. We have developed a hybrid MC simulation method that combines a probabilistic MC simulation with an explicit free energy-based MC scheme. Some of the lipid-mediated interactions, such as the cholesterol-lipid interactions, are simulated in an implicit way. We examine the effect of varying attractive interactions between raft forming lipids and ligand-bound receptors and show that strong coupling between receptor-receptor and receptor-sphingolipid molecules generate raft formation similar to that observed in recent biological experiments. We study the effect of variation of receptor affinity for ligands (as happens in adaptive immune cells) on raft formation. Such affinity dependence in receptor-lipid raft formation provides insight into important problems in B cell biology.

  20. Pore formation by antimicrobial peptides: structural tendencies in bulk and quasi-2D membrane systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Vernita; Yang, Lihua; Davis, Matthew; Som, A.; Tew, G.; Wong, Gerard

    2007-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are cationic, amphiphilic structures that are key components of innate immunity. A prototypical family of synthetic analogs are the phenylene ethynylene antimicrobial oligomers (AMOs), which have hydrophobic alkyl chains connected to cationic hydrophilic regions. Synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) shows that when AMO is mixed with concentrated model membranes, initially in the form of Small Unilamellar Vesicles, the sample forms the inverted hexagonal phase. This is a 3-dimensional phase characterized by a regular array of size-defined water channels. We demonstrate how this structural tendency is expressed when AMOs interact with dilute model membranes in the form of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs). Using confocal microscopy, we see that applying AMO to the GUVs causes small encapsulated molecules to be released while large molecules are retained, indicating that size-defined pores have been created. Examining the partial release of polydisperse intermediately-sized molecules allows a closer measurement of the pore size, and there are indications that this single-vesicle microscopy will allow elucidation of the kinetics of the pore-forming process.

  1. Characterization of Mas-7-induced pore formation in SK-N-BE(2)C human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, B C; Lee, I S; Chae, H D; Han, S; Kim, K T

    1998-04-30

    Mastoparan, a peptide toxin from wasp venome, mimics receptors by stimulating the GTPase activity of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and the G-protein-coupled phospholipase C (PLC). By using Mas-7, the active analog of mastoparan, we showed that it makes pores in the plasma membrane. Treatment with Mas-7 but not Mas-17, the inactive analog, produced a concentration-dependent rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and facilitated the uptake of ethidium bromide (EtBr) (314 Da) to a sustained level during the stimulation. In addition, Mas-7 triggered the influx of lucifer yellow (457 Da), while it did not induce the influx of fura-2 (831 Da) and Evans blue (961 Da). However, the Mas-7-induced permeability was selectively prevented by the addition of La3+, Ni2+, and Co2+, but not Cd2+. This blocking activity was concentration-dependent. While the stimulatory effect of Mas-7 on PLC activity was dependent on extracellular Ca2+, the pore forming activity of Mas-7 was not effected by removal of extracellular Ca2+. These results, therefore, suggest that the mastoparan's action in pore formation is independent from its action in PLC stimulation and is negatively effected by inorganic cations.

  2. Pardaxin permeabilizes vesicles more efficiently by pore formation than by disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vad, Brian S; Bertelsen, Kresten; Johansen, Charlotte Hau

    2010-01-01

    Pardaxin is a 33-amino-acid neurotoxin from the Red Sea Moses sole Pardachirus marmoratus, whose mode of action shows remarkable sensitivity to lipid chain length and charge, although the effect of pH is unclear. Here we combine optical spectroscopy and dye release experiments with laser scanning...

  3. Requirements for the formation of membrane pores by the reovirus myristoylated micro1N peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lan; Agosto, Melina A; Ivanovic, Tijana; King, David S; Nibert, Max L; Harrison, Stephen C

    2009-07-01

    The outer capsid of the nonenveloped mammalian reovirus contains 200 trimers of the micro1 protein, each complexed with three copies of the protector protein sigma3. Conformational changes in micro1 following the proteolytic removal of sigma3 lead to release of the myristoylated N-terminal cleavage fragment micro1N and ultimately to membrane penetration. The micro1N fragment forms pores in red blood cell (RBC) membranes. In this report, we describe the interaction of recombinant micro1 trimers and synthetic micro1N peptides with both RBCs and liposomes. The micro1 trimer mediates hemolysis and liposome disruption under conditions that promote the micro1 conformational change, and mutations that inhibit micro1 conformational change in the context of intact virus particles also prevent liposome disruption by particle-free micro1 trimer. Autolytic cleavage to form micro1N is required for hemolysis but not for liposome disruption. Pretreatment of RBCs with proteases rescues hemolysis activity, suggesting that micro1N cleavage is not required when steric barriers are removed. Synthetic myristoylated micro1N peptide forms size-selective pores in liposomes, as measured by fluorescence dequenching of labeled dextrans of different sizes. Addition of a C-terminal solubility tag to the peptide does not affect activity, but sequence substitution V13N or L36D reduces liposome disruption. These substitutions are in regions of alternating hydrophobic residues. Their locations, the presence of an N-terminal myristoyl group, and the full activity of a C-terminally extended peptide, along with circular dichroism data that indicate prevalence of beta-strand secondary structure, suggest a model in which micro1N beta-hairpins assemble in the membrane to form a beta-barrel pore.

  4. Lipid oxidation promotes acrylamide formation in fat-rich model systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capuano, E.; Oliviero, T.; Açar, Ö.; Gökmen, V.; Fogliano, V.

    2010-01-01

    Lipid oxidation is one of the major chemical reactions occurring during food processing or storage and may have a strong impact on the final quality of foods. A significant role of carbonyl compounds derived from lipid oxidation in acrylamide formation has been recently proposed. In this work, the

  5. Lipid oxidation promotes acrylamide formation in fat-rich model systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capuano, E.; Oliviero, T.; Açar, Ö.; Gökmen, V.; Fogliano, V.

    2010-01-01

    Lipid oxidation is one of the major chemical reactions occurring during food processing or storage and may have a strong impact on the final quality of foods. A significant role of carbonyl compounds derived from lipid oxidation in acrylamide formation has been recently proposed. In this work, the e

  6. Requirements for the Formation of Membrane Pores by the Reovirus Myristoylated μ1N Peptide▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lan; Agosto, Melina A.; Ivanovic, Tijana; King, David S.; Nibert, Max L.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    The outer capsid of the nonenveloped mammalian reovirus contains 200 trimers of the μ1 protein, each complexed with three copies of the protector protein σ3. Conformational changes in μ1 following the proteolytic removal of σ3 lead to release of the myristoylated N-terminal cleavage fragment μ1N and ultimately to membrane penetration. The μ1N fragment forms pores in red blood cell (RBC) membranes. In this report, we describe the interaction of recombinant μ1 trimers and synthetic μ1N peptides...

  7. Mechanism of pore formation and structural characterization for mesoporous Mg-Al composite oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵芸; 矫庆泽; 段雪

    2002-01-01

    Mg-AI layered double hydroxides (LDH) with different particle sizes were prepared using different aging times at high supersaturation by a new method developed in our laboratory. The key features of this method are a very rapid mixing and nucleation process followed by a separate aging process. By calcination of LDH at 500癈, mesoporous Mg-AI composite oxides with an extremely narrow pore size distribution were produced. The crystal structure of the Mg-AI composite oxides was a multiphasic one consisting of MgO-like crystals and a layered material.

  8. Mechanism of pore formation and structural characterization for mesoporous Mg-Al composite oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Mg-Al layered double hydroxides(LDH) with different particle sizes were prepared using different aging times at high supersaturation by a new method developed in our laboratory. The key features of this method are a very rapid mixing and nucleation process followed by a separate aging process. By calcination of LDH at 500℃, mesoporous Mg-Al composite oxides with an ex-tremely narrow pore size distribution were produced. The crystal structure of the Mg-Al composite oxides was a multiphasic one consisting of MgO-like crystals and a layered material.

  9. The effects of salt, particle and pore size on the process of carbon dioxide hydrate formation: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, Hosein; Ayoub, Muhammad; Bhat, A. H.; Mahmood, Syed Mohammad; Akbari, Saeed; Murshid, Ghulam

    2016-11-01

    Hydration is an alternative method for CO2 capture. In doing so, some researchers use porous media on an experimental scale. This paper tries to gather the researches on the formation of CO2 hydrate in different types of porous media such as silica sand, quartz sand, Toyoura, pumice, and fire hardened red clay. This review has attempted to examine the effects of salt and particle sizes as two major factors on the induction time, water to hydrate conversion, gas uptake (or gas consumption), and the rate of CO2 hydrate formation. By performing a critical assessment of previous research works, it was observed that the figure for the gas uptake (or gas consumption) and water to hydrate conversion in porous media was decreased by increasing the particle size provided that the pore size was constant. Although, salt can play a role in hydrate formation as the thermodynamic inhibitor, the results show that salt can be regarded as the kinetic growth inhibitor and kinetic promoter. Because of the fact that the gas uptake in seawater is lower than pure water at the end of experiment, the salt can act as a kinetic growth inhibitor. However, since gas uptake (after the nucleation period and for a short period) and the initial rate of hydrate formation in saline water were more than that of pure water, salt can play a promoter role in the kinetic reaction, too. Besides these, in the case of pure water and within a certain particle size, the amount of the hydrate formation rate has been seen to be greater in smaller particles (provided that the pore size is constant), however this has not been observed for seawater.

  10. Automobile diesel exhaust particles induce lipid droplet formation in macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Jantzen, Kim; Gouveia, Ana Cecilia Damiao; Skovmand, Astrid; Roursgaard, Martin; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been associated with adverse cardiopulmonary health effects, which may be related to dysregulation of lipid metabolism and formation of macrophage foam cells. In this study, THP-1 derived macrophages were exposed to an automobile generated DEP (A-DEP) for 24h to study lipid droplet formation and possible mechanisms. The results show that A-DEP did not induce cytotoxicity. The production of reactive oxygen species was only significantly increased after exposure for 3h, but not 24h. Intracellular level of reduced glutathione was increased after 24h exposure. These results combined indicate an adaptive response to oxidative stress. Exposure to A-DEP was associated with significantly increased formation of lipid droplets, as well as changes in lysosomal function, assessed as reduced LysoTracker staining. In conclusion, these results indicated that exposure to A-DEP may induce formation of lipid droplets in macrophages in vitro possibly via lysosomal dysfunction.

  11. The influence of capping layers on pore formation in Ge during ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhaldi, H. S.; Tran, Tuan T.; Kremer, F.; Williams, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    Ion induced porosity in Ge has been investigated with and without a cap layer for two ion species, Ge and Sn, with respect to ion fluence and temperature. Results without a cap are consistent with a previous work in terms of an observed ion fluence and temperature dependence of porosity, but with a clear ion species effect where heavier Sn ions induce porosity at lower temperature (and fluence) than Ge. The effect of a cap layer is to suppress porosity for both Sn and Ge at lower temperatures but in different temperatures and fluence regimes. At room temperature, a cap does not suppress porosity and results in a more organised pore structure under conditions where sputtering of the underlying Ge does not occur. Finally, we observed an interesting effect in which a barrier layer of a-Ge that is denuded of pores formed directly below the cap layer. The thickness of this layer (˜ 8 nm) is largely independent of ion species, fluence, temperature, and cap material, and we suggest that this is due to viscous flow of a-Ge under ion irradiation and wetting of the cap layer to minimize the interfacial free energy.

  12. Micromachined glass apertures for artificial lipid bilayer formation in a microfluidic system

    OpenAIRE

    Sandison, M.E.; Zagnoni, M.; Abu-Hantash, M.; Morgan, H

    2007-01-01

    The use of spark assisted chemical engraving (SACE) to produce glass apertures that are suitable for the formation of artificial bilayer lipid membranes is described. Prior to use, the glass apertures were rendered hydrophobic by a silanization process and were then incorporated into a simple microfluidic device. Successful bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) formation and the subsequent acquisition of single-channel recordings are demonstrated. Due to the simplicity and rapidity of the SACE process...

  13. Single-cell quantification of Bax activation and mathematical modelling suggest pore formation on minimal mitochondrial Bax accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düssmann, H; Rehm, M; Concannon, C G; Anguissola, S; Würstle, M; Kacmar, S; Völler, P; Huber, H J; Prehn, J H M

    2010-02-01

    Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilisation (MOMP) during apoptosis is triggered by the activation and oligomerisation of Bax and Bak, but a quantification of these processes in individual cells has not yet been performed. Single-cell imaging of Bax translocation and oligomerisation in Bax-deficient DU-145 cells expressing CFP-Bax and YFP-Bax revealed that both processes started only minutes before or concomitantly with MOMP, with the majority of Bax translocation and oligomerisation occurring downstream of MOMP. Quantification of YFP-Bax concentrations at mitochondria revealed an increase of only 1.8 + or - 1.5% at MOMP onset. This was increased to 11.2 + or - 3.6% in bak-silenced cells. These data suggested that Bax activation exceeded by far the quantities required for MOMP induction, and that minimal Bax or Bak activation may be sufficient to trigger rapid pore formation. In a cellular automaton modelling approach that incorporated the quantities and movement probabilities of Bax and its inhibitors, activators and enablers in the mitochondrial membrane, we could re-model rapid pore formation kinetics at submaximal Bax activation.

  14. Ultrastructure of the human aortic fibrolipid lesion. Formation of the atherosclerotic lipid-rich core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocan, T. M.; Schifani, T. A.; Guyton, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The formation of the atherosclerotic lipid-rich core has been elucidated by electron microscopy of the core region in small, raised fibrolipid lesions. The relationship among lipid deposits, extracellular matrix, and cells found in distinct regions of the fibrolipid lesion was examined. Extracellular lipid droplets, verified by osmium-thiocarbohydrazide-osmium staining, made up approximately 40% of the lipid-rich core volume. The lipid droplets were often found distinctly associated with elastin and/or collagen; these associations were dependent upon the location examined within or near the lipid-rich core. Within areas of intense extracellular lipid deposits, crystalline clefts suggesting cholesterol monohydrate were observed. Stereologic analysis of the lipid-rich core components revealed marked reductions in the volume fractions of cells, reticular ground substance, and basement membrane; while the extent of extracellular lipid increased 7-10-fold. Eleven percent or less of lipid in the core region was found within cells, usually smooth muscle cells. Above the core region in the lesion cap, monocyte-macrophage foam cells were prominent. Cellular lipid droplets were much larger (profile diameters sixfold higher) than extracellular droplets. With these data as well as transitional morphologic features at the boundaries of the core region, it is suggested that the abundant extracellular lipid does not derive from cell necrosis, and lipid deposition in association with extracellular matrix constituents is an early event in the development of the lipid-rich core. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3717297

  15. Studying the influence of pore water electrical conductivity on the formation factor, as estimated based on electrical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, Martin (Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)); Vecernik, Petr; Havlova, Vaclava (Waste Disposal Dept., Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc. (Czech Republic))

    2009-11-15

    factors and generic surface conductivities, and fairly good agreement was obtained. Part 1 suffered from methodology problems, which ultimately lead to poor reproducibility and accuracy. Here a single sample was in sequence saturated with the 0.001, 0.03, 0.5, 0.1 and 1.0 M NaCl electrolytes. The aim was to see if the apparent formation factor increasingly overestimates the formation factor with decreasing electrical conductivity of the pore water. Notwithstanding the experimental problems and errors, it was shown that this is clearly the case. For the electrolyte 0.001 M NaCl, and for this particular sample, the apparent formation factor overestimates the formation factor by at least one order of magnitude. The measured apparent formation factors were compared with modelled apparent formation factors, where input data were the sample's measured formation factor and surface conductivity, and fairly good agreement was obtained. The formation factors obtained by the TEM method were comparable with those obtained in the previous through diffusion experiments on the same samples. Especially for the Forsmark samples of part 2, the TEM results agreed with the through diffusion results, indicating that anion exclusion is not a major issue. From comparison of the TEM formation factors, obtained with anionic tracer iodide, and estimated formation factors based on the resistivity methods, it is indicated that anion exclusion should not reduce the effective diffusivity by more than a few factors

  16. Lipid body formation during maturation of human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichlberger, Andrea; Schlager, Stefanie; Lappalainen, Jani; Käkelä, Reijo; Hattula, Katarina; Butcher, Sarah J; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Kovanen, Petri T

    2011-12-01

    Lipid droplets, also called lipid bodies (LB) in inflammatory cells, are important cytoplasmic organelles. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics and functions of LBs in human mast cells (MC). Here, we have analyzed the genesis and components of LBs during differentiation of human peripheral blood-derived CD34(+) progenitors into connective tissue-type MCs. In our serum-free culture system, the maturing MCs, derived from 18 different donors, invariably developed triacylglycerol (TG)-rich LBs. Not known heretofore, the MCs transcribe the genes for perilipins (PLIN)1-4, but not PLIN5, and PLIN2 and PLIN3 display different degrees of LB association. Upon MC activation and ensuing degranulation, the LBs were not cosecreted with the cytoplasmic secretory granules. Exogenous arachidonic acid (AA) enhanced LB genesis in Triacsin C-sensitive fashion, and it was found to be preferentially incorporated into the TGs of LBs. The large TG-associated pool of AA in LBs likely is a major precursor for eicosanoid production by MCs. In summary, we demonstrate that cultured human MCs derived from CD34(+) progenitors in peripheral blood provide a new tool to study regulatory mechanisms involving LB functions, with particular emphasis on AA metabolism, eicosanoid biosynthesis, and subsequent release of proinflammatory lipid mediators from these cells.

  17. Trapping of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin in the membrane-bound monomeric state blocks membrane insertion and functional pore formation by the toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2014-06-13

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a potent membrane-damaging cytolytic toxin that belongs to the family of β barrel pore-forming protein toxins. VCC induces lysis of its target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β barrel pores. The mechanism of membrane pore formation by VCC follows the overall scheme of the archetypical β barrel pore-forming protein toxin mode of action, in which the water-soluble monomeric form of the toxin first binds to the target cell membrane, then assembles into a prepore oligomeric intermediate, and finally converts into the functional transmembrane oligomeric β barrel pore. However, there exists a vast knowledge gap in our understanding regarding the intricate details of the membrane pore formation process employed by VCC. In particular, the membrane oligomerization and membrane insertion steps of the process have only been described to a limited extent. In this study, we determined the key residues in VCC that are critical to trigger membrane oligomerization of the toxin. Alteration of such key residues traps the toxin in its membrane-bound monomeric state and abrogates subsequent oligomerization, membrane insertion, and functional transmembrane pore-formation events. The results obtained from our study also suggest that the membrane insertion of VCC depends critically on the oligomerization process and that it cannot be initiated in the membrane-bound monomeric form of the toxin. In sum, our study, for the first time, dissects membrane binding from the subsequent oligomerization and membrane insertion steps and, thus, defines the exact sequence of events in the membrane pore formation process by VCC.

  18. Effect of Fe- and Si-Enriched Secondary Precipitates and Surface Roughness on Pore Formation on Aluminum Plate Surfaces During Anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanzhi; Wang, Shizhi; Yang, Qingda; Zhou, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Two twin roll casts (TRCs) and one hot rolled (HR) AA 1235 aluminum alloy plates with different microstructures are prepared. The plates were electrolyzed in a 1.2 wt% HCl solution with a voltage of 21 V and a current of 1.9 mA. The shape, size, and number of pores formed on the surfaces of these plates were analyzed and correlated with the microstructures of the plates. It is found that pores are easier to form on the alloy plates containing subgrains with a lower dislocation density inside the subgrains, rather than along the grain boundaries. Furthermore, Fe- and Si-enriched particles in the AA1235 aluminum alloys lead to the formation of pores on the surface during electrolyzing; the average precipitate sizes of 4, 3.5, and 2 μm in Alloy 1#, Alloy 2# and Alloy 3# result in the average pore sizes of 3.78, 2.76, and 1.9 μm on the surfaces of the three alloys, respectively; The G.P zone in the alloy also facilitates the surface pore formation. High-surface roughness enhances the possibility of entrapping more lubricants into the plate surface, which eventually blocks the formation of the pores on the surface of the aluminum plates in the following electrolyzing process.

  19. Lipid nanotube formation using space-regulated electric field above interdigitated electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hongmei; Fu, Dingguo; Wang, Lei; Han, Xiaojun

    2014-04-22

    Lipid nanotubes have great potential in biology and nanotechnology. Here we demonstrate a method to form lipid nanotubes using space-regulated AC electric fields above coplanar interdigitated electrodes. The AC electric field distribution can be regulated by solution height above the electrodes. The ratio of field component in x axis (Ex) to field component in z axis (Ez) increases dramatically at solution height below 50 μm; therefore, at lower solution height, the force from Ex predominantly drives lipids to form lipid nanotubes along with the electric field direction. The forces exerted on the lipid nanotube during its formation were analyzed in detail, and an equation was obtained to describe the relationship among nanotube length and field frequency, amplitude, and time. We believe that the presented approach opens a way to design and prepare nanoscale materials with unique structural and functional properties using space-regulated electric fields.

  20. Physical mechanisms of micro- and nanodomain formation in multicomponent lipid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes a variety of physical mechanisms proposed in the literature, which can generate micro- and nanodomains in multicomponent lipid bilayers and biomembranes. It mainly focusses on lipid-driven mechanisms that do not involve direct protein-protein interactions. Specifically, it considers (i) equilibrium mechanisms based on lipid-lipid phase separation such as critical cluster formation close to critical points, and multiple domain formation in curved geometries, (ii) equilibrium mechanisms that stabilize two-dimensional microemulsions, such as the effect of linactants and the effect of curvature-composition coupling in bilayers and monolayers, and (iii) non-equilibrium mechanisms induced by the interaction of a biomembrane with the cellular environment, such as membrane recycling and the pinning effects of the cytoplasm. Theoretical predictions are discussed together with simulations and experiments. The presentation is guided by the theory of phase transitions and critical phenomena, and t...

  1. Formation, Stability, and Mobility of One-Dimensional Lipid Bilayer on High Curvature Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J; Martinez, J; Artyukhin, A; Sirbuly, D; Wang, Y; Ju, J W; Stroeve, P; Noy, A

    2007-03-23

    Curved lipid membranes are ubiquitous in living systems and play an important role in many biological processes. To understand how curvature and lipid composition affect membrane formation and fluidity we have assembled and studied mixed 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) supported lipid bilayers on amorphous silicon nanowires with controlled diameters ranging from 20 nm to 200 nm. Addition of cone-shaped DOPE molecules to cylindrical DOPC molecules promotes vesicle fusion and bilayer formation on smaller diameter nanowires. Our experiments demonstrate that nanowire-supported bilayers are mobile, exhibit fast recovery after photobleaching, and have low concentration of defects. Lipid diffusion coefficients in these high-curvature tubular membranes are comparable to the values reported for flat supported bilayers and increase with decreasing nanowire diameter.

  2. Formation, Stability, and Mobility of One-Dimensional Lipid Bilayer on High Curvature Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J; Martinez, J; Artyukhin, A; Sirbuly, D; Wang, Y; Ju, J W; Stroeve, P; Noy, A

    2007-03-23

    Curved lipid membranes are ubiquitous in living systems and play an important role in many biological processes. To understand how curvature and lipid composition affect membrane formation and fluidity we have assembled and studied mixed 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) supported lipid bilayers on amorphous silicon nanowires with controlled diameters ranging from 20 nm to 200 nm. Addition of cone-shaped DOPE molecules to cylindrical DOPC molecules promotes vesicle fusion and bilayer formation on smaller diameter nanowires. Our experiments demonstrate that nanowire-supported bilayers are mobile, exhibit fast recovery after photobleaching, and have low concentration of defects. Lipid diffusion coefficients in these high-curvature tubular membranes are comparable to the values reported for flat supported bilayers and increase with decreasing nanowire diameter.

  3. Mechanisms of formation and function of eosinophil lipid bodies: inducible intracellular sites involved in arachidonic acid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozza Patricia T

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid bodies, inducible lipid-rich cytoplasmic inclusions, are characteristically abundant in cells associated with inflammation, including eosinophils. Here we reviewed the formation and function of lipid bodies in human eosinophils. We now have evidence that the formation of lipid bodies is not attributable to adverse mechanisms, but is centrally mediated by specific signal transduction pathways. Arachidonic acid and other cis fatty acids by an NSAID-inhibitable process, diglycerides, and PAF by a 5-lipoxygenase dependent pathway are potent stimulators of lipid body induction. Lipid body formation develops rapidly by processes that involve PKC, PLC, and de novo mRNA and protein synthesis. These structures clearly serve as repositoires of arachidonyl-phospholipids and are more than inert depots. Specific enzymes, including cytosolic phospholipase A2, MAP kinases, lipoxygenases and cyclooxygenases, associate with lipid bodies. Lipid bodies appear to be dynamic, organelle-like structures involved in intracellular pathways of lipid mobilization and metabolism. Indeed, increases in lipid body numbers correlated with enhanced production of both lipoxygenase- and cyclooxygenase-derived eicosanoids. We hypothesize that lipid bodies are distinct inducible sites for generating eicosanoids as paracrine mediators with varied activities in inflammation. The capacity of lipid body formation to be specifically and rapidly induced in leukocytes enhances eicosanoid mediator formation, and conversely pharmacologic inhibition of lipid body induction represents a potential novel and specific target for anti-inflammatory therapy.

  4. Lipid droplets may lay a spacial foundation for vasculogenic mimicry formation in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Cai, Weiwei; Yi, Qingqing; Xie, Fengshan; Liu, Yanling; Du, Bin; Feng, Lei; Qiu, Liying

    2014-07-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry is a highly patterned vascular channel distinguished from the endothelium-dependent blood vessel. Vasculogenic mimicry is lined by highly aggressive tumor cells, and is associated with tumor grade, invasion and metastasis, and poor clinical prognosis. Much attention has been focused on the signaling pathways and the tumor microenvironment needed for vasculogenic mimicry formation, however, the studies on the spacial foundation for vasculogenic mimicry formation are limited. There are many lipid droplets in hepatocellular carcinoma due to steatosis, while increased numbers of lipid droplets also have been reported in many other neoplastic processes. The role of lipid droplets in tumor is still unclear. Based on the similar structural and morphological characteristics between vasculogenic mimicry and lipid droplet, we speculate that the lipid droplets may lay a spacial foundation for vasculogenic mimicry formation by a way of "space placeholder" in HCC. Experimental data and limited clinical literatures support the hypothesis to a certain degree. This hypothesis may provide a new idea for the study of vasculogenic mimicry and also provide a new direction for the functional study of lipid droplets in tumor.

  5. Physical Property Changes During CO2 Injection into Sandstone from Pukpyeong Formation, South Korea: Pore-scale Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J.; Keehm, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is believed to be responsible for global warming and climate change, and Korea government puts a great effort in CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage). The geological sequestration is regarded as one viable option and we are looking for prospecting formations for carbon storage. In this paper, we present a new approach to determine physical property changes during CO2 injection and preliminary results from applying the method to one of prospective Tertiary formation in South Korea. The so-called computational rock physics method is composed of three steps: 1) acquisition of high-resolution pore microstructures by X-ray micro-tomography; 2) CO2 injection simulation using lattice-Boltzmann (LB) two-phase flow simulation; and 3) FEM property simulations (electrical and elastic) at different CO2 saturations during the injection. We have been shown the viability of the method last year. This year we applied this method to one of CS (carbon storage) target area, Pukpyeong formation located in north-eastern part of South Korea. From thin section analysis, we found that the formation is composed of mudstone, sandstone and conglomerate, and most of them are poorly consolidated. The mudstone and poorly-sorted conglomerate are believed to have very low permeability, and the effect of CO2 injection would be significant. Thus we focus on sandstone units and get pore microstructure of those units. We then performed the computational rock physics analysis, and present the relations of Vp - CO2 saturation, and electrical conductivity - CO2 saturation for a few sand units. We also present the preliminary upscaling results by putting combined sandstone and mudstone units into FEM modeling. The modeling results implies that the new computational approach can be very useful to characterizing the CS sites especially in early stage. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Energy R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP

  6. Formation of supported lipid bilayers containing phase-segregated domains and their interaction with gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melby, Eric S.; Mensch, Arielle C.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Murphy, Catherine J.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    The cell membrane represents an important biological interface that nanoparticles may encounter after being released into the environment. Interaction of nanoparticles with cellular membranes may alter membrane structure and function, lead to their uptake into cells, and elicit adverse biological responses. Supported lipid bilayers have proven to be valuable ex vivo models for biological membranes, allowing investigation of their mechanisms of interaction with nanoparticles with a degree of control impossible in living cells. To date, the majority of research on nanoparticle interaction with supported lipid bilayers has employed membranes composed of single or binary mixtures of phospholipids. Cellular membranes contain a wide variety of lipids and exhibit lateral organization. Ordered membrane domains enriched in specific membrane components are referred to as lipid rafts and have not been explored with respect to their interaction with nanoparticles. Here we develop model lipid raft-containing membranes amenable to investigation by a variety of surface-sensitive analytical techniques and demonstrate that lipid rafts influence the extent of nanoparticle attachment to model membranes. We determined conditions that allow reliable formation of bilayers containing rafts enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol and confirmed their morphology by structured illumination and atomic force microscopies. We demonstrate that lipid rafts increase attachment of cationic gold nanoparticles to model membranes under near physiological ionic strength conditions (0.1 M NaCl) at pH 7.4. We anticipate that these results will serve as the foundation for and motivate further study of nanoparticle interaction with compositionally varied lipid rafts.

  7. Formation of Giant Protein Vesicles by a Lipid Cosolvent Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper S.; Vararattanavech, Ardcharaporn; Vissing, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a method to create giant protein vesicles (GPVs) of ≥10 μm by solvent‐driven fusion of large vesicles (0.1–0.2 μm) with reconstituted membrane proteins. We found that formation of GPVs proceeded from rotational mixing of protein‐reconstituted large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs...

  8. Sizable dynamics in small pores: CO2 location and motion in the α-Mg formate metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuanjun; Lucier, Bryan E G; Zhang, Yue; Ren, Pengju; Zheng, Anmin; Huang, Yining

    2017-02-22

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising materials for carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption and storage; however, many details regarding CO2 dynamics and specific adsorption site locations within MOFs remain unknown, restricting the practical uses of MOFs for CO2 capture. The intriguing α-magnesium formate (α-Mg3(HCOO)6) MOF can adsorb CO2 and features a small pore size. Using an intertwined approach of (13)C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy, (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization SSNMR, and computational molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, new physical insights and a rich variety of information have been uncovered regarding CO2 adsorption in this MOF, including the surprising suggestion that CO2 motion is restricted at elevated temperatures. Guest CO2 molecules undergo a combined localized rotational wobbling and non-localized twofold jumping between adsorption sites. MD simulations and SSNMR experiments accurately locate the CO2 adsorption sites; the mechanism behind CO2 adsorption is the distant interaction between the hydrogen atom of the MOF formate linker and a guest CO2 oxygen atom, which are ca. 3.2 Å apart.

  9. Toosendanin interferes with pore formation of botulinum toxin type A in PC12 cell membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu-feng LI; Yu-liang SHI

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) abort the process of neurotransmitter release at presynaptic motor nerve terminals, causing muscle paralysis. The ability of botulinum toxin to produce its effect is dependent on the ability of the light chain to cleave the SNARE proteins associated with transmitter release. Translocation of the light chain protease through the heavy chain-formed channel is a pivotal step in the intoxication process. Toosendanin (TSN), a triterpenoid derivative extracted from a Chinese traditional medicine, has been demonstrated to be an effective cure for experimental botulism. This study was designed to explore the antibotulismic mechanisms of toosendanin. Methods: The inside-out singlechannel recording patch-clamp technique was used to record the BoNT/A-induced currents in the presence and absence of TSN. Results: Channel formation was delayed and the sizes of the channels were reduced in the TSN-treated PC12cell membrane. Conclusion: The antibotulismic effect of TSN might occur via interference with toxin translocation.

  10. Aqueous gel formation from sodium salts of cellobiose lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imura, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Yamashita, Chikako; Taira, Toshiaki; Minamikawa, Hiroyuki; Morita, Tomotake; Kitamoto, Dai

    2014-01-01

    Cellobiose lipids (CLs) are asymmetric bolaform biosurfactants, which are produced by Cryptococcus humicola JCM 10251 and have fungicidal activity. In this study, the sodium salts of CLs (CLNa) were prepared to improve aqueous solubility of the CLs, and their surface and gelation properties in aqueous solutions were examined by surface tension, rheology, and freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM) measurements. The surface tension measurements revealed that the CLNa have high surface activity: CMC1 and γCMC1 are 0.1 mg/mL and 34.7 mN/m, respectively. It was also found that the CLNa form giant micelles above their CMC, whose average size is 116.6 ± 31.9 nm. Unlike conventional surfactants, the surface tension reduced further with an increase in concentration and the aqueous solution became viscous at the minimum gelation concentration (MGC: 5.0 mg/mL). In rheological studies, the obtained gels proved to be rather soft and their sol-gel temperature was found to be approximately 50℃. FF-TEM observation of the gels showed 3D supramolecular structures with an entangled fibrous network. Since the present CLNa aqueous gels have a degree of fungicidal activity, they could be useful for novel multifunctional soft materials applicable to the food and cosmetic industries.

  11. Evidence for the Formation of Symmetric and Asymmetric DLPC-DAPC Lipid Bilayer Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Ritter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: We investigated if mixtures of the phosphatidylcholine (PC lipids 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C12:0 PC; DLPC and 1,2-diarachidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C20:0 PC; DAPC, which differ by eight methylene groups in acyl chain length, lead to the spontaneous formation of distinct lipid rafts and asymmetric bilayers. Methods: The experiments were performed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. Results: We show that DLPC and DAPC mixed at a molar ratio of 1:1 lead to the formation of single, double and triple bilayers with peaks at 6.14 ± 0.11, 13.27 ± 0.17 and 20.54 ± 0.46 nm, respectively (n=750. Within these formations discrete height steps of 0.92 nm can be resolved (n=422. Conclusion: The most frequently observed height steps value of 0.92 nm matches best with the calculated mean lipid hydrophobic thickness difference for asymmetric C12:0 PC and C20:0 PC lipid bilayers of 0.88 nm. This indicates the ability of DLPC and DAPC to form asymmetric lipid bilayers.

  12. Lipid-assisted formation and dispersion of aqueous and bilayer-embedded nano-C60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanjing; Bothun, Geoffrey D

    2009-05-05

    Lipid assemblies provide a biocompatible approach for preparing aqueous nanoparticles. In this work, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was used to assist in the formation and dispersion of C(60) and nano-C(60) aggregates using a modified reverse phase evaporation (REV) method. This method led to the rapid formation of aqueous nano-C(60) at DPPC/C(60) molar ratios from 500:1 to 100:1 (12-38 nm; verified by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy), which were present in the bulk phase and encapsulated within vesicles. In addition to forming nanoparticles, C(60) was trapped within the vesicle bilayer and led to a reduction in the lipid melting temperature. Solvent extraction was used to isolate nano-C(60) from the lipids and bilayer-embedded C(60). Our results suggest that bilayer-embedded C(60) was present as molecular C(60) and as small amorphous nano-C(60) (2.3 +/- 0.4 nm), which clustered in the aqueous phase after the lipids were extracted. In addition to developing a new technique for nano-C(60) formation, our results suggest that the lipid bilayer may be used as a hydrophobic region for dispersing and assembling small nano-C(60).

  13. The Unique Molecular Choreography of Giant Pore Formation by the Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysins of Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweten, Rodney K; Hotze, Eileen M; Wade, Kristin R

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) assemble their giant β-barrel pore in cholesterol-rich membranes has been the subject of intense study in the past two decades. A combination of structural, biophysical, and biochemical analyses has revealed deep insights into the series of complex and highly choreographed secondary and tertiary structural transitions that the CDCs undergo to assemble their β-barrel pore in eukaryotic membranes. Our knowledge of the molecular details of these dramatic structural changes in CDCs has transformed our understanding of how giant pore complexes are assembled and has been critical to our understanding of the mechanisms of other important classes of pore-forming toxins and proteins across the kingdoms of life. Finally, there are tantalizing hints that the CDC pore-forming mechanism is more sophisticated than previously imagined and that some CDCs are employed in pore-independent processes.

  14. The C-terminus of IcmT is essential for pore formation and for intracellular trafficking of Legionella pneumophila within Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molmeret, Maëlle; Alli, O A Terry; Radulic, Marina; Susa, Milorad; Doric, Miljenko; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    2002-03-01

    We have shown previously that the five rib (release of intracellular bacteria) mutants of Legionella pneumophila are competent for intracellular replication but defective in pore formation-mediated cytolysis and egress from protozoan and mammalian cells. The rib phenotype results from a point mutation (deletion) DeltaG544 in icmT that is predicted to result in the expression of a protein truncated by 32 amino acids from the C-terminus. In contrast to the rib mutants that are capable of intracellular replication, an icmT null mutant was completely defective in intracellular replication within mammalian and protozoan cells, in addition to its defect in pore formation-mediated cytolysis. The icmT wild-type allele complemented the icmT null mutant for both defects of intracellular replication and pore formation-mediated cytolysis and egress from mammalian cells. In contrast, the icmTDeltaG544 allele complemented the icmT null mutant for intracellular growth, but not for the pore-forming activity. Consistent with their defect in pore formation-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, both mutants failed to cause pulmonary inflammation in A/J mice. Interestingly, the rib mutant was severely defective in intracellular growth within Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Confocal laser scanning and electron microscopy confirmed that the rib mutant and the icmT null mutant were severely and completely defective, respectively, in intracellular growth in A. polyphaga, and the respective defects correlated with fusion of the bacterial phagosomes to lysosomes. Taken together, the data showed that the C-terminus domain of IcmT is essential for the pore-forming activity and is required for intracellular trafficking and replication within A. polyphaga, but not within mammalian cells.

  15. Control of lignin solubility and particle formation modulates its antioxidant efficiency in lipid medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barsberg, Søren Talbro; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Sanadi, Anand Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is an abundant plant polymer usually regarded as waste material. In the present work, antioxidant properties of lignin preparations with differing lipid solubility were studied using biodiesel as a convenient lipid test substrate. In place of formerly used assays, we used attenuated total...... reflectance (ATR) FT-IR spectroscopy to follow in situ biodiesel autoxidation on a heated ATR crystal as a function of time. The study demonstrates that a complex balance between intrinsic (chemical) efficiency, solubility, and particle formation controls the antioxidant efficiency of differently prepared...... lignin fractions. It was found that solubility and particle formation of lignin preparations strongly modulate its antioxidant efficiency and that these properties might depend on the presence of lipid components within the original lignin source....

  16. Effects of pore-scale dispersion, degree of heterogeneity, sampling size, and source volume on the concentration moments of conservative solutes in heterogeneous formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele Tonina; Alberto Bellin

    2008-01-01

    Pore-scale dispersion (PSD), aquifer heterogeneity, sampling volume, and source size influence solute concentrations of conservative tracers transported in heterogeneous porous formations. In this work, we developed a new set of analytical solutions for the concentration ensemble mean, variance, and coefficient of variation (CV), which consider the effects of all these...

  17. Automobile diesel exhaust particles induce lipid droplet formation in macrophages in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Yi; Jantzen, Kim; Gouveia, Ana Cecilia Damiao

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been associated with adverse cardiopulmonary health effects, which may be related to dysregulation of lipid metabolism and formation of macrophage foam cells. In this study, THP-1 derived macrophages were exposed to an automobile generated DEP (A...

  18. Langmuir films of chiral lipid molecules and Pattern Formation .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Prem; Mann, Elizabeth; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2009-03-01

    Langmuir films of 1,2-bis(10,12 Tricosadiynoyl)-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphoethanolamine form spiral and target patterns when compressed between two movable barriers in a Langmuir trough above 30^0C, up to the chain-melting transition at ˜37^0C. The critical pressure, at which spirals appear, increases with temperature. The patterns themselves also depend on temperature, with single-armed spirals with many defects forming near 30^0C and defect-free target patterns at higher temperatures. The mechanism of spiral formation could be a competition among elasticity, chirality, and the boundary conditions at the core of the domains. Optical anisotropy and the growth rate of internal structures test this suggested mechanism. .

  19. Possible participation of mitochondria in lipid yolk formation in oocytes of paddlefish and sturgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelazowska, Monika; Kilarski, Wincenty

    2009-03-01

    The ovary of paddlefish and sturgeons (Acipenseriformes) is composed of discrete units: the ovarian nests and ovarian follicles. The ovarian nests comprise oogonia and numerous early dictyotene oocytes surrounded by somatic prefollicular cells. Each ovarian follicle consists of a spherical oocyte and a layer of follicular cells situated on a thick basal lamina, encompassed by thecal cells. The cytoplasm of previtellogenic oocytes is differentiated into two distinct zones: the homogeneous and granular zones. The homogeneous cytoplasm is organelle-free, whereas the granular cytoplasm contains numerous organelles, including mitochondria and lipid droplets. We have analyzed the cytoplasm of early dictyotene and previtellogenic oocytes ultrastructurally and histologically. In the cytoplasm of early dictyotene oocytes, two morphologically different types of mitochondria can be distinguished: (1) with well-developed cristae and (2) with distorted and fused cristae. In previtellogenic oocytes, the mitochondria of the second type show various stages of cristae distortion; they contain and release material morphologically similar to that of lipid droplets and eventually degenerate. This process of mitochondrial transformation is accompanied by an accumulation of lipid droplets that form a single large accumulation (lipid body) located in the vicinity of the oocyte nucleus (germinal vesicle). The lipid body eventually disperses in the oocyte center. The possible participation of these mitochondria in the formation of oocyte lipid droplets is discussed.

  20. Laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing: Effects of main physical processes on dynamical melt flow and pore formation from mesoscopic powder simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Khairallah, Saad A; Rubenchik, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    There is a need in laser powder-bed fusion of metals to produce high quality parts without pores by better understanding the complex interplay of process parameters. This study considers the main physical phenomena involved in laser powder interactions using a high fidelity three-dimensional mesoscopic simulation model of 316L stainless steel powder. The model emphasizes the importance of the recoil pressure and the Marangoni effect in generating strong dynamical melt flow and the role of radiative and evaporative cooling at capping the maximum surface temperature. The melt track is divided into an indentation, transition and tail end regions, each being the stage of specific physical effects. Pore formation mechanisms are observed at the edge of a scan track, at the melt pool bottom center during collapse of the indentation, and at the end of the melt track during laser power ramp down. Remedies to these undesirable pores are discussed.

  1. Exploring Pore Formation of Atomic Layer-Deposited Overlayers by in Situ Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tao; Karwal, Saurabh; Aoun, Bachir; Zhao, Haiyan; Ren, Yang; Canlas, Christian P.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Winans, Randall E.

    2016-10-11

    In this work, we explore the pore structure of overcoated materials by in situ synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)/(WAXS). Thin films of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) with thicknesses of 4.9 and 2.5 nm, respectively, are prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on non-porous nanoparticles. In situ X-ray measurements reveal that porosity is induced in the ALD films by annealing the samples at high temperature. Moreover, this pore formation can be attributed to densification resulting from an amorphous to crystalline phase transition of the ALD films as confirmed by high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) and pair distribution function (PDF). Simultaneous SAXS/WAXS results not only show the porosity is formed by the phase transition but also that the pore size increases with temperature.

  2. Resistance of Gram-positive bacteria to nisin is not determined by Lipid II levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, NE; Smid, EJ; Kok, J; de Kruijff, B; Kuipers, OP; Breukink, E; Kramer, Naomi E.; Smid, Eddy J.

    2004-01-01

    Lipid II is essential for nisin-mediated pore formation at nano-molar concentrations. We tested whether nisin resistance could result from different Lipid II levels, by comparing the maximal Lipid II pool in Micrococcus flavus (sensitive) and Listeria monocytogenes (relatively insensitive) and their

  3. Clostridial pore-forming toxins: powerful virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoff, Michel R

    2014-12-01

    Pore formation is a common mechanism of action for many bacterial toxins. More than one third of clostridial toxins are pore-forming toxins (PFTs) belonging to the β-PFT class. They are secreted as soluble monomers rich in β-strands, which recognize a specific receptor on target cells and assemble in oligomers. Then, they undergo a conformational change leading to the formation of a β-barrel, which inserts into the lipid bilayer forming functional pore. According to their structure, clostridial β-PFTs are divided into several families. Clostridial cholesterol-dependent cytolysins form large pores, which disrupt the plasma membrane integrity. They are potent virulence factors mainly involved in myonecrosis. Clostridial heptameric β-PFTs (aerolysin family and staphylococcal α-hemolysin family) induce small pores which trigger signaling cascades leading to different cell responses according to the cell types and toxins. They are mainly responsible for intestinal diseases, like necrotic enteritis, or systemic diseases/toxic shock from intestinal origin. Clostridial intracellularly active toxins exploit pore formation through the endosomal membrane to translocate the enzymatic component or domain into the cytosol. Single chain protein toxins, like botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins, use hydrophobic α-helices to form pores, whereas clostridial binary toxins encompass binding components, which are structurally and functionally related to β-PFTs, but which have acquired the specific activity to internalize their corresponding enzymatic components. Structural analysis suggests that β-PFTs and binding components share a common evolutionary origin.

  4. Conversion of membrane lipid acyl groups to triacylglycerol and formation of lipid bodies upon nitrogen starvation in biofuel green algae Chlorella UTEX29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Elton C; Johnson, Jodie V; Rathinasabapathi, Bala

    2013-11-01

    Algal lipids are ideal biofuel sources. Our objective was to determine the contributors to triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation and lipid body formation in Chlorella UTEX29 under nitrogen (N) deprivation. A fivefold increase in intracellular lipids following N starvation for 24 h confirmed the oleaginous characteristics of UTEX29. Ultrastructural studies revealed increased number of lipid bodies and decreased starch granules in N-starved cells compared to N-replete cells. Lipid bodies were observed as early as 3 h after N removal and plastids collapsed after 48 h of stress. Moreover, the identification of intracellular pyrenoids and differences in the expected nutritional requirements for Chlorella protothecoides (as UTEX29 is currently classified) led us to conduct a phylogenetic study using 18S and actin cDNA sequences. This indicated UTEX29 to be more phylogenetically related to Chlorella vulgaris. To investigate the fate of different lipids after N starvation, radiolabeling using ¹⁴C-acetate was used. A significant decrease in ¹⁴C-galactolipids and phospholipids matched the increase in ¹⁴C-TAG starting at 3 h of N starvation, consistent with acyl groups from structural lipids as sources for TAG under N starvation. These results have important implications for the identification of key steps controlling oil accumulation in N-starved biofuel algae and demonstrate membrane recycling during lipid body formation.

  5. Suppressive actions of eicosapentaenoic acid on lipid droplet formation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair Andrew J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid droplet (LD formation and size regulation reflects both lipid influx and efflux, and is central in the regulation of adipocyte metabolism, including adipokine secretion. The length and degree of dietary fatty acid (FA unsaturation is implicated in LD formation and regulation in adipocytes. The aims of this study were to establish the impact of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; C20:5n-3 in comparison to SFA (STA; stearic acid, C18:0 and MUFA (OLA; oleic acid, C18:1n-9 on 3T3-L1 adipocyte LD formation, regulation of genes central to LD function and adipokine responsiveness. Cells were supplemented with 100 μM FA during 7-day differentiation. Results EPA markedly reduced LD size and total lipid accumulation, suppressing PPARγ, Cidea and D9D/SCD1 genes, distinct from other treatments. These changes were independent of alterations of lipolytic genes, as both EPA and STA similarly elevated LPL and HSL gene expressions. In response to acute lipopolysaccharide exposure, EPA-differentiated adipocytes had distinct improvement in inflammatory response shown by reduction in monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-6 and elevation in adiponectin and leptin gene expressions. Conclusions This study demonstrates that EPA differentially modulates adipogenesis and lipid accumulation to suppress LD formation and size. This may be due to suppressed gene expression of key proteins closely associated with LD function. Further analysis is required to determine if EPA exerts a similar influence on LD formation and regulation in-vivo.

  6. Ion transport across transmembrane pores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leontiadou, Hari; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert-Jan

    2007-01-01

    To study the pore-mediated transport of ionic species across a lipid membrane, a series of molecular dynamics simulations have been performed of a dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline bilayer containing a preformed water pore in the presence of sodium and chloride ions. It is found that the stability of

  7. Lipid Reconstitution-Enabled Formation of Gold Nanoparticle Clusters for Mimetic Cellular Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoung Nam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs encapsulated within reconstituted phospholipid bilayers have been utilized in various bioapplications due to their improved cellular uptake without compromising their advantages. Studies have proved that clustering AuNPs can enhance the efficacy of theranostic effects, but controllable aggregation or oligomerization of AuNPs within lipid membranes is still challenging. Here, we successfully demonstrate the formation of gold nanoparticle clusters (AuCLs, supported by reconstituted phospholipid bilayers with appropriate sizes for facilitating cellular uptake. Modulation of the lipid membrane curvatures influences not only the stability of the oligomeric state of the AuCLs, but also the rate of cellular uptake. Dynamic light scattering (DLS data showed that 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE, with its relatively small head group, is crucial for establishing an effective membrane curvature to encapsulate the AuCLs. The construction of phospholipid bilayers surrounding AuCLs was confirmed by analyzing the secondary structure of M2 proteins incorporated in the lipid membrane surrounding the AuCLs. When AuCLs were incubated with cells, accumulated clusters were found inside the cells without the lipids being removed or exchanged with the cellular membrane. We expect that our approach of clustering gold nanoparticles within lipid membranes can be further developed to design a versatile nanoplatform.

  8. Formation of Poultry Meat Flavor by Heating Process and Lipid Oxidation

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    Maijon Purba

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Flavor is an important factor in the acceptance of food. Flavor of poultry meat is naturally formed through a specific process of heating, where various chemical reactions complex occurred among nonvolatile precursors in fatty tissue or in lean tissue. The main flavor in the form of volatile and nonvolatile components play a major influence on the acceptance of various processed meat, especially the taste. Removal of sulfur components decreases meat flavor (meaty, while removal of carbonyl compounds decrease the specific flavor and increases common flavor of the meat. Poultry meat has a fairly high fat content that easily generates lipid oxidation. Lipid oxidation in poultry meat is a sign that the meat was damaged and caused off odor. Addition of antioxidants in the diet can inhibit lipid oxidation in the meat. Lipids interaction with proteins and carbohydrates is unavoidable during the thermal processing of food, causing the appearance of volatile components. The main reaction in meat flavor formation mechanism is Maillard reaction followed by Stecker reaction and degradation of lipids and thiamine. They involve in the reaction between carbonyl and amine components to form flavor compounds, which enhance the flavor of poultry meat.

  9. Specific binding of activated Vip3Aa10 to Helicoverpa armigera brush border membrane vesicles results in pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Guo; Yang, Ai-Zhen; Shen, Xiao-Hong; Hua, Bao-Guang; Shi, Guang-Lu

    2011-10-01

    Helicoverpa armigera is one of the most harmful pests in China. Although it had been successfully controlled by Cry1A toxins, some H. armigera populations are building up resistance to Cry1A toxins in the laboratory. Vip3A, secreted by Bacillus thuringiensis, is another potential toxin against H. armigera. Previous reports showed that activated Vip3A performs its function by inserting into the midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) of susceptible insects. To further investigate the binding of Vip3A to BBMV of H. armigera, the full-length Vip3Aa10 toxin expressed in Escherichia coli was digested by trypsin or midgut juice extract, respectively. Among the fragments of digested Vip3Aa10, only a 62kDa fragment (Vip3Aa10-T) exhibited binding to BBMV of H. armigera and has insecticidal activity. Moreover, this interaction was specific and was not affected by the presence of Cry1Ab toxin. Binding of Vip3Aa10-T to BBMV resulted in the formation of an ion channel. Unlike Cry1A toxins, Vip3Aa10-T was just slightly associated with lipid rafts of BBMV. These data suggest that although activated Vip3Aa10 specifically interacts with BBMV of H. armigera and forms an ion channel, the mode of action of it may be different from that of Cry1A toxins.

  10. Amyloid fibril formation of peptides derived from the C-terminus of CETP modulated by lipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-González, Victor [Instituto de Fisiología Celular, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); Mas-Oliva, Jaime, E-mail: jmas@ifc.unam.mx [Instituto de Fisiología Celular, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); División de Investigación, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF (Mexico)

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •The secondary structure of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP was studied. •Lipids modulate secondary structure changes of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP. •Lysophosphatidic acid maintains a functional α-helix and prevents fibril formation. •Transfer of lipids by CETP is related to the presence of an α-helix at its C-end. -- Abstract: Cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) is a plasmatic protein involved in neutral lipid transfer between lipoproteins. Focusing on the last 12 C-terminus residues we have previously shown that mutation D{sub 470}N promotes a conformational change towards a β-secondary structure. In turn, this modification leads to the formation of oligomers and fibrillar structures, which cause cytotoxic effects similar to the ones provoked by amyloid peptides. In this study, we evaluated the role of specific lipid arrangements on the structure of peptide helix-Z (D{sub 470}N) through the use of thioflavin T fluorescence, peptide bond absorbance, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The results indicate that the use of micelles formed with lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) under neutral pH induce a conformational transition of peptide helix-Z containing a β-sheet conformation to a native α-helix structure, therefore avoiding the formation of amyloid fibrils. In contrast, incubation with phosphatidic acid does not change the profile for the β-sheet conformation. When the electrostatic charge at the surface of micelles or vesicles is regulated through the use of lipids such as phospholipid and LPA, minimal changes and the presence of β-structures were recorded. Mixtures with a positive net charge diminished the percentage of β-structure and the amount of amyloid fibrils. Our results suggest that the degree of solvation determined by the presence of a free hydroxyl group on lipids such as LPA is a key condition that can modulate the secondary structure and the consequent formation of

  11. Soluble VCAM-1 Alters Lipid Phosphatase Activity in Epicardial Mesothelial Cells: Implications for Lipid Signaling During Epicardial Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Dettman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Epicardial formation involves the attachment of proepicardial (PE cells to the heart and the superficial migration of mesothelial cells over the surface of the heart. Superficial migration has long been known to involve the interaction of integrins expressed by the epicardium and their ligands expressed by the myocardium; however, little is understood about signals that maintain the mesothelium as it migrates. One signaling pathway known to regulate junctional contacts in epithelia is the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and this pathway can be modified by integrins. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the myocardially expressed, integrin ligand VCAM-1 modulates the activity of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway by activating the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN. We found that epicardial cells stimulated with a soluble form of VCAM-1 (sVCAM-1 reorganized PTEN from the cytoplasm to the membrane and nucleus and activated PTEN’s lipid phosphatase activity. Chick embryonic epicardial mesothelial cells (EMCs expressing a shRNA to PTEN increased invasion in collagen gels, but only after stimulation by TGFβ3, indicating that loss of PTEN is not sufficient to induce invasion. Expression of an activated form of PTEN was capable of blocking degradation of junctional complexes by TGFβ3. This suggested that PTEN plays a role in maintaining the mesothelial state of epicardium and not in EMT. We tested if altering PTEN activity could affect coronary vessel development and observed that embryonic chick hearts infected with a virus expressing activated human PTEN had fewer coronary vessels. Our data support a role for VCAM-1 in mediating critical steps in epicardial development through PTEN in epicardial cells.

  12. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ag85A is a novel diacylglycerol acyltransferase involved in lipid body formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, Ayssar A; Stehr, Matthias; Spallek, Ralf; Rohde, Manfred; Singh, Mahavir

    2011-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis accumulates large amounts of triacylglycerol (TAG) which acts as storage compounds for energy and carbon. The mycobacterial triacylglycerols stored in the form of intracellular lipid droplets are essential for long-term survival of M. tuberculosis during a dormant state. We report here that when the M. tuberculosis mycolytransferase Ag85A is overexpressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155, cell morphology was changed and the cells became grossly enlarged. A massive formation of lipid bodies and a change in lipid pattern was observed simultaneously. We suspected a possible role of Ag85A in the acyl lipid metabolism and discovered that the enzyme possesses acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) activity in addition to its well-known function as mycolyltransferase. Ag85A mediates the transesterification of diacylglycerol using long-chain acyl-CoA as acyl donors. The K(m) and K(cat) values for palmitoleoyl-coenzyme A were 390 µM and 55.54 min(-1) respectively. A docking model suggests that palmitoleoyl-coenzyme A and 1,2-dipalmitin occupy the same active site as trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate and trehalose 6'-monomycolate. The site-directed Ser126Ala mutation of the active site proved that this residue is involved in the catalytic activity of this enzyme. Although not proven conclusively for dormant stage of M. tuberculosis, our novel finding about the synthesis of TAGs by Ag85A strongly suggests that Ag85A may play a significant role in the formation of lipid storage bodies and thus also in the establishment and maintenance of a persistent tuberculosis infection.

  13. Tribolium castaneum RR-1 cuticular protein TcCPR4 is required for formation of pore canals in rigid cuticle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Young Noh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Insect cuticle is composed mainly of structural proteins and the polysaccharide chitin. The CPR family is the largest family of cuticle proteins (CPs, which can be further divided into three subgroups based on the presence of one of the three presumptive chitin-binding sequence motifs denoted as Rebers-Riddiford (R&R consensus sequence motifs RR-1, RR-2 and RR-3. The TcCPR27 protein containing the RR-2 motif is one of the most abundant CPs present both in the horizontal laminae and in vertical pore canals in the procuticle of rigid cuticle found in the elytron of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Depletion of TcCPR27 by RNA interference (RNAi causes both unorganized laminae and pore canals, resulting in malformation and weakening of the elytron. In this study, we investigated the function(s of another CP, TcCPR4, which contains the RR-1 motif and is easily extractable from elytra after RNAi to deplete the level of TcCPR27. Transcript levels of the TcCPR4 gene are dramatically increased in 3 d-old pupae when adult cuticle synthesis begins. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that TcCPR4 protein is present in the rigid cuticles of the dorsal elytron, ventral abdomen and leg but not in the flexible cuticles of the hindwing and dorsal abdomen of adult T. castaneum. Immunogold labeling and transmission electron microscopic analyses revealed that TcCPR4 is predominantly localized in pore canals and regions around the apical plasma membrane protrusions into the procuticle of rigid adult cuticles. RNAi for TcCPR4 resulted in an abnormal shape of the pore canals with amorphous pore canal fibers (PCFs in their lumen. These results support the hypothesis that TcCPR4 is required for achieving proper morphology of the vertical pore canals and PCFs that contribute to the assembly of a cuticle that is both lightweight and rigid.

  14. Critical size dependence of domain formation observed in coarse-grained simulations of bilayers composed of ternary lipid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelopulos, George A.; Nagai, Tetsuro; Bandara, Asanga; Panahi, Afra; Straub, John E.

    2017-09-01

    Model cellular membranes are known to form micro- and macroscale lipid domains dependent on molecular composition. The formation of macroscopic lipid domains by lipid mixtures has been the subject of many simulation investigations. We present a critical study of system size impact on lipid domain phase separation into liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered macroscale domains in ternary lipid mixtures. In the popular di-C16:0 PC:di-C18:2 PC:cholesterol at 35:35:30 ratio mixture, we find systems with a minimum of 1480 lipids to be necessary for the formation of macroscopic phase separated domains and systems of 10 000 lipids to achieve structurally converged conformations similar to the thermodynamic limit. To understand these results and predict the behavior of any mixture forming two phases, we develop and investigate an analytical Flory-Huggins model which is recursively validated using simulation and experimental data. We find that micro- and macroscale domains can coexist in ternary mixtures. Additionally, we analyze the distributions of specific lipid-lipid interactions in each phase, characterizing domain structures proposed based on past experimental studies. These findings offer guidance in selecting appropriate system sizes for the study of phase separations and provide new insights into the nature of domain structure for a popular ternary lipid mixture.

  15. Lipid-free Apolipoprotein A-I Structure: Insights into HDL Formation and Atherosclerosis Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xiaohu; Atkinson, David

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I is the major protein in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and plays an important role during the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Knowledge of the high-resolution structure of full-length apoA-I is vital for a molecular understanding of the function of HDL at the various steps of the RCT pathway. Due to the flexible nature of apoA-I and aggregation properties, the structure of full-length lipid-free apoA-I has evaded description for over three decades. Sequence analysis of apoA-I suggested that the amphipathic α-helix is the structural motif of exchangeable apolipoprotein, and NMR, X-ray and MD simulation studies have confirmed this. Different laboratories have used different methods to probe the secondary structure distribution and organization of both the lipid-free and lipid-bound apoA-I structure. Mutation analysis, synthetic peptide models, surface chemistry and crystal structures have converged on the lipid-free apoA-I domain structure and function: the N-terminal domain [1–184] forms a helix bundle while the C-terminal domain [185–243] mostly lacks defined structure and is responsible for initiating lipid-binding, aggregation and is also involved in cholesterol efflux. The first 43 residues of apoA-I are essential to stabilize the lipid-free structure. In addition, the crystal structure of C-terminally truncated apoA-I suggests a monomer-dimer conversation mechanism mediated through helix 5 reorganization and dimerization during the formation of HDL. Based on previous research, we have proposed a structural model for full-length monomeric apoA-I in solution and updated the HDL formation mechanism through three intermediate states. Mapping the known natural mutations on the full-length monomeric apoA-I model provides insight into atherosclerosis development through disruption of the N-terminal helix bundle or deletion of the C-terminal lipid-binding domain. PMID:26048453

  16. Mechanism of Secondary Pore Formation and Prediction of Favorable Reservoir of Paleogene in Jiyang Sag,Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Xiaomin; Chen Huanqing; Zhong Dakang; Zhang Qin; Zhang Shanwen; Lü Xixue

    2008-01-01

    Jiyang (济阳) sag is an oil rich basin,consisting of Huimin (惠民),Dongying (东营),Zhanhua (沾化),and Chezhen (车镇) depressions.The elastic rock of Paleogene has undergone early and middle diagenetic stages and now the main clastic reservoir is in the middle diagenetic stage.Primary and secondary pores are developed in Paleogene sandstone,the latter is generated from the dissolution of feldspar and calcite cement in rocks owing to the organic acid from the maturated source rock,but the materials dissolved are different in different depressions.The reservoir secondary pores of Dongying depression are generated from the dissolution of calcite cement,the ones of Zhanhua and Huimin depressions from the dissolution of feldspar,the secondary pores of Chezhen depression from the dissolution of feldspar in upper section,and the dissolution of calcite cement in the lower section of Paleogene,respectively.The secondary pores are developed in two depths and the depth goes down from west to east,from south to north in Jiyang sag.The major controlling factors for secondary pore development are maturity and location of source rock.Lastly,the favorable reservoirs are evaluated according to reservoir buried depth,sedimentation,and diagenesis.The reservoir with high quality is located in the northern and central parts in Dongying depression; there are some good reservoirs in Gndao (孤岛),Gudong (孤东),and Gunan (孤南) areas in Zhanhua depression,and the favorable reservoirs are located in the north steep slope and the south gentle slope of Chezhen depression and central uplift,south gentle slope of Huimin depression.

  17. [Formation of the compensation answer in the system "lipid peroxidation - antioxidant protection" in rats with alimentary dislipidemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Iu K; Novgorodtseva, T P; Vitkina, T I; Lobanova, E G

    2011-01-01

    It is investigated conditions of system "lipid peroksidation - antioxidant protection" at rats of the line Wistar at prolonged formation alimentary dyslipidemia (DLP). It is established, that at formation DLP during 46 days in cells there was no increase in resistance and capacity of processes antioxidant protection. In prolonged DLP (90 days) was characterized by occurrence of the compensation-adaptive answer in the system "lipid peroksidation - antioxidant protection".

  18. Key molecular requirements for raft formation in lipid/cholesterol membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davit Hakobyan

    Full Text Available The lipid mixture of DPPC (saturated lipid/DUPC (unsaturated lipid/CHOL (cholesterol is studied with respect to its ability to form liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. We employ coarse-grained simulations with MARTINI force field. All three components are systematically modified in order to explore the relevant molecular properties, leading to phase separation. Specifically, we show that the DPPC/DUPC/CHOL system unmixes due to enthalpic DPPC-DPPC and DPPC-CHOL interactions. The phase separation remains unchanged, except for the formation of a gel phase at long times after decreasing the conformational degrees of freedom of the unsaturated DUPC. In contrast, the phase separation can be suppressed by softening the DPPC chains. In an attempt to mimic the ordering and unmixing effect of CHOL the latter is replaced by a stiff and shortened DPPC-like lipid. One still observes phase separation, suggesting that it is mainly the rigid and planar structure of CHOL which is important for raft formation. Addition of an extra bead to the head of CHOL has no notable impact on the phase separation of the system, supporting the irrelevance of the Umbrella model for the phase separation. Reduction of the conformational entropy of CHOL by stiffening its last bead results in a significant increase of the order of the DPPC/CHOL domain. This suggests that the conformational entropy of CHOL is important to prohibit the gelation process. The interleaflet interactions as mediated by the terminal molecular groups seem to have a strong impact on the possibility of a subsequent gelation process after phase separation.

  19. Formation and evaluation of semi-IPN of nafion 117 membrane for direct methanol fuel cell. 1. Crosslinked sulfonated polystyrene in the pores of nafion 117

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, P. P.; Kim, Beom Taek; Ahn, Ji Eun; Han, Hak Soo; Shul, Yong Gun

    The in situ polymerization and crosslinking of sodium salt of sulfonated styrene in the pores of nafion 117 membrane has been studied for the evaluation of electrical performance of the resultant semi-IPN (semi-interpenetrating polymer network) membrane in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The formation of semi-IPN is confirmed from the presence of aromatic characteristics peak in the FTIR spectra. Impedance results indicate that the semi-IPN sample with higher water uptake exhibits lower interfacial resistance compared to a sample with water uptake. This indicates that the semi-IPN formed in the pores of nafion 117 membrane has the ability to reduce methanol crossover by blocking the transportation. At higher temperatures (>110 °C) and lower current density (<25 mA cm -2), the electrical performance (power density) of a DMFC with a representative semi-IPN sample is observed to be higher than that with a nafion membrane.

  20. Molecular-scale studies of single-channel membrane pores : final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, James Grant; Evans, Kervin O.; Burns, Alan Richard; Swartzentruber, Brian Shoemaker

    2003-10-01

    We present our research results on membrane pores. The study was divided into two primary sections. The first involved the formation of protein pores in free-standing lipid bilayer membranes. The second involved the fabrication via surface micromachining techniques and subsequent testing of solid-state nanopores using the same characterization apparatus and procedures as that used for the protein pores. We were successful in our ability to form leak-free lipid bilayers, to detect the formation of single protein pores, and to monitor the translocation dynamics of individual homogeneous 100 base strands of DNA. Differences in translocation dynamics were observed when the base was switched from adenine to cytosine. The solid state pores (2-5 nm estimated) were fabricated in thin silicon nitride membranes. Testing of the solid sate pores indicated comparable currents for the same size protein pore with excellent noise and sensitivity. However, there were no conditions under which DNA translocation was observed. After considerable effort, we reached the unproven conclusion that multiple (<1 nm) pores were formed in the nitride membrane, thus explaining both the current sensitivity and the lack of DNA translocation blockages.

  1. Formation of arenicin-1 microdomains in bilayers and their specific lipid interaction revealed by Z-scan FCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macháň, Radek; Hof, Martin; Chernovets, Tatsiana; Zhmak, Maxim N; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V; Sýkora, Jan

    2011-04-01

    Z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is employed to characterize the interaction between arenicin-1 and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) of different compositions. Lipid analogue C8-BODIPY 500/510C5-HPC and ATTO 465 labelled arenicin-1 are used to detect changes in lipid and peptide diffusion upon addition of unlabelled arenicin-1 to SLBs. Arenicin-1 decreases lipid mobility in negatively charged SLBs. According to diffusion law analysis, microdomains of significantly lower lipid mobility are formed. The analysis of peptide FCS data confirms the presence of microdomains for anionic SLBs. No indications of microdomain formation are detected in SLBs composed purely of zwitterionic lipids. Additionally, our FCS results imply that arenicin-1 exists in the form of oligomers and/or aggregates when interacting with membranes of both compositions.

  2. Pectin-lipid self-assembly: influence on the formation of polyhydroxy fatty acids nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Guzman-Puyol

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles, named cutinsomes, have been prepared from aleuritic (9,10,16-trihidroxipalmitic acid and tomato fruit cutin monomers (a mixture of mainly 9(10,16-dihydroxypalmitic acid (85%, w/w and 16-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid (7.5%, w/w with pectin in aqueous solution. The process of formation of the nanoparticles of aleuritic acid plus pectin has been monitored by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, while their chemical and morphological characterization was analyzed by ATR-FTIR, TEM, and non-contact AFM. The structure of these nanoparticles can be described as a lipid core with a pectin shell. Pectin facilitated the formation of nanoparticles, by inducing their aggregation in branched chains and favoring the condensation between lipid monomers. Also, pectin determined the self-assembly of cutinsomes on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG surfaces, causing their opening and forming interconnected structures. In the case of cutin monomers, the nanoparticles are fused, and the condensation of the hydroxy fatty acids is strongly affected by the presence of the polysaccharide. The interaction of pectin with polyhydroxylated fatty acids could be related to an initial step in the formation of the plant biopolyester cutin.

  3. Pectin-Lipid Self-Assembly: Influence on the Formation of Polyhydroxy Fatty Acids Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Puyol, Susana; Benítez, José Jesús; Domínguez, Eva; Bayer, Ilker Sefik; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Heredia, Antonio; Heredia-Guerrero, José Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles, named cutinsomes, have been prepared from aleuritic (9,10,16-trihidroxipalmitic) acid and tomato fruit cutin monomers (a mixture of mainly 9(10),16-dihydroxypalmitic acid (85%, w/w) and 16-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid (7.5%, w/w)) with pectin in aqueous solution. The process of formation of the nanoparticles of aleuritic acid plus pectin has been monitored by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, while their chemical and morphological characterization was analyzed by ATR-FTIR, TEM, and non-contact AFM. The structure of these nanoparticles can be described as a lipid core with a pectin shell. Pectin facilitated the formation of nanoparticles, by inducing their aggregation in branched chains and favoring the condensation between lipid monomers. Also, pectin determined the self-assembly of cutinsomes on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces, causing their opening and forming interconnected structures. In the case of cutin monomers, the nanoparticles are fused, and the condensation of the hydroxy fatty acids is strongly affected by the presence of the polysaccharide. The interaction of pectin with polyhydroxylated fatty acids could be related to an initial step in the formation of the plant biopolyester cutin. PMID:25915490

  4. Quantitative characterization of fractures and pores in shale beds of the Lower Silurian, Longmaxi Formation, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuman Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fractures and pores are important storage and percolation spaces in tight reservoirs, and the identification, characterization and quantitative evaluation on them are the key aspects and difficulties in shale gas reservoir evaluation. In view of this, quantitative evaluation was performed on the fracture porosity of organic-rich shale intervals of Longmaxi Fm, Lower Silurian, Sichuan Basin (Wufeng Fm, Upper Ordovician included, after a dual-porosity medium porosity interpretation model was built on the basis of drilling data of Fuling Gasfield and Changning gas block in the Sichuan Basin. And then, the following conclusions are reached. First, shale fracture porosity interpretation by using dual-porosity medium model is the effective method to evaluate quantitatively the fracture porosity of shale reservoirs, and the development of quantitative characterization techniques of marine shale reservoir spaces. Second, the matrix pore volume of the principal pay zones in this area and its constitution regions are stably distributed with matrix porosity generally in the range of 4.6%–5.4%. And third, the development characteristics of fracture porosity vary largely in different tectonic regions and indifferent wellblocks and intervals even in the same tectonic region, presenting strong heterogeneity in terms of shale reservoir storage and percolation properties. It is indicated by quantitative characterization of fractures and pores that there are two types of shale gas reservoirs in Wufeng Fm – Longmaxi Fm, Sichuan Basin, including matrix porosity + fracture type and matrix porosity type. The former are mainly developed in the areas with special structure settings and they are characterized by developed fracture pores, high gas content, high free gas content, thick pay zones and high single-well production rate. And in the Sichuan Basin, its distribution is possibly in a restricted range. The latter are characterized by high matrix porosity

  5. Computer simulation study of nanoparticle interaction with a lipid membrane under mechanical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kan; Wang, Biao; Zhang, Yong; Zheng, Yue

    2013-01-07

    Pore formation of lipid bilayers under mechanical stress is critical to biological processes. A series of coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations of lipid bilayers with carbon nanoparticles different in size have been performed. Surface tension was applied to study the disruption of lipid bilayers by nanoparticles and the formation of pores inside the bilayers. The presence of small nanoparticles enhances the probability of water penetration thus decreasing the membrane rupture tension, while big nanoparticles have the opposite effect. Nanoparticle volume affects bilayer strength indirectly, and particle surface density can complicate the interaction. The structural, dynamic, elastic properties and lateral densities of lipid bilayers with nanoparticles under mechanical stress were analyzed. The results demonstrate the ability of nanoparticles to adjust the structural and dynamic properties of a lipid membrane, and to efficiently regulate the pore formation behavior and hydrophobicity of membranes.

  6. Pore-scale insights to the rate of organic carbon degradation and biofilm formation under variable hydro-biogeochemical conditions in soils and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Yan, Z.; Liu, Y.; Li, M.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical processes that control microbial growth, organic carbon degradation, and CO2 production and migration are fundamentally occur at the pore scale. In this presentation, we will describe our recent results of a pore-scale simulation research to investigate: 1) how moisture content and distribution affects oxygen delivery, organic carbon availability, and microbial activities that regulate the rate of organic carbon degradation and CO2 production in aerobic systems; and 2) how pore-scale reactive transport processes affect local microbial growth, biofilm formation, and overall rate of microbial reactions in anoxic systems. The results revealed that there is an optimal moisture content for aerobic bacterial respiration and CO2 production. When moisture is below the optimal value, organic carbon availability limits its degradation due to diffusion and osmotic stress to bacterial reactivity; and when moisture is above the optimal value, oxygen delivery limits microbial respiration. The optimal moisture condition is, however, a function of soil texture and physical heterogeneity, bioavailable soil organic carbon, and microbial community function. In anoxic and saturated system, simulation results show that biofilm preferentially forms in concave areas around sand particles and macro aggregates where cross-directional fluxes of organic carbon and electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate) favor microbial growth and attachment. The results provide important insights to the establishment of constitutive relationships between the macroscopic rates of soil organic carbon degradation and moisture content, and to the development of biogeochemical reactive transport models that incorporate biofilm structures and physio-chemical heterogeneity in soils and sediments.

  7. Push and pull forces in lipid raft formation: the push can be as important as the pull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chang; Krause, Martin R; Regen, Steven L

    2015-01-21

    Nearest-neighbor recognition measurements have been made using exchangeable mimics of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine in the liquid-ordered (lo) and liquid-disordered (ld) states. In the ld phase, the net interaction between these two lipids is repulsive. In the lo phase, their interactions are neither attractive nor repulsive. These results, together with previous nearest-neighbor measurements, imply that the overall driving force for lipid domain formation in bilayers composed of high-melting lipids, low-melting lipids, and cholesterol, corresponds to a strong pull (attraction) between the high-melting lipids and cholesterol, a significant push (repulsion) between the low-melting and high-melting lipids, and a significant push between the low-melting lipids and cholesterol. In a broader context, these results provide strong support for the notion that repulsive forces play a major role in the formation of lipid rafts.

  8. Oxidized LDL lipids increase β-amyloid production by SH-SY5Y cells through glutathione depletion and lipid raft formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Irundika H K; Mistry, Jayna; Fell, Shaun; Reis, Ana; Spickett, Corinne M; Polidori, Maria C; Lip, Gregory Y H; Griffiths, Helen R

    2014-10-01

    Elevated total cholesterol in midlife has been associated with increased risk of dementia in later life. We have previously shown that low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is more oxidized in the plasma of dementia patients, although total cholesterol levels are not different from those of age-matched controls. β-Amyloid (Aβ) peptide, which accumulates in Alzheimer disease (AD), arises from the initial cleavage of amyloid precursor protein by β-secretase-1 (BACE1). BACE1 activity is regulated by membrane lipids and raft formation. Given the evidence for altered lipid metabolism in AD, we have investigated a mechanism for enhanced Aβ production by SH-SY5Y neuronal-like cells exposed to oxidized LDL (oxLDL). The viability of SH-SY5Y cells exposed to 4μg oxLDL and 25µM 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OH-C) was decreased significantly. Lipids, but not proteins, extracted from oxLDL were more cytotoxic than oxLDL. In parallel, the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione was decreased at sublethal concentrations of lipids extracted from native and oxLDL. GSH loss was associated with an increase in acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) activity and lipid raft formation, which could be inhibited by the ASMase inhibitor desipramine. 27OH-C and total lipids from LDL and oxLDL independently increased Aβ production by SH-SY5Y cells, and Aβ accumulation could be inhibited by desipramine and by N-acetylcysteine. These data suggest a mechanism whereby oxLDL lipids and 27OH-C can drive Aβ production by GSH depletion, ASMase-driven membrane remodeling, and BACE1 activation in neuronal cells.

  9. Alkylated glass partition allows formation of solvent-free lipid bilayer by Montal-Mueller technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishchev, Oleg V; Indenbom, Andrey V

    2008-11-01

    Formation of bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) by Montal-Mueller technique across a small aperture in a partition film traditionally requires coating of the aperture with a hydrophobic substance, often just an organic solvent. However, we demonstrate here that the most effective coating is not strictly hydrophobic but rather provides water/oil repellent properties. BLM were formed from diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) on small 0.1-0.8 mm apertures made in specially prepared alkylated glass coverslips. The coverslips were either fluorosiliconized by 3,3,3-Trifluoropropyl-trimethoxysilane, which reduces adsorption of DPhPC in addition to creation of hydrophobic surface, or silanized, which promote adsorption of DPhPC. At fluorosiliconized surfaces stable BLM were formed. Specific capacitance of these BLM was 0.86 microF/cm(2)+/-5%, while their lateral tension was estimated as 4.3+/-0.4 mN/m. BLM were stable for hours under moderate voltage applied. At silanized surfaces stable BLM were formed only in acidic medium (3 glass can be robustly used for formation of model lipid membranes under physiological conditions.

  10. Effect of integral proteins in the phase stability of a lipid bilayer: Application to raft formation in cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Jordi; Sagués, Francesc; Reigada, Ramon

    2010-04-01

    The existence of lipid rafts is a controversial issue. The affinity of cholesterol for saturated lipids is manifested in macroscopic phase separation in model membranes, and is believed to be the thermodynamic driving force for raft formation. However, there is no clear reason to explain the small (nanometric) size of raft domains in cell membranes. In a recent paper Yethiraj and Weisshaar [Biophys. J. 93, 3113 (2007)] proposed that the effect of neutral integral membrane proteins may prevent from the formation of large lipid domains. In this paper we extend this approach by studying the effect of the protein size, as well as the lipid-protein interaction. Depending on these factors, two different mechanisms for nanodomain stabilization are shown to be possible for static proteins. The application of these results to a biological context is discussed.

  11. The Serine Protease EspC from Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Regulates Pore Formation and Cytotoxicity Mediated by the Type III Secretion System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Guignot

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Type III secretion systems (T3SSs are specialized macromolecular machines critical for bacterial virulence, and allowing the injection of bacterial effectors into host cells. The T3SS-dependent injection process requires the prior insertion of a protein complex, the translocon, into host cell membranes consisting of two-T3SS hydrophobic proteins, associated with pore-forming activity. In all described T3SS to date, a hydrophilic protein connects one hydrophobic component to the T3SS needle, presumably insuring the continuum between the hollow needle and the translocon. In the case of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, the hydrophilic component EspA polymerizes into a filament connecting the T3SS needle to the translocon composed of the EspB and EspD hydrophobic proteins. Here, we identify EspA and EspD as targets of EspC, a serine protease autotransporter of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE. We found that in vitro, EspC preferentially targets EspA associated with EspD, but was less efficient at proteolyzing EspA alone. Consistently, we found that EspC did not regulate EspA filaments at the surface of primed bacteria that was devoid of EspD, but controlled the levels of EspD and EspA secreted in vitro or upon cell contact. While still proficient for T3SS-mediated injection of bacterial effectors and cytoskeletal reorganization, an espC mutant showed increased levels of cell-associated EspA and EspD, as well as increased pore formation activity associated with cytotoxicity. EspP from enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC also targeted translocator components and its activity was interchangeable with that of EspC, suggesting a common and important function of these SPATEs. These findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism of T3SS-mediated pore formation and cytotoxicity control during EPEC/EHEC infection.

  12. Interaction of quorum signals with outer membrane lipids: insights into prokaryotic membrane vesicle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn-Warren, Lauren; Howe, Jörg; Garidel, Patrick; Richter, Walter; Steiniger, Frank; Roessle, Manfred; Brandenburg, Klaus; Whiteley, Marvin

    2008-07-01

    Bacteria have evolved elaborate communication strategies to co-ordinate their group activities, a process termed quorum sensing (QS). Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that utilizes QS for diverse activities, including disease pathogenesis. P. aeruginosa has evolved a novel communication system in which the signal molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal, PQS) is trafficked between cells via membrane vesicles (MVs). Not only is PQS packaged into MVs, it is required for MV formation. Although MVs are involved in important biological processes aside from signalling, the molecular mechanism of MV formation is unknown. To provide insight into the molecular mechanism of MV formation, we examined the interaction of PQS with bacterial lipids. Here, we show that PQS interacts strongly with the acyl chains and 4'-phosphate of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using PQS derivatives, we demonstrate that the alkyl side-chain and third position hydroxyl of PQS are critical for these interactions. Finally, we show that PQS stimulated purified LPS to form liposome-like structures. These studies provide molecular insight into P. aeruginosa MV formation and demonstrate that quorum signals serve important non-signalling functions.

  13. Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations: Linking the Chemical and Physical Effects to Elastic and Transport Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavko, G.; Vanorio, T.; Vialle, S.; Saxena, N.

    2014-03-31

    advection: because of an efficient mass transfer of reactants and products, the fluid remains acidic, far from thermodynamical equilibrium and the dissolution of calcite is important. These conclusions are consistent with the lab observations. Sandstones from the Tuscaloosa formation in Mississippi were also subjected to injection under representative in situ stress and pore pressure conditions. Again, both P- and S-wave velocities decreased with injection. Time-lapse SEM images indicated permanent changes induced in the sandstone microstructure by chamosite dissolution upon injection of CO2-rich brine. After injection, the sandstone showed an overall cleaner microstructure. Two main changes are involved: (a) clay dissolution between grains and at the grain contact and (b) rearrangement of grains due to compaction under pressure Theoretical and empirical models were developed to quantify the elastic changes associated with injection. Permanent changes to the rock frame resulted in seismic velocity-porosity trends that mimic natural diagenetic changes. Hence, when laboratory measurments are not available for a candidate site, these trends can be estimated from depth trends in well logs. New theoretical equations were developed to predict the changes in elastic moduli upon substitution of pore-filling material. These equations reduce to Gassmann’s equations for the case of constant frame properties, low seismic frequencies, and fluid changes in the pore space. The new models also predict the change dissolution or precipitation of mineral, which cannot be described with the conventional Gassmann theory.

  14. Revisiting the membrane interaction mechanism of a membrane-damaging β-barrel pore-forming toxin Vibrio cholerae cytolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2015-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) permeabilizes target cell membranes by forming transmembrane oligomeric β-barrel pores. VCC has been shown to associate with the target membranes via amphipathicity-driven spontaneous partitioning into the membrane environment. More specific interaction(s) of VCC with the membrane components have also been documented. In particular, specific binding of VCC with the membrane lipid components is believed to play a crucial role in determining the efficacy of the pore-formation process. However, the structural basis and the functional implications of the VCC interaction with the membrane lipids remain unclear. Here we show that the distinct loop sequences within the membrane-proximal region of VCC play critical roles to determine the functional interactions of the toxin with the membrane lipids. Alterations of the loop sequences via structure-guided mutagenesis allow amphipathicity-driven partitioning of VCC to the membrane lipid bilayer. Alterations of the loop sequences, however, block specific interactions of VCC with the membrane lipids and abort the oligomerization, membrane insertion, pore-formation and cytotoxic activity of the toxin. Present study identifies the structural signatures in VCC implicated for its functional interactions with the membrane lipid components, a process that presumably acts to drive the subsequent steps of the oligomeric β-barrel pore-formation and cytotoxic responses.

  15. The membranotropic activity of N-terminal peptides from the pore-forming proteins sticholysin I and II is modulated by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions as well as lipid composition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Uris Ros; Lohans Pedrera; Daylín Díaz; Juan C De Karam; Tatiane P Sudbrack; Pedro A Valiente; Diana Martínez; Eduardo M Cilli; Fabiola Pazos; Rosangela Itri; Maria E Lanio; Shirley Schreier; Carlos Álvarez

    2011-12-01

    The sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus produces two pore-forming proteins, sticholysins I and II (St I and St II). Despite their high identity (93%), these toxins exhibit differences in hemolytic activity that can be related to those found in their N-terminal. To clarify the contribution of the N-terminal amino acid residues to the activity of the toxins, we synthesized peptides spanning residues 1–31 of St I (StI1-31) or 1–30 of St II (StII1-30) and demonstrated that StII1-30 promotes erythrocyte lysis to a higher extent than StI1-31. For a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the peptide activity, here we studied their binding to lipid monolayers and pemeabilizing activity in liposomes. For this, we examined the effect on peptide membranotropic activity of including phospatidic acid and cholesterol in a lipid mixture of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. The results suggest the importance of continuity of the 1–10 hydrophobic sequence in StII1-30 for displaying higher binding and activity, in spite of both peptides’ abilities to form pores in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, the different peptide membranotropic action is explained in terms of the differences in hydrophobic and electrostatic peptide properties as well as the enhancing role of membrane inhomogeneities.

  16. Diel rhythmicity of lipid-body formation in a coral- Symbiodinium endosymbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.-N. U.; Kang, H.-J.; Weis, V. M.; Mayfield, A. B.; Jiang, P.-L.; Fang, L.-S.; Chen, C.-S.

    2012-06-01

    The biogenesis of intracellular lipid bodies (LBs) is dependent upon the symbiotic status between host corals and their intracellular dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium), though aside from this observation, little is known about LB behavior and function in this globally important endosymbiosis. The present research aimed to understand how LB formation and density are regulated in the gastrodermal tissue layer of the reef-building coral Euphyllia glabrescens. After tissue fixation and labeling with osmium tetroxide, LB distribution and density were quantified by imaging analysis of serial cryo-sections, and a diel rhythmicity was observed; the onset of solar irradiation at sunrise initiated an increase in LB density and size, which peaked at sunset. Both LB density and size then decreased to basal levels at night. On a seasonal timescale, LB density was found to be significantly positively correlated with seasonal irradiation, with highest densities found in the summer and lowest in the fall. In terms of LB lipid composition, only the concentration of wax esters, and not triglycerides or sterols, exhibited diel variability. This suggests that the metabolism and accumulation of lipids in LBs is at least partially light dependent. Ultrastructural examinations revealed that the LB wax ester concentration correlated with the number of electron-transparent inclusion bodies. Finally, there was a directional redistribution of the LB population across the gastroderm over the diel cycle. Collectively, these data reveal that coral gastrodermal LBs vary in composition and intracellular location over diel cycles, features which may shed light on their function within this coral-dinoflagellate mutualism.

  17. [Regularities of endogenous lipid metabolites formation in phorbol 12-miristate 13-acetate-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes at leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batikian, T B; Akopian, G V; Lazian, M P; Torgomian, T R; Kazarian, R A; Amirkhanian, E S; Tadevosian, Iu V

    2011-01-01

    Regularities of biologically active lipid metabolites formation in dynamics (5, 10, 30, 60 s) by phorbol 12-miristate 13-acetate stimulation in [14C]palmitic acid have been investigated in normal and leukemia peripheral blood lymphocytes prelabeled with [14C]palmitate. In normal cells there was two-phase formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol (5, 30 s), lysophosphatidylcholine (10, 60 s), as well as free palmitic acid at 10 s of stimulation. Under the identical experimental conditions there was inhibition of investigated lipid release processes at early (5 and 10 s) stages of stimulation of leukemic lymphocytes. At later (30, 60 s) terms of these lymphocytes the activation, basically, similar to norm changes in the formation of palmitic acid-containing metabolites except free palmitic acid (the level of which raised only at 60 second of the post-stimulation) was found. Various protein kinases C are involved in the regulation of investigated lipid levels at certain stages of signal transduction both in norm, and in blast cells. Short-term (5, 10 s) activations of healthy donors lymphocytes are coupled to functioning of Ca2+-independent isoforms of protein kinase C. The inhibition of this protein kinase C in leukemic cells leads to normalization of the investigated lipid release. The data obtained suggests disorders of early membrane-bound reactions in agonist - and a protein kinase C-mediated processes of formation palmitic acid-containing lipid metabolites in the leukemic cells in comparison with the norm.

  18. Five Decades with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Chemical Synthesis, Enzymatic Formation, Lipid Peroxidation and Its Biological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Catalá

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available I have been involved in research on polyunsaturated fatty acids since 1964 and this review is intended to cover some of the most important aspects of this work. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have followed me during my whole scientific career and I have published a number of studies concerned with different aspects of them such as chemical synthesis, enzymatic formation, metabolism, transport, physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of a reconstructed desaturase system in liposomes, lipid peroxidation, and their effects. The first project I became involved in was the organic synthesis of [1-14C] eicosa-11,14-dienoic acid, with the aim of demonstrating the participation of that compound as a possible intermediary in the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid “in vivo.” From 1966 to 1982, I was involved in several projects that study the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the eighties, we studied fatty acid binding protein. From 1990 up to now, our laboratory has been interested in the lipid peroxidation of biological membranes from various tissues and different species as well as liposomes prepared with phospholipids rich in PUFAs. We tested the effect of many antioxidants such as alpha tocopherol, vitamin A, melatonin and its structural analogues, and conjugated linoleic acid, among others.

  19. Physiological characterization of lipid accumulation and in vivo ester formation in Gordonia sp. KTR9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberly, Jed O; Ringelberg, David B; Indest, Karl J

    2013-02-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo biodiesel synthesis in Escherichia coli, however, ethyl ester formation was dependent on an external fatty acid feedstock. In contrast to E. coli, actinomycetes may be ideal organisms for direct biodiesel synthesis because of their capacity to synthesize high levels of triacylglcerides (TAGs). In this study, we investigated the physiology and associated TAG accumulation along with the in vivo ability to catalyze ester formation from exogenous short chain alcohol sources in Gordonia sp. KTR9, a strain that possesses a large number of genes dedicated to fatty acid and lipid biosynthesis. Total lipid fatty acids content increased by 75 % and TAG content increased by 50 % under nitrogen starvation conditions in strain KTR9. Strain KTR9 tolerated the exogenous addition of up to 4 % methanol, 4 % ethanol and 2 % propanol in the media. Increasing alcohol concentrations resulted in a decrease in the degree of saturation of recovered fatty acid alcohol esters and a slight increase in the fatty acid chain length. A linear dose dependency in fatty alcohol ester synthesis was observed in the presence of 0.5-2 % methanol and ethanol compared to control KTR9 strains grown in the absence of alcohols. An inspection of the KTR9 genome revealed the presence of several putative wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme A : diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) enzymes, encoded by atf gene homologs, that may catalyze the in vivo synthesis of fatty acid esters from short chain alcohols. Collectively, these results indicate that Gordonia sp. KTR9 may be a suitable actinomycete host strain for in vivo biodiesel synthesis.

  20. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation of binary charged lipid membranes: Phase separation and morphological dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Hiroaki; Shimokawa, Naofumi

    2016-01-01

    Biomembranes, which are mainly composed of neutral and charged lipids, exhibit a large variety of functional structures and dynamics. Here, we report a coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the phase separation and morphological dynamics in charged lipid bilayer vesicles. The screened long-range electrostatic repulsion among charged head groups delays or inhibits the lateral phase separation in charged vesicles compared with neutral vesicles, suggesting the transition of the phase-separation mechanism from spinodal decomposition to nucleation or homogeneous dispersion. Moreover, the electrostatic repulsion causes morphological changes, such as pore formation, and further transformations into disk, string, and bicelle structures, which are spatiotemporally coupled to the lateral segregation of charged lipids. Based on our coarse-grained MD simulation, we propose a plausible mechanism of pore formation at the molecular level. The pore formation in a charged-lipid-rich domain is initiated by the p...

  1. Label-Free Analysis of Cellular Lipid Droplet Formation by Non-Linear Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schie, Iwan W.

    Cellular lipid droplets (LD) are cellular organelles that can be found in every cell type. Recent research indicates that cellular LD are involved in a large number of cellular metabolic functions, such as lipid metabolism, protection from lipotoxicity, protein storage and degradation, and many more. LD formation is frequently associated with adverse health effects, i.e. alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes type-2, as well as many cardiovascular disorders. Despite their wide presence, LDs are the least studied and most poorly understood cellular organelles. Typically, LDs are investigated using fluorescence-based techniques that require staining with exogenous fluorophores. Other techniques, e.g. biochemical assays, require the destruction of cells that prohibit the analysis of living cells. Therefore, in my thesis research I developed a novel compound fast-scanning nonlinear optical microscope equipped with the ability to also acquire Raman spectra at specific image locations. This system allows us to image label-free cellular LD formation in living cells and analyze the composition of single cellular LDs. Images can be acquired at near video-rate (˜16 frames/s). Furthermore, the system has the ability to acquire very large images of tissue of up to 7.5x15 cm2 total area by stitching together scans with dimensions of 1x1 mm2 in less than 1 minute. The system also enables the user to acquire Raman spectra from points of interest in the multiphoton images and provides chemically-specific data from sample volumes as small as 1 femtoliter. In my thesis I used this setup to determine the effects of VLDL lipolysis products on primary rat hepatocytes. By analyzing the Raman spectra and comparing the peak ratios for saturated and unsaturated fatty acid it was determined that the small cellular LD are highly saturated, while large cellular LDs contain mostly unsaturated lipids. Furthermore, I established a method to determine the specific contribution

  2. Capsid protein VP4 of human rhinovirus induces membrane permeability by the formation of a size-selective multimeric pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Panjwani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-enveloped viruses must deliver their viral genome across a cell membrane without the advantage of membrane fusion. The mechanisms used to achieve this remain poorly understood. Human rhinovirus, a frequent cause of the common cold, is a non-enveloped virus of the picornavirus family, which includes other significant pathogens such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus. During picornavirus cell entry, the small myristoylated capsid protein VP4 is released from the virus, interacts with the cell membrane and is implicated in the delivery of the viral RNA genome into the cytoplasm to initiate replication. In this study, we have produced recombinant C-terminal histidine-tagged human rhinovirus VP4 and shown it can induce membrane permeability in liposome model membranes. Dextran size-exclusion studies, chemical crosslinking and electron microscopy demonstrated that VP4 forms a multimeric membrane pore, with a channel size consistent with transfer of the single-stranded RNA genome. The membrane permeability induced by recombinant VP4 was influenced by pH and was comparable to permeability induced by infectious virions. These findings present a molecular mechanism for the involvement of VP4 in cell entry and provide a model system which will facilitate exploration of VP4 as a novel antiviral target for the picornavirus family.

  3. Lipid bilayer microarray for parallel recording of transmembrane ion currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pioufle, Bruno; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Tabata, Kazuhito V; Noji, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a multiwell biochip for simultaneous parallel recording of ion current through transmembrane pores reconstituted in planar lipid bilayer arrays. Use of a thin poly(p-xylylene) (parylene) film having micrometer-sized apertures (phi=15-50 microm, t=20 microm) led to formation of highly stable bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) for incorporation of transmembrane pores; thus, a large number of BLMs could be arrayed without any skillful technique. We optically confirmed the simultaneous formation of BLMs in a 5x5 matrix, and in our durability test, the BLM lasted more than 15 h. Simultaneous parallel recording of alamethicin and gramicidin transmembrane pores in multiple contiguous recording sites demonstrated the feasibility of high-throughput screening of transmembrane ion currents in artificial lipid bilayers.

  4. Self-organization-induced three-dimensional honeycomb pattern in structure-controlled bulky methacrylate polymers: Synthesis, morphology, and mechanism of pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, V D; Asha, S K

    2006-11-02

    Here we report, for the first time, a novel molecular design for three-dimensional honeycomb structures through a self-organization of hydrogen-bonded bulky anchoring group in a methacrylic polymer backbone. The polymerizable monomer design includes a methacrylic double bond linked to various hydrophobic anchoring units such as ethane, n-decane, tricyclodecane (TCD), and adamantane via a hydrogen-bonded cycloaliphatic urethane linkage. The structures of the polymers were confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and the molecular weights of the polymer were determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The methacrylate polymers having tricyclodecane and adamantane bulky anchoring groups self-organized to produce three-dimensional honeycomb patterns in tetrahydrofuran-water solvent mixture at ambient conditions, whereas its linear analogues (ethane, n-decane) failed to produce any micropattern. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the above-prepared polymer films revealed that the structure of the polymer played a major role in the formation of the honeycomb patterns. The solution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements confirmed that the bulky tricyclodecane and adamantane polymers have strong hydrogen-bonding interaction compared to that of their linear analogues, which is the driving force for the micropatterns. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of the bulky polymers revealed that the polymers exist as vesicles or micelles in the solution, which leads to the formation of the honeycomb pattern. The honeycomb pattern formation in the bulky polymer systems suggests that two cooperative factors such as hydrogen-bonding interaction and hydrophobicity of bulky anchoring units are necessary to induce three-dimensional honeycomb structures. To investigate the effect of molecular weights and its distribution on the self-organization process, both benzoyl peroxide (BPO) initiated free radical and

  5. The amino- and carboxyl-terminal fragments of the Bacillus thuringensis Cyt1Aa toxin have differential roles on toxin oligomerization and pore formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Almazan, Claudia; Ruiz de Escudero, Iñigo; Emiliano Cantón, Pablo; Muñoz-Garay, Carlos; Pérez, Claudia; Gill, Sarjeet S.; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2011-01-01

    The Cyt toxins produced by the bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis show insecticidal activity against some insects, mainly dipteran larvae, being able to kill mosquitoes and black flies. However, they also possess a general cytolytic activity in vitro showing hemolytic activity in red blood cells. These proteins are composed of two outer layers of α-helix hairpins wrapped around a β-sheet. Regarding to their mode of action, one model proposed that the two outer layers of α-helix hairpins swing away from the β-sheet allowing insertion of β-strands into the membrane forming a pore after toxin oligomerization. The other model suggested a detergent-like mechanism of action of the toxin on the surface of the lipid bilayer. In this work we cloned the N- and C-terminal domains form Cyt1Aa and analyzed their effects in Cyt1Aa toxin action. The N-terminal domain shows a dominant negative phenotype inhibiting the in vitro hemolytic activity of Cyt1Aa in red blood cells and the in vivo insecticidal activity of Cyt1Aa against Aedes aegypti larvae. In addition, N-terminal region is able to induce aggregation of Cyt1Aa toxin in solution. Finally, C-terminal domain composed mainly of β-strands, is able to bind to the SUV liposomes, suggesting that this region of the toxin is involved in membrane interaction. Overall, our data indicate that the two isolated domains of Cyt1Aa have different roles in toxin action. The N-terminal region is involved in toxin aggregation while the C-terminal domain in the interaction of the toxin with the lipid membrane. PMID:21142020

  6. Evidence for the involvement of lipid rafts localized at the ER-mitochondria associated membranes in autophagosome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Tina; Matarrese, Paola; Manganelli, Valeria; Marconi, Matteo; Tinari, Antonella; Gambardella, Lucrezia; Faggioni, Alberto; Misasi, Roberta; Sorice, Maurizio; Malorni, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) are subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that interact with mitochondria. This membrane scrambling between ER and mitochondria appears to play a critical role in the earliest steps of autophagy. Recently, lipid microdomains, i.e. lipid rafts, have been identified as further actors of the autophagic process. In the present work, a series of biochemical and molecular analyses has been carried out in human fibroblasts with the specific aim of characterizing lipid rafts in MAMs and to decipher their possible implication in the autophagosome formation. In fact, the presence of lipid microdomains in MAMs has been detected and, in these structures, a molecular interaction of the ganglioside GD3, a paradigmatic "brick" of lipid rafts, with core-initiator proteins of autophagy, such as AMBRA1 and WIPI1, was revealed. This association seems thus to take place in the early phases of autophagic process in which MAMs have been hypothesized to play a key role. The functional activity of GD3 was suggested by the experiments carried out by knocking down ST8SIA1 gene expression, i.e., the synthase that leads to the ganglioside formation. This experimental condition results in fact in the impairment of the ER-mitochondria crosstalk and the subsequent hindering of autophagosome nucleation. We thus hypothesize that MAM raft-like microdomains could be pivotal in the initial organelle scrambling activity that finally leads to the formation of autophagosome.

  7. Differential roles of CIDEA and CIDEC in insulin-induced anti-apoptosis and lipid droplet formation in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Minoru; Nagasawa, Michiaki; Hara, Tomoko; Ide, Tomohiro; Murakami, Koji

    2010-07-01

    Both insulin and the cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector (CIDE) family play important roles in apoptosis and lipid droplet formation. However, regulation of the CIDE family by insulin and the contribution of the CIDE family to insulin actions remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether insulin regulates expression of the CIDE family and which subtypes contribute to insulin-induced anti-apoptosis and lipid droplet formation in human adipocytes. Insulin decreased CIDEA and increased CIDEC but not CIDEB mRNA expression. Starvation-induced apoptosis in adipocytes was significantly inhibited when insulin decreased the CIDEA mRNA level. Small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of CIDEA inhibited starvation-induced apoptosis similarly to insulin and restored insulin deprivation-reduced adipocyte number, whereas CIDEC depletion did not. Lipid droplet size of adipocytes was increased when insulin increased the CIDEC mRNA level. In contrast, insulin-induced enlargement of lipid droplets was markedly abrogated by depletion of CIDEC but not CIDEA. Furthermore, depletion of CIDEC, but not CIDEA, significantly increased glycerol release from adipocytes. These results suggest that CIDEA and CIDEC are novel genes regulated by insulin in human adipocytes and may play key roles in the effects of insulin, such as anti-apoptosis and lipid droplet formation.

  8. Specific DNA duplex formation at an artificial lipid bilayer: fluorescence microscopy after Sybr Green I staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Werz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the immobilization of different probe oligonucleotides (4, 7, 10 carrying each a racemic mixture of 2,3-bis(hexadecyloxypropan-1-ol (1a at the 5’-terminus on a stable artificial lipid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC. The bilayer separates two compartments (cis/trans channel of an optical transparent microfluidic sample carrier with perfusion capabilities. Injection of unlabeled target DNA sequences (6, 8, or 9, differing in sequence and length, leads in the case of complementarity to the formation of stable DNA duplexes at the bilayer surface. This could be verified by Sybr Green I double strand staining, followed by incubation periods and thorough perfusions, and was visualized by single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. The different bilayer-immobilized complexes consisting of various DNA duplexes and the fluorescent dye were studied with respect to the kinetics of their formation as well as to their stability against perfusion.

  9. Shiga toxin induces membrane reorganization and formation of long range lipid order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovyeva, Vita; Johannes, Ludger; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2015-01-01

    microscopy. A content of 1% of glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) receptor lipids in a bilayer was used to bind the Shiga toxin B-subunit to the surface of gel domains. Binding of the Shiga toxin B-subunit to lipids led to the modulation of orientational membrane texture in gel domains and induced...... membrane reordering. When Shiga toxin was added above the lipid chain melting temperature, the toxin interaction with the membrane induced rearrangement and clustering of Gb3 lipids that resulted in the long range order and alignment of lipids in gel domains. The toxin induced redistribution of Gb3 lipids...... inside gel domains is governed by the temperature at which Shiga toxin was added to the membrane: above or below the phase transition. The temperature is thus one of the critical factors controlling lipid organization and texture in the presence of Shiga toxin. Lipid chain ordering imposed by Shiga toxin...

  10. Photoirradiation of representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and twelve isomeric methylbenz[a]anthracene with UVA light: formation of lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qingsu; Chou, Ming W; Yin, Jun J; Howard, Paul C; Yu, Hongtao; Fu, Peter P

    2006-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread genotoxic environmental pollutants, which require metabolic activation in order to exert biological activities, including mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Photoactivation is another activation pathway that can lead to PAH genotoxicity. In this paper, we demonstrate that photoirradiation of a series of representative PAHs, with and without bearing a methyl substituent, with UVA light in the presence of methyl linoleate resulted in the formation of methyl linoleate hydroperoxides (a lipid peroxide). The lipid peroxide formation was inhibited by dithiothreitol (DTT) (free radical scavenger), NaN3 (singlet oxygen and free radical scavenger), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) (superoxide scavenger), but was enhanced by the presence of deuterium oxide (D2O) (extends singlet oxygen lifetime). These results suggest that photoirradiation of PAHs by UVA light generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), which induce lipid peroxidation.

  11. Formation of 7-(2-oxoethyl) guanine from lipid peroxidation and vinyl chloride exposure in male sprague dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    With a development of a new sensitive LC-MS/MS method to analyze 7-(2-oxoethylguanine) (7OEG), we confirmed and differentiated 7-0EG DNA adduct formation endogenously from lipid peroxidation and exogenously from Vinyl Chloride (VC) exposure. VC is an industrial chemical that is ...

  12. In depth study of acrylamide formation in coffee during roasting: role of sucrose decomposition and lipid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocadağlı, Tolgahan; Göncüoğlu, Neslihan; Hamzalıoğlu, Aytül; Gökmen, Vural

    2012-09-01

    Coffee, as a source of acrylamide, needs to be investigated in depth to understand the contribution of different precursors. This study aimed to investigate the contributions of sucrose decomposition and lipid oxidation on acrylamide formation in coffee during roasting. Coffee beans and model systems were used to monitor the accumulation of neo-formed carbonyls during heating through sucrose decomposition and lipid oxidation. High resolution mass spectrometry analyses confirmed the formation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and 3,4-dideoxyosone, which were identified as the major sugar decomposition products in both roasted coffee and model systems. Among others, 2-octenal, 2,4-decadienal, 2,4-heptadienal, 4-hydroxynonenal, and 4,5-epoxy-2-decenal were identified in relatively high quantities in roasted coffee. Formation and elimination of HMF in coffee during roasting had a kinetic pattern similar to those of acrylamide. Its concentration rapidly increased within 10 min followed by an exponential decrease afterward. The amount of lipid oxidation products tended to increase linearly during roasting. It was concluded from the results that roasting formed a pool of neo-formed carbonyls from sucrose decomposition and lipid oxidation, and they play certain role on acrylamide formation in coffee.

  13. Impact of antioxidants on the formation of volatile secondary lipid oxidation products in oil-in-water emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food emulsions are particularly susceptible to lipid oxidation, which leads to the formation of off-flavors and odors, and ultimately, shorter product shelf lives. Here we examine antioxidants for use in emulsions from a variety of different sources, including natural product extracts as well as rat...

  14. Lutzomyia longipalpis saliva triggers lipid body formation and prostaglandin E₂ production in murine macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Théo Araújo-Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sand fly saliva contains molecules that modify the host's hemostasis and immune responses. Nevertheless, the role played by this saliva in the induction of key elements of inflammatory responses, such as lipid bodies (LB, also known as lipid droplets and eicosanoids, has been poorly investigated. LBs are cytoplasmic organelles involved in arachidonic acid metabolism that form eicosanoids in response to inflammatory stimuli. In this study, we assessed the role of salivary gland sonicate (SGS from Lutzomyia (L. longipalpis, a Leishmania infantum chagasi vector, in the induction of LBs and eicosanoid production by macrophages in vitro and ex vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Different doses of L. longipalpis SGS were injected into peritoneal cavities of C57BL/6 mice. SGS induced increased macrophage and neutrophil recruitment into the peritoneal cavity at different time points. Sand fly saliva enhanced PGE₂ and LTB₄ production by harvested peritoneal leukocytes after ex vivo stimulation with a calcium ionophore. At three and six hours post-injection, L. longipalpis SGS induced more intense LB staining in macrophages, but not in neutrophils, compared with mice injected with saline. Moreover, macrophages harvested by peritoneal lavage and stimulated with SGS in vitro presented a dose- and time-dependent increase in LB numbers, which was correlated with increased PGE₂ production. Furthermore, COX-2 and PGE-synthase co-localized within the LBs induced by L. longipalpis saliva. PGE₂ production by macrophages induced by SGS was abrogated by treatment with NS-398, a COX-2 inhibitor. Strikingly, SGS triggered ERK-1/2 and PKC-α phosphorylation, and blockage of the ERK-1/2 and PKC-α pathways inhibited the SGS effect on PGE₂ production by macrophages. CONCLUSION: In sum, our results show that L. longipalpis saliva induces lipid body formation and PGE₂ production by macrophages ex vivo and in vitro via the ERK-1/2 and PKC

  15. Fluorescence detection of lipid-induced oligomeric intermediates involved in lysozyme "amyloid-like" fiber formation driven by anionic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Ana M; Ricardo, Joana C; Fedorov, Aleksander; Prieto, Manuel; Coutinho, Ana

    2013-03-14

    Recent findings implicate that "amyloid-like" fiber formation by several non-amyloidogenic proteins/peptides can be triggered by negatively charged lipid membranes. In order to elucidate the factors that govern the formation of these structures, the interaction of lysozyme with phosphatidylserine-containing lipid vesicles was studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Three consecutive stages in the interaction of Alexa488-fluorescently labeled lysozyme (Lz-A488) with acidic lipid vesicles were identified in ensemble average measurements. The variation of the mean fluorescence lifetime of Lz-A488 as a function of the surface coverage of the liposomes was quantitatively described by a cooperative partition model that assumes that monomeric lysozyme molecules partition into the bilayer surface and reversibly assemble into oligomers with k subunits (k ≥ 6). The global fit to the experimental data covering a wide range of experimental conditions was performed by taking into account electrostatic effects by means of the Gouy-Chapman theory using a single self-consistent pair of parameters (aggregation constant and stoichiometry). The lipid-protein supramolecular assemblies formed at a low lipid/protein molar ratio were further characterized by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy at the single-fiber level, which reported that quenched oligomers are the predominant species in these structures.

  16. Lipid Droplet Formation, Their Localization and Dynamics during Leishmania major Macrophage Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Rabhi

    Full Text Available Leishmania, the causative agent of vector-borne diseases, known as leishmaniases, is an obligate intracellular parasite within mammalian hosts. The outcome of infection depends largely on the activation status of macrophages, the first line of mammalian defense and the major target cells for parasite replication. Understanding the strategies developed by the parasite to circumvent macrophage defense mechanisms and to survive within those cells help defining novel therapeutic approaches for leishmaniasis. We previously showed the formation of lipid droplets (LDs in L. major infected macrophages. Here, we provide novel insights on the origin of the formed LDs by determining their cellular distribution and to what extent these high-energy sources are directed to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. We show that the ability of L. major to trigger macrophage LD accumulation is independent of parasite viability and uptake and can also be observed in non-infected cells through paracrine stimuli suggesting that LD formation is from cellular origin. The accumulation of LDs is demonstrated using confocal microscopy and live-cell imagin in parasite-free cytoplasmic region of the host cell, but also promptly recruited to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. Indeed LDs are observed inside parasitophorous vacuole and in parasite cytoplasm suggesting that Leishmania parasites besides producing their own LDs, may take advantage of these high energy sources. Otherwise, these LDs may help cells defending against parasitic infection. These metabolic changes, rising as common features during the last years, occur in host cells infected by a large number of pathogens and seem to play an important role in pathogenesis. Understanding how Leishmania parasites and different pathogens exploit this LD accumulation will help us define the common mechanism used by these different pathogens to manipulate and/or take advantage of this high-energy source.

  17. Fluorescence formation from the interaction of DNA with lipid oxidation degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, E N; Neff, W E; Brooks, D D; Fujimoto, K

    1987-06-23

    To clarify the mechanism of fluorescence formation between DNA and lipid degradation products in the presence of ferric chloride and ascorbic acid, a number of carbonyl compounds and decomposition products of pure methyl linolenate hydroperoxides were examined. Keto derivatives of methyl ricinoleate, linoleate, and oleate, alkanals and 2-alkenals produced little or no fluorescence with DNA in the presence of ferric chloride-ascorbic acid. 2,4-Alkadienals were more active and 2,4,7-decatrienal was the most active. Mixtures of volatile aldehydes prepared from linolenate hydroperoxide decomposed either thermally or with iron and ascorbate had the same activity as 2,4,7-decatrienal. Higher molecular-weight products from the decomposition of methyl linolenate hydroperoxides showed relatively low activity. beta-Carotene, alpha-tocopherol and other antioxidants effectively reduced the amount of fluorescence formed by linolenate hydroperoxides. The results suggest that, in addition to hydroperoxide decomposition products, singlet oxygen and/or free radical species contribute significantly to the fluorescence formed from the interaction of methyl linolenate hydroperoxides with DNA in the presence of ferric chloride and ascorbic acid.

  18. Lipid-specific β-sheet formation in a mussel byssus protein domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Markus; Elsner, Martina B; Scheibel, Thomas

    2013-09-09

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP) or regions (IDR) can adopt multiple conformational states, depending on the interaction partners they encounter. This enables proteins or individual domains to fulfill multiple functions. Here, we analyzed the flank sequences of preCol-NG, one of three collagenous proteins of a mussel byssus thread governing its mechanical performance. preCol-NG comprises a collagen domain and nonrepetitive termini enclosing specific flank regions characterized by tandem repeats known from silk proteins, protein elastomers, and plant cell wall-associated proteins. We recombinantly produced a protein mimicking the M. galloprovincialis preCol-NG C-terminal flank region. The protein was intrinsically unfolded in solution, even at elevated temperatures. However, upon contact with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) reversible β-structure formation occurred, reminiscent of partitioning-folding coupling. This behavior of preCol-NG flank domains likely impacts byssogenesis and sheds new light on a distinct mechanism of how fibrous protein materials might be achieved by lipid-induced self-assembly in nature.

  19. Formation mechanism, degradation behavior, and cytocompatibility of a nanorod-shaped HA and pore-sealed MgO bilayer coating on magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Han, Yong; Qi, Kai

    2014-10-22

    A novel bilayer coating (HT24h) was fabricated on magnesium using microarc oxidation (MAO) and hydrothermal treatment (HT). The coating comprises an outer layer of narrow interrod spaced hydroxyapatite (HA) nanorods and an inner layer of MgO containing Mg(OH)2/HA-sealing-pores. The hydrothermal formation mechanism of HA nanorods on MAO-formed MgO was explored. Also, evolution of structure and bonding integrity of HT24h coating with immersion in physiological saline (PS) for 0-90 days, corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility of the coating were investigated, together with MgO containing Mg(OH)2-sealing-pores (HT2h) and porous MgO (MAO) coatings. Corrosion resistance was identified by three-point bending and electrochemical tests in PS, while cytocompatibility was determined by MTT, live/dead staining, and vinculin-actin-nucleus tricolor staining assays of hFOB1.19 cells. Immersion tests indicate that cracking rather than delamination is a common feature in most areas of the coatings up to day 90 and degradation is the reason for thinning in thickness of the coatings. MAO and HT2h coatings exhibit a significant thinning due to fast degradation of MgO. However, HT24h coating shows a quite small thinning, owing to the fact that the HA nanorods underwent quite slow degradation while the underlying MgO only underwent conversion to Mg(OH)2 without dissolution of the Mg(OH)2. Scratch tests reveal that HT24h coating still retains relatively high bonding integrity, although the failure position changes from the MgO interior to a point between the HA and MgO layers after 90 days of immersion. HT24h coating appears far more effective than MAO and HT2h coatings in reducing degradation and maintaining the mechanical integrity of Mg, as well as enhancing the mitochondrial activity, adhesion, and proliferation of osteoblasts.

  20. NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion is required for nuclear envelope formation and completion of nuclear pore complex assembly in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Tina; Ramadan, Kristijan; Schlundt, Andreas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Meyer, Hemmo H

    2007-08-15

    Despite the progress in understanding nuclear envelope (NE) reformation after mitosis, it has remained unclear what drives the required membrane fusion and how exactly this is coordinated with nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. Here, we show that, like other intracellular fusion reactions, NE fusion in Xenopus laevis egg extracts is mediated by SNARE proteins that require activation by NSF. Antibodies against Xenopus NSF, depletion of NSF or the dominant-negative NSF(E329Q) variant specifically inhibited NE formation. Staging experiments further revealed that NSF was required until sealing of the envelope was completed. Moreover, excess exogenous alpha-SNAP that blocks SNARE function prevented membrane fusion and caused accumulation of non-flattened vesicles on the chromatin surface. Under these conditions, the nucleoporins Nup107 and gp210 were fully recruited, whereas assembly of FxFG-repeat-containing nucleoporins was blocked. Together, we define NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events as essential steps during NE formation downstream of Nup107 recruitment, and upstream of membrane flattening and completion of NPC assembly.

  1. Integration and oligomerization of Bax protein in lipid bilayers characterized by single molecule fluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Dongxiang

    2014-11-14

    Bax is a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein. The activated Bax translocates to mitochondria, where it forms pore and permeabilizes the mitochondrial outer membrane. This process requires the BH3-only activator protein (i.e. tBid) and can be inhibited by anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins such as Bcl-xL. Here by using single molecule fluorescence techniques, we studied the integration and oligomerization of Bax in lipid bilayers. Our study revealed that Bax can bind to lipid membrane spontaneously in the absence of tBid. The Bax pore formation undergoes at least two steps: pre-pore formation and membrane insertion. The activated Bax triggered by tBid or BH3 domain peptide integrates on bilayers and tends to form tetramers, which are termed as pre-pore. Subsequent insertion of the pre-pore into membrane is highly dependent on the composition of cardiolipin in lipid bilayers. Bcl-xL can translocate Bax from membrane to solution and inhibit the pore formation. The study of Bax integration and oligomerization at the single molecule level provides new evidences that may help elucidate the pore formation of Bax and its regulatory mechanism in apoptosis. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Metabolic networks and bioenergetics of Aurantiochytrium sp. B-072 during storage lipid formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montri Chaisawang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Baffled shake flask cultivation of Aurantiochytrium sp. B-072 was carried out at in a glucose-monosodium glutamate mineral medium at different C/N-ratios (30-165 with glucose fixed at 90 g/L. With increasing C/N-ratio, a modest increase in lipid content (60 to 73 % w/w was observed whereas fat-free biomass decreased but overall biomass showed little variation. FA-profiles were not affected to a large extent by C/N-ratio and absolute docosahexaenoic (DHA-levels fell in narrow range (5-6 g/L. However at C/N > 64 a rapid decrease in lipid synthetic rate and/or incomplete glucose utilization occurred. Glucose and FA-fluxes based on fat-free biomass peaked at a C/N ratio of 56. This condition was chosen for calculation of the redox balance (NAD(PH and energy (ATP requirement and to estimate the in vivo P/O ratio during the main period of fatty acid biosynthesis. Several models with different routes for NADPH, acetyl-CoA formation and re-oxidation of OAA formed via ATP-citrate lyase were considered as these influence the redox- and energy balance. As an example, using a commonly shown scheme whereby NADPH is supplied by a cytosolic "transhydrogenase cycle" (pyruvate-OAA-malate-pyruvate and OAA formed by ATP-citrate lyase is recycled via import into the mitochondria as malate, the calculated NADPH-requirement amounted to 5.5 with an ATP-demand of 10.5 mmol/(g fat-free biomass x h and an in vivo P/O-ratio (not including non-growth associated maintenance of 1.6. The lowest ATP requirement is found when acetyl-CoA would be transported directly from the mitochondria to the cytosol by carnitine acetyltransferase. Assay of some enzymes critical for NADPH supply indicates that activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the first enzyme in the HMP pathway, is far insufficient for the required NADPH-flux and malic enzyme must be a major source. Activity of the latter (ca. 300 mU/mg protein far exceeds that in oleaginous fungi and yeast.

  3. Formation and Functions of the Corneocyte Lipid Envelope (CLE)☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Peter M.; Gruber, Robert; Crumrine, Debra; Menon, Gopinathan; Williams, Mary L; Wakefield, Joan S.; Holleran, Walter M.; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Corneocytes in mammalian stratum corneum are surrounded by a monolayer of covalently bound ω-OH-ceramides that form the corneocyte (-bound) lipid envelope (CLE). We review here the structure, composition, and possible functions of this structure, with insights provided by inherited and acquired disorders of lipid metabolism. PMID:24076475

  4. A New Route to Liposil Formation by an Interfacial Sol-Gel Process Confined by Lipid Bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shukun; Yang, Lu; Lu, Yaxing; Chen, Jian-Gang; Song, Shaofei; Hu, Daodao; Parikh, Atul

    2015-11-18

    We report a new and simple approach to prepare a class of silica-reinforced liposomes with hybrid core-shell nanostructures. The amphiphilic natural structure of lipids was exploited to sequester hydrophobic molecules, namely precursor TEOS and pyrene, in the hydrophobic midplane of liposomal bilayer assemblies in the aqueous phase. Subsequent interfacial hydrolysis of TEOS at the bilayer/water interface and ensuing condensation within the hydrophobic interstices of the lipid bilayer drives silica formation in situ, producing a novel class of silica-lipid hybrid liposils. Structural characterization by scanning- and transmission electron microscopy confirm that the liposils so generated preserve closed topologies and size-monodipersity of the parent lecithin liposomes, and DSC-TGA and XRD measurements provide evidence for the silica coating. Monitoring fluorescence measurements using embedded pyrene yield detailed information on microenvironment changes, which occur during sol-gel process and shed light on the structural evolution during silica formation. We envisage that liposils formed by this simple, new approach, exploiting the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer to spatially localize silica-forming precursors enables preparation of stable liposils exhibiting capacity for cargo encapsulation, bicompatibility, and fluorescence monitoring, more generally opening a window for construction of stable, functional hybrid materials.

  5. The neutral lipid composition present in the digestive vacuole of Plasmodium falciparum concentrates heme and mediates β-hematin formation with an unusually low activation energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Anh N; Sandlin, Rebecca D; Omar, Aneesa; Egan, Timothy J; Wright, David W

    2010-11-30

    In eukaryotic cells, neutral lipids serve as major energy storage molecules; however, in Plasmodium falciparum, a parasite responsible for causing malaria in humans, neutral lipids may have other functions during the intraerythrocytic stage of the parasite life cycle. Specifically, experimental data suggest that neutral lipid structures behave as a catalyst for the crystallization of hemozoin, a detoxification byproduct of several blood-feeding organisms, including malaria parasites. Synthetic neutral lipid droplets (SNLDs) were produced by depositing a lipid blend solution comprised of mono- and diglycerides onto an aqueous surface. These lipid droplets are able to mediate the production of brown pigments that are morphologically and chemically identical to hemozoin. The partitioning of heme into these SNLDs was examined by employing Nile Red, a lipid specific dye. Soluble ferriprotoporphyrin IX was observed to spontaneously localize to the lipid droplets, partitioning in a pH-dependent manner with an estimated log P of 2.6. Interestingly, the pH profile of heme partitioning closely resembles that of β-hematin formation. Differential scanning calorimetry and kinetic studies demonstrated that the SNLDs provide a unique environment that promotes hemozoin formation. SNLD-mediated formation of the malaria pigment displayed an activation energy barrier lower than those of individual lipid components. In particular, lipid droplets composed of diglycerides displayed activation barriers lower than those composed of monoglycerides. This difference was attributed to the greater fluidity of these lipids. In conjunction with the known pattern of lipid body proliferation, it is suggested that neutral lipid structures within the digestive vacuole not only are the location of in vivo hemozoin formation but are also essential for the survival of the parasite by functioning as a kinetically competent and site specific mediator for heme detoxification.

  6. Spontaneous formation of two-dimensional and three-dimensional cholesterol crystals in single hydrated lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziblat, Roy; Fargion, Iael; Leiserowitz, Leslie; Addadi, Lia

    2012-07-18

    Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements were performed on single hydrated bilayers and monolayers of Ceramide/Cholesterol/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocyholine at varying concentrations. There are substantial differences in the phase and structure behavior of the crystalline domains formed within the bilayers relative to the corresponding monolayers, due to interactions between the opposing lipid leaflets. Depending on the lipid composition, these interactions lead to phase separation and formation of cholesterol crystals. The cholesterol and ceramide/cholesterol mixed phases were further characterized at 37°C by immunolabeling with specific antibodies recognizing ordered molecular arrays of cholesterol. Previous studies have shown that cholesterol may nucleate in artificial membranes to form thick two-dimensional bilayer crystals. The study herein demonstrates further growth of cholesterol into three-dimensional crystals. We believe that these results may provide further insight into the formation of cholesterol crystals in early stages of atherosclerosis inflammation.

  7. Neutral lipids associated with haemozoin mediate efficient and rapid β-haematin formation at physiological pH, temperature and ionic composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambele Melvin A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The malaria parasite disposes of host-derived ferrihaem (iron(IIIprotoporphyrin IX, Fe(IIIPPIX by conversion to crystalline haemozoin in close association with neutral lipids. Lipids mediate synthetic haemozoin (β-haematin formation very efficiently. However, the effect on reaction rates of concentrations of lipid, Fe(IIIPPIX and physiologically relevant ions and biomolecules are unknown. Methods Lipid emulsions containing Fe(IIIPPIX were prepared in aqueous medium (pH 4.8, 37°C to mediate β-haematin formation. The reaction was quenched at various times and free Fe(IIIPPIX measured colorimetrically as a pyridine complex and the kinetics and yields analysed. Products were also characterized by FTIR, TEM and electron diffraction. Autofluorescence was also used to monitor β-haematin formation by confocal microscopy. Results At fixed Fe(IIIPPIX concentration, β-haematin yields remained constant with decreasing lipid concentration until a cut-off ratio was reached whereupon efficiency decreased dramatically. For the haemozoin-associated neutral lipid blend (NLB and monopalmitoylglycerol (MPG, this occurred below a lipid/Fe(IIIPPIX (L/H ratio of 0.54. Rate constants were found to increase with L/H ratio above the cut-off. At 16 μM MPG, Fe(IIIPPIX concentration could be raised until the L/H ratio reached the same ratio before a sudden decline in yield was observed. MPG-mediated β-haematin formation was relatively insensitive to biologically relevant cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, or anions (H2PO4−, HCO3−, ATP, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, glutathione. Confocal microscopy demonstrated β-haematin formation occurs in association with the lipid particles. Conclusions Kinetics of β-haematin formation have shown that haemozoin-associated neutral lipids alone are capable of mediating β-haematin formation at adequate rates under physiologically realistic conditions of ion concentrations to account for haemozoin formation.

  8. Rapid quantitative analysis of lipids using a colorimetric method in a microplate format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Shen; Zheng, Yi; VanderGheynst, Jean S

    2011-01-01

    A colorimetric sulfo-phospho-vanillin (SPV) method was developed for high throughput analysis of total lipids. The developed method uses a reaction mixture that is maintained in a 96-well microplate throughout the entire assay. The new assay provides the following advantages over other methods of lipid measurement: (1) background absorbance can be easily corrected for each well, (2) there is less risk of handling and transferring sulfuric acid contained in reaction mixtures, (3) color develops more consistently providing more accurate measurement of absorbance, and (4) the assay can be used for quantitative measurement of lipids extracted from a wide variety of sources. Unlike other spectrophotometric approaches that use fluorescent dyes, the optimal spectra and reaction conditions for the developed assay do not vary with the sample source. The developed method was used to measure lipids in extracts from four strains of microalgae. No significant difference was found in lipid determination when lipid content was measured using the new method and compared to results obtained using a macro-gravimetric method.

  9. Pharmacological inhibition of lipid droplet formation enhances the effectiveness of curcumin in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Issan; Cui, Yiming; Amiri, Abdolali; Ding, Yidan; Campbell, Robert E; Maysinger, Dusica

    2016-03-01

    Increased lipid droplet number and fatty acid synthesis allow glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and aggressive type of brain cancer, to withstand accelerated metabolic rates and resist therapeutic treatments. Lipid droplets are postulated to sequester hydrophobic therapeutic agents, thereby reducing drug effectiveness. We hypothesized that the inhibition of lipid droplet accumulation in glioblastoma cells using pyrrolidine-2, a cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 alpha inhibitor, can sensitize cancer cells to the killing effect of curcumin, a promising anticancer agent isolated from the turmeric spice. We observed that curcumin localized in the lipid droplets of human U251N glioblastoma cells. Reduction of lipid droplet number using pyrrolidine-2 drastically enhanced the therapeutic effect of curcumin in both 2D and 3D glioblastoma cell models. The mode of cell death involved was found to be mediated by caspase-3. Comparatively, the current clinical chemotherapeutic standard, temozolomide, was significantly less effective in inducing glioblastoma cell death. Together, our results suggest that the inhibition of lipid droplet accumulation is an effective way to enhance the chemotherapeutic effect of curcumin against glioblastoma multiforme.

  10. Fibre-induced lipid peroxidation leads to DNA adduct formation in Salmonella typhimurium TA104 and rat lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, P J; Faux, S P

    1996-03-01

    Certain end-products of lipid peroxidation bind to DNA forming a fluorescent chromophore. Incubation of both Salmonella typhimurium TA104 and a rat lung fibroblast cell line, RFL-6, with various types of mineral fibre resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in DNA fluorescence. The increase in DNA fluorescence was shown to be directly related to the amount of iron that could be mobilized from the fibre surface using in vitro studies in the absence of cells or bacteria. Crocidolite and man-made vitreous fibre-21 (MMVF-21) mobilized significant quantities of iron and were significantly more active than chrysotile and refactory ceramic fibre-1 (RCF-1). Fibre-induced malondialdehyde-DNA adduct formation, the fluorescent product, was increased by incubating cells with buthionine sulfoximine and ameliorated by co-treatment with N-acetylcysteine, indicating a protective role for glutathione. Similarly, vitamin E was also shown to inhibit DNA adduct formation. These results suggest that mineral fibre-induced lipid peroxidation produced genotoxic products which can diffuse into nucleus and interact with cellular DNA. In conclusion, fibre-induced lipid peroxidation may be a possible mechanism in the genotoxic action of fibrous materials.

  11. Essential role of the cytochrome P450 CYP4F22 in the production of acylceramide, the key lipid for skin permeability barrier formation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yusuke Ohno; Shota Nakamichi; Aya Ohkuni; Nozomi Kamiyama; Ayano Naoe; Hisashi Tsujimura; Urara Yokose; Kazumitsu Sugiura; Junko Ishikawa; Masashi Akiyama; Akio Kihara

    2015-01-01

    .... Although acylceramide is an important lipid for the skin permeability barrier, details of its production have yet to be determined, leaving the molecular mechanism of skin permeability barrier formation unclear...

  12. Formation of a quasi-solid structure by intercalated noble gas atoms in pores of Cu(I)-MFU-4l metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdysyuk, Oxana V; Denysenko, Dmytro; Weinrauch, Ingrid; Volkmer, Dirk; Hirscher, Michael; Dinnebier, Robert E

    2015-01-14

    The primary adsorption sites for Kr and Xe within the large-pore metal-organic framework Cu(I)-MFU-4l have been investigated by high-resolution synchrotron powder diffraction, revealing an enormous number of adsorption sites: in total, 10 crystallographically different positions for Xe and 8 positions for Kr were localized, the first five of which are located near metal atoms and the organic linker, and the remaining sites form a second adsorption layer in the pores.

  13. Undulation instability in a bilayer lipid membrane due to electric field interaction with lipid dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Bingham, Richard J; Smye, Stephen W

    2010-01-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes [BLMs] are an essential component of all biological systems, forming a functional barrier for cells and organelles from the surrounding environment. The lipid molecules that form membranes contain both permanent and induced dipoles, and an electric field can induce the formation of pores when the transverse field is sufficiently strong (electroporation). Here, a phenomenological free energy is constructed to model the response of a BLM to a transverse static electric field. The model contains a continuum description of the membrane dipoles and a coupling between the headgroup dipoles and the membrane tilt. The membrane is found to become unstable through buckling modes, which are weakly coupled to thickness fluctuations in the membrane. The thickness fluctuations, along with the increase in interfacial area produced by membrane buckling, increase the probability of localized membrane breakdown, which may lead to pore formation. The instability is found to depend strongly on the strengt...

  14. Aminoguanidine inhibits reactive oxygen species formation, lipid peroxidation, and oxidant-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, I; Fard, A K; Hatchell, D L; Brownlee, M

    1998-07-01

    Aminoguanidine (AG) treatment, like nerve growth factor (NGF) treatment, prevents diabetes-induced apoptosis of retinal Müller cells in the rat eye, but the mechanism involved is unknown. In this study, the effects of preincubation with AG on oxidant-induced apoptosis, oxidant-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and lipid peroxidation were determined in rat retinal Müller cells and compared with the effects of NGF, a protein that protects neuronal cells from oxidative stress. The effect of AG on rabbit vitreous lipid peroxide levels was also determined. After exposure to increasing concentrations of H2O2, there was a corresponding increase in the percentage of apoptotic Müller cells. Preincubation with AG for 48 h completely inhibited oxidant-induced apoptosis in response to 10 micromol/l H2O2 (+AG 0 vs. 10 micromol/l, NS), and reduced the percentage of apoptotic cells in response to 50 micromol/l H2O2 by 50% (+AG vs. -AG, P NGF. Both AG and NGF preincubation prevented the twofold increase in oxidant-induced lipid peroxides. The fivefold increase in oxidant-induced ROS production was decreased 100% by NGF, but only 61% by AG preincubation. The twofold increase in vitreous lipid peroxide level in diabetic rabbits was completely prevented by AG treatment. AG reduced H2O2-induced benzoate hydroxylation in a dose-dependent manner. Intracellular glutathione content was unchanged. These data demonstrate that AG can act as an antioxidant in vivo, quenching hydroxyl radicals and lipid peroxidation in cells and tissues and preventing oxidant-induced apoptosis.

  15. Giant MACPF/CDC pore forming toxins: A class of their own.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Cyril F; Whisstock, James C; Dunstone, Michelle A

    2016-03-01

    Pore Forming Toxins (PFTs) represent a key mechanism for permitting the passage of proteins and small molecules across the lipid membrane. These proteins are typically produced as soluble monomers that self-assemble into ring-like oligomeric structures on the membrane surface. Following such assembly PFTs undergo a remarkable conformational change to insert into the lipid membrane. While many different protein families have independently evolved such ability, members of the Membrane Attack Complex PerForin/Cholesterol Dependent Cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) superfamily form distinctive giant β-barrel pores comprised of up to 50 monomers and up to 300Å in diameter. In this review we focus on recent advances in understanding the structure of these giant MACPF/CDC pores as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to their formation. Commonalities and evolved variations of the pore forming mechanism across the superfamily are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Mauro Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale.

  16. On the formation of lipid droplets in human adipocytes: the organization of the perilipin-vimentin cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Heid

    Full Text Available We report on the heterogeneity and diversity of lipid droplets (LDs in early stages of adipogenesis by elucidating the cell and molecular biology of amphiphilic and cytoskeletal proteins regulating and stabilizing the generation of LDs in human adipose cells. A plethora of distinct and differently sized LDs was detected by a brief application of adipocyte differentiation medium and additional short treatment with oleic acid. Using these cells and highly specific antibodies for LD-binding proteins of the perilipin (PLIN family, we could distinguish between endogenously derived LDs (endogenous LDs positive for perilipin from exogenously induced LDs (exogenous LDs positive for adipophilin, TIP47 and S3-12. Having optimized these stimulation conditions, we used early adipogenic differentiation stages to investigate small-sized LDs and concentrated on LD-protein associations with the intermediate-sized filament (IF vimentin. This IF protein was described earlier to surround lipid globules, showing spherical, cage-like structures. Consequently - by biochemical methods, by immunofluorescence microscopy and by electron- and immunoelectron microscopy - various stages of emerging lipid globules were revealed with perilipin as linking protein between LDs and vimentin. For this LD-PLIN-Vimentin connection, a model is now proposed, suggesting an interaction of proteins via opposed charged amino acid domains respectively. In addition, multiple sheaths of smooth endoplasmic reticulum cisternae surrounding concentrically nascent LDs are shown. Based on our comprehensive localization studies we present and discuss a novel pathway for the LD formation.

  17. Oxidative Stress Induced Lipid Peroxidation And DNA Adduct Formation In The Pathogenesis Of Multiple Myeloma And Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandon, Ravi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To access the oxidative stress status by quantification of byproducts generated during lipid peroxidation and DNA breakdown products generated during DNA damage in the blood serum of multiple myeloma and lymphoma patients.Material & Methods: Case control study comprised of 40 patients of multiple myeloma and 20 patients of lymphoma along with 20 age and sex-matched healthy subjects as controls. Levels of Malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy-Guanosine were measured to study the oxidative stress status in the study subjects.Results: The level of markers of DNA damage and lipid peroxidation were found to be raised significantly in the study subjects in comparison to healthy controls. The results indicate oxidative stress and DNA damage activity increase progressively with the progression of disease.Conclusion: Oxidative stress causes DNA damage and Lipid peroxidation which results in the formation of DNA adducts leading to mutations thereby indicate the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma and lymphoma.

  18. Is Lipid Profile Associated with Bone Mineral Density and Bone Formation in Subjects with Spinal Cord Injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadis Sabour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The association between serum lipids and bone mineral density (BMD has been investigated previously but, up to now, these relationships have not yet been described in spinal cord injury (SCI. We tried to assess the correlation between serum triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL and BMD in male subjects with SCI. Methods. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA was used to assess BMD in femoral neck, trochanter, intertrochanteric zone, and lumbar vertebras. Blood samples were taken to measure serums lipids and bone biomarkers including osteocalcin, cross-linked type I collagen (CTX, and bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP. Partial correlation analysis was used to evaluate the relationships between mentioned measurements after adjustment for weight and age. Results. We found a positive correlation between HDL and femoral neck BMD (P: 0.004, r=0.33. HDL was negatively correlated with osteocalcin (P: 0.017, r=-0.31 which was not in consistency with its relationship with BMD. TC and LDL were not related to CTX, BALP and BMD. Conclusion. This study does not support a strong association between serum lipids and BMD in subjects with SCI. Moreover it seems that positive association between HDL and BMD is not mediated through increased bone formation.

  19. Translocation domain mutations affecting cellular toxicity identify the Clostridium difficile toxin B pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhifen; Park, Minyoung; Tam, John; Auger, Anick; Beilhartz, Greg L; Lacy, D Borden; Melnyk, Roman A

    2014-03-11

    Disease associated with Clostridium difficile infection is caused by the actions of the homologous toxins TcdA and TcdB on colonic epithelial cells. Binding to target cells triggers toxin internalization into acidified vesicles, whereupon cryptic segments from within the 1,050-aa translocation domain unfurl and insert into the bounding membrane, creating a transmembrane passageway to the cytosol. Our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying pore formation and the subsequent translocation of the upstream cytotoxic domain to the cytosol is limited by the lack of information available regarding the identity and architecture of the transmembrane pore. Here, through systematic perturbation of conserved sites within predicted membrane-insertion elements of the translocation domain, we uncovered highly sensitive residues--clustered between amino acids 1,035 and 1,107--that when individually mutated, reduced cellular toxicity by as much as >1,000-fold. We demonstrate that defective variants are defined by impaired pore formation in planar lipid bilayers and biological membranes, resulting in an inability to intoxicate cells through either apoptotic or necrotic pathways. These findings along with the unexpected similarities uncovered between the pore-forming "hotspots" of TcdB and the well-characterized α-helical diphtheria toxin translocation domain provide insights into the structure and mechanism of formation of the translocation pore for this important class of pathogenic toxins.

  20. Inner/Outer nuclear membrane fusion in nuclear pore assembly: biochemical demonstration and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtman, Boris; Ramos, Corinne; Rasala, Beth; Harel, Amnon; Forbes, Douglass J

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large proteinaceous channels embedded in double nuclear membranes, which carry out nucleocytoplasmic exchange. The mechanism of nuclear pore assembly involves a unique challenge, as it requires creation of a long-lived membrane-lined channel connecting the inner and outer nuclear membranes. This stabilized membrane channel has little evolutionary precedent. Here we mapped inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion in NPC assembly biochemically by using novel assembly intermediates and membrane fusion inhibitors. Incubation of a Xenopus in vitro nuclear assembly system at 14°C revealed an early pore intermediate where nucleoporin subunits POM121 and the Nup107-160 complex were organized in a punctate pattern on the inner nuclear membrane. With time, this intermediate progressed to diffusion channel formation and finally to complete nuclear pore assembly. Correct channel formation was blocked by the hemifusion inhibitor lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), but not if a complementary-shaped lipid, oleic acid (OA), was simultaneously added, as determined with a novel fluorescent dextran-quenching assay. Importantly, recruitment of the bulk of FG nucleoporins, characteristic of mature nuclear pores, was not observed before diffusion channel formation and was prevented by LPC or OA, but not by LPC+OA. These results map the crucial inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion event of NPC assembly downstream of POM121/Nup107-160 complex interaction and upstream or at the time of FG nucleoporin recruitment.

  1. Lipid bilayers on nano-templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Aleksandr; Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Bakajin, Olgica; Stoeve, Pieter

    2009-08-04

    A lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising a nanotube or nanowire and a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire. One embodiment provides a method of fabricating a lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising the steps of providing a nanotube or nanowire and forming a lipid bilayer around the polymer cushion. One embodiment provides a protein pore in the lipid bilayer. In one embodiment the protein pore is sensitive to specific agents

  2. Diffusion mediated coagulation and fragmentation based study of domain formation in lipid bilayer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Laxminarsimha V., E-mail: laxman@iitk.ac.in [Mechanics and Applied Mathematics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Roy, Subhradeep [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics (MC 0219), Virginia Tech, 495 Old Turner Street, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Das, Sovan Lal [Mechanics and Applied Mathematics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2017-01-15

    We estimate the equilibrium size distribution of cholesterol rich micro-domains on a lipid bilayer by solving Smoluchowski equation for coagulation and fragmentation. Towards this aim, we first derive the coagulation kernels based on the diffusion behaviour of domains moving in a two dimensional membrane sheet, as this represents the reality better. We incorporate three different diffusion scenarios of domain diffusion into our coagulation kernel. Subsequently, we investigate the influence of the parameters in our model on the coagulation and fragmentation behaviour. The observed behaviours of the coagulation and fragmentation kernels are also manifested in the equilibrium domain size distribution and its first moment. Finally, considering the liquid domains diffusing in a supported lipid bilayer, we fit the equilibrium domain size distribution to a benchmark solution.

  3. Free energy of the edge of an open lipid bilayer based on the interactions of its constituent molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Meisam; Biria, Aisa

    2015-11-01

    Lipid-bilayers are the fundamental constituents of the walls of most living cells and lipid vesicles, giving them shape and compartment. The formation and growing of pores in a lipid bilayer have attracted considerable attention from an energetic point of view in recent years. Such pores permit targeted delivery of drugs and genes to the cell, and regulate the concentration of various molecules within the cell. The formation of such pores is caused by various reasons such as changes in cell environment, mechanical stress or thermal fluctuations. Understanding the energy and elastic behaviour of a lipid-bilayer edge is crucial for controlling the formation and growth of such pores. In the present work, the interactions in the molecular level are used to obtain the free energy of the edge of an open lipid bilayer. The resulted free-energy density includes terms associated with flexural and torsional energies of the edge, in addition to a line-tension contribution. The line tension, elastic moduli, and spontaneous normal and geodesic curvatures of the edge are obtained as functions of molecular distribution, molecular dimensions, cutoff distance, and the interaction strength. These parameters are further analyzed by implementing a soft-core interaction potential in the microphysical model. The dependence of the elastic free-energy of the edge to the size of the pore is reinvestigated through an illustrative example, and the results are found to be in agreement with the previous observations.

  4. Formation of Dense Pore Structure by Te Addition in Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3: An Approach to Minimize Lattice Thermal Conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Waqar Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We herein report the electronic and thermal transport properties of p-type Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 polycrystalline bulks with dense pore structure. Dense pore structure was fabricated by vaporization of residual Te during the pressureless annealing of spark plasma sintered bulks of Te coated Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 powders. The lattice thermal conductivity was effectively reduced to the value of 0.35 W m−1 K−1 at 300 K mainly due to the phonon scattering by pores, while the power factor was not significantly affected. An enhanced ZT of 1.24 at 300 K was obtained in spark plasma sintered and annealed bulks of 3 wt.% Te coated Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 by these synergetic effects.

  5. Lipid Droplet Formation in HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells Depends on Cell Density and the Concentration of Exogenous Unsaturated Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guštin, Ema; Jarc, Eva; Kump, Ana; Petan, Toni

    2017-09-01

    Cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs) store excess fatty acids (FAs) in the form of neutral lipids and prevent starvation-induced cancer cell death. Here we studied the ability of mono- and polyunsaturated FAs to affect LD formation and survival in HeLa cervical cancer cells. We found that the LD content in HeLa cells increases with cell density, but it decreases in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Exogenously-added unsaturated FAs, including oleic (OA), linoleic (LA), arachidonic (AA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) displayed a similar ability to alter LD formation in HeLa cells. There was a dual, concentration-dependent effect on neutral lipid accumulation: low micromolar concentrations of LA, AA and DHA reduced, while all FAs induced LD formation at higher concentrations. In serum starved He-La cells, OA stimulated LD formation, but, contrary to expectations, it promoted cell death. Our results reveal a link between cell population density and LD formation in HeLa cells and show that unsaturated FAs may both suppress or stimulate LD formation. This dynamic regulation of LD content must be accounted for when studying the effects of lipids and lipid metabolism-targeting drugs on LD metabolism in HeLa cells.

  6. Separable roles of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola accessory protein HrpZ1 in ion-conducting pore formation and activation of plant immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhardt, S.; Lee, J.; Gäbler, Y.; Kemmerling, B.; Haapalainen, M.L.; Li, C.M.; Wei, Z.; Keller, H.; Joosten, M.; Taira, S.; Nürnberger, T.

    2009-01-01

    The HrpZ1 gene product from phytopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae is secreted in a type-III secretion system-dependent manner during plant infection. The ability of HrpZ1 to form ion-conducting pores is proposed to contribute to bacterial effector delivery into host cells, or may facilitate the nutri

  7. Separable roles of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola accessory protein HrpZ1 in ion-conducting pore formation and activation of plant immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhardt, S.; Lee, J.; Gäbler, Y.; Kemmerling, B.; Haapalainen, M.L.; Li, C.M.; Wei, Z.; Keller, H.; Joosten, M.; Taira, S.; Nürnberger, T.

    2009-01-01

    The HrpZ1 gene product from phytopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae is secreted in a type-III secretion system-dependent manner during plant infection. The ability of HrpZ1 to form ion-conducting pores is proposed to contribute to bacterial effector delivery into host cells, or may facilitate the

  8. Oxidation of Membrane Curvature-Regulating Phosphatidylethanolamine Lipid Results in Formation of Bilayer and Cubic Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankhagowit, Shalene; Lee, Ernest Y; Wong, Gerard C L; Malmstadt, Noah

    2016-03-15

    Oxidation is associated with conditions related to chronic inflammations and aging. Cubic structures have been observed in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial membranes of cells under oxidative stress (e.g., tumor cells and virus-infected cells). It has been previously suspected that oxidation can result in the rearrangement of lipids from a fluid lamellar phase to a cubic structure in organelles containing membranes enriched with amphiphiles that have nonzero intrinsic curvature, such as phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and cardiolipin. This study focuses on the oxidation of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE), a lipid that natively forms an inverted hexagonal phase at physiological conditions. The oxidized samples contain an approximately 3:2 molar ratio of nonoxidized to oxidized DOPE. Optical microscopy images collected during the hydration of this mixture from a dried film suggest that the system evolves into a coexistence of a stable fluid lamellar phase and transient square lattice structures with unit cell sizes of 500-600 nm. Small-angle X-ray scattering of the same lipid mixture yielded a body-centered Im3m cubic phase with the lattice parameter of 14.04 nm. On average, the effective packing parameter of the oxidized DOPE species was estimated to be 0.657 ± 0.069 (standard deviation). This suggests that the oxidation of PE leads to a group of species with inverted molecular intrinsic curvature. Oxidation can create amphiphilic subpopulations that potently impact the integrity of the membrane, since negative Gaussian curvature intrinsic to cubic phases can enable membrane destabilization processes.

  9. Effect of different cooking methods on lipid oxidation and formation of free cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) in Latissimus dorsi muscle of Iberian pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broncano, J M; Petrón, M J; Parra, V; Timón, M L

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of different cooking methods (grilled (GR), fried (FP), microwave (MW) and roasted (RO)) on lipid oxidation and formation of free cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) of meat from Iberian pigs that have been fed on an intensive system. Moisture and total lipid content, TBARs, hexanal and COPs were measured in Latissimus dorsi muscle samples. Cooking did not produce changes in total lipid content in meat but induced significantly higher lipid oxidation (TBARs and hexanal values) (p<0.001) and cholesterol oxidation (COPs) (p<0.01). When the different cooking methods were studied, the grilled method was the least affected by lipid oxidation (TBARs and hexanal) compared to the others. There were no significant differences among different cooking methods on COPs values. The most abundant cholesterol oxides were both 7α-hydroxycholesterol and 7β-hydroxycholesterol in all groups studied.

  10. Formation and fluidity measurement of supported lipid bilayer on polyvinyl chloride membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takuji; Kono, Akiteru; Futagawa, Masato; Sawada, Kazuaki; Tero, Ryugo

    2014-02-01

    We prepared an artificial lipid bilayer on a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane on a Si3N4 layer deposited on a Si wafer. We optimized the experimental condition for the fabrication of the PVC membrane, and obtained a PVC membrane with a flat and uniform surface on the scale of several hundreds of micrometer suitable for a substrate for supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). The SLB of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) was formed on the PVC membrane by the vesicle fusion method. The observation with a conventional epi-fluorescence microscope and a confocal laser scanning microscope gave geometrically uniform images of the SLB on the PVC membrane. The fluidity and the mobile fraction of the SLB was evaluated by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method, and compared with that on a thermally oxidized SiO2/Si substrate. The SLB on the PVC membrane contained immobile fraction ˜30%, but the diffusion in the mobile fraction was two times faster than that in the SLB on SiO2/Si, which had little immobile fraction.

  11. Formation and fluidity measurement of supported lipid bilayer on polyvinyl chloride membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Takuji, E-mail: kobayashi-t@int.ee.tut.ac.jp; Kono, Akiteru, E-mail: kobayashi-t@int.ee.tut.ac.jp; Sawada, Kazuaki [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, 441-8580 (Japan); Futagawa, Masato [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and Head Office for the Tailor-Made and Baton-Zone Graduate Course, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, 441-8580 (Japan); Tero, Ryugo, E-mail: tero@tut.jp [Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute and Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, 441-8580 (Japan)

    2014-02-20

    We prepared an artificial lipid bilayer on a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane on a Si3N4 layer deposited on a Si wafer. We optimized the experimental condition for the fabrication of the PVC membrane, and obtained a PVC membrane with a flat and uniform surface on the scale of several hundreds of micrometer suitable for a substrate for supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). The SLB of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) was formed on the PVC membrane by the vesicle fusion method. The observation with a conventional epi-fluorescence microscope and a confocal laser scanning microscope gave geometrically uniform images of the SLB on the PVC membrane. The fluidity and the mobile fraction of the SLB was evaluated by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method, and compared with that on a thermally oxidized SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. The SLB on the PVC membrane contained immobile fraction ∼30%, but the diffusion in the mobile fraction was two times faster than that in the SLB on SiO{sub 2}/Si, which had little immobile fraction.

  12. Formation of "solvent-free" black lipid bilayer membranes from glyceryl monooleate dispersed in squalene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S H

    1978-09-01

    A simple technique for forming "black" lipid bilayer membranes containing negligible amounts of alkyl solvent is described. The membranes are formed by the method of Mueller et al (Circulation. 1962. 26:1167.) from glyceryl monooleate (GMO) dispersed in squalene. The squalene forms an annulus to satisfy the boundary conditions of the planar bilayer but does not appear to dissolve noticeably in the bilayer itself. The specific geometric capacitance (Cg) of the membranes at 20 degrees C formed by this technique is 0.7771 +/- 0.0048 muF/cm2. Theoretical estimates of Cg for solvent-free bilayers range from 0.75 to 0.81 muF/cm2. Alkane-free GMO bilayers formed from n-octadecane by the solvent freeze-out method of White (Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 1974. 356:8) have values of Cg = 0.7903 +/- 0.0013 muF/cm2 at 20.5 degrees C. The agreement between the various values of Cg strongly suggests that the bilayers are free of squalene. DC potentials applied to the bilayers have no detectable effect on the value of Cg, as expected for solvent-free films. The ability to form bilayers essentially free of the solvent used in the forming solution makes it possible to determine the area per molecule of the surface active lipid in the bilayer. The area per molecule of GMO at 20 degrees C is estimated to be 37.9 +/- 0.2 A2.

  13. How to link pyrene to its host lipid to minimize the extent of membrane perturbations and to optimize pyrene dimer formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franova, M. D.; Repakova, J.; Holopainen, J. M.;

    2014-01-01

    atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to consider membranes where pyrene moieties are attached to lipid acyl chains in varying positions. We find that in a DOPC bilayer the conformational ordering of lipids around di-pyrenyl-PC probes is altered to a largely similar extent regardless of where the pyrene...... moiety is attached to the hydrocarbon chain. This is in contrast to saturated membranes, where pyrene-induced perturbations have been observed to be more prominent. Meanwhile, the formation of pyrene dimers depends on the linkage point between pyrene and its host lipid. Membrane-spanning dimers between...

  14. Pore Geometry Features in Lower Cambrian Niutitang Formation Shale, Hunan Province%湖南省下寒武统牛蹄塘组页岩孔隙结构特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓龙; 蔡宁波

    2016-01-01

    选取下寒武统牛蹄塘组作为湖南省页岩气勘探开发的目标层位,通过对典型页岩样品的有机碳含量、有机质成熟度、矿物形态、裂缝形态、孔隙结构特征等进行测试分析,结果表明:①从采集的65块黑色页岩样品的有机碳值分析,有机碳含量普遍较高,最高值达到17.7%。其中湘西北高值区主要在大庸、慈利、桃源和常德县等地,含量在6%~15%;湘南高值区主要分布在衡阳、郴州及江永;湘西、常德部分地区、龙山地区等热演化已达到成熟及过成熟阶段。②牛蹄塘组裂缝发育,孔隙类型有原生孔、外生孔、矿物质孔,矿物质含量高,矿物自形程度高。③牛蹄塘组储层微孔较多,且孔隙体积较大,具有较好的储气性。研究认为:湖南省下寒武统牛蹄塘组页岩储层微孔较多,且孔隙体积较大,具有较好的储气性;孔隙和喉道分布均匀,孔隙分布较均匀,有利于页岩气的排出;页岩吸附能力较强。据此得出牛蹄塘组是湖南省页岩气勘探开发的重点目标层位。%Taking the lower Cambrian Niutitang Formation as the target for shale gas exploration and exploitation in Hunan Province has carried out tests and analyses of organic carbon content, organic matter maturity, mineral form, fissure form and pore geometry for typical shale samples. The result has shown that:①Analysis of organic carbon contents from 65 black shale samples has found that the contents are generally higher, the highest can be 17.7%. The higher content areas have Dayong, Cili, Taoyuan and Changde counties in northwestern Hunan;the figure is about 6%~15%;southern Hunan higher content areas have Hengyang, Chenzhou and Jiangyong;the thermal evolution in western Hunan, some parts in Changde area and Longshan area has reached mature and over mature stages.②Fissures are well developed in Niutitang Formation, pore types have primary pore

  15. Interactions of a lytic peptide with supported lipid bilayers investigated by time-resolved evanescent wave-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapson, Andrew C.; Gee, Michelle L.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.; Smith, Trevor A.

    2016-12-01

    We report investigations, using time-resolved and polarised evanescent wave-induced fluorescence methods, into the location, orientation and mobility of a fluorescently labelled form of the antimicrobial peptide, melittin, when it interacts with vesicles and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). This melittin analogue, termed MK14-A430, was found to penetrate the lipid headgroup structure in pure, ordered-phase DPPC membranes but was located near the headgroup-water region when cholesterol was included. MK14-A430 formed lytic pores in SLBs, and an increase in pore formation with incubation time was observed through an increase in polarity and mobility of the probe. When associated with the Cholesterol-containing SLB, the probe displayed polarity and mobility that indicated a population distributed near the lipid headgroup-water interface with MK14-A430 arranged predominantly in a surface-aligned state. This study indicates that the lytic activity of MK14-A430 occurred through a pore-forming mechanism. The lipid headgroup environment experienced by the fluorescent label, where MK14-A430 displayed pore information, indicated that pore formation was best described by the toroidal pore model.

  16. Laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing: physics of complex melt flow and formation mechanisms of pores, spatter and denudation zones

    OpenAIRE

    Khairallah, Saad A.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Rubenchik, Alexander; King, Wayne E.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the significant effect of the recoil pressure and Marangoni convection in laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) of 316L stainless steel. A three-dimensional high fidelity powder-scale model reveals how the strong dynamical melt flow generates pore defects, material spattering (sparking), and denudation zones. The melt track is divided into three sections: a topological depression, a transition and a tail region, each being the location of specific physical effects. The inclu...

  17. Effect of hydrophobic mismatch on domain formation and peptide sorting in the multicomponent lipid bilayers in the presence of immobilized peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qing; Wu, Qing-Yan; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2014-08-21

    In the plasma membranes, many transmembrane (TM) proteins/peptides are anchored to the underlying cytoskeleton and/or the extracellular matrix. The lateral diffusion and the tilt of these proteins/peptides may be greatly restricted by the anchoring. Here, using the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation, we investigated the domain formation and peptide sorting in the ternary lipid bilayers in the presence of the immobilized peptide-grid and peptide-cluster. We mainly focused on examining the combining effect of the peptide immobilization and hydrophobic mismatch on the domain formation and peptide sorting in the lipid bilayers. Compared to the lipid bilayers inserted with free TM peptides, our results showed that, because of the tilt restriction imposed on the peptides, the hydrophobic mismatch effect more significantly influences the domain size, the dynamics of domain formation, and the peptide sorting in our systems. Our results provide some theoretical insights into understanding the formation of nanosized lipid rafts, the protein sorting in the lipid rafts and the interaction between the cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix, and the plasma membranes.

  18. Effect of hydrophobic mismatch on domain formation and peptide sorting in the multicomponent lipid bilayers in the presence of immobilized peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qing; Wu, Qing-Yan; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2014-08-01

    In the plasma membranes, many transmembrane (TM) proteins/peptides are anchored to the underlying cytoskeleton and/or the extracellular matrix. The lateral diffusion and the tilt of these proteins/peptides may be greatly restricted by the anchoring. Here, using the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation, we investigated the domain formation and peptide sorting in the ternary lipid bilayers in the presence of the immobilized peptide-grid and peptide-cluster. We mainly focused on examining the combining effect of the peptide immobilization and hydrophobic mismatch on the domain formation and peptide sorting in the lipid bilayers. Compared to the lipid bilayers inserted with free TM peptides, our results showed that, because of the tilt restriction imposed on the peptides, the hydrophobic mismatch effect more significantly influences the domain size, the dynamics of domain formation, and the peptide sorting in our systems. Our results provide some theoretical insights into understanding the formation of nanosized lipid rafts, the protein sorting in the lipid rafts and the interaction between the cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix, and the plasma membranes.

  19. Binding of Cyt1Aa and Cry11Aa toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis to brush border membrane vesicles of Tipula paludosa (Diptera: Nematocera) and subsequent pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestergaard, Jesko; Ehlers, Ralf-Udo; Martínez-Ramírez, Amparo C; Real, Maria Dolores

    2007-06-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis (B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis) produces four insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) (Cry4A, Cry4B, Cry11A, and Cyt1A). Toxicity of recombinant B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strains expressing only one of the toxins was determined with first instars of Tipula paludosa (Diptera: Nematocera). Cyt1A was the most toxic protein, whereas Cry4A, Cry4B, and Cry11A were virtually nontoxic. Synergistic effects were recorded when Cry4A and/or Cry4B was combined with Cyt1A but not with Cry11A. The binding and pore formation are key steps in the mode of action of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis ICPs. Binding and pore-forming activity of Cry11Aa, which is the most toxic protein against mosquitoes, and Cyt1Aa to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) of T. paludosa were analyzed. Solubilization of Cry11Aa resulted in two fragments, with apparent molecular masses of 32 and 36 kDa. No binding of the 36-kDa fragment to T. paludosa BBMVs was detected, whereas the 32-kDa fragment bound to T. paludosa BBMVs. Only a partial reduction of binding of this fragment was observed in competition experiments, indicating a low specificity of the binding. In contrast to results for mosquitoes, the Cyt1Aa protein bound specifically to the BBMVs of T. paludosa, suggesting an insecticidal mechanism based on a receptor-mediated action, as described for Cry proteins. Cry11Aa and Cyt1Aa toxins were both able to produce pores in T. paludosa BBMVs. Protease treatment with trypsin and proteinase K, previously reported to activate Cry11Aa and Cyt1Aa toxins, respectively, had the opposite effect. A higher efficiency in pore formation was observed when Cyt1A was proteinase K treated, while the activity of trypsin-treated Cry11Aa was reduced. Results on binding and pore formation are consistent with results on ICP toxicity and synergistic effect with Cyt1Aa in T. paludosa.

  20. Reduction of lipid oxidation by formation of caseinate-oil-oat gum emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concentration of oat gum, though important for formation of stable emulsion, has no effect on oxidation of Omega 3 oil; this is most prominent in fish-oil based Omega 3 oil. The optimal concentration of oat gum is about 0.2% wt for emulsion stability and visual appearance. We found that concentr...

  1. Intrinsic repair protects cells from pore-forming toxins by microvesicle shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Matthew; Keyel, Michelle; Shi, Guilan; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Roth, Robyn; Heuser, John E; Keyel, Peter A

    2017-02-10

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are used by both the immune system and by pathogens to disrupt cell membranes. Cells attempt to repair this disruption in various ways, but the exact mechanism(s) that cells use are not fully understood, nor agreed upon. Current models for membrane repair include (1) patch formation (e.g., fusion of internal vesicles with plasma membrane defects), (2) endocytosis of the pores, and (3) shedding of the pores by blebbing from the cell membrane. In this study, we sought to determine the specific mechanism(s) that cells use to resist three different cholesterol-dependent PFTs: Streptolysin O, Perfringolysin O, and Intermedilysin. We found that all three toxins were shed from cells by blebbing from the cell membrane on extracellular microvesicles (MVs). Unique among the cells studied, we found that macrophages were 10 times more resistant to the toxins, yet they shed significantly smaller vesicles than the other cells. To examine the mechanism of shedding, we tested whether toxins with engineered defects in pore formation or oligomerization were shed. We found that oligomerization was necessary and sufficient for membrane shedding, suggesting that calcium influx and patch formation were not required for shedding. However, pore formation enhanced shedding, suggesting that calcium influx and patch formation enhance repair. In contrast, monomeric toxins were endocytosed. These data indicate that cells use two interrelated mechanisms of membrane repair: lipid-dependent MV shedding, which we term 'intrinsic repair', and patch formation by intracellular organelles. Endocytosis may act after membrane repair is complete by removing inactivated and monomeric toxins from the cell surface.Cell Death and Differentiation advance online publication, 10 February 2017; doi:10.1038/cdd.2017.11.

  2. ABCA12 maintains the epidermal lipid permeability barrier by facilitating formation of ceramide linoleic esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Ying; Zhuang, Debbie Z; Han, Rong; Isaac, Giorgis; Tobin, Jennifer J; McKee, Mary; Welti, Ruth; Brissette, Janice L; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Freeman, Mason W

    2008-12-26

    Harlequin ichthyosis is a congenital scaling syndrome of the skin in which affected infants have epidermal hyperkeratosis and a defective permeability barrier. Mutations in the gene encoding a member of the ABCA transporter family, ABCA12, have been linked to harlequin ichthyosis, but the molecular function of the protein is unknown. To investigate the activity of ABCA12, we generated Abca12 null mice and analyzed the impact on skin function and lipid content. Abca12-/- mice are born with a thickened epidermis and die shortly after birth, as water rapidly evaporates from their skin. In vivo skin proliferation measurements suggest a lack of desquamation of the skin cells, rather than enhanced proliferation of basal layer keratinocytes, accounts for the 5-fold thickening of the Abca12-/- stratum corneum. Electron microscopy revealed a loss of the lamellar permeability barrier in Abca12-/- skin. This was associated with a profound reduction in skin linoleic esters of long-chain omega-hydroxyceramides and a corresponding increase in their glucosyl ceramide precursors. Because omega-hydroxyceramides are required for the barrier function of the skin, these results establish that ABCA12 activity is required for the generation of long-chain ceramide esters that are essential for the development of normal skin structure and function.

  3. Effect of processing on amine formation and the lipid profile of cod (Gadus morhua) roe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa-Guimarães, Judite; Trattner, Sofia; Pickova, Jana

    2011-12-01

    The processing of fish roe leads to changes in its chemical composition, the extent of which depends on the techniques and additives employed. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ripening temperature and the use of sodium benzoate and citric acid on the quality of ripened cod roe, with respect to the contents of volatile base nitrogen (VBN), trimethylamine (TMA), biogenic amines (BA) and on the lipid composition. In comparison with fresh roes, ripened roes presented higher contents of VBN, TMA, BA and the proportion of free fatty acids regardless of the temperature and additives used during the ripening process. The greatest increases were observed in the samples ripened at 17°C without additives, in which histamine was detected at 8.8mg/100g. A low ripening temperature was the main factor responsible for minimising changes in the cod roe composition. The addition of sodium benzoate as a preservative or citric acid to decrease the pH value had a significant effect in maintaining the quality of the cod roes, mainly at high ripening temperature.

  4. Pattern formation in fatty acid-nanoparticle and lipid-nanoparticle mixed monolayers at water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, M.; Datta, A.; Iyengar, A. N. Sekar; Janaki, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    Dodecanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are self-organized in two different amphiphilic monolayers one of which is a single-tailed fatty acid Stearic acid (StA) and the other a double-tailed lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC). In the StA-AuNP film the AuNPs self-organize to form an interconnected network of nanoclusters on compression while in the DMPC-AuNP film the AuNPs aggregate to form random, isolated clusters in the film. The long time evolution of the films at constant surface pressure reveals ring structures in the former and diffusion limited aggregates in the latter that with time evolve into an irregular porous maze of AuNPs in the DMPC film. The difference in structure of the AuNP patterns in the two films can be attributed to a difference in the lipophilic interactions between the NPs and the amphiphilic molecules. The mean square intensity fluctuations f(ln) calculated along a typical line for the 2D structures in both the films at initial and final stages of long time evolution reflect the structural changes in the films over time.

  5. Comparison of coarse-grained (MARTINI) and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of α and β toxin nanopores in lipid membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAJAT DESIKAN; SWARNA M PATRA; KUMAR SARTHAK; PRABAL K MAITI; K G AYAPPA

    2017-07-01

    Pore forming toxins (PFTs) are virulent proteins whose primary goal is to lyse target cells by unregulated pore formation. Molecular dynamics simulations can potentially provide molecular insights on the properties of the pore complex as well as the underlying pathways for pore formation. In this manuscript wecompare both coarse-grained (MARTINI force-field) and all-atom simulations, and comment on the accuracy of the MARTINI coarse-grained method for simulating these large membrane protein pore complexes. We report 20 μs long coarse-grained MARTINI simulations of prototypical pores from two different classes ofpore forming toxins (PFTs) in lipid membranes - Cytolysin A (ClyA), which is an example of an α toxin, and α-hemolysin (AHL) which is an example of a β toxin. We compare and contrast structural attributes such as the root mean square deviation (RMSD) histograms and the inner pore radius profiles from the MARTINIsimulations with all-atom simulations. RMSD histograms sampled by the MARTINI simulations are about a factor of 2 larger, and the radius profiles show that the transmembrane domains of both ClyA and AHL pores undergo significant distortions, when compared with the all-atom simulations. In addition to the fully inserted transmembrane pores, membrane-inserted proteo-lipid ClyA arcs show large shape distortions with a tendency to close in the MARTINI simulations. While this phenomenon could be biologically plausible given the factthat α-toxins can form pores of varying sizes, the additional flexibility is probably due to weaker inter-protomer interactions which are modulated by the elastic dynamic network in the MARTINI force-field. We conclude that there is further scope for refining inter-protomer contacts and perhaps membrane-protein interactions in the MARTINI coarse-grained framework. A robust coarse-grained force-field will enable one to reliably carry out mesoscopic simulations which are required to understand protomer oligomerization, pore

  6. Regulation of EGFR nanocluster formation by ionic protein-lipid interaction

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The abnormal activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is strongly associated with a variety of human cancers but the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. By using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), we find that EGFR proteins form nanoclusters in the cell membrane of both normal lung epithelial cells and lung cancer cells, but the number and size of clusters significantly increase in lung cancer cells. The formation of EGFR clusters is...

  7. Method for Assaying the Lipid Kinase Phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase α in Quantitative High-Throughput Screening (qHTS) Bioluminescent Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mindy I.; Sasaki, Atsuo T.; Simeonov, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Summary ipid kinases are important regulators of a variety of cellular processes and their dysregulation causes diseases such as cancer and metabolic diseases. Distinct lipid kinases regulate the seven different phosphorylated forms of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns). Some lipid kinases utilize long-chain lipid substrates that have limited solubility in aqueous solutions, which can lead to difficulties in developing a robust and miniaturizable biochemical assay. The ability to prepare the lipid substrate and develop assays to identify modulators of lipid kinases is important and is the focus of this methods chapter. Herein, we describe a method to prepare a DMSO-based lipid mixture that enables the 1536-well screening of the lipid kinase phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase α (PI5P4Kα) utilizing the D-myo-di16-PtIns(5)P substrate in quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) format using the ADP-Glo™ technology to couple the production of ADP to a bioluminescent readout. PMID:26552670

  8. Synergy of Membrane Curvature-Stabilization and Electrostatic Interaction leads to Formation of Block Liposomes by Colossal Charged Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidovska, Alexandra; Ewert, Kai K.; Safinya, Cyrus R.; Quispe, Joel; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S.

    2008-03-01

    Recently, we have reported block liposomes (BLs), a new vesicle phase formed in mixtures of MVLBG2, DOPC and water (A. Zidovska et al., Submitted, 2007), where MVLBG2 is a newly synthesized highly charged (16+) lipid (K. Ewert et al., JACS, 2006) with giant dendrimer-like headgroup. BLs are liposomes consisting of distinctly shaped nanoscale spheres, pears, tubes, or rods connected into blocks. In this work we investigate the contribution of spontaneous curvature and membrane charge density to the formation of BLs. By comparing with a system of matching membrane charge density but zero spontaneous curvature and by screening the charge of MVLBG2 but keeping the curvature constant, we were able to identify both, spontaneous curvature and membrane charge, as critical parameters for BLs-formation. The effect of salt and pH on the shape evolution of the BLs was also carefully studied. Funding provided by DOE DE-FG-02-06ER46314, NIH GM-59288, NSF DMR-0503347.

  9. α-Naphthoflavone Increases Lipid Accumulation in Mature Adipocytes and Enhances Adipocyte-Stimulated Endothelial Tube Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Lin Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR is a ligand-activated factor that regulates biological effects associated with obesity. The AhR agonists, such as environmental contaminants 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD and β-naphthoflavone (BNF, inhibit preadipocyte differentiation and interfere with the functions of adipose tissue, whereas the antagonist may have opposite or protective effects in obesity. This study investigated the effects of α-naphthoflavone (α-NF, an AhR antagonist, on adipogenesis- and angiogenesis-associated factors in mature adipocytes and on cross-talk of mature adipocytes with endothelial cells (ECs. Besides, the roles of the AhR on lipid accumulation and on secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were also determined by introducing siRNA of AhR. Differentiated 3T3-L1 cells were treated with α-naphthoflavone (α-NF (1–5 μM for 16 h. Lipid accumulation and the expressions of AhR-associated factors in the cells were determined. The interaction between adipocytes and ECs was investigated by cultivating ECs with conditioned medium (CM from α-NF-treated mature adipocytes, followed by the determination of endothelial tube formation. The results showed that α-NF significantly increased triglyceride (TG accumulation in mature adipocytes, which was associated with increased expression of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, estrogen receptor (ER, as well as decreased expression of AhR, AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT, cytochrome P4501B1 (CYP1B1, and nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor (NRF-2 proteins. In addition, CM stimulated formation of tube-like structures in ECs, and α-NF further enhanced such stimulation in association with modulated the secretions of various angiogenic mediators by mature adipocytes. Similarly, increased TG accumulation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF secretion were observed in AhR-knockout cells. In conclusion, α-NF increased TG accumulation in mature adipocytes and

  10. Study of pores produced in underwater wet welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Xiaoqin; Liu Shiming

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of water depth in the range of 10 m to 80 m upon the formation of pores produced during underwater wet welding. The results show that it is easy for the inner pores to occur owing to the particularity of the molten metal solidification that the outer pores begin to appear when the water depth increases to about 60 m, that the porosity increases and pore grows up as the water depth increases, and that pores are all hydrogen-cont aining ones through the examination of the variation of number of pores with the residual hydrogen and oxygen content in the weld metal.

  11. Metabolic incorporation of unsaturated fatty acids into boar spermatozoa lipids and de novo formation of diacylglycerols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svetlichnyy, V.; Müller, P.; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Lipids play an important role in the maturation, viability and function of sperm cells. In this study, we examined the neutral and polar lipid composition of boar spermatozoa by thin-layer chromatography/mass spectrometry. Main representatives of the neutral lipid classes were diacylglycerols...

  12. Self-assembled core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell nanoparticles demonstrate high stability in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiqiang; Ye, Huilin; Kröger, Martin; Li, Ying

    2017-05-24

    A core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell (CPLS) nanoparticle consists of an inorganic core coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, surrounded by a lipid bilayer shell. It can be self-assembled from a PEGylated core with surface-tethered PEG chains, where all the distal ends are covalently bonded to lipid molecules. Upon adding free lipids, a complete lipid bilayer shell can be formed on the surface driven by the hydrophobic nature of lipid tails, leading to the formation of a CPLS nanoparticle. The stability of CPLS nanoparticles in shear flow has been systematically studied through large scale dissipative particle dynamics simulations. CPLS nanoparticles demonstrate higher stability and less deformation in shear flow, compared with lipid vesicles. Burst leakage of drug molecules inside lipid vesicles and CPLS NPs can be induced by the large pores at their tips. These pores are initiated by the maximum stress in the waist region. It further grows along with the tank-treading motion of vesicles or CPLS NPs in shear flow. However, due to the constraints applied by PEG polymers, CPLS NPs are less deformed than vesicles with comparable size under the same flow conditions. Thus, the less deformed CPLS NPs express a smaller maximum stress at waists, demonstrating higher stability. Pore formation at waists, evolving into large pores on vesicles, leads to the burst leakage of drug molecules and complete rupture of vesicles. In contrast, although similar drug leakage in CPLS nanoparticles can occur at high shear rates, pores initiated at moderate shear rates tend to be short-lived and close due to the constraints mediated by PEG polymers. This kind of 'self-healing' capability can be observed over a wide range of shear rates for CPLS nanoparticles. Our results suggest self-assembled CPLS nanoparticles to exhibit high stability during blood circulation without rapid drug leakage. These features make CPLS nanoparticles candidates for a promising drug delivery platform.

  13. Organization of the mitochondrial apoptotic BAK pore: oligomerization of the BAK homodimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluvila, Sreevidya; Mandal, Tirtha; Hustedt, Eric; Fajer, Peter; Choe, Jun Yong; Oh, Kyoung Joon

    2014-01-31

    The multidomain pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins BAK and BAX are believed to form large oligomeric pores in the mitochondrial outer membrane during apoptosis. Formation of these pores results in the release of apoptotic factors including cytochrome c from the intermembrane space into the cytoplasm, where they initiate the cascade of events that lead to cell death. Using the site-directed spin labeling method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, we have determined the conformational changes that occur in BAK when the protein targets to the membrane and forms pores. The data showed that helices α1 and α6 disengage from the rest of the domain, leaving helices α2-α5 as a folded unit. Helices α2-α5 were shown to form a dimeric structure, which is structurally homologous to the recently reported BAX "BH3-in-groove homodimer." Furthermore, the EPR data and a chemical cross-linking study demonstrated the existence of a hitherto unknown interface between BAK BH3-in-groove homodimers in the oligomeric BAK. This novel interface involves the C termini of α3 and α5 helices. The results provide further insights into the organization of the BAK oligomeric pores by the BAK homodimers during mitochondrial apoptosis, enabling the proposal of a BAK-induced lipidic pore with the topography of a "worm hole."

  14. Dilated pore of winer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of dilated pore of Winer were observed. First case had single defined black papule with well defined margin, central pore and discharge of black powdery material from nose since 3 years. The second case had one 9mm, black well-defined papule with central pore discharging black powdery material on right forearm since 9 months and 9 similar smaller papules were seen on forearm and lower abdomen. Histopathologically both revealed greatly dilated infundibulum lined by acanthotic epidermis and atrophic subinfundibular hair structures thus confirming diagnosis of dilated pore of Winer

  15. Rationalizing lipid nanoemulsion formation for utilization in the food and beverage industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jiajia

    There is growing interest in the use of nanoemulsions as delivery systems for lipophilic functional agents in food and beverage products due to their high optical clarity, physical stability and bioavailability. The goal of this research is to establish quantitative structure-function relationships to allow rational formulation of food-grade nanoemulsions for food and beverage applications. Initially, formation of oil-in-water nanoemulsions using a low energy method was examined. Nanoemulsions were formed using the phase inversion temperature (PIT) method, which involves heating a surfactant, oil, water (SOW) systems near the PIT, and then cooling rapidly with stirring. Preliminary experiments were carried out using a model system consisting of a non-ionic surfactant (C12E4), hydrocarbon oil (tetradecane), and water. Nanoemulsions were formed by holding SOW mixtures near their PIT (38.5 °C) and then cooling them rapidly to 10 °C. The PIT was measured using electrical, conductivity and turbidity methods. The optimum storage temperature for PIT-nanoemulsions was about 27 °C lower than the PIT. The stability of PIT-nanoemulsions at ambient temperatures can be improved by adding either Tween 80 (0.2 wt%) or SDS (0.1 wt%) to displace the C12E4 (Brij 30) from the nano-droplet surfaces. Experiments were then carried out to establish if stable nanoemulsions could be formed using the PIT method from food-grade ingredients. Nanoemulsions were fabricated from a non-ionic surfactant (Tween 80) and flavor oil (lemon oil) by heat treatment. Different types of colloidal dispersion could be formed by simple heat treatment (90 °C, 30 minutes) depending on the surfactant-to-oil ratio (SOR): emulsions at SOR 2. The results suggested that there was a kinetic energy barrier in the SOW system at ambient temperature that prevented it from moving from a highly unstable system into a nanoemulsion system. The conditions where stable nanoemulsions could be fabricated were also

  16. Lipid droplets formation in human endothelial cells in response to polyunsaturated fatty acids and 1-methyl-nicotinamide (MNA); confocal Raman imaging and fluorescence microscopy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzner, Katarzyna; Chlopicki, Stefan; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2016-04-01

    In this work the formation of lipid droplets (LDs) in human endothelial cells culture in response to the uptake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) was studied. Additionally, an effect of 1-methylnicotinamide (MNA) on the process of LDs formation was investigated. LDs have been previously described structurally and to some degree biochemically, however neither the precise function of LDs nor the factors responsible for LD induction have been clarified. Lipid droplets, sometimes referred in the literature as lipid bodies are organelles known to regulate neutrophil, eosinophil, or tumor cell functions but their presence and function in the endothelium is largely unexplored. 3D linear Raman spectroscopy was used to study LDs formation in vitro in a single endothelial cell. The method provides information about distribution and size of LDs as well as their composition. The incubation of endothelial cells with various PUFAs resulted in formation of LDs. As a complementary method for LDs identification a fluorescence microscopy was applied. Fluorescence measurements confirmed the Raman results suggesting endothelial cells uptake of PUFAs and subsequent LDs formation in the cytoplasm of the endothelium. Furthermore, MNA seem to potentiate intracellular uptake of PUFAs to the endothelium that may bear physiological and pharmacological significance. Confocal Raman imaging of HAoEC cell with LDs.

  17. The formation of lipid droplets favors intracellular Mycobacterium leprae survival in SW-10, non-myelinating Schwann cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Song-Hyo; An, Sung-Kwan

    2017-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that is caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae (M.leprae), which is the leading cause of all non-traumatic peripheral neuropathies worldwide. Although both myelinating and non-myelinating Schwann cells are infected by M.leprae in patients with lepromatous leprosy, M.leprae preferentially invades the non-myelinating Schwann cells. However, the effect of M.leprae infection on non-myelinating Schwann cells has not been elucidated. Lipid droplets (LDs) are found in M.leprae-infected Schwann cells in the nerve biopsies of lepromatous leprosy patients. M.leprae-induced LD formation favors intracellular M.leprae survival in primary Schwann cells and in a myelinating Schwann cell line referred to as ST88-14. In the current study, we initially characterized SW-10 cells and investigated the effects of LDs on M.leprae-infected SW-10 cells, which are non-myelinating Schwann cells. SW-10 cells express S100, a marker for cells from the neural crest, and NGFR p75, a marker for immature or non-myelinating Schwann cells. SW-10 cells, however, do not express myelin basic protein (MBP), a marker for myelinating Schwann cells, and myelin protein zero (MPZ), a marker for precursor, immature, or myelinating Schwann cells, all of which suggests that SW-10 cells are non-myelinating Schwann cells. In addition, SW-10 cells have phagocytic activity and can be infected with M. leprae. Infection with M. leprae induces the formation of LDs. Furthermore, inhibiting the formation of M. leprae-induced LD enhances the maturation of phagosomes containing live M.leprae and decreases the ATP content in the M. leprae found in SW-10 cells. These facts suggest that LD formation by M. leprae favors intracellular M. leprae survival in SW-10 cells, which leads to the logical conclusion that M.leprae-infected SW-10 cells can be a new model for investigating the interaction of M.leprae with non-myelinating Schwann cells. PMID:28636650

  18. Lipid mobilization and acid phosphatase activity in lytic compartments during conidium dormancy and appressorium formation of Colletotrichum graminicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadeck, R J; Leite, B; de Freitas Buchi, D

    1998-12-01

    Colletotrichum graminicola, a pathogen of sorghum and corn, was investigated prior and during germination as to certain aspects of acid phosphatase activity and lipid mobilization. Ungerminated conidia cytoplasm was filled with lipid deposits, which were mobilized during the germination process. Cytochemical ultrastructural examination showed that conidia vacuoles exhibit acid phosphatase activity, which is suggestive of lytic activity. Lipid bodies, stored in the ungerminated conidia cytoplasm, were internalized by vacuoles in a process analogous to microautophagy and were apparently digested inside them. The lipid bodies disappeared and vacuoles became enlarged in conidial cells during germination. Appressoria also showed acid phosphatase activity in multiple heterogeneous vesicles which were, in most cases, juxtaposed with lipid bodies. These results suggest that the vacuolar system plays an important role during C. graminicola germination and that the initial stages of lipid metabolization are taking place inside the vacuoles.

  19. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Lee, Elizabeth (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Kallam, Alekhya (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Majumdar, Partha (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J. (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  20. Membrane damage by an α-helical pore-forming protein, Equinatoxin II, proceeds through a succession of ordered steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojko, Nejc; Kristan, Katarina Č; Viero, Gabriella; Žerovnik, Eva; Maček, Peter; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Anderluh, Gregor

    2013-08-16

    Actinoporin equinatoxin II (EqtII) is an archetypal example of α-helical pore-forming toxins that porate cellular membranes by the use of α-helices. Previous studies proposed several steps in the pore formation: binding of monomeric protein onto the membrane, followed by oligomerization and insertion of the N-terminal α-helix into the lipid bilayer. We studied these separate steps with an EqtII triple cysteine mutant. The mutant was engineered to monitor the insertion of the N terminus into the lipid bilayer by labeling Cys-18 with a fluorescence probe and at the same time to control the flexibility of the N-terminal region by the disulfide bond formed between cysteines introduced at positions 8 and 69. The insertion of the N terminus into the membrane proceeded shortly after the toxin binding and was followed by oligomerization. The oxidized, non-lytic, form of the mutant was still able to bind to membranes and oligomerize at the same level as the wild-type or the reduced form. However, the kinetics of the N-terminal helix insertion, the release of calcein from erythrocyte ghosts, and hemolysis of erythrocytes was much slower when membrane-bound oxidized mutant was reduced by the addition of the reductant. Results show that the N-terminal region needs to be inserted in the lipid membrane before the oligomerization into the final pore and imply that there is no need for a stable prepore formation. This is different from β-pore-forming toxins that often form β-barrel pores via a stable prepore complex.

  1. Pore Structure Characterization of Indiana Limestone and Pink Dolomite from Pore Network Reconstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freire-Gormaly Marina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon sequestration in deep underground saline aquifers holds significant promise for reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions (CO2. However, challenges remain in predicting the long term migration of injected CO2. Addressing these challenges requires an understanding of pore-scale transport of CO2 within existing brine-filled geological reservoirs. Studies on the transport of fluids through geological porous media have predominantly focused on oil-bearing formations such as sandstone. However, few studies have considered pore-scale transport within limestone and other carbonate formations, which are found in potential storage sites. In this work, high-resolution micro-Computed Tomography (microCT was used to obtain pore-scale structural information of two model carbonates: Indiana Limestone and Pink Dolomite. A modified watershed algorithm was applied to extract pore network from the reconstructed microCT volumetric images of rock samples and compile a list of pore-scale characteristics from the extracted networks. These include statistical distributions of pore size and radius, pore-pore separation, throat radius, and network coordination. Finally, invasion percolation algorithms were applied to determine saturation-pressure curves for the rock samples. The statistical distributions were comparable to literature values for the Indiana Limestone. This served as validation for the network extraction approach for Pink Dolomite, which has not been considered previously. Based on the connectivity and the pore-pore separation, formations such as Pink Dolomite may present suitable storage sites for carbon storage. The pore structural distributions and saturation curves obtained in this study can be used to inform core- and reservoir-scale modeling and experimental studies of sequestration feasibility.

  2. Fingerprint pores extractor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mngenge, NA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available alone. Sweat pores have been less utilized in the past due to constraints imposed by fingerprint scanning devices and resolution standards. Recently, progress has been made on both scanning devices and resolution standards to support the use of pores...

  3. Pore size distribution mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Strange, John H.; J. Beau W. WEBBER; Schmidt, S.D.

    1996-01-01

    Pore size distribution mapping has been demonstrated using NMR cryoporometry\\ud in the presence of a magnetic field gradient, This novel method is extendable to 2D and 3D mapping. It offers a unique nondestructive method of obtaining full pore-size distributions in the range 3 to 100 nm at any point within a bulk sample. \\ud

  4. Enriched n-3 PUFA/konjac gel low-fat pork liver pâté: lipid oxidation, microbiological properties and biogenic amine formation during chilling storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Pando, G; Cofrades, S; Ruiz-Capillas, C; Triki, M; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2012-12-01

    Low-fat pork liver pâtés enriched with n-3 PUFA/konjac gel were formulated by replacing (totally or partially) pork backfat by a combination of healthier oils (olive, linseed and fish oils) and konjac gel. Lipid oxidation, microbiological changes and biogenic amine (BA) formation were studied in healthier-lipid pâtés during chill storage (85 days, 2 °C). Increasing unsaturated fatty acid levels favoured lipid oxidation, although the levels reached were low throughout the storage period, ranging from 0.113 to 0.343 mg malonaldehyde/kg sample. Neither the formulation nor the time in storage affected the microbial load. Biogenic amine contents of products (the sum of initial concentrations and amines formed during storage) varied according to the type of BA but were far below levels that could constitute a consumer health hazard.

  5. INFLUENCE OF NEUROTIC AND AFFECTIVE DISORDERS ON FORMATION OF PREDICTORS OF ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE AND DISORDERS OF CARBOHYDRATE AND LIPID METABOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Garganeyeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of analysis of cardiovascular and psychosocial risk factors which influence the development and prediction of ischemic heart disease (IHD and disorders of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in 132 patients with neurotic and affective disorders are presented. The significance of predictors of IHD formation was evaluated with method of logistic regression. According to results of stepwise procedure the total score of prediction of IHD in male group was 93.7%. The influence of mental factors on disorders of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism which lead to persistent rise of level of blood glucose, lipid spectrum indices imbalance, promoting the progression of cardiovascular risk in IHD patients with anxiety, depressive, asthenic and other non-psychotic mental disorders, was ascertained.

  6. Effect of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field on Bone Formation and Lipid Metabolism of Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis Rats through Canonical Wnt Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF has been suggested as a promising method alternative to drug-based therapies for treating osteoporosis (OP, but the role of PEMF in GIOP animal models still remains unknown. This study was performed to investigate the effect of PEMF on bone formation and lipid metabolism and further explored the several important components and targets of canonical Wnt signaling pathway in GIOP rats. After 12 weeks of intervention, bone mineral density (BMD level of the whole body increased significantly, serum lipid levels decreased significantly, and trabeculae were thicker in GIOP rats of PEMF group. PEMF stimulation upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of Wnt10b, LRP5, β-catenin, OPG, and Runx2 and downregulated Axin2, PPAR-γ, C/EBPα, FABP4, and Dkk-1. The results of this study suggested that PEMF stimulation can prevent bone loss and improve lipid metabolism disorders in GIOP rats. Canonical Wnt signaling pathway plays an important role in bone formation and lipid metabolism during PEMF stimulation.

  7. Importance of polarity of the α4-α5 loop residue-Asn(166) in the pore-forming domain of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba toxin: implications for ion permeation and pore opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntadech, Thanate; Kanintronkul, Yodsoi; Kanchanawarin, Chalermpol; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba toxin is lethal to mosquito-larvae by forming ion-permeable pores in the target midgut cell membrane. Previously, the polarity of Asn(166) located within the α4-α5 loop composing the Cry4Ba pore-forming domain was shown to be crucial for larvicidal activity. Here, structurally stable-mutant toxins of both larvicidal-active (N166D) and inactive (N166A and N166I) mutants were FPLC-purified and characterized for their relative activities in liposomal-membrane permeation and single-channel formation. Similar to the 65-kDa trypsin-activated wild-type toxin, the N166D bio-active mutant toxin was still capable of releasing entrapped calcein from lipid vesicles. Conversely, the two other bio-inactive mutants showed a dramatic decrease in causing membrane permeation. When the N166D mutant was incorporated into planar lipid bilayers (under symmetrical conditions at 150mM KCl, pH8.5), it produced single-channel currents with a maximum conductance of about 425pS comparable to the wild-type toxin. However, maximum conductances for single K(+)-channels formed by both bio-inactive mutants (N166I and N166A) were reduced to approximately 165-205pS. Structural dynamics of 60-ns simulations of a trimeric α4-α5 pore model in a fully hydrated-DMPC system revealed that an open-pore structure could be observed only for the simulated pores of the wild type and N166D. Additionally, the number of lipid molecules interacting with both wild-type and N166D pores is relatively higher than those of N166A and N166I pores. Altogether, our results further signify that the polarity at the α4-α5 loop residue-Asn(166) is directly involved in ion permeation through the Cry4Ba toxin-induced ionic pore and pore opening at the membrane-water interface.

  8. Cell lipid metabolism modulators 2-bromopalmitate, D609, monensin, U18666A and probucol shift discoidal HDL formation to the smaller-sized particles: implications for the mechanism of HDL assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Duyen; Vitali, Cecilia; La, Fiona M; Xiao, Angel X; Millar, John S; Tang, Chongren; Rader, Daniel J; Phillips, Michael C; Lyssenko, Nicholas N

    2016-12-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates formation of disc-shaped high-density lipoprotein (HDL) from cell lipid and lipid-free apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I). Discoidal HDL particles are heterogeneous in physicochemical characteristics for reasons that are understood incompletely. Discoidal lipoprotein particles similar in characteristics and heterogeneity to cell-formed discoidal HDL can be reconstituted from purified lipids and apo A-I by cell-free, physicochemical methods. The heterogeneity of reconstituted HDL (rHDL) is sensitive to the lipid composition of the starting lipid/apo A-I mixture. To determine whether the heterogeneity of cell-formed HDL is similarly sensitive to changes in cell lipids, we investigated four compounds that have well-established effects on cell lipid metabolism and ABCA1-mediated cell cholesterol efflux. 2-Bromopalmitate, D609, monensin and U18666A decreased formation of the larger-sized, but dramatically increased formation of the smaller-sized HDL. 2-Bromopalmitate did not appear to affect ABCA1 activity, subcellular localization or oligomerization, but induced dissolution of the cholesterol-phospholipid complexes in the plasma membrane. Arachidonic and linoleic acids shifted HDL formation to the smaller-sized species. Tangier disease mutations and inhibitors of ABCA1 activity wheat germ agglutinin and AG 490 reduced formation of both larger-sized and smaller-sized HDL. The effect of probucol was similar to the effect of 2-bromopalmitate. Taking rHDL formation as a paradigm, we propose that ABCA1 mutations and activity inhibitors reduce the amount of cell lipid available for HDL formation, and the compounds in the 2-bromopalmitate group and the polyunsaturated fatty acids change cell lipid composition from one that favors formation of the larger-sized HDL particles to one that favors formation of the smaller-sized species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Proton Gradients as a Key Physical Factor in the Evolution of the Forced Transport Mechanism Across the Lipid Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strbak, Oliver; Kanuchova, Zuzana; Krafcik, Andrej

    2016-11-01

    A critical phase in the transition from prebiotic chemistry to biological evolution was apparently an asymmetric ion flow across the lipid membrane. Due to imbalance in the ion flow, the early lipid vesicles could selectively take the necessary molecules from the environment, and release the side-products from the vesicle. Natural proton gradients played a definitively crucial role in this process, since they remain the basis of energy transfer in the present-day cells. On the basis of this supposition, and the premise of the early vesicle membrane's impermeability to protons, we have shown that the emergence of the proton gradient in the lipid vesicle could be a key physical factor in the evolution of the forced transport mechanism (pore formation and active transport) across the lipid bilayer. This driven flow of protons across the membrane is the result of the electrochemical proton gradient and osmotic pressures on the integrity of the lipid vesicle. At a critical number of new lipid molecules incorporated into the vesicle, the energies associated with the creation of the proton gradient exceed the bending stiffness of the lipid membrane, and overlap the free energy of the lipid bilayer pore formation.

  10. Proton Gradients as a Key Physical Factor in the Evolution of the Forced Transport Mechanism Across the Lipid Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strbak, Oliver; Kanuchova, Zuzana; Krafcik, Andrej

    2016-11-01

    A critical phase in the transition from prebiotic chemistry to biological evolution was apparently an asymmetric ion flow across the lipid membrane. Due to imbalance in the ion flow, the early lipid vesicles could selectively take the necessary molecules from the environment, and release the side-products from the vesicle. Natural proton gradients played a definitively crucial role in this process, since they remain the basis of energy transfer in the present-day cells. On the basis of this supposition, and the premise of the early vesicle membrane's impermeability to protons, we have shown that the emergence of the proton gradient in the lipid vesicle could be a key physical factor in the evolution of the forced transport mechanism (pore formation and active transport) across the lipid bilayer. This driven flow of protons across the membrane is the result of the electrochemical proton gradient and osmotic pressures on the integrity of the lipid vesicle. At a critical number of new lipid molecules incorporated into the vesicle, the energies associated with the creation of the proton gradient exceed the bending stiffness of the lipid membrane, and overlap the free energy of the lipid bilayer pore formation.

  11. Velocities in Solar Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  12. Structure and distribution of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba toxin in lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puntheeranurak, Theeraporn [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Mahidol University, Salaya Campus, Nakornpathom 73170 (Thailand); Stroh, Cordula [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Zhu Rong [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Angsuthanasombat, Chanan [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Mahidol University, Salaya Campus, Nakornpathom 73170 (Thailand); Hinterdorfer, Peter [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.hinterdorfer@jku.at

    2005-11-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry {delta}-endotoxins cause death of susceptible insect larvae by forming lytic pores in the midgut epithelial cell membranes. The 65 kDa trypsin activated Cry4Ba toxin was previously shown to be capable of permeabilizing liposomes and forming ionic channels in receptor-free planar lipid bilayers. Here, magnetic ACmode (MACmode) atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the lateral distribution and the native molecular structure of the Cry4Ba toxin in the membrane. Liposome fusion and the Langmuir-Blodgett technique were employed for supported lipid bilayer preparations. The toxin preferentially inserted in a self-assembled structure, rather than as a single monomeric molecule. In addition, the spontaneous insertion into receptor-free lipid bilayers lead to formation of characteristic pore-like structures with four-fold symmetry, suggesting that tetramers are the preferred oligomerization state of this toxin.

  13. Cell type-specific modulation of lipid mediator's formation in murine adipose tissue by omega-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuda, Ondrej; Rombaldova, Martina; Janovska, Petra; Flachs, Pavel; Kopecky, Jan

    2016-01-15

    Mutual interactions between adipocytes and immune cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) are involved in modulation of lipid metabolism in the tissue and also in response to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which counteract adverse effects of obesity. This complex interplay depends in part on in situ formed anti- as well as pro-inflammatory lipid mediators, but cell types engaged in the synthesis of the specific mediators need to be better characterized. We used tissue fractionation and metabolipidomic analysis to identify cells producing lipid mediators in epididymal WAT of mice fed for 5 weeks obesogenic high-fat diet (lipid content 35% wt/wt), which was supplemented or not by omega-3 PUFA (4.3 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 14.7 mg docosahexaenoic acid per g of diet). Our results demonstrate selective increase in levels of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in WAT in response to omega-3, reflecting either their association with adipocytes (endocannabinoid-related N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine) or with stromal vascular cells (pro-resolving lipid mediator protectin D1). In parallel, tissue levels of obesity-associated pro-inflammatory endocannabinoids were suppressed. Moreover, we show that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which could be isolated using magnetic force from the stromal vascular fraction, are not the major producers of protectin D1 and that omega-3 PUFA lowered lipid load in ATMs while promoting their less-inflammatory phenotype. Taken together, these results further document specific roles of various cell types in WAT in control of WAT inflammation and metabolism and they suggest that also other cells but ATMs are engaged in production of pro-resolving lipid mediators in response to omega-3 PUFA.

  14. Spontaneous Formation of Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Cholesterol Crystals in Single Hydrated Lipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements were performed on single hydrated bilayers and monolayers of Ceramide/Cholesterol/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocyholine at varying concentrations. There are substantial differences in the phase and structure behavior of the crystalline domains formed within the bilayers relative to the corresponding monolayers, due to interactions between the opposing lipid leaflets. Depending on the lipid composition, these interactions lead to pha...

  15. UVA photoirradiation of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-induction of reactive oxygen species and formation of lipid peroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qingsu; Yin, Jun-Jie; Zhao, Yuewei; Wu, Yuh-Sen; Wang, Yu-Qui; Ma, Liang; Chen, Shoujun; Sun, Xin; Fu, Peter P; Yu, Hongtao

    2013-03-14

    Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) are a class of genotoxic environmental contaminants. We have long been interested in determining the mechanisms by which nitro-PAHs induce genotoxicity. Although the metabolic activation of nitro-PAHs leading to toxicological activities has been well studied, the photo-induced activation of nitro-PAHs has seldom been reported. In this paper, we report photo-induced lipid peroxidation by 19 nitro-PAHs. The results indicated that all but two of the nitro-PAHs can induce lipid peroxidation. Mechanistic studies suggest that lipid peroxidation by nitro-PAHs is mediated by free radicals generated in the reaction. There was no structural correlation between the nitro-PAHs and their ability to induce lipid peroxidation upon UVA irradiation, or between the HOMO-LUMO gap and the ability to cause lipid peroxidation. Most of the nitro-PAHs are less potent in terms of causing lipid peroxidation than their parent PAHs. The lack of correlation is attributed to the complex photophysics and photochemistry of the nitro-PAHs and the yield of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other factors.

  16. UVA Photoirradiation of Nitro-Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons—Induction of Reactive Oxygen Species and Formation of Lipid Peroxides †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qingsu; Yin, Jun J.; Zhao, Yuewei; Wu, Yuh-Sen; Wang, Yu-Qui; Ma, Liang; Chen, Shoujun; Sun, Xin; Fu, Peter P.; Yu, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) are a class of genotoxic environmental contaminants. We have long been interested in determining the mechanisms by which nitro-PAHs induce genotoxicity. Although the metabolic activation of nitro-PAHs leading to toxicological activities has been well studied, the photo-induced activation of nitro-PAHs has seldom been reported. In this paper, we report photo-induced lipid peroxidation by 19 nitro-PAHs. The results indicated that all but two of the nitro-PAHs can induce lipid peroxidation. Mechanistic studies suggest that lipid peroxidation by nitro-PAHs is mediated by free radicals generated in the reaction. There was no structural correlation between the nitro-PAHs and their ability to induce lipid peroxidation upon UVA irradiation, or between the HOMO-LUMO gap and the ability to cause lipid peroxidation. Most of the nitro-PAHs are less potent in terms of causing lipid peroxidation than their parent PAHs. The lack of correlation is attributed to the complex photophysics and photochemistry of the nitro-PAHs and the yield of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other factors. PMID:23493032

  17. Mutagenesis and functional analysis of the pore-forming toxin HALT-1 from Hydra magnipapillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Yvonne Jing Mei; Soh, Wai Tuck; Jiemy, William Febry; Hwang, Jung Shan

    2015-02-03

    Actinoporins are small 18.5 kDa pore-forming toxins. A family of six actinoporin genes has been identified in the genome of Hydra magnipapillata, and HALT-1 (Hydra actinoporin-like toxin-1) has been shown to have haemolytic activity. In this study, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the role of amino acids in the pore-forming N-terminal region and the conserved aromatic cluster required for cell membrane binding. A total of 10 mutants of HALT-1 were constructed and tested for their haemolytic and cytolytic activity on human erythrocytes and HeLa cells, respectively. Insertion of 1-4 negatively charged residues in the N-terminal region of HALT-1 strongly reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity, suggesting that the length or charge of the N-terminal region is critical for pore-forming activity. Moreover, substitution of amino acids in the conserved aromatic cluster reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity by more than 80%, suggesting that these aromatic amino acids are important for attachment to the lipid membrane as shown for other actinoporins. The results suggest that HALT-1 and other actinoporins share similar mechanisms of pore formation and that it is critical for HALT-1 to maintain an amphipathic helix at the N-terminus and an aromatic amino acid-rich segment at the site of membrane binding.

  18. Mutagenesis and Functional Analysis of the Pore-Forming Toxin HALT-1 from Hydra magnipapillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Jing Mei Liew

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Actinoporins are small 18.5 kDa pore-forming toxins. A family of six actinoporin genes has been identified in the genome of Hydra magnipapillata, and HALT-1 (Hydra actinoporin-like toxin-1 has been shown to have haemolytic activity. In this study, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the role of amino acids in the pore-forming N-terminal region and the conserved aromatic cluster required for cell membrane binding. A total of 10 mutants of HALT-1 were constructed and tested for their haemolytic and cytolytic activity on human erythrocytes and HeLa cells, respectively. Insertion of 1–4 negatively charged residues in the N-terminal region of HALT-1 strongly reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity, suggesting that the length or charge of the N-terminal region is critical for pore-forming activity. Moreover, substitution of amino acids in the conserved aromatic cluster reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity by more than 80%, suggesting that these aromatic amino acids are important for attachment to the lipid membrane as shown for other actinoporins. The results suggest that HALT-1 and other actinoporins share similar mechanisms of pore formation and that it is critical for HALT-1 to maintain an amphipathic helix at the N-terminus and an aromatic amino acid-rich segment at the site of membrane binding.

  19. Effect of the formation of secondary pores in zeolite ZSM-5 on the properties of molybdenum-zeolite catalysts for methane aromatization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherov, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    A study is performed of 4% Mo/ZSM-5 (30) catalysts for methane aromatization prepared by solid-phase synthesis with mechanical mixing of a zeolite with MoO3 followed by calcination at 550°C. Zeolite etched with sodium hydroxide solutions and dealuminated with aluminum nitrate solutions is used as a support. Catalytic studies of the catalysts are conducted. The effect of treating the initial zeolite on the properties of catalysts in methane aromatization is determined. The effect subsequently treating a zeolite support has on the acid sites of a catalyst is confirmed by means of temperature-programmed reduction and the temperature-programmed desorption of NH3. The formation of molybdenum ions in the +5 oxidation state during catalysis and the presence of graphitized carbon deposits on a spent catalyst's surface are confirmed by EPR and temperature-programmed oxidation.

  20. The Reorientation of T-Cell Polarity and Inhibition of Immunological Synapse Formation by CD46 Involves Its Recruitment to Lipid Rafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy J. Ludford-Menting

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many infectious agents utilize CD46 for infection of human cells, and therapeutic applications of CD46-binding viruses are now being explored. Besides mediating internalization to enable infection, binding to CD46 can directly alter immune function. In particular, ligation of CD46 by antibodies or by measles virus can prevent activation of T cells by altering T-cell polarity and consequently preventing the formation of an immunological synapse. Here, we define a mechanism by which CD46 reorients T-cell polarity to prevent T-cell receptor signaling in response to antigen presentation. We show that CD46 associates with lipid rafts upon ligation, and that this reduces recruitment of both lipid rafts and the microtubule organizing centre to the site of receptor cross-linking. These data combined indicate that polarization of T cells towards the site of CD46 ligation prevents formation of an immunological synapse, and this is associated with the ability of CD46 to recruit lipid rafts away from the site of TCR ligation.

  1. Enrichment of sulfate-reducing bacteria and resulting mineral formation in media mimicking pore water metal ion concentrations and pH conditions of acidic pit lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Jutta; Piva, Angela; Fortin, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Acid mine drainage sites are extreme environments with high acidity and metal ion concentrations. Under anoxic conditions, microbial sulfate reduction may trigger the formation of secondary minerals as a result of H2S production and pH increase. This process was studied in batch experiments with enrichment cultures from acidic sediments of a pit lake using growth media set at different pH values and containing elevated concentrations of Fe²⁺ and Al³⁺. At initial pH values of 5 and 6, sulfate reduction occurred shortly after inoculation. Sulfate- reducing bacteria affiliated to the genus Desulfosporosinus predominated the microbial communities as shown by 16S rRNA gene analysis performed at the end of the incubation. At initial pH values of 3 and 4, sulfate reduction and cell growth occurred only after an extended lag phase, however, at a higher rate than in the less acidic assays. At the end of the growth phase, enrichments were dominated by Thermodesulfobium spp. suggesting that these sulfate reducers were better adapted to acidic conditions. Iron sulfides in the bulk phase were common in all assays, but specific aluminum precipitates formed in close association with cell surfaces and may function as a detoxification mechanism of dissolved Al species at low pH.

  2. Factors Determining the Pore Shape in Polycarbonate Track Membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, P Yu; Orelovich, O L; Akimenko, S N; Sartowska, B; Dmitriev, S N

    2004-01-01

    The process of pore formation in ion-irradiated polycarbonate films on treatment with alkali solutions in the presence of a surfactant is studied. It is found that the pore shape depends on both the structure of the initial films and the peculiarities of the interaction of the surfactant with the polymer surface and the transport of the surfactant into tracks. Due to heterogeneity of the films the cross-section of a track pore channel changes along its length. The presence of the surfactant results in a further effect. Surfactant molecules adsorb on the polymer surface at the pore entries and reduce the etch rate which leads to formation of cigar-like pore channels. The use of surfactant as a component of chemical etchant enables one to control the pore shape in track membranes thus optimizing their retention and permeation characteristics.

  3. Detergent Stabilized Nanopore Formation Kinetics of an Anthrax Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kelby

    2015-03-01

    This summer research project funded through the Society of Physics Students Internship Program and The National Institute of Standards and Technology focused on optimization of pore formation of Protective Antigen protein secreted by Bacillus Anthraces. This experiment analyzes the use of N-tetradecylphosphocholine (FOS-14 Detergent) to stabilize the water soluble protein, protective antigen protein (PA63) to regulate the kinetics of pore formation in a model bilayer lipid membrane. The FOS-14 Detergent was tested under various conditions to understand its impact on the protein pore formation. The optimization of this channel insertion is critical in preparing samples of oriented for neutron reflectometry that provide new data to increase the understanding of the protein's structure.

  4. Structure formation of lipid membranes: Membrane self-assembly and vesicle opening-up to octopus-like micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    We briefly review our recent studies on self-assembly and vesicle rupture of lipid membranes using coarse-grained molecular simulations. For single component membranes, lipid molecules self-assemble from random gas states to vesicles via disk-shaped clusters. Clusters aggregate into larger clusters, and subsequently the large disks close into vesicles. The size of vesicles are determined by kinetics than by thermodynamics. When a vesicle composed of lipid and detergent types of molecules is ruptured, a disk-shaped micelle called bicelle can be formed. When both surfactants have negligibly low critical micelle concentration, it is found that bicelles connected with worm-like micelles are also formed depending on the surfactant ratio and spontaneous curvature of the membrane monolayer.

  5. Biosensor for dopamine based on stabilized lipid films with incorporated resorcin[4]arene receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolelis, Dimitrios P; Theoharis, George

    2003-04-01

    This work reports a technique for the stabilization after storage in air of a lipid film with incorporated resorcin[4]arene receptor based biosensor for dopamine. Microporous filters composed of glass fibers (nominal pore sizes, 0.7 and 1.0 microm) were used as supports for the formation and stabilization of these devices and the lipid film is formed on the filter by polymerization prior its use. Methacrylic acid was the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate was the crosslinker and 2,2'-azobis-(2-methylpropionitrile) was the initiator. The stability of the lipid films by incorporation of a receptor for the preparation of stabilized lipid film biosensor is studied throughout this work. The response towards dopamine of the present stabilized for repetitive uses lipid membrane biosensor composed of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid was compared with planar freely suspended bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs). The stabilized lipid membranes provided similar artificial ion gating events as BLMs in the form of transient signals and can function for repetitive uses after storage in air. However, the response of the stabilized lipid films was slower than that of the freely suspended BLMs. This will allow the practical use of the techniques for chemical sensing based on lipid films and commercialization of these devices, because it is now possible to prepare stabilized lipid film based biosensors and store them in the air.

  6. Fusion Pore Diameter Regulation by Cations Modulating Local Membrane Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron Kabaso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fusion pore is an aqueous channel that is formed upon the fusion of the vesicle membrane with the plasma membrane. Once the pore is open, it may close again (transient fusion or widen completely (full fusion to permit vesicle cargo discharge. While repetitive transient fusion pore openings of the vesicle with the plasma membrane have been observed in the absence of stimulation, their frequency can be further increased using a cAMP-increasing agent that drives the opening of nonspecific cation channels. Our model hypothesis is that the openings and closings of the fusion pore are driven by changes in the local concentration of cations in the connected vesicle. The proposed mechanism of fusion pore dynamics is considered as follows: when the fusion pore is closed or is extremely narrow, the accumulation of cations in the vesicle (increased cation concentration likely leads to lipid demixing at the fusion pore. This process may affect local membrane anisotropy, which reduces the spontaneous curvature and thus leads to the opening of the fusion pore. Based on the theory of membrane elasticity, we used a continuum model to explain the rhythmic opening and closing of the fusion pore.

  7. Pore-forming Activity of the Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System Protein EspD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Caballero-Franco, Celia; Bakker, Dannika; Totten, Stephanie; Jardim, Armando

    2015-10-16

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli is a causative agent of gastrointestinal and diarrheal diseases. Pathogenesis associated with enterohemorrhagic E. coli involves direct delivery of virulence factors from the bacteria into epithelial cell cytosol via a syringe-like organelle known as the type III secretion system. The type III secretion system protein EspD is a critical factor required for formation of a translocation pore on the host cell membrane. Here, we show that recombinant EspD spontaneously integrates into large unilamellar vesicle (LUV) lipid bilayers; however, pore formation required incorporation of anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine and an acidic pH. Leakage assays performed with fluorescent dextrans confirmed that EspD formed a structure with an inner diameter of ∼2.5 nm. Protease mapping indicated that the two transmembrane helical hairpin of EspD penetrated the lipid layer positioning the N- and C-terminal domains on the extralumenal surface of LUVs. Finally, a combination of glutaraldehyde cross-linking and rate zonal centrifugation suggested that EspD in LUV membranes forms an ∼280-320-kDa oligomeric structure consisting of ∼6-7 subunits.

  8. Structural and functional analysis of the pore-forming toxin NetB from Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xu-Xia; Porter, Corrine J; Hardy, Simon P; Steer, David; Smith, A Ian; Quinsey, Noelene S; Hughes, Victoria; Cheung, Jackie K; Keyburn, Anthony L; Kaldhusdal, Magne; Moore, Robert J; Bannam, Trudi L; Whisstock, James C; Rood, Julian I

    2013-02-05

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic bacterium that causes numerous important human and animal diseases, primarily as a result of its ability to produce many different protein toxins. In chickens, C. perfringens causes necrotic enteritis, a disease of economic importance to the worldwide poultry industry. The secreted pore-forming toxin NetB is a key virulence factor in the pathogenesis of avian necrotic enteritis and is similar to alpha-hemolysin, a β-barrel pore-forming toxin from Staphylococcus aureus. To address the molecular mechanisms underlying NetB-mediated tissue damage, we determined the crystal structure of the monomeric form of NetB to 1.8 Å. Structural comparisons with other members of the alpha-hemolysin family revealed significant differences in the conformation of the membrane binding domain. These data suggested that NetB may recognize different membrane receptors or use a different mechanism for membrane-protein interactions. Consistent with this idea, electrophysiological experiments with planar lipid bilayers revealed that NetB formed pores with much larger single-channel conductance than alpha-hemolysin. Channel conductance varied with phospholipid net charge. Furthermore, NetB differed in its ion selectivity, preferring cations over anions. Using hemolysis as a screen, we carried out a random-mutagenesis study that identified several residues that are critical for NetB-induced cell lysis. Mapping of these residues onto the crystal structure revealed that they were clustered in regions predicted to be required for oligomerization or membrane binding. Together these data provide an insight into the mechanism of NetB-mediated pore formation and will contribute to our understanding of the mode of action of this important toxin. IMPORTANCE Necrotic enteritis is an economically important disease of the worldwide poultry industry and is mediated by Clostridium perfringens strains that produce NetB, a β-pore-forming toxin. We carried out

  9. Drug-induced hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia associated with alterations of cell membrane lipids and acanthocyte formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Frederique M; Penraat, Kelley; Collins, Nathaniel; Evans, Ellen; Thackaberry, Evan; Manfra, Denise; Engstrom, Laura; Geissler, Richard; Geraci-Erck, Maria; Frugone, Carlos; Abutarif, Malaz; Fine, Jay S; Peterson, Brianna L; Cummings, Brian S; Johnson, Robert C

    2010-10-01

    CXCR3 is a chemokine receptor, upregulated upon activation of T cells and expressed on nearly 100% of T cells in sites of inflammation. SCH 900875 is a selective CXCR3 receptor antagonist. Thrombocytopenia and severe hemolytic anemia with acanthocytosis occurred in rats at doses of 75, 100, and 150 mg/kg/day. Massively enlarged spleens corresponded histologically to extramedullary hematopoiesis, macrophages, and hemosiderin pigment and sinus congestion. Phagocytosed erythrocytes and platelets were within splenic macrophages. IgG and/or IgM were not detected on erythrocyte and platelet membranes. Ex vivo increased osmotic fragility of RBCs was observed. Lipid analysis of the RBC membrane revealed modifications in phosphatidylcholine, overall cholesterol, and/or sphingomyelin. Platelets exhibited slender filiform processes on their plasma membranes, analogous to those of acanthocytes. The presence of similar morphological abnormalities in acanthocytes and platelets suggests that possibly similar alterations in the lipid composition of the plasma membrane have taken place in both cell types. This phenotype correlated with alterations in plasma lipids (hypercholesterolemia and low triglycerides) that occurred after SCH 900875 administration, although other factors cannot be excluded. The increased cell destruction was considered triggered by alterations in the lipid profile of the plasma membranes of erythrocytes and platelets, as reflected morphologically.

  10. Properties of solar pores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sütterlin, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of an extensive investigation of the properties of solar pores. Spectra of all 4 Stokes parameters of several magnetic sensitive absorption lines as well as Stokes I only spectra of lines with low or vanishing Landéfactor have been observed. An inversion code based on the Leve

  11. 川东北飞仙关组白云岩成因及其次生孔隙%Genesis and secondary pores of dolomite from Triassic Feixianguan Formation in the northeast of Sichuan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄勇; 魏志红; 邓金花; 刘若冰; 陈再学

    2011-01-01

    白云岩以其次生晶间孔隙发育、易于形成高孔高渗优质油气储层为特征,长期以来受到地质学界的高度重视.早期白云石晶体自形程度及晶间孔隙的发育程度除受白云石化成岩流体的影响外,还受原岩储渗性能的控制.川东北宣汉-达县地区飞仙关组白云岩主要存在渗透回流白云石化、混合水白云石化和埋藏白云石化3种成因模式和至少3期次云化.白云岩化并未直接改善储层物性,不是形成优质储层的主要原因,只是形成优质储层的前提;多期次强烈的溶蚀作用及构造碎裂化作用才是形成优质储层的主控因素.大量次生孔隙主要发育在白云岩化之后.台缘暴露浅滩有利于混合水白云石化和大套层状优质白云岩储层的发育.%The dolomites are characterized by the developed secondary intercrystalline pores and easily form qualified reservoirs with high permeability and porosity, and thus are emphasized by geological academic circles for a long time. The idiomorphic degrees of dolomite crystals and the developing degrees of intercyrstalline pores are controlled by accumulating and permeable properties of the original rocks in addition to fluids leading to dolomitization. There exist three genetic models of dolomitization, such as the permeating-flowing-back dolomitization, mixed water dolomitization and burying Dolomitization and at least three times secondary dolomitization for dolomiltes of the Triassic Feixianguan Formation in Xuanhan-Daxuan County in the northeast of Sichuan Province. The dolomitization of dolomites of the-Triassic Feixianguan Formation in the northeast of Sichuan Province does not play the role of improving the geophysical properties of reservoirs and it is not the main reason to form qualified reservoirs but just a premise. Intense dissolution and structural fragmentation of many times are the main controlling factors to form qualified reservoirs and lots of secondary pores

  12. Formation Regularity of Pores During Laser Welding of Die-Cast Magnesium Alloys and Its Mechanism%压铸镁合金激光焊气孔形成规律及原因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婧; 单际国; 温鹏; 任家烈

    2011-01-01

    由于母材含有大量气源,气孔是压铸镁合金激光焊最主要的问题.在不同的激光功率密度下,采用不同的热输入对压铸镁合金激光焊气孔形成规律进行了研究.在低激光功率密度(1.6×10W/cm以下)焊接时,随着热输入的升高气孔率持续升高;在高激光功率密度(3.2×10W/cm以上)焊接时,在一定热输入下气孔率出现极小值,由此增加或减少热输入都会造成气孔率的升高,但当热输入非常低时气孔率又出现降低的趋势,即不同激光功率密度下气孔率随焊接热输入的变化存在两种不同的规律.结合压铸镁合金母材中气源行为以及焊接热过程,对两种规律的形成原因进行了讨论和实验验证,研究发现获得低气孔率焊缝的关键是抑制压铸镁合金中原子氢的析出,使其以固溶形式继续存在于焊缝中.%Welding pore is the main problem during laser welding of die-cast magnesium alloys. The influences of laser power density and heat input on pore formation regularity during laser welding of die-cast magnesium alloys are studied. The formation regularities of pore are different under low and high laser power densities. Under low laser power densities (less than 1.6 × l06 W/cm2 ), porosity increases with the increase of weld heat input; under high power densities(more than 3.2 × l06 W/cm2 ), the minimum value of porosity can be obtained at certain weld heat input, and changing weld heat input a bit higher or lower than this certain value both increase porosity, but when the weld heat input is low enough, low porosity can be obtained. The different regularities can be attributed to the influences of laser power density and weld heat input on welding thermal process and the behaviors of gas sources in weld pool. It is found that suppressing the atomic hydrogen precipitation is the key of obtaining low porosity welds.

  13. 叶片真空灌注工艺管路布置以及孔隙的形成%Piping Layout and Pores Formation in VARTM Manufacture Process of Wind Tube Blade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭家顺; 高建勋

    2009-01-01

    Study the influence of infusion time and infusion effect with two different piping layout in VARTM manufacture process of wind tube blade, as well as the formation of pores in VARTM manufacture process were analyzed. Experiments show that open the main pipelines of the blade shell and then open the pipelines on the blade root layers will save the infusion time but also to avoid the dry spot at the blade root.%研究2种不同管路布置方法对风机叶片灌注时间以及灌注效果的影响,并对灌注过程中孔隙的形成进行了分析.实验表明,采用先开启叶片壳体主管道,再开启叶裉铺层上方管路的方法,节约壳体灌注时间,同时也避免了叶根白斑的产生.

  14. Teardrop shapes minimize bending energy of fusion pores connecting planar bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryham, Rolf J.; Ward, Mark A.; Cohen, Fredric S.

    2013-12-01

    A numerical gradient flow procedure was devised to characterize minimal energy shapes of fusion pores connecting two parallel planar bilayer membranes. Pore energy, composed of splay, tilt, and stretching, was obtained by modeling each bilayer as two monolayers and treating each monolayer of a bilayer membrane as a freely deformable surface described with a mean lipid orientation field. Voids between the two monolayers were prevented by a steric penalty formulation. Pore shapes were assumed to possess both axial and reflectional symmetry. For fixed pore radius and bilayer separation, the gradient flow procedure was applied to initially toroidal pore shapes. Using initially elliptical pore shapes yielded the same final shape. The resulting minimal pore shapes and energies were analyzed as a function of pore dimension and lipid composition. Previous studies either assumed or confined pore shapes, thereby tacitly supplying an unspecified amount of energy to maintain shape. The shapes derived in the present study were outputs of calculations and an externally provided energy was not supplied. Our procedure therefore yielded energy minima significantly lower than those reported in prior studies. The membrane of minimal energy pores bowed outward near the pore lumen, yielding a pore length that exceeded the distance between the two fusing membranes.

  15. The formation of lipid droplets: possible role in the development of insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Sven-Olof; Andersson, Linda; Håversen, Liliana; Olsson, Christina; Myhre, Susanna; Rutberg, Mikael; Mobini, Reza; Li, Lu; Lu, Emma; Borén, Jan; Boström, Pontus

    2011-11-01

    Neutral lipids are stored in so-called lipid droplets, which are formed as small primordial droplets at microsomal membranes and increase in size by a fusion process. The fusion is catalyzed by the SNARE proteins SNAP23, syntaxin-5 and VAMP4. SNAP23 is involved in the insulin dependent translocation of GLUT4 to the plasma membrane, and has an important role in the development of insulin resistance. Thus fatty acids relocalize SNAP23 from the plasma membrane (and the translocation of GLUT 4) to the interior of the cell giving rise to insulin resistance. Moreover this relocalization is seen in skeletal muscles biopsies from patients with type 2 diabetes compared to matched control. Thus a missorting of SNAP23 is essential for the development of insulin resistance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tension-induced vesicle fusion: pathways and pore dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2008-01-01

    and eventually opens a pore to complete the fusion process. In pathway II, at higher tension, a stalk is formed during the fusion process that is then transformed by transmembrane pore formation into a fusion pore. Whereas the latter pathway II resembles stalk pathways as observed in other simulation studies...... fusion time on membrane tension implies that the fusion process is completed by overcoming two energy barriers with scales of 13kBT and 11kBT. The fusion pore radius as a function of time has also been extracted from the simulations, and provides a quantitative measure of the fusion dynamics which...

  17. Transient hepatic overexpression of Insulin-like growth factor 2 induces free cholesterol and lipid droplet formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja M Kessler

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2 has been reported to be overexpressed in steatosis and steatohepatitis, a causal role of IGF2 in steatosis development remains elusive. Aim of our study was to decipher the role of IGF2 in steatosis development.Hydrodynamic gene delivery of the Igf2 plasmid used for transient IGF2 overexpression employing codon-optimized plasmid DNA resulted in a strong induction of hepatic Igf2 expression. The exogenously delivered Igf2 had no influence on endogenous Igf2 expression. The downstream kinase AKT was activated in IGF2 animals. Decreased ALT levels mirrored the cytoprotective effect of IGF2. Serum cholesterol was increased and sulfo-phospho-vanillin colorimetric assay confirmed lipid accumulation in IGF2-livers without signs of inflammation. Interestingly, hepatic cholesterol and phospholipids, determined by thin layer chromatography and free cholesterol by filipin staining, were specifically increased. Lipid droplet (LD size was not changed, but their number was significantly elevated. Furthermore, free cholesterol, which can be stored in LDs and has been reported to be critical for steatosis progression, was elevated in IGF2 overexpressing mice. Accordingly, HmgCoAR was upregulated. To have a closer look at de novo lipid synthesis we investigated expression of the lipogenic transcription factor SREBP1 and its target genes. SREBP1 was induced and also SREBP1 target genes were slightly upregulated. Interestingly, the expression of Cpt1a, which is responsible for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, was induced. Hepatic Igf2 expression induces a fatty liver, characterized by increased cholesterol and phospholipids leading to accumulation of LDs. We therefore suggest a causal role for IGF2 in hepatic lipid accumulation.

  18. [The role of adipokines in formation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolic disorders in patients with cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchun, P; Kadykova, O; Gabisoniia, T

    2012-12-01

    Cardio-vascular disease is an important public health problem in all developed countries.The challenge isto learn thepathogenic mechanisms of this disease.Attention of scientists of the world are drown to the role of hormones in the development of adipose tissue metabolic disorders. Adipose tissue is composed of adipocytes embedded in a loose connective tissue meshwork containing adipocyte precursors, fibroblasts, immune cells, and various other cell types. Adipose tissue was traditionally considered an energy storage depot with few interesting attributes. Due to the dramatic rise in obesity and its metabolic sequelae during the past decades, adipose tissue gained tremendous scientific interest. It is now regarded as an active endocrine organ that, in addition to regulating fat mass and nutrient homeostasis, releases a large number of bioactive mediators (adipokines) modulating hemostasis, blood pressure, lipid and glucose metabolism, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. The aim of our study was to examine the metabolic disorders in patients with cardiovascular disease. Based on identifying the nature of changes of insulin antagonists and of insulin sensitizers. We were investigated 68 patients with hypertension, which included 35 women and 33 men.Estimated distance of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and adipose tissue hormone imbalance. Our results suggest that the mechanisms underlying the progression of diabetes and obesity in patients with hypertension against metabolic disorders that manifest dysfunction of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism are associated with insulinorezistense and hypervisfatinemia and hyperrezistinemia against hypoadiponektinemia occur in hypertensive patients by having diabetes mellitus type 2.

  19. Ubisol-Q10 Prevents Glutamate-Induced Cell Death by Blocking Mitochondrial Fragmentation and Permeability Transition Pore Opening

    OpenAIRE

    Kumari, Santosh; Mehta, Suresh L.; Milledge, Gaolin Z.; Huang, Xinyu; Li, Haining; Li, P. Andy

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are the major events that lead to the formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) during glutamate-induced cytotoxicity and cell death. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has widely been used for the treatment of mitochondrial disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Comparing to traditional lipid-soluble CoQ10, water soluble CoQ10 (Ubisol-Q10) has high intracellular and intra-mitochondrial distribution. The aims of the present study are to...

  20. Optical detection of pores in adipocyte membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanina, I. Yu.; Doubrovski, V. A.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    Structures that can be interpreted as cytoplasm droplets leaking through the membrane are experimentally detected on the membranes of adipocytes using optical digital microscopy. The effect of an aqueous alcohol solution of brilliant green on the amount and sizes of structures is studied. It is demonstrated that the optical irradiation of the adipocytes that are sensitized with the aid of the brilliant green leads to an increase in the amount of structures (pores) after the irradiation. The experimental results confirm the existence of an earlier-proposed effect of photochemical action on the sensitized cells of adipose tissue that involves additional formation of pores in the membrane of the sensitized cell under selective optical irradiation. The proposed method for the detection of micropores in the membrane of adipose tissue based on the detection of the cytoplasm droplets leaking from the cell can be considered as a method for the optical detection of nanosized pores.

  1. Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO₂ and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  2. Low pore connectivity in natural rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO(2) and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air-water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  3. Essential role of the cytochrome P450 CYP4F22 in the production of acylceramide, the key lipid for skin permeability barrier formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yusuke; Nakamichi, Shota; Ohkuni, Aya; Kamiyama, Nozomi; Naoe, Ayano; Tsujimura, Hisashi; Yokose, Urara; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Ishikawa, Junko; Akiyama, Masashi; Kihara, Akio

    2015-06-23

    A skin permeability barrier is essential for terrestrial animals, and its impairment causes several cutaneous disorders such as ichthyosis and atopic dermatitis. Although acylceramide is an important lipid for the skin permeability barrier, details of its production have yet to be determined, leaving the molecular mechanism of skin permeability barrier formation unclear. Here we identified the cytochrome P450 gene CYP4F22 (cytochrome P450, family 4, subfamily F, polypeptide 22) as the long-sought fatty acid ω-hydroxylase gene required for acylceramide production. CYP4F22 has been identified as one of the autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis-causative genes. Ichthyosis-mutant proteins exhibited reduced enzyme activity, indicating correlation between activity and pathology. Furthermore, lipid analysis of a patient with ichthyosis showed a drastic decrease in acylceramide production. We determined that CYP4F22 was a type I membrane protein that locates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), suggesting that the ω-hydroxylation occurs on the cytoplasmic side of the ER. The preferred substrate of the CYP4F22 was fatty acids with a carbon chain length of 28 or more (≥C28). In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that CYP4F22 is an ultra-long-chain fatty acid ω-hydroxylase responsible for acylceramide production and provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms of skin permeability barrier formation. Furthermore, based on the results obtained here, we proposed a detailed reaction series for acylceramide production.

  4. Acetylsalicylic Acid reduces the severity of dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and increases the formation of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhnke, Thomas; Gomolka, Beate; Bilal, Süleyman; Zhou, Xiangzhi; Sun, Yanping; Rothe, Michael; Baumgart, Daniel C; Weylandt, Karsten H

    2013-01-01

    The role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in inflammatory bowel disease is controversial, as they have been implicated in disease aggravation. Different from other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) enhances the formation of anti-inflammatory and proresolution lipoxins derived from arachidonic acid as well as resolvins from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). In this study, we examined the effect of ASA on murine dextran sodium sulfate colitis. A mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol and post mortem assessment were used to assess disease severity, and lipid metabolites were measured using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry. Decreased colitis activity was demonstrated by phenotype and MRI assessment in mice treated with ASA, and confirmed in postmortem analysis. Analysis of lipid mediators showed sustained formation of lipoxin A4 and an increase of DHA-derived 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) after treatment with ASA. Furthermore, in vitro experiments in RAW264.7 murine macrophages demonstrated significantly increased phagocytosis activity after incubation with 17-HDHA, supporting its proresolution effect. These results show a protective effect of ASA in a murine colitis model and could give a rationale for a careful reassessment of ASA therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and particularly ulcerative colitis, possibly combined with DHA supplementation.

  5. Semisynthetic Lipopeptides Derived from Nisin Display Antibacterial Activity and Lipid II Binding on Par with That of the Parent Compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Timo; Wood, Thomas M; 't Hart, Peter; Kleijn, Laurens H J; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Willems, Rob J L; Breukink, Eefjan; Martin, Nathaniel I

    2015-07-29

    The lipid II-binding N-terminus of nisin, comprising the so-called A/B ring system, was synthetically modified to provide antibacterially active and proteolytically stable derivatives. A variety of lipids were coupled to the C-terminus of the nisin A/B ring system to generate semisynthetic constructs that display potent inhibition of bacterial growth, with activities approaching that of nisin itself. Most notable was the activity observed against clinically relevant bacterial strains including MRSA and VRE. Experiments with membrane models indicate that these constructs operate via a lipid II-mediated mode of action without causing pore formation. A lipid II-dependent mechanism of action is further supported by antagonization assays wherein the addition of lipid II was found to effectively block the antibacterial activity of the nisin-derived lipopeptides.

  6. Performance of Small Pore Microchannel Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Ravinett, T.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Edgar, M.

    1995-01-01

    Small pore size microchannel plates (MCP's) are needed to satisfy the requirements for future high resolution small and large format detectors for astronomy. MCP's with pore sizes in the range 5 micron to 8 micron are now being manufactured, but they are of limited availability and are of small size. We have obtained sets of Galileo 8 micron and 6.5 micron MCP's, and Philips 6 micron and 7 micron pore MCP's, and compared them to our larger pore MCP Z stacks. We have tested back to back MCP stacks of four of these MCP's and achieved gains greater than 2 x 1O(exp 7) with pulse height distributions of less than 40% FWHM, and background rates of less than 0.3 events sec(exp -1) cm(exp -2). Local counting rates up to approx. 100 events/pore/sec have been attained with little drop of the MCP gain. The bare MCP quantum efficiencies are somewhat lower than those expected, however. Flat field images are characterized by an absence of MCP fixed pattern noise.

  7. The pore space scramble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormally, Alexandra; Bentham, Michelle; Vermeylen, Saskia; Markusson, Nils

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and energy security continue to be the context of the transition to a secure, affordable and low carbon energy future, both in the UK and beyond. This is reflected in for example, binding climate policy targets at the EU level, the introduction of renewable energy targets, and has also led to an increasing interest in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology with its potential to help mitigate against the effects of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning. The UK has proposed a three phase strategy to integrate CCS into its energy system in the long term focussing on off-shore subsurface storage (DECC, 2014). The potential of CCS therefore, raises a number of challenging questions and issues surrounding the long-term storage of CO2 captured and injected into underground spaces and, alongside other novel uses of the subsurface, contributes to opening a new field for discussion on the governance of the subsurface. Such 'novel' uses of the subsurface have lead to it becoming an increasingly contested space in terms of its governance, with issues emerging around the role of ownership, liability and property rights of subsurface pore space. For instance, questions over the legal ownership of pore space have arisen with ambiguity over the legal standpoint of the surface owner and those wanting to utilise the pore space for gas storage, and suggestions of whether there are depths at which legal 'ownership' becomes obsolete (Barton, 2014). Here we propose to discuss this 'pore space scramble' and provide examples of the competing trajectories of different stakeholders, particularly in the off-shore context given its priority in the UK. We also propose to highlight the current ambiguity around property law of pore space in the UK with reference to approaches currently taken in different national contexts. Ultimately we delineate contrasting models of governance to illustrate the choices we face and consider the ethics of these models for the common good

  8. Role of pore-forming toxins in neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Henneke, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Protein toxins are important virulence factors contributing to neonatal sepsis. The major pathogens of neonatal sepsis, group B Streptococci, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, secrete toxins of different molecular nature, which are key for defining the disease. Amongst these toxins are pore-forming exotoxins that are expressed as soluble monomers prior to engagement of the target cell membrane with subsequent formation of an aqueous membrane pore. Membrane pore formation is not only a means for immediate lysis of the targeted cell but also a general mechanism that contributes to penetration of epithelial barriers and evasion of the immune system, thus creating survival niches for the pathogens. Pore-forming toxins, however, can also contribute to the induction of inflammation and hence to the manifestation of sepsis. Clearly, pore-forming toxins are not the sole factors that drive sepsis progression, but they often act in concert with other bacterial effectors, especially in the initial stages of neonatal sepsis manifestation.

  9. Lysenin: a sphingomyelin specific pore-forming toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shogomori, Hidehiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2008-03-01

    Sphingomyelin is a major sphingolipid in mammalian cells. Recent results indicate that sphingomyelin is a reservoir of lipid second messengers, ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Sphingomyelin is also a major component of sphingolipid and cholesterol-rich membrane domains (lipid rafts). Lysenin is a pore-forming toxin that specifically binds sphingomyelin. The binding of lysenin to sphingomyelin is dependent on the membrane distribution of the lipid, i.e. the toxin selectively binds sphingomyelin clusters. Development of a non-toxic lysenin mutant revealed the spatial and functional heterogeneity of sphingolipid-rich membrane domains.

  10. Consideraciones termodinámicas entre la formación de poros y la presión hidrostática durante la soldadura subacuatica mojada Thermodynamic considerations between pores formation and hydrostatic pressure during underwater wet welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Quintana Puchol

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Las formaciones de poros y grietas en los cordones de soldadura durante la soldadura subacuatica mojada son las principales causas que impiden alcanzar las propiedades mecánicas requeridas en el metal de soldadura para que estas possam ser utilizadas em aplicações de responsabilidade. Estos defectos están estrechamente asociados a la descomposición de la molécula de agua en las condiciones del arco eléctrico. En el presente trabajo se expone los cálculos termodinámicos sobre el complejo proceso de la descomposición del agua en las condiciones de las altas temperaturas de arco eléctrico a una presión de una atmósfera de vapor. Los valores de las presiones parciales de los cinco principales productos de la evaporización y descomposición del agua (H2O(g, H2, O2, H y O son calculados a temperaturas entre 1870 y 4000 K. Debido a que el hidrógeno atómico es el principal responsable de la formación de poros en el metal de soldadura es que se expresa finalmente su presión parcial en función de las presiones parciales del oxígeno atómico y vapor de agua. Se expone valores de la solubilidad del hidrógeno en el metal líquido en las condiciones de la soldadura subacuatica mojada a 50 y 100 m de profundidad y finalmente se compara los resultados obtenidos por cálculos termodinámicos con las mediciones efectuadas en soldaduras realizadas a 50 y 100m de profundidad.The pores and cracks formations in weld bead during underwater wet welding are the main cause that prevent to reach the required mechanical properties of the weld metal. These defects are closely associated with the decomposition of the water molecule under conditions of electric arc. In this paper the thermodynamic calculations of the complex process of the water decomposition under the conditions of high temperatures of electric arc to a pressure of one atmosphere of steam is exposed. The values of the partial pressures of the five main products of the vaporizations and

  11. Asymmetric distribution of charged lipids between the leaflets of a vesicle bilayer induced by melittin and alamethicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Shuo [ORNL; Heller, William T [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Cellular membranes are complex mixtures of lipids, proteins, and other small molecules that provide functional, dynamic barriers between the cell and its environment, as well as between environments within the cell. The lipid composition of the membrane is highly specific and controlled in terms of both content and lipid localization. The membrane structure results from the complex interplay between the wide varieties of molecules present. Here, small-angle neutron scattering and selective deuterium labeling were used to probe the impact of the membrane-active peptides melittin and alamethicin on the structure of lipid bilayers composed of a mixture of the lipids dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) and chain-perdeuterated dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC). We found that both peptides enriched the outer leaflet of the bilayer with the negatively charged DMPG, creating an asymmetric distribution of lipids. The level of enrichment is peptide concentration-dependent and is stronger for melittin than it is for alamethicin. The enrichment between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets occurs at very low peptide concentrations and increases with peptide concentration, including when the peptide adopts a membrane-spanning, pore-forming state. The results suggest that these membrane-active peptides may have a secondary stressful effect on target cells at low concentrations that results from a disruption of the lipid distribution between the inner and outer leaflets of the bilayer that is independent of the formation of transmembrane pores.

  12. Structural Basis for Recognition of the Pore-Forming Toxin Intermedilysin by Human Complement Receptor CD59

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Johnson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Pore-forming proteins containing the structurally conserved membrane attack complex/perforin fold play an important role in immunity and host-pathogen interactions. Intermedilysin (ILY is an archetypal member of a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin subclass that hijacks the complement receptor CD59 to make cytotoxic pores in human cells. ILY directly competes for the membrane attack complex binding site on CD59, rendering cells susceptible to complement lysis. To understand how these bacterial pores form in lipid bilayers and the role CD59 plays in complement regulation, we determined the crystal structure of human CD59 bound to ILY. Here, we show the ILY-CD59 complex at 3.5 Å resolution and identify two interfaces mediating this host-pathogen interaction. An ILY-derived peptide based on the binding site inhibits pore formation in a CD59-containing liposome model system. These data provide insight into how CD59 coordinates ILY monomers, nucleating an early prepore state, and suggest a potential mechanism of inhibition for the complement terminal pathway.

  13. Effects of supersaturation on pore shape in solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, P. S.; Hsiao, S. Y.

    2017-02-01

    The shape of a pore resulting from a bubble entrapped by a solidification front with different supersaturation ratios is predicted in this work. Supersaturation ratio, representing the ratio between solute concentration and saturation solute concentration, determines nucleation of a bubble and development of the pore shape in the early stage. Pore formation and its shape in solid influence contemporary issues of biology, engineering, foods, geophysics and climate change, etc. This work extends and combines previous models accounting for realistic mass and momentum transport, and physico-chemical equilibrium of solute gas across the bubble cap to self-consistently determine shape of the bubble cap beyond the solidification front and the pore shape in solid. The study also deal with that pore formation can be resulted from three different mechanisms, depending on the directions and magnitude of solute gas transport across the bubble cap. Case 1 is subject to solute transport from the pore across the cap into the surrounding liquid in the early stage. Cases 2a and 2b indicate opposite direction of solute transport. In contrast to Case 2b, the effect of solute transport on solute gas pressure in the pore in Case 2a is stronger than that of pore volume expansionin the last stage. The results find that an increase in supersaturation ratio decreases pore radius and time for bubble entrapment in Case 1. The bubble cannot be entrapped in Case 2. The predicted pore shape in solid agrees with experimental data. Understanding, prediction and control of the growth of the pore shape have therefore been obtained.

  14. Ripples and the formation of anisotropic lipid domains: Imaging two-component double bilayers by atomic force microscopy_copy_03

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leidy, C.; Kaasgaard, Thomas; Crowe, J.H.;

    2002-01-01

    . Intriguing straight-edged anisotropic fluid-phase domains were observed in the fluid-phase/ordered-phase coexistence temperature range, which resemble the fluid-phase/ordered-phase domain patterns observed in giant unilamellar vesicles composed of such phospholipid mixtures. With the high resolution provided......Direct visualization of the fluid-phase/ordered-phase domain structure in mica-supported bilayers composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine mixtures is performed with atomic force microscopy. The system studied is a double bilayer supported...... by atomic force microscopy, we investigated the origin of these anisotropic lipid domain patterns, and found that ripple phase formation is directly responsible for the anisotropic nature of these domains. The nucleation and growth of fluid-phase domains are found to be directed by the presence of ripples...

  15. Lipid Biomarkers of the Maquoketa Formation, Iowa: Transect of a Paleobathymetry Gradient in the Lead-Up to the Late Ordovician Mass Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrssen, M.; Love, G. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Late Ordovician (~450-44 Ma) was a period of drastic environmental change, beginning in a hothouse climate with epeiric seaways near a Phanerozoic high and concluding with the Hirnantian glaciation, large positive carbon isotope excursion(s) (Hirnantian isotopic carbon excursion, HICE) and one of the Big Five mass extinctions. The two-phased expression of the Late Ordovician mass extinction has been attributed to regression-driven habitat loss and the consequences of cooling climate, followed by transgression of oxygen-deficient bottom water onto previously oxygenated shelves. Lipid biomarker records indicate substantial changes in microbial communities during the glacial maximum and mass extinction (Rohrssen et al., in press); to fully uncouple the effects of sea level-driven facies change from more regional or global factors we have analyzed lipid biomarkers along a shallow to deep water paleobathymetry gradient in central Laurentia across a transgressive-regressive cycle. We compare results from the Maquoketa Formation to previous work on Hirnantian- and Katian-age rocks to develop a better understanding of the association of microbial communities with Late Ordovician-age epeiric sea and upwelling environments. During deposition of the Katian-age Maquoketa Formation, Iowa was bounded to the north by exposed highlands of the Transcontinental Arch and separated from the southeastern half of the Laurentian epeiric seaway by a northeast-southwest trending shelf-break into the deeper waters of the Seebree Trough, a depression thought to have connected central and eastern Laurentia to the open ocean. As a result of this paleotopography, samples of the Maquoketa Formation collected from drill cores BS5 (Clayton County), SS-15 (Jackson County), and H33 (Des Moines County) in a transect from northeastern to southeastern Iowa capture the change in facies from carbonate-rich platform to shale with phosphatic intervals at the shelf-break in contemporaneous deposits

  16. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 samples (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010). Third, relaxometric information forms the basis of understanding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. The general difficulty of imaging in soils are the inherent fast T2 relaxation times due to i) the small pore sizes, ii) presence of paramagnetic ions in the solid matrix, and iii) diffusion in internal gradients. The last point is important, since echo times can not set shorter than about 1ms for imaging purposes. The way out is either the usage of low fields for imaging in soils or special ultra-short pulse sequences, which do not create echoes. In this presentation we will give examples on conventional imaging of macropore fluxes in soil cores (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010), and the combination with relaxometric imaging, as well as the advantages and drawbacks of low-field and ultra-fast pulse imaging. Also first results on the imaging of soil columns measured by SIP in Project A3 are given. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Waterflow Monitored by Tracer Transport in Natural Porous Media Using MRI." Vadose Zone J.: submitted. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Relaxation in a

  17. Crystal structure of an invertebrate cytolysin pore reveals unique properties and mechanism of assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobnik, Marjetka; Savory, Peter; Rojko, Nejc; Kisovec, Matic; Wood, Neil; Hambley, Richard; Pugh, Jonathan; Wallace, E. Jayne; McNeill, Luke; Bruce, Mark; Liko, Idlir; Allison, Timothy M.; Mehmood, Shahid; Yilmaz, Neval; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Gilbert, Robert J. C.; Robinson, Carol V.; Jayasinghe, Lakmal; Anderluh, Gregor

    2016-05-01

    The invertebrate cytolysin lysenin is a member of the aerolysin family of pore-forming toxins that includes many representatives from pathogenic bacteria. Here we report the crystal structure of the lysenin pore and provide insights into its assembly mechanism. The lysenin pore is assembled from nine monomers via dramatic reorganization of almost half of the monomeric subunit structure leading to a β-barrel pore ~10 nm long and 1.6-2.5 nm wide. The lysenin pore is devoid of additional luminal compartments as commonly found in other toxin pores. Mutagenic analysis and atomic force microscopy imaging, together with these structural insights, suggest a mechanism for pore assembly for lysenin. These insights are relevant to the understanding of pore formation by other aerolysin-like pore-forming toxins, which often represent crucial virulence factors in bacteria.

  18. Lipid Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Lipid Profile Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... as: Lipid Panel; Coronary Risk Panel Formal name: Lipid Profile Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; ...

  19. Induction of nano pore in Agrobacterial hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Tousheh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A variety of oxygen-transport and -binding proteins exist in organisms including bacteria, protozoans, and fungi all have hemoglobin-like proteins. In addition to dealing with transport and sensing of oxygen, they may also deal with NO2, CO2, sulfide compounds, and even O2 scavenging in environments. Also they detoxified chlorinated materials like P450 enzymes and peroxidases and use as a detector of nitrate and hydrogen peroxide. Pore-forming bacterial globins are interested for filtration. Materials and methods: Although there are data for bacterial toxin as a filter, here we used Agrobacterial hem to induce nano pore in the heme structure using point mutation. Results: Investigations showed that three amino acids leucine 76, alanine 83 and histidine 80 are important for pore formation in Agrobacterium hemoglobin. A point mutation on leucine 76 to glycine, histidine 80 to asparagine and alanine 83 to lysine step by step led to create the nano pore 0.7- 0.8 nm in the globin. Discussion and conclusion: These mutations in bacterial hemoglobin increase the stability when mutation is with it’s at pH7. This mutation decreases the aliphatic index however increase the stability index.

  20. Micro pore and throat characteristics and moveable fluid variation of tight sandstone in 4th member of Xujiahe Formation, Xinchang Gas Field, western Sichuan Basin%川西新场须四段致密砂岩储层微观孔喉与可动流体变化特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖开华; 冯动军; 李秀鹏

    2014-01-01

    In order to evaluate the tight sandstone reservoirs in the 4th member of the Xujiahe Formation in the Xinchang area of the western Sichuan Basin, nuclear magnetic resonance and constant-rate mercury intrusion ex-periments have been carried out to quantitatively analyze micro pore and throat and moveable fluid variation char-acteristics. Studies have indicated that the moveable fluid parameters, throat parameters and pore parameters of tight sandstones vary largely. In micro-fractured tight sandstones, pores have an advantage over throats affecting the moveable fluid parameters, and the moveable fluid parameters are mainly controlled by pores. Low moveable fluid content and low producing degree of tight sandstones are mainly caused by the relatively long radius and wide distribution of pores and throats. In micro-fractured tight sandstones, the mercury saturation in throats is higher than that in pores, indicating that the dominant type of reservoir space is pore-fracture type in the 4th member of the Xujiahe Formation, the Xinchang Gas Field.%为了评价川西新场须四段致密砂岩储层,应用恒速压汞及核磁共振实验方法对储层微观孔喉与可动流体变化特征进行定量分析。结果表明,须四段致密砂岩储层可动流体参数、喉道特征参数及孔隙参数变化幅度大。微裂隙发育的致密砂岩储层孔隙对可动流体参数的影响较喉道要更大一些,在微观上可动流体参数主要受孔隙控制。孔喉半径比较大、分布范围宽是致密砂岩储层可动流体含量低、可动用程度差的主要原因之一。微裂隙发育的致密砂岩储层具有喉道进汞饱和度较孔隙进汞饱和度高的特点,说明新场须四段致密砂岩储层的储集空间类型主要为孔隙-裂缝型。

  1. Analytical modeling of mercury injection in high-rank coalbed methane reservoirs based on pores and microfractures: a case study of the upper carboniferous Taiyuan Formation in the Heshun block of the Qinshui Basin, central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yang; Ding, Wenlong; Yin, Shuai; Wang, Ruyue; Mei, Yonggui; Liu, Jianjun

    2017-03-01

    The coalbed gas reservoirs in the Qinshui Basin in central China are highly heterogeneous; thus, the reservoir characteristics are difficult to assess. Research on the pore structure of a reservoir can provide a basis for understanding the occurrence and seepage mechanisms of coal reservoirs, rock physics modeling and the formulation of rational development plans. Therefore, the pore structure characteristics of the coalbed gas reservoirs in the high rank bituminous coal in the No. 15 coal seam of the Carboniferous Taiyuan Group in the Heshun coalbed methane (CBM) blocks in the northeastern Qinshui Basin were analyzed based on pressure mercury and scanning electron microscopy data. The results showed that the effective porosity system of the coal reservoir was mainly composed of pores and microfractures and that the pore throat configuration of the coal reservoir was composed of pores and microthroats. A model was developed based on the porosity and microfractures of the high rank coal rock and the mercury injection and drainage curves. The mercury injection curve model and the coal permeability are well correlated and were more reliable for the analysis of coal and rock pore system connectivity than the mercury drainage curve model. Coal rocks with developed microfractures are highly permeable; the production levels are often high during the initial drainage stages, but they decrease rapidly. A significant portion of the natural gas remains in the strata and cannot be exploited; therefore, the ultimate recovery is rather low. Coal samples with underdeveloped microfractures have lower permeabilities. While the initial production levels are lower, the production cycle is longer, and the ultimate recovery is higher. Therefore, the initial production levels of coal reservoirs with poorly developed microfractures in some regions of China may be low. However, over the long term, due to their higher ultimate recoveries and longer production cycles, the total gas

  2. Vapor intrusion in soils with multimodal pore-size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfaro Soto Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Johnson and Ettinger [1] model and its extensions are at this time the most widely used algorithms for estimating subsurface vapor intrusion into buildings (API [2]. The functions which describe capillary pressure curves are utilized in quantitative analyses, although these are applicable for porous media with a unimodal or lognormal pore-size distribution. However, unaltered soils may have a heterogeneous pore distribution and consequently a multimodal pore-size distribution [3], which may be the result of specific granulometry or the formation of secondary porosity related to genetic processes. The present paper was designed to present the application of the Vapor Intrusion Model (SVI_Model to unsaturated soils with multimodal pore-size distribution. Simulations with data from the literature show that the use of a multimodal model in soils with such pore distribution characteristics could provide more reliable results for indoor air concentration, rather than conventional models.

  3. Clostridium Perfringens Epsilon Toxin Binds to Membrane Lipids and Its Cytotoxic Action Depends on Sulfatide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Gil

    Full Text Available Epsilon toxin (Etx is one of the major lethal toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, being the causal agent of fatal enterotoxemia in animals, mainly sheep and goats. Etx is synthesized as a non-active prototoxin form (proEtx that becomes active upon proteolytic activation. Etx exhibits a cytotoxic effect through the formation of a pore in the plasma membrane of selected cell targets where Etx specifically binds due to the presence of specific receptors. However, the identity and nature of host receptors of Etx remain a matter of controversy. In the present study, the interactions between Etx and membrane lipids from the synaptosome-enriched fraction from rat brain (P2 fraction and MDCK cell plasma membrane preparations were analyzed. Our findings show that both Etx and proEtx bind to lipids extracted from lipid rafts from the two different models as assessed by protein-lipid overlay assay. Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Binding of proEtx to sulfatide, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol (3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol (5-phosphate was detected. Removal of the sulphate groups via sulfatase treatment led to a dramatic decrease in Etx-induced cytotoxicity, but not in proEtx-GFP binding to MDCK cells or a significant shift in oligomer formation, pointing to a role of sulfatide in pore formation in rafts but not in toxin binding to the target cell membrane. These results show for the first time the interaction between Etx and membrane lipids from host tissue and point to a major role for sulfatides in C. perfringens epsilon toxin pathophysiology.

  4. Suppressing the formation of lipid raft-associated Rac1/PI3K/Akt signaling complexes by curcumin inhibits SDF-1α-induced invasion of human esophageal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng-Liang; Lu, Yao-Cheng; Chen, Hung-Yi; Lee, Chuan-Chun; Chung, Jing-Gung; Chen, Shih-Shun

    2014-05-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) is a ligand for C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), which contributes to the metastasis of cancer cells by promoting cell migration. Here, we show that the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis can significantly increase invasion of esophageal carcinoma (EC) cells. We accomplished this by examining the effects of CXCR4 knockdown as well as treatment with a CXCR4-neutralizing antibody and the CXCR4-specific inhibitor AMD3100. Curcumin suppressed SDF-1α-induced cell invasion and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) promoter activity, cell surface localization of CXCR4 at lipid rafts, and lipid raft-associated ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) p85α/Akt signaling. Curcumin inhibited SDF-1α-induced cell invasion by suppressing the Rac1-PI3K signaling complex at lipid rafts but did not abrogate lipid raft formation. We further demonstrate that the attenuation of lipid raft-associated Rac1 activity by curcumin was critical for the inhibition of SDF-1α-induced PI3K/Akt/NF-κB activation, cell surface localization of CXCR4 at lipid rafts, MMP-2 promoter activity, and cell invasion. Collectively, our results indicate that curcumin inhibits SDF-1α-induced EC cell invasion by suppressing the formation of the lipid raft-associated Rac1-PI3K-Akt signaling complex, the localization of CXCR4 with lipid rafts at the cell surface, and MMP-2 promoter activity, likely through the inhibition of Rac1 activity.

  5. 外源性 ATP 诱导 PC12细胞的膜孔形成%Exogenous ATP induces formation of membrane pore in PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈慧; 尹雅玲; 李超堃; 赵红岗; 马洁; 李东亮

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the formation of membrane pore in PC 12 cells induced by exogenous adenosine triphosphate ( ATP) and to identify the key molecular targets .METHODS:PC12 cells were treated with different concen-trations of ATP to establish the injury model .The morphological change was observed under an inverted phase -contrast mi-croscope.The viability of the PC12 cells was measured by CCK-8 assay.Fluorescent dye YO-PRO-1 was used to detect the membrane permeability.The expression of P2X7 receptor and pannexin 1 (Panx1) at mRNA and protein levels was as-sessed by real-time PCR and Western blotting .RESULTS:After exposed to ATP (1 mmol/L, 3 mmol/L and 5 mmol/L) for 3 h, the PC12 cells became edematous , and the number of adherent cells decreased gradually in a dose-dependent man-ner .The cell viabilities in 3 mmol/L ATP group and 5 mmol/L ATP group were significantly decreased compared with con-trol group (P0. 05).The expression of P2X7 receptor at mRNA and protein levels was significantly increased (P0.05) when PC12 cells were exposed to ATP for 3 h.CONCLUSION:Extracellular ATP at high concentration may induce membrane pore formation with the expression and activation of P 2X7 receptor in PC12 cells.%目的:探讨外源性三磷酸腺苷( ATP)诱导PC12细胞的膜孔形成及关键分子靶标。方法:用不同浓度的ATP处理培养的PC12细胞,采用倒置相差显微镜观察形态,CCK-8法检测细胞存活率,YO-PRO-1染色检测细胞膜通透性,Western blotting和real-time PCR检测P2X7受体和pannexin 1(Panx1)表达的变化。结果:(1)ATP(1 mmol/L、3 mmol/L、5 mmol/L)作用3 h,可见随着ATP浓度升高,PC12细胞变圆,脱壁细胞增多;当ATP浓度为3 mmol/L或5 mmol/L时,PC12细胞活力较对照组显著下降(P<0.05)。(2)不同浓度的ATP(0、1、3、5 mmol/L)作用1 h,PC12细胞摄入YO-PRO-1的荧光强度随着浓度增加而增加;同一浓度的ATP作用不同时间(15

  6. A pore water conductivity sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The electrical permittivity and conductivity of the bulk soil are a function of the permittivity and conductivity of the pore water. For soil water contents higher than 0.10 both functions are equal, facilitating in situ conductivity measurements of the pore water. A novel method is described, based

  7. A quantitative approach to the determination of drug release from reverse-phase evaporation lipid vesicles. The influence of sodium ion-pair formation on warfarin partitioning and permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, L.H.M.; Cools, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of sodium ion-pair formation on warfarin partitioning and permeability has been investigated using reverse-phase evaporation lipid vesicles. An experimental method for the isolation of the vesicles having known amounts of encapsulated drug has been described. The partitioning of warfar

  8. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  9. Molecular Properties of Globin Channels and Pores: Role of Cholesterol in Ligand Binding and Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene A Morrill

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Globins contain one or more cavities that control or affect such functions as ligand movement and ligand binding. Here we report that the extended globin family [cytoglobin (Cygb; neuroglobin (Ngb; myoglobin (Mb; hemoglobin (Hb subunits Hba(α and Hbb(β] contain either a transmembrane (TM helix or pore-lining region as well as internal cavities. Protein motif/domain analyses indicate that Ngb and Hbb each contain 5 cholesterol-binding (CRAC/CARC domains and 1 caveolin binding motif, whereas the Cygb dimer has 6 cholesterol-binding domains but lacks caveolin-binding motifs. Mb and Hba each exhibit 2 cholesterol-binding domains and also lack caveolin-binding motifs. The Hb αβ-tetramer contains 14 cholesterol-binding domains. Computer algorithms indicate that Cygb and Ngb cavities display multiple partitions and C-terminal pore-lining regions, whereas Mb has three major cavities plus a C-terminal pore-lining region. The Hb tetramer exhibits a large internal cavity but the subunits differ in that they contain a C-terminal TM helix (Hba and pore-lining region (Hbb. The cavities include 43 of 190 Cygb residues, 38 of 151 of Ngb residues, 55 of 154 Mb residues and 137 of 688 residues in the Hb tetramer. Each cavity complex includes 6 to 8 residues of the TM helix or pore-lining region and CRAC/CARC domains exist within all cavities. Erythrocyte Hb αβ-tetramers are largely cytosolic but also bind to a membrane anion exchange protein, band 3, which contains a large internal cavity and 12 TM helices (5 being pore-lining regions. The Hba TM helix may be the erythrocyte membrane band 3 attachment site. Band 3 contributes 4 caveolin binding motifs and 10 CRAC/CARC domains. Cholesterol binding may create lipid-disordered phases that alter globin cavities and facilitate ligand movement, permitting ion channel formation and conformational changes that orchestrate anion and ligand (O2, CO2, NO movement within the large internal cavities and

  10. Molecular Properties of Globin Channels and Pores: Role of Cholesterol in Ligand Binding and Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B

    2016-01-01

    Globins contain one or more cavities that control or affect such functions as ligand movement and ligand binding. Here we report that the extended globin family [cytoglobin (Cygb); neuroglobin (Ngb); myoglobin (Mb); hemoglobin (Hb) subunits Hba(α); and Hbb(β)] contain either a transmembrane (TM) helix or pore-lining region as well as internal cavities. Protein motif/domain analyses indicate that Ngb and Hbb each contain 5 cholesterol- binding (CRAC/CARC) domains and 1 caveolin binding motif, whereas the Cygb dimer has 6 cholesterol-binding domains but lacks caveolin-binding motifs. Mb and Hba each exhibit 2 cholesterol-binding domains and also lack caveolin-binding motifs. The Hb αβ-tetramer contains 14 cholesterol-binding domains. Computer algorithms indicate that Cygb and Ngb cavities display multiple partitions and C-terminal pore-lining regions, whereas Mb has three major cavities plus a C-terminal pore-lining region. The Hb tetramer exhibits a large internal cavity but the subunits differ in that they contain a C-terminal TM helix (Hba) and pore-lining region (Hbb). The cavities include 43 of 190 Cygb residues, 38 of 151 of Ngb residues, 55 of 154 Mb residues, and 137 of 688 residues in the Hb tetramer. Each cavity complex includes 6 to 8 residues of the TM helix or pore-lining region and CRAC/CARC domains exist within all cavities. Erythrocyte Hb αβ-tetramers are largely cytosolic but also bind to a membrane anion exchange protein, "band 3," which contains a large internal cavity and 12 TM helices (5 being pore-lining regions). The Hba TM helix may be the erythrocyte membrane "band 3" attachment site. "Band 3" contributes 4 caveolin binding motifs and 10 CRAC/CARC domains. Cholesterol binding may create lipid-disordered phases that alter globin cavities and facilitate ligand movement, permitting ion channel formation and conformational changes that orchestrate anion and ligand (O2, CO2, NO) movement within the large internal cavities and channels of the

  11. Lipid Structure in Triolein Lipid Droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are primary repositories of esterified fatty acids and sterols in animal cells. These organelles originate on the lumenal or cytoplasmic side of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and are released to the cytosol. In contrast to other intracellular organelles, LDs are composed...... of a mass of hydrophobic lipid esters coved by phospholipid monolayer. The small size and unique architecture of LDs makes it complicated to study LD structure by modern experimental methods. We discuss coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of LD formation in systems containing 1-palmitoyl-2...... to coarse-grained simulations, the presence of PE lipids at the interface has a little impact on distribution of components and on the overall LD structure. (4) The thickness of the lipid monolayer at the surface of the droplet is similar to the thickness of one leaflet of a bilayer. Computer simulations...

  12. Performance of slotted pores in particle manufacture using rotating membrane emulsification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingchun Yuan; Nita Aryanti; Ruozhou Hou; Richard A.Williams

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the use of different slotted pores in rotating membrane emulsification technology.Pores of square and rectangular shapes were studied to understand the effect of aspect ratio (1-3.5) and their orientation on oil droplet formation.Increasing the membrane rotation speed decreased the droplet size,and the oil droplets produced were more uniform using slotted pores as compared to circular geometry.At a given rotation speed,the droplet size was mainly determined by the pore size and the fluid velocity of oil through the pore (pore fluid velocity).The ratio of droplet diameter to the equivalent diameter of the slotted pore increased with the pore fluid velocity.At a given pore fluid velocity and rotation speed,pore orientation significantly influences the droplet formation rate: horizontally disposed pores (with their longer side perpendicular to the membrane axis) generate droplets at double the rate of vertically disposed pores.This work indicates practical benefits in the use of slotted membranes over conventional methods.

  13. Probing peptide and protein insertion in a biomimetic S-layer supported lipid membrane platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiati, Samar; Schrems, Angelika; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Sleytr, Uwe B; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-27

    The most important aspect of synthetic lipid membrane architectures is their ability to study functional membrane-active peptides and membrane proteins in an environment close to nature. Here, we report on the generation and performance of a biomimetic platform, the S-layer supported lipid membrane (SsLM), to investigate the structural and electrical characteristics of the membrane-active peptide gramicidin and the transmembrane protein α-hemolysin in real-time using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring in combination with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A shift in membrane resistance is caused by the interaction of α-hemolysin and gramicidin with SsLMs, even if only an attachment onto, or functional channels through the lipid membrane, respectively, are formed. Moreover, the obtained results did not indicate the formation of functional α-hemolysin pores, but evidence for functional incorporation of gramicidin into this biomimetic architecture is provided.

  14. Effect of Supporting Polyelectrolyte Multilayers and Deposition Conditions on the Formation of 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodek, Magdalena; Szuwarzynski, Michal; Kolasinska-Sojka, Marta

    2015-09-29

    The formation of complete supported lipid bilayers by vesicle adsorption and rupture was studied in relation to deposition conditions of vesicles and underlying cushion formed from various polyelectrolytes. Lipid vesicles were formed from zwitterionic 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and negatively charged 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) in phosphate buffer of various pH with or without NaCl addition. Polyelectrolyte multilayer films (PEM) were constructed by sequential adsorption of alternately charged polyelectrolytes from their solutions-layer-by-layer deposition (LBL). The mechanism of the formation of supported lipid bilayer on polyelectrolyte films was studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). QCM-D allowed following the adsorption kinetics while AFM measurements verified the morphology of lipid vesicles and isolated bilayer patches on the PEM cushions providing local topological images in terms of lateral organization. Additionally, polyelectrolyte cushions were characterized with ellipsometry to find thickness and swelling properties, and their roughness was determined using AFM. It has been demonstrated that the pH value and an addition of NaCl in the buffer solution as well as the type of the polyelectrolyte cushion influence the kinetics of bilayer formation and the quality of formed bilayer patches.

  15. A pore-forming toxin requires a specific residue for its activity in membranes with particular physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morante, Koldo; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Tanaka, Koji; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-04-24

    The physicochemical landscape of the bilayer modulates membrane protein function. Actinoporins are a family of potent hemolytic proteins from sea anemones acting at the membrane level. This family of cytolysins preferentially binds to target membranes containing sphingomyelin, where they form lytic pores giving rise to cell death. Although the cytolytic activity of the actinoporin fragaceatoxin C (FraC) is sensitive to vesicles made of various lipid compositions, it is far from clear how this toxin adjusts its mechanism of action to a broad range of physiochemical landscapes. Herein, we show that the conserved residue Phe-16 of FraC is critical for pore formation in cholesterol-rich membranes such as those of red blood cells. The interaction of a panel of muteins of Phe-16 with model membranes composed of raft-like lipid domains is inactivated in cholesterol-rich membranes but not in cholesterol-depleted membranes. These results indicate that actinoporins recognize different membrane environments, resulting in a wider repertoire of susceptible target membranes (and preys) for sea anemones. In addition, this study has unveiled promising candidates for the development of protein-based biosensors highly sensitive to the concentration of cholesterol within the membrane.

  16. Pore growth in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Soo, E-mail: yskim@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Jeong, G.Y.; Sohn, D.-S. [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, 50 UNIST-gil, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan, 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Jamison, L.M. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel is currently under development in the DOE’s Material Management and Minimization program to convert HEU-fueled research reactors to LEU-fueled reactors. In some demanding conditions in high-power and high-performance reactors, large pores form in the interaction layers between the U-Mo fuel particles and the Al matrix, which pose a potential to cause fuel failure. In this study, comprehension of the formation and growth of these pores was explored. As a product, a model to predict pore growth and porosity increase was developed. The model includes three major topics: fission gas release from the U-Mo and the IL to the pores, stress evolution in the fuel meat, and the effect of amorphous IL growth. Well-characterized in-pile data from reduced-size plates were used to fit the model parameters. A data set from full-sized plates, independent and distinctively different from those used to fit the model parameters, was used to examine the accuracy of the model. The model showed fair agreement with the measured data. The model suggested that the growth of the IL has a critical effect on pore growth, as both its material properties and energetics are favorable to pore formation. Therefore, one area of the current effort, focused on suppressing IL growth, appears to be on the right track to improve the performance of this fuel.

  17. Pore growth in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Jeong, G. Y.; Sohn, D.-S.; Jamison, L. M.

    2016-09-01

    U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel is currently under development in the DOE's Material Management and Minimization program to convert HEU-fueled research reactors to LEU-fueled reactors. In some demanding conditions in high-power and high-performance reactors, large pores form in the interaction layers between the U-Mo fuel particles and the Al matrix, which pose a potential to cause fuel failure. In this study, comprehension of the formation and growth of these pores was explored. As a product, a model to predict pore growth and porosity increase was developed. The model includes three major topics: fission gas release from the U-Mo and the IL to the pores, stress evolution in the fuel meat, and the effect of amorphous IL growth. Well-characterized in-pile data from reduced-size plates were used to fit the model parameters. A data set from full-sized plates, independent and distinctively different from those used to fit the model parameters, was used to examine the accuracy of the model. The model showed fair agreement with the measured data. The model suggested that the growth of the IL has a critical effect on pore growth, as both its material properties and energetics are favorable to pore formation. Therefore, one area of the current effort, focused on suppressing IL growth, appears to be on the right track to improve the performance of this fuel.

  18. Interaction of articaine hydrochloride with prokaryotic membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygre, Henning; Moe, Grete; Nerdal, Willy; Holmsen, Holm

    2009-01-01

    Local anesthetics are the most commonly used drugs in dentistry, with a wide range of effects, including antimicrobial activity. High antimicrobial effects have recently been reported on oral microbes from articaine hydrochloride, revealed by the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration. Additionally, articaine has recently been used as an alkaline component in endodontic materials with a proposed antibacterial activity. However, the detailed mechanisms of action have not been discussed. We determined the Langmuir surface pressure/molecular area isotherms of prokaryotic lipid monolayers, as well as the phospholipid phase transitions, by employing differential scanning calorimetry on unilamellar prokaryotic liposomes (bilayers). Articaine hydrochloride was found to interact with the prokaryotic membrane lipids in both monolayers and bilayers. An increase of the phospholipid molecular area of acidic glycerophospholipids as well as a decrease in phase transition temperature and enthalpy were found with increasing articaine hydrochloride concentration. The thermodynamic changes by adding articaine hydrochloride to prokaryotic membrane lipids are potentially related to the effects observed from antimicrobial peptides resulting from membrane insertion, aggregate composition, pore formation, and lysis. Interaction of articaine hydrochloride with prokaryotic membrane lipids is indicated. Hence, further research is necessary to gain insight into where these compounds exert their effects at the molecular level.

  19. Lipid domains in bicelles containing unsaturated lipids and cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyo Soon; Dominick, Johnna L; Spence, Megan M

    2010-07-22

    We have created a stable bicelle system capable of forming micrometer-scale lipid domains that orient in a magnetic field, suitable for structural biology determination in solid-state NMR. The bicelles consisted of a mixture of cholesterol, saturated lipid (DMPC), and unsaturated lipid (POPC), a mixture commonly used to create domains in model membranes, along with a short chain lipid (DHPC) that allows formation of the bicelle phase. While maintaining a constant molar ratio of long to short chain lipids, q = ([POPC]+[DMPC])/[DHPC] = 3, we varied the concentrations of the unsaturated lipid, POPC, and cholesterol to observe the effects of the components on bicelle stability. Using (31)P solid-state NMR, we observed that unsaturated lipids (POPC) greatly destabilized the alignment of the membranes in the magnetic field, while cholesterol stabilized their alignment. By combining cholesterol and unsaturated lipids in the bicelles, we created membranes aligning uniformly in the magnetic field, despite very high concentrations of unsaturated lipids. These bicelles, with high concentrations of both cholesterol and unsaturated lipid, showed similar phase behavior to bicelles commonly used in structural biology, but aligned over a wider temperature range (291-314 K). Domains were observed by measuring time-dependent diffusion constants reflecting restricted diffusion of the lipids within micrometer-scale regions of the bicelles. Micron-scale domains have never been observed in POPC/DMPC/cholesterol vesicles, implying that bilayers in bicelles show different phase behavior than their counterparts in vesicles, and that bilayers in bicelles favor domain formation.

  20. Microscopic pore structure of the fourth and fifth members of the Yanchang Formation in Zhenbei area of the Ordos Basin%鄂尔多斯盆地镇北地区长4+5储层微观孔隙结构研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李成; 郑庆华; 张三; 柳益群; 汪伶俐; 梁晓伟

    2015-01-01

    The fourth and fifth members of the Yanchang Formation ( Chang4+5) in Zhenbei area of the Ordos Basin are low⁃permeability reservoirs of diagenetic origin. Conventional methods such as thin section analysis, scanning electron microscopy and physical properties determination failed to analyze the microscopic pore struc⁃ture of these reservoirs. We used conventional methods and applied constant rate mercury penetration to study the controlling factors to quantitatively determine microscopic pore structure. The microscopic pore structure of the Chang4+5 reservoirs was mainly impacted by diagenetic effects. When mechanical compaction and carbonate cementa⁃tion were weaker and feldspar dissolution was more intense, intergranular pores and dissolution pores would be more developed, resulting in better connectivity and higher permeability. Microscopic pore structure and permeability were mainly controlled by throat radius. Generally, if average throat radius was >0.12μm, permeability would be higher, the smaller the pore/throat radius ratio, the better the microscopic pore structure, the greater the reservoir quality index ( RQI) , and the higher liquid oil yield, especially when the average throat radius was <1.26μm. Throats controlled the quality of the microscopic pore structure of low permeability reservoirs.%鄂尔多斯盆地镇北地区延长组长4+5以成岩型低渗透储层为主,常规方法较难评价该类储层微观孔隙结构品质。利用铸体薄片、扫描电镜和物性分析等方法对影响储层微观孔隙结构特征的因素进行了定性分析,恒速压汞方法对储层微观孔隙结构特征参数进行了定量表征。研究表明:镇北地区长4+5低渗透储层微观孔隙结构与成岩作用密切相关,主要表现为机械压实作用和碳酸盐胶结作用越弱,长石溶蚀作用越强烈,粒间孔和溶蚀孔越发育,孔喉连通性越好,渗透率越大;微观孔

  1. Nano pores evolution in hydroxyapatite microsphere during spark plasma sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Micron-spherical granules of hydroxyapatite (HAp nanoparticles were prepared by powder granulation methods. Through subsequent sintering, porous HAp microspheres with tailored pore and grain framework structures were obtained. Detailed microstructure investigation by SEM and TEM revealed the correlation of the pore structure and the necking strength with the sintering profiles that determine the coalescence features of the nanoparticles. The partially sintered porous HAp microspheres containing more than 50% porosity consisting of pores and grains both in nano-scale are active in inducing the precipitation of HAp in simulated body fluid. The nano-porous HAp microspheres with an extensive surface and interconnecting pores thus demonstrate the potential of stimulating the formation of collagen and bone and the integration with the newly formed bones during physiological bone remodeling.

  2. Curcuma oil attenuates accelerated atherosclerosis and macrophage foam-cell formation by modulating genes involved in plaque stability, lipid homeostasis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishal; Rana, Minakshi; Jain, Manish; Singh, Niharika; Naqvi, Arshi; Malasoni, Richa; Dwivedi, Anil Kumar; Dikshit, Madhu; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-14

    In the present study, the anti-atherosclerotic effect and the underlying mechanism of curcuma oil (C. oil), a lipophilic fraction from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), was evaluated in a hamster model of accelerated atherosclerosis and in THP-1 macrophages. Male golden Syrian hamsters were subjected to partial carotid ligation (PCL) or FeCl3-induced arterial oxidative injury (Ox-injury) after 1 week of treatment with a high-cholesterol (HC) diet or HC diet plus C. oil (100 and 300 mg/kg, orally). Hamsters fed with the HC diet were analysed at 1, 3 and 5 weeks following carotid injury. The HC diet plus C. oil-fed group was analysed at 5 weeks. In hyperlipidaemic hamsters with PCL or Ox-injury, C. oil (300 mg/kg) reduced elevated plasma and aortic lipid levels, arterial macrophage accumulation, and stenosis when compared with those subjected to arterial injury alone. Similarly, elevated mRNA transcripts of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, cluster of differentiation 45 (CD45), TNF-α, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-1β and IL-6 were reduced in atherosclerotic arteries, while those of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and IL-10 were increased after the C. oil treatment (300 mg/kg). The treatment with C. oil prevented HC diet- and oxidised LDL (OxLDL)-induced lipid accumulation, decreased the mRNA expression of CD68 and CD36, and increased the mRNA expression of PPARα, LXRα, ABCA1 and ABCG1 in both hyperlipidaemic hamster-derived peritoneal and THP-1 macrophages. The administration of C. oil suppressed the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ and increased the expression of TGF-β in peritoneal macrophages. In THP-1 macrophages, C. oil supplementation prevented OxLDL-induced production of TNF-α and IL-1β and increased the levels of TGF-β. The present study shows that C. oil attenuates arterial injury-induced accelerated atherosclerosis, inflammation and macrophage foam-cell formation.

  3. Pore network and pore scale modeling of reactive transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, P. M.; Vu, T. M.; Varloteaux, C.; Bekri, S.

    2012-12-01

    dominant diffusion to the one of perfect mixing (with a constant concentration). Then, the three macroscopic parameters governing the solute displacement are successfully compared as well as the reaction regimes. Note that the resolution of one reactive transport problem requires 48 hours and 3 gigabytes of random access memory for PSM and only a few seconds and 100 megabytes for PNM. The second pore-network is mostly used to bring a new reaction regime into light. According to the classical classification of Daccord et al (1993), three main regimes occur during a surface reaction depending on the Péclet and Péclet Dahmkohler numbers Pe and PeDa, namely a uniform reaction for low PeDa, a flow path reaction for high PeDa and high Pe (with wormholing) and a compact reaction for high PeDa and low Pe (with formation of a vuggy porosity). A new reaction regime can occur which depends on the localization and on the diameter of the greatest elements of the porous medium compared to the main flow path. This new reaction regime can have major consequences on the macroscopic behavior of the solute in reservoir simulators. Finally, application of PNM is made on a large irregular network reconstructed from micro-tomography images.

  4. The Bicomponent Pore-Forming Leucocidins of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Francis

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to produce water-soluble proteins with the capacity to oligomerize and form pores within cellular lipid bilayers is a trait conserved among nearly all forms of life, including humans, single-celled eukaryotes, and numerous bacterial species. In bacteria, some of the most notable pore-forming molecules are protein toxins that interact with mammalian cell membranes to promote lysis, deliver effectors, and modulate cellular homeostasis. Of the bacterial species capable of producing pore-forming toxic molecules, the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most notorious. S. aureus can produce seven different pore-forming protein toxins, all of which are believed to play a unique role in promoting the ability of the organism to cause disease in humans and other mammals. The most diverse of these pore-forming toxins, in terms of both functional activity and global representation within S. aureus clinical isolates, are the bicomponent leucocidins. From the first description of their activity on host immune cells over 100 years ago to the detailed investigations of their biochemical function today, the leucocidins remain at the forefront of S. aureus pathogenesis research initiatives. Study of their mode of action is of immediate interest in the realm of therapeutic agent design as well as for studies of bacterial pathogenesis. This review provides an updated perspective on our understanding of the S. aureus leucocidins and their function, specificity, and potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:24847020

  5. The reduced GM-CSF priming of ROS production in granulocytes from patients with myelodysplasia is associated with an impaired lipid raft formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuhler, Gwenny M.; Blom, Nel R.; Coffer, Paul J.; Drayer, A. Lyndsay; Vellenga, Edo

    2007-01-01

    Patients with myelodysplasia (MDS) show an impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in response to fMLP stimulation of GMCSF-primed nentrophils. In this study, we investigated the involvement of lipid rafts in this process and showed that treatment of neutrophils with the lipid raft-disrupt

  6. Effects of deformability and thermal motion of lipid membrane on electroporation: By molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Sheng; Yin, Guangyao [Bioengineering Graduate Program, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Lee, Yi-Kuen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Wong, Joseph T.Y. [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Zhang, Tong-Yi, E-mail: mezhangt@ust.hk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} MD simulations show that deformability and thermal motion of membrane affect electroporation. {yields} Stiffer membrane inhibits electroporation and makes water penetrate from both sides. {yields} Higher temperature accelerates electroporation. -- Abstract: Effects of mechanical properties and thermal motion of POPE lipid membrane on electroporation were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Among simulations in which specific atoms of lipids were artificially constrained at their equilibrium positions using a spring with force constant of 2.0 kcal/(mol A{sup 2}) in the external electric field of 1.4 kcal/(mol A e), only constraint on lateral motions of lipid tails prohibited electroporation while non-tail parts had little effects. When force constant decreased to 0.2 kcal/(mol A{sup 2}) in the position constraints on lipid tails in the external electric field of 2.0 kcal/(mol A e), water molecules began to enter the membrane. Position constraints of lipid tails allow water to penetrate from both sides of membrane. Thermal motion of lipids can induce initial defects in the hydrophobic core of membrane, which are favorable nucleation sites for electroporation. Simulations at different temperatures revealed that as the temperature increases, the time taken to the initial pore formation will decrease.

  7. Effects of deformability and thermal motion of lipid membrane on electroporation: By molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Effects of mechanical properties and thermal motion of POPE lipid membrane on electroporation were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Among simulations in which specific atoms of lipids were artificially constrained at their equilibrium positions using a spring with force constant of 2.0kcal/(molÅ2) in the external electric field of 1.4kcal/(molÅe), only constraint on lateral motions of lipid tails prohibited electroporation while non-tail parts had little effects. When force constant decreased to 0.2kcal/(molÅ2) in the position constraints on lipid tails in the external electric field of 2.0kcal/(molÅe), water molecules began to enter the membrane. Position constraints of lipid tails allow water to penetrate from both sides of membrane. Thermal motion of lipids can induce initial defects in the hydrophobic core of membrane, which are favorable nucleation sites for electroporation. Simulations at different temperatures revealed that as the temperature increases, the time taken to the initial pore formation will decrease. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  8. Self-assembling bacterial pores as components of nanobiosensors for the detection of single peptide molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Nano-sized bacterial pores were inserted into a lipid membrane as a nanobiosensor for the detection of single peptide molecules. Due to the intrinsic properties of single-channel conductance, the transit of individual molecules through the pore can be studied. The analysis of both the blockage current and duration is able to provide specific structural information and allows the detection of specific peptides in bulk mixtures.

  9. Direct measurement of the critical pore size in a model membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Ilton, Mark; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2016-01-01

    We study pore nucleation in a model membrane system, a freestanding polymer film. Nucleated pores smaller than a critical size close, while pores larger than the critical size grow. Holes of varying size were purposefully prepared in liquid polymer films, and their evolution in time was monitored using optical and atomic force microscopy to extract a critical radius. The critical radius scales linearly with film thickness for a homopolymer film. The results agree with a simple model which takes into account the energy cost due to surface area at the edge of the pore. The energy cost at the edge of the pore is experimentally varied by using a lamellar-forming diblock copolymer membrane. The underlying molecular architecture causes increased frustration at the pore edge resulting in an enhanced cost of pore formation.

  10. Does distant homology with Evf reveal a lipid binding site in Bacillus thuringiensis cytolytic toxins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigden, Daniel J

    2009-05-19

    The Cry and Cyt classes of insecticidal toxins derived from the sporulating bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis are valuable substitutes for synthetic pesticides in agricultural contexts. Crystal structures and many biochemical data have provided insights into their molecular mechanisms, generally thought to involve oligomerization and pore formation, but have not localised the site on Cyt toxins responsible for selective binding of phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids. Here, distant homology between the structure of Cyt toxins and Erwinia virulence factor (Evf) is demonstrated which, along with sequence conservation analysis, allows a putative lipid binding site to be localised in the toxins.

  11. Voltage-gated lipid ion channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blicher, Andreas; Heimburg, Thomas Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic lipid membranes can display channel-like ion conduction events even in the absence of proteins. We show here that these events are voltage-gated with a quadratic voltage dependence as expected from electrostatic theory of capacitors. To this end, we recorded channel traces and current...... histograms in patch-experiments on lipid membranes. We derived a theoretical current-voltage relationship for pores in lipid membranes that describes the experimental data very well when assuming an asymmetric membrane. We determined the equilibrium constant between closed and open state and the open...... probability as a function of voltage. The voltage-dependence of the lipid pores is found comparable to that of protein channels. Lifetime distributions of open and closed events indicate that the channel open distribution does not follow exponential statistics but rather power law behavior for long open times...

  12. Involvement of cytoskeletal proteins in the barrier function of the human erythrocyte membrane. I. Impairment of resealing and formation of aqueous pores in the ghost membrane after modification of SH groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonk, S; Deuticke, B

    1992-04-29

    Resealed human erythrocyte ghosts prepared by a two-step procedure were shown to have small residual barrier defects with the properties of aqueous pores, such as size discrimination of hydrophilic nonelectrolytes (erythritol to sucrose), indicative of an apparent pore radius of about 0.7 nm, and a low activation energy (about 12-20 kJ/mol (mannitol, sucrose)) of the leak fluxes. As in other cases (Deuticke et al. (1991) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1067, 111-122) these leak fluxes can be inhibited by phloretin. Treatment of such resealed ghosts with the mild SH oxidizing agent, diamide, induces additional membrane leaks to the same extent and with the same properties as in native erythrocytes (Deuticke et al. (1983) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 731, 196-210), including reversibility of the leak by SH reducing agents, inhibition by phloretin and stimulation by alkanols. In contrast, resealed ghosts prepared either from diamide-treated erythrocytes or by adding diamide to the 'open' membranes prior to reconstitution of high ionic strength and raising the temperature, exhibit a state of greater leakiness. This leakiness is somewhat different in its origin from the former class of leaks, since it can also be produced by N-ethylmaleimide, which is essentially ineffective when added to the membrane in its 'tight' state. The leaks induced in the 'open' state of the membrane, which can be regarded as a consequence of an impaired resealing, are nevertheless reversible by reducing agents added after resealing and are comparable in many, but not all their characteristics to leaks induced in the 'tight' state of the membrane. Resealing in the presence of the isothiocyanostilbenes DIDS or SITS mimicks the leak forming effect of diamide by modifying a small population of SH groups, while amino groups seem not to be involved. The findings indicate and substantiate an important role of the redox state of membrane skeletal protein sulfhydryls in the maintenance and the re-establishment of the

  13. Pore opening dynamics in the exocytosis of serotonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo; Cercos, Montserrat G.; Martinez-Valencia, Alejandro; Salinas Hernandez, Israel; Rodríguez-Sosa, Leonardo; de-Miguel, Francisco F.

    2015-03-01

    The current view of the exocytosis of transmitter molecules is that it starts with the formation of a fusion pore that connects the intravesicular and the extracellular spaces, and is completed by the release of the rest of the transmitter contained in the vesicle upon the full fusion and collapse of the vesicle with the plasma membrane. However, under certain circumstances, a rapid closure of the pore before the full vesicle fusion produces only a partial release of the transmitter. Here we show that whole release of the transmitter occurs through fusion pores that remain opened for tens of milliseconds without vesicle collapse. This was demonstrated through amperometric measurements of serotonin release from electrodense vesicles in the axon of leech Retzius neurons and mathematical modelling. By modeling transmitter release with a diffusion equation subjected to boundary conditions that are defined by the experiment, we showed that those pores with a fast half rise time constant remained opened and allowed the full quantum release without vesicle collapse, whereas pores with a slow rise time constant closed rapidly, thus producing partial release. We conclude that a full transmitter release may occur through the fusion pore in the absence of vesicle collapse. This work was founded by a DGAPA-UNAM grants IN200914 and IN118410 CONACYT GRANT 130031, and CONACyT doctoral fellowships.

  14. The Effect of Detergent, Temperature, and Lipid on the Oligomeric State of MscL Constructs: Insights from Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, Eamonn; Walton, Troy A; Liko, Idlir; Marty, Michael T; Laganowsky, Arthur; Rees, Douglas C; Robinson, Carol V

    2015-05-21

    The mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) acts as an emergency release valve for osmotic shock of bacteria preventing cell lysis. The large pore size, essential for function, requires the formation of oligomers with tetramers, pentamers, or hexamers observed depending on the species and experimental approach. We applied non-denaturing (native) mass spectrometry to five different homologs of MscL to determine the oligomeric state under more than 50 different experimental conditions elucidating lipid binding and subunit stoichiometry. We found equilibrium between pentameric and tetrameric species, which can be altered by detergent, disrupted by binding specific lipids, and perturbed by increasing temperature (37°C). We also established the presence of lipopolysaccharide bound to MscL and other membrane proteins expressed in Escherichia coli, revealing a potential source of heterogeneity. More generally, we highlight the use of mass spectrometry in probing membrane proteins under a variety of detergent-lipid environments relevant to structural biology.

  15. Role of Pore-Forming Toxins in Neonatal Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas F.-P. Sonnen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein toxins are important virulence factors contributing to neonatal sepsis. The major pathogens of neonatal sepsis, group B Streptococci, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, secrete toxins of different molecular nature, which are key for defining the disease. Amongst these toxins are pore-forming exotoxins that are expressed as soluble monomers prior to engagement of the target cell membrane with subsequent formation of an aqueous membrane pore. Membrane pore formation is not only a means for immediate lysis of the targeted cell but also a general mechanism that contributes to penetration of epithelial barriers and evasion of the immune system, thus creating survival niches for the pathogens. Pore-forming toxins, however, can also contribute to the induction of inflammation and hence to the manifestation of sepsis. Clearly, pore-forming toxins are not the sole factors that drive sepsis progression, but they often act in concert with other bacterial effectors, especially in the initial stages of neonatal sepsis manifestation.

  16. The Electrostatic Component of the Disjoining Pressure and the Pore Creation Rate in Electroporation Models and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Vasilkoski, Zlatko

    2008-01-01

    Under externally applied electric fields, lipid membranes tend to permeate and change their electrical resistance by the combined processes of pore creation and pore evolution (expansion or contraction). This study is focused on the pore creation process, represented by an empirical expression currently used in the electroporation (EP) models, for which an alternative theoretically based expression was provided. The choice of this expression was motivated by the role the DLVO's (disjoining) pressures may play in the process of EP. The electrostatic energy effects on each sides of a lipid membrane were evaluated in terms of the electrostatic component of the disjoining pressure. Thus the pore creation energy considerations in the current EP models, associated with the necessity of an idealized non conducting circular pre-pore were avoided. As a result, a new expression for the onset of the electroporation was proposed. It was found that this new theoretically determined expression is in good agreement with the...

  17. Phase structure of liposome in lipid mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianxi; Li, Yuzhuo; Mueller, Anja

    2011-11-01

    Gas microbubbles present in ultrasound imaging contrast agents are stabilized by lipid aggregates that typically contain a mixture of lipids. In this study, the phase structure of the lipid mixtures that contained two or three lipids was investigated using three different methods: dynamic light scattering, (1)H NMR, and microfluidity measurements with fluorescence probes. Three lipids that are commonly present in imaging agents (DPPC, DPPE-PEG, and DPPA) were used. Two types of systems, two-lipid model systems and simulated imaging systems were investigated. The results show that liposomes were the dominant aggregates in all the samples studied. The polar PEG side chains from the PEGylated lipid lead to the formation of micelles and micellar aggregates in small sizes. In the ternary lipid systems, almost all the lipids were present in bilayers with micelles absent and free lipids at very low concentration. These results suggest that liposomes, not micelles, contribute to the stabilization of microbubbles in an ultrasound imaging contrast agent.

  18. Diffusion in the pore water of compacted crushed salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluegge, Judith; Herr, Sebastian; Lauke, Thomas; Meleshyn, Artur; Miehe, Ruediger; Ruebel, Andre

    2016-07-15

    Diffusion of dissolved radionuclides in the pore water of compacted crushed salt in the long-term is the most relevant process for the release of radionuclides from a dedicated repository for high-level waste in a salt formation as has been shown in latest safety assessments and research projects /BUH 16/. So far, diffusion coefficients for free water have been applied for the diffusion in pore water in models for long-term safety assessments. This conservative assumption was used, because data on the diffusion coefficient of dissolved substances in crushed salt have been missing. Furthermore, the diffusion coefficient in the pore water was assumed to be constant and independent from the degree of compaction of the crushed salt. The work presented in this report was intended to contribute to fill this gap of knowledge about how the diffusion of radionuclides takes place in the compacted backfill of a repository in salt. For the first time, the pore diffusion coefficient as well as its dependence on the porosity of the crushed salt was determined experimentally by means of through-diffusion experiments using caesium as tracer. The results achieved in this project suggest that the diffusion in compacted crushed salt is not fully comparable to that in a homogeneous, temporally stable porous medium like sand or clay. The results obtained from four diffusion experiments show a remarkably different behaviour and all yield unique concentration versus time plots which includes highly temporal variable tracer fluxes with even full interruptions of the flux for longer periods of time. This effect cannot be explained by assuming a tracer transport by diffusion in a temporarily invariant pore space and / or under temporally invariant experimental conditions. From our point of view, a restructuring of the pore space seems to lead to closed areas of pore water in the sample which may open up again after some time, leading to a variable pore space and hence variable diffusive

  19. Displacement of soil pore water by trichloroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershaw, R. L.; Aiken, G.R.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.; Goldberg, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLS) are important pollutants because of their widespread use as chemical and industrial solvents. An example of the pollution caused by the discharge of DNAPLs is found at the Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where trichloroethylene (TCE) has been discharged directly into the unsaturated zone. This discharge has resulted in the formation of a plume of TCE-contaminated water in the aquifer downgradient of the discharge. A zone of dark-colored groundwater containing a high dissolved organic C content has been found near the point of discharge of the TCE. The colored-water plume extends from the point of discharge at least 30 m (100 feet) downgradient. Fulvic acids isolated from the colored-waters plume, from water from a background well that has not been affected by the discharge of chlorinated solvents, and from soil pore water collected in a lysimeter installed at an uncontaminated site upgradient of the study area have been compared. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the fulvic acids from the colored waters and from the lysimeter are very similar, but are markedly different from the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the fulvic acid from the background well. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectrum and the DOC fractionation profile of the colored groundwater and the soil pore water are very similar to each other, but quite different from those of the background water. It is proposed from these observations that this colored water is soil pore water that has been displaced by a separate DNAPL liquid phase downward to the saturated zone.

  20. Synthesis and phototoxicity of isomeric 7,9-diglutathione pyrrole adducts: Formation of reactive oxygen species and induction of lipid peroxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs are hepatotoxic, genotoxic, and carcinogenic in experimental animals. Because of their widespread distribution in the world, PA-containing plants are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. Upon metabolism, PAs generate reactive dehydro-PAs and other pyrrolic metabolites that lead to toxicity. Dehydro-PAs are known to react with glutathione (GSH to form 7-GSH-(+/−-6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (7-GS-DHP in vivo and in vitro and 7,9-diGS-DHP in vitro. To date, the phototoxicity of GS-DHP adducts has not been well studied. In this study, we synthesized 7-GS-DHP, a tentatively assigned 9-GS-DHP, and two enantiomeric 7,9-diGS-DHP adducts by reaction of dehydromonocrotaline with GSH. The two 7,9-diGS-DHPs were separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and their structures were characterized by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and 1H–1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY NMR spectral analysis. Photoirradiation of 7-GS-DHP, 9-GS-DHP, and the two 7,9-diGS-DHPs as well as dehydromonocrotaline, dehydroheliotrine, and the 7-R enantiomer of DHP (DHR, by UVA light at 0 J/cm2, 14 J/cm2, and 35 J/cm2 in the presence of a lipid, methyl linoleate, all resulted in lipid peroxidation in a light dose-responsive manner. The levels of lipid peroxidation induced by the two isomeric 7,9-diGS-DHPs were significantly higher than that by 7-GS-DHP and 9-GS-DHP. When 7,9-diGS-DHP was irradiated in the presence of sodium azide (NaN3, the level of lipid peroxidation decreased; lipid peroxidation was enhanced when methanol was replaced by deuterated methanol. These results suggest that singlet oxygen is a product induced by the irradiation of 7,9-diGS-DHP. When irradiated in the presence of superoxide dismutase (SOD, the level of lipid peroxidation decreased, indicating that lipid peroxidation is also mediated by superoxide. These results indicate that lipid

  1. Lipids of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Susanne E; Daum, Günther

    2013-10-01

    A unique organelle for studying membrane biochemistry is the mitochondrion whose functionality depends on a coordinated supply of proteins and lipids. Mitochondria are capable of synthesizing several lipids autonomously such as phosphatidylglycerol, cardiolipin and in part phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidic acid and CDP-diacylglycerol. Other mitochondrial membrane lipids such as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sterols and sphingolipids have to be imported. The mitochondrial lipid composition, the biosynthesis and the import of mitochondrial lipids as well as the regulation of these processes will be main issues of this review article. Furthermore, interactions of lipids and mitochondrial proteins which are highly important for various mitochondrial processes will be discussed. Malfunction or loss of enzymes involved in mitochondrial phospholipid biosynthesis lead to dysfunction of cell respiration, affect the assembly and stability of the mitochondrial protein import machinery and cause abnormal mitochondrial morphology or even lethality. Molecular aspects of these processes as well as diseases related to defects in the formation of mitochondrial membranes will be described. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lipid somersaults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane lipids diffuse rapidly in the plane of the membrane but their ability to flip spontaneously across a membrane bilayer is hampered by a significant energy barrier. Thus spontaneous flip-flop of polar lipids across membranes is very slow, even though it must occur rapidly to support divers...

  3. Residues involved in the pore-forming activity of the Clostridium perfringens iota toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Oliver; Maier, Elke; Waltenberger, Eva; Mazuet, Christelle; Benz, Roland; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota toxin is a binary toxin that is organized into enzyme (Ia) and binding (Ib) components. Ib forms channels in lipid bilayers and mediates the transport of Ia into the target cells. Here we show that Ib residues 334-359 contain a conserved pattern of alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues forming two amphipathic β-strands involved in membrane insertion and channel formation. This stretch of amino acids shows remarkable structural and functional analogies with the β-pore-forming domain of C. perfringens epsilon toxin. Several mutations within the two amphipathic β-strands affected pore formation, single-channel conductance and ion selectivity (S339E-S341E, Q345H N346E) confirming their involvement in channel formation. F454 of Ib corresponds to the Φ-clamp F427 of anthrax protective antigen and F428 of C2II binary toxins. The mutation F454A resulted in a loss of cytotoxicity and strong increase in single-channel conductance (500 pS as compared with 85 pS in 1 M KCl) with a slight decrease in cation selectivity, indicating that the Φ-clamp is highly conserved and crucial for binary toxin activity. In contrast, the mutants Q367D, N430D, L443E had no or only minor effects on Ib properties, while T360I, T360A and T360W caused a dramatic effect on ion selectivity and single-channel conductance, indicating gross disturbance of the oligomer structure. This suggests that, at least in the iota toxin family, T360 has a structural role in the pore organization. Moreover, introduction of charged residues within the channel (S339E-S341E) or in the vestibule (Q367D, N430D and L443E) had virtually no effect on chloroquine or Ia binding, whereas F454A, T360I, T360A and T360W strongly decreased the chloroquine and Ia affinity to Ib. These results support that distinct residues within the vestibule interact with chloroquine and Ia or are responsible for channel structure, while the channel lining amino acids play a less important role.

  4. Development and application of coarse-grained models for lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qiang

    2013-03-01

    I'll discuss a number of topics that represent our efforts in developing reliable molecular models for describing chemical and physical processes involving biomembranes. This is an exciting yet challenging research area because of the multiple length and time scales that are present in the relevant problems. Accordingly, we attempt to (1) understand the value and limitation of popular coarse-grained (CG) models for lipid membranes with either a particle or continuum representation; (2) develop new CG models that are appropriate for the particular problem of interest. As specific examples, I'll discuss (1) a comparison of atomistic, MARTINI (a particle based CG model) and continuum descriptions of a membrane fusion pore; (2) the development of a modified MARTINI model (BMW-MARTINI) that features a reliable description of membrane/water interfacial electrostatics and its application to cell-penetration peptides and membrane-bending proteins. Motivated specifically by the recent studies of Wong and co-workers, we compare the self-assembly behaviors of lipids with cationic peptides that include either Arg residues or a combination of Lys and hydrophobic residues; in particular, we attempt to reveal factors that stabilize the cubic ``double diamond'' Pn3m phase over the inverted hexagonal HII phase. For example, to explicitly test the importance of the bidentate hydrogen-bonding capability of Arg to the stabilization of negative Gaussian curvature, we also compare results using variants of the BMW-MARTINI model that treat the side chain of Arg with different levels of details. Collectively, the results suggest that both the bidentate feature of Arg and the overall electrostatic properties of cationic peptides are important to the self-assembly behavior of these peptides with lipids. The results are expected to have general implications to the mechanism of peptides and proteins that stimulate pore formation in biomembranes. Work in collaboration with Zhe Wu, Leili Zhang

  5. Effect of anesthetics on bending elasticity of lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zheng; Michihiro, Nagao; Bossev, Dobrin

    2008-03-01

    Change in physical and chemical properties of bio-membranes is of great interest for understanding the mechanism of anesthetic action on membranes. Hypothetically the anesthetic alters the lipid membrane structure (promoting pore formation across membranes or at least switching transmembrane channels) and therefore the biophysical properties of the membrane. We have used neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy to study the effect of anesthetic molecule, lidocaine, on the bending elasticity (BE) of lipid membranes. BE of lipid bilayers made of (1,2-Dimyristoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine) DMPC and 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DPPC) have been measured at different temperatures and different in the fluid (Lα) phase. Using Zilman-Granek theory the BE were obtained from the decay of the NSE intermediate scattering function. We have found that in the presence of lidocaine the BE of DMPC and DPPC bilayers increases. The results were correlated with those from differential scanning calorimetry. Increase in the lidocaine concentration leads to decrease in the liquid/crystalline transition temperature.

  6. Liver X receptor antagonist reduces lipid formation and increases glucose metabolism in myotubes from lean, obese and type 2 diabetic individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kase, E T; Thoresen, G H; Westerlund, S

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Liver X receptors (LXRs) play important roles in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate effects of the endogenous LXR agonist 22-R-hydroxycholesterol (22-R-HC) and its stereoisomer 22-S-hydroxycholesterol (22-S-HC), in comparison...... with labelled precursors, and gene expression was analysed using real-time PCR. RESULTS: Treatment with T0901317 increased lipogenesis (de novo lipid synthesis) and lipid accumulation in myotubes, this increase being more pronounced in myotubes from type 2 diabetic volunteers than from lean volunteers......-HC, in contrast to T0901317, decreased the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis, whereas only 22-R-HC, like T0901317, increased the expression of the gene encoding the reverse cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette subfamily A1 (ABCA1). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: T0901317-induced...

  7. Inverted micelle formation of cell-penetrating peptide studied by coarse-grained simulation: Importance of attractive force between cell-penetrating peptides and lipid head group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Shuhei; Takasu, Masako; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Morikawa, Ryota; Oda, Tatsuki; Futaki, Shiroh; Nagao, Hidemi

    2011-03-01

    Arginine-rich peptide and Antennapedia are cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) which have the ability to permeate plasma membrane. Deformation of the plasma membrane with CPPs is the key to understand permeation mechanism. We investigate the dynamics of CPP and the lipid bilayer membrane by coarse-grained simulation. We found that the peptide makes inverted micelle in the lipid bilayer membrane, when the attractive potential between the peptide and lipid heads is strong. The inverted micelle is formed to minimize potential energy of the peptide. For vesicle membrane, the peptide moves from the outer vesicle to the inner vesicle through the membrane. The translocation of the peptide suggests inverted micelle model as a possible mechanism of CPPs.

  8. Pore morphologies of root induced biopores from single pore to network scale investigated by XRCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peth, Stephan; Wittig, Marlen C.; Uteau Puschmann, Daniel; Pagenkemper, Sebastian; Haas, Christoph; Holthusen, Dörthe; Horn, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Biopores are assumed to be an important factor for nutrient acquisition by providing biologically highly active soil-root interfaces to re-colonizing roots and controlling oxygen and water flows at the pedon scale and within the rhizosphere through the formation of branching channel networks which potentially enhance microbial turnover processes. Characteristic differences in pore morphologies are to be expected depending on the genesis of biopores which, for example, can be earthworm-induced or root-induced or subsequently modified by one of the two. Our understanding of biophysical interactions between plants and soil can be significantly improved by quantifying 3D biopore architectures across scales ranging from single biopores to pedon scale pore networks and linking pore morphologies to microscale measurements of transport processes (e.g. oxygen diffusion). While a few studies in the past have investigated biopore networks on a larger scale yet little is known on the micro-morphology of root-induces biopores and their associated rhizosphere. Also little data is available on lateral transport of oxygen through the rhizosphere which will strongly influence microbial turnover processes and consequently control the release and uptake of nutrients. This paper highlights results gathered within a research unit on nutrient acquisition from the subsoil. Here we focus on X-ray microtomography (XRCT) studies ranging from large soil columns (70 cm length and 20 cm diameter) to individual biopores and its surrounding rhizosphere. Samples were collected from sites with different preceding crops (fescue, chicory, alfalfa) and various cropping durations (1-3 years). We will present an approach for quantitative image analysis combined with micro-sensor measurements of oxygen diffusion and spatial gradients of O2 partial pressures to relate pore structure with transport functions. Implications of various biopore architectures for the accessibility of nutrient resources in

  9. Comparison of caprock pore networks which potentially will be impacted by carbon sequestration projects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCray, John (Colorado School of Mines); Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis (Colorado School of Mines); Mouzakis, Katherine (Colorado School of Mines); Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rother, Gernot (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    2010-12-01

    Injection of CO2 into underground rock formations can reduce atmospheric CO2 emissions. Caprocks present above potential storage formations are the main structural trap inhibiting CO2 from leaking into overlying aquifers or back to the Earth's surface. Dissolution and precipitation of caprock minerals resulting from reaction with CO2 may alter the pore network where many pores are of the micrometer to nanometer scale, thus altering the structural trapping potential of the caprock. However, the distribution, geometry and volume of pores at these scales are poorly characterized. In order to evaluate the overall risk of leakage of CO2 from storage formations, a first critical step is understanding the distribution and shape of pores in a variety of different caprocks. As the caprock is often comprised of mudstones, we analyzed samples from several mudstone formations with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging to compare the pore networks. Mudstones were chosen from current or potential sites for carbon sequestration projects including the Marine Tuscaloosa Group, the Lower Tuscaloosa Group, the upper and lower shale members of the Kirtland Formation, and the Pennsylvanian Gothic shale. Expandable clay contents ranged from 10% to approximately 40% in the Gothic shale and Kirtland Formation, respectively. During SANS, neutrons effectively scatter from interfaces between materials with differing scattering length density (i.e., minerals and pores). The intensity of scattered neutrons, I(Q), where Q is the scattering vector, gives information about the volume and arrangement of pores in the sample. The slope of the scattering data when plotted as log I(Q) vs. log Q provides information about the fractality or geometry of the pore network. On such plots slopes from -2 to -3 represent mass fractals while slopes from -3 to -4 represent surface fractals. Scattering data showed surface fractal dimensions

  10. How does the spacer length of cationic gemini lipids influence the lipoplex formation with plasmid DNA? Physicochemical and biochemical characterizations and their relevance in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Úbeda, Mónica; Misra, Santosh K; Barrán-Berdón, Ana L; Datta, Sougata; Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; Kondaiah, Paturu; Junquera, Elena; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Aicart, Emilio

    2012-12-10

    Lipoplexes formed by the pEGFP-C3 plasmid DNA (pDNA) and lipid mixtures containing cationic gemini surfactant of the 1,2-bis(hexadecyl dimethyl ammonium) alkanes family referred to as C16CnC16, where n=2, 3, 5, or 12, and the zwitterionic helper lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) have been studied from a wide variety of physical, chemical, and biological standpoints. The study has been carried out using several experimental methods, such as zeta potential, gel electrophoresis, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), cryo-TEM, gene transfection, cell viability/cytotoxicity, and confocal fluorescence microscopy. As reported recently in a communication (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 18014), the detailed physicochemical and biological studies confirm that, in the presence of the studied series lipid mixtures, plasmid DNA is compacted with a large number of its associated Na+ counterions. This in turn yields a much lower effective negative charge, qpDNA−, a value that has been experimentally obtained for each mixed lipid mixture. Consequently, the cationic lipid (CL) complexes prepared with pDNA and CL/DOPE mixtures to be used in gene transfection require significantly less amount of CL than the one estimated assuming a value of qDNA−=−2. This drives to a considerably lower cytotoxicity of the gene vector. Depending on the CL molar composition, α, of the lipid mixture, and the effective charge ratio of the lipoplex, ρeff, the reported SAXS data indicate the presence of two or three structures in the same lipoplex, one in the DOPE-rich region, other in the CL-rich region, and another one present at any CL composition. Cryo-TEMand SAXS studies with C16CnC16/DOPE-pDNA lipoplexes indicate that pDNA is localized between the mixed lipid bilayers of lamellar structures within a monolayer of ∼2 nm. This is consistent with a highly compacted supercoiled pDNA conformation compared with that of linear DNA. Transfection studies were carried out

  11. Pore structure effect on reservoir electrical properties and well logging evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bian Huan-Lin; Guan Ju; Mao Zhi-Qiang; Ju Xiao-Dong; Han Gui-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The reservoir pore structure controls the reservoir quality and resistivity response of hydrocarbon-bearing zones and thus, critically affects logging interpretation. We use petrophysical data in three types of reservoir with different pore structure characteristics to show that the complexity of pore structure had a significant effect on the effective porosity and permeability regardless of geological factors responsible for the formation of pore structure. Moreover,, the distribution and content of conductive fluids in the reservoir varies dramatically owing to pore structure differences, which also induces resistivity variations in reservoir rocks. Hence, the origin of low-resistivity hydrocarbon-bearing zones, except for those with conductive matrix and mud filtrate invasion, is attributed to the complexity of the pore structures. Consequently, reservoir-specific evaluation models, parameters, and criteria should be chosen for resistivity log interpretation to make a reliable evaluation of reservoir quality and fluids.

  12. DESIGN INFORMATION ON FINE PORE AERATION SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field studies were conducted over several years at municipal wastewater treatment plants employing line pore diffused aeration systems. These studies were designed to produce reliable information on the performance and operational requirements of fine pore devices under process ...

  13. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANTIOXIDANT POWER OF PLASMA WITH LIPID PEROXIDE FORMATION IN PLASMA AND LIVER DAMAGES CAUSED BY OVERDOSE OF VITAMIN K1 IN ADULT AND WEANLING RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ansari Hadipour

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study the plasma levels of lipid peroxidation (LP products, protein carbonyls and antioxidant capacity of plasma as judged by ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP assay were compared in adult and weanling rats treated with vitamin K1 phylloquinone.

  14. Nuclear pore complex assembly and maintenance in POM121- and gp210-deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stavru, Fabrizia; Nautrup-Pedersen, Gitte; Cordes, Volker C

    2006-01-01

    So far, POM121 and gp210 are the only known anchoring sites of vertebrate nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) within the lipid bilayer of the nuclear envelope (NE) and, thus, are excellent candidates for initiating the NPC assembly process. Indeed, we demonstrate that POM121 can recruit several...

  15. Assemblies of pore-forming toxins visualized by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Neval; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2016-03-01

    A number of pore-forming toxins (PFTs) can assemble on lipid membranes through their specific interactions with lipids. The oligomeric assemblies of some PFTs have been successfully revealed either by electron microscopy (EM) and/or atomic force microscopy (AFM). Unlike EM, AFM imaging can be performed under physiological conditions, enabling the real-time visualization of PFT assembly and the transition from the prepore state, in which the toxin does not span the membrane, to the pore state. In addition to characterizing PFT oligomers, AFM has also been used to examine toxin-induced alterations in membrane organization. In this review, we summarize the contributions of AFM to the understanding of both PFT assembly and PFT-induced membrane reorganization. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Mauro Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale.

  16. Formation conditions and pore forming process of porous corn starch%玉米多孔淀粉生成条件及其成孔过程的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱培蕾; 赵贵云; 汪名春; 刘才宇

    2011-01-01

    以玉米淀粉为原料,考察了糖化酶酶解条件对原淀粉水解规律的影响;同时采用扫描电子显微镜、X射线衍射仪等手段对淀粉成孔过程中颗粒形貌、结晶结构、直链淀粉含量变化进行了研究.结果表明:酶解条件对多孔淀粉的生成有较显著影响,可通过改变酶添加量、反应时问、温度等因素控制淀粉水解率大小;在多孔淀粉生成过程中,随着酶解时间的延长,淀粉颗粒的完整性遭到破坏,淀粉结晶度大小和直链淀粉含量都呈现了先上升后下降的趋势,但多孔淀粉衍射曲线仍维持A型图谱特征,说明淀粉颗粒结晶结构的有序化程度变化有限.%Corn starch was used as raw materials to investigate the effect of enzymatic hydrolysis conditions on the law of native corn starch hydrolysis. Changes of granule morphology, crystal structure and amylose content were also studied by scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffractometer during the pore forming process. The results indicated that the enzymatic hydrolysis conditions had relatively significant effects on the production of porous starch, and the hydrolysis rate could be controlled by changing the reaction factors such as enzyme concentration, reaction time and temperature. During the production process of porous starch, starch granule integrity was destroyed. The degree of crystallinity of the processed com starch and the amylose content increased at first,and then decreased. In the meantime, the diffraction curve of com starch still kept a A-type diffraction pattern,which meant that the crystal structure ordering had a limited change.

  17. Methods of Pore Pressure Detection from Real-time Drilling Data

    OpenAIRE

    Stunes, Sindre

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge of formation pore pressure, and how it changes throughout the length of a well, is crucial in terms of maintaining control of the wellbore. Failure to recognize deviations from the expected pressures can lead to problems and instabilities, which increases drilling costs. A worst case scenario may lead to loss of an entire well section. Thus maintaining a real-time knowledge of the formation pore pressure is beneficial regarding both the cost and the safety of a drilling operatio...

  18. Revealing Assembly of a Pore-Forming Complex Using Single-Cell Kinetic Analysis and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischofberger, Mirko; Iacovache, Ioan; Boss, Daniel; Naef, Felix; van der Goot, F Gisou; Molina, Nacho

    2016-04-12

    Many biological processes depend on the sequential assembly of protein complexes. However, studying the kinetics of such processes by direct methods is often not feasible. As an important class of such protein complexes, pore-forming toxins start their journey as soluble monomeric proteins, and oligomerize into transmembrane complexes to eventually form pores in the target cell membrane. Here, we monitored pore formation kinetics for the well-characterized bacterial pore-forming toxin aerolysin in single cells in real time to determine the lag times leading to the formation of the first functional pores per cell. Probabilistic modeling of these lag times revealed that one slow and seven equally fast rate-limiting reactions best explain the overall pore formation kinetics. The model predicted that monomer activation is the rate-limiting step for the entire pore formation process. We hypothesized that this could be through release of a propeptide and indeed found that peptide removal abolished these steps. This study illustrates how stochasticity in the kinetics of a complex process can be exploited to identify rate-limiting mechanisms underlying multistep biomolecular assembly pathways.

  19. An investigation of pore collapse in asymmetric polysulfone membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyan, Sumitra

    2003-06-01

    Porous polysulfone membranes prepared by phase inversion can be tailored to suit filtration requirements by the choice of solvent and coagulant. In the current research polysulfone membranes were prepared by inverting a solution in N-methyl pyrrolidinone (NMP) in isopropanol to form uniform sized pores. Phase inversion resulted in the formation of an asymmetric membrane. The membranes have a characteristic "skin" which is supported by a highly porous substructure. Water-wet membranes experience capillary force during water evaporation. Since the modulus of the membranes is lower than the capillary force, the membrane walls shrink and thicken giving rise to a condensed structure. The "skin" regulates permeation through the membranes which is essential for filtration. A change in the pore structure of the skin alters the permeability. The current research investigates the influence of amine plasma treatments on the surface pore structure of polysulfone membranes. The permeation of a rhodamine dye through the plasma treated membranes and through non-plasma treated membranes is used to examine the influence of the plasma treatment. Furthermore, the influence of plasma treatment on the loss of water from the membranes leading to pore collapse is also explored. The study revealed that a plasma ablates the skin, increasing the permeation. An ammonia plasma treatment produced more etching, and hence increased permeation compared to permeation for an aniline plasma-treated membrane. A one-minute aniline plasma treatment only caused a moderate increase in permeation. Plasma treatments introduced significant surface modification by the introduction of new functionalities. However, permeation was not influenced by the surface modification. Water trapped in the pores is essential to maintain the pore structure of the membrane. The surface treatment dictates the pore size and therefore, the convection allowing water evaporation, leading to pore collapse. Heat treating also

  20. Lipidomics of Candida albicans biofilms reveals phase-dependent production of phospholipid molecular classes and role for lipid rafts in biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattif, Ali Abdul; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Chandra, Jyotsna; Roth, Mary R; Welti, Ruth; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2011-11-01

    Candida albicans-associated bloodstream infections are linked to the ability of this yeast to form biofilms. In this study, we used lipidomics to compare the lipid profiles of C. albicans biofilms and planktonic cells, in early and mature developmental phases. Our results showed that significant differences exist in lipid composition in both developmental phases. Biofilms contained higher levels of phospholipid and sphingolipids than planktonic cells (nmol per g biomass, Pbiofilms compared to planktonic cells (P≤0.05). The ratio of phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylethanolamine was lower in biofilms compared to planktonic cells in both early (1.17 vs 2.52, P≤0.001) and late (2.34 vs 3.81, P≤0.001) developmental phases. The unsaturation index of phospholipids decreased with time, with this effect being particularly strong for biofilms. Inhibition of the biosynthetic pathway for sphingolipid [mannosyl diinositolphosphoryl ceramide, M(IP)₂C] by myriocin or aureobasidin A, and disruption of the gene encoding inositolphosphotransferase (Ipt1p), abrogated the ability of C. albicans to form biofilms. The differences in lipid profiles between biofilms and planktonic Candida cells may have important implications for the biology and antifungal resistance of biofilms.

  1. Generic sorting of raft lipids into secretory vesicles in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surma, Michal A; Klose, Christian; Klemm, Robin W;

    2011-01-01

    a complete lipid overview of the yeast late secretory pathway. We could show that vesicles captured with different baits carry the same cargo and have almost identical lipid compositions; being highly enriched in ergosterol and sphingolipids. This finding indicates that lipid raft sorting is a generic...... feature of vesicles carrying PM cargo and suggests a common lipid-based mechanism for their formation....

  2. Nanometer to Centimeter Scale Analysis and Modeling of Pore Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, D. J.; Anovitz, L.; Vlcek, L.; Rother, G.; Cole, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The microstructure and evolution of pore space in rocks is a critically important factor controlling fluid flow. The size, distribution and connectivity of these confined geometries dictate how fluids including H2O and CO2, migrate into and through these micro- and nano-environments, wet and react with the solid. (Ultra)small-angle neutron scattering and autocorrelations derived from BSE imaging provide a method of quantifying pore structures in a statistically significant manner from the nanometer to the centimeter scale. Multifractal analysis provides additional constraints. These methods were used to characterize the pore features of a variety of potential CO2 geological storage formations and geothermal systems such as the shallow buried quartz arenites from the St. Peter Sandstone and the deeper Mt. Simon quartz arenite in Ohio as well as the Eau Claire shale and mudrocks from the Cranfield MS CO2 injection test and the normal temperature and high-temperature vapor-dominated parts of the Geysers geothermal system in California. For example, analyses of samples of St. Peter sandstone show total porosity correlates with changes in pores structure including pore size ratios, surface fractal dimensions, and lacunarity. These samples contain significant large-scale porosity, modified by quartz overgrowths, and neutron scattering results show significant sub-micron porosity, which may make up fifty percent or more of the total pore volume. While previous scattering data from sandstones suggest scattering is dominated by surface fractal behavior, our data are both fractal and pseudo-fractal. The scattering curves are composed of steps, modeled as polydispersed assemblages of pores with log-normal distributions. In some samples a surface-fractal overprint is present. There are also significant changes in the mono and multifractal dimensions of the pore structure as the pore fraction decreases. There are strong positive correlations between D(0) and image and total

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pore-Forming Exolysin and Type IV Pili Cooperate To Induce Host Cell Lysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Pauline; Ragno, Michel; Elsen, Sylvie; Reboud, Emeline; Golovkine, Guillaume; Bouillot, Stephanie; Huber, Philippe; Lory, Stephen; Faudry, Eric

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lacking the type III secretion system genes employ a toxin, exolysin (ExlA), for host cell membrane disruption. Here, we demonstrated that ExlA export requires a predicted outer membrane protein, ExlB, showing that ExlA and ExlB define a new active two-partner secretion (TPS) system of P. aeruginosa. In addition to the TPS signals, ExlA harbors several distinct domains, which include one hemagglutinin domain, five arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motifs, and a C-terminal region lacking any identifiable sequence motifs. However, this C-terminal region is important for the toxic activity, since its deletion abolishes host cell lysis. Using lipid vesicles and eukaryotic cells, including red blood cells, we demonstrated that ExlA has a pore-forming activity which precedes cell membrane disruption of nucleated cells. Finally, we developed a high-throughput cell-based live-dead assay and used it to screen a transposon mutant library of an ExlA-producing P. aeruginosa clinical strain for bacterial factors required for ExlA-mediated toxicity. The screen resulted in the identification of proteins involved in the formation of type IV pili as being required for ExlA to exert its cytotoxic activity by promoting close contact between bacteria and the host cell. These findings represent the first example of cooperation between a pore-forming toxin of the TPS family and surface appendages in host cell intoxication. PMID:28119472

  4. Yeast lipid metabolism at a glance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Lisa; Daum, Günther

    2014-05-01

    During the last decades, lipids have gained much attention due to their involvement in health and disease. Lipids are required for the formation of membranes and contribute to many different processes such as cell signaling, energy supply, and cell death. Various organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and lipid droplets are involved in lipid metabolism. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become a reliable model organism to study biochemistry, molecular biology, and cell biology of lipids. The availability of mutants bearing defects in lipid metabolic pathways and the ease of manipulation by culture conditions facilitated these investigations. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about lipid metabolism in yeast. We grouped this large topic into three sections dealing with (1) fatty acids; (2) membrane lipids; and (3) storage lipids. Fatty acids serve as building blocks for the synthesis of membrane lipids (phospholipids, sphingolipids) and storage lipids (triacylglycerols, steryl esters). Phospholipids, sterols, and sphingolipids are essential components of cellular membranes. Recent investigations addressing lipid synthesis, degradation, and storage as well as regulatory aspects are presented. The role of enzymes governing important steps of the different lipid metabolic pathways is described. Finally, the link between lipid metabolic and dynamic processes is discussed.

  5. USING A NEW FINITE SLIT PORE MODEL FOR NLDFT ANALYSIS OF CARBON PORE STRUCTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagiello, Jacek [Micromeritics Instrument Corporation; Kenvin, Jeffrey [Micromeritics Instrument Corporation; Oliver, James P [Micromeritics Instrument Corporation; Lupini, Andrew R [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we present a model for analyzing activated carbon micropore structures based on graphene sheet walls of finite thickness and extent. This is a two-dimensional modification of the widely used infinite slit pore model that assumes graphite-like infinitely extended pore walls. The proposed model has two versions: (1) a strip pore constructed with graphene strip walls that have finite length L in the x direction and are infinite in the y direction. Strip pores are open on both sides in the x direction. (2) A channel pore is a strip pore partially closed along one edge by a perpendicularly oriented graphene wall. This more realistic model allows pore termination via both physical pore entrances and pore blockage. The model consequently introduces heterogeneity of the adsorption potential that is reduced near pore entrances and enhanced near corners of pore walls. These energetically heterogeneous structures fill with adsorbate more gradually than homogeneous pores of the same width. As a result, the calculated adsorption isotherms are smoother and less steep for the finite versus the infinite pore model. In the application of this model for carbon characterization it is necessary to make an assumption about the pore length. In this work we made this assumption based on the high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) results. We find the agreement between the experiment and the model significantly better for the finite than for the infinite pore model.

  6. Three-Dimensional Quantification of Pore Space in Flocculated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Tom; Spencer, Kate; Bushby, Andy; Manning, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Flocculated sediment structure plays a vital role in determining sediment dynamics within the water column in fresh and saline water bodies. The porosity of flocs contributes to their specific density and therefore their settling characteristics, and can also affect settling characteristics via through-flow. The process of settling and resuspension of flocculated material causes the formation of larger and more complex individual flocs, about which little is known quantitatively of the internal micro-structure and therefore porosity. Hydrological and sedimentological modelling software currently uses estimations of porosity, because it is difficult to capture and analyse flocs. To combat this, we use a novel microscopy method usually performed on biological material to scan the flocs, the output of which can be used to quantify the dimensions and arrangement of pores. This involves capturing flocculated sediment, staining the sample with heavy metal elements to highlight organic content in the Scanning Electron Microscope later, and finally setting the sample in resin. The overall research aim is to quantitatively characterise the dimensions and distribution of pore space in flocs in three dimensions. In order to gather data, Scanning Electron Microscopy and micro-Computed Tomography have been utilised to produce the necessary images to identify and quantify the pore space. The first objective is to determine the dimensional limits of pores in the structure (i.e. what area do they encapsulate? Are they interconnected or discreet?). This requires a repeatable definition to be established, so that all floc pore spaces can be quantified using the same parameters. The LabSFLOC settling column and dyes will be used as one possible method of determining the outer limits of the discreet pore space. LabSFLOC is a sediment settling column that uses a camera to record the flocs, enabling analysis of settling characteristics. The second objective is to develop a reliable

  7. Cationic PAMAM dendrimers as pore-blocking binary toxin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förstner, Philip; Bayer, Fabienne; Kalu, Nnanya; Felsen, Susanne; Förtsch, Christina; Aloufi, Abrar; Ng, David Y W; Weil, Tanja; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M; Barth, Holger

    2014-07-14

    Dendrimers are unique highly branched macromolecules with numerous groundbreaking biomedical applications under development. Here we identified poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers as novel blockers for the pore-forming B components of the binary anthrax toxin (PA63) and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin (C2IIa). These pores are essential for delivery of the enzymatic A components of the internalized toxins from endosomes into the cytosol of target cells. We demonstrate that at low μM concentrations cationic PAMAM dendrimers block PA63 and C2IIa to inhibit channel-mediated transport of the A components, thereby protecting HeLa and Vero cells from intoxication. By channel reconstitution and high-resolution current recording, we show that the PAMAM dendrimers obstruct transmembrane PA63 and C2IIa pores in planar lipid bilayers at nM concentrations. These findings suggest a new potential role for the PAMAM dendrimers as effective polyvalent channel-blocking inhibitors, which can protect human target cells from intoxication with binary toxins from pathogenic bacteria.

  8. Microfluidic Experiments Studying Pore Scale Interactions of Microbes and Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Kocar, B. D.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding how physical phenomena, chemical reactions, and microbial behavior interact at the pore-scale is crucial to understanding larger scale trends in groundwater chemistry. Recent studies illustrate the utility of microfluidic devices for illuminating pore-scale physical-biogeochemical processes and their control(s) on the cycling of iron, uranium, and other important elements 1-3. These experimental systems are ideal for examining geochemical reactions mediated by microbes, which include processes governed by complex biological phenomenon (e.g. biofilm formation, etc.)4. We present results of microfluidic experiments using a model metal reducing bacteria and varying pore geometries, exploring the limitations of the microorganisms' ability to access tight pore spaces, and examining coupled biogeochemical-physical controls on the cycling of redox sensitive metals. Experimental results will provide an enhanced understanding of coupled physical-biogeochemical processes transpiring at the pore-scale, and will constrain and compliment continuum models used to predict and describe the subsurface cycling of redox-sensitive elements5. 1. Vrionis, H. A. et al. Microbiological and geochemical heterogeneity in an in situ uranium bioremediation field site. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 71, 6308-6318 (2005). 2. Pearce, C. I. et al. Pore-scale characterization of biogeochemical controls on iron and uranium speciation under flow conditions. Environ. Sci. Technol. 46, 7992-8000 (2012). 3. Zhang, C., Liu, C. & Shi, Z. Micromodel investigation of transport effect on the kinetics of reductive dissolution of hematite. Environ. Sci. Technol. 47, 4131-4139 (2013). 4. Ginn, T. R. et al. Processes in microbial transport in the natural subsurface. Adv. Water Resour. 25, 1017-1042 (2002). 5. Scheibe, T. D. et al. Coupling a genome-scale metabolic model with a reactive transport model to describe in situ uranium bioremediation. Microb. Biotechnol. 2, 274-286 (2009).

  9. Analysis of the effect of pore geometry in the physical properties of rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alberto Oliveira Lima Roque

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pore geometry is one of the main factors influencing the flow of reservoir fluids under pressure. Pores with narrower formats are more easily compressed when subject to pressure. Pressure modifies pore geometry by opening or closing cracks, causing increase or decrease in the elastic modulus, porosity, permeability, and other parameters. Rock physical properties depend on the size and shape of pores. Thus, in order to analyze changes on the physical properties behavior according to the pores geometry, it is necessary to study and improve mathematical models of the porous media by taking into account the pore shape factor for estimating rock elastic properties. Differential effective medium model (DEM, Hertz-Mindlin theory and coherent potential approximation (CPA are some of the theoretical paradigms that take into account pore geometry in changes in elastic moduli. Given the importance of the pore structure effect on the behavior of physical parameters, this article proposes an analysis of some mathematical models that consider the influence of pore shapes in the physical properties of rocks.

  10. An Investigation of Pore Collapse in Asymmetric Polysulfone Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Subrahmanyan, Sumitra

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Porous polysulfone membranes prepared by phase inversion can be tailored to suit filtration requirements by the choice of solvent and coagulant. In the current research polysulfone membranes were prepared by inverting a solution in N-methyl pyrrolidinone (NMP) in isopropanol to form uniform sized pores. Phase inversion resulted in the formation of an asymmetric membrane. The membranes have a characteristic "skin" which is supported by a highly porous substructure. Water-wet membra...

  11. Membranes with functionalized carbon nanotube pores for selective transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakajin, Olgica; Noy, Aleksandr; Fornasiero, Francesco; Park, Hyung Gyu; Holt, Jason K; Kim, Sangil

    2015-01-27

    Provided herein composition and methods for nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material. Average pore size of the carbon nanotube can be 6 nm or less. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  12. Reduction of Streptolysin O (SLO Pore-Forming Activity Enhances Inflammasome Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Keyel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pore-forming toxins are utilized by bacterial and mammalian cells to exert pathogenic effects and induce cell lysis. In addition to rapid plasma membrane repair, macrophages respond to pore-forming toxins through activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, leading to IL-1β secretion and pyroptosis. The structural determinants of pore-forming toxins required for NLRP3 activation remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate using streptolysin O (SLO that pore-formation controls IL-1β secretion and direct toxicity. An SLO mutant incapable of pore-formation did not promote direct killing, pyroptosis or IL-1β production. This indicated that pore formation is necessary for inflammasome activation. However, a partially active mutant (SLO N402C that was less toxic to macrophages than wild-type SLO, even at concentrations that directly lysed an equivalent number of red blood cells, enhanced IL-1β production but did not alter pyroptosis. This suggests that direct lysis may attenuate immune responses by preventing macrophages from successfully repairing their plasma membrane and elaborating more robust cytokine production. We suggest that mutagenesis of pore-forming toxins represents a strategy to enhance adjuvant activity.

  13. Nanoparticle-lipid bilayer interactions studied with lipid bilayer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Smith, Tyler; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2015-04-01

    The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which can provide insight into the nature of the particle-membrane interaction through variation of membrane and solution properties not possible with cell-based assays. However, the scope of these studies can be limited because of the low throughput characteristic of lipid bilayer platforms. We have recently described an easy to use, parallel lipid bilayer platform which we have used to electrically investigate the activity of 60 nm diameter amine and carboxyl modified polystyrene nanoparticles (NH2-NP and COOH-NP) with over 1000 lipid bilayers while varying lipid composition, bilayer charge, ionic strength, pH, voltage, serum, particle concentration, and particle charge. Our results confirm recent studies finding activity of NH2-NP but not COOH-NP. Detailed analysis shows that NH2-NP formed pores 0.3-2.3 nm in radius, dependent on bilayer and solution composition. These interactions appear to be electrostatic, as they are regulated by NH2-NP surface charge, solution ionic strength, and bilayer charge. The ability to rapidly measure a large number of nanoparticle and membrane parameters indicates strong potential of this bilayer array platform for additional nanoparticle bilayer studies.The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which

  14. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M., E-mail: Frans.leermakers@wur.nl [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 6, 6307 HB Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2014-02-14

    strengths. We anticipate that these changes lead to unstable membranes as these become vulnerable to pore formation or disintegration into lipid disks.

  15. Microlens arrays with integrated pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yang

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Microlenses are important optical components that image, detect, and couple light. But most synthetic microlenses have fixed position and shape once they are fabricated, so their possible range of tunability and complexity is rather limited. By comparison, biology provides many varied, new paradigms for the development of adaptive optical networks. Here, we discuss inspirational examples of biological lenses and their synthetic analogs. We focus on the fabrication and characterization of biomimetic microlens arrays with integrated pores, whose appearance and function are similar to highly efficient optical elements formed by brittlestars. The complex design can be created by three-beam interference lithography. The synthetic lens has strong focusing ability for use as an adjustable lithographic mask and a tunable optical device coupled with the microfluidic system. Replacing rigid microlenses with soft hydrogels provides a way of changing the lens geometry and refractive index continuously in response to external stimuli, resulting in intelligent, multifunctional, tunable optics.

  16. Atomic Structure of Graphene Subnanometer Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alex W; Lee, Gun-Do; He, Kuang; Gong, Chuncheng; Chen, Qu; Yoon, Euijoon; Kirkland, Angus I; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-12-22

    The atomic structure of subnanometer pores in graphene, of interest due to graphene's potential as a desalination and gas filtration membrane, is demonstrated by atomic resolution aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. High temperatures of 500 °C and over are used to prevent self-healing of the pores, permitting the successful imaging of open pore geometries consisting of between -4 to -13 atoms, all exhibiting subnanometer diameters. Picometer resolution bond length measurements are used to confirm reconstruction of five-membered ring projections that often decorate the pore perimeter, knowledge which is used to explore the viability of completely self-passivated subnanometer pore structures; bonding configurations where the pore would not require external passivation by, for example, hydrogen to be chemically inert.

  17. Roles of Lipids in Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Endo, Kaichiro; Wada, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes in cyanobacterial cells and chloroplasts of algae and higher plants are the sites of oxygenic photosynthesis. The lipid composition of the thylakoid membrane is unique and highly conserved among oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. Major lipids in thylakoid membranes are glycolipids, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, digalactosyldiacylglycerol and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, and the phospholipid, phosphatidylglycerol. The identification of almost all genes involved in the biosynthesis of each lipid class over the past decade has allowed the generation and isolation of mutants of various photosynthetic organisms incapable of synthesizing specific lipids. Numerous studies using such mutants have revealed that these lipids play important roles not only in the formation of the lipid bilayers of thylakoid membranes but also in the folding and assembly of the protein subunits in photosynthetic complexes. In addition to the studies with the mutants, recent X-ray crystallography studies of photosynthetic complexes in thylakoid membranes have also provided critical information on the association of lipids with photosynthetic complexes and their activities. In this chapter, we summarize our current understanding about the structural and functional involvement of thylakoid lipids in oxygenic photosynthesis.

  18. A mechanistic view of mitochondrial death decision pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Belizário

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria increase their outer and inner membrane permeability to solutes, protons and metabolites in response to a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic signaling events. The maintenance of cellular and intraorganelle ionic homeostasis, particularly for Ca2+, can determine cell survival or death. Mitochondrial death decision is centered on two processes: inner membrane permeabilization, such as that promoted by the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, formed across inner membranes when Ca2+ reaches a critical threshold, and mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, in which the pro-apoptotic proteins BID, BAX, and BAK play active roles. Membrane permeabilization leads to the release of apoptogenic proteins: cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor, Smac/Diablo, HtrA2/Omi, and endonuclease G. Cytochrome c initiates the proteolytic activation of caspases, which in turn cleave hundreds of proteins to produce the morphological and biochemical changes of apoptosis. Voltage-dependent anion channel, cyclophilin D, adenine nucleotide translocase, and the pro-apoptotic proteins BID, BAX, and BAK may be part of the molecular composition of membrane pores leading to mitochondrial permeabilization, but this remains a central question to be resolved. Other transporting pores and channels, including the ceramide channel, the mitochondrial apoptosis-induced channel, as well as a non-specific outer membrane rupture may also be potential release pathways for these apoptogenic factors. In this review, we discuss the mechanistic models by which reactive oxygen species and caspases, via structural and conformational changes of membrane lipids and proteins, promote conditions for inner/outer membrane permeabilization, which may be followed by either opening of pores or a rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane.

  19. Revisiting the oligomerization mechanism of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin, a beta-barrel pore-forming toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2016-06-03

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a membrane-damaging beta-barrel pore-forming toxin (beta-PFT). VCC causes permeabilization of the target membranes by forming transmembrane oligomeric beta-barrel pores. Oligomerization is a key step in the mode of action of any beta-PFT, including that of VCC. Earlier studies have identified some of the key residues in VCC that are directly involved in the generation of the inter-protomer contacts, thus playing critical roles in the oligomerization of the membrane-bound toxin. Analysis of the VCC oligomeric pore structure reveals a potential hydrogen-bond network that appears to connect the sidechain of an asparagine residue (Asn582; located within an inter-domain linker sequence) from one protomer to the backbone CO- and NH-groups of the neighbouring protomer, indirectly through water molecules at most of the inter-protomer interfaces. In the present study, we show that the mutation of Asn582Ala affects the oligomerization and the pore-forming activity of VCC in the membrane lipid bilayer of the synthetic lipid vesicles, while the replacement of Asn582Gln results into the restoration of the oligomeric pore-forming ability of the toxin. Using a number of truncated variants of VCC, having deletion in the C-terminal region of the toxin starting from the Asn582 residue or beyond, we also show that the presence of Asn582 is critically required for the oligomerization of the truncated form of the protein.

  20. The Arabidopsis P4-ATPase ALA3 localizes to the golgi and requires a beta-subunit to function in lipid translocation and secretory vesicle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Lisbeth Rosager; López-Marqués, Rosa Laura; McDowell, Stephen C; Okkeri, Juha; Licht, Dirk; Schulz, Alexander; Pomorski, Thomas; Harper, Jeffrey F; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde

    2008-03-01

    Vesicle budding in eukaryotes depends on the activity of lipid translocases (P(4)-ATPases) that have been implicated in generating lipid asymmetry between the two leaflets of the membrane and in inducing membrane curvature. We show that Aminophospholipid ATPase3 (ALA3), a member of the P(4)-ATPase subfamily in Arabidopsis thaliana, localizes to the Golgi apparatus and that mutations of ALA3 result in impaired growth of roots and shoots. The growth defect is accompanied by failure of the root cap to release border cells involved in the secretion of molecules required for efficient root interaction with the environment, and ala3 mutants are devoid of the characteristic trans-Golgi proliferation of slime vesicles containing polysaccharides and enzymes for secretion. In yeast complementation experiments, ALA3 function requires interaction with members of a novel family of plant membrane-bound proteins, ALIS1 to ALIS5 (for ALA-Interacting Subunit), and in this host ALA3 and ALIS1 show strong affinity for each other. In planta, ALIS1, like ALA3, localizes to Golgi-like structures and is expressed in root peripheral columella cells. We propose that the ALIS1 protein is a beta-subunit of ALA3 and that this protein complex forms an important part of the Golgi machinery required for secretory processes during plant development.

  1. Influence of carbonization conditions on micro-pore structure of foundry formed coke produced with char

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun Qiao; Jianjun Wu; Jingru Zu; Zhiyuan Gao; Guoli Zhou

    2009-07-01

    There are few studies on coke's micro-pore structure in recent years, however, micro-pore structure of foundry coke determines its macroscopically quality index and reactivity in cupola furnace. Effect of such factors on micro-pore structure were investigated under different carbonization conditions with certain ratio of raw materials and material forming process in this article as charging temperature (A); braised furnace time (B); heating rate of the first stage (C)and the second stage (D) and holding time of ultimate temperature (E). Research showed that charging temperature was the most influential factor on the coke porosity, pore volume, pore size and specific surface area. It is suggested that formation of plastic mass and releasing rate of volatile during carbonization period are two main factors on microstructure of foundry coke while charging temperature contributes most to the above factors. 6 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. 中地壳断层带内微裂隙愈合与高压流体形成条件的模拟实验研究%A simulating experimental study on crack healing and the formation of high pore fluid pressure in faults of middle crust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩亮; 周永胜; 姚文明

    2013-01-01

    中地壳断层带内发现的接近静岩压力的高压流体能够合理解释汶川Ms8.0级地震断层的高角度逆冲滑动,而高压流体的产生与断层带的微裂隙愈合紧密相关.利用熔融盐固体介质三轴高温高压实验系统,我们采用含水和烘干的Carrara大理岩样品开展了微裂隙愈合实验,研究中地壳断层带内高压流体的形成条件.实验分为三类:A类、A+B类和A+B+C类,其中A阶段实验在室温条件下将样品压裂,形成一系列共轭破裂面,B阶段实验在600℃、围压700 MPa和应变速率10-6s-1条件下愈合了A阶段破碎的样品,实验样品从以碎裂变形为主向以韧性变形为主转变,C阶段实验通过快速降低轴压模拟一个扩容过程,再以相同实验条件重新加载样品,通过比较实验样品强度来检验样品的愈合程度.样品显微结构和实验样品强度表明,动态重结晶作用能够愈合微裂隙和孔隙,水能促进矿物的动态重结晶作用,较高的水含量和较大的应变有利于微裂隙和孔隙的愈合,从而有利于高压流体的形成.%Sublithostatic pore fluid pressure in faults cutting the middle crust is considered to trigger slip on the high-angle reverse fault slip for the Wenchuan MS8.0 earthquake, the mechanism of which is suggested to be related to crack healing. We conducted microcrack healing experiments on Carrara marble samples with different water contents to reveal the formation conditions of high pore fluid pressure using a molten-cell solid medium triaxial apparatus under high temperature and pressure. The experiments were designed to be three types as A, A+B and A+B+C, respectively. All the samples were fractured at room temperature in phase A, leading to conjugate fractures as the result of brittle deformation, and then healed at a constant temperature of 600 C , confining pressure of 700 Mpa and a strain rate of 10-6s-1 in phase B, causing a transition from cataclastic flow to plastic

  3. Targeting bacteria via iminoboronate chemistry of amine-presenting lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Anupam; McCarthy, Kelly A; Kelly, Michael A; Gao, Jianmin

    2015-03-12

    Synthetic molecules that target specific lipids serve as powerful tools for understanding membrane biology and may also enable new applications in biotechnology and medicine. For example, selective recognition of bacterial lipids may give rise to novel antibiotics, as well as diagnostic methods for bacterial infection. Currently known lipid-binding molecules primarily rely on noncovalent interactions to achieve lipid selectivity. Here we show that targeted recognition of lipids can be realized by selectively modifying the lipid of interest via covalent bond formation. Specifically, we report an unnatural amino acid that preferentially labels amine-presenting lipids via iminoboronate formation under physiological conditions. By targeting phosphatidylethanolamine and lysylphosphatidylglycerol, the two lipids enriched on bacterial cell surfaces, the iminoboronate chemistry allows potent labelling of Gram-positive bacteria even in the presence of 10% serum, while bypassing mammalian cells and Gram-negative bacteria. The covalent strategy for lipid recognition should be extendable to other important membrane lipids.

  4. Activation of TLR3 in keratinocytes increases expression of genes involved in formation of the epidermis, lipid accumulation and epidermal organelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Andrew W.; Park, Kyungho; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Gallo, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Injury to the skin, and the subsequent release of non-coding double-stranded RNA from necrotic keratinocytes, has been identified as an endogenous activator of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). Since changes in keratinocyte growth and differentiation follow injury, we hypothesized that TLR3 might trigger some elements of the barrier repair program in keratinocytes. Double-stranded RNA was observed to induce TLR3-dependent increases in human keratinocyte mRNA abundance for ABCA12 (ATP-binding cassette, sub-family A, member 12), glucocerebrosidase, acid sphingomyelinase, and transglutaminase 1. Additionally, treatment with double-stranded RNA resulted in increases in sphingomyelin and morphologic changes including increased epidermal lipid staining by oil-red O and TLR3-dependent increases in lamellar bodies and keratohyalin granules. These observations show that double-stranded RNA can stimulate some events in keratinocytes that are important for skin barrier repair and maintenance. PMID:23353987

  5. Dietary strawberry seed oil affects metabolite formation in the distal intestine and ameliorates lipid metabolism in rats fed an obesogenic diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Jurgoński

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To answer the question whether dietary strawberry seed oil rich in α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid (29.3 and 47.2% of total fatty acids, respectively can beneficially affect disorders induced by the consumption of an obesogenic diet. Design: Thirty-two male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups of eight animals each and fed with a basal or obesogenic (high in fat and low in fiber diet that contained either strawberry seed oil or an edible rapeseed oil. A two-way analysis of variance was then applied to assess the effects of diet and oil and the interaction between them. Results: After 8 weeks of feeding, the obesogenic diet increased the body weight and the liver mass and fat content, whereas decreased the cecal acetate and butyrate concentration. This diet also altered the plasma lipid profile and decreased the liver sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c content. However, the lowest liver SREBP-1c content was observed in rats fed an obesogenic diet containing strawberry seed oil. Moreover, dietary strawberry seed oil decreased the cecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations (acetate, propionate, and butyrate regardless of the diet type, whereas the cecal β-glucuronidase activity was considerably increased only in rats fed an obesogenic diet containing strawberry seed oil. Dietary strawberry seed oil also lowered the liver fat content, the plasma triglyceride level and the atherogenic index of plasma. Conclusions: Strawberry seed oil has a potent lipid-lowering activity but can unfavorably affect microbial metabolism in the distal intestine. The observed effects are partly due to the synergistic action of the oil and the obesogenic diet.

  6. Bilayer lipid membranes supported on Teflon filters: a functional environment for ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung, Thai; Zhang, Yanli; Dunlop, James; Dalziel, Julie

    2011-03-15

    Many ion channel proteins have binding sites for toxins and pharmaceutical drugs and therefore have much promise as the sensing entity in high throughput technologies and biosensor devices. Measurement of ionic conductance changes through ion channels requires a robust biological membrane with sufficient longevity for practical applications. The conventional planar BLM is 100-300 μm in diameter and typically contains fewer than a dozen channels whereas pharmaceutical screening methods in cells use current recordings for many ion channels. We present a new, simple method for the fabrication of a disposable porous-supported bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) ion channel biosensor using hydrated Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE) filter material (pore size 5 μm, filter diameter=1 mm). The lipid layer was monitored for its thickness and mechanical stability by electrical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed membrane capacitances of 1.8±0.2 nF and membrane resistances of 25.9±4.1 GΩ, indicating the formation of lipid bilayers. The current level increased upon addition of the pore-forming peptide gramicidin. Following addition of liposomes containing voltage-gated sodium channels, small macroscopic sodium currents (1-80 pA) could be recorded. By preloading the porous Teflon with sodium channel proteoliposomes, prior to BLM formation, currents of 1-10 nA could be recorded in the presence of the activator veratridine that increased with time, and were inhibited by tetrodotoxin. A lack of rectification suggests that the channels incorporated in both orientations. This work demonstrates that PTFE filters can support BLMs that provide an environment in which ion channels can maintain their functional activity relevant for applications in drug discovery, toxin detection, and odour sensing.

  7. Cholesterol favors the emergence of a long-range autocorrelated fluctuation pattern in voltage-induced ionic currents through lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvalán, Natalia A; Kembro, Jackelyn M; Clop, Pedro D; Perillo, María A

    2013-08-01

    The present paper was aimed at evaluating the effect of cholesterol (CHO) on the voltage-induced lipid pore formation in bilayer membranes through a global characterization of the temporal dynamics of the fluctuation pattern of ion currents. The bilayer model used was black lipid membranes (BLMs) of palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylethanolamine and palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPE:POPC) at a 7:3 molar ratio in the absence (BLM0) or in the presence of 30 (BLM30), 40 (BLM40) or 50(BLM50)mol% of cholesterol with respect to total phospholipids. Electrical current intensities (I) were measured in voltage (ΔV) clamped conditions at ΔV ranging between 0 and ±200mV. The autocorrelation parameter α derived from detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) on temporal fluctuation patterns of electrical currents allowed discriminating between non-correlated (α=0.5, white noise) and long-range correlated (0.5number of conductance states, the magnitude of conductance level, the capacitance of the bilayers and increased the tendency towards the development of long-range autocorrelated (fractal) processes (0.5<α<1) in lipid channel generation. Experiments were performed above the phase transition temperature of the lipid mixtures, but compositions used predicted a superlattice-like organization. This leads to the conclusion that structural defects other than phase coexistence may promote lipid channel formation under voltage clamped conditions. Furthermore, cholesterol controls the voltage threshold that allows the percolation of channel behavior where isolated channels become an interconnected network.

  8. Analyzing and Modeling the Kinetics of Amyloid Beta Pores Associated with Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Ullah

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta (Aβ oligomers associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD form Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane pores, leading to a disruption of the otherwise well-controlled intracellular calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis. The resultant up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration has detrimental implications for memory formation and cell survival. The gating kinetics and Ca2+ permeability of Aβ pores are not well understood. We have used computational modeling in conjunction with the ability of optical patch-clamping for massively parallel imaging of Ca2+ flux through thousands of pores in the cell membrane of Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the kinetic properties of Aβ pores. The fluorescence time-series data from individual pores were idealized and used to develop data-driven Markov chain models for the kinetics of the Aβ pore at different stages of its evolution. Our study provides the first demonstration of developing Markov chain models for ion channel gating that are driven by optical-patch clamp data with the advantage of experiments being performed under close to physiological conditions. Towards the end, we demonstrate the up-regulation of gating of various Ca2+ release channels due to Aβ pores and show that the extent and spatial range of such up-regulation increases as Aβ pores with low open probability and Ca2+ permeability transition into those with high open probability and Ca2+ permeability.

  9. Effect of pore structure on seismic rock-physics characteristics of dense carbonates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Jian-Guo; Wang Hong-Bin; Li Chuang; Zhao Jian-Guo

    2015-01-01

    The Ordovician carbonate rocks of the Yingshan formation in the Tarim Basin have a complex pore structure owing to diagenetic and secondary structures. Seismic elastic parameters (e.g., wave velocity) depend on porosity and pore structure. We estimated the average specific surface, average pore-throat radius, pore roundness, and average aspect ratio of carbonate rocks from the Tazhong area. High P-wave velocity samples have small average specific surface, small average pore-throat radius, and large average aspect ratio. Differences in the pore structure of dense carbonate samples lead to fluid-related velocity variability. However, the relation between velocity dispersion and average specifi c surface, or the average aspect ratio, is not linear. For large or small average specifi c surface, the pore structure of the rock samples becomes uniform, which weakens squirtfl ow and minimizes the residuals of ultrasonic data and predictions with the Gassmann equation. When rigid dissolved (casting mold) pores coexist with less rigid microcracks, there are significant P-wave velocity differences between measurements and predictions.

  10. Analyzing and Modeling the Kinetics of Amyloid Beta Pores Associated with Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ghanim; Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; Pearson, John E

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) form Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane pores, leading to a disruption of the otherwise well-controlled intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. The resultant up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration has detrimental implications for memory formation and cell survival. The gating kinetics and Ca2+ permeability of Aβ pores are not well understood. We have used computational modeling in conjunction with the ability of optical patch-clamping for massively parallel imaging of Ca2+ flux through thousands of pores in the cell membrane of Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the kinetic properties of Aβ pores. The fluorescence time-series data from individual pores were idealized and used to develop data-driven Markov chain models for the kinetics of the Aβ pore at different stages of its evolution. Our study provides the first demonstration of developing Markov chain models for ion channel gating that are driven by optical-patch clamp data with the advantage of experiments being performed under close to physiological conditions. Towards the end, we demonstrate the up-regulation of gating of various Ca2+ release channels due to Aβ pores and show that the extent and spatial range of such up-regulation increases as Aβ pores with low open probability and Ca2+ permeability transition into those with high open probability and Ca2+ permeability.

  11. Evaluation of the capacity of mosaic-like porous ceramics with designed pores to support osteoconduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, Kay; Kato, Tomotaka; Hattori, Koji; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2013-12-01

    Under osteoconductive conditions, porous calcium phosphate ceramics are known to induce new bone formation within their pores. A critical aspect of the design of porous ceramics is the geometrical features of their pores, with regard to promoting bone formation and mass transfer management in pore networks. However, the pore geometries of common porous ceramics lack clear details. Further, the connections between pores are hard to characterize and thus have not been thoroughly researched. To address these issues, we have developed an original method for fabricating porous ceramics, which we have termed "mosaic-like ceramics fabrication (MLCF)." Using MLCF, pore geometries can be designed and fabricated by each unit, and a network covering all the pores can be fabricated. Furthermore, MLCF can be used to build porous ceramics with custom-made shapes. In this study, we assessed the osteogenic influences of MLCF products (MLPC) composed of hydroxyapatite units on the differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Two types of commercial porous artificial bone were used as positive controls. MLPC was superior in osteogenic potential, and proved to be a reliable scaffold for bone tissue engineering. Furthermore, this study succeeded in defining the important geometries for osteoconduction.

  12. Mode of action of antimicrobial proteins, pore-forming toxins and biologically active

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Schmidt

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides and pore-forming toxins are important effectors in innate immune defencereactions. But their mode of action, comprising the insertion into cholesterol-containing membranes isnot known. Here we explore the mechanical implications of pore-formation by extracellular proteinassemblies that drive cellular uptake reactions by leverage-mediated (LM processes, whereoligomeric adhesion molecules bent membrane-receptors around ‘hinge’-like lipophorin particles. Theinteractions of antimicrobial peptides, pore-forming toxins and biologically active proteins with LMassembliesprovide a new paradigm for the configurational specificity and sterical selectivity ofbiologically active peptides.

  13. Gas transport and subsoil pore characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berisso, Feto Esimo; Schjønning, Per; Keller, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Arrangements of elementary soil particles during soil deposition and subsequent biological and physical processes in long-term pedogenesis are expected to lead to anisotropy of the non-tilled subsoil pore system. Soil compaction by agricultural machinery is known to affect soil pore characteristi...

  14. Cavitation and pore blocking in nanoporous glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, C; Kalies, G; Enke, D; Klank, D

    2011-09-06

    In gas adsorption studies, porous glasses are frequently referred to as model materials for highly disordered mesopore systems. Numerous works suggest that an accurate interpretation of physisorption isotherms requires a complete understanding of network effects upon adsorption and desorption, respectively. The present article deals with nitrogen and argon adsorption at different temperatures (77 and 87 K) performed on a series of novel nanoporous glasses (NPG) with different mean pore widths. NPG samples contain smaller mesopores and significantly higher microporosity than porous Vycor glass or controlled pore glass. Since the mean pore width of NPG can be tuned sensitively, the evolution of adsorption characteristics with respect to a broadening pore network can be investigated starting from the narrowest nanopore width. With an increasing mean pore width, a H2-type hysteresis develops gradually which finally transforms into a H1-type. In this connection, a transition from a cavitation-induced desorption toward desorption controlled by pore blocking can be observed. Furthermore, we find concrete hints for a pore size dependence of the relative pressure of cavitation in highly disordered pore systems. By comparing nitrogen and argon adsorption, a comprehensive insight into adsorption mechanisms in novel disordered materials is provided.

  15. Bioluminescence Methods for Assaying Kinases in Quantitative High-Throughput Screening (qHTS) Format Applied to Yes1 Tyrosine Kinase, Glucokinase, and PI5P4Kα Lipid Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mindy I; Auld, Douglas S; Inglese, James

    2016-01-01

    Assays in which the detection of a biological phenomenon is coupled to the production of bioluminescence by luciferase have gained widespread use. As firefly luciferases (FLuc) and kinases share a common substrate (ATP), coupling of a kinase to FLuc allows for the amount of ATP remaining following a kinase reaction to be assessed by quantitating the amount of luminescence produced. Alternatively, the amount of ADP produced by the kinase reaction can be coupled to FLuc through a two-step process. This chapter describes the bioluminescent assays that were developed for three classes of kinases (lipid, protein, and metabolic kinases) and miniaturized to 1536-well format, enabling their use for quantitative high-throughput (qHTS) of small-molecule libraries.

  16. Coating of silicon pore optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Ackermann, M.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2009-01-01

    For the International X-ray observatory (IXO), a mirror module with an effective area of 3 m2 at 1.25 keV and at least 0.65 m2 at 6 keV has to be realized. To achieve this goal, coated silicon pore optics has been developed over the last years. One of the challenges is to coat the Si plates...... and still to realize Si-Si bonding. It has been demonstrated that ribbed silicon plates can be produced and assembled into stacks. All previously work has been done using uncoated Si plates. In this paper we describe how to coat the ribbed Si plates with an Ir coating and a top C coating through a mask so...... that there will be coating only between the ribs and not in the area where bonding takes place. The paper includes description of the mounting jig and how to align the mask on top of the plate. We will also present energy scans from Si plates coated through a mask....

  17. Functional characterization of sticholysin I and W111C mutant reveals the sequence of the actinoporin's pore assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Antonini

    Full Text Available The use of pore-forming toxins in the construction of immunotoxins against tumour cells is an alternative for cancer therapy. In this protein family one of the most potent toxins are the actinoporins, cytolysins from sea anemones. We work on the construction of tumour proteinase-activated immunotoxins using sticholysin I (StI, an actinoporin isolated from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. To accomplish this objective, recombinant StI (StIr with a mutation in the membrane binding region has been employed. In this work, it was evaluated the impact of mutating tryptophan 111 to cysteine on the toxin pore forming capability. StI W111C is still able to permeabilize erythrocytes and liposomes, but at ten-fold higher concentration than StI. This is due to its lower affinity for the membrane, which corroborates the importance of residue 111 for the binding of actinoporins to the lipid bilayer. In agreement, other functional characteristics not directly associated to the binding, are essentially the same for both variants, that is, pores have oligomeric structures with similar radii, conductance, cation-selectivity, and instantaneous current-voltage behavior. In addition, this work provides experimental evidence sustaining the toroidal protein-lipid actinoporins lytic structures, since the toxins provoke the trans-bilayer movement (flip-flop of a pyrene-labeled analogue of phosphatidylcholine in liposomes, indicating the existence of continuity between the outer and the inner membrane leaflet. Finally, our planar lipid membranes results have also contributed to a better understanding of the actinoporin's pore assembly mechanism. After the toxin binding and the N-terminal insertion in the lipid membrane, the pore assembly occurs by passing through different transient sub-conductance states. These states, usually 3 or 4, are due to the successive incorporation of N-terminal α-helices and lipid heads to the growing pores until a stable toroidal

  18. Effects of Dimethyl Sulfoxide in Cholesterol-Containing Lipid Membranes: A Comparative Study of Experiments In Silico and with Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ménorval, Marie-Amélie; Mir, Lluis M.; Fernández, M. Laura; Reigada, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been known to enhance cell membrane permeability of drugs or DNA. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single-component lipid bilayers predicted the existence of three regimes of action of DMSO: membrane loosening, pore formation and bilayer collapse. We show here that these modes of action are also reproduced in the presence of cholesterol in the bilayer, and we provide a description at the atomic detail of the DMSO-mediated process of pore formation in cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. We also successfully explore the applicability of DMSO to promote plasma membrane permeability to water, calcium ions (Ca2+) and Yo-Pro-1 iodide (Yo-Pro-1) in living cell membranes. The experimental results on cells in culture can be easily explained according to the three expected regimes: in the presence of low doses of DMSO, the membrane of the cells exhibits undulations but no permeability increase can be detected, while at intermediate DMSO concentrations cells are permeabilized to water and calcium but not to larger molecules as Yo-Pro-1. These two behaviors can be associated to the MD-predicted consequences of the effects of the DMSO at low and intermediate DMSO concentrations. At larger DMSO concentrations, permeabilization is larger, as even Yo-Pro-1 can enter the cells as predicted by the DMSO-induced membrane-destructuring effects described in the MD simulations. PMID:22848583

  19. Particle diffusion in complex nanoscale pore networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müter, Dirk; Sørensen, Henning Osholm; Bock, H.

    2015-01-01

    decreased to as much as 60% when particle size increased from 1% to 35% of the average pore diameter. When particles were attracted to the pore surfaces, even very small particles, diffusion was drastically inhibited, by as much as a factor of 100. Thus, the size of particles and their interaction......We studied the diffusion of particles in the highly irregular pore networks of chalk, a very fine-grained rock, by combining three-dimensional X-ray imaging and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. X-ray imaging data were collected at 25 nm voxel dimension for two chalk samples...... with very different porosities (4% and 26%). The three-dimensional pore systems derived from the tomograms were imported into DPD simulations and filled with spherical particles of variable diameter and with an optional attractive interaction to the pore surfaces. We found that diffusion significantly...

  20. FINGERPRINT MATCHING BASED ON PORE CENTROIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Malathi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been exponential growth in the use of bio- metrics for user authentication applications. Automated Fingerprint Identification systems have become popular tool in many security and law enforcement applications. Most of these systems rely on minutiae (ridge ending and bifurcation features. With the advancement in sensor technology, high resolution fingerprint images (1000 dpi pro- vide micro level of features (pores that have proven to be useful fea- tures for identification. In this paper, we propose a new strategy for fingerprint matching based on pores by reliably extracting the pore features The extraction of pores is done by Marker Controlled Wa- tershed segmentation method and the centroids of each pore are con- sidered as feature vectors for matching of two fingerprint images. Experimental results shows that the proposed method has better per- formance with lower false rates and higher accuracy.

  1. Stratum corneum barrier lipids in cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, V; Halkier-Sørensen, L; Rasmussen, G;

    2000-01-01

    Specimens from primary cholesteatomas were examined under the electron microscope using a lipid-retaining method that is best suited for intracellular lipids and a method that is best for intercellular lipids. In the stratum granulosum of the squamous epithelium, a large number of Odland bodies...... emerged. When the corneocyte reaches the transitional stage to the stratum corneum, the Odland bodies accumulate near the cell membrane and discharge their contents of lipid and enzymes. The lipids are reorganized into multiple long sheets of lamellar structures that embrace the keratinized corneocytes......, as seen in the formation and maintenance of the cutaneous permeability barrier. In this study we draw the attention to the facts that the cholesteatoma epithelium is capable of producing not only cholesterol, but also several lipids, and that the lipid molecules are organized in multilamellar structures...

  2. Stratum Corneum Barrier Lipids in Cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, V; Halkier-Sørensen, L; Rasmussen, G

    2000-01-01

    emerged. When the corneocyte reaches the transitional stage to the stratum corneum, the Odland bodies accumulate near the cell membrane and discharge their contents of lipid and enzymes. The lipids are reorganized into multiple long sheets of lamellar structures that embrace the keratinized corneocytes......Specimens from primary cholesteatomas were examined under the electron microscope using a lipid-retaining method that is best suited for intracellular lipids and a method that is best for intercellular lipids. In the stratum granulosum of the squamous epithelium, a large number of Odland bodies......, as seen in the formation and maintenance of the cutaneous permeability barrier. In this study we draw the attention to the facts that the cholesteatoma epithelium is capable of producing not only cholesterol, but also several lipids, and that the lipid molecules are organized in multilamellar structures...

  3. Formation of ion pairing as an alternative to improve encapsulation and anticancer activity of all-trans retinoic acid loaded in solid lipid nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carneiro G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Guilherme Carneiro,1 Elton Luiz Silva,1 Layssa Alves Pacheco,1 Elaine Maria de Souza-Fagundes,2 Natássia Caroline Resende Corrêa,3 Alfredo Miranda de Goes,3 Mônica Cristina de Oliveira,1 Lucas Antônio Miranda Ferreira11Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 2Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 3Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, BrazilAbstract: This work aims to develop solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs loaded with retinoic acid (RA to evaluate the influence of two lipophilic amines, stearylamine (SA and benethamine (BA, and one hydrophilic, triethylamine (TA, on drug-encapsulation efficiency (EE and cytotoxicity in cancer cell lines. The SLNs were characterized for EE, size, and zeta potential. The mean particle size decreased from 155 ± 1 nm (SLNs without amine to 104 ± 4, 95 ± 1, and 96 ± 1 nm for SLNs prepared with SA, BA, and TA, respectively. SA-RA-loaded SLNs resulted in positively charged particles, whereas those with TA and BA were negatively charged. The EEs were significantly improved with the addition of the amines, and they increased from 36% ± 6% (without amine to 97% ± 2%, 90% ± 2%, and 100% ± 1% for SA, TA, and BA, respectively. However, stability studies showed higher EE for BA-RA-loaded SLNs than TA-RA-loaded SLNs after 30 days. The formulations containing SA loaded or unloaded (blank SLNs with RA were cytotoxic in normal and cancer cell lines. In contrast, the blank SLNs containing TA or BA did not show cytotoxicity in human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7, while RA-loaded SLNs with the respective amines were significantly more cytotoxic than free RA. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of BA-RA-loaded SLNs was significantly higher than TA-RA-loaded SLNs. These

  4. A new method of evaluating tight gas sands pore structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liang; Mao, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Xiu-hong

    2016-04-01

    Tight gas sands always display such characteristics of ultra-low porosity, permeability, high irreducible water, low resistivity contrast, complicated pore structure and strong heterogeneity, these make that the conventional methods are invalid. Many effective gas bearing formations are considered as dry zones or water saturated layers, and cannot be identified and exploited. To improve tight gas sands evaluation, the best method is quantitative characterizing rock pore structure. The mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves are advantageous in predicting formation pore structure. However, the MICP experimental measurements are limited due to the environment and economy factors, this leads formation pore structure cannot be consecutively evaluated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs are considered to be promising in evaluating rock pore structure. Generally, to consecutively quantitatively evaluate tight gas sands pore structure, the best method is constructing pseudo Pc curves from NMR logs. In this paper, based on the analysis of lab experimental results for 20 core samples, which were drilled from tight gas sandstone reservoirs of Sichuan basin, and simultaneously applied for lab MICP and NMR measurements, the relationships of piecewise power function between nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation T2 time and pore-throat radius Rc are established. A novel method, which is used to transform NMR reverse cumulative curve as pseudo capillary pressure (Pc) curve is proposed, and the corresponding model is established based on formation classification. By using this model, formation pseudo Pc curves can be consecutively synthesized. The pore throat radius distribution, and pore structure evaluation parameters, such as the average pore throat radius (Rm), the threshold pressure (Pd), the maximum pore throat radius (Rmax) and so on, can also be precisely extracted. After this method is extended into field applications, several tight gas

  5. Pore Space Connectivity and the Transport Properties of Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabé Yves

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pore connectivity is likely one of the most important factors affecting the permeability of reservoir rocks. Furthermore, connectivity effects are not restricted to materials approaching a percolation transition but can continuously and gradually occur in rocks undergoing geological processes such as mechanical and chemical diagenesis. In this study, we compiled sets of published measurements of porosity, permeability and formation factor, performed in samples of unconsolidated granular aggregates, in which connectivity does not change, and in two other materials, sintered glass beads and Fontainebleau sandstone, in which connectivity does change. We compared these data to the predictions of a Kozeny-Carman model of permeability, which does not account for variations in connectivity, and to those of Bernabé et al. (2010, 2011 model, which does [Bernabé Y., Li M., Maineult A. (2010 Permeability and pore connectivity: a new model based on network simulations, J. Geophys. Res. 115, B10203; Bernabé Y., Zamora M., Li M., Maineult A., Tang Y.B. (2011 Pore connectivity, permeability and electrical formation factor: a new model and comparison to experimental data, J. Geophys. Res. 116, B11204]. Both models agreed equally well with experimental data obtained in unconsolidated granular media. But, in the other materials, especially in the low porosity samples that had undergone the greatest amount of sintering or diagenesis, only Bernabé et al. model matched the experimental data satisfactorily. In comparison, predictions of the Kozeny-Carman model differed by orders of magnitude. The advantage of the Bernabé et al. model was its ability to account for a continuous, gradual reduction in pore connectivity during sintering or diagenesis. Although we can only speculate at this juncture about the mechanisms responsible for the connectivity reduction, we propose two possible mechanisms, likely to be active at different stages of sintering and diagenesis

  6. Effect of coriander seed powder (CSP) on 1, 2-dimethyl hydrazine-induced changes in antioxidant enzyme system and lipid peroxide formation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anilakumar, K R; Khanum, Farhath; Bawa, A S

    2010-03-01

    The effect of coriander seed powder (CSP), a culinary spice, on dimethyl hydrazine (DMH)-induced oxidative stress and toxicity in rats was investigated. Six groups of 6 male rats each were maintained for 12 weeks as (a) Control; (b) DMH (60 mg/kg body weight) injected; (c) 5% CSP incorporated diet; (d) 5% CSP incorporated diet + DMH; (e) 10% CSP incorporated diet; and (f) 10% CSP incorporated diet + DMH. The rats were sacrificed after 12 weeks. The results revealed that DMH administration lead to an increase in hepatic lipid peroxidation associated with reduction in levels of glutathione (GSH), activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The coadministration of CSP and DMH diminished the hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) significantly as compared to DMH-alone administered rats. The intake of coriander seeds at 10% level also enhanced the hepatic GSH-redox system by elevating GSH-Px, GSSGR, and GST activities. The DMH-induced decline in SOD and catalase activities was brought to normal by 10% CSP. The coadministration of CSP and the DMH produced a significant reduction in MDA and enhancement in catalase activity as compared to control. Coriander powder at 5% and 10% levels produced a significant rise in colonic catalase and GSH-Px. The coriander seeds produced significant beneficial effects by reducing the DMH-induced oxidative stress and enhancing the tissue levels of antioxidant/detoxification agent in tissues.

  7. Impact of lipid content and composition on lipid oxidation and protein carbonylation in experimental fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Verónica; Estévez, Mario; Ventanas, Jesús; Ventanas, Sonia

    2014-03-15

    This study aims to investigate the effect of lipid content (∼4%, ∼10% and ∼15%) and composition (different lipid sources; animal fat and sunflower oil) on the oxidative stability of proteins and lipids in experimental fermented sausages. Increasing the lipid content of sausages enhanced the susceptibility of lipids to oxidation whereas the effect on the formation of specific carbonyls from protein oxidation was not so evident. Sausages manufactured with different lipid sources affected the susceptibility of lipids and proteins to oxidation as a likely result of the modifications in the fatty acid profile, as well as to the presence of antioxidant compounds. While the fatty acid profile had a major effect on the occurrence and extent of lipid oxidation, the presence of compounds with potential antioxidant activity may be more influential on the extent of protein carbonylation.

  8. Pre-activation of aerosol particles by ice preserved in pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolli, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    .Pre-activation experiments confirm that materials susceptible to pre-activation are indeed porous. Pre-activation was observed for clay minerals like illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite with inherent porosity. The largest effect was observed for the swelling clay mineral montmorillonite. Some materials may acquire porosity, depending on the formation and processing conditions. Particles of CaCO3, meteoritic material, and volcanic ash showed pre-activation for some samples or in some studies but not in other ones. Quartz and silver iodide were not susceptible to pre-activation.Atmospheric relevance of pre-activation by ice preserved in pores may not be generally given but depend on the atmospheric scenario. Lower-level cloud seeding by pre-activated particles released from high-level clouds crucially depends on the ability of pores to retain ice at the relative humidities and temperatures of the air masses they pass through. Porous particles that are recycled in wave clouds may show pre-activation with subsequent ice growth as soon as ice saturation is exceeded after having passed a first cloud event. Volcanic ash particles and meteoritic material likely influence ice cloud formation by pre-activation. Therefore, the possibility of pre-activation should be considered when ice crystal number densities in clouds exceed the number of ice-nucleating particles measured at the cloud forming temperature.

  9. Role of the synaptobrevin C terminus in fusion pore formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngatchou, Annita N; Kisler, Kassandra; Fang, Qinghua;

    2010-01-01

    remains elusive. Here we show that the ability of sybII to support exocytosis is inhibited by addition of one or two residues to the sybII C terminus depending on their energy of transfer from water to the membrane interface, following a Boltzmann distribution. These results suggest that following...

  10. Functional Contributions of Positive Charges in the Pore-Lining Helix 3 of the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin to Hemolytic Activity and Ion-Channel Opening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattip Kurehong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Bordetella pertussis CyaA-hemolysin (CyaA-Hly domain was previously demonstrated to be an important determinant for hemolysis against target erythrocytes and ion-channel formation in planar lipid bilayers (PLBs. Here, net-charge variations in the pore-lining helix of thirteen related RTX cytolysins including CyaA-Hly were revealed by amino acid sequence alignments, reflecting their different degrees of hemolytic activity. To analyze possible functional effects of net-charge alterations on hemolytic activity and channel formation of CyaA-Hly, specific mutations were made at Gln574 or Glu581 in its pore-lining α3 of which both residues are highly conserved Lys in the three highly active RTX cytolysins (i.e., Escherichia coli α-hemolysin, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae toxin, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin. All six constructed CyaA-Hly mutants that were over-expressed in E. coli as 126 kDa His-tagged soluble proteins were successfully purified via immobilized Ni2+-affinity chromatography. Both positive-charge substitutions (Q574K, Q574R, E581K, E581R and negative-charge elimination (E581Q appeared to increase the kinetics of toxin-induced hemolysis while the substitution with a negatively-charged side-chain (Q574E completely abolished its hemolytic activity. When incorporated into PLBs under symmetrical conditions (1.0 M KCl, pH 7.4, all five mutant toxins with the increased hemolytic activity produced clearly-resolved single channels with higher open probability and longer lifetime than the wild-type toxin, albeit with a half decrease in their maximum conductance. Molecular dynamics simulations for 50 ns of a trimeric CyaA-Hly pore model comprising three α2-loop-α3 transmembrane hairpins revealed a significant role of the positive charge at both target positions in the structural stability and enlarged diameter of the simulated pore. Altogether, our present data have disclosed functional contributions of positively

  11. Functional and topological studies with Trp-containing analogs of the peptide StII(1-30) derived from the N-terminus of the pore forming toxin sticholysin II: contribution to understand its orientation in membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Uris; Souto, Ana Lucia C F; de Oliveira, Felipe J; Crusca, Edson; Pazos, Fabiola; Cilli, Eduardo M; Lanio, Maria E; Schreier, Shirley; Alvarez, Carlos

    2013-07-01

    Sticholysin II (St II) is the most potent cytolysin produced by the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, exerting hemolytic activity via pore formation in membranes. The toxin's N-terminus contains an amphipathic α-helix that is very likely involved in pore formation. We have previously demonstrated that the synthetic peptide StII(1-30) encompassing the 1-30 segment of St II forms pores of similar radius to that of the protein (around 1 nm), being a good model of toxin functionality. Here we have studied the functional and conformational properties of fluorescent analogs of StII(1-30) in lipid membranes. The analogs were obtained by replacing Leu residues at positions 2, 12, 17, and 24 with the intrinsically fluorescent amino acid Trp (StII(1-30L2W), StII(1-30L12W), StII(1-30L17W), or StII(1-30L24W), respectively). The exchange by Trp did not significantly modify the activity and conformation of the parent peptide. The blue-shift and intensity enhancement of fluorescence in the presence of membrane indicated that Trp at position 2 is more deeply buried in the hydrophobic region of the bilayer. These experiments, as well as assays with water-soluble or spin-labeled lipid-soluble fluorescence quenchers suggest an orientation of StII(1-30) with its N-terminus oriented towards the hydrophobic core of the bilayer while the rest of the peptide is more exposed to the aqueous environment, as hypothesized for sticholysins.

  12. Pore evolution and gas accumulation in tight sandstone reservoir of Member 2 of Xujiahe Formation in Yuanba area of Sichuan, China%四川元坝地区须二段致密砂岩储层孔隙演化与天然气成藏

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王威

    2012-01-01

    Based on the quantitative statistics of the clasties and matrixes in the reservoir and quantitative evolutional analysis of pores, and according to the homogeneous temperature of inclusions and buried history of the reservoir, this paper makes an approach to the pore evolution and the natural gas accumulation in the tight sandstone reservoir of Member 2 of Xujiahe Formation (T3x2) of Upper Triassic in the Yuanba area of Sichuan Basin. The dynamic recovery of the compacted history of the reservoir is achieved. In the early diagenetic stage, the porosity of the reservoir declined to 8. 7%, meanwhile, the tight reservoir formed. Following this? A scries of cementations made the primary pores decreasing. The anisotropy is heightened, too. It can be known that the gas filling time of T3x2 in the Yuanba area is in the middle diagenetic stage A when the reservoir was tightened. Totally, "first is the compaction of reservoirs, and second is natural gas accumulation". The gas moves by "piston type advancing" in the reservoir. So the gas concentration is controlled by hydrocarbon-generating intensity and high quality reservoirs. Therefore, the depressed area in the eastern of Yuanba can be regarded as a favorable area for gas exploration.%利用储层中不同碎屑颗粒、填隙物的定量统计和孔隙在压实作用下的定量演化分析以及储层中包裹体均一温度,结合储层埋藏史分析等方法,探讨了四川盆地元坝地区上三叠统须二段致密砂岩储层孔隙演化与天然气成藏的关系.早成岩阶段结束时,储层的孔隙度已经降至8.7%,致密储层业已形成,此后一系列的胶结作用导致原生孔隙进一步减少,非均质性强.而元坝地区须二段天然气大规模充注时间为中成岩A期,此时储层巳经致密,总体反映出“储层先致密,天然气后成藏”的特点,天然气在储层中以“活塞式推进”方式运移,气藏富集主要受源岩的生烃强度

  13. Pore-network study of the mechanisms of foam generation in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Yortsos, Yannis C.; Rossen, William R.

    2006-03-01

    Understanding the role of pore-level mechanisms is essential to the mechanistic modeling and simulation of foam processes in porous media. Three different pore-level events can lead to foam formation: snapoff, leave behind, and lamella division. The initial state of the porous medium (fully saturated with liquid or already partially drained), as surfactant is introduced, also affects the different foam-generation mechanisms. Bubbles created by any of these mechanisms cause the formation of new bubbles by snapoff and leave behind as gas drains liquid-saturated pores. Lamellae are stranded unless the pressure gradient is sufficient to mobilize those that have been created. To appreciate the roles of these mechanisms, their interaction at the pore-network level was studied. We report an extensive pore-network study that incorporates the above pore-level mechanisms, as foam is created by drainage or by the continuous injection of gas and liquid in porous media. Pore networks with up to 10 000 pores are considered. The study explores the roles of the pore-level events, and by implication, the appropriate form of the foam-generation function for mechanistic foam simulation. Results are compared with previous studies. In particular, the network simulations reconcile an apparent contradiction in the foam-generation model of Rossen and Gauglitz [AIChE J. 36, 1176 (1990)], and identify how foam is created near the inlet of the porous medium when lamella division controls foam generation. In the process, we also identify a new mechanism of snap-off and foam generation near the inlet of the medium.

  14. Designing Nonwovens to Meet Pore Size Specifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen E. Simmonds

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available New nonwovens applications in areas such as filtration require a media designed to particular pore size specifications in the 3 to 20 micron range. The purpose of this work was to develop a basis by which to design and construct a fabric with given pore size specifications. While doing so we have provided a validation for two different mathematical models. We have also found that bicomponent spunbonded islands-in-the-sea nonwoven fabrics can be designed very precisely to achieve target pore diamet