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Sample records for lipid ii flippase

  1. Assay of flippase activity in proteoliposomes using fluorescent lipid derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Specific membrane proteins, termed lipid flippases, play a central role in facilitating the movement of lipids across cellular membranes. In this protocol, we describe the reconstitution of ATP-driven lipid flippases in liposomes and the analysis of their in vitro flippase activity based on the use...... of fluorescent lipid derivatives. Working with purified and reconstituted systems provides a well-defined experimental setup and allows to directly characterize these membrane proteins at the molecular level....

  2. Cell-based lipid flippase assay employing fluorescent lipid derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Stumph; Costa, Sara; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    P-type ATPases in the P4 subfamily (P4-ATPases) are transmembrane proteins unique for eukaryotes that act as lipid flippases, i.e., to translocate phospholipids from the exofacial to the cytofacial monolayer of cellular membranes. While initially characterized as aminophospholipid translocases, s...... flippase activities in the plasma membrane of cells, using yeast as an example.......P-type ATPases in the P4 subfamily (P4-ATPases) are transmembrane proteins unique for eukaryotes that act as lipid flippases, i.e., to translocate phospholipids from the exofacial to the cytofacial monolayer of cellular membranes. While initially characterized as aminophospholipid translocases......, studies of individual P4-ATPase family members from fungi, plants, and animals show that P4-ATPases differ in their substrate specificities and mediate transport of a broader range of lipid substrates. Here, we describe an assay based on fluorescent lipid derivatives to monitor and characterize lipid...

  3. Structural and functional characterization of P4-ATPase lipid flippases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulstrup, Jakob

    2018-01-01

    to its much larger substrate and how the mechanism allowing the transport unfolds. This is one of the central questions in the field known as the “giant substrate problem”. To this date, no structural information of P4-ATPases is available. The focus of this thesis is divided into two projects, both...... focusing on P4-ATPases from the yeast organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae: I. The structural characterization of the flippase Drs2p in complex with its auxiliary subunit Cdc50p. II. Establishing a protocol for obtaining a homogenous sample of the flippase Neo1p suitable for biochemical characterization...... and substrate identification. Part I was performed using X-ray crystallography and single-particle electron microscopy as the main methods. A 3D envelope was obtained by cryo-EM extending to a resolution of 4.4 Å. This envelope reveals the first structural insight of the conformational organization of the Drs2p...

  4. Application of image cytometry to characterize heterologous lipid flippases in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Stumph; Costa, Sara; Theorin, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Lipid flippases are integral membrane proteins that play a central role in moving lipids across cellular membranes. Some of these transporters are ATPases that couple lipid translocation to ATP hydrolysis, whereas others function without any discernible metabolic energy input. A growing number...... is typically monitored by flow cytometry, a costly and maintenance-intensive method. Here, we have optimized a protocol to use an automated image-based cell counter to accurately measure lipid uptake by heterologous lipid flippases expressed in yeast. The method was validated by comparison with the classical...... for characterization of lipid flippase activity, and should be readily adaptable to analyze a variety of other transport systems in yeast, parasites, and mammalian cells. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry....

  5. Final Report for DE-FG02-04ER15626: P-type ATPases in Plants – Role of Lipid Flippases in Membrane Biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, Jeffrey F. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2015-02-24

    The long-range goal of the research is to understand the structure and biological functions of different P-type ATPases (ion pumps) in plant cells, and to use that knowledge to enhance the production of bioenergy from plants, or plant-research inspired technologies. Ptype ATPases include ion pumps that specifically transport H+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, K+, or Na+, as well as at least one unusual subfamily that appears to function as lipid flippases, flipping specific lipids from one side of a membrane bilayer to the other. As a group, P-type ATPases are thought to consume more than 1/3 of the cellular ATP in typical eukaryotic cells. Recent research in the Harper lab focused on understanding the biochemical and biological functions of P-type ATPases that flip lipids. These flippases belong to the P4 subfamily of P-type ATPases. The activity of lipid flippases is thought to induce membrane curvature and/or create an asymmetry in which certain lipid head groups are preferential exposed to one surface or the other. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are 12 members of this family referred to as Aminophospholipid ATPase (ALA) 1 to ALA12. Using genetic knockouts, the Harper lab has established that this unusual subfamily of P-type ATPases are critical for plants to cope with even modest changes in temperature (e.g., down to 15°C, or up to 30°C). In addition, members of one subclade are critical for cell expansion, and loss of function mutants result in severe dwarfism. Other members of this same sub-clade are critical for pollen tube growth, and loss of function mutants are sterile under conditions of hot days and cold nights. While the cellular processes that depend on lipid flippases are still unclear, the genetic analysis of loss of function mutants clearly show they are of fundamental importance to plant growth and response to the environment.

  6. ATP8B1 requires an accessory protein for endoplasmic reticulum exit and plasma membrane lipid flippase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulusma, Coen C.; Folmer, Dineke E.; Ho-Mok, Kam S.; de Waart, D. Rudi; Hilarius, Petra M.; Verhoeven, Arthur J.; Oude Elferink, Ronald P. J.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in ATP8B1 cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 and benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis type 1. Previously, we have shown in mice that Atp8b1 deficiency leads to enhanced biliary excretion of phosphatidylserine, and we hypothesized that ATP8B1 is a flippase for

  7. Shedding light on the role of lipid flippases in the secretory pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    that these pumps serve important functions in vesicular traffic, their activities being required to support vesicle formation in the secretory and endocytic pathways. We are now aiming at determining the mechanism by which these ATPases function in vesicle biogenesis. For this purpose, we are using novel...... biophysical approaches based on giant vesicles and several advanced bioimaging methods. The limitations and future perspectives of these techniques for the characterization of lipid translocases will be discussed in the light of our recent results....

  8. A high-yield co-expression system for the purification of an intact drs2p-cdc50p lipid flippase complex, critically dependent on and stabilized by phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azouaoui, Hassina; Montigny, Cédric; Ash, Miriam-Rose

    2014-01-01

    P-type ATPases from the P4 subfamily (P4-ATPases) are energy-dependent transporters, which are thought to establish lipid asymmetry in eukaryotic cell membranes. Together with their Cdc50 accessory subunits, P4-ATPases couple ATP hydrolysis to lipid transport from the exoplasmic to the cytoplasmic...... leaflet of plasma membranes, late Golgi membranes, and endosomes. To gain insights into the structure and function of these important membrane pumps, robust protocols for expression and purification are required. In this report, we present a procedure for high-yield co-expression of a yeast flippase......, the Drs2p-Cdc50p complex. After recovery of yeast membranes expressing both proteins, efficient purification was achieved in a single step by affinity chromatography on streptavidin beads, yielding ∼1-2 mg purified Drs2p-Cdc50p complex per liter of culture. Importantly, the procedure enabled us to recover...

  9. Direct observation of the influence of cardiolipin and antibiotics on lipid II binding to MurJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Jani Reddy; Sauer, Joshua B.; Wu, Di; Mehmood, Shahid; Allison, Timothy M.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2018-03-01

    Translocation of lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is essential in peptidoglycan biogenesis. Although most steps are understood, identifying the lipid II flippase has yielded conflicting results, and the lipid II binding properties of two candidate flippases—MurJ and FtsW—remain largely unknown. Here we apply native mass spectrometry to both proteins and characterize lipid II binding. We observed lower levels of lipid II binding to FtsW compared to MurJ, consistent with MurJ having a higher affinity. Site-directed mutagenesis of MurJ suggests that mutations at A29 and D269 attenuate lipid II binding to MurJ, whereas chemical modification of A29 eliminates binding. The antibiotic ramoplanin dissociates lipid II from MurJ, whereas vancomycin binds to form a stable complex with MurJ:lipid II. Furthermore, we reveal cardiolipins associate with MurJ but not FtsW, and exogenous cardiolipins reduce lipid II binding to MurJ. These observations provide insights into determinants of lipid II binding to MurJ and suggest roles for endogenous lipids in regulating substrate binding.

  10. A high-yield co-expression system for the purification of an intact drs2p-cdc50p lipid flippase complex, critically dependent on and stabilized by phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azouaoui, Hassina; Montigny, Cédric; Ash, Miriam-Rose

    2014-01-01

    , the Drs2p-Cdc50p complex. After recovery of yeast membranes expressing both proteins, efficient purification was achieved in a single step by affinity chromatography on streptavidin beads, yielding ∼1-2 mg purified Drs2p-Cdc50p complex per liter of culture. Importantly, the procedure enabled us to recover...... was critically dependent on the simultaneous presence of PI4P and PS. We also identified a prominent role for PI4P in stabilization of the Drs2p-Cdc50p complex towards temperature- or C12E8-induced irreversible inactivation. These results indicate that the Drs2p-Cdc50p complex remains functional after affinity...... purification and that PI4P as a cofactor tightly controls its stability and catalytic activity. This work offers appealing perspectives for detailed structural and functional characterization of the Drs2p-Cdc50p lipid transport mechanism....

  11. LipidII : Just Another Brick in the Wall?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffers, Dirk-Jan; Tol, Menno B

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all bacteria contain a peptidoglycan cell wall. The peptidoglycan precursor molecule is LipidII, containing the basic peptidoglycan building block attached to a lipid. Although the suitability of LipidII as an antibacterial target has long been recognized, progress on elucidating the role(s)

  12. P4 ATPases - lipid flippases and their role in disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, Dineke E.; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude; Paulusma, Coen C.

    2009-01-01

    P4 ATPases (type 4 P-type ATPases) are multispan transmembrane proteins that have been implicated in phospholipid translocation from the exoplasmic to the cytoplasmic leaflet of biological membranes. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have indicated that P4 ATPases are important in vesicle

  13. Resistance of Gram-positive bacteria to nisin is not determined by Lipid II levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, NE; Smid, EJ; Kok, J; de Kruijff, B; Kuipers, OP; Breukink, E; Kramer, Naomi E.; Smid, Eddy J.

    2004-01-01

    Lipid II is essential for nisin-mediated pore formation at nano-molar concentrations. We tested whether nisin resistance could result from different Lipid II levels, by comparing the maximal Lipid II pool in Micrococcus flavus (sensitive) and Listeria monocytogenes (relatively insensitive) and their

  14. An alternative bactericidal mechanism of action for lantibiotic peptides that target lipid II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasper, Hester E.; Kramer, Naomi E.; Smith, James L.; Hillman, J. D.; Zachariah, Cherian; Kuipers, Oscar P.; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2006-01-01

    Lantibiotics are polycyclic peptides containing unusual amino acids, which have binding specificity for bacterial cells, targeting the bacterial cell wall component lipid II to form pores and thereby lyse the cells. Yet several members of these lipid II - targeted lantibiotics are too short to be

  15. Flip or flop: functional analysis of a disease-related class of lipid pumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    A fascinating aspect of cellular membranes is that the different lipid species are often non-randomly distributed across the bilayer. This lipid asymmetry serves a multitude of cellular functions and is maintained by uni-directional flippases. The identity of these activities remains to be

  16. P4 ATPases: Flippases in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen C. Paulusma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available P4 ATPases catalyze the translocation of phospholipids from the exoplasmic to the cytosolic leaflet of biological membranes, a process termed “lipid flipping”. Accumulating evidence obtained in lower eukaryotes points to an important role for P4 ATPases in vesicular protein trafficking. The human genome encodes fourteen P4 ATPases (fifteen in mouse of which the cellular and physiological functions are slowly emerging. Thus far, deficiencies of at least two P4 ATPases, ATP8B1 and ATP8A2, are the cause of severe human disease. However, various mouse models and in vitro studies are contributing to our understanding of the cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases. This review summarizes current knowledge on the basic function of these phospholipid translocating proteins, their proposed action in intracellular vesicle transport and their physiological role.

  17. Quality control of photosystem II: lipid peroxidation accelerates photoinhibition under excessive illumination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffanie Chan

    Full Text Available Environmental stresses lower the efficiency of photosynthesis and sometimes cause irreversible damage to plant functions. When spinach thylakoids and Photosystem II membranes were illuminated with excessive visible light (100-1,000 µmol photons m(-1 s(-1 for 10 min at either 20°C or 30°C, the optimum quantum yield of Photosystem II decreased as the light intensity and temperature increased. Reactive oxygen species and endogenous cationic radicals produced through a photochemical reaction at and/or near the reaction center have been implicated in the damage to the D1 protein. Here we present evidence that lipid peroxidation induced by the illumination is involved in the damage to the D1 protein and the subunits of the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II. This is reasoned from the results that considerable lipid peroxidation occurred in the thylakoids in the light, and that lipoxygenase externally added in the dark induced inhibition of Photosystem II activity in the thylakoids, production of singlet oxygen, which was monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping, and damage to the D1 protein, in parallel with lipid peroxidation. Modification of the subunits of the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II by malondialdehyde as well as oxidation of the subunits was also observed. We suggest that mainly singlet oxygen formed through lipid peroxidation under light stress participates in damaging the Photosystem II subunits.

  18. Lipids in the Structure of Photosystem I, Photosystem II and the Cytochrome b6f Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kern, Jan; Zouni, Athina; Guskov, Albert; Krauss, Norbert; Wada, Hajime; Murata, Norio

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes the data accumulated in the last decade regarding the specific function of lipids in oxygenic photosynthesis, based on crystal structures of at least 3.0 Å resolution of the main photosynthetic membrane protein—pigment complexes, photosystem I, photosystem II and cytochrome

  19. Zn(II)-dipicolylamine-based metallo-lipids as novel non-viral gene vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Rong-Chuan; Liu, Qiang; Yi, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2017-08-01

    In this study, a series of Zn(II)-dipicolylamine (Zn-DPA) based cationic lipids bearing different hydrophobic tails (long chains, α-tocopherol, cholesterol or diosgenin) were synthesized. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) of these lipids was studied in detail by investigating the effects of several structural aspects including the type of hydrophobic tails, the chain length and saturation degree. In addition, several assays were used to study their interactions with plasmid DNA, and results reveal that these lipids could condense DNA into nanosized particles with appropriate size and zeta-potentials. MTT-based cell viability assays showed that lipoplexes 5 had low cytotoxicity. The in vitro gene transfection studies showed the hydrophobic tails clearly affected the TE, and hexadecanol-containing lipid 5b gives the best TE, which was 2.2 times higher than bPEI 25k in the presence of 10% serum. The results not only demonstrate that these lipids might be promising non-viral gene vectors, but also afford us clues for further optimization of lipidic gene delivery materials.

  20. Effect of brewer’s yeast supplementation on serum glucose and lipids in type II diabetic patients with dislipidemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sh. Ravanshad; H. Khosvani Borujeni; M. Soveid; B. Zeighami

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose : Chromium deficiency leads to impaired glucose and lipid metabolism. Chromium supplementation in type II diabetic patients improves glucose and lipid profiles. Organic chromium, such as found in brewer’s yeast, is much better absorbed than inorganic chromium. In this study, the effect of chromium supplementation in the form of brewer’s yeast on glucose and lipid profile of diabetic patients were evaluated.Materials and methods : In a clinical trial study (before and af...

  1. Semisynthetic Lipopeptides Derived from Nisin Display Antibacterial Activity and Lipid II Binding on Par with That of the Parent Compound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Timo; Wood, Thomas M.; 't Hart, Peter; Kleijn, Laurens H. J.; Hendrickx, Antoni P. A.; Willems, Rob J. L.; Breukink, Eefjan; Martin, Nathaniel I.

    2015-01-01

    The lipid II-binding N-terminus of nisin, comprising the so-called A/B ring system, was synthetically modified to provide antibacterially active and proteolytically stable derivatives. A variety of lipids were coupled to the C-terminus of the nisin A/B ring system to generate semisynthetic

  2. Type II NKT-TFH cells against Gaucher lipids regulate B-cell immunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Shiny; Boddupalli, Chandra Sekhar; Verma, Rakesh; Liu, Jun; Yang, Ruhua; Pastores, Gregory M; Mistry, Pramod K; Dhodapkar, Madhav V

    2015-02-19

    Chronic inflammation including B-cell activation is commonly observed in both inherited (Gaucher disease [GD]) and acquired disorders of lipid metabolism. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying B-cell activation in these settings remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that β-glucosylceramide 22:0 (βGL1-22) and glucosylsphingosine (LGL1), 2 major sphingolipids accumulated in GD, can be recognized by a distinct subset of CD1d-restricted human and murine type II natural killer T (NKT) cells. Human βGL1-22- and LGL1-reactive CD1d tetramer-positive T cells have a distinct T-cell receptor usage and genomic and cytokine profiles compared with the classical type I NKT cells. In contrast to type I NKT cells, βGL1-22- and LGL1-specific NKT cells constitutively express T-follicular helper (TFH) phenotype. Injection of these lipids leads to an increase in respective lipid-specific type II NKT cells in vivo and downstream induction of germinal center B cells, hypergammaglobulinemia, and production of antilipid antibodies. Human βGL1-22- and LGL1-specific NKT cells can provide efficient cognate help to B cells in vitro. Frequency of LGL1-specific T cells in GD mouse models and patients correlates with disease activity and therapeutic response. Our studies identify a novel type II NKT-mediated pathway for glucosphingolipid-mediated dysregulation of humoral immunity and increased risk of B-cell malignancy observed in metabolic lipid disorders. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Two roles of thylakoid lipids in modifying the activity of herbicides which inhibit photosystem II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupatt, C.C. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Thylakoid lipids may modify the activity of herbicides which inhibit electron transport at the Q/sub B/ protein of photosystem II in two ways: (1) lipids can act as a hydrophobic barrier to a binding site localized close to the loculus of the membrane, and (2) changes in lipid composition can reduce the ability of inhibitors to block electron transport, possibly due to a change in the conformation of the Q/sub B/ protein. The herbicide binding site was localized close to the locular side of the thylakoid membrane by determining the activity of a number of substituted phenylurea and s-triazine herbicides in inverted and non-inverted thylakoids. Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis showed that inversion of thylakoids reduced the requirement of molecular lipophilicity deemed necessary for phenylurea activity in non-inverted membranes, whereas s-triazines exhibited no differences in the lipophilicity requirement in thylakoid membranes of either orientation. The binding affinity of 14 C-diuron was reduced in bicarbonate-depleted thylakoids relative to reconstituted or control membranes, as is the case with atrazine binding. These observations support a model of the herbicide binding site containing both common and herbicide family specific binding domains. Thylakoids isolated either from detached lambs quarters (Chenopodium album L.) leaves, treated with SAN 6706, or from soybean (Glycine max L.), with norflurazon or pyrazon applied preemergence, exhibited decreased susceptibility to atrazine. The ability of lipid-modifying treatments to decrease the atrazine susceptibility of field-grown soybeans was also investigated

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Lipid Droplet Formation and Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebao Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM, a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, is caused by insufficient insulin production due to excessive loss of pancreatic β cells (type I diabetes or impaired insulin signaling due to peripheral insulin resistance (type II diabetes. Pancreatic β cell is the only insulin-secreting cell type that has highly developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER to cope with high demands of insulin synthesis and secretion. Therefore, ER homeostasis is crucial to the proper function of insulin signaling. Accumulating evidence suggests that deleterious ER stress and excessive intracellular lipids in nonadipose tissues, such as myocyte, cardiomyocyte, and hepatocyte, cause pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance, leading to type II diabetes. The excessive deposition of lipid droplets (LDs in specialized cell types, such as adipocytes, hepatocytes, and macrophages, has been found as a hallmark in ER stress-associated metabolic diseases, including obesity, diabetes, fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis. However, much work remains to be done in understanding the mechanism by which ER stress response regulates LD formation and the pathophysiologic role of ER stress-associated LD in metabolic disease. This paper briefly summarizes the recent advances in ER stress-associated LD formation and its involvement in type II diabetes.

  5. Enhanced lipid accumulation and biodiesel production by oleaginous Chlorella protothecoides under a structured heterotrophic-iron (II) induction strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuqin; Mu, Jinxiu; Chen, Di; Xu, Hua; Han, Fangxin

    2015-05-01

    A structured heterotrophic-iron (II) induction (HII) strategy was proposed to enhance lipid accumulation in oleaginous Chlorella protothecoides. C. protothecoides subjected to heterotrophic-iron (II) induction achieved a favorable lipid accumulation up to 62 % and a maximum lipid productivity of 820.17 mg/day, representing 2.78-fold and 3.64-fold increase respectively over heterotrophic cultivation alone. HII-induced cells produced significantly elevated levels of 16:0, 18:1(Δ9), and 18:2(Δ9,12) fatty acids (over 90 %). The lipid contents and plant lipid-like fatty acid compositions exhibit the potential of HII-induced C. protothecoides as biodiesel feedstock. Furthermore, 31 altered proteins in HII-induced algal cells were successfully identified. These differentially expressed proteins were assigned into nine molecular function categories, including carbohydrate metabolism, lipid biosynthesis, Calvin cycle, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, energy and transport, protein biosynthesis, regulate and defense, and unclassified. Analysis using the Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes and gene ontology annotation showed that malic enzyme, acyltransferase, and ACP were key metabolic checkpoints found to modulate lipid accumulation in C. protothecoides. The results provided possible applications of HII cultivation strategy in other microalgal species and new possibilities in developing genetic and metabolic engineering microalgae for desirable lipid productivity.

  6. Lipid profile abnormalities in Type II diabetics with and without microalbuminura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadoos, A.; Javaid, Q.U.A.; Shahzad, A.; Toor, I.

    2017-01-01

    To find the frequency of microalbuminemia in type II diabetic patients and to determine the frequency of different abnormalities of lipid profile in Type II diabetic patients with and without microalbuminuria. Methodology: Total 344 patients of type-II diabetes mellitus of both genders between the age of 35-70 years were enrolled in the study from Lahore General Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. Blood sample for lipid profile was collected after 12 hours of fasting and spot mid stream early morning urine sample was collected in laboratory for microalbuminuria detection. Results: Out of 344 cases, 151 (43.90%) were male and 193 (56.10%) were females with male to female ratio of 2:1. 132 (38.37%) cases were between 35-50 years of age while 212 (61.63%) between 51-70 years of age (mean 53.18+9.32). Frequency of microalbuminuria was recorded in 32.56% (n=112) cases. Out of 112 cases of microalbuminuria, Hypertriglyceridemia was seen in 98 (87.5%) cases, increased LDL-C in 102 (91%) while decreased HDL-C was found in 95 (84.8%) cases (p=0.000). Out of 232 cases of without microalbuminuria, hypertriglyceridemia was found in 143 (61%) cases, increased LDL-C in 151 (65%) and decreased HDL-C was seen in 169 (72.8%) cases. Frequency of microalbuminuria was seen more in age group of 51-75 years (n=65) with disease duration of more than 3 years (n=71), HbA1c 6 (n=69) and BMI more than 30. Conclusion: The frequency of hypertriglyceridemia, increased LDL-C and decreased HDL-C is higher in type II diabetic patients with microalbuminuria as compare to patients without microalbuminuria and is dependent on advanced age, duration of disease and BMI. (author)

  7. Lipid rafts are required for signal transduction by angiotensin II receptor type 1 in neonatal glomerular mesangial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adebiyi, Adebowale, E-mail: aadebiyi@uthsc.edu; Soni, Hitesh; John, Theresa A.; Yang, Fen

    2014-05-15

    Angiotensin II (ANG-II) receptors (AGTRs) contribute to renal physiology and pathophysiology, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate AGTR function in glomerular mesangium are poorly understood. Here, we show that AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal pig glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Cyclodextrin (CDX)-mediated cholesterol depletion attenuated cell surface AGTR1 protein expression and ANG-II-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) elevation in the cells. The COOH-terminus of porcine AGTR1 contains a caveolin (CAV)-binding motif. However, neonatal GMCs express CAV-1, but not CAV-2 and CAV-3. Colocalization and in situ proximity ligation assay detected an association between endogenous AGTR1 and CAV-1 in the cells. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the CAV-1 scaffolding domain (CSD) sequence also reduced ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in the cells. Real-time imaging of cell growth revealed that ANG-II stimulates neonatal GMC proliferation. ANG-II-induced GMC growth was attenuated by EMD 66684, an AGTR1 antagonist; BAPTA, a [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} chelator; KN-93, a Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor; CDX; and a CSD peptide, but not PD 123319, a selective AGTR2 antagonist. Collectively, our data demonstrate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent proliferative effect of ANG-II and highlight a critical role for lipid raft microdomains in AGTR1-mediated signal transduction in neonatal GMCs. - Highlights: • AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal mesangial cells. • Endogenous AGTR1 associates with CAV-1 in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption attenuates cell surface AGTR1 protein expression. • Lipid raft disruption reduces ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption inhibits ANG-II-induced neonatal mesangial cell growth.

  8. ColoLipidGene: signature of lipid metabolism-related genes to predict prognosis in stage-II colon cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Teodoro; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Herranz, Jesús; Cejas, Paloma; Molina, Susana; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Mendiola, Marta; Burgos, Emilio; Aguayo, Cristina; Custodio, Ana B.; Machado, Isidro; Ramos, David; Gironella, Meritxell; Espinosa-Salinas, Isabel; Ramos, Ricardo; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Risueño, Alberto; De Las Rivas, Javier; Reglero, Guillermo; Yaya, Ricardo; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Maurel, Joan; Feliu, Jaime; de Molina, Ana Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism plays an essential role in carcinogenesis due to the requirements of tumoral cells to sustain increased structural, energetic and biosynthetic precursor demands for cell proliferation. We investigated the association between expression of lipid metabolism-related genes and clinical outcome in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients with the aim of identifying a metabolic profile associated with greater malignancy and increased risk of relapse. Expression profile of 70 lipid metabolism-related genes was determined in 77 patients with stage II colon cancer. Cox regression analyses using c-index methodology was applied to identify a metabolic-related signature associated to prognosis. The metabolic signature was further confirmed in two independent validation sets of 120 patients and additionally, in a group of 264 patients from a public database. The combined analysis of these 4 genes, ABCA1, ACSL1, AGPAT1 and SCD, constitutes a metabolic-signature (ColoLipidGene) able to accurately stratify stage II colon cancer patients with 5-fold higher risk of relapse with strong statistical power in the four independent groups of patients. The identification of a group of 4 genes that predict survival in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients allows delineation of a high-risk group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy, and avoids the toxic and unnecessary chemotherapy in patients classified as low-risk group. PMID:25749516

  9. Endothelial microparticle formation by angiotensin II is mediated via Ang II receptor type I/NADPH oxidase/ Rho kinase pathways targeted to lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Dylan; Montezano, Augusto C; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; He, Ying; Carter, Anthony; Touyz, Rhian M

    2011-08-01

    Circulating microparticles are increased in cardiovascular disease and may themselves promote oxidative stress and inflammation. Molecular mechanisms underlying their formation and signaling are unclear. We investigated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), Rho kinase, and lipid rafts in microparticle formation and examined their functional significance in endothelial cells (ECs). Microparticle formation from angiotensin II (Ang II)-stimulated ECs and apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice was assessed by annexin V or by CD144 staining and electron microscopy. Ang II promoted microparticle formation and increased EC O(2)(-) generation and Rho kinase activity. Ang II-stimulated effects were inhibited by irbesartan (Ang II receptor type I blocker) and fasudil (Rho kinase inhibitor). Methyl-β-cyclodextrin and nystatin, which disrupt lipid rafts/caveolae, blocked microparticle release. Functional responses, assessed in microparticle-stimulated ECs, revealed increased O(2)(-) production, enhanced vascular cell adhesion molecule/platelet-EC adhesion molecule expression, and augmented macrophage adhesion. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor blocked the prooxidative and proinflammatory effects of microparticles. In vitro observations were confirmed in apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice, which displayed vascular inflammation and high levels of circulating endothelial microparticles, effects that were reduced by apocynin. We demonstrated direct actions of Ang II on endothelial microparticle release, mediated through NADPH oxidase, ROS, and Rho kinase targeted to lipid rafts. Microparticles themselves stimulated endothelial ROS formation and inflammatory responses. Our findings suggest a feedforward system whereby Ang II promotes EC injury through its own endothelial-derived microparticles.

  10. ASSESSMENT OF SERUM LIPIDS IN TYPE II DIABETES MALE AND FEMALE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapurna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM often have both quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of lipoproteins that are responsible for increased incidence of microvascular and macrovascular complications. Incidence of coronary heart disease is three to four folds higher in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to non - diabetics. It has been proposed that the composition of lipid particles in diabetic dyslipidemia is more atherogenic than other types of dyslipidemia. This study was conducted to asses s serum lipid profile in type diabetes male and female patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was conducted on 50 T2DM patients with history more than ten yrs diabetes. Diabetic patients with overt complications and patients on drugs like diuretics, s teroids, oral contraceptives and beta blockers etc are excluded from study. 5 ml of whole blood was collected via vena puncture with the help of a disposable syringe in between 7.00am and 8.00am. Fasting plasma glucose and different Lipid fractions were es timated using standard procedure. All values were expressed as mean ± S.D. Statistical significance of differences between control and study groups were evaluated by student’s t test. A p - value less than 0.05 were considered as significant. RESULTS: The se rum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly raised in both males and females . CONCLUSION: Hyperlipidaemia is a common finding among DM patients. DM patients should be screened and appropriate management should be instituted to reduce the risk of CHD and atherosclerosis

  11. Protection against inhaled oxidants through scavenging of oxidized lipids by macrophage receptors MARCO and SR-AI/II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Bauer, Alison K; Arredouani, Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) express the class A scavenger receptors (SRAs) macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) and scavenger receptor AI/II (SRA-I/II), which recognize oxidized lipids and provide innate defense against inhaled pathogens and particles. Increased MARCO expression...... in lungs of ozone-resistant mice suggested an additional role protecting against inhaled oxidants. After ozone exposure, MARCO-/- mice showed greater lung injury than did MARCO+/+ mice. Ozone is known to generate oxidized, proinflammatory lipids in lung lining fluid, such as 5beta,6beta......-epoxycholesterol (beta-epoxide) and 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-glycerophosphocholine (PON-GPC). Intratracheal instillation of either lipid caused substantial neutrophil influx in MARCO-/- mice, but had no effect in MARCO+/+ mice. Normal AMs showed greater uptake in vitro of beta-epoxide compared with MARCO-/- AMs...

  12. Effects of PEGylated lipid nanoparticles on the oral absorption of one BCS II drug: a mechanistic investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang XW

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Xingwang Zhang,* Guijiang Chen,* Tianpeng Zhang, Zhiguo Ma, Baojian WuDivision of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Lipid nanocarriers are becoming a versatile platform for oral delivery of lipophilic drugs. In this article, we aimed to explore the gastrointestinal behaviors of lipid nanoparticles and the effect of PEGylation on oral absorption of fenofibrate (FN, a Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS II model drug. FN-loaded PEGylated lipid nanoparticles (FN-PLNs were prepared by the solvent-diffusion method and characterized by particle size distribution, morphology, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and drug release. Lipolytic experiments were performed to assess the resistance of lipid nanoparticles against pancreatic lipase. Pharmacokinetics was evaluated in rats after oral administration of FN preparations. The obtained FN-PLNs were 186.7 nm in size with an entrapment efficiency of >95%. Compared to conventional lipid nanoparticles, PLNs exhibited slower drug release in the lipase-containing medium, strikingly reduced mucin binding, and suppressed lipolysis in vitro. Further, oral absorption of FN was significantly enhanced using PLNs with relative bioavailability of 123.9% and 157.0% to conventional lipid nanoparticles and a commercial formulation (Lipanthyl®, respectively. It was demonstrated that reduced mucin trapping, suppressed lipolysis, and/or improved mucosal permeability were responsible for increased oral absorption. These results facilitated a better understanding of the in vivo fate of lipid nanoparticles, and suggested the potential of PLNs as oral carriers of BCS II drugs.Keywords: fenofibrate, lipid nanoparticles, PEGylation, oral bioavailability, absorption mechanism

  13. Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers on lipid bilayers II: Effects of bilayer phase and dendrimer termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Christopher V; Leroueil, Pascale R; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2008-08-07

    The molecular structures and enthalpy release of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers binding to 1,2-dimyristoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) bilayers were explored through atomistic molecular dynamics. Three PAMAM dendrimer terminations were examined: protonated primary amine, neutral acetamide, and deprotonated carboxylic acid. Fluid and gel lipid phases were examined to extract the effects of lipid tail mobility on the binding of generation-3 dendrimers, which are directly relevant to the nanoparticle interactions involving lipid rafts, endocytosis, lipid removal, and/or membrane pores. Upon binding to gel phase lipids, dendrimers remained spherical, had a constant radius of gyration, and approximately one-quarter of the terminal groups were in close proximity to the lipids. In contrast, upon binding to fluid phase bilayers, dendrimers flattened out with a large increase in their asphericity and radii of gyration. Although over twice as many dendrimer-lipid contacts were formed on fluid versus gel phase lipids, the dendrimer-lipid interaction energy was only 20% stronger. The greatest enthalpy release upon binding was between the charged dendrimers and the lipid bilayer. However, the stronger binding to fluid versus gel phase lipids was driven by the hydrophobic interactions between the inner dendrimer and lipid tails.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal the Conformational Flexibility of Lipid II and Its Loose Association with the Defensin Plectasin in the Staphylococcus aureus Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witzke, Sarah; Petersen, Michael; Carpenter, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    dynamics simulation study of the conformational dynamics of Lipid II within a detailed model of the Staphylococcus aureus cell membrane. We show that Lipid II is able to adopt a range of conformations, even within the packed lipidic environment of the membrane. Our simulations also reveal dimerization...... the biosynthesis of the cell wall. Given the urgent need for development of novel antibiotics to counter the growing threat of bacterial infection resistance, it is imperative that a thorough molecular-level characterization of the molecules targeted by antibiotics be achieved. To this end, we present a molecular...... of Lipid II mediated by cations. In the presence of the defensin peptide plectasin, the conformational lability of Lipid II allows it to form loose complexes with the protein, via a number of different binding modes....

  15. Lipid Based Formulations of Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS Class II Drugs: Strategy, Formulations, Methods and Saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šoltýsová I.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Active ingredients in pharmaceuticals differ by their physico-chemical properties and their bioavailability therefore varies. The most frequently used and most convenient way of administration of medicines is oral, however many drugs are little soluble in water. Thus they are not sufficiently effective and suitable for such administration. For this reason a system of lipid based formulations (LBF was developed. Series of formulations were prepared and tested in water and biorelevant media. On the basis of selection criteria, there were selected formulations with the best emulsification potential, good dispersion in the environment and physical stability. Samples of structurally different drugs included in the Class II of the Biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS were obtained, namely Griseofulvin, Glibenclamide, Carbamazepine, Haloperidol, Itraconazol, Triclosan, Praziquantel and Rifaximin, for testing of maximal saturation in formulations prepared from commercially available excipients. Methods were developed for preparation of formulations, observation of emulsification and its description, determination of maximum solubility of drug samples in the respective formulation and subsequent analysis. Saturation of formulations with drugs showed that formulations 80 % XA and 20 % Xh, 35 % XF and 65 % Xh were best able to dissolve the drugs which supports the hypothesis that it is desirable to identify limited series of formulations which could be generally applied for this purpose.

  16. Interaction of red pepper (Capsicum annum, Tepin) polyphenols with Fe(II)-induced lipid peroxidation in brain and liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oboh, G [Biochemistry Department, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Ondo State (Nigeria); [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), Campus Universitario - Camobi, Santa Maria RS (Brazil); [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)]. E-mail: goboh2001@yahoo.com; Rocha, J B.T. [Campus Universitario - Camobi, Santa Maria RS (Brazil)

    2006-03-15

    Polyphenols exhibit a wide range of biological effects because of their antioxidant properties. Several types of polyphenols (phenolic acids, hydrolyzable tannins, and flavonoids) show anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic effects. Comparative studies were carried on the protective ability of free and bound polyphenol extracts of red Capsicum annuum Tepin (CAT) on brain and liver - In vitro. Free polyphenols of red Capsicum annuum Tepin (CAT) were extracted with 80% acetone, while the bound polyphenols were extracted with ethyl acetate from acid and alkaline hydrolysis of the pepper residue from free polyphenols extract. The phenol content, Fe (II) chelating ability, OH radical scavenging ability and protective ability of the extract against Fe (II)-induced lipid peroxidation in brain and liver was subsequently determined. The results of the study revealed that the free polyphenols (218.2mg/100g) content of the pepper were significantly higher than the bound polyphenols (42.5mg/100g). Furthermore, the free polyphenol extract had a significantly higher (<0.05) Fe (II) chelating ability, OH radical scavenging ability than the bound polyphenols. In addition, both extracts significantly inhibited (P<0.05) basal and 25{mu}M Fe (II)- induced lipid peroxidation in Rat's brain and liver in a dose dependent. However, the free polyphenols caused a significantly higher inhibition in the MDA (Malondialdehyde) production in the brain and liver homogenates than the bound phenols. Furthermore, the polyphenols protected the liver more than the brain. In conclusion, free polyphenols from Capsicum annuum protects both the liver and brain from Fe{sup 2+} induced lipid peroxidation, and this is probably due to the higher Fe (II) chelating ability and OH radical scavenging ability of the free polyphenols from the pepper. (author)

  17. Review: P4-ATPases as Phospholipid Flippases-Structure, Function, and Enigmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens P; Vestergaard, Anna L; Mikkelsen, Stine A

    2016-01-01

    group is propelled along against its concentration gradient with the hydrocarbon chains projecting out into the lipid phase by movement of an isoleucine located at the position corresponding to an ion binding glutamate in the Ca2+- and Na+/K+-ATPases. Hence, the P4-ATPase mechanism is quite similar...... on properties of mammalian and yeast P4-ATPases for which most mechanistic insight is available. However, the structure, function and enigmas associated with mammalian and yeast P4-ATPases most likely extend to P4-ATPases of plants and other organisms....

  18. Lipid flopping in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Kenneth J

    2015-10-01

    Bile is synthesized in the liver and is essential for the emulsification of dietary lipids and lipid-soluble vitamins. It is a complex mixture of amphiphilic bile acids (BAs; which act as detergent molecules), the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), cholesterol and a variety of endogenous metabolites and waste products. Over the last 20 years, the combined effort of clinicians, geneticists, physiologists and biochemists has shown that each of these bile components is transported across the canalicular membrane of the hepatocyte by its own specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. The bile salt export pump (BSEP) ABCB11 transports the BAs and drives bile flow from the liver, but it is now clear that two lipid transporters, ABCB4 (which flops PC into the bile) and the P-type ATPase ATP8B1/CDC50 (which flips a different phospholipid in the opposite direction) play equally critical roles that protect the biliary tree from the detergent activity of the bile acids. Understanding the interdependency of these lipid floppases and flippases has allowed the development of an assay to measure ABCB4 function. ABCB4 harbours numerous mis-sense mutations which probably reflects the spectrum of liver disease rooted in ABCB4 aetiology. Characterization of the effect of these mutations at the protein level opens the possibility for the development of personalized prognosis and treatment. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  19. Apolipoprotein A-II Plus Lipid Emulsion Enhance Cell Growth via SR-B1 and Target Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh LE, Thao N.; Gill, Anthony J.; Bulanadi, Jerikho C.; Patel, Mili; Waddington, Lynne J.; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Moghaddam, Minoo J.; Smith, Ross C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Apolipoprotein A-II (ApoA-II) is down regulated in the sera of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients, which may be due to increase utilization of high density lipoprotein (HDL) lipid by pancreatic cancer tissue. This study examined the influence of exogenous ApoA-II on lipid uptake and cell growth in pancreatic cancer (PC) both in vitro and in vivo. Methods Cryo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examined ApoA-II’s influence on morphology of SMOFLipid emulsion. The influence of ApoA-II on proliferation of cancer cell lines was determined by incubating them with lipid+/-ApoA-II and anti-SR-B1 antibody. Lipid was labeled with the fluorophore, DiD, to trace lipid uptake by cancer cells in vitro by confocal microscopy and in vivo in PDAC patient derived xenograft tumours (PDXT) by fluorescence imaging. Scavenger receptor class B type-1(SR-B1) expression in PDAC cell lines and in PDAC PDXT was measured by western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results ApoA-II spontaneously converted lipid emulsion into very small unilamellar rHDL like vesicles (rHDL/A-II) and enhanced lipid uptake in PANC-1, CFPAC-1 and primary tumour cells as shown by confocal microscopy. SR-B1 expression was 13.2, 10.6, 3.1 and 2.3 fold higher in PANC-1, MIAPaCa-2, CFPAC-1 and BxPC3 cell lines than the normal pancreatic cell line (HPDE6) and 3.7 fold greater in PDAC tissue than in normal pancreas. ApoA-II plus lipid significantly increased the uptake of labeled lipid and promoted cell growth in PANC-1, MIAPaCa-2, CFPAC-1 and BxPC3 cells which was inhibited by anti SR-B1 antibody. Further, ApoA-II increased the uptake of lipid in xenografts by 3.4 fold. Conclusion Our data suggest that ApoA-II enhance targeting potential of lipid in pancreatic cancer which may have imaging and drug delivery potentialities. PMID:27002321

  20. C-terminus of the P4-ATPase ATP8A2 functions in protein folding and regulation of phospholipid flippase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalat, Madhavan; Moleschi, Kody; Molday, Robert S

    2017-02-01

    ATP8A2 is a P4-ATPase that flips phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine across cell membranes. This generates membrane phospholipid asymmetry, a property important in many cellular processes, including vesicle trafficking. ATP8A2 deficiency causes severe neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated the role of the C-terminus of ATP8A2 in its expression, subcellular localization, interaction with its subunit CDC50A, and function as a phosphatidylserine flippase. C-terminal deletion mutants exhibited a reduced tendency to solubilize in mild detergent and exit the endoplasmic reticulum. The solubilized protein, however, assembled with CDC50A and displayed phosphatidylserine flippase activity. Deletion of the C-terminal 33 residues resulted in reduced phosphatidylserine-dependent ATPase activity, phosphatidylserine flippase activity, and neurite extension in PC12 cells. These reduced activities were reversed with 60- and 80-residue C-terminal deletions. Unlike the yeast P4-ATPase Drs2, ATP8A2 is not regulated by phosphoinositides but undergoes phosphorylation on the serine residue within a CaMKII target motif. We propose a model in which the C-terminus of ATP8A2 consists of an autoinhibitor domain upstream of the C-terminal 33 residues and an anti-autoinhibitor domain at the extreme C-terminus. The latter blocks the inhibitory activity of the autoinhibitor domain. We conclude that the C-terminus plays an important role in the efficient folding and regulation of ATP8A2. © 2017 Chalat et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  1. Interaction of red pepper (Capsicum annum, Tepin) polyphenols with Fe(II)-induced lipid peroxidation in brain and liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oboh, G.; Rocha, J.B.T.

    2006-03-01

    Polyphenols exhibit a wide range of biological effects because of their antioxidant properties. Several types of polyphenols (phenolic acids, hydrolyzable tannins, and flavonoids) show anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic effects. Comparative studies were carried on the protective ability of free and bound polyphenol extracts of red Capsicum annuum Tepin (CAT) on brain and liver - In vitro. Free polyphenols of red Capsicum annuum Tepin (CAT) were extracted with 80% acetone, while the bound polyphenols were extracted with ethyl acetate from acid and alkaline hydrolysis of the pepper residue from free polyphenols extract. The phenol content, Fe (II) chelating ability, OH radical scavenging ability and protective ability of the extract against Fe (II)-induced lipid peroxidation in brain and liver was subsequently determined. The results of the study revealed that the free polyphenols (218.2mg/100g) content of the pepper were significantly higher than the bound polyphenols (42.5mg/100g). Furthermore, the free polyphenol extract had a significantly higher ( 2+ induced lipid peroxidation, and this is probably due to the higher Fe (II) chelating ability and OH radical scavenging ability of the free polyphenols from the pepper. (author)

  2. Fatty Acid Profile of Sunshine Bass: II. Profile Change Differs Among Fillet Lipid Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushenski, Jesse T; Lewis, Heidi A; Kohler, Christopher C

    2008-07-01

    Fatty acid (FA) profile of fish tissue mirrors dietary FA profile and changes in a time-dependent manner following a change in dietary FA composition. To determine whether FA profile change varies among lipid classes, we evaluated the FA composition of fillet cholesteryl esters (CE), phospholipids (PL), and triacylglycerols (TAG) of sunshine bass (SB, Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis) raised on feeds containing fish oil or 50:50 blend of fish oil and coconut, grapeseed, linseed, or poultry oil, with or without implementation of a finishing period (100% FO feed) prior to harvest. Each lipid class was associated with a generalized FA signature, irrespective of nutritional history: fillet PL was comprised largely of saturated FA (SFA), long-chain polyunsaturated FA (LC-PUFA), and total n-3 FA; fillet TAG was higher in MC-PUFA and total n-6 FA; and fillet CE was highest in monounsaturated FA (MUFA). Neutral lipids reflected dietary composition in a near-direct fashion; conversely, PL showed evidence of selectivity for MC- and LC-PUFA. Shorter-chain SFA were not strongly reflected within any lipid fraction, even when dietary availability was high, suggesting catabolism of these FA. FA metabolism in SB is apparently characterized by a division between saturated and unsaturated FA, whereby LC-PUFA are preferentially incorporated into tissues and SFA are preferentially oxidized for energy production. We demonstrated provision of SFA in grow-out feeds for SB, instead MC-PUFA which compete for tissue deposition, meets energy demands and allows for maximum inclusion of LC-PUFA within fillet lipids.

  3. Metallothionein-II Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation and Improves Functional Recovery after Transient Brain Ischemia and Reperfusion in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Diaz-Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R, damaging mechanisms, such as excitotoxicity and oxidative stress, lead to irreversible neurological deficits. The induction of metallothionein-II (MT-II protein is an endogenous mechanism after I/R. Our aim was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of MT-II after I/R in rats. Male Wistar rats were transiently occluded at the middle cerebral artery for 2 h, followed by reperfusion. Rats received either MT (10 μg per rat i.p. or vehicle after ischemia. Lipid peroxidation (LP was measured 22 h after reperfusion in frontal cortex and hippocampus; also, neurological deficit was evaluated after ischemia, using the Longa scoring scale. Infarction area was analyzed 72 hours after ischemia. Results showed increased LP in frontal cortex (30.7% and hippocampus (26.4%, as compared to control group; this effect was fully reversed by MT treatment. Likewise, we also observed a diminished neurological deficit assessed by the Longa scale in those animals treated with MT compared to control group values. The MT-treated group showed a significant (P<0.05 reduction of 39.9% in the infarction area, only at the level of hippocampus, as compared to control group. Results suggest that MT-II may be a novel neuroprotective treatment to prevent ischemia injury.

  4. Part II: Effects of gamma irradiation on lipid and cholesterol oxidation in mechanically deboned turkey meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.; Andrassy, E.; Meszaros, L.; Beczner, J.; Polyak-Feher, K.; Gaal, O.; Lebovics, V.K.; Lugasi, A.

    2009-01-01

    The pasteurizing effect of a 2 kGy radiation dose on non-frozen mechanically deboned turkey meat was achieved without increase in cholesterol oxidation products or increases in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance values during 15 d of chilled storage following the treatments, while untreated samples were spoiled. The addition of antioxidants, such as thyme oil or α-tocopherol plus ascorbic acid, significantly inhibited the oxidative changes of cholesterol and lipids during 3 kGy treatment. (author)

  5. Lysosome lipid storage disorder in NCTR-BALB/c mice. II. Morphologic and cytochemical studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Shio, H.; Fowler, S.; Bhuvaneswaran, C.; Morris, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    Electron-microscopic and cytochemical studies were carried out on tissues of NCTR-BALB/c mice. These mice are affected with a neurovisceral genetic disorder involving excessive tissue accumulation of lipid. Distinctive polymorphic intracellular inclusions, bounded by a membrane and containing lamellated bodies, were found in many cells of liver, spleen, lung, kidney, intestine, lymph nodes, and brain. The inclusions transformed reticuloendothelial cells into massive foam cells. Acid phosphata...

  6. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Coat Protein II Transport Machinery Coordinates Cellular Lipid Secretion and Cholesterol Biosynthesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Lee G. D.; Jones, Bethan; Duncan, Emma J.; Hutchison, Claire E.; Ozkan, Tozen; Williams, Paul A.; Alder, Olivia; Nieuwdorp, Max; Townley, Anna K.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Stephens, David J.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Shoulders, Carol C.

    2014-01-01

    Triglycerides and cholesterol are essential for life in most organisms. Triglycerides serve as the principal energy storage depot and, where vascular systems exist, as a means of energy transport. Cholesterol is essential for the functional integrity of all cellular membrane systems. The endoplasmic reticulum is the site of secretory lipoprotein production and de novo cholesterol synthesis, yet little is known about how these activities are coordinated with each other or with the activity of the COPII machinery, which transports endoplasmic reticulum cargo to the Golgi. The Sar1B component of this machinery is mutated in chylomicron retention disorder, indicating that this Sar1 isoform secures delivery of dietary lipids into the circulation. However, it is not known why some patients with chylomicron retention disorder develop hepatic steatosis, despite impaired intestinal fat malabsorption, and why very severe hypocholesterolemia develops in this condition. Here, we show that Sar1B also promotes hepatic apolipoprotein (apo) B lipoprotein secretion and that this promoting activity is coordinated with the processes regulating apoB expression and the transfer of triglycerides/cholesterol moieties onto this large lipid transport protein. We also show that although Sar1A antagonizes the lipoprotein secretion-promoting activity of Sar1B, both isoforms modulate the expression of genes encoding cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes and the synthesis of cholesterol de novo. These results not only establish that Sar1B promotes the secretion of hepatic lipids but also adds regulation of cholesterol synthesis to Sar1B's repertoire of transport functions. PMID:24338480

  7. Change in Serum Lipid during Growth Hormone Therapy in a Growth Hormone-Deficient Patient with Decreased Serum Apolipoprotem C-II

    OpenAIRE

    Tadashi, Moriwake; Masanori, Takaiwa; Masako, Kawakami; Shouichi, Tanaka; Tetsuya, Nakamura; Department of Pediatrics, Iwakuni National Hospital; Department of Pediatrics, Iwakuni National Hospital; Department of Pediatrics, Iwakuni National Hospital; Department of Internal Medicine, Iwakuni National Hospital; Department of Radiology, Iwakuni National Hospital

    2003-01-01

    Introduction The effects of GH on lipid metabolism have been discussed frequently in relation to quality of adult life in childhood-onset GH deficiency, but its effects on lipid metabolism were not fully understood. In the present study, we analyzed the longitudinal change in serum lipid metabolites and apolipoproteins in a GH-deficient patient who had a history of cholelithiasis with decreased apolipoprotein C-II. Case K.Y. Four-year old boy visited the emergency clinic of Iwakuni National H...

  8. The Ia.2 Epitope Defines a Subset of Lipid Raft Resident MHC Class II Molecules Crucial to Effective Antigen Presentation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busman-Sahay, Kathleen; Sargent, Elizabeth; Harton, Jonathan A.; Drake, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has established that binding of the 11-5.2 anti-I-Ak mAb, which recognizes the Ia.2 epitope on I-Ak class II molecules, elicits MHC class II signaling, whereas binding of two other anti-I-Ak mAb that recognize the Ia.17 epitope fail to elicit signaling. Using a biochemical approach, we establish that the Ia.2 epitope recognized by the widely used 11-5.2 mAb defines a subset of cell surface I-Ak molecules predominantly found within membrane lipid rafts. Functional studies demonstrate that the Ia.2 bearing subset of I-Ak class II molecules is critically necessary for effective B cell–T cell interactions especially at low antigen doses, a finding consistent with published studies on the role of raft-resident class II molecules in CD4 T cell activation. Interestingly, B cells expressing recombinant I-Ak class II molecules possessing a β chain-tethered HEL peptide lack the Ia.2 epitope and fail to partition into lipid rafts. Moreover, cells expressing Ia.2 negative tethered peptide-class II molecules are severely impaired in their ability to present both tethered peptide or peptide derived from exogenous antigen to CD4 T cells. These results establish the Ia.2 epitope as defining a lipid raft-resident MHC class II confomer vital to the initiation of MHC class II restricted B cell–T cell interactions. PMID:21543648

  9. Study of biodistribution of lipidic nanospheres charged with cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (II) and labelled with radioactive nuclei of Indium-111

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez R, V.; Juarez O, C.; Medina L, A.; Perez C, E.; Garcia L, P.

    2007-01-01

    The general objective of the study was to evaluate the lipidic nanospheres biodistribution charged with cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (II) (cis-DDP) and labelled with radioactive nuclei of Indium-111 (Lip-Cis-in-111) in Wistar rats and in a tumoral model of CaCu. The conclusions were: 1. The system Lip-Cis-in-111 it presents a very fast elimination probably, to a fast recognition response of the reticuloendothelial system (RES). 2. It is planned to make modifications to the formulation to increase the quantity of the hydrophilic polymer (PEG), so that its time of residence in the blood is bigger and allow a bigger accumulation in the tumor. (Author)

  10. Identification and in vitro analysis of the GatD/MurT enzyme-complex catalyzing lipid II amidation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Münch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The peptidoglycan of Staphylococcus aureus is characterized by a high degree of crosslinking and almost completely lacks free carboxyl groups, due to amidation of the D-glutamic acid in the stem peptide. Amidation of peptidoglycan has been proposed to play a decisive role in polymerization of cell wall building blocks, correlating with the crosslinking of neighboring peptidoglycan stem peptides. Mutants with a reduced degree of amidation are less viable and show increased susceptibility to methicillin. We identified the enzymes catalyzing the formation of D-glutamine in position 2 of the stem peptide. We provide biochemical evidence that the reaction is catalyzed by a glutamine amidotransferase-like protein and a Mur ligase homologue, encoded by SA1707 and SA1708, respectively. Both proteins, for which we propose the designation GatD and MurT, are required for amidation and appear to form a physically stable bi-enzyme complex. To investigate the reaction in vitro we purified recombinant GatD and MurT His-tag fusion proteins and their potential substrates, i.e. UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide, as well as the membrane-bound cell wall precursors lipid I, lipid II and lipid II-Gly₅. In vitro amidation occurred with all bactoprenol-bound intermediates, suggesting that in vivo lipid II and/or lipid II-Gly₅ may be substrates for GatD/MurT. Inactivation of the GatD active site abolished lipid II amidation. Both, murT and gatD are organized in an operon and are essential genes of S. aureus. BLAST analysis revealed the presence of homologous transcriptional units in a number of gram-positive pathogens, e.g. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumonia and Clostridium perfringens, all known to have a D-iso-glutamine containing PG. A less negatively charged PG reduces susceptibility towards defensins and may play a general role in innate immune signaling.

  11. Tetraspan microdomains distinct from lipid rafts enrich select peptide-MHC class II complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kropshofer, H.; Spindeldreher, S.; Rohn, T. A.; Platania, N.; Grygar, C.; Daniel, N.; Wolpl, A.; Langen, H.; Hořejší, Václav; Vogt, A. B.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2002), s. 61-68 ISSN 1529-2908 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : MHC II * tetraspan microdomains * peptide presentation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 27.868, year: 2002

  12. SC lipid model membranes designed for studying impact of ceramide species on drug diffusion and permeation--part II: diffusion and permeation of model drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochalek, M; Podhaisky, H; Ruettinger, H-H; Wohlrab, J; Neubert, R H H

    2012-10-01

    The barrier function of two quaternary stratum corneum (SC) lipid model membranes, which were previously characterized with regard to the lipid organization, was investigated based on diffusion studies of model drugs with varying lipophilicities. Diffusion experiments of a hydrophilic drug, urea, and more lipophilic drugs than urea (i.e. caffeine, diclofenac sodium) were conducted using Franz-type diffusion cells. The amount of permeated drug was analyzed using either HPLC or CE technique. The subjects of interest in the present study were the investigation of the influence of physicochemical properties of model drugs on their diffusion and permeation through SC lipid model membranes, as well as the study of the impact of the constituents of these artificial systems (particularly ceramide species) on their barrier properties. The diffusion through both SC lipid model membranes and the human SC of the most hydrophilic model drug, urea, was faster than the permeation of the more lipophilic drugs. The slowest rate of permeation through SC lipid systems occurred in the case of caffeine. The composition of SC lipid model membranes has a significant impact on their barrier function. Model drugs diffused and permeated faster through Membrane II (presence of Cer [EOS]). In terms of the barrier properties, Membrane II is much more similar to the human SC than Membrane I. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Lipid nanoparticles (SLN, NLC): Overcoming the anatomical and physiological barriers of the eye - Part II - Ocular drug-loaded lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-López, E; Espina, M; Doktorovova, S; Souto, E B; García, M L

    2017-01-01

    In the recent decades, various controlled delivery systems have been introduced with the aim to improve solubility, stability and bioavailability of poorly absorbed drugs. Among all, lipid nanoparticles gather interesting properties as drug or gene delivery carriers. These systems, composed either of solid lipids (SLN) or of solid and liquid lipids (NLC) stabilized with surfactants, combine the advantages of other colloidal particles such as polymeric nanoparticles, fat emulsions and liposomes avoiding their main disadvantages. Lipid nanoparticles represent an interesting approach for eye drug delivery as they can improve the corneal absorption of drugs enhancing their bioavailability. The Generally Recognized as Safe status of formulation excipients, the scaling-up facilities and the possibility of sterilization, make them suitable for industrial production. In this review, the latest findings, potential applications, and challenges related to the use of lipid nanoparticles for ocular drug delivery are comprehensively discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Nanostructured Lipid System as a Strategy to Improve the in Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Copper(II Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia B. da Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to construct a nanostructured lipid system as a strategy to improve the in vitro antibacterial activity of copper(II complexes. New compounds with the general formulae [CuX2(INH2]·nH2O (X = Cl− and n = 1 (1; X = NCS− and n = 5 (2; X = NCO− and n = 4 (3; INH = isoniazid, a drug widely used to treat tuberculosis derived from the reaction between the copper(II chloride and isoniazid in the presence or absence of pseudohalide ions (NCS− or NCO− were synthesized and characterized by infrared spectrometry, electronic absorption spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, melting points and complexometry with 2,2′,2′′,2′′′-(Ethane-1,2-diyldinitrilotetraacetic acid (EDTA. The characterization techniques allowed us to confirm the formation of the copper(II complexes. The Cu(II complexes were loaded into microemulsion (MEs composed of 10% phase oil (cholesterol, 10% surfactant [soy oleate and Brij® 58 (1:2] and 80% aqueous phase (phosphate buffer pH = 7.4 prepared by sonication. The Cu(II complex-loaded MEs displayed sizes ranging from 158.0 ± 1.060 to 212.6 ± 1.539 nm, whereas the polydispersity index (PDI ranged from 0.218 ± 0.007 to 0.284 ± 0.034. The antibacterial activity of the free compounds and those that were loaded into the MEs against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC® 25923 and Escherichia coli ATCC® 25922, as evaluated by a microdilution technique, and the cytotoxicity index (IC50 against the Vero cell line (ATCC® CCL-81TM were used to calculate the selectivity index (SI. Among the free compounds, only compound 2 (MIC 500 μg/mL showed activity for S. aureus. After loading the compounds into the MEs, the antibacterial activity of compounds 1, 2 and 3 was significantly increased against E. coli (MIC’s 125, 125 and 500 μg/mL, respectively and S. aureus (MICs 250, 500 and 125 μg/mL, respectively. The loaded compounds were less toxic against the Vero

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Lipid Droplet Formation and Type II Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xuebao; Zhang, Kezhong

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, is caused by insufficient insulin production due to excessive loss of pancreatic β cells (type I diabetes) or impaired insulin signaling due to peripheral insulin resistance (type II diabetes). Pancreatic β cell is the only insulin-secreting cell type that has highly developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to cope with high demands of insulin synthesis and secretion. Therefore, ER homeostasis is crucial to the proper fu...

  16. Effect of substratum, serum and linoleic acid on the lipid synthesis of isolated alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cott, G.R.; Edeen, K.E.; Hale, S.G.; Mason, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors examined the effect of cellular substratum (plastic or amnionic basement membrane (ABM)) and serum additive (fetal bovine (FBS), pork, horse, rat or human) on phospholipid synthesis in alveolar type II cells. The cells were isolated from adult rats, cultured for 48 hours under the various substratum and serum conditions, and then incubated for an additional 2 hours with [1- 14 C] acetate. ABM consistently caused a significant increase in the percent of radiolabel incorporated into phosphatidylcholine (PC) and/or phosphatidylglycerol (PG). Serum also had a significant effect with the highest values of PC and saturated PC being obtained with rat serum and the highest PG values with horse serum. The fatty acid composition of the sera used varied according to species with the largest variations in percent linoleic acid. Supplementing media with linoleic acid resulted in a marked increase in saturated PC values and a fall in PG values. Therefore, they conclude that: 1) ABM improves differentiated function, 2) FBS supplementation may not be optimal, and 3) the different effects of linoleic acid supplementation on PC, saturated PC, and PG values suggests an independent regulation of synthesis for these lipid species in vitro

  17. APOA II genotypes frequency and their interaction with saturated fatty acids consumption on lipid profile of patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorshahi, Neda; Sotoudeh, Gity; Djalali, Mahmoud; Eshraghian, Mohamad Reza; Keramatipour, Mohammad; Basiri, Marjan Ghane; Doostan, Farideh; Koohdani, Fariba

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have suggested that APOA II-265T/C polymorphism affect lipid profile. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of -265T/C APOA II polymorphism and saturated fatty acids (SFA) intake interaction on lipid profile in diabetic population who are at risk for lipid disorders. In this cross sectional study, 697 type 2 diabetic patients participated. Food consumption data were collected using validated semi-quantitative FFQ during the last year. Realtime-PCR was used to determine APOA II-265T/C genotypes. The interaction between the genotypes and SFA intake with lipid profile was tested using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). According to APOA II-265T/C (rs5082) genotype distribution results, CC genotype with a frequency of 12.9% and TC with that of 47.7% showed the lowest and highest frequency in our population, respectively. CC genotype subjects had significantly lower total cholesterol, triglyceride, Cholesterol/HDL-c ratio and non-HDL cholesterol than T allele carriers (p = 0.009, p = 0.02, p = 0.02 and p = 0.002, respectively). The interaction between genotype and SFA intake contributed to significant higher levels of LDL-c and LDL/HDL in CCs (p = 0.05 and p = 0.01), suggesting vulnerability of these individuals to high intake of SFA in the diet. APOA II polymorphism may influence the saturated fatty acid intake required to prevent dyslipidemia in the type 2 diabetic population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevention of non-communicable disease in a population in nutrition transition: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study phase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedayati Mehdi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS is a long term integrated community-based program for prevention of non-communicable disorders (NCD by development of a healthy lifestyle and reduction of NCD risk factors. The study begun in 1999, is ongoing, to be continued for at least 20 years. A primary survey was done to collect baseline data in 15005 individuals, over 3 years of age, selected from cohorts of three medical heath centers. A questionnaire for past medical history and data was completed during interviews; blood pressure, pulse rate, and anthropometrical measurements and a limited physical examination were performed and lipid profiles, fasting blood sugar and 2-hours-postload-glucose challenge were measured. A DNA bank was also collected. For those subjects aged over 30 years, Rose questionnaire was completed and an electrocardiogram was taken. Data collected were directly stored in computers as database software- computer assisted system. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of lifestyle modification in preventing or postponing the development of NCD risk factors and outcomes in the TLGS population. Design and methods In phase II of the TLGS, lifestyle interventions were implemented in 5630 people and 9375 individuals served as controls. Primary, secondary and tertiary interventions were designed based on specific target groups including schoolchildren, housewives, and high-risk persons. Officials of various sectors such as health, education, municipality, police, media, traders and community leaders were actively engaged as decision makers and collaborators. Interventional strategies were based on lifestyle modifications in diet, smoking and physical activity through face-to-face education, leaflets & brochures, school program alterations, training volunteers as health team and treating patients with NCD risk factors. Collection of demographic, clinical and laboratory data will be

  19. In Vitro Activity of Copper(II Complexes, Loaded or Unloaded into a Nanostructured Lipid System, against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia B. da Silva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is an infectious disease caused mainly by the bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, presenting 9.5 million new cases and 1.5 million deaths in 2014. The aim of this study was to evaluate a nanostructured lipid system (NLS composed of 10% phase oil (cholesterol, 10% surfactant (soy phosphatidylcholine, sodium oleate, and Eumulgin® HRE 40 ([castor oil polyoxyl-40-hydrogenated] in a proportion of 3:6:8, and an 80% aqueous phase (phosphate buffer pH = 7.4 as a tactic to enhance the in vitro anti-Mtb activity of the copper(II complexes [CuCl2(INH2]·H2O (1, [Cu(NCS2(INH2]·5H2O (2 and [Cu(NCO2(INH2]·4H2O (3. The Cu(II complex-loaded NLS displayed sizes ranging from 169.5 ± 0.7095 to 211.1 ± 0.8963 nm, polydispersity index (PDI varying from 0.135 ± 0.0130 to 0.236 ± 0.00100, and zeta potential ranging from −0.00690 ± 0.0896 to −8.43 ± 1.63 mV. Rheological analysis showed that the formulations behave as non-Newtonian fluids of the pseudoplastic and viscoelastic type. Antimycobacterial activities of the free complexes and NLS-loaded complexes against Mtb H37Rv ATCC 27294 were evaluated by the REMA methodology, and the selectivity index (SI was calculated using the cytotoxicity index (IC50 against Vero (ATCC® CCL-81, J774A.1 (ATCC® TIB-67, and MRC-5 (ATCC® CCL-171 cell lines. The data suggest that the incorporation of the complexes into NLS improved the inhibitory action against Mtb by 52-, 27-, and 4.7-fold and the SI values by 173-, 43-, and 7-fold for the compounds 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The incorporation of the complexes 1, 2 and 3 into the NLS also resulted in a significant decrease of toxicity towards an alternative model (Artemia salina L.. These findings suggest that the NLS may be considered as a platform for incorporation of metallic complexes aimed at the treatment of TB.

  20. Toward the establishment of standardized in vitro tests for lipid-based formulations, part 3: understanding supersaturation versus precipitation potential during the in vitro digestion of type I, II, IIIA, IIIB and IV lipid-based formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Hywel D; Sassene, Philip; Kleberg, Karen; Calderone, Marilyn; Igonin, Annabel; Jule, Eduardo; Vertommen, Jan; Blundell, Ross; Benameur, Hassan; Müllertz, Anette; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that digestion of lipid-based formulations (LBFs) can stimulate both supersaturation and precipitation. The current study has evaluated the drug, formulation and dose-dependence of the supersaturation - precipitation balance for a range of LBFs. Type I, II, IIIA/B LBFs containing medium-chain (MC) or long-chain (LC) lipids, and lipid-free Type IV LBF incorporating different doses of fenofibrate or tolfenamic acid were digested in vitro in a simulated intestinal medium. The degree of supersaturation was assessed through comparison of drug concentrations in aqueous digestion phases (APDIGEST) during LBF digestion and the equilibrium drug solubility in the same phases. Increasing fenofibrate or tolfenamic acid drug loads (i.e., dose) had negligible effects on LC LBF performance during digestion, but promoted drug crystallization (confirmed by XRPD) from MC and Type IV LBF. Drug crystallization was only evident in instances when the calculated maximum supersaturation ratio (SR(M)) was >3. This threshold SR(M) value was remarkably consistent across all LBF and was also consistent with previous studies with danazol. The maximum supersaturation ratio (SR(M)) provides an indication of the supersaturation 'pressure' exerted by formulation digestion and is strongly predictive of the likelihood of drug precipitation in vitro. This may also prove effective in discriminating the in vivo performance of LBFs.

  1. Plant P4-ATPases: lipid translocators with a role in membrane traficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    a large family of membrane proteins involved in pumping different physiologically-relevant substrates across biological membranes [4]. The members of the P4 subfamily (also known as flippases) catalyze the energy-driven translocation of lipids necessary for establishing transbilayer lipid asymmetry [5......], a feature necessary for correct functioning of the cells [6,7]. Deletion of one or more P4-ATPase genes causes defects in vesicle budding in various organisms [8-10] and some members of the yeast family have been shown to interact with the vesiculation machinery [11,12]. Thus, unraveling the key features...... of P4-ATPase functioning is crucial to understand the mechanisms underlying the whole secretory and endocytic pathways. In the model plant Arabidopsis, 12 members of the P4-ATPase family have been described (ALA1-ALA12, for Aminophospholipid ATPase) [4]. In the past years, we have characterized several...

  2. The Structural Basis for Calcium Inhibition of Lipid Kinase PI4K II alpha and Comparison With the Apo State

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bäumlová, Adriana; Gregor, Jiří; Bouřa, Evžen

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 6 (2016), s. 987-993 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : lipid kinase * calcium * phosphatidylinositol * crystal structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/65/65_987.pdf

  3. G protein-membrane interactions II: Effect of G protein-linked lipids on membrane structure and G protein-membrane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Jesús; Ibarguren, Maitane; Álvarez, Rafael; Terés, Silvia; Lladó, Victoria; Piotto, Stefano P; Concilio, Simona; Busquets, Xavier; López, David J; Escribá, Pablo V

    2017-09-01

    G proteins often bear myristoyl, palmitoyl and isoprenyl moieties, which favor their association with the membrane and their accumulation in G Protein Coupled Receptor-rich microdomains. These lipids influence the biophysical properties of membranes and thereby modulate G protein binding to bilayers. In this context, we showed here that geranylgeraniol, but neither myristate nor palmitate, increased the inverted hexagonal (H II ) phase propensity of phosphatidylethanolamine-containing membranes. While myristate and palmitate preferentially associated with phosphatidylcholine membranes, geranylgeraniol favored nonlamellar-prone membranes. In addition, Gαi 1 monomers had a higher affinity for lamellar phases, while Gβγ and Gαβγ showed a marked preference for nonlamellar prone membranes. Moreover, geranylgeraniol enhanced the binding of G protein dimers and trimers to phosphatidylethanolamine-containing membranes, yet it decreased that of monomers. By contrast, both myristate and palmitate increased the Gαi 1 preference for lamellar membranes. Palmitoylation reinforced the binding of the monomer to PC membranes and myristoylation decreased its binding to PE-enriched bilayer. Finally, binding of dimers and trimers to lamellar-prone membranes was decreased by palmitate and myristate, but it was increased in nonlamellar-prone bilayers. These results demonstrate that co/post-translational G protein lipid modifications regulate the membrane lipid structure and that they influence the physico-chemical properties of membranes, which in part explains why G protein subunits sort to different plasma membrane domains. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Perspectives on marine zooplankton lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kattner, G.; Hagen, W.; Lee, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    We developed new perspectives to identify important questions and to propose approaches for future research on marine food web lipids. They were related to (i) structure and function of lipids, (ii) lipid changes during critical life phases, (iii) trophic marker lipids, and (iv) potential impact...... of climate change. The first addresses the role of lipids in membranes, storage lipids, and buoyancy with the following key question: How are the properties of membranes and deposits affected by the various types of lipids? The second deals with the importance of various types of lipids during reproduction......, development, and resting phases and addresses the role of the different storage lipids during growth and dormancy. The third relates to trophic marker lipids, which are an important tool to follow lipid and energy transfer through the food web. The central question is how can fatty acids be used to identify...

  5. Effects of Sesame Oil on Blood Glucose and Lipid Profile in Type II Diabetic Patients Referring to The Yazd Diabetes Research Center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Hoseini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type II Diabetes is one of the most prevalent endocrine diseases in the world that results from a combination of insulin resistance and ß-cell failure. Regarding importance of nutritional factors in management of diabetes, this study was designed to explore the effect of sesame oil on blood glucose and lipid profile in type II diabetic patients at Yazd Diabetes Research Center in 2007. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was conducted on 25 patients with type II diabetes mellitus (age: 51.5±6.28y; BMI:27.3±3kg/m2; disease duration:7.08±5.03y; Fasting blood glucose level: 181±51.9mg/dl. Subjects received 30 g/day sesame oil for 6 weeks. Sesame oil was supplied to the patients, who were instructed to use it in place of other cooking oils for 42 days. Plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, lipid profiles [Total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and triglycerides (TG] were measured at baseline and after 45 days of sesame oil substitution. 24 hours dietary recalls were obtained at the start , middle and end of study. Data was analyzed using analysis of variance with repeated measures and paired t-test. Results: Following 42 days intake of sesame oil, there were significant decrease in FBS (181±51.93 vs 154±39.65 mg/dl, HbA1c (9.64 ± 2 vs 8.4 ± 1.74 percent, TC (226.68 ± 31.4 vs 199.8 ± 37.87 mg/dl, LDL-c (123.9 ± 34.56 vs 95.53 ± 32.54 mg/dl compared to pre-treatment values. (P <0.05 . Blood TG level decreased after intake of sesame oil but this difference was not significant (P=0.2.Also, the changes of HDL-c levels were not significant (P=0.1. Conclusion: Sesame oil consumption results in considerable decrease in blood sugar, HbA1c and blood lipid levels (TC and LDL-C in type II diabetics.

  6. Cholesterol target value attainment and lipid-lowering therapy in patients with stable or acute coronary heart disease: Results from the Dyslipidemia International Study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitt, Anselm K; Lautsch, Dominik; Ferrières, Jean; De Ferrari, Gaetano M; Vyas, Ami; Baxter, Carl A; Bash, Lori D; Ashton, Veronica; Horack, Martin; Almahmeed, Wael; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Poh, Kian Keong; Brudi, Philippe; Ambegaonkar, Baishali

    2017-11-01

    Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease. In the Dyslipidemia International Study II (DYSIS II), we determined LDL-C target value attainment, use of lipid-lowering therapy (LLT), and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) and those suffering from an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). DYSIS II included patients from 18 countries. Patients with either stable CHD or an ACS were enrolled if they were ≥18 years old and had a full lipid profile available. Data were collected at a physician visit (CHD cohort) or at hospital admission and 120 days later (ACS cohort). A total of 10,661 patients were enrolled, 6794 with stable CHD and 3867 with an ACS. Mean LDL-C levels were low at 88 mg/dl and 108 mg/dl for the CHD and ACS cohorts respectively, with only 29.4% and 18.9% displaying a level below 70 mg/dl. LLT was utilized by 93.8% of the CHD cohort, with a mean daily statin dosage of 25 ± 18 mg. The proportion of the ACS cohort treated with LLT rose from 65.2% at admission to 95.6% at follow-up. LLT-treated patients, who were female, obese, or current smokers, were less likely to achieve an LDL-C level of <70 mg/dl, while those with type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease, or those taking a higher statin dosage were more likely. Few of these very high-risk patients achieved the LDL-C target, indicating huge potential for improving cardiovascular outcome by use of more intensive LLT. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Relationship between insulin resistance and blood lipid and sport in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension%2型糖尿病合并高血压患者胰岛素低抗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭丽艳; 杨红玉; 柴国禄; 沈凌元

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between insulin resistance and blood pressure and blood lipid in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension.Methods The serum concentration of fasting glucose,insulin,lipids and the level of blood pressure were measured in 56 patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension.Results The insulin sensitivity index(ISI) decreased in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension compared with the patients with type II diabetes mellitus with normal blood pressure(P< 0.05).A negative correlation with hypertension was found between ISI and SBP,DBP,TG,ApoB in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension(P<0.05).There was a positive correlation between ISI and HDL in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension(P<0.05).Conclusion Insulin resistance presents in patients of type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension.Insulin resistance is the major cause of hypertension and lipid metabolic disturbance in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension.

  8. Seasonal variability of oxidative stress markers in city bus drivers. Part II. Oxidative damage to lipids and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossner, Pavel; Svecova, Vlasta; Milcova, Alena; Lnenickova, Zdena; Solansky, Ivo; Sram, Radim J

    2008-07-03

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the seasonal variability of markers of oxidative damage to lipids (15-F2t-isoprostane, 15-F2t-IsoP) and proteins (protein carbonyl levels) in 50 bus drivers and 50 controls from Prague, Czech Republic, and to identify factors affecting oxidative stress markers. The samples were collected in three seasons with different levels of air pollution. The exposure to environmental pollutants (carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, c-PAHs, particulate matter, PM2.5 and PM10, and volatile organic compounds, VOC) was monitored by personal and/or stationary monitors. For the analysis of both markers, ELISA techniques were used. The median levels of individual markers in bus drivers versus controls were as follows: 15-F2t-IsoP (nmol/mmol creatinine): winter 2005, 0.81 versus 0.68 (pbus drivers in winter seasons, but not in summer. Lipid peroxidation was positively correlated with c-PAHs and PM exposure; protein oxidation correlated negatively and was highest in summer suggesting another factor(s) affecting protein carbonyl levels.

  9. Effects of Low-Molecular-Weight Fucoidan and High Stability Fucoxanthin on Glucose Homeostasis, Lipid Metabolism, and Liver Function in a Mouse Model of Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ting Victor Lin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of low-molecular-weight fucoidan (LMF and fucoxanthin (Fx in terms of antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and hepatoprotective activities were investigated in a mouse model of type II diabetes. The intake of LMF, Fx, and LMF + Fx lowered the blood sugar and fasting blood sugar levels, and increased serum adiponectin levels. The significant decrease in urinary sugar was only observed in LMF + Fx supplementation. LMF and Fx had ameliorating effects on the hepatic tissue of db/db mice by increasing hepatic glycogen and antioxidative enzymes, and LMF was more effective than Fx at improving hepatic glucose metabolism. As for glucose and lipid metabolism in the adipose tissue, the expression of insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1, glucose transporter (GLUT, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, and uncoupling protein (UCP-1 mRNAs in the adipose tissue of diabetic mice was significantly upregulated by Fx and LMF + Fx, and levels of inflammatory adipocytokines, such as adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-6 (IL-6, were significantly modulated only by LMF + Fx supplementation. The efficacy of LMF + Fx supplementation on the decrease in urinary sugar and on glucose and lipid metabolism in the white adipose tissue of db/db mice was better than that of Fx or LMF alone, indicating the occurrence of a synergistic effect of LMF and Fx.

  10. Peptide-selective inrichment of MHC II-peptide complexes in tetraspan microdomains distinct from lipid rafts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kropshofer, H.; Spindeldreher, S.; Rohn, T. A.; Platania, N.; Grygar, C.; Wolpl, A.; Langen, H.; Hořejší, Václav; Vogt, A. B.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2002), s. 61-68 ISSN 1529-2908 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A026 Keywords : Microdomain * tetraspan proteins * MHC class II Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 27.868, year: 2002

  11. Effect of 17β-estradiol on plasma lipids and LDL oxidation in postmenopausal women with type II diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussaard, H.E.; Leuven, J.A.G.; Kluft, C.; Krans, H.M.J.; Duyvenvoorde, W. van; Buytenhek, R.; Laarse, A. van der; Princen, H.M.G.

    1997-01-01

    In type II diabetes mellitus the altered hormonal state after menopause may represent an additional cardiovascular risk factor. Estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) is associated with a decreased cardiovascular risk, at least in nondiabetic post-menopausal women. We studied the effect of ERT on plasma

  12. Cyanobacterial photosystem II at 2.9-A resolution and the role of quinones, lipids, channels and chloride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guskov, Albert; Kern, Jan; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Broser, Matthias; Zouni, Athina; Saenger, Wolfram

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a large homodimeric protein-cofactor complex located in the photosynthetic thylakoid membrane that acts as light-driven water:plastoquinone oxidoreductase. The crystal structure of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus at 2.9-A resolution allowed the unambiguous assignment

  13. Interaction of Newly Platinum(II) with Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine Complex with DNA and Model Lipid Membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pruchnik, H.; Kral, Teresa; Hof, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 250, č. 5 (2017), s. 461-470 ISSN 0022-2631 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : dna * DPPC bilayer * dsc * IR spectroscopy * Platinum(II) complex * tcspc-fcs Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 1.696, year: 2016

  14. Study of biodistribution of lipidic nanospheres charged with cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (II) and labelled with radioactive nuclei of Indium-111; Estudio de biodistribucion de nanoesferas lipidicas cargadas con cis-diaminodicloroplatino (II) y marcadas con nucleos radioactivos de Indio-111

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez R, V.; Juarez O, C.; Medina L, A. [Unidad de Investigacion Biomedica en Cancer INCAN-UNAM, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Perez C, E.; Garcia L, P. [Instituto nacional de cancerologia, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The general objective of the study was to evaluate the lipidic nanospheres biodistribution charged with cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (II) (cis-DDP) and labelled with radioactive nuclei of Indium-111 (Lip-Cis-in-111) in Wistar rats and in a tumoral model of CaCu. The conclusions were: 1. The system Lip-Cis-in-111 it presents a very fast elimination probably, to a fast recognition response of the reticuloendothelial system (RES). 2. It is planned to make modifications to the formulation to increase the quantity of the hydrophilic polymer (PEG), so that its time of residence in the blood is bigger and allow a bigger accumulation in the tumor. (Author)

  15. Solid Lipid Particles for Oral Delivery of Peptide and Protein Drugs II - The Digestion of Trilaurin Protects Desmopressin from Proteolytic Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten; Zhang, Long; Müllertz, Anette

    2014-01-01

    , which is the same rank order as the lipid degradation rate. A reverse rank order was found for the protection of desmopressin from enzymatic degradation due to spatial separation of desmopressin from the protease. TG12 accelerated the release of desmopressin from all lipid particles when added as either...... and protease was determined. Trilaurin (TG12), trimyristin (TG14), tripalmitin (TG16), and tristearin (TG18) were used as lipid excipients to produce solid lipid microparticles. RESULTS: In the presence of lipase, the rate of drug release from different lipid particles was in the order of TG14 > TG16 > TG18...... drug-free microparticles to the lipolysis medium or incorporated in TG16 particles. Additionally, TG12 particles protected desmopressin from degradation when present in the lipolysis medium with the other lipid microparticles. CONCLUSIONS: TG12 is a very interesting lipid for oral lipid formulations...

  16. Sorafenib suppresses TGF-β responses by inducing caveolae/lipid raft-mediated internalization/degradation of cell-surface type II TGF-β receptors: Implications in development of effective adjunctive therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chih-Ling; Wang, Shih-Wei; Sun, Wei-Chih; Shu, Chih-Wen; Kao, Yu-Chen; Shiao, Meng-Shin; Chen, Chun-Lin

    2018-04-18

    Sorafenib is the only FDA approved drug for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and other malignancies. Studies indicate that TGF-β signalling is associated with tumour progression in HCC. Autocrine and paracrine TGF-β promotes tumour growth and malignancy by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Sorafenib is believed to antagonize tumour progression by inhibiting TGF-β-induced EMT. It improves survival of patients but HCC later develops resistance and relapses. The underlying mechanism of resistance is unknown. Understanding of the molecular mechanism of sorafenib inhibition of TGF-β-induced signalling or responses in HCC may lead to development of adjunctive effective therapy for HCC. In this study, we demonstrate that sorafenib suppresses TGF-β responsiveness in hepatoma cells, hepatocytes, and animal liver, mainly by downregulating cell-surface type II TGF-β receptors (TβRII) localized in caveolae/lipid rafts and non-lipid raft microdomains via caveolae/lipid rafts-mediated internalization and degradation. Furthermore, sorafenib-induced downregulation and degradation of cell-surface TβRII is prevented by simultaneous treatment with a caveolae disruptor or lysosomal inhibitors. On the other hand, sorafenib only downregulates cell-surface TβRII localized in caveolae/lipid rafts but not localized in non-lipid raft microdomains in hepatic stellate cells. These results suggest that sorafenib inhibits TGF-β signalling mainly by inducing caveolae/lipid raft-mediated internalization and degradation of cell-surface TβR-II in target cells. They may also imply that treatment with agents which promote formation of caveolae/lipid rafts, TGF-β receptor kinase inhibitors (e.g., LY2157299) or TGF-β peptide antagonists (by liver-targeting delivery) may be considered as effective adjunct therapy with sorafenib for HCC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differences between easy- and difficult-to-mill chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes. Part II: protein, lipid and mineral composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jennifer A; Knights, Edmund J; Campbell, Grant M; Choct, Mingan

    2014-05-01

    Part I introduced the concept of easy- and difficult-to-mill chickpea genotypes, the broad chemical composition of their seed fractions and proposed mechanistic explanations for physical differences consistent with observed variation in milling ease. Part II continues this research by delving deeper into the amino acid, fatty acid and mineral components. No association between fatty acid composition and ease of milling was observed. However, particular amino acids and mineral elements were identified that further support roles of lectins, pectins and mineral-facilitated binding in the adhesion of chickpea seed coat and cotyledons. These differences suggest underlying mechanisms that could be exploited by breeding programmes to improve milling performance. This study shows that the content and composition of amino acids, fatty acids and minerals within different chickpea tissues vary with seed type (desi and kabuli) and within desi genotypes in ways that are consistent with physical explanations of how seed structure and properties relate to milling behaviour. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Disease mutations reveal residues critical to the interaction of P4-ATPases with lipid substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gantzel, Rasmus H; Mogensen, Louise S; Mikkelsen, Stine A

    2017-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases (P4-ATPases) translocate specific phospholipids from the exoplasmic to the cytoplasmic leaflet of membranes. While there is good evidence that the overall molecular structure of flippases is similar to that of P-type ATPase ion-pumps, the transport pathway for the "giant...

  19. Studies on lipids and fatty acids in rats with streptozotocin-induced insulin deficiency II. Incorporation of 1-(14)C-sodium acetate into lipids and fatty acids of liver slices and whole blood cells

    OpenAIRE

    三宅,寛治

    1988-01-01

    In order to study the lipid and fatty acid metabolism in the insulin deficient state, the in vitro incorporation of 1-(14)C-sodium acetate into major lipid fractions and fatty acids of liver slices and whole blood cells was determined. Rats were studied one week, one month and three months after insulin deficiency was induced by administration of streptozotocin.The net incorporation of (14)C into lipid fractions and total fatty acids of liver slices significantly decreased after one week. On ...

  20. Association of Neuropeptide-Y (NPY) and Interleukin-1beta (IL1B), Genotype-Phenotype Correlation and Plasma Lipids with Type-II Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Roma; Dwivedi, Mitesh; Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Ansarullah; Laddha, Naresh C; Thakker, Ami; Ramachandran, A V; Begum, Rasheedunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is known to play a role in the regulation of satiety, energy balance, body weight, and insulin release. Interleukin-1beta (IL1B) has been associated with loss of beta-cell mass in type-II diabetes (TIID). The present study attempts to investigate the association of NPY exon2 +1128 T/C (Leu7Pro; rs16139), NPY promoter -399 T/C (rs16147) and IL1B -511 C/T (rs16944) polymorphisms with TIID and their correlation with plasma lipid levels, BMI, and IL1B transcript levels. PCR-RFLP was used for genotyping these polymorphisms in a case-control study involving 558 TIID patients and 1085 healthy age-matched controls from Gujarat. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analysis of the NPY polymorphic sites were performed to assess their association with TIID. IL1B transcript levels in PBMCs were also assessed in 108 controls and 101 patients using real-time PCR. Our results show significant association of both structural and promoter polymorphisms of NPY (p<0.0001 and p<0.0001 respectively) in patients with TIID. However, the IL1B C/T polymorphism did not show any association (p = 0.3797) with TIID patients. Haplotype analysis revealed more frequent association of CC and CT haplotypes (p = 3.34 x 10-5, p = 6.04 x 10-9) in diabetics compared to controls and increased the risk of diabetes by 3.02 and 2.088 respectively. Transcript levels of IL1B were significantly higher (p<0.0001) in patients as compared to controls. Genotype-phenotype correlation of IL1B polymorphism did not show any association with its higher transcript levels. In addition, NPY +1128 T/C polymorphism was found to be associated with increased plasma LDL levels (p = 0.01). The present study provides an evidence for a strong correlation between structural and promoter polymorphisms of NPY gene and upregulation of IL1B transcript levels with susceptibility to TIID and altering the lipid metabolism in Gujarat population.

  1. Characterization of P4 ATPase Phospholipid Translocases (Flippases) in Human and Rat Pancreatic Beta Cells: THEIR GENE SILENCING INHIBITS INSULIN SECRETION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansari, Israr-Ul H.; Longacre, Melissa J.; Paulusma, Coen C.; Stoker, Scott W.; Kendrick, Mindy A.; MacDonald, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The negative charge of phosphatidylserine in lipid bilayers of secretory vesicles and plasma membranes couples the domains of positively charged amino acids of secretory vesicle SNARE proteins with similar domains of plasma membrane SNARE proteins enhancing fusion of the two membranes to promote

  2. Perioperative lipid-enriched enteral nutrition versus standard care in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery (SANICS II): a multicentre, double-blind, randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Emmeline G.; Smeets, Boudewijn J. J.; Nors, Jesper; Back, Christian M.; Funder, Jonas A.; Sommer, Thorbjørn; Laurberg, Søren; Løve, Uffe S.; Leclercq, Wouter K. G.; Slooter, Gerrit D.; de Vries Reilingh, Tammo S.; Wegdam, Johannes A.; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A. P.; Hiligsmann, Mickaël; Buise, Marc P.; Buurman, Willem A.; de Jonge, Wouter J.; Rutten, Harm J. T.; Luyer, Misha D. P.

    2018-01-01

    Postoperative ileus and anastomotic leakage severely impair recovery after colorectal resection. We investigated the effect of perioperative lipid-enriched enteral nutrition versus standard care on the risk of postoperative ileus, anastomotic leakage, and other clinical outcomes. We did an

  3. Lipid somersaults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane lipids diffuse rapidly in the plane of the membrane but their ability to flip spontaneously across a membrane bilayer is hampered by a significant energy barrier. Thus spontaneous flip-flop of polar lipids across membranes is very slow, even though it must occur rapidly to support diverse...... aspects of cellular life. Here we discuss the mechanisms by which rapid flip-flop occurs, and what role lipid flipping plays in membrane homeostasis and cell growth. We focus on conceptual aspects, highlighting mechanistic insights from biochemical and in silico experiments, and the recent, ground......-breaking identification of a number of lipid scramblases....

  4. I. Lipid metabolism stimulated by altered intracellular calcium in cultured fibroblasts. II. Regulation of the activity of rat adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Wang, Huei-Hsiang Lisa.

    1988-01-01

    The cell killing process of 3T3 Swiss mouse fibroblasts stimulated by Ca 2+ plus A23187, a Ca 2+ ionophore has been studied. The aim of this research is to understand the biochemical mechanism of this process, i.e, to elucidate the step involved and to characterize the enzymes involved with each steps in the lipid metabolism stimulated in cultured fibroblasts undergoing a toxic death response. Parallel 3T3 cultures biosynthetically labeled with lipid precursors were examined under Ca 2+ -mediated killing conditions. Labeled lipids were extracted and analyzed by thin-layer chromatography and autoradiography. Evidence for activation of a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C has been obtained in injured 3T3 cells labeled with [ 3 H]glycerol and [ 3 H]inositol. To simplify the system for studying the lipoprotein lipase reaction, our laboratory prepared the chromophore containing a substrate: 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3-β-2-furylacryloyltriacylglycerol (DPFATG). By using this artificial lipid we could readily investigate the lipoprotein lipase reactions, since the absorbance change directly represents the hydrolysis of the chromophoric side chain of the substrate

  5. The relationship between vegetables and fruits intake and glycosylated hemoglobin values, lipids profiles and nitrogen status in type II inactive diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Tabesh

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions : Intake of vegetables and fruits may reduce the glycosylated hemoglobin, therefore choosing the appropriate diet with high fruits and vegetables may help to develop antioxidant defense and reduce the HbA1C in diabetic patients but it did not have any impact on lipids profiles, BUN/creatinine and urine protein 24 h.

  6. A new intranasal influenza vaccine based on a novel polycationic lipid-ceramide carbamoyl-spermine (CCS). II. Studies in mice and ferrets and mechanism of adjuvanticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Or, Orli; Joseph, Aviva; Itskovitz-Cooper, Noga; Samira, Sarit; Rochlin, Eli; Eliyahu, Hagit; Goldwaser, Itzik; Balasingam, Shobana; Mann, Alex J; Lambkin-Williams, Rob; Kedar, Eli; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2011-03-16

    We recently showed that lipid assemblies comprised of a novel polycationic sphingolipid (ceramide carbamoyl-spermine, CCS) are an effective adjuvant/carrier when complexed with cholesterol (CCS/C) for influenza and other vaccines administered parenterally and intranasally (i.n.) in mice. Here we expand these studies to ferrets, an established model of influenza infection. We also address the question of why the CCS/C-based liposomal vaccine (also known as VaxiSome™) in mice is superior to vaccines based on liposomes of other lipid compositions (neutral, anionic or cationic). Ferrets immunized i.n. with CCS/C-influenza vaccine produced significantly higher hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers compared to ferrets immunized intramuscularly with the unadjuvanted influenza vaccine, indicating that the CCS/C-based vaccine is very immunogenic. Furthermore, the i.n. adjuvanted vaccine was shown to significantly reduce the severity of influenza virus infection in ferrets following homologous viral challenge as determined by weight loss, temperature rise and viral titer. No adverse reactions were observed. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies following i.n. administration in mice of CCS/C-based vaccine showed that both the lipids and antigens are retained in the nose and lung for at least 24h, and it appears that this retention correlates with the superior immunogenicity elicited by the adjuvanted vaccine formulation. The CCS lipid also increases production of cytokines (mainly IFN gamma, IL-2 and IL-12) and co-stimulatory molecules' expression, which might further explain the robust adjuvantation of this liposome-based vaccine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The main thylakoid membrane lipid monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) promotes the de-epoxidation of violaxanthin associated with the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHCII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Susann; Latowski, Dariusz; Jemioła-Rzemińska, Małgorzata; Wilhelm, Christian; Strzałka, Kazimierz; Goss, Reimund

    2010-03-01

    In higher plants, the major part of the xanthophyll cycle pigment violaxanthin (Vx) is non-covalently bound to the main light-harvesting complex of PSII (LHCII). Under saturating light conditions Vx has to be released from its binding site into the surrounding lipid phase, where it is converted to zeaxanthin (Zx) by the enzyme Vx de-epoxidase (VDE). In the present study we investigated the influence of thylakoid lipids on the de-epoxidation of Vx, which was still associated with the LHCII. We isolated LHCII with different concentrations of native, endogenous lipids and Vx by sucrose gradient centrifugation or successive cation precipitation. Analysis of the different LHCII preparations showed that the concentration of LHCII-associated Vx was correlated with the concentration of the main thylakoid lipid monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) associated with the complexes. Decreases in the MGDG content of the LHCII led to a diminished Vx concentration, indicating that a part of the total Vx pool was located in an MGDG phase surrounding the LHCII, whereas another part was bound to the LHCII apoproteins. We further studied the convertibility of LHCII-associated Vx in in-vitro enzyme assays by addition of isolated VDE. We observed an efficient and almost complete Vx conversion in the LHCII fractions containing high amounts of endogenous MGDG. LHCII preparations with low concentrations of MGDG exhibited a strongly reduced Vx de-epoxidation, which could be increased by addition of exogenous, pure MGDG. The de-epoxidation of LHCII-associated Vx was saturated at a much lower concentration of native, endogenous MGDG compared with the concentration of isolated, exogenous MGDG, which is needed for optimal VDE activity in in-vitro assays employing pure isolated Vx. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Lipid Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gijsje Koenderink

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary field that covers a vast and diverse array of devices and machines derived from engineering, physics, materials science, chemistry and biology. These devices have found applications in biomedical sciences, such as targeted drug delivery, bio-imaging, sensing and diagnosis of pathologies at early stages. In these applications, nano-devices typically interface with the plasma membrane of cells. On the other hand, naturally occurring nanostructures in biology have been a source of inspiration for new nanotechnological designs and hybrid nanostructures made of biological and non-biological, organic and inorganic building blocks. Lipids, with their amphiphilicity, diversity of head and tail chemistry, and antifouling properties that block nonspecific binding to lipid-coated surfaces, provide a powerful toolbox for nanotechnology. This review discusses the progress in the emerging field of lipid nanotechnology.

  9. Analysis of lipid profile in lipid storage myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguennouz, M'hammed; Beccaria, Marco; Purcaro, Giorgia; Oteri, Marianna; Micalizzi, Giuseppe; Musumesci, Olimpia; Ciranni, Annmaria; Di Giorgio, Rosa Maria; Toscano, Antonio; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    Lipid dysmetabolism disease is a condition in which lipids are stored abnormally in organs and tissues throughout the body, causing muscle weakness (myopathy). Usually, the diagnosis of this disease and its characterization goes through dosage of Acyl CoA in plasma accompanied with evidence of droplets of intra-fibrils lipids in the patient muscle biopsy. However, to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of lipid storage diseases, it is useful to identify the nature of lipids deposited in muscle fiber. In this work fatty acids and triglycerides profile of lipid accumulated in the muscle of people suffering from myopathies syndromes was characterized. In particular, the analyses were carried out on the muscle biopsy of people afflicted by lipid storage myopathy, such as multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency, and neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy, and by the intramitochondrial lipid storage dysfunctions, such as deficiencies of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II enzyme. A single step extraction and derivatization procedure was applied to analyze fatty acids from muscle tissues by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector and with an electronic impact mass spectrometer. Triglycerides, extracted by using n-hexane, were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometer equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface. The most representative fatty acids in all samples were: C16:0 in the 13-24% range, C18:1n9 in the 20-52% range, and C18:2n6 in the 10-25% range. These fatty acids were part of the most representative triglycerides in all samples. The data obtained was statistically elaborated performing a principal component analysis. A satisfactory discrimination was obtained among the different diseases. Using component 1 vs component 3 a 43.3% of total variance was explained. Such results suggest the important role that lipid profile characterization can have in supporting a correct

  10. The impact of auxins used in assisted phytoextraction of metals from the contaminated environment on the alterations caused by lead(II) ions in the organization of model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Sroka, Aleksandra; Jabłońska, Klaudia

    2016-07-01

    Auxins are successfully used to improve phytoextraction efficiency of metal ions from the contaminated environment, however, the mechanism of their activity in this field is not explained. Auxins are known to exert various biochemical alterations in the plant membranes and cells, but their activity involves also direct interactions with lipids leading to changes in membrane organization. Following the suggestion that the auxins-induced modifications in membrane properties alleviate toxic effect of metal ions in this paper we have undertaken the comparative studies on the effect of metal ions and metal ions/auxins mixtures on model membrane systems. The experiments were done on lipid monolayers differing in their composition spread on water subphase and on Pb(2+), Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and Pb(2+)/IAA and Pb(2+)/NAA water solutions. The analysis of the collected data suggests that metal ions and auxins can change fluidity of the lipid systems and weaken the interactions between monolayer components. This manifested in the increase of the mean area per molecule and the excess area per molecule values for the films on Pb(2+), auxins as well as Pb(2+)/auxin solutions as compared to the values on pure water subphase. However, the presence of auxin in the mixture with lead(II) ions makes the alterations induced by sole metal ions weaker. This effect was more pronounced for the membranes of a higher packing. Thus it was proposed that auxins may enhance phytoextraction of metal ions by weakening their destabilizing effect on membrane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A mathematical model for the study of lipid accumulation in oleaginous microorganisms. II. Study of cellular lipids of Mucor circinelloides during growth on a vegetable oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggelis, G.

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial oil production from fatty materials of animal or plant origin has been an object of research and industrial interest for many years. During the process of microbial growth/accumulation of fat reserves, the dominating phenomena that define the composition of endocellular fat are, first, the specific process of incorporation of substrate fatty acids into the microbial cell and, second, the endocellular changes of fatty acids defined by the enzymic capabilities of the microorganism. The fatty acids will either be degraded for growth needs or act as substrate of endocellular biotransformation processes, leading to concentration changes and production of "new" fatty acids which did not previously exist in the substrate.
    The purpose of the present work is to study the endocellular lipids of Mucor circinelloidesCBS 172-27 grown on sunflower oil. The mathematical model, described in part I, was applied in order to investigate the following:
    a. Microorganism specificity in the incorporation of substrate fatty acids.
    b. Microorganism specificity in the degradation of fatty acids present in the reserve fat.
    c. Possibilities of endocellular biotransformations during the microbial growth.
    In conclusion, this work is aimed at developing a quantitative expression of parameters defining the lipid composition of fat reserves. The proposed mathematical model can be used not only for selection of microbial strains having specific enzymic potential but also for substrate selection.

    La producción de aceites microbianos a partir de materiales grasos de origen animal o vegetal ha sido objeto de investigación e interés industrial durante muchos años. En el proceso de crecimiento microbiano/acumulación de reservas grasas, los fenómenos dominantes que definen la composición de grasa endocelular son, primero, el proceso específico de incorporación de ácidos grasos como sustratos en la célula microbiana

  12. Effect of gamma-radiation treatment on the lipids of meat products during storage.II Fatty acid composition in durable raw-dried products of chopped meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, G.; Bakalivanova, T.; Tsvetkova, E.; Grigorova, S.; Marinova, T.

    2004-01-01

    Studied is the effect of gamma rays treatment with 4 kGy on the total fatty acid composition (FAC) of Karlovska Lukanka and Shumenski Sudzhuk for 30 days and nights from the moment of treatment with gamma-rays. The saturated fatty acids in the Lukanka/flat sausage/ are 42,5-44,7% of the total lipids, and in the Sudzhuk/sausage/ the level of the saturated fatty acids is 45,7-49,7%. The mono-unsaturated fatty acids in the two products are between 44 and 47%. The share of poly-unsaturated fatty acids in the Lukanka is over 10% of the total lipids, and in the Sudzhuk - 7%. It was established that the treatment of Karlovo Lukanka and Shumen Sudzhuk with 4 kGy gamma-rays: does not affect the total fatty acid composition of the tested samples; does not change the balance in the fatty acid composition and the nutritional value of the tested samples; does not change the quantity of the essential fatty acids; quarantees the safety of the treated products

  13. Lipid Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A routine cardiac risk assessment typically includes a fasting lipid panel. Beyond that, research continues into the usefulness of other non-traditional markers of cardiac risk, such as Lp-PLA 2 . A health practitioner may choose to evaluate one or more ...

  14. LipidPedia: a comprehensive lipid knowledgebase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tien-Chueh; Tseng, Yufeng Jane

    2018-04-10

    Lipids are divided into fatty acyls, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, saccharolipids, sterols, prenol lipids and polyketides. Fatty acyls and glycerolipids are commonly used as energy storage, whereas glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, sterols and saccharolipids are common used as components of cell membranes. Lipids in fatty acyls, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols classes play important roles in signaling. Although more than 36 million lipids can be identified or computationally generated, no single lipid database provides comprehensive information on lipids. Furthermore, the complex systematic or common names of lipids make the discovery of related information challenging. Here, we present LipidPedia, a comprehensive lipid knowledgebase. The content of this database is derived from integrating annotation data with full-text mining of 3,923 lipids and more than 400,000 annotations of associated diseases, pathways, functions, and locations that are essential for interpreting lipid functions and mechanisms from over 1,400,000 scientific publications. Each lipid in LipidPedia also has its own entry containing a text summary curated from the most frequently cited diseases, pathways, genes, locations, functions, lipids and experimental models in the biomedical literature. LipidPedia aims to provide an overall synopsis of lipids to summarize lipid annotations and provide a detailed listing of references for understanding complex lipid functions and mechanisms. LipidPedia is available at http://lipidpedia.cmdm.tw. yjtseng@csie.ntu.edu.tw. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. Normal and abnormal lipid and lipoprotein metabolism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-03-20

    Mar 20, 2009 ... This article focuses on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and introduces a range of genetic ... spherical structures that are suspended in the plasma and whose ..... atherosclerosis. Table II suggests a simple classification of.

  16. Low density lipoprotein receptor gene Ava II polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Dong-Feng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several common genetic polymorphisms in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R gene have associated with modifications of serum total cholesterol (TC and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C levels, but the results are not consistent in different populations. Bai Ku Yao is a special subgroup of the Yao minority in China. The present study was undertaken to detect the association of LDL-R gene Ava Ⅱ polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. Methods A total of 1024 subjects of Bai Ku Yao and 792 participants of Han Chinese were randomly selected from our previous stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotyping of the LDL-R gene Ava Ⅱ polymorphism was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The levels of serum TC, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, LDL-C, apolipoprotein (Apo A1 and the ratio of ApoA1 to ApoB were lower in Bai Ku Yao than in Han (P - and A+ alleles was 65.5% and 34.5% in Bai Ku Yao, and 80.7% and 19.3% in Han (P -A-, A-A+ and A+A+ genotypes was 42.6%, 45.9% and 11.5% in Bai Ku Yao, and 64.9%, 31.6% and 3.5% in Han (P P 3.20 mmol/L subgroups in Bai Ku Yao (P P P P +A+ genotype had higher serum LDL-C, TC, HDL-C or ApoA1 levels than the subjects with A-A+ and A-A- genotypes. Spearman rank correlation analysis revealed that the levels of LDL-C in Bai Ku Yao and HDL-C in Han were correlated with genotypes (P P Conclusions The association of LDL-R gene Ava Ⅱ polymorphism and serum lipid levels is different between the Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. The discrepancy might partly result from different LDL-R gene Ava Ⅱ polymorphism or LDL-R gene-enviromental interactions.

  17. Genetic architecture of circulating lipid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirkan, Ayşe; Amin, Najaf; Isaacs, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Serum concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TGs) and total cholesterol (TC) are important heritable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of circulating lipid...... the ENGAGE Consortium GWAS on serum lipids, were applied to predict lipid levels in an independent population-based study, the Rotterdam Study-II (RS-II). We additionally tested for evidence of a shared genetic basis for different lipid phenotypes. Finally, the polygenic score approach was used to identify...... an alternative genome-wide significance threshold before pathway analysis and those results were compared with those based on the classical genome-wide significance threshold. Our study provides evidence suggesting that many loci influencing circulating lipid levels remain undiscovered. Cross-prediction models...

  18. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction. PMID:23016123

  19. Steroidal compounds in commercial parenteral lipid emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P; Siddiqui, Rafat A

    2012-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn(®) II, Liposyn(®) III, Lipofundin(®) MCT, Lipofundin(®) N, Structolipid(®), Intralipid(®), Ivelip(®) and ClinOleic(®). Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction.

  20. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat A. Siddiqui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction.

  1. Spontaneous charged lipid transfer between lipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richens, Joanna L; Tyler, Arwen I I; Barriga, Hanna M G; Bramble, Jonathan P; Law, Robert V; Brooks, Nicholas J; Seddon, John M; Ces, Oscar; O'Shea, Paul

    2017-10-03

    An assay to study the spontaneous charged lipid transfer between lipid vesicles is described. A donor/acceptor vesicle system is employed, where neutrally charged acceptor vesicles are fluorescently labelled with the electrostatic membrane probe Fluoresceinphosphatidylethanolamine (FPE). Upon addition of charged donor vesicles, transfer of negatively charged lipid occurs, resulting in a fluorescently detectable change in the membrane potential of the acceptor vesicles. Using this approach we have studied the transfer properties of a range of lipids, varying both the headgroup and the chain length. At the low vesicle concentrations chosen, the transfer follows a first-order process where lipid monomers are transferred presumably through the aqueous solution phase from donor to acceptor vesicle. The rate of transfer decreases with increasing chain length which is consistent with energy models previously reported for lipid monomer vesicle interactions. Our assay improves on existing methods allowing the study of a range of unmodified lipids, continuous monitoring of transfer and simplified experimental procedures.

  2. Importance of the hexagonal lipid phase in biological membrane organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette eJouhet

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Domains are present in every natural membrane. They are characterised by a distinctive protein and/or lipid composition. Their size is highly variable from the nano- to the micrometer scale. The domains confer specific properties to the membrane leading to original structure and function. The determinants leading to domain organisation are therefore important but remain obscure. This review presents how the ability of lipids to organize into hexagonal II or lamellar phases can promote particular local structures within membranes. Since biological membranes are composed of a mixture of lipids, each with distinctive biophysical properties, lateral and transversal sorting of lipids can promote creation of domains inside the membrane through local modulation of the lipid phase. Lipid biophysical properties have been characterized for long based on in vitro analyses using non-natural lipid molecules; their re-examinations using natural lipids might open interesting perspectives on membrane architecture occurring in vivo in various cellular and physiological contexts.

  3. Importance of the hexagonal lipid phase in biological membrane organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhet, Juliette

    2013-01-01

    Domains are present in every natural membrane. They are characterized by a distinctive protein and/or lipid composition. Their size is highly variable from the nano- to the micrometer scale. The domains confer specific properties to the membrane leading to original structure and function. The determinants leading to domain organization are therefore important but remain obscure. This review presents how the ability of lipids to organize into hexagonal II or lamellar phases can promote particular local structures within membranes. Since biological membranes are composed of a mixture of lipids, each with distinctive biophysical properties, lateral and transversal sorting of lipids can promote creation of domains inside the membrane through local modulation of the lipid phase. Lipid biophysical properties have been characterized for long based on in vitro analyses using non-natural lipid molecules; their re-examinations using natural lipids might open interesting perspectives on membrane architecture occurring in vivo in various cellular and physiological contexts.

  4. Bile acids and lipids in isolated rat hepatocytes. II. Source of cholesterol used for bile acid formation, estimated by incorporation of tritium from tritiated water, and by the effect of ML-236B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, H.J.; Vos Van Holstein, M.; Lange, J.de

    1983-01-01

    Chemicals/CAS: cholesterol, 57-88-5; cholic acid, 32500-01-9, 361-09-1, 81-25-4; colestyramine, 11041-12-6, 58391-37-0; compactin, 73573-88-3; lipid, 66455-18-3; tritium oxide, 14940-65-9; Bile Acids and Salts; Cholesterol, 57-88-5; Cholestyramine, 11041-12-6; compactin, 73573-88-3; Lipids;

  5. Lipid exchange by ultracentrifugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drachmann, Nikolaj Düring; Olesen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    , and the complex interplay between the lipids and the P-type ATPases are still not well understood. We here describe a robust method to exchange the majority of the lipids surrounding the ATPase after solubilisation and/or purification with a target lipid of interest. The method is based on an ultracentrifugation...... step, where the protein sample is spun through a dense buffer containing large excess of the target lipid, which results in an approximately 80-85 % lipid exchange. The method is a very gently technique that maintains protein folding during the process, hence allowing further characterization...

  6. Lipid Structure in Triolein Lipid Droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    of a mass of hydrophobic lipid esters coved by phospholipid monolayer. The small size and unique architecture of LDs makes it complicated to study LD structure by modern experimental methods. We discuss coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of LD formation in systems containing 1-palmitoyl-2...... to coarse-grained simulations, the presence of PE lipids at the interface has a little impact on distribution of components and on the overall LD structure. (4) The thickness of the lipid monolayer at the surface of the droplet is similar to the thickness of one leaflet of a bilayer. Computer simulations......Lipid droplets (LDs) are primary repositories of esterified fatty acids and sterols in animal cells. These organelles originate on the lumenal or cytoplasmic side of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and are released to the cytosol. In contrast to other intracellular organelles, LDs are composed...

  7. Hormone signaling linked to silkmoth sex pheromone biosynthesis involves Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of the insect PAT family protein Bombyx mori lipid storage droplet protein-1(BmLsd)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The structurally-related members of the PAT family of proteins, which are so name based on similarity amongst perilipin, adipophilin/adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP), and tail-interacting protein of 47 kilodaltons (TIP47), are cytoplasmic lipid droplet (LD)-associated proteins charac...

  8. Affinity of serum apolipoproteins for lipid monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibdah, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of lipid composition and packing as well as the structure of the protein on the affinities of apolipoproteins for lipid monolayers have been investigated. The adsorption of 14 C-reductively methylated human apolipoproteins A-I and A-II at saturating subphase concentrations to monolayers prepared with synthetic lipids or lipoprotein surface lipids spread at various initial surface pressures has been studied. The adsorption of apolipoproteins is monitored by following the surface radioactivity using a gas flow counter and Wilhelmy plate, respectively. The physical states of the lipid monolayers are evaluated by measurement of the surface pressure-molecular area isotherms using a Langmuir-Adam surface balance. The probable helical regions in various apolipoproteins have been predicted using a secondary structure analysis computer program. The mean residue hydrophobicity and mean residue hydrophobic moment for the predicted helical segments have been calculated. The surface properties of synthetic peptides which are amphipathic helix analogs have been investigated at the air-water and lipid-water interfaces

  9. Polyene-lipids: a new tool to image lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuerschner, Lars; Ejsing, Christer S.; Ekroos, Kim

    2005-01-01

    conjugated double bonds as a new type of lipid tag. Polyene-lipids exhibit a unique structural similarity to natural lipids, which results in minimal effects on the lipid properties. Analyzing membrane phase partitioning, an important biophysical and biological property of lipids, we demonstrated......Microscopy of lipids in living cells is currently hampered by a lack of adequate fluorescent tags. The most frequently used tags, NBD and BODIPY, strongly influence the properties of lipids, yielding analogs with quite different characteristics. Here, we introduce polyene-lipids containing five...... the superiority of polyene-lipids to both NBD- and BODIPY-tagged lipids. Cells readily take up various polyene-lipid precursors and generate the expected end products with no apparent disturbance by the tag. Applying two-photon excitation microscopy, we imaged the distribution of polyene-lipids in living...

  10. The evolution of lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Y. H.; Sugai, A.; Uda, I.; Itoh, T.

    2001-01-01

    Living organisms on the Earth which are divided into three major domains - Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya, probably came from a common ancestral cell. Because there are many thermophilic microorganisms near the root of the universal phylogenetic tree, the common ancestral cell should be considered to be a thermophilic microorganism. The existence of a cell is necessary for the living organisms; the cell membrane is the essential structural component of a cell, so its amphiphilic property is vital for the molecule of lipids for cell membranes. Tetraether type glycerophospholipids with C 40 isoprenoid chains are major membrane lipids widely distributed in archaeal cells. Cyclization number of C 40 isoprenoid chains in thermophilic archaea influences the fluidity of lipids whereas the number of carbons and degree of unsaturation in fatty acids do so in bacteria and eucarya. In addition to the cyclization of the tetraether lipids, covalent bonding of two C 40 isoprenoid chains was found in hyperthermophiles. These characteristic structures of the lipids seem to contribute to their fundamental physiological roles in hyperthermophiles. Stereochemical differences between G-1-P archaeal lipids and G-3-P bacterial and eucaryal lipids might have occured by the function of some proteins long after the first cell was developed by the reactions of small organic molecules. We propose that the structure of lipids of the common ancestral cell may have been similar to those of hyperthermophilic archaea.

  11. Lysosomal lipid storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Heike; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2011-06-01

    Lysosomal lipid storage diseases, or lipidoses, are inherited metabolic disorders in which typically lipids accumulate in cells and tissues. Complex lipids, such as glycosphingolipids, are constitutively degraded within the endolysosomal system by soluble hydrolytic enzymes with the help of lipid binding proteins in a sequential manner. Because of a functionally impaired hydrolase or auxiliary protein, their lipid substrates cannot be degraded, accumulate in the lysosome, and slowly spread to other intracellular membranes. In Niemann-Pick type C disease, cholesterol transport is impaired and unesterified cholesterol accumulates in the late endosome. In most lysosomal lipid storage diseases, the accumulation of one or few lipids leads to the coprecipitation of other hydrophobic substances in the endolysosomal system, such as lipids and proteins, causing a "traffic jam." This can impair lysosomal function, such as delivery of nutrients through the endolysosomal system, leading to a state of cellular starvation. Therapeutic approaches are currently restricted to mild forms of diseases with significant residual catabolic activities and without brain involvement.

  12. Lipid bilayers and interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kik, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    In biological systems lipid bilayers are subject to many different interactions with other entities. These can range from proteins that are attached to the hydrophilic region of the bilayer or transmembrane proteins that interact with the hydrophobic region of the lipid bilayer. Interaction between

  13. P4-ATPases on the spotlight: lessons from a green world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    flippases, play an essential role in this transport process. We have recently characterized several members of the P4 subfamily of P-type ATPases as prime candidate lipid flippases in the secretory pathway of several eukaryotic cells. Our studies in yeast, plants and mammalian cells uncovered...

  14. Cellular function and pathological role of ATP13A2 and related P-type transport ATPases in Parkinson's disease and other neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Veen, Sarah; Sørensen, Danny M.; Holemans, Tine

    2014-01-01

    -type ATPases. We critically review the available data concerning the role of ATP13A2 in heavy metal transport and propose a possible alternative hypothesis that ATP13A2 might be a flippase. As a flippase, ATP13A2 may transport an organic molecule, such as a lipid or a peptide, from one membrane leaflet...

  15. Avanti lipid tools: connecting lipids, technology, and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Kacee H; Tytler, Ewan M; Tipton, John; Hill, Kasey L; Burgess, Stephen W; Shaw, Walter A

    2014-08-01

    Lipid research is challenging owing to the complexity and diversity of the lipidome. Here we review a set of experimental tools developed for the seasoned lipid researcher, as well as, those who are new to the field of lipid research. Novel tools for probing protein-lipid interactions, applications for lipid binding antibodies, enhanced systems for the cellular delivery of lipids, improved visualization of lipid membranes using gold-labeled lipids, and advances in mass spectrometric analysis techniques will be discussed. Because lipid mediators are known to participate in a host of signal transduction and trafficking pathways within the cell, a comprehensive lipid toolbox that aids the science of lipidomics research is essential to better understand the molecular mechanisms of interactions between cellular components. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Tools to study lipid functions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Lipid rafts and B cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Neetu; DeFranco, Anthony L

    2007-10-01

    B cells comprise an essential component of the humoral immune system. They are equipped with the unique ability to synthesize and secrete pathogen-neutralizing antibodies, and share with professional antigen presenting cells the ability to internalize foreign antigens, and process them for presentation to helper T cells. Recent evidence indicates that specialized cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-rich microdomains in the plasma membrane commonly referred to as lipid rafts, serve to compartmentalize key signaling molecules during the different stages of B cell activation including B cell antigen receptor (BCR)-initiated signal transduction, endocytosis of BCR-antigen complexes, loading of antigenic peptides onto MHC class II molecules, MHC-II associated antigen presentation to helper T cells, and receipt of helper signals via the CD40 receptor. Here we review the recent literature arguing for a role of lipid rafts in the spatial organization of B cell function.

  17. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  18. Synthesis of Lipidated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejuch, Tom; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-08-17

    Protein lipidation is one of the major post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins. The attachment of the lipid moiety frequently determines the localization and the function of the lipoproteins. Lipidated proteins participate in many essential biological processes in eukaryotic cells, including vesicular trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the immune response. Malfunction of these cellular processes usually leads to various diseases such as cancer. Understanding the mechanism of cellular signaling and identifying the protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in which the lipoproteins are involved is a crucial task. To achieve these goals, fully functional lipidated proteins are required. However, access to lipoproteins by means of standard expression is often rather limited. Therefore, semisynthetic methods, involving the synthesis of lipidated peptides and their subsequent chemoselective ligation to yield full-length lipoproteins, were developed. In this Review we summarize the commonly used methods for lipoprotein synthesis and the development of the corresponding chemoselective ligation techniques. Several key studies involving full-length semisynthetic lipidated Ras, Rheb, and LC3 proteins are presented.

  19. Mechanism of liver lipid accumulation in X-irradiated rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiyar, A.S.; De, A.K.

    1978-01-01

    The incorporation, both in vivo and in vitro, of 14 C-acetate into hepatic lipids, notably the triglyceride and free fatty acid fractions, is greatly reduced following whole-body irradiation and is indicative of significantly reduced lipogenesis. Irradiation results in a several-fold increase in fatty acid oxidation, by the liver in vitro as well as in the whole animal, during the phase of active hepatic lipid accumulation. Small increases in lipoprotein lipase activity of adipose, immediately following irradiation and up to 24 hours, and the attendant marked fall in adipose lipids are suggestive of increased mobilization of peripheral lipids during the early period. However, in view of the fact that maximum lipid accumulations occurs very much later, inflow of extra-hepatic lipid into liver does not appear to be of major etiological significance. There is three-fold experimental evidence in support of an impairment of trigylceride transport from liver being primarily responsible for the build-up of liver lipids: (I) Triton WR-1339 induced hypertriglyceridemia is totally absent in the irradiated rat during the period when liver lipids increase significantly; (II) the rate of disappearance of radioactivity from pre-labeled hepatic lipids is considerably lower in the irradiated rats; and (III) the irradiated rats show decrease in lipoproteins of liver cell-sap and of serum, the latter being more marked and a lowered synthesis of the lipoproteins, as assessed by labeling of the protein moiety. (orig.) [de

  20. Mechanism of liver lipid accumulation in X-irradiated rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiyar, A S; De, A K [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Biochemistry and Food Technology Div.

    1978-03-01

    The incorporation, both in vivo and in vitro, of /sup 14/C-acetate into hepatic lipids, notably the triglyceride and free fatty acid fractions, is greatly reduced following whole-body irradiation and is indicative of significantly reduced lipogenesis. Irradiation results in a several-fold increase in fatty acid oxidation, by the liver in vitro as well as in the whole animal, during the phase of active hepatic lipid accumulation. Small increases in lipoprotein lipase activity of adipose, immediately following irradiation and up to 24 hours, and the attendant marked fall in adipose lipids are suggestive of increased mobilization of peripheral lipids during the early period. However, in view of the fact that maximum lipid accumulations occurs very much later, inflow of extra-hepatic lipid into liver does not appear to be of major etiological significance. There is three-fold experimental evidence in support of an impairment of trigylceride transport from liver being primarily responsible for the build-up of liver lipids: (I) Triton WR-1339 induced hypertriglyceridemia is totally absent in the irradiated rat during the period when liver lipids increase significantly; (II) the rate of disappearance of radioactivity from pre-labeled hepatic lipids is considerably lower in the irradiated rats; and (III) the irradiated rats show decrease in lipoproteins of liver cell-sap and of serum, the latter being more marked and a lowered synthesis of the lipoproteins, as assessed by labeling of the protein moiety.

  1. Toward the establishment of standardized in vitro tests for lipid-based formulations. 2. The effect of bile salt concentration and drug loading on the performance of type I, II, IIIA, IIIB, and IV formulations during in vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Hywel D; Anby, Mette U; Sassene, Philip; Kleberg, Karen; Bakala-N'Goma, Jean-Claude; Calderone, Marilyn; Jannin, Vincent; Igonin, Annabel; Partheil, Anette; Marchaud, Delphine; Jule, Eduardo; Vertommen, Jan; Maio, Mario; Blundell, Ross; Benameur, Hassan; Carrière, Frédéric; Müllertz, Anette; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2012-11-05

    The LFCS Consortium was established to develop standardized in vitro tests for lipid-based formulations (LBFs) and to examine the utility of these tests to probe the fundamental mechanisms that underlie LBF performance. In this publication, the impact of bile salt (sodium taurodeoxycholate, NaTDC) concentration and drug loading on the ability of a range of representative LBFs to generate and sustain drug solubilization and supersaturation during in vitro digestion testing has been explored and a common driver of the potential for drug precipitation identified. Danazol was used as a model poorly water-soluble drug throughout. In general, increasing NaTDC concentrations increased the digestion of the most lipophilic LBFs and promoted lipid (and drug) trafficking from poorly dispersed oil phases to the aqueous colloidal phase (AP(DIGEST)). High NaTDC concentrations showed some capacity to reduce drug precipitation, although, at NaTDC concentrations ≥3 mM, NaTDC effects on either digestion or drug solubilization were modest. In contrast, increasing drug load had a marked impact on drug solubilization. For LBFs containing long-chain lipids, drug precipitation was limited even at drug loads approaching saturation in the formulation and concentrations of solubilized drug in AP(DIGEST) increased with increased drug load. For LBFs containing medium-chain lipids, however, significant precipitation was evident, especially at higher drug loads. Across all formulations a remarkably consistent trend emerged such that the likelihood of precipitation was almost entirely dependent on the maximum supersaturation ratio (SR(M)) attained on initiation of digestion. SR(M) defines the supersaturation "pressure" in the system and is calculated from the maximum attainable concentration in the AP(DIGEST) (assuming zero precipitation), divided by the solubility of the drug in the colloidal phases formed post digestion. For LBFs where phase separation of oil phases did not occur, a

  2. In vitro synthesis of a lipid-linked trisaccharide involved in synthesis of enterobacterial common antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, K.; Nunes-Edwards, P.; Rick, P.D.

    1989-01-01

    The heteropolysaccharide chains of enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) are made up of linear trisaccharide repeat units with the structure----3)-alpha-D-Fuc4NAc-(1----4)- beta-D-ManNAcA-(1----4)-alpha-D-GlcNAc-(1----, where Fuc4NAc is 4-acetamido-4,6-dideoxy-D-galactose, ManNAcA is N-acetyl-D-mannosaminuronic acid, and GlcNAc is N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. The assembly of these chains involves lipid-linked intermediates, and both GlcNAc-pyrophosphorylundecaprenol (lipid I) and ManNAcA-GlcNAc-pyrophosphorylundecaprenol (lipid II) are intermediates in ECA biosynthesis. In this study we demonstrated that lipid II serves as the acceptor of Fuc4NAc residues in the assembly of the trisaccharide repeat unit of ECA chains. Incubation of Escherichia coli membranes with UDP-GlcNAc, UDP-[14C]ManNAcA, and TDP-[3H]Fuc4NAc resulted in the synthesis of a radioactive glycolipid (lipid III) that contained both [14C]ManNAcA and [3H]Fuc4NAc. The oligosaccharide moiety of lipid III was identified as a trisaccharide by gel-permeation chromatography, and the in vitro synthesis of lipid III was dependent on prior synthesis of lipids I and II. Accordingly, the incorporation of [3H]Fuc4NAc into lipid III from the donor TDP-[3H]Fuc4NAc was dependent on the presence of both UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-ManNAcA in the reaction mixtures. In addition, the in vitro synthesis of lipid III was abolished by tunicamycin. Direct conversion of lipid II to lipid III was demonstrated in two-stage reactions in which membranes were initially incubated with UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-[14C]ManNAcA to allow the synthesis of radioactive lipid II

  3. Importance of the hexagonal lipid phase in biological membrane organization

    OpenAIRE

    Jouhet, Juliette

    2013-01-01

    Domains are present in every natural membrane. They are characterized by a distinctive protein and/or lipid composition. Their size is highly variable from the nano- to the micrometer scale. The domains confer specific properties to the membrane leading to original structure and function. The determinants leading to domain organization are therefore important but remain obscure. This review presents how the ability of lipids to organize into hexagonal II or lamellar phases can promote particu...

  4. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  5. Effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Rhus coriaria seed on glucose and insulin related biomarkers, lipid profile, and hepatic enzymes in nicotinamide-streptozotocin-induced type II diabetic male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid; Junghani, Majid Salehizade; Absari, Reza; Khoogar, Mehdi; Ghaedi, Ehsan

    2017-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes often leads to dislipidemia and abnormal activity of hepatic enzymes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of Rhus coriaria ( R. coriaria ) seed extrac on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 diabetic mice. In this experimental study, 56 male Naval Medical Research Institute mice (30-35 g) were randomly separated into seven groups: control, diabetic group, diabetic mice treated with glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg, as standard antidiabetic drug) or R. coriaria seed extract in doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg, and control groups received these two doses of extract orally for 28 days. Induction of diabetes was done by intraperitoneal injection of nicotinamide and streptozotocin. Ultimately, body weight of mice, blood levels of glucose, insulin, hepatic enzymes, leptin, and lipid profile were assayed. After induction of type 2 diabetes, level of glucose, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase increased and level of insulin and high density lipoprotein decreased remarkably. Administration of both doses of extract decreased level of glucose and cholesterol significantly in diabetic mice. LDL level decreased in treated group with dose of 300 mg/kg of the extract. Although usage of the extract improved level of other lipid profiles, insulin and hepatic enzymes, changes weren't significant. This study showed R. coriaria seeds administration has a favorable effect in controlling some blood parameters in type 2 diabetes. Therefore it may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes.

  6. A new look at lipid-membrane structure in relation to drug research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Jørgensen, Kent

    1998-01-01

    Lipid-bilayer membranes are key objects in drug research in relation to (i) interaction of drugs with membrane-bound receptors, (ii) drug targeting, penetration, and permeation of cell membranes, and (iii) use of liposomes in micro-encapsulation technologies for drug delivery. Rational design...... of new drugs and drug-delivery systems therefore requries insight into the physical properties of lipid-bilayer membranes. This mini-review provides a perspective on the current view of lipid-bilayer structure and dynamics based on information obtained from a variety of recent experimental...... and theoretical studies. Special attention is paid to trans-bilayer structure, lateral molecular organization of the lipid bilayer, lipid-mediated protein assembly, and lipid-bilayer permeability. It is argued that lipids play a major role in lipid membrane-organization and functionality....

  7. Study on mechanism of decreased lipid peroxide by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Okazoe, Yoko; Akimaru, Kunihiro; Sato, E.F.; Utsumi, Kozo.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the effect of SOD on lipid peroxidation in biomembrane from V.E-deficient rats, in order to study the mechanism of increased SOD activities and decreased lipid peroxide by low dose irradiation. The following results were obtained. i. Active oxygen (O 2 - ) strongly enhances lipid peroxidations in biomembrane with the Fe 3+ as catalyst. ii. SOD evidently inhibits lipid peroxidations under above conditions. iii. We suggested that the effect of SOD enhanced by low dose irradiation results in inhibition of lipid peroxidation. (author)

  8. Lipid Cell Biology: A Focus on Lipids in Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storck, Elisabeth M; Özbalci, Cagakan; Eggert, Ulrike S

    2018-06-20

    Cells depend on hugely diverse lipidomes for many functions. The actions and structural integrity of the plasma membrane and most organelles also critically depend on membranes and their lipid components. Despite the biological importance of lipids, our understanding of lipid engagement, especially the roles of lipid hydrophobic alkyl side chains, in key cellular processes is still developing. Emerging research has begun to dissect the importance of lipids in intricate events such as cell division. This review discusses how these structurally diverse biomolecules are spatially and temporally regulated during cell division, with a focus on cytokinesis. We analyze how lipids facilitate changes in cellular morphology during division and how they participate in key signaling events. We identify which cytokinesis proteins are associated with membranes, suggesting lipid interactions. More broadly, we highlight key unaddressed questions in lipid cell biology and techniques, including mass spectrometry, advanced imaging, and chemical biology, which will help us gain insights into the functional roles of lipids.

  9. Pharmacogenetics of lipid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ordovas Jose M

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genetic basis for most of the rare lipid monogenic disorders have been elucidated, but the challenge remains in determining the combination of genes that contribute to the genetic variability in lipid levels in the general population; this has been estimated to be in the range of 40-60 per cent of the total variability. Therefore, the effect of common polymorphisms on lipid phenotypes will be greatly modulated by gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. This approach can also be used to characterise the individuality of the response to lipid-lowering therapies, whether using drugs (pharmacogenetics or dietary interventions (nutrigenetics. In this regard, multiple studies have already described significant interactions between candidate genes for lipid and drug metabolism that modulate therapeutic response--although the outcomes of these studies have been controversial and call for more rigorous experimental design and analytical approaches. Once solid evidence about the predictive value of genetic panels is obtained, risk and therapeutic algorithms can begin to be generated that should provide an accurate measure of genetic predisposition, as well as targeted behavioural modifications or drugs of choice and personalised dosages of these drugs.

  10. Lipids, lipid bilayers and vesicles as seen by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seto, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Lipid molecules self-assemble into bilayers in water with their hydrocarbon chains facing inward due to their amphiphilic nature. The structural and dynamical properties of lipids and lipid bilayers have been studied by neutron scattering intensively. In this article, 3 topics are shown as typical examples. 1) a time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering on uni-lamellar vesicles composed of deuterated and protonated lipids to determine lipid kinetics, 2) small-angle neutron scattering to investigate spontaneous formation of nanopores on uni-lamellar vesicles, and 3) neutron spin echo study to determine bending modulus of lipid bilayers. (author)

  11. Role of AMPK in regulation of LC3 lipidation as a marker of autophagy in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel; Frøsig, Christian; Jeppesen, Jacob Fuglsbjerg

    2016-01-01

    During induction of the autophagosomal degradation process, LC3-I is lipidated to LC3-II and associates to the cargo isolation membrane allowing for autophagosome formation. Lipidation of LC3 results in an increased LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, and this ratio is an often used marker for autophagy in vario...

  12. Lipid management in ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slim, Ines; Ach, Koussay; Chaieb, Larbi

    2015-05-01

    During Ramadan fast, Muslims must refrain from smoking, eating, drinking, having sexual activity, and consuming oral medications from sunrise to sunset. It has been previously shown that Ramadan fasting induces favourable changes on metabolic parameters, reduces oxidative stress and inflammation and promotes cardiovascular benefits. Although ill people are exempted from fasting, most patients with chronic diseases are keen on performing this Islamic-ritual. During recent years, Risk stratification and treatment adjustment during Ramadan are well known and structured in several guidelines for patients with diabetes mellitus. Data related to the effect of Ramadan fast on lipid profiles are less known and several controversies have been reported. Here, we focus on lipid profile and lipid management during Ramadan taking into account comorbidities and cardiovascular risk.

  13. Heart, lipids and hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wolf

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in general population. Besides well-known risk factors such as hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia, growing evidence suggests that hormonal changes in various endocrine diseases also impact the cardiac morphology and function. Recent studies highlight the importance of ectopic intracellular myocardial and pericardial lipid deposition, since even slight changes of these fat depots are associated with alterations in cardiac performance. In this review, we overview the effects of hormones, including insulin, thyroid hormones, growth hormone and cortisol, on heart function, focusing on their impact on myocardial lipid metabolism, cardiac substrate utilization and ectopic lipid deposition, in order to highlight the important role of even subtle hormonal changes for heart function in various endocrine and metabolic diseases.

  14. Lipid storage myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Claudio; Dimauro, Salvatore

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an update on disorders of lipid metabolism affecting skeletal muscle exclusively or predominantly and to summarize recent clinical, genetic, and therapeutic studies in this field. Over the past 5 years, new clinical phenotypes and genetic loci have been described, unusual pathogenic mechanisms have been elucidated, and novel pharmacological approaches have been developed. At least one genetic defect responsible for the myopathic form of CoQ10 deficiency has been identified, causing a disorder that is allelic with the late-onset riboflavine-responsive form of multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenation deficiency. Novel mechanisms involved in the lipolytic breakdown of cellular lipid depots have been described and have led to the identification of genes and mutations responsible for multisystemic neutral lipid storage disorders, characterized by accumulation of triglyceride in multiple tissues, including muscle. Defects in lipid metabolism can affect either the mitochondrial transport and oxidation of exogenous fatty acid or the catabolism of endogenous triglycerides. These disorders impair energy production and almost invariably involve skeletal muscle, causing progressive myopathy with muscle weakness, or recurrent acute episodes of rhabdomyolysis triggered by exercise, fasting, or infections. Clinical and genetic characterization of these disorders has important implications both for accurate diagnostic approach and for development of therapeutic strategies.

  15. Lipids in airway secretions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskar, K.R.; DeFeudis O'Sullivan, D.; Opaskar-Hincman, H.; Reid, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Lipids form a significant portion of airway mucus yet they have not received the same attention that epithelial glycoproteins have. We have analysed, by thin layer chromatography, lipids present in airway mucus under 'normal' and hypersecretory (pathological) conditions.The 'normals' included (1) bronchial lavage obtained from healthy human volunteers and from dogs and (2) secretions produced ''in vitro'' by human (bronchial) and canine (tracheal) explants. Hypersecretory mucus samples included (1) lavage from dogs made bronchitic by exposure to SO 2 , (2) bronchial aspirates from acute and chronic tracheostomy patients, (3) sputum from patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis and (4) postmortem secretions from patients who died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or from status asthmaticus. Cholesterol was found to be the predominant lipid in 'normal' mucus with lesser amounts of phospholipids. No glycolipids were detected. In the hypersecretory mucus, in addition to neutral and phospholipids, glycolipids were present in appreciable amounts, often the predominant species, suggesting that these may be useful as markers of disease. Radioactive precursors 14 C acetate and 14 C palmitate were incorporated into lipids secreted ''in vitro'' by canine tracheal explants indicating that they are synthesised by the airway. (author)

  16. Exogenous lipid pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernasconi, A.; Gavelli, G.; Zompatori, M.; Galleri, C.; Zanasi, A.; Fabbri, M.; Bazzocchi, F.

    1988-01-01

    Exogenous lipid pneumonia (ELP) is caused by the aspiration of animal, vegetal or, more often, mineral oils. Even though it may also be acute, ELP is most frequently a chronic disease, affecting people with predisposing factors, such as neuromuscular disorders, structural abnormalities and so on; very often exogenous lipid pneumonia is found in tracheotomized patients. The pathology of lipid pneumonia is a chronic inflammatory process evolving in foreign-body-like reaction, and eventually in ''end-stage lung'' condition. Clinically, most patients are asymptomatic; few cases only present with cough, dyspnea and chest pain. Eight cases of ELP, studied over the past 3 years, are described in this paper. All the patients were examined by chest radiographs and standard tomograms; 3 patients underwent CT. X-ray features were mono/bilateral consolidation of the lower zones, with air bronchogram and variable reduction in volume. CT density was not specific for fat tissue. In all cases the diagnosis was confirmed at biopsy. In 5 patients, followed for at least one year, clinical-radiological features showed no change. Thus, complications of ELP (especially malignant evolution) could be excluded. The authors conclude that lipid pneumonia must be considered in differential diagnosis of patients with history of usage of oils and compatible X-ray findings. The usefulness of an accurate follow-up is stressed

  17. Lipid Therapy for Intoxications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robben, Joris Henricus; Dijkman, Marieke Annet

    This review discusses the use of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) in the treatment of intoxications with lipophilic agents in veterinary medicine. Despite growing scientific evidence that ILE has merit in the treatment of certain poisonings, there is still uncertainty on the optimal composition of

  18. Lipid Therapy for Intoxications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robben, Joris Henricus; Dijkman, Marieke Annet

    2017-01-01

    This review discusses the use of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) in the treatment of intoxications with lipophilic agents in veterinary medicine. Despite growing scientific evidence that ILE has merit in the treatment of certain poisonings, there is still uncertainty on the optimal composition of

  19. Effect of irradiation of lipid peroxidation in serum, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisa, Yoshio

    1976-01-01

    With blood obtained from patients irradiated for cervical uterine cancer (consisting of 4 cases of Stage I, 5 cases of Stage II and 4 cases of Stage III), changes of blood picture, serum lipid weight and serum lipid peroxide accompanying irradiation were studied on 3 occasions, before, during and after the irradiation. The following results were obtained. Serum lipid and serum lipid peroxide were found to increase along with the advance of uterine cancer from Stage I to II and III. At the termination of irradiation the serum lipid and serum lipid peroxide in the cases of cervical uterine cancer at Stage III were found to have recovered to close to the levels before irradiation, but in the other cases these values tended to increase with irradiation. Except the termination of irradiation treatment of cervical uterine cancer of Stage III, the decrease of leucocyte count has a mutual relationship with the increase of serum thiobarbituric acid (TBA), so that change in the serum TBA level can be assumed to be a criterion for irradiation injury. (auth.)

  20. Big, Fat World of Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... offered a more quantitative and systematic approach to lipids research. Much of the effort has been led by a research consortium called LIPID MAPS. With funding from the National Institutes of ...

  1. Amphotericin B Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is used to treat serious, possibly life-threatening fungal infections in people who did ... respond or are unable to tolerate conventional amphotericin B therapy. Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is in ...

  2. Planktonic Euryarchaeota are a significant source of archaeal tetraether lipids in the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Sara A; Wai, Brenner; Eppley, John M; Church, Matthew J; Summons, Roger E; DeLong, Edward F

    2014-07-08

    Archaea are ubiquitous in marine plankton, and fossil forms of archaeal tetraether membrane lipids in sedimentary rocks document their participation in marine biogeochemical cycles for >100 million years. Ribosomal RNA surveys have identified four major clades of planktonic archaea but, to date, tetraether lipids have been characterized in only one, the Marine Group I Thaumarchaeota. The membrane lipid composition of the other planktonic archaeal groups--all uncultured Euryarchaeota--is currently unknown. Using integrated nucleic acid and lipid analyses, we found that Marine Group II Euryarchaeota (MG-II) contributed significantly to the tetraether lipid pool in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre at shallow to intermediate depths. Our data strongly suggested that MG-II also synthesize crenarchaeol, a tetraether lipid previously considered to be a unique biomarker for Thaumarchaeota. Metagenomic datasets spanning 5 y indicated that depth stratification of planktonic archaeal groups was a stable feature in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. The consistent prevalence of MG-II at depths where the bulk of exported organic matter originates, together with their ubiquitous distribution over diverse oceanic provinces, suggests that this clade is a significant source of tetraether lipids to marine sediments. Our results are relevant to archaeal lipid biomarker applications in the modern oceans and the interpretation of these compounds in the geologic record.

  3. Relation between plasma and brain lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellington, Cheryl L; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    : Plasma levels of traditional lipids and lipoproteins are not consistently associated with risk of dementia even though low plasma levels of apolipoprotein E, through unknown mechanisms, robustly predict future dementia. Experimental evidence suggests neuroprotective roles of several brain...... and cerebrospinal fluid apolipoproteins. Whether plasma levels of apolipoprotein E, or any other apolipoprotein with possible central nervous system and/or blood-brain barrier functions (apolipoproteins J, A-I, A-II, A-IV, D, C-I, and C-III) may become accessible biomarker components that improve risk prediction...

  4. Endometriosis and Type I Interferon & Characterization of a Mammalian Flippase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anna Lindeløv

    2010-01-01

    endometriosis lesion. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of cervix cancer, and DNA viruses might play a role in endometriosis. DNA purified from tissue samples were subjected to highly sensitive PCR tests detecting HPV types, the herpes family viruses HSV-1 and -2, CMV, and EBV......, and ERa, when analyzed by bisulfate PCR and melting curve analysis. Also, no mutations of BRAF, HRAS, NRAS, CTNNB1, CDK4, FGFR3, PIK3CA, P53, and PTEN were detected by PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. A well-known cancer-associated mutation in KRAS was detected in a single...

  5. Effects of Ferulago angulata Extract on Serum Lipids and Lipid Peroxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Rafieian-kopaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nowadays, herbs they are considered to be the main source of effective drugs for lowering serum lipids and lipid peroxidation. The present experimental animal study aimed to assess the impact of Ferulago angulata on serum lipid profiles, and on levels of lipid peroxidation. Methods. Fifty male Wistar rats, weighing 250–300 g, were randomly divided into five equal groups (ten rats in each. The rat groups received different diets as follows: Group I: fat-rich diet; Group II: fat-rich diet plus hydroalcoholic extracts of Ferulago angulata at a dose of 400 mg/kg; Group III: fat-rich diet plus hydroalcoholic extracts of Ferulago angulata at a dose of 600 mg/kg; Group IV: fat-rich diet plus atorvastatin; Group V: common stock diet. The levels of serum glucose and lipids and the atherogenic index were measured. In addition, malondialdehyde (MDA, thiol oxidation, carbonyl concentrations, C-reactive proteins, and antioxidant capacity were evaluated in each group of rats. Results. Interestingly, by adding a hydroalcoholic extract of Ferulago angulata to the high-fat diet, the levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins (LDL in the high-fat diet rats were both significantly reduced. This result was considerably greater compared to when atorvastatin was added as an antilipid drug. The beneficial effects of the Ferulago angulata extract on lowering the level of triglycerides was observed only when a high dosage of this plant extraction was added to a high fat diet. Furthermore, the level of malondialdehyde, was significantly affected by the use of the plant extract in a high-fat diet, compared with a normal regimen or high-fat diet alone. Conclusion. Administration of a hydroalcoholic extract of Ferulago angulata can reduce serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL. It can also inhibit lipid peroxidation.

  6. Molecular modeling of proteinlike inclusions in lipid bilayers: lipid-mediated interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kik, Richard A; Leermakers, Frans A M; Kleijn, J Mieke

    2010-02-01

    We investigated the insertion of transmembrane structures in a lipid bilayer and their interactions using self-consistent field theory. The lipids are coarse-grained on a united-atom level and consist of a phosphatidylcholinelike headgroup and two hydrophobic tails. The inclusions, acting as simple models for proteins that span biological membranes, are rigid rods (radius R ) with a hydrophobic surface and hydrophilic end caps. The insertion free energy Omega of an individual rod is strongly regulated by the affinity between its hydrophobic surface and the lipid tails. This affinity also controls the best match of the hydrophobic length of the rod with that of the bilayer. The line tension tau(=Omega/2piR) is practically independent of R . The perturbations in the bilayer as a function of distance from the inclusion, have the shape of a damped oscillation. The wavelength and decay length are related to the elastic properties of the bilayer and do not depend on R . These results are used to analyze how the lipid matrix affects the interaction between transmembrane objects, for computational reasons considering the limit of R-->infinity . Contributions on different length scales can be distinguished: (i) a long-range elastic interaction, which is an exponentially decaying oscillation; (ii) an exponentially decaying repulsion on an intermediate length scale, resulting from the loss of conformational entropy of the lipid tails; and (iii) a short-range interaction due to the finite compressibility of the lipid tails, which manifests either as a depletion attraction if there is no affinity between the tails and the inclusions' surface or, otherwise, as an oscillatory structural force.

  7. Polar lipids of Burkholderia pseudomallei induce different host immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Gonzalez-Juarrero

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is a disease in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. In endemic regions the disease occurs primarily in humans and goats. In the present study, we used the goat as a model to dissect the polar lipids of B. pseudomallei to identify lipid molecules that could be used for adjuvants/vaccines or as diagnostic tools. We showed that the lipidome of B. pseudomallei and its fractions contain several polar lipids with the capacity to elicit different immune responses in goats, namely rhamnolipids and ornithine lipids which induced IFN-γ, whereas phospholipids and an undefined polar lipid induced strong IL-10 secretion in CD4(+ T cells. Autologous T cells co-cultured with caprine dendritic cells (cDCs and polar lipids of B. pseudomallei proliferated and up-regulated the expression of CD25 (IL-2 receptor molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrated that polar lipids were able to up-regulate CD1w2 antigen expression in cDCs derived from peripheral blood monocytes. Interestingly, the same polar lipids had only little effect on the expression of MHC class II DR antigens in the same caprine dendritic cells. Finally, antibody blocking of the CD1w2 molecules on cDCs resulted in decreased expression for IFN-γ by CD4(+ T cells. Altogether, these results showed that polar lipids of B. pseudomallei are recognized by the caprine immune system and that their recognition is primarily mediated by the CD1 antigen cluster.

  8. LRRK2 mediated Rab8a phosphorylation promotes lipid storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Arshad, Muhammad; Wang, Wenmin; Zhao, Dongyu; Xu, Li; Zhou, Linkang

    2018-02-27

    Several mutations in leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene have been associated with pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder marked by resting tremors, and rigidity, leading to Postural instability. It has been revealed that mutations that lead to an increase of kinase activity of LRRK2 protein are significantly associated with PD pathogenesis. Recent studies have shown that some Rab GTPases, especially Rab8, serve as substrates of LRRK2 and undergo phosphorylation in its switch II domain upon interaction. Current study was performed in order to find out the effects of the phosphorylation of Rab8 and its mutants on lipid metabolism and lipid droplets growth. The phosphorylation status of Rab8a was checked by phos-tag gel. Point mutant construct were generated to investigate the function of Rab8a. 3T3L1 cells were transfected with indicated plasmids and the lipid droplets were stained with Bodipy. Fluorescent microscopy experiments were performed to examine the sizes of lipid droplets. The interactions between Rab8a and Optineurin were determined by immunoprecipitation and western blot. Our assays demonstrated that Rab8a was phosphorylated by mutated LRRK2 that exhibits high kinase activity. Phosphorylation of Rab8a on amino acid residue T72 promoted the formation of large lipid droplets. T72D mutant of Rab8a had higher activity to promote the formation of large lipid droplets compared with wild type Rab8a, with increase in average diameter of lipid droplets from 2.10 μm to 2.46 μm. Moreover, phosphorylation of Rab8a weakened the interaction with its effector Optineurin. Y1699C mutated LRRK2 was able to phosphorylate Rab8a and phosphorylation of Rab8a on site 72 plays important role in the fusion and enlargement of lipid droplets. Taken together, our study suggests an indirect relationship between enhanced lipid storage capacity and PD pathogenesis.

  9. Polar Lipids of Burkholderia pseudomallei Induce Different Host Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Mima, Naoko; Trunck, Lily A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Bowen, Richard A.; Dascher, Kyle; Mwangi, Waithaka; Eckstein, Torsten M.

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is a disease in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. In endemic regions the disease occurs primarily in humans and goats. In the present study, we used the goat as a model to dissect the polar lipids of B. pseudomallei to identify lipid molecules that could be used for adjuvants/vaccines or as diagnostic tools. We showed that the lipidome of B. pseudomallei and its fractions contain several polar lipids with the capacity to elicit different immune responses in goats, namely rhamnolipids and ornithine lipids which induced IFN-γ, whereas phospholipids and an undefined polar lipid induced strong IL-10 secretion in CD4+ T cells. Autologous T cells co-cultured with caprine dendritic cells (cDCs) and polar lipids of B. pseudomallei proliferated and up-regulated the expression of CD25 (IL-2 receptor) molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrated that polar lipids were able to up-regulate CD1w2 antigen expression in cDCs derived from peripheral blood monocytes. Interestingly, the same polar lipids had only little effect on the expression of MHC class II DR antigens in the same caprine dendritic cells. Finally, antibody blocking of the CD1w2 molecules on cDCs resulted in decreased expression for IFN-γ by CD4+ T cells. Altogether, these results showed that polar lipids of B. pseudomallei are recognized by the caprine immune system and that their recognition is primarily mediated by the CD1 antigen cluster. PMID:24260378

  10. Scavenger receptor AI/II truncation, lung function and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M; Nordestgaard, B G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A

    2011-01-01

    The scavenger receptor A-I/II (SRA-I/II) on alveolar macrophages is involved in recognition and clearance of modified lipids and inhaled particulates. A rare variant of the SRA-I/II gene, Arg293X, truncates the distal collagen-like domain, which is essential for ligand recognition. We tested whet...

  11. Association between single nucleotide polymorphism of apoVLDL-II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... Very low density apolipoprotein-II (apoVLDL-II) is a major polypeptide component of avian VLDL. The function of apoVLDL-II is the transport of neutral lipids (triacylglycerol) in the form of VLDL in the plasma. The apoVLDLII gene is dormant in embryos, chicks and roosters but can be activated by estrogen.

  12. Unraveling lipid metabolism in lipid-dependent pathogenic Malassezia yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Celis Ramirez, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Malassezia yeasts are lipid-dependent fungal species that are common members of the human and animal skin microbiota. The lipid-dependency is a crucial trait in the adaptation process to grow on the skin but also plays a role in their pathogenic life style. Malassezia species can cause several skin infections like dandruff or seborrheic dermatitis but also bloodstream infections. Understanding the lipid metabolism in Malassezia is essential to understand its life style as skin commensal and p...

  13. Probing lipid membrane electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi

    The electrostatic properties of lipid bilayer membranes play a significant role in many biological processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is highly sensitive to membrane surface potential in electrolyte solutions. With fully characterized probe tips, AFM can perform quantitative electrostatic analysis of lipid membranes. Electrostatic interactions between Silicon nitride probes and supported zwitterionic dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayer with a variable fraction of anionic dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) were measured by AFM. Classical Gouy-Chapman theory was used to model the membrane electrostatics. The nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation was numerically solved with finite element method to provide the potential distribution around the AFM tips. Theoretical tip-sample electrostatic interactions were calculated with the surface integral of both Maxwell and osmotic stress tensors on tip surface. The measured forces were interpreted with theoretical forces and the resulting surface charge densities of the membrane surfaces were in quantitative agreement with the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model of membrane charge regulation. It was demonstrated that the AFM can quantitatively detect membrane surface potential at a separation of several screening lengths, and that the AFM probe only perturbs the membrane surface potential by external field created by the internai membrane dipole moment. The analysis yields a dipole moment of 1.5 Debye per lipid with a dipole potential of +275 mV for supported DOPC membranes. This new ability to quantitatively measure the membrane dipole density in a noninvasive manner will be useful in identifying the biological effects of the dipole potential. Finally, heterogeneous model membranes were studied with fluid electric force microscopy (FEFM). Electrostatic mapping was demonstrated with 50 nm resolution. The capabilities of quantitative electrostatic measurement and lateral charge density mapping make AFM a unique and powerful

  14. Comparison of the orientational order of lipid chains in the Lα and HII phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, M.; Cullis, P.R.; Fine, B.; Bloom, M.

    1990-01-01

    The orientational order profile has been determined by using deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ( 2 H NMR) for POPE in the lamellar liquid-crystalline (L α ) and the hexagonal (H II ) phases and is shown to be sensitive to the symmetry of the lipid phase. In the H II phase, as compared to the L α phase, the acyl chains are characterized by a greater motional freedom, and the orientational order is distributed more uniformly along the lipid acyl chain. This is consistent with a change from a cylindrical to a wedge-shaped space available for the lipid chain. 2 H NMR studies of POPE dispersions containing tetradecanol or decane, both of which can induce H II phase structure, show very different behavior. Tetradecanol appears to align with the phospholipid chains and experience the L α to H II phase transition with a similar change in motional averaging as observed for the phospholipid chains themselves. In contrast, decane is apparently deeply embedded in the lipid structure and exhibits only a small degree of orientation. The L α to H II phase transition for systems containing decane leads to a dramatic increase of the motional freedom of decane which is more pronounced than that observed for the lipid chains. The presence of decane in the H II phase structure does not modify the order of the lipid chains. However, the L α phase of POPE is slightly disordered by the addition of 9 mol% decane whereas it can accommodate as much as 20 mol% tetradecanol without a significant change of order. Finally, the concept of a stretching vector associated with the lipid acyl chain has been introduced to analyze the orientational order profile obtained in the H II phase. With this model, the average order parameter of the H II phase has been calculated and found to be in good agreement with experiment

  15. Altered fructosamine and lipid fractions in subclinical hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, Sridevi V; Manjrekar, Poornima A; Udupa, Vinit A; Vivian, D'Souza

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid function disorders lead to changes in the lipoprotein metabolism. To study the lipid and the glycaemic abnormalities in the subclinical hypothyroidism cases and to compare the same with the euthyroid, overt hypothyroid and the hyperthyroid subjects. Four groups, euthyroid (Group-I), hypothyroid (Group-II), subclinical hypothyroid (Group-III) and hyperthyroid (Group-IV), which consisted of 30 subjects each, of either sex, who were aged 25-55 years, underwent Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG), fructosamine, lipid profile and total T3, T4 and TSH estimations. The subjects who were on lipid lowering or thyroid disorder drugs and known diabetics were excluded from the study. In Group-III, all the lipid fractions were comparable to those of Group-II and they were significantly deranged, as compared to those of Group-I. The fructosamine levels were significantly higher in Group-II and Group-III (phypothyrodism, the subclinical hypothyroid cases also need to be treated similarly. The fructosamine values which are largely in excess of the FPG values, indicate a higher propensity to glycation and a decreased turnover of the proteins in the hypothyroid and the subclinical hypothyroid pools. Vice versa is true of the hyperthyroid pool. Fructosamine can be included in the thyroid work up of the patients to assess the metabolic function and the subsequent response after the initiation of the therapy.

  16. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Valine (2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid), is a chemical compound containing .... Stability constant (Kf). Gibb's free energy. ) (. 1. −. ∆. Mol. JG. [CuL2(H2O)2] ... synthesis and characterization of Co(ii), Ni(ii), Cu (II), and Zn(ii) complexes with ...

  17. Texture of lipid bilayer domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Uffe Bernchou; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Midtiby, Henrik Skov

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the texture of gel (g) domains in binary lipid membranes composed of the phospholipids DPPC and DOPC. Lateral organization of lipid bilayer membranes is a topic of fundamental and biological importance. Whereas questions related to size and composition of fluid membrane domain...... are well studied, the possibility of texture in gel domains has so far not been examined. When using polarized light for two-photon excitation of the fluorescent lipid probe Laurdan, the emission intensity is highly sensitive to the angle between the polarization and the tilt orientation of lipid acyl...... chains. By imaging the intensity variations as a function of the polarization angle, we map the lateral variations of the lipid tilt within domains. Results reveal that gel domains are composed of subdomains with different lipid tilt directions. We have applied a Fourier decomposition method...

  18. Lipids and membrane lateral organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro eSonnino

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Shortly after the elucidation of the very basic structure and properties of cellular membranes, it became evident that cellular membranes are highly organized structures with multiple and multi-dimensional levels of order. Very early observations suggested that the lipid components of biological membranes might be active players in the creations of these levels of order. In the late 80’s, several different and diverse experimental pieces of evidence coalesced together giving rise to the lipid raft hypothesis. Lipid rafts became enormously (and, in the opinion of these authors, sometimes acritically popular, surprisingly not just within the lipidologist community (who is supposed to be naturally sensitive to the fascination of lipid rafts. Today, a PubMed search using the key word lipid rafts returned a list of 3767 papers, including 690 reviews (as a term of comparison, searching over the same time span for a very hot lipid-related key word, ceramide returned 6187 hits with 799 reviews, and a tremendous number of different cellular functions have been described as lipid raft-dependent. However, a clear consensus definition of lipid raft has been proposed only in recent times, and the basic properties, the ruling forces, and even the existence of lipid rafts in living cells have been recently matter of intense debate. The scenario that is gradually emerging from the controversies elicited by the lipid raft hypothesis emphasize multiple roles for membrane lipids in determining membrane order, that encompasses their tendency to phase separation but are clearly not limited to this. In this review, we would like to re-focus the attention of the readers on the importance of lipids in organizing the fine structure of cellular membranes.

  19. Unraveling lipid metabolism in lipid-dependent pathogenic Malassezia yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celis Ramirez, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Malassezia yeasts are lipid-dependent fungal species that are common members of the human and animal skin microbiota. The lipid-dependency is a crucial trait in the adaptation process to grow on the skin but also plays a role in their pathogenic life style. Malassezia species can cause several skin

  20. Update of the LIPID MAPS comprehensive classification system for lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahy, E.; Subramaniam, S.; Murphy, R.C.; Nishijima, M.; Raetz, C.R.H.; Shimizu, T.; Spener, F.; van Meer, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068570368; Wakelam, M.J.O.; Dennis, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the International Lipid Classification and Nomenclature Committee under the sponsorship of the LIPID MAPS Consortium developed and established a “Comprehensive Classification System for Lipids” based on well-defined chemical and biochemical principles and using an ontology that is

  1. ORF Sequence: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000913 gi|16131649 >gi|16131649|ref|NP_418241.1| TDP-Fuc4NAc:lipidII transferase; synthesis of enterobac...terial common antigen (ECA) [Escherichia coli K12] MSLLQFSGLFVVWLLCTLFIATLTWFEFRRVR

  2. Phloem proteomics reveals new lipid-binding proteins with a putative role in lipid-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Marie Barbaglia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho- lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and that they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012. Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein, a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH, which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while

  3. Solid lipid nanoparticles for parenteral drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, S.A.; Kayser, Oliver; Muller, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    This review describes the use of nanoparticles based on solid lipids for the parenteral application of drugs. Firstly, different types of nanoparticles based on solid lipids such as "solid lipid nanoparticles" (SLN), "nanostructured lipid carriers" (NLC) and "lipid drug conjugate" (LDC)

  4. INFLUÊNCIA DO TEOR DE NITROGÊNIO NO CULTIVO DE Spirulina maxima EM DOIS NÍVEIS DE TEMPERATURA: Parte II: PRODUÇÃO DE LIPÍDIOS INFLUENCE OF THE NITROGEN LEVEL IN THE CULTIVATION OF Spirulina maxima IN TWO LEVELS OF TEMPERATURES: PART II: "PRODUCTION OF LIPIDS"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Verthein Tavares de MACEDO

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available A microalga Spirulina maxima foi cultivada em meios com 2,5g/L KNO3 (2,5N, proposto por PAOLETTI et al [10] e considerado meio padrão, em meios com 0,2g/L KNO3 (0,2N e em ausência de nitrogênio (0,0N nas temperaturas de 25°C e 35°C. A composição da biomassa celular seca apresentou a 35°C um aumento médio dos lipídios totais, de 2,8 vezes do meio com ausência de nitrogênio (0,0N e 2,9 vezes do meio 0,2N em relação ao meio padrão. A 25°C apresentou um aumento médio de 3,1 vezes do meio com ausência de nitrogênio (0,0N e 3,2 vezes do meio 0,2N em relação ao meio padrão. A biomassa em forma de gel de cada tratamento foi recolhida e feita a extração dos lipídios totais, os quais foram pesados em base seca. As análises estatísticas dos resultados, em estimativa não linear com superfície de resposta e regressão múltipla com análise de resíduos, mostraram para o aumento dos lipídios totais uma função linear com a temperatura (T e não linear com o nitrogênio (N, ajustando-se a um modelo onde o coeficiente de regressão R=0,99459 e a equação LIPT = A+B²T+CN ².The micraolgae Spirulina maxima was cultivated in medium with 2,5g/L KNO3 (2,5N, proposed by Paoletti et al [10] and considered standard medium, in media with 0,2g/L KNO3 (0,2N and in absence of nitrogen (0,0N in temperatures of 25°C and 35°C. The composition of the dry cellular biomass presented to 35°C a medium increase of the total lipids, of 2,8 times of the middle with absence of nitrogen (0,0N and 2,9 times of the half 0,2N in relation to the standard medium. To 25°C it presented a medium increase of 3,1 times of the medium with absence of nitrogen (0,0N and 3,2 times of the half 0,2N in relation to the standard medium. The biomass in form of gel of each treatment was picked up and made the extraction of the total lipids, which were heavy in base evaporate. The statistical analyses of the results, in estimate non lineal with answer surface and

  5. Dermal extracellular lipid in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, M W; Hinsman, E J; Hullinger, R L

    1990-01-01

    A light and electron microscopic study of the skin of domestic chickens, seagulls, and antarctic penguins revealed abundant extracellular dermal lipid and intracellular epidermal lipid. Dermal lipid appeared ultrastructurally as extracellular droplets varying from less than 1 micron to more than 25 microns in diameter. The droplets were often irregularly contoured, sometimes round, and of relatively low electron density. Processes of fibrocytes were often seen in contact with extracellular lipid droplets. Sometimes a portion of such a droplet was missing, and this missing part appeared to have been "digested away" by the cell process. In places where cells or cell processes are in contact with fact droplets, there are sometimes extracellular membranous whorls or fragments which have been associated with the presence of fatty acids. Occasionally (in the comb) free fat particles were seen in intimate contact with extravasated erythrocytes. Fat droplets were seen in the lumen of small dermal blood and lymph vessels. We suggest that the dermal extracellular lipid originates in the adipocyte layer and following hydrolysis the free fatty acids diffuse into the epidermis. Here they become the raw material for forming the abundant neutral lipid contained in many of the epidermal cells of both birds and dolphins. The heretofore unreported presence and apparently normal utilization of abundant extracellular lipid in birds, as well as the presence of relatively large droplets of neutral lipid in dermal vessels, pose questions which require a thorough reappraisal of present concepts of the ways in which fat is distributed and utilized in the body.

  6. The Flexibility of Ectopic Lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Loher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the subcutaneous and the visceral fat tissue, lipids can also be stored in non-adipose tissue such as in hepatocytes (intrahepatocellular lipids; IHCL, skeletal (intramyocellular lipids; IMCL or cardiac muscle cells (intracardiomyocellular lipids; ICCL. Ectopic lipids are flexible fuel stores that can be depleted by physical exercise and repleted by diet. They are related to obesity and insulin resistance. Quantification of IMCL was initially performed invasively, using muscle biopsies with biochemical and/or histological analysis. 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS is now a validated method that allows for not only quantifying IMCL non-invasively and repeatedly, but also assessing IHCL and ICCL. This review summarizes the current available knowledge on the flexibility of ectopic lipids. The available evidence suggests a complex interplay between quantitative and qualitative diet, fat availability (fat mass, insulin action, and physical exercise, all important factors that influence the flexibility of ectopic lipids. Furthermore, the time frame of the intervention on these parameters (short-term vs. long-term appears to be critical. Consequently, standardization of physical activity and diet are critical when assessing ectopic lipids in predefined clinical situations.

  7. Neuroimaging of Lipid Storage Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Deborah; Auerbach, Sarah; Robinson, Paul; Gropman, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Lipid storage diseases, also known as the lipidoses, are a group of inherited metabolic disorders in which there is lipid accumulation in various cell types, including the central nervous system, because of the deficiency of a variety of enzymes. Over time, excessive storage can cause permanent cellular and tissue damage. The brain is particularly…

  8. Fasting and nonfasting lipid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, Anne; Freiberg, Jacob J; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2008-01-01

    Lipid profiles are usually measured after fasting. We tested the hypotheses that these levels change only minimally in response to normal food intake and that nonfasting levels predict cardiovascular events.......Lipid profiles are usually measured after fasting. We tested the hypotheses that these levels change only minimally in response to normal food intake and that nonfasting levels predict cardiovascular events....

  9. Lipid and bile acid analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Argmann, Carmen A.; Houten, Sander M.; Champy, Marie-France; Auwerx, Johan

    2006-01-01

    Lipids are important body constituents that are vital for cellular, tissue, and whole-body homeostasis. Lipids serve as crucial membrane components, constitute the body's main energy reservoir, and are important signaling molecules. As a consequence of these pleiotropic functions, many common

  10. Lysosomal degradation of membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolter, Thomas; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2010-05-03

    The constitutive degradation of membrane components takes place in the acidic compartments of a cell, the endosomes and lysosomes. Sites of lipid degradation are intralysosomal membranes that are formed in endosomes, where the lipid composition is adjusted for degradation. Cholesterol is sorted out of the inner membranes, their content in bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate increases, and, most likely, sphingomyelin is degraded to ceramide. Together with endosomal and lysosomal lipid-binding proteins, the Niemann-Pick disease, type C2-protein, the GM2-activator, and the saposins sap-A, -B, -C, and -D, a suitable membrane lipid composition is required for degradation of complex lipids by hydrolytic enzymes. Copyright 2009 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Model for the structure of the lipid bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, R.W.; Venable, R.M.; Karplus, M.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed model for the structure and dynamics of the interior of the lipid bilayer in the liquid crystal phase is presented. The model includes two classes of motion: (i) the internal dynamics of the chains, determined from Brownian dynamics simulations with a continuous version of the Marcelja mean-field potential, and (ii) noncollective reorientation (axial rotation and wobble) of the entire molecule, introduced by a cone model. The basic unit of the model is a single lipid chain with field parameters adjusted to fit the 2H order parameters and the frequency-dependent 13C NMR T1 relaxation times of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers. The chain configurations obtained from the trajectory are used to construct a representation of the bilayer. The resulting lipid assembly is consistent with NMR, neutron diffraction, surface area, and density data. It indicates that a high degree of chain disorder and entanglement exists in biological membranes

  12. Lipid profiling in sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fenfen; Wu, Xuemin; Zhao, Luyao; Liu, Xiaohui; Qi, Juanjuan; Wang, Xueying; Wang, Jiawei

    2017-06-01

    High value-added reutilization of sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is essential in sustainable development in WWTPs. However, despite the advantage of high value reutilization, this process must be based on a detailed study of organics in sludge. We used the methods employed in life sciences to determine the profile of lipids (cellular lipids, free fatty acids (FFAs), and wax/gum) in five sludge samples obtained from three typical WWTPs in Beijing; these samples include one sludge sample from a primary sedimentation tank, two activated sludge samples from two Anaerobic-Anoxic-Oxic (A2/O) tanks, and two activated sludge samples from two membrane bioreactor tanks. The percentage of total raw lipids varied from 2.90% to 12.3%. Sludge from the primary sedimentation tank showed the highest concentrations of lipid, FFA, and wax/gum and the second highest concentration of cellular lipids. All activated sludge contained an abundance of cellular lipids (>54%). Cells in sludge can from plants, animals, microbes and so on in wastewater. Approximately 14 species of cellular lipids were identified, including considerable high value-potential ceramide (9567-38774 mg/kg), coenzyme (937-3897 mg/kg), and some phosphatidylcholine (75-548 mg/kg). The presence of those lipid constituents would thus require a wider range of recovery methods for sludge. Both cellular lipids and FFAs contain an abundance of C16-C18 lipids at high saturation level, and they serve as good resources for biodiesel production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  14. Coral lipids and environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriott, V J

    1993-04-01

    Environmental monitoring of coral reefs is presently limited by difficulties in recognising coral stress, other than by monitoring coral mortality over time. A recent report described an experiment demonstrating that a measured lipid index declined in shaded corals. The technique described might have application in monitoring coral health, with a decline in coral lipid index as an indicator of coral stress. The application of the technique as a practical monitoring tool was tested for two coral species from the Great Barrier Reef. Consistent with the previous results, lipid index for Pocillopora damicornis initially declined over a period of three weeks in corals maintained in filtered seawater in the dark, indicating possible utilization of lipid stored as energy reserves. However, lipid index subsequently rose to near normal levels. In contrast, lipid index of Acropora formosa increased after four weeks in the dark in filtered seawater. The results showed considerable variability in lipid content between samples from the same colony. Results were also found to be dependent on fixation times and sample weight, introducing potential error into the practical application of the technique. The method as described would be unsuitable for monitoring environmental stress in corals, but the search for a practical method to monitor coral health should continue, given its importance in coral reef management.

  15. Lipid composition of human meibum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Schnetler

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The structure and function of meibomian gland lipids in the tear film are highly complex. Evidence shows that the precorneal tear film consists of discrete layers: the inner mucin layer, the middle aqueous layer and the outer lipid layer. In this review we focus on the outer, biphasic lipid layer of the tear film which consists of a ‘thick’ outer, non-polar layer  and a ‘thin’ inner, polar layer. We discuss the main composition of the polar and non-polar lipids within meibum (wax esters, cholesteryl esters, mono-, di- and tri-acylglycerols, ceramides, phospholipids  et cetera. We address the composition of meibomian lipids in subjects suffering from various ocular diseases in comparison with the composition in healthy individuals. Further analysis is needed to determine whether a correlation exists between the etiology of various ocular diseases and the fluctuation on the lipids as well as to establish whether or not tear lipid analysis can be used as a diagnostic tool.

  16. Operation Everest II. Plasma Lipid and Hormonal Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    ingestion of a hypocaloric diet , weight loss, and a decrement in maximal oxygen uptake. Also, fasting plasma TG accumulation was increased with a...in the hypobaric chamber, the subjects consumed an ad libitum diet . The menus, food preparation, and dietary data collection were supervised by a...approximately 3000 kcal/day distributed to provide 60% carbohydrate, 15% protein, and 25% fat in the diet . A variety of foods and non-alcoholic beverages were

  17. Disorders of muscle lipid metabolism: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforêt, Pascal; Vianey-Saban, Christine

    2010-11-01

    Disorders of muscle lipid metabolism may involve intramyocellular triglyceride degradation, carnitine uptake, long-chain fatty acids mitochondrial transport, or fatty acid β-oxidation. Three main diseases leading to permanent muscle weakness are associated with severe increased muscle lipid content (lipid storage myopathies): primary carnitine deficiency, neutral lipid storage disease and multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. A moderate lipidosis may be observed in fatty acid oxidation disorders revealed by rhabdomyolysis episodes such as carnitine palmitoyl transferase II, very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiencies, and in recently described phosphatidic acid phosphatase deficiency. Respiratory chain disorders and congenital myasthenic syndromes may also be misdiagnosed as fatty acid oxidation disorders due to the presence of secondary muscle lipidosis. The main biochemical tests giving clues for the diagnosis of these various disorders are measurements of blood carnitine and acylcarnitines, urinary organic acid profile, and search for intracytoplasmic lipid on peripheral blood smear (Jordan's anomaly). Genetic analysis orientated by the results of biochemical investigation allows establishing a firm diagnosis. Primary carnitine deficiency and multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency may be treated after supplementation with carnitine, riboflavine and coenzyme Q10. New therapeutic approaches for fatty acid oxidation disorders are currently developed, based on pharmacological treatment with bezafibrate, and specific diets enriched in medium-chain triglycerides or triheptanoin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in male infertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandekar S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Mammalian spermatozoa are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and are very susceptible to attack by reactive oxygen species (ROS and membrane lipid peroxide ion. Normally a balance is maintained between the amount of ROS produced and that scavenged. Cellular damage arises when this equilibrium is disturbed. A shift in the levels of ROS towards pro-oxidants in semen and vaginal secretions can induce an oxidative stress on spermatozoa. The aim was to study lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase (SOD and to correlate the same, with the ′water test′, in male infertility. SETTINGS: Experimental study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Ejaculates from a total of 83 infertile and fertile healthy individuals were obtained. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme levels were studied and correlated with water test. RESULTS: The results indicate that (i the antioxidant enzyme catalase showed no significant changes in the various pathological samples, (ii antioxidant enzymes SOD and glutathione peroxidase correlate positively with asthenozoospermic samples and (iii the degree of lipid peroxidation also correlates positively with the poorly swollen sperm tails. The increase in SOD and glutathione peroxidase values, in the pathological cases represents an attempt made to overcome the reactive oxygen species. CONCLUSION: Water test could be used as a preliminary marker test for sperm tail damage by reactive oxygen species, since it correlates very well with lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes.

  19. Size and mobility of lipid domains tuned by geometrical constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, Ole M; Mey, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg; Savić, Filip; Geil, Burkhard; Janshoff, Andreas; Steinem, Claudia

    2017-07-25

    In the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, proteins and lipids are organized in clusters, the latter ones often called lipid domains or "lipid rafts." Recent findings highlight the dynamic nature of such domains and the key role of membrane geometry and spatial boundaries. In this study, we used porous substrates with different pore radii to address precisely the extent of the geometric constraint, permitting us to modulate and investigate the size and mobility of lipid domains in phase-separated continuous pore-spanning membranes (PSMs). Fluorescence video microscopy revealed two types of liquid-ordered ( l o ) domains in the freestanding parts of the PSMs: ( i ) immobile domains that were attached to the pore rims and ( ii ) mobile, round-shaped l o domains within the center of the PSMs. Analysis of the diffusion of the mobile l o domains by video microscopy and particle tracking showed that the domains' mobility is slowed down by orders of magnitude compared with the unrestricted case. We attribute the reduced mobility to the geometric confinement of the PSM, because the drag force is increased substantially due to hydrodynamic effects generated by the presence of these boundaries. Our system can serve as an experimental test bed for diffusion of 2D objects in confined geometry. The impact of hydrodynamics on the mobility of enclosed lipid domains can have great implications for the formation and lateral transport of signaling platforms.

  20. Physiological Roles for mafr-1 in Reproduction and Lipid Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshat Khanna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Maf1 is a conserved repressor of RNA polymerase (Pol III transcription; however, its physiological role in the context of a multicellular organism is not well understood. Here, we show that C. elegans MAFR-1 is functionally orthologous to human Maf1, represses the expression of both RNA Pol III and Pol II transcripts, and mediates organismal fecundity and lipid homeostasis. MAFR-1 impacts lipid transport by modulating intestinal expression of the vitellogenin family of proteins, resulting in cell-nonautonomous defects in the developing reproductive system. MAFR-1 levels inversely correlate with stored intestinal lipids, in part by influencing the expression of the lipogenesis enzymes fasn-1/FASN and pod-2/ACC1. Animals fed a high carbohydrate diet exhibit reduced mafr-1 expression and mutations in the insulin signaling pathway genes daf-18/PTEN and daf-16/FoxO abrogate the lipid storage defects associated with deregulated mafr-1 expression. Our results reveal physiological roles for mafr-1 in regulating organismal lipid homeostasis, which ensure reproductive success.

  1. Lipid metabolism in cancer cachexia.

    OpenAIRE

    Mulligan, H. D.; Beck, S. A.; Tisdale, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of cancer cachexia on the oxidative metabolism of lipids has been studied in mice transplanted either with the MAC16 adenocarcinoma, which induces profound loss of body weight and depletion of lipid stores, or the MAC13 adenocarcinoma, which is the same histological type, but which grows without an effect on host body weight or lipid stores. While oxidation of D-[U-14C]glucose did not differ between animals bearing tumours of either type and non-tumour bearing controls, oxidation o...

  2. Muscle Lipid Metabolism: Role of Lipid Droplets and Perilipins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Esteban Morales

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is one of the main regulators of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in our organism, and therefore, it is highly susceptible to changes in glucose and fatty acid (FA availability. Skeletal muscle is an extremely complex tissue: its metabolic capacity depends on the type of fibers it is made up of and the level of stimulation it undergoes, such as acute or chronic contraction. Obesity is often associated with increased FA levels, which leads to the accumulation of toxic lipid intermediates, oxidative stress, and autophagy in skeletal fibers. This lipotoxicity is one of the most common causes of insulin resistance (IR. In this scenario, the “isolation” of certain lipids in specific cell compartments, through the action of the specific lipid droplet, perilipin (PLIN family of proteins, is conceived as a lifeguard compensatory strategy. In this review, we summarize the cellular mechanism underlying lipid mobilization and metabolism inside skeletal muscle, focusing on the function of lipid droplets, the PLIN family of proteins, and how these entities are modified in exercise, obesity, and IR conditions.

  3. Hormonal regulation of lipid metabolism in developing coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Lipid metabolism in juvenile coho salmon is characterized, and adaptive changes in lipid mobilization are described in relation to development and hormonal influences. The rates of lipogenesis and lipolysis were determined in selected tissues of juvenile salmon during the period of seawater preadaptive development (smoltification). Neutral lipid (sterol) and fatty acid synthesis in the liver and mesenteric fat was measured by tritium incorporation. Fatty acid synthesis in the liver and mesenteric fat decreased by 88% and 81%, respectively, between late February (parr) and early June (smolt). To assess the role of hormones in smoltification-associated lipid depletion, growth hormone, prolactin, thyroxin and cortisol were administered in vivo early in development (parr) to determine if any of these factors could initiate the metabolic responses normally seen later in development (smolt). Growth hormone stimulated lipid mobilization from coho salmon parr. Prolactin strongly stimulated lipid mobilization in coho parr. Thyroxin and cortisol also stimulated lipid mobilization for coho salmon parr. The direct effect of hormones was studied by in vitro pH-stat incubation of liver slices. These data suggest that norepinephrine stimulates fatty acid release via β-adrenergic pathways. Somatostatin and its partial analogue from the fish caudal neurosecretory system, urotensin II, also affect lipid mobilization. These results establish the presence of hormone-sensitive lipase in salmon liver and suggest that the regulation of lipid metabolism in salmon involves both long-acting and short-acting hormonal agents

  4. Assessment of lipid metabolism in thyroid dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Kadzharyan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available 1. Actuality According to WHO Thyroid dysfunction is one of the most prevalent in humans and is one of the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. Hypothyroidism affects the mechanisms of potentiation of cardiovascular risk factors, suggesting the need to study the level of the blood lipids in all patients with thyroid dysfunction. 2. The purpose of this study. To define features of lipid metabolism, depending on the functional state of the thyroid gland. 3. Material and methods. The study included 95 patients, mean age was 49,8 ± 12,9 years. 74 of them were women (78% and 21 - men (22%. In accordance with the purpose of the work 3 groups of subjects were formed. I-st group - 35 patients with hypothyroidism, mean age 52,5 ± 10,3 years, II-nd group - 37 patients with hyperthyroidism, the average age was 45,1 ± 13 years, III (control group - 23 patients with euthyroid, mean age 53,9 ± 14,8 years. Levels of TSH, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, microsomal antibodies to thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase were evaluated for total and biochemical analysis. To determine the type of hyperlipoproteinemia Fredrickson, 1967 recommendations were used. 4. Results of the study Lipid profile parameters in the I-st group compared with the control were even higher. Cholesterol increased up to 6,9% (p <0,005, Tg - 8,6% (p <0,005, β -DP - 6,8% (p <0,5, in comparison with the II-nd: cholesterol - 56% (p <0,005, TG - 55% (p <0,005 and β-PL 44% (p <0.5. In group II rates were lower than in the III- cholesterol - 8% (p <0,005, Tg 8,3% (p <0,005 and β-PL 6,5% (p <0,5. Patients from the I-st group had the following distribution of hyperlipidemia (Fredrickson, 1967.: I type - 10 patients (29%; IIb type - 15 subjects (43%; IIa type - 9 subjects (26%; IV type - 1 patient (2%. The correlation dependence of TSH and cholesterol (r = +0,37, p <0,05, TG (r = +0,25, p <0,05, β-PL (r = +0,74, p <0.05, TG AT (r = +0,55, p <0,05, the level of bilirubin (r = +0,29, p <0

  5. Blood lipids and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Caroline J; Bonilla, Carolina; Holly, Jeff M P

    2016-01-01

    Genetic risk scores were used as unconfounded instruments for specific lipid traits (Mendelian randomization) to assess whether circulating lipids causally influence prostate cancer risk. Data from 22,249 prostate cancer cases and 22,133 controls from 22 studies within the international PRACTICAL...... into logistic regression models to estimate the presence (and direction) of any causal effect of each lipid trait on prostate cancer risk. There was weak evidence for an association between the LDL genetic score and cancer grade: the odds ratio (OR) per genetically instrumented standard deviation (SD) in LDL.......95, 3.00; P = 0.08). The rs12916-T variant in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) was inversely associated with prostate cancer (OR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.00; P = 0.03). In conclusion, circulating lipids, instrumented by our genetic risk scores, did not appear to alter prostate cancer risk...

  6. Bioactive Lipids in Dairy Fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellgren, Lars; Nordby, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    Milk fat is the most important energy source for the newborn infant beside its important role as energy source, milk fat also contain a range of bioactive lipids, that potentially can modulate the immune response and metabolic regulation in the child. In this chapter we review the literature on b...... on bioactive dairy fatty acids: conjugated linoleic acid, branched chained and odd chained fatty acids, as well as bioactive complex lipids such as sphingomyelin and gangliosides....

  7. Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    . .... In all the metal complexes, the azomethine group is shifted to lower .... According to Overtone's concept of cell permeability the lipid membrane that surrounds the cell favours the passage of only lipid soluble materials due to which ...

  8. [Lipids of Aureobasidium (Pullularia) pullulans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elinov, N P; Iurlova, N A; Efimova, T P

    1975-01-01

    Fractional composition of free and bound lipids was studied in Aureobasidium (Pullularia) pullulans 8 by preparative TLC on Silufol. Bound lipids contained a fraction (27.76 +/- 0.5%) of dark brown colour, similar to melanin. The composition of fatty acids was studied by GLC. The following fatty acids were identified and determined quantitatively: C12:0, C14:0, C15:0, C16:0, C18:0, C18:1+C15:2. The following fatty acids predominated in free and bound lipids: C16:0, C18:1+C18:2. The ratio between unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in all fractions of free and bound lipids was more than unity. The following parameters were determined for lipids; ester number (173.89 and 178.53); iodine number (44.1 and 33.10), and saponification number (181.17 and 206.03) (the values are given for free and bound lipids, respectively).

  9. Defining Lipid Transport Pathways in Animal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Richard E.; Sleight, Richard G.

    1985-09-01

    A new technique for studying the metabolism and intracellular transport of lipid molecules in living cells based on the use of fluorescent lipid analogs is described. The cellular processing of various intermediates (phosphatidic acid and ceramide) and end products (phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine) in lipid biosynthesis is reviewed and a working model for compartmentalization during lipid biosynthesis is presented.

  10. Particulate sulfur-containing lipids: Production and cycling from the epipelagic to the abyssopelagic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gašparović, Blaženka; Penezić, Abra; Frka, Sanja; Kazazić, Saša; Lampitt, Richard S.; Holguin, F. Omar; Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Schaub, Tanner

    2018-04-01

    There are major gaps in our understanding of the distribution and role of lipids in the open ocean especially with regard to sulfur-containing lipids (S-lipids). Here, we employ a powerful analytical approach based on high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) to elucidate depth-related S-lipid production and molecular transformations in suspended particulate matter from the Northeast Atlantic Ocean in this depth range. We show that within the open-ocean environment S-lipids contribute up to 4.2% of the particulate organic carbon, and that up to 95% of these compounds have elemental compositions that do not match those found in the Nature Lipidomics Gateway database (termed "novel"). Among the remaining 5% of lipids that match the database, we find that sulphoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) are efficiently removed while sinking through the mesopelagic zone. The relative abundance of other assigned lipids (sulphoquinovosylmonoacylglycerol (SQMG), sulfite and sulfate lipids, Vitamin D2 and D3 derivatives, and sphingolipids) did not change substantially with depth. The novel S-lipids, represented by hundreds of distinct elemental compositions (160-300 molecules at any one depth), contribute increasingly to the lipid and particulate organic matter pools with increased depth. Depth-related transformations cause (i) incomplete degradation/transformation of unsaturated S-lipids which leads to the depth-related accumulation of the refractory saturated compounds with reduced molecular weight (average 455 Da) and (ii) formation of highly unsaturated S-lipids (average abyssopelagic molecular double bond equivalents, DBE=7.8) with lower molecular weight (average 567 Da) than surface S-lipids (average 592 Da). A depth-related increase in molecular oxygen content is observed for all novel S-lipids and indicates that oxidation has a significant role in their transformation while (bio)hydrogenation possibly impacts the formation of

  11. An Overview of Lipid Droplets in Cancer and Cancer Stem Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tirinato, Luca; Pagliari, Francesca; Limongi, Tania; Marini, Monica; Falqui, Andrea; Seco, J.; Candeloro, Patrizio; Liberale, Carlo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2017-01-01

    For decades, lipid droplets have been considered as the main cellular organelles involved in the fat storage, because of their lipid composition. However, in recent years, some new and totally unexpected roles have been discovered for them: (i) they are active sites for synthesis and storage of inflammatory mediators, and (ii) they are key players in cancer cells and tissues, especially in cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize the main concepts related to the lipid droplet structure and function and their involvement in inflammatory and cancer processes.

  12. An Overview of Lipid Droplets in Cancer and Cancer Stem Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tirinato, Luca

    2017-08-13

    For decades, lipid droplets have been considered as the main cellular organelles involved in the fat storage, because of their lipid composition. However, in recent years, some new and totally unexpected roles have been discovered for them: (i) they are active sites for synthesis and storage of inflammatory mediators, and (ii) they are key players in cancer cells and tissues, especially in cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize the main concepts related to the lipid droplet structure and function and their involvement in inflammatory and cancer processes.

  13. Modeling growth, lipid accumulation and lipid turnover in submerged batch cultures of Umbelopsis isabellina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwse, P.; Akbari, P.; Tramper, J.; Rinzema, A.

    2012-01-01

    The production of lipids by oleaginous yeast and fungi becomes more important because these lipids can be used for biodiesel production. To understand the process of lipid production better, we developed a model for growth, lipid production and lipid turnover in submerged batch fermentation. This

  14. Lipid nanoparticle interactions and assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Matthew Ryan

    Novel liposome-nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs) provide a biologically inspired route for designing multifunctional bionanotheranostics. LNAs combine the benefits of lipids and liposomes to encapsulate, transport, and protect hydrophilic and hydrophobic therapeutics with functional nanoparticles. Functional nanoparticles endow LNAs with additional capabilities, including the ability to target diseases, triggered drug release, controlled therapeutic output, and diagnostic capabilities to produce a drug delivery system that can effectively and efficiently deliver therapeutics while reducing side effects. Not only could LNAs make existing drugs better, they could also provide an avenue to allow once promising non-approved drugs (rejected due to harmful side effects, inadequate pharmacokinetics, and poor efficacy) to be safely used through targeted and controlled delivery directly to the diseased site. LNAs have the potential to be stimuli responsive, delivering drugs on command by external (ultrasound, RF heating, etc.) or internal (pH, blood sugar, heart rate, etc.) stimuli. Individually, lipids and nanoparticles have been clinically approved for therapy, such as Doxil (a liposomal doxorubicin for cancer treatment), and diagnosis, such as Feridex (an iron oxide nanoparticle an MRI contrast enhancement agent for liver tumors). In order to engineer these multifunctional LNAs for theranostic applications, the interactions between nanoparticles and lipids must be better understood. This research sought to explore the formation, design, structures, characteristics, and functions of LNAs. To achieve this goal, different types of LNAs were formed, specifically magnetoliposomes, bilayer decorated LNAs (DLNAs), and lipid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs). A fluorescent probe was embedded in the lipid bilayer of magnetoliposomes allowing the local temperature and membrane fluidity to be observed. When subjected to an electromagnetic field that heated the encapsulated iron

  15. Position of residues in transmembrane peptides with respect to the lipid bilayer: A combined lipid NOEs and water chemical exchange approach in phospholipid bicelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, Kerney Jebrell; Whiles, Jennifer A.; Vold, Regitze R.; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    The model transmembrane peptide P16 was incorporated into small unaligned phospholipid bicelles, which provide a 'native-like' lipid bilayer compatible with high-resolution solution NMR techniques. Using amide-water chemical exchange and amide-lipid cross-relaxation measurements, the interactions between P16 and bicelles were investigated. Distinctive intermolecular NOE patterns observed in band-selective 2D-NOESY spectra of bicellar solutions with several lipid deuteration schemes indicated that P16 is preferentially interacting with the 'bilayered' region of the bicelle rather than with the rim. Furthermore, when amide-lipid NOEs were combined with amide-water chemical exchange cross-peaks of selectively 15 N-labeled P16 peptides, valuable information was obtained about the position of selected residues relative to the membrane-water interface. Specifically, three main classes were identified. Class I residues lie outside the bilayer and show amide-water exchange cross-peaks but no amide-lipid NOEs. Class II residues reside in the bilayer-water interface and show both amide-water exchange cross-peaks and amide-lipid NOEs. Class III residues are embedded within the hydrophobic core of the membrane and show no amide-water exchange cross-peaks but strong amide-lipid NOEs

  16. Lipids, lipid droplets and lipoproteins in their cellular context; an ultrastructural approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesman, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipids are essential for cellular life, functioning either organized as bilayer membranes to compartmentalize cellular processes, as signaling molecules or as metabolic energy storage. Our current knowledge on lipid organization and cellular lipid homeostasis is mainly based on biochemical data.

  17. Gene therapy for lipid disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rader Daniel J

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lipid disorders are associated with atherosclerotic vascular disease, and therapy is associated with a substantial reduction in cardiovascular events. Current approaches to the treatment of lipid disorders are ineffective in a substantial number of patients. New therapies for refractory hypercholesterolemia, severe hypertriglyceridemia, and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are needed: somatic gene therapy is one viable approach. The molecular etiology and pathophysiology of most of the candidate diseases are well understood. Animal models exist for the diseases and in many cases preclinical proof-of-principle studies have already been performed. There has been progress in the development of vectors that provide long-term gene expression. New clinical gene therapy trials for lipid disorders are likely to be initiated within the next few years.

  18. Analysis of Lipid Experiments (ALEX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husen, Peter; Tarasov, Kirill; Katafiasz, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Global lipidomics analysis across large sample sizes produces high-content datasets that require dedicated software tools supporting lipid identification and quantification, efficient data management and lipidome visualization. Here we present a novel software-based platform for streamlined data...... processing, management and visualization of shotgun lipidomics data acquired using high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. The platform features the ALEX framework designed for automated identification and export of lipid species intensity directly from proprietary mass spectral data files......, and an auxiliary workflow using database exploration tools for integration of sample information, computation of lipid abundance and lipidome visualization. A key feature of the platform is the organization of lipidomics data in "database table format" which provides the user with an unsurpassed flexibility...

  19. Adjuvant tamoxifen influences the lipid profile in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che; Chen, Li-Sheng; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Chen, Dar-Ren

    2014-02-01

    Currently there is a debate regarding whether tamoxifen used in breast cancer has an impact on lipid profiles. The aim of this study was to determine whether tamoxifen has an impact on the serum lipid profile in Taiwanese women. Data of 109 patients were collected from the routine clinical follow-up for women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer who were treated between July 2005 and March 2008. These patients were divided into 2 subgroups, based on their tumor grade and lymph node status. Subgroup 1 patients had tumor grade I/II and a negative lymph node status. Those patients with tumor grade III or a positive lymph node status were defined as subgroup 2. In the 109 patients, the mean serum total cholesterol (TC) levels after tamoxifen treatment, as well as the serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, were lower than the baseline levels, with statistically significant differences. Treatment with tamoxifen lowered the serum TC and LDL-C levels in both subgroups. The results indicate that tamoxifen has an impact on the serum lipid profile of breast cancer patients in Taiwan. Physicians should follow up the lipid profile in these patients.

  20. Membrane lipid peroxidation by UV-A: Mechanism and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, B.; Agarwal, S.; Chatterjee, S.N.

    1990-01-01

    UV-A produced a dose-dependent linear increase of lipid peroxidation in liposomal membrane, as detected by the assay of (i) conjugated dienes, (ii) lipid hydroperoxides, (iii) malondialdehydes (MDA), and (iv) the fluorescent adducts formed by the reaction of MDA with glycine and also a linear dose-dependent increase of [ 14 C]glucose efflux from the liposomes. UV-A-induced MDA production could not be inhibited by any significant degree by sodium formate, dimethyl sulfoxide, EDTA, or superoxide dismutase but was very significantly inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene, alpha-tocopherol, sodium azide, L-histidine, dimethylfuran, and beta-carotene. MDA formation increased with an increase in the D 2 O content in water, leading to a maximal amount of nearly 50% enhancement of lipid peroxidation in 100% D 2 O vis-a-vis water used as dispersion medium. The experimental findings indicate the involvement of singlet oxygen as the initiator of the UV-A-induced lipid peroxidation

  1. Antitumor Lipids--Structure, Functions, and Medical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinova, Aneliya; Topouzova-Hristova, Tanya; Momchilova, Albena; Tzoneva, Rumiana; Berger, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Cell proliferation and metastasis are considered hallmarks of tumor progression. Therefore, efforts have been made to develop novel anticancer drugs that inhibit both the proliferation and the motility of tumor cells. Synthetic antitumor lipids (ATLs), which are chemically divided into two main classes, comprise (i) alkylphospholipids (APLs) and (ii) alkylphosphocholines (APCs). They represent a new entity of drugs with distinct antiproliferative properties in tumor cells. These compounds do not interfere with the DNA or mitotic spindle apparatus of the cell, instead, they incorporate into cell membranes, where they accumulate and interfere with lipid metabolism and lipid-dependent signaling pathways. Recently, it has been shown that the most commonly studied APLs inhibit proliferation by inducing apoptosis in malignant cells while leaving normal cells unaffected and are potent sensitizers of conventional chemo- and radiotherapy, as well as of electrical field therapy. APLs resist catabolic degradation to a large extent, therefore accumulate in the cell and interfere with lipid-dependent survival signaling pathways, notably PI3K-Akt and Raf-Erk1/2, and de novo phospholipid biosynthesis. They are internalized in the cell membrane via raft domains and cause downstream reactions as inhibition of cell growth and migration, cell cycle arrest, actin stress fibers collapse, and apoptosis. This review summarizes the in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials of most common ATLs and their mode of action at molecular and biochemical levels. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities in acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Sophia; Leahy, Jade; Fournier, Maryse; Lamarche, Benoit; Garofalo, Carole; Grimard, Guy; Poulain, Floriane; Delvin, Edgard; Laverdière, Caroline; Krajinovic, Maja; Drouin, Simon; Sinnett, Daniel; Marcil, Valérie; Levy, Emile

    2017-05-01

    Survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common cancer in children, are at increased risk of developing late cardiometabolic conditions. However, the mechanisms are not fully understood. This study aimed to characterize the plasma lipid profile, Apo distribution, and lipoprotein composition of 80 childhood ALL survivors compared with 22 healthy controls. Our results show that, despite their young age, 50% of the ALL survivors displayed dyslipidemia, characterized by increased plasma triglyceride (TG) and LDL-cholesterol, as well as decreased HDL-cholesterol. ALL survivors exhibited lower plasma Apo A-I and higher Apo B-100 and C-II levels, along with elevated Apo C-II/C-III and B-100/A-I ratios. VLDL fractions of dyslipidemic ALL survivors contained more TG, free cholesterol, and phospholipid moieties, but less protein. Differences in Apo content were found between ALL survivors and controls for all lipoprotein fractions except HDL 3 HDL 2 , especially, showed reduced Apo A-I and raised Apo A-II, leading to a depressed Apo A-I/A-II ratio. Analysis of VLDL-Apo Cs disclosed a trend for higher Apo C-III 1 content in dyslipidemic ALL survivors. In conclusion, this thorough investigation demonstrates a high prevalence of dyslipidemia in ALL survivors, while highlighting significant abnormalities in their plasma lipid profile and lipoprotein composition. Special attention must, therefore, be paid to these subjects given the atherosclerotic potency of lipid and lipoprotein disorders. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Lipids in citrus sinensis seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, S.; Liaquat, L.; Khalid, B.; Khan, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    The seed oil of citrus sinensis when subjected to different physicochemical tests showed moisture 13.2%, ash 7.5%, ester value 1.29%, free fatty acid 0.4%. iodine value 65.0% and protein value 6.0%. According to lipid analysis. the oil was classified into hydrocarbons. wax esters, sterol esters, triglycerides. free fatty acids, 1,3 and 1,2 diglycerides, alcohols, sterols, monoglycerides, phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines and lysophosphatidylethanolamines. The fatty acid (C/sub 12.0/ - C/sub 21.0/) composition of all lipid classes was determined with the help of thin layer and gas liquid chromatography. (author)

  4. Sensing voltage across lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Kenton J.

    2009-01-01

    The detection of electrical potentials across lipid bilayers by specialized membrane proteins is required for many fundamental cellular processes such as the generation and propagation of nerve impulses. These membrane proteins possess modular voltage-sensing domains, a notable example being the S1-S4 domains of voltage-activated ion channels. Ground-breaking structural studies on these domains explain how voltage sensors are designed and reveal important interactions with the surrounding lipid membrane. Although further structures are needed to fully understand the conformational changes that occur during voltage sensing, the available data help to frame several key concepts that are fundamental to the mechanism of voltage sensing. PMID:19092925

  5. Blood lipid metabolites and meat lipid peroxidation responses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esnart Mukumbo

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... Fat and protein contents of thigh muscle and abdominal fat weight were measured and reported. Chickens fed LPO had greater serum triacylglycerol and very low ... favour lipid peroxidation, inhibit synthesis of higher homologous of ... The ambient temperature was gradually decreased from 33 °C at first.

  6. Blood lipid metabolites and meat lipid peroxidation responses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood samples were collected from broilers to evaluate serum biochemical metabolites on day 41. Thigh meat samples were provided and analysed after 1, 5 and 10 days' storage to evaluate lipid peroxidation at the end of the experiment. Fat and protein contents of thigh muscle and abdominal fat weight were measured ...

  7. Chemical and structural investigation of lipid nanoparticles: drug-lipid interaction and molecular distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anantachaisilp, Suranan; Smith, Siwaporn Meejoo [Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama VI Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Treetong, Alongkot; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rungsardthong [National Nanotechnology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 111 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Pratontep, Sirapat [College of KMITL Nanotechnology, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok (Thailand); Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit, E-mail: uracha@nanotec.or.th [Department of Manufacturing Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2010-03-26

    Lipid nanoparticles are a promising alternative to existing carriers in chemical or drug delivery systems. A key challenge is to determine how chemicals are incorporated and distributed inside nanoparticles, which assists in controlling chemical retention and release characteristics. This study reports the chemical and structural investigation of {gamma}-oryzanol loading inside a model lipid nanoparticle drug delivery system composed of cetyl palmitate as solid lipid and Miglyol 812 as liquid lipid. The lipid nanoparticles were prepared by high pressure homogenization at varying liquid lipid content, in comparison with the {gamma}-oryzanol free systems. The size of the lipid nanoparticles, as measured by the photon correlation spectroscopy, was found to decrease with increased liquid lipid content from 200 to 160 nm. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-NMR) measurements of the medium chain triglyceride of the liquid lipid has confirmed successful incorporation of the liquid lipid in the lipid nanoparticles. Differential scanning calorimetric and powder x-ray diffraction measurements provide complementary results to the {sup 1}H-NMR, whereby the crystallinity of the lipid nanoparticles diminishes with an increase in the liquid lipid content. For the distribution of {gamma}-oryzanol inside the lipid nanoparticles, the {sup 1}H-NMR revealed that the chemical shifts of the liquid lipid in {gamma}-oryzanol loaded systems were found at rather higher field than those in {gamma}-oryzanol free systems, suggesting incorporation of {gamma}-oryzanol in the liquid lipid. In addition, the phase-separated structure was observed by atomic force microscopy for lipid nanoparticles with 0% liquid lipid, but not for lipid nanoparticles with 5 and 10% liquid lipid. Raman spectroscopic and mapping measurements further revealed preferential incorporation of {gamma}-oryzanol in the liquid part rather than the solid part of in the lipid nanoparticles. Simple models

  8. Chemical and structural investigation of lipid nanoparticles: drug-lipid interaction and molecular distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantachaisilp, Suranan; Meejoo Smith, Siwaporn; Treetong, Alongkot; Pratontep, Sirapat; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Rungsardthong Ruktanonchai, Uracha

    2010-03-01

    Lipid nanoparticles are a promising alternative to existing carriers in chemical or drug delivery systems. A key challenge is to determine how chemicals are incorporated and distributed inside nanoparticles, which assists in controlling chemical retention and release characteristics. This study reports the chemical and structural investigation of γ-oryzanol loading inside a model lipid nanoparticle drug delivery system composed of cetyl palmitate as solid lipid and Miglyol 812® as liquid lipid. The lipid nanoparticles were prepared by high pressure homogenization at varying liquid lipid content, in comparison with the γ-oryzanol free systems. The size of the lipid nanoparticles, as measured by the photon correlation spectroscopy, was found to decrease with increased liquid lipid content from 200 to 160 nm. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) measurements of the medium chain triglyceride of the liquid lipid has confirmed successful incorporation of the liquid lipid in the lipid nanoparticles. Differential scanning calorimetric and powder x-ray diffraction measurements provide complementary results to the 1H-NMR, whereby the crystallinity of the lipid nanoparticles diminishes with an increase in the liquid lipid content. For the distribution of γ-oryzanol inside the lipid nanoparticles, the 1H-NMR revealed that the chemical shifts of the liquid lipid in γ-oryzanol loaded systems were found at rather higher field than those in γ-oryzanol free systems, suggesting incorporation of γ-oryzanol in the liquid lipid. In addition, the phase-separated structure was observed by atomic force microscopy for lipid nanoparticles with 0% liquid lipid, but not for lipid nanoparticles with 5 and 10% liquid lipid. Raman spectroscopic and mapping measurements further revealed preferential incorporation of γ-oryzanol in the liquid part rather than the solid part of in the lipid nanoparticles. Simple models representing the distribution of γ-oryzanol and

  9. Chemical and structural investigation of lipid nanoparticles: drug-lipid interaction and molecular distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anantachaisilp, Suranan; Smith, Siwaporn Meejoo; Treetong, Alongkot; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rungsardthong; Pratontep, Sirapat; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2010-01-01

    Lipid nanoparticles are a promising alternative to existing carriers in chemical or drug delivery systems. A key challenge is to determine how chemicals are incorporated and distributed inside nanoparticles, which assists in controlling chemical retention and release characteristics. This study reports the chemical and structural investigation of γ-oryzanol loading inside a model lipid nanoparticle drug delivery system composed of cetyl palmitate as solid lipid and Miglyol 812 as liquid lipid. The lipid nanoparticles were prepared by high pressure homogenization at varying liquid lipid content, in comparison with the γ-oryzanol free systems. The size of the lipid nanoparticles, as measured by the photon correlation spectroscopy, was found to decrease with increased liquid lipid content from 200 to 160 nm. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H-NMR) measurements of the medium chain triglyceride of the liquid lipid has confirmed successful incorporation of the liquid lipid in the lipid nanoparticles. Differential scanning calorimetric and powder x-ray diffraction measurements provide complementary results to the 1 H-NMR, whereby the crystallinity of the lipid nanoparticles diminishes with an increase in the liquid lipid content. For the distribution of γ-oryzanol inside the lipid nanoparticles, the 1 H-NMR revealed that the chemical shifts of the liquid lipid in γ-oryzanol loaded systems were found at rather higher field than those in γ-oryzanol free systems, suggesting incorporation of γ-oryzanol in the liquid lipid. In addition, the phase-separated structure was observed by atomic force microscopy for lipid nanoparticles with 0% liquid lipid, but not for lipid nanoparticles with 5 and 10% liquid lipid. Raman spectroscopic and mapping measurements further revealed preferential incorporation of γ-oryzanol in the liquid part rather than the solid part of in the lipid nanoparticles. Simple models representing the distribution of γ-oryzanol and

  10. Lipid profile in cerebrovascular accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togha, Mansoureh; Gheini, Mohamad Reza; Ahmadi, Babak; Khashaiar, Patricia; Razeghi, Soodeh

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the lipid profile have been suggested as a risk factor for developing ischemic stroke. Their role in intra-cerebral hemorrhage, however, is not clear. The present study was designed to evaluate the lipid profile levels of patients who had experienced an acute stroke during the first 24-hour and to compare these levels in different patients suffering from the stroke, either hemorrhagic or ischemic, and healthy individuals. In this cross-sectional study, 258 consecutive patients with acute stroke admitted to the neurology department of our center during September 2006 and September 2007 were studied. As for the control group, 187 apparently healthy subjects living in the same community and matched for age and sex were selected. Lipid profile was measured and compared between the three groups. In the patients' group, 65 suffered from hemorrhagic stroke (group 1) and the other 193 had ischemic stroke (group 2). Except for TG values, there was no significant difference among the ischemic and hemorrhagic lipid profile. Age, cholesterol, and LDL influenced the risk of developing an ischemic stroke; TG was not reported as a risk factor or a protective one. While the comparison of data retrieved from patients suffering from hemorrhagic strokes with the controls, revealed LDL as the risk factor contributing to the development of ICH whereas TG was reported as a protective factor. It could be concluded that LDL level can be considered as a risk factor for both ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebral events.

  11. Future directions in lipid therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansell, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    Cholesterol management to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease is a major public health concern. Despite widespread recognition of lipid abnormalities as cardiovascular risk factors, significant cardiovascular event reductions with cholesterol-lowering therapies, and dissemination of treatment guidelines, most high-risk patients are not at target lipid levels. In addition to lifestyle changes, four major drug classes are available to modify lipid levels: fibrates, niacin, resins, and statins. High efficacy and tolerability in clinical trials make statins the most widely prescribed of these agents. Newer, more potent members of this class and novel formulations of niacin and resins may provide more effective therapy for dyslipidemia with fewer side effects. Several agents in development (cholesterol-absorption inhibitors and ACAT inhibitors) exploit mechanisms of action complementary to those of current treatments and combined with statins may produce greater improvements in lipid profiles than are now possible. These innovations should enable a greater number of patients to achieve more aggressive cholesterol goals, thereby reducing the risk of cardiovascular events.

  12. Computer Simulations of Lipid Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier F. Fernandez-Luengo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipid nanoparticles (LNP are promising soft matter nanomaterials for drug delivery applications. In spite of their interest, little is known about the supramolecular organization of the components of these self-assembled nanoparticles. Here, we present a molecular dynamics simulation study, employing the Martini coarse-grain forcefield, of self-assembled LNPs made by tripalmitin lipid in water. We also study the adsorption of Tween 20 surfactant as a protective layer on top of the LNP. We show that, at 310 K (the temperature of interest in biological applications, the structure of the lipid nanoparticles is similar to that of a liquid droplet, in which the lipids show no nanostructuration and have high mobility. We show that, for large enough nanoparticles, the hydrophilic headgroups develop an interior surface in the NP core that stores liquid water. The surfactant is shown to organize in an inhomogeneous way at the LNP surface, with patches with high surfactant concentrations and surface patches not covered by surfactant.

  13. Parvovirus B19 VLP recognizes globoside in supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Waqas; Nilsson, Jonas; Olofsson, Sigvard; Bally, Marta; Rydell, Gustaf E

    2014-05-01

    Studies have suggested that the glycosphingolipid globoside (Gb4Cer) is a receptor for human parvovirus B19. Virus-like particles bind to Gb4Cer on thin-layer chromatograms, but a direct interaction between the virus and lipid membrane-associated Gb4Cer has been debated. Here, we characterized the binding of parvovirus B19 VP1/VP2 virus-like particles to glycosphingolipids (i) on thin-layer chromatograms (TLCs) and (ii) incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) acting as cell-membrane mimics. The binding specificities of parvovirus B19 determined in the two systems were in good agreement; the VLP recognized both Gb4Cer and the Forssman glycosphingolipid on TLCs and in SLBs compatible with the role of Gb4Cer as a receptor for this virus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Modification by oral contraceptives in rat of 14C acetate incorporation into platelet lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciavatti, M.; Renaud, S.

    1979-01-01

    The in vitro incorporation of acetate 14 C in platelet lipids was compared in control female rats (Gr.I) to rats treated for 4 days either by an oral contraceptive ethinyl oestradiol + lynestrenol (Gr.II), or by ethinyl oestradiol alone (Gr.III) or lynestrenol alone (Gr.IV). An increase of 43-45% in the incorporation of acetate could be ovserved in the two groups (II and III) which received ethinyl oestradiol, while the incorporation in group IV was similar to that of the controls. The lipid fractions of which the synthesis was the most considerably stimulated by the oestrogen treatment, were the neutral lipids as separated from the other lipids by TLC. In groups II and III the incorporation in cholesterol and cholesterol esters was increased by 8 fold and by 10 fold in the free fatty acid fraction. In these two groups, even in the phospholipid fractions PS + PI and PE, the radioactivity was significantly increased. The observed effect of the oral contraceptive studied here on platelet lipid synthesis in female rats, appears to be essentially due to the estrogens, since lynestrenol had only minimal effects in that respect. (orig.) [de

  15. Lipids in the cell: organisation regulates function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana L; Preta, Giulio

    2018-06-01

    Lipids are fundamental building blocks of all cells and play important roles in the pathogenesis of different diseases, including inflammation, autoimmune disease, cancer, and neurodegeneration. The lipid composition of different organelles can vary substantially from cell to cell, but increasing evidence demonstrates that lipids become organised specifically in each compartment, and this organisation is essential for regulating cell function. For example, lipid microdomains in the plasma membrane, known as lipid rafts, are platforms for concentrating protein receptors and can influence intra-cellular signalling. Lipid organisation is tightly regulated and can be observed across different model organisms, including bacteria, yeast, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting that lipid organisation is evolutionarily conserved. In this review, we summarise the importance and function of specific lipid domains in main cellular organelles and discuss recent advances that investigate how these specific and highly regulated structures contribute to diverse biological processes.

  16. Lipids and essential oils as antimicrobial agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thormar, Halldor

    2011-01-01

    ... of Antimicrobial Lipids on Cell Membranes 20 1.7 Conclusions 21 Acknowledgements 21 References 22 2 Antibacterial Effects of Lipids: Historical Review (1881 to 1960) Halldor Thormar 2.1 Introduction 2....

  17. Characterization of Carbamazepine-Loaded Solid Lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    loaded solid lipid nanoparticles by RESS as well as their characterization has been achieved in this study. Keywords: Rapid expansion of supercritical fluid, Stearic acid, Solid lipid nanoparticles, Carbamazepine, Co-precipitation ...

  18. Exogenous ether lipids predominantly target mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Kuerschner

    Full Text Available Ether lipids are ubiquitous constituents of cellular membranes with no discrete cell biological function assigned yet. Using fluorescent polyene-ether lipids we analyzed their intracellular distribution in living cells by microscopy. Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum accumulated high amounts of ether-phosphatidylcholine and ether-phosphatidylethanolamine. Both lipids were specifically labeled using the corresponding lyso-ether lipids, which we established as supreme precursors for lipid tagging. Polyfosine, a fluorescent analogue of the anti-neoplastic ether lipid edelfosine, accumulated to mitochondria and induced morphological changes and cellular apoptosis. These data indicate that edelfosine could exert its pro-apoptotic power by targeting and damaging mitochondria and thereby inducing cellular apoptosis. In general, this study implies an important role of mitochondria in ether lipid metabolism and intracellular ether lipid trafficking.

  19. A close collaboration of chitosan with lipid colloidal carriers for drug delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugnicourt, Loïc; Ladavière, Catherine

    2017-06-28

    Chitosan and lipid colloids have separately shown a growing interest in the field of drug delivery applications. Their success is mainly due to their interesting physicochemical behaviors, as well as their biological properties such as bioactivity and biocompatibility. While chitosan is a well-known cationic polysaccharide with the ability to strongly interact with drugs and biological matrices through mainly electrostatic interactions, lipid colloids are carriers particularly recognized for the drug vectorization. In recent years, the combination of both entities has been considered because it offers new systems which gather the advantages of each of them to efficiently deliver various types of bioactive species. The purpose of this review is to describe these associations between chemically-unmodified chitosan chains (solubilized or dispersed) and lipid colloids (as nanoparticles or organized in lipid layers), as well as their potential in the drug delivery area so far. Three assemblies have mainly been reported in the literature: i) lipid nanoparticles (solid lipid nanoparticles or nanostructured lipid carriers) coated with chitosan chains, ii) lipid vesicles covered with chitosan chains, and iii) chitosan chains structured in nanoparticles with a lipid coating. Their elaboration processes, their physicochemical characterization, and their biological studies are detailed and discussed herein. The different bioactive species (drugs and bio(macro)molecules) incorporated in these assemblies, their maximal incorporation efficiency, and their loading capacity are also presented. This review reveals the versatility of these assemblies. Depending on the organization of lipids (i.e., nanoparticles or vesicles) and the state of polymer chains (i.e., solubilized or dispersed under the form of nanoparticles), a large variety of drugs can be successfully incorporated, and various routes of administration can be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Formation of milk lipids: a molecular perspective

    OpenAIRE

    McManaman, James L

    2009-01-01

    Lipids, primarily triglycerides, are major milk constituents of most mammals, providing a large percentage of calories, essential fatty acids and bioactive lipids required for neonatal growth and development. To meet the caloric and nutritional demands of newborns, the mammary glands of most species have evolved an enormous capacity to synthesize and secrete large quantities of lipids during lactation. Significant information exists regarding the physiological regulation of lipid metabolism i...

  1. Lipid Neuroprotectants and Traumatic Glaucomatous Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    not in individuals suffering from glaucoma (endogenous lipids ). The proposed research is to develop several such lipids as potential glaucoma...The proposed research will further assess the efficacy of the new lipids to lower IOP using mouse and monkeys that can develop glaucoma naturally or...of seminars and posters. Two high school students during summer (as part of their HHMI research program) learned hands-on about lipid analyses. A

  2. Polymorphism of lipid self-assembly systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    When lipid molecules are dispersed into an aqueous medium, various self-organized structures are formed, depending on conditions (temperature, concentration, etc), in consequence of the amphipathic nature of the molecules. In addition, lipid self-assembly systems exhibit polymorphic phase transition behavior. Since lipids are one of main components of biomembranes, studies on the structure and thermodynamic properties of lipid self-assembly systems are fundamentally important for the consideration of the stability of biomembranes. (author)

  3. Electrodiffusion of Lipids on Membrane Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Y. C.

    2011-01-01

    Random lateral translocation of lipids and proteins is a universal process on membrane surfaces. Local aggregation or organization of lipids and proteins can be induced when this lateral random diffusion is mediated by the electrostatic interactions and membrane curvature. Though the lateral diffusion rates of lipids on membrane of various compositions are measured and the electrostatic free energies of predetermined protein-membrane-lipid systems can be computed, the process of the aggregati...

  4. Surfactant properties of human meibomian lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Poonam; Millar, Thomas J

    2011-03-25

    Human meibomian lipids are the major part of the lipid layer of the tear film. Their surfactant properties enable their spread across the aqueous layer and help maintain a stable tear film. The purpose of this study was to investigate surfactant properties of human meibomian lipids in vitro and to determine effects of different physical conditions such as temperature and increased osmolarity, such as occur in dry eye, on these properties. Human meibomian lipids were spread on an artificial tear solution in a Langmuir trough. The lipid films were compressed and expanded to record the surface pressure-area (Π-A) isocycles. The isocycles were recorded under different physical conditions such as high pressure, increasing concentration and size of divalent cations, increasing osmolarity, and varying temperature. Π-A isocycles of meibomian lipids showed that they form liquid films that are compressible and multilayered. The isocycles were unaffected by increasing concentration or size of divalent cations and increasing osmolarity in the subphase. Temperature had a marked effect on the lipids. Increase in temperature caused lipid films to become fluid, an expected feature, but decrease in temperature unexpectedly caused expansion of lipids and an increase in pressure suggesting enhanced surfactant properties. Human meibomian lipids form highly compressible, non-collapsible, multilayered liquid films. These lipids have surfactants that allow them to spread across an aqueous subphase. Their surfactant properties are unaffected by increasing divalent cations or hyperosmolarity but are sensitive to temperature. Cooling of meibomian lipids enhances their surfactant properties.

  5. Spin trapping studies of essential oils in lipid systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarova Katerina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we report the results of a spin trapping ESR study of four essential oils widely used for skin care products such as creams and bath salts. The studied essential oils are Rosmarini aetheroleum (rosemary, Menthae piperitae aetheroleum (mint, Lavandulae aetheroleum (lavender, and Thymi aetheroleum (thyme. Fenton reaction in the presence of ethanol was used to generate free radicals. The N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN was used as a spin trap. In the Fenton reaction, the rosemary oil had the lowest effect on radical adduct formation as compared to the reference Fenton system. Since essential oils are known to be lipid soluble, we also conducted studies of essential oils in Fenton reaction in the presence of lipids. Two model lipids were used, namely 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC. The obtained results suggested that in the presence of DOPC lipids, the •OH and PBN/•CHCH3(OH radicals are formed in both phases, that is, water and lipids, and all the studied essential oils affected the Fenton reaction in a similar way. Whereas, in the DPPC system, the additional type of PBN/X (aN = 16.1 G, aH = 2.9 G radical adduct was generated. DFT calculations of hyperfine splittings were performed at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p/EPR-II level of theory for the set of c-centered PBN adducts in order to identify PBN/X radical.

  6. Proteins mediating intra- and intercellular transport of lipids and lipid-modified proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, S.

    2008-01-01

    Proteins mediating intra- and intercellular transport of lipids and lipid-modified proteins In this thesis, I studied the intra- and intercellular transport of lipidic molecules, in particular glycosphingolipids and lipid-modified proteins. The first part focuses on the intracellular transport of

  7. TBscore II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Lemvik, Grethe; Abate, Ebba

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The TBscore, based on simple signs and symptoms, was introduced to predict unsuccessful outcome in tuberculosis patients on treatment. A recent inter-observer variation study showed profound variation in some variables. Further, some variables depend on a physician assessing...... them, making the score less applicable. The aim of the present study was to simplify the TBscore. Methods: Inter-observer variation assessment and exploratory factor analysis were combined to develop a simplified score, the TBscore II. To validate TBscore II we assessed the association between start...

  8. Exome-wide association study of plasma lipids in >300,000 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dajiang J; Peloso, Gina M; Yu, Haojie

    2017-01-01

    -density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and/or triglycerides (TG). At two loci (JAK2 and A1CF), experimental analysis in mice showed lipid changes consistent with the human data. We also found that: (i) beta-thalassemia trait carriers displayed lower TC and were protected from coronary artery disease (CAD); (ii) excluding...

  9. Pb II

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    This investigation describes the use of non-living biomass of Aspergillus caespitosus for removal of ... Pb(II) production has exceeded 3.5 million tons per year. It has been used in the ... This biomass was selected after screening a wide range of microbes. .... prolonged, which proved better biopolymer in metal uptake (Gadd ...

  10. Lipid processing in ionic liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lue, Bena-Marie; Guo, Zheng; Xu, Xuebing

    2007-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been touted as “green” alternatives to traditional molecular solvents and have many unique properties which make them extremely desirable substitutes. Among their most attractive properties are their lack of vapour pressure, broad liquid range, strong solvating power and ...... and the ability to tailor properties of individual ILs to meet specific requirements. This article highlights current research as well as the vast potential of ILs for use as media for reactions, separation and processing in the lipid area....

  11. Proton permeation of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamer, D W

    1987-10-01

    Proton permeation of the lipid bilayer barrier has two unique features. First, permeability coefficients measured at neutral pH ranges are six to seven orders of magnitude greater than expected from knowledge of other monovalent cations. Second, proton conductance across planar lipid bilayers varies at most by a factor of 10 when pH is varied from near 1 to near 11. Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for this anomalous behavior: proton conductance related to contaminants of lipid bilayers, and proton translocation along transient hydrogen-bonded chains (tHBC) of associated water molecules in the membrane. The weight of evidence suggests that trace contaminants may contribute to proton conductance across planar lipid membranes at certain pH ranges, but cannot account for the anomalous proton flux in liposome systems. Two new results will be reported here which were designed to test the tHBC model. These include measurements of relative proton/potassium permeability in the gramicidin channel, and plots of proton flux against the magnitude of pH gradients. (1) The relative permeabilities of protons and potassium through the gramicidin channel, which contains a single strand of hydrogen-bonded water molecules, were found to differ by at least four orders of magnitude when measured at neutral pH ranges. This result demonstrates that a hydrogen-bonded chain of water molecules can provide substantial discrimination between protons and other cations. It was also possible to calculate that if approximately 7% of bilayer water was present in a transient configuration similar to that of the gramicidin channel, it could account for the measured proton flux. (2) The plot of proton conductance against pH gradient across liposome membranes was superlinear, a result that is consistent with one of three alternative tHBC models for proton conductance described by Nagle elsewhere in this volume.

  12. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  13. Mechanics of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Thomas R.

    All cells have membranes. The plasma membrane encapsulates the cell's interior, acting as a barrier against the outside world. In cells with nuclei (eukaryotic cells), membranes also form internal compartments (organelles) which carry out specialized tasks, such as protein modification and sorting in the case of the Golgi apparatus, and ATP production in the case of mitochondria. The main components of membranes are lipids and proteins. The proteins can be channels, carriers, receptors, catalysts, signaling molecules, or structural elements, and typically contribute a substantial fraction of the total membrane dry weight. The equilibrium properties of pure lipid membranes are relatively well-understood, and will be the main focus of this article. The framework of elasticity theory and statistical mechanics that we will develop will serve as the foundation for understanding biological phenomena such as the nonequilibrium behavior of membranes laden with ion pumps, the role of membrane elasticity in ion channel gating, and the dynamics of vesicle fission and fusion. Understanding the mechanics of lipid membranes is also important for drug encapsulation and delivery.

  14. Fat & fabulous: bifunctional lipids in the spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberkant, Per; Holthuis, Joost C M

    2014-08-01

    Understanding biological processes at the mechanistic level requires a systematic charting of the physical and functional links between all cellular components. While protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid networks have been subject to many global surveys, other critical cellular components such as membrane lipids have rarely been studied in large-scale interaction screens. Here, we review the development of photoactivatable and clickable lipid analogues-so-called bifunctional lipids-as novel chemical tools that enable a global profiling of lipid-protein interactions in biological membranes. Recent studies indicate that bifunctional lipids hold great promise in systematic efforts to dissect the elaborate crosstalk between proteins and lipids in live cells and organisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Tools to study lipid functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Lipid Biosynthesis as an Antifungal Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Pan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipids, commonly including phospholipids, sphingolipids, fatty acids, sterols, and triacylglycerols (TAGs, are important biomolecules for the viability of all cells. Phospholipids, sphingolipids, and sterols are important constituents of biological membranes. Many lipids play important roles in the regulation of cell metabolism by acting as signaling molecules. Neutral lipids, including TAGs and sterol esters (STEs, are important storage lipids in cells. In view of the importance of lipid molecules, this review briefly summarizes the metabolic pathways for sterols, phospholipids, sphingolipids, fatty acids, and neutral lipids in fungi and illustrates the differences between fungal and human (or other mammalian cells, especially in relation to lipid biosynthetic pathways. These differences might provide valuable clues for us to find target proteins for novel antifungal drugs. In addition, the development of lipidomics technology in recent years has supplied us with a shortcut for finding new antifungal drug targets; this ability is important for guiding our research on pathogenic fungi.

  16. Presentation of lipid antigens to T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro

    2008-04-15

    T cells specific for lipid antigens participate in regulation of the immune response during infections, tumor immunosurveillance, allergy and autoimmune diseases. T cells recognize lipid antigens as complexes formed with CD1 antigen-presenting molecules, thus resembling recognition of MHC-peptide complexes. The biophysical properties of lipids impose unique mechanisms for their delivery, internalization into antigen-presenting cells, membrane trafficking, processing, and loading of CD1 molecules. Each of these steps is controlled at molecular and celular levels and determines lipid immunogenicity. Lipid antigens may derive from microbes and from the cellular metabolism, thus allowing the immune system to survey a large repertoire of immunogenic molecules. Recognition of lipid antigens facilitates the detection of infectious agents and the initiation of responses involved in immunoregulation and autoimmunity. This review focuses on the presentation mechanisms and specific recognition of self and bacterial lipid antigens and discusses the important open issues.

  17. Stratum Corneum Barrier Lipids in Cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, V; Halkier-Sørensen, L; Rasmussen, G

    2000-01-01

    emerged. When the corneocyte reaches the transitional stage to the stratum corneum, the Odland bodies accumulate near the cell membrane and discharge their contents of lipid and enzymes. The lipids are reorganized into multiple long sheets of lamellar structures that embrace the keratinized corneocytes......, as seen in the formation and maintenance of the cutaneous permeability barrier. In this study we draw the attention to the facts that the cholesteatoma epithelium is capable of producing not only cholesterol, but also several lipids, and that the lipid molecules are organized in multilamellar structures......Specimens from primary cholesteatomas were examined under the electron microscope using a lipid-retaining method that is best suited for intracellular lipids and a method that is best for intercellular lipids. In the stratum granulosum of the squamous epithelium, a large number of Odland bodies...

  18. Introduction to fatty acids and lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdge, Graham C; Calder, Philip C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the structure, function and metabolism of fatty acids and lipids that are of particular importance in the context of parenteral nutrition. Lipids are a heterogeneous group of molecules that share the common property of hydrophobicity. Lipids range in structure from simple short hydrocarbon chains to more complex molecules, including triacylglycerols, phospholipids and sterols and their esters. Lipids within each class may differ structurally. Fatty acids are common components of complex lipids, and these differ according to chain length and the presence, number and position of double bonds in the hydrocarbon chain. Structural variation among complex lipids and among fatty acids gives rise to functional differences that result in different impacts upon metabolism and upon cell and tissue responses. Fatty acids and complex lipids exhibit a variety of structural variations that influence their metabolism and their functional effects. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Genetic ablation of carotene oxygenases and consumption of lycopene or tomato powder diets modulates carotenoid and lipid metabolism in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Nikki A.; Elsen, Amy C.; Erdman, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Carotene-15,15'-monooxygenase (CMO-I) cleaves β-carotene to form vitamin A while carotene-9’,10’-monooxygenase (CMO-II) preferentially cleaves non-provitamin A carotenoids. Recent reports indicate that beta-carotene metabolites regulate dietary lipid uptake while lycopene regulates peroxisome-proliferated activator receptor (PPAR) expression. To determine the physiologic consequences of carotenoids and their interactions with CMO-I and CMO-II, we characterized mammalian carotenoid metabolism, metabolic perturbations and lipid metabolism in female CMO-I−/− and CMO-II−/− mice fed lycopene or tomato-containing diets for 30 days. We hypothesized that there would be significant interactions between diet and genotype on carotenoid accumulation and lipid parameters. CMO-I−/− mice had higher levels of leptin, insulin and hepatic lipidosis, but lower levels of serum cholesterol. CMO-II−/− mice had increased tissue lycopene and phytofluene accumulation, reduced IGF-1 levels and cholesterol levels, but elevated liver lipids and cholesterol compared with WT mice. The diets did not modulate these genotypic perturbations, but lycopene and tomato powder did significantly decrease serum insulin-like growth factor-I. Tomato powder also reduced hepatic PPAR expression, independent of genotype. These data point to the pleiotropic actions of CMO-I and CMO-II supporting a strong role of these proteins in regulating tissue carotenoid accumulation and the lipid metabolic phenotype, as well as tomato carotenoid-independent regulation of lipid metabolism. PMID:24034573

  20. Cytoplasmic lipid bodies of human neutrophilic leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, P.F.; Ackerman, S.J.; Nicholson-Weller, A.; Dvorak, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The morphology and function of cytoplasmic lipid bodies in human neutrophils were evaluated. By transmission electron microscopy, neutrophil lipid bodies were cytoplasmic inclusions, usually several microns in diameter, that occasionally coalesced to attain a diameter up to 7 microM. Neutrophil lipid bodies were not enveloped by membrane but were often surrounded by a more electron-dense shell at their periphery. Normal peripheral blood neutrophils contained an average of approximately one lipid body per cell. Lipid bodies appeared in greater numbers in neutrophils from inflammatory lesions. Perturbation of neutrophils during conventional methods of cell isolation and purification modestly increased lipid body numbers in neutrophils, whereas incubation of neutrophils with 1 microM oleic acid rapidly induced lipid body formation over 30 to 60 minutes. After granulocytes were incubated for 2 hours with 3H-fatty acids, including arachidonic, oleic, and palmitic acids, electron microscopic autoradiography demonstrated that lipid bodies represented the predominant intracellular sites of localization of each of the three 3H-fatty acids. There was lesser labeling noted in the perinuclear cisterna, but not in cell membranes. Virtually all of each of the three 3H-fatty acids incorporated by the neutrophils were esterified into chromatographically resolved classes of neutral lipids or phospholipids. These findings indicate that cytoplasmic lipid bodies are more prominent in neutrophils in vivo engaged in inflammatory responses and that these organelles in human neutrophils function as sites of deposition of esterified, incorporated fatty acids

  1. Exogenous and endogenous lipids of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coderch, L; Oliver, M A; Martínez, V; Manich, A M; Rubio, L; Martí, M

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the external and internal lipids of Caucasian hair and their influence in different hair properties such as moisture content, hydrophobic character, and mechanical properties. Lipid extraction and their analysis by thin layer chromatography with flame ionization detector were carried out. Lipid rearrangement and water sorption and desorption evaluation of these fibers with and without lipids will also be determined using different techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis and dynamic vapor sorption, mainly to evaluate permeation changes of these hair fibers possibly related to the fluidity of the lipids extracted. Caucasian fibers were found to be well hydrated, and moisture diminution was observed mainly for the external lipid extracted fibers. Unexpectedly, the lipid extraction promoted an increase in the break tenacity of the Caucasian fibers. The hydrophobic character of the fiber surfaces indicates the marked hydrophobicity of all fibers. Delipidization promotes only a slight diminution of their hydrophobic properties. Water uptake and desorption studies indicate an important water regain for Caucasian fibers. The external extracted hair fibers presented a diminution of maximum water regain, which surprisingly increases with the following internal lipid extraction. This can be due to a higher water desorption found only for external extracted fibers. The relationship between fluidity of lipids extracted and hair fiber water diffusion were established. Extraction of internal lipids of Caucasian fibers, which have a higher unsaturated lipid content than external lipids of the same hair fiber, leads to a lower water permeability of the fiber. On the capillar formulations should be considered the importance of lipid fluidity to modify the permeability of the fiber. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Hydration dynamics of a lipid membrane: Hydrogen bond networks and lipid-lipid associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhinav; Debnath, Ananya

    2018-03-01

    Dynamics of hydration layers of a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer are investigated using an all atom molecular dynamics simulation. Based upon the geometric criteria, continuously residing interface water molecules which form hydrogen bonds solely among themselves and then concertedly hydrogen bonded to carbonyl, phosphate, and glycerol head groups of DMPC are identified. The interface water hydrogen bonded to lipids shows slower relaxation rates for translational and rotational dynamics compared to that of the bulk water and is found to follow sub-diffusive and non-diffusive behaviors, respectively. The mean square displacements and the reorientational auto-correlation functions are slowest for the interfacial waters hydrogen bonded to the carbonyl oxygen since these are buried deep in the hydrophobic core among all interfacial water studied. The intermittent hydrogen bond auto-correlation functions are calculated, which allows breaking and reformations of the hydrogen bonds. The auto-correlation functions for interfacial hydrogen bonded networks develop humps during a transition from cage-like motion to eventual power law behavior of t-3/2. The asymptotic t-3/2 behavior indicates translational diffusion dictated dynamics during hydrogen bond breaking and formation irrespective of the nature of the chemical confinement. Employing reactive flux correlation analysis, the forward rate constant of hydrogen bond breaking and formation is calculated which is used to obtain Gibbs energy of activation of the hydrogen bond breaking. The relaxation rates of the networks buried in the hydrophobic core are slower than the networks near the lipid-water interface which is again slower than bulk due to the higher Gibbs energy of activation. Since hydrogen bond breakage follows a translational diffusion dictated mechanism, chemically confined hydrogen bond networks need an activation energy to diffuse through water depleted hydrophobic environments. Our calculations

  3. Effect of visfatin on lipid profile of obese and diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, R.; Hussain, M.M.; Aslam, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of visfatin on blood lipid levels in balb/c strain of albino mice. Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and duration of study: The study was carried out at the department of Physiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and National Institute of Health Sciences, Islamabad from April to December 2007. Material and Methods: One hundred and twenty balb/c strain albino mice were procured from NIH, Islamabad. After taking base line blood samples, mice were divided randomly into four groups. Animals in groups I and II were made obese by feeding high fat / high carbohydrate diet whereas mice in Groups III and IV were induced diabetes mellitus by injecting streptozotocin. Groups I (obese) and III (diabetic) served as controls whereas groups II (obese treated) and IV (diabetic treated) were administered visfatin injection. Terminal intracardiac blood sample was used to measure the serum lipid and visfatin levels. Results: Serum lipid levels were found increased in obese and diabetic groups as compared to healthy mice. The administration of recombinant-histidine soluble (mice) visfatin significantly (p< 0.01) decreased the serum lipid levels with concomitant increase in HDL levels (p< 0.01) in obese and diabetic groups of mice and were comparable with baseline normal values of healthy controls. Conclusion: Visfatin is a potential antilipidemic adipocytokine that probably modulates insulin sensitivity and decreases atherogenic lipids (triglycerides, cholesterol, LDL and VLDL) with concomitant increase in HDL in obesity and diabetes mellitus. (author)

  4. Ethanol Enhances TGF-β Activity by Recruiting TGF-β Receptors From Intracellular Vesicles/Lipid Rafts/Caveolae to Non-Lipid Raft Microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuan Shian; Chen, Chun-Lin; Huang, Franklin W; Johnson, Frank E; Huang, Jung San

    2016-04-01

    Regular consumption of moderate amounts of ethanol has important health benefits on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Overindulgence can cause many diseases, particularly alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The mechanisms by which ethanol causes both beneficial and harmful effects on human health are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that ethanol enhances TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity with a maximum of 0.5-1% (v/v) in Mv1Lu cells stably expressing a luciferase reporter gene containing Smad2-dependent elements. In Mv1Lu cells, 0.5% ethanol increases the level of P-Smad2, a canonical TGF-β signaling sensor, by ∼ 2-3-fold. Ethanol (0.5%) increases cell-surface expression of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβR-II) by ∼ 2-3-fold from its intracellular pool, as determined by I(125) -TGF-β-cross-linking/Western blot analysis. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and indirect immunofluorescence staining analyses reveal that ethanol (0.5% and 1%) also displaces cell-surface TβR-I and TβR-II from lipid rafts/caveolae and facilitates translocation of these receptors to non-lipid raft microdomains where canonical signaling occurs. These results suggest that ethanol enhances canonical TGF-β signaling by increasing non-lipid raft microdomain localization of the TGF-β receptors. Since TGF-β plays a protective role in ASCVD but can also cause ALD, the TGF-β enhancer activity of ethanol at low and high doses appears to be responsible for both beneficial and harmful effects. Ethanol also disrupts the location of lipid raft/caveolae of other membrane proteins (e.g., neurotransmitter, growth factor/cytokine, and G protein-coupled receptors) which utilize lipid rafts/caveolae as signaling platforms. Displacement of these membrane proteins induced by ethanol may result in a variety of pathologies in nerve, heart and other tissues. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease and Lipid Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubovic, Sandra Vegar; Kristic, Spomenka; Prevljak, Sabina; Pasic, Irmina Sefic

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents a serious public health problem due to the increase in incidence and prevalence of this disease worldwide. Given the significant morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the population of patients with CKD, and the fact that dyslipidemia itself is a risk factor for CVD, increases the importance of lipid metabolism study in patients with CKD. Evaluate the lipid status of patients with chronic kidney disease. A one-year prospective study included 150 adult patients who were in various stages of chronic renal failure (stage I to IV). Estimate of creatinine clearance was performed using Cockroft-Goult formula. The classification of patients according to stages of chronic renal insufficiency was performed in accordance with the criteria of Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI). Of the total number of patients (N=150) there was 71 males and 79 females. The mean age of patients was 55.43 years. Average values of serum cholesterol were highest in patients with stage II renal disease and the lowest in patients classified as stage IV (5.76±1.60 mmol/L vs. 5.07±1.88 mmol/L). Analysis of the average value of triglycerides in blood show a slight increase through the stages of CKD in a manner that patients classified into stage I have low serum triglyceride levels (1.73±1.17 mmol/L (range 0.61 to 5.5 mmol/L), and patients classified in stage III the highest value 2.13±1.11 mmol/L (range 0.62 to 4.66 mmol/L). Average cholesterol levels does not statistically significantly change with progression of chronic renal disease. There is an almost linear increase in average triglyceride levels in chronic renal disease. Triglyceride levels in serum begins to increase in the early stage of chronic renal disease and reach the peak in stage IV.

  6. Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-439 Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense... Bomb Increment II (SDB II) DoD Component Air Force Joint Participants Department of the Navy Responsible Office References SAR Baseline (Production...Mission and Description Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II) is a joint interest United States Air Force (USAF) and Department of the Navy

  7. Lipid resuscitation in acute poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegberg, Lotte C G; Gosselin, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The decision to provide intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) therapy as a treatment modality for the reversal of various drug toxicity was discovered in the last decade. Numerous publications, in both humans and animals attest to its clinical use, but current supporting evidence...... is inconsistent. RECENT FINDINGS: A recent systematic review reported evidence for benefit of ILE in bupivacaine toxicity. Human randomized trials, large observational studies as well as animal models of orogastric poisoning failed to report a clear benefit of ILE for nonlocal anesthetics poisoning. SUMMARY: ILE...

  8. Cholesterol Perturbs Lipid Bilayers Nonuniversally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jianjun; Mills, Thalia T.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Cholesterol is well known to modulate the physical properties of biomembranes. Using modern x-ray scattering methods, we have studied the effects of cholesterol on the bending modulus K C , the thickness D HH , and the orientational order parameter S xray of lipid bilayers. We find that the effects are different for at least three classes of phospholipids characterized by different numbers of saturated hydrocarbon chains. Most strikingly, cholesterol strongly increases K C when both chains of the phospholipid are fully saturated but not at all when there are two monounsaturated chains

  9. Acyl transfer from membrane lipids to peptides is a generic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dods, Robert H; Bechinger, Burkhard; Mosely, Jackie A; Sanderson, John M

    2013-11-15

    The generality of acyl transfer from phospholipids to membrane-active peptides has been probed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of peptide-lipid mixtures. The peptides examined include melittin, magainin II, PGLa, LAK1, LAK3 and penetratin. Peptides were added to liposomes with membrane lipid compositions ranging from pure phosphatidylcholine (PC) to mixtures of PC with phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylglycerol. Experiments were typically conducted at pH7.4 at modest salt concentrations (90 mM NaCl). In favorable cases, lipidated peptides were further characterized by tandem mass spectrometry methods to determine the sites of acylation. Melittin and magainin II were the most reactive peptides, with significant acyl transfer detected under all conditions and membrane compositions. Both peptides were lipidated at the N-terminus by transfer from PC, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylglycerol, as well as at internal sites: lysine for melittin; serine and lysine for magainin II. Acyl transfer could be detected within 3h of melittin addition to negatively charged membranes. The other peptides were less reactive, but for each peptide, acylation was found to occur in at least one of the conditions examined. The data demonstrate that acyl transfer is a generic process for peptides bound to membranes composed of diacylglycerophospholipids. Phospholipid membranes cannot therefore be considered as chemically inert toward peptides and by extension proteins. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. SREBP-1c Gene Silencing can Decrease Lipid Deposits in Bovine Hepatocytes Cultured in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Deng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatty liver is a major metabolic disorder that occurs during early lactation in high-producing dairy cows. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c is an important transcription factor that regulates lipid synthesis by regulating the expression of lipid metabolism genes. Methods: In this study, we reduced the expression of SREBP-1c by adenovirus-mediated SREBP-1c with a low expression vector (AD-GFP-SREBP-1c to study the effects of SREBP-1c on lipid deposits in bovine hepatocytes. The expression levels and enzyme activities of SERBP-1c and its target genes were determined by real-time PCR, western blot, and ELISA. Results: These results showed that Ad-GFP-SREBP-1c could inhibit SREBP-1c expression. The expression of the lipid synthesis enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC was down-regulated. The expression levels of the lipid oxidation enzymes long-chain fatty acyl-COA synthetase (ACSL-1, carnitine palmitoyltransferase І (CPT-І, carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT- II, and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA-DH (HADH were significantly elevated. Furthermore, the expression levels of factors involved in the assembly and transport of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs, such as apolipoprotein B100 (ApoB, apolipoprotein E (ApoE, and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP were decreased comparison with the negative control and the blank control groups, but the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR was elevated. The concentrations of TG (triglyceride and VLDL were also reduced. Conclusion: These data suggest that low SREBP-1c expression can decrease lipid synthesis, increase lipid oxidation, and decrease the TG and VLDL content in bovine hepatocytes.

  11. Lipid phase control of DNA delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koynova, Rumiana; Wang, Li; Tarahovsky, Yury; MacDonald, Robert C. (NWU)

    2010-01-18

    Cationic lipids form nanoscale complexes (lipoplexes) with polyanionic DNA and can be utilized to deliver DNA to cells for transfection. Here we report the correlation between delivery efficiency of these DNA carriers and the mesomorphic phases they form when interacting with anionic membrane lipids. Specifically, formulations that are particularly effective DNA carriers form phases of highest negative interfacial curvature when mixed with anionic lipids, whereas less effective formulations form phases of lower curvature. Structural evolution of the carrier lipid/DNA complexes upon interaction with cellular lipids is hence suggested as a controlling factor in lipid-mediated DNA delivery. A strategy for optimizing lipofection is deduced. The behavior of a highly effective lipoplex formulation, DOTAP/DOPE, is found to conform to this 'efficiency formula'.

  12. Targeting Lipid Metabolic Reprogramming as Anticancer Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Ji-Young; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells rewire their metabolism to satisfy the demands of growth and survival, and this metabolic reprogramming has been recognized as an emerging hallmark of cancer. Lipid metabolism is pivotal in cellular process that converts nutrients into energy, building blocks for membrane biogenesis and the generation of signaling molecules. Accumulating evidence suggests that cancer cells show alterations in different aspects of lipid metabolism. The changes in lipid metabolism of cancer cells c...

  13. Lipids as organizers of cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornmann, Benoît; Roux, Aurélien

    2012-08-01

    The 105th Boehringer Ingelheim Fonds International Titisee Conference 'Lipids as Organizers of Cell Membranes' took place in March 2012, in Germany. Kai Simons and Gisou Van der Goot gathered cell biologists and biophysicists to discuss the interplay between lipids and proteins in biological membranes, with an emphasis on how technological advances could help fill the gap in our understanding of the lipid part of the membrane.

  14. Changes of lipids in irradiated chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moersel, J.T.; Wende, I.; Schwarz, K.

    1991-01-01

    Chickens were irradiated in a 6 deg Co gamma irradiation source. The irradiation has been done to reduce or eliminate Salmonella. The experiments were done to test this decontamination method of chickens if changes of lipids take place. It was to be seen, that peroxidation of lipids was more rapidly as in control. The time of storage of irradiated chickens has to be shorter because of changes in lipids. After irradiation the chickens had trade quality. (orig.) [de

  15. Effects of atmospheric pollutants on lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howton, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    Studies on effects of atmospheric pollutants on lipids emphasized effects of nitrogen dioxide on olefinic centers of alveolar fluid surfactant lipids. The finding that NO 2 attacks α-tocopherol much more avidly than olefinic fatty esters indicates that the autoxidation enhancing effects of this atmospheric pollutant may be greatly magnified by destruction of native antioxidants that normally suppress the extensiveness of such lipid oxidation

  16. Lipid polymorphism of mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine and saturated and monounsaturated phosphatidylcholines of various chain lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tate, M.W.; Gruner, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    The L/sub α/-H/sub II/ phase transition behavior of many lipid-water liquid crystals is dominated by the competition between the tendency to curl the lipid layers to an intrinsic radius of curvature and opposing hydrocarbon packing constraints. In particular, packing constraints can increase the free energy of the inverted hexagonal (H/sub II/) phase as compared to that of the lamellar (L/sub α/) phase. This is especially true where the lipid molecule is not long enough to reach into the corners of the lattice in large hexagonal structures necessitated by a large radius of curvature.In this paper it is shown that the addition of a minor fraction long-chain lipid to a system of otherwise uniform chain composition can also relax packing constraints, thereby lowering the lamellar to hexagonal transition temperature. For the specific systems used, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (di-18:1/sub c/-PE) with minor fractions of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines [di-n:1/sub c/-PC (n = 14, 18, 22, and 24)], the observed H/sub II/lattices systematically increased in size with increasing chain length suggesting that the chain length also may affect the intrinsic curvature of the mixture. These experiments demonstrate that the lipid shape concept, which is a qualitative expression of the concept quantitatively described by the intrinsic radius of curvature, is insufficient to understand the L/sub α/-H/sub II/ transition. It is necessary to, at least, consider the competition between curvature and packing

  17. Polar lipid composition of mammalian hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wix, M A; Wertz, P W; Downing, D T

    1987-01-01

    The types and amounts of polar lipids from the hair of monkey (Macacca fascicularis), dog (Canis familiaris), pig (Sus scrofa) and porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum) have been determined by quantitative thin-layer chromatography. The polar lipid content of the hair samples ranged from 0.6 to 1.6 wt%. Lipid compositions included ceramides (57-63% of the polar lipid by weight), glycosphingolipids (7-9%) and cholesteryl sulfate (22-29%). Several minor components (4-7%) remain unidentified. The results suggest that cholesteryl sulfate may be an important determinant of the cohesiveness of hair.

  18. Lipid Metabolism, Apoptosis and Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfa Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy.

  19. Metabolism of lipids in Epidermophyton floccosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, A; Khuller, G K [Post-Graduate Inst. of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India)

    1981-03-01

    Metabolism of major lipids in E. floccosum was studied with /sup 14/C-acetate as a precursor. Among the phosphatides, phosphatidylcholine exhibited the maximum rate of synthesis and degradation, followed by phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine. These phospholipids appear to exist in two pools, one metabolically more active than the other. In neutral lipids, maximum uptake was observed in triglycerides, followed by free fatty acids, diglycerides and monoglycerides. However, on chase of the labelled lipids, a continuous synthesis of all neutral lipid fractions was observed suggesting a recycling of the labelled carbon.

  20. Jabuticaba [Pliniajaboticaba (Vell.) Berg] skins decrease lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-03-12

    density lipoprotein cholesterol; MDA, malondialdehyde ... rats, and quantification and characterization of its .... Moisture and lipid content were determined using the methods ... acids and flavonoids were identified, presenting the.

  1. Electrodiffusion of lipids on membrane surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y C

    2012-05-28

    Lateral translocation of lipids and proteins is a universal process on membrane surfaces. Local aggregation or organization of lipids and proteins can be induced when the random lateral motion is mediated by the electrostatic interactions and membrane curvature. Although the lateral diffusion rates of lipids on membranes of various compositions are measured and the electrostatic free energies of predetermined protein-membrane-lipid systems can be computed, the process of the aggregation and the evolution to the electrostatically favorable states remain largely undetermined. Here we propose an electrodiffusion model, based on the variational principle of the free energy functional, for the self-consistent lateral drift-diffusion of multiple species of charged lipids on membrane surfaces. Finite sizes of lipids are modeled to enforce the geometrical constraint of the lipid concentration on membrane surfaces. A surface finite element method is developed to appropriate the Laplace-Beltrami operators in the partial differential equations of the model. Our model properly describes the saturation of lipids on membrane surfaces, and correctly predicts that the MARCKS peptide can consistently sequester three multivalent phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate lipids through its basic amino acid residues, regardless of a wide range of the percentage of monovalent phosphatidylserine in the membrane.

  2. Biologic activity of porphyromonas endodontalis complex lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirucki, Christopher S; Abedi, Mehran; Jiang, Jin; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Safavi, Kamran E; Clark, Robert B; Nichols, Frank C

    2014-09-01

    Periapical infections secondary to pulpal necrosis are associated with bacterial contamination of the pulp. Porphyromonas endodontalis, a gram-negative organism, is considered to be a pulpal pathogen. P. gingivalis is phylogenetically related to P. endodontalis and synthesizes several classes of novel complex lipids that possess biological activity, including the capacity to promote osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activation. The purpose of this study was to extract and characterize constituent lipids of P. endodontalis and evaluate their capacity to promote proinflammatory secretory responses in the macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, as well as their capacity to promote osteoclastogenesis and inhibit osteoblast activity. Constituent lipids of both organisms were fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography and were structurally characterized using electrospray mass spectrometry or electrospray-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. The virulence potential of P. endodontalis lipids was then compared with known biologically active lipids isolated from P. gingivalis. P. endodontalis total lipids were shown to promote tumor necrosis factor alpha secretion from RAW 264.7 cells, and the serine lipid fraction appeared to account for the majority of this effect. P. endodontalis lipid preparations also increased osteoclast formation from RAW 264.7 cells, but osteoblast differentiation in culture was inhibited and appeared to be dependent on Toll-like receptor 2 expression. These effects underscore the importance of P. endodontalis lipids in promoting inflammatory and bone cell activation processes that could lead to periapical pathology. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Potential impact of inorganic nanoparticles on macronutrient digestion: titanium dioxide nanoparticles slightly reduce lipid digestion under simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Li, Ti; Liu, Chengmei; DeLoid, Glen; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Demokritou, Philip; Zhang, Ruojie; Xiao, Hang; McClements, David Julian

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) particles are used in some food products to alter their optical properties, such as whiteness or brightness. These additives typically contain a population of TiO 2 nanoparticles (d digestion through two physicochemical mechanisms: (i) a fraction of the lipase adsorbs to TiO 2 particle surfaces, thereby reducing the amount available to hydrolyze lipid droplets; (ii) some TiO 2 particles adsorb to the surfaces of lipid droplets, thereby reducing the lipid surface area exposed to lipase. The importance of these mechanisms was tested by passing protein-coated lipid droplets (2%, w/w) through the simulated GIT in the absence and presence of TiO 2 (0.5%, w/w) nanoparticles (18 nm) and fine particles (167 nm). Changes in particle characteristics (size, organization, and charge) and lipid digestion were then measured. Both TiO 2 nanoparticles and fine particles had little impact on the aggregation state and charge of the lipid droplets in the different GIT regions, as well as on the rate and extent of lipid digestion. This suggests that the theoretically predicted impact of particle size on lipid digestion was not seen in practice.

  4. Lipid sac area as a proxy for individual lipid content of arctic calanoid copepods

    OpenAIRE

    Vogedes, Daniel; Varpe, ?ystein; S?reide, Janne E.; Graeve, Martin; Berge, J?rgen; Falk-Petersen, Stig

    2010-01-01

    We present an accurate, fast, simple and non-destructive photographic method to estimate wax ester and lipid content in single individuals of the calanoid copepod genus Calanus and test this method against gas-chromatographic lipid measurements.

  5. Proteomic analysis of lipid droplets from Caco-2/TC7 enterocytes identifies novel modulators of lipid secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauke Beilstein

    Full Text Available In enterocytes, the dynamic accumulation and depletion of triacylglycerol (TAG in lipid droplets (LD during fat absorption suggests that cytosolic LD-associated TAG contribute to TAG-rich lipoprotein (TRL production. To get insight into the mechanisms controlling the storage/secretion balance of TAG, we used as a tool hepatitis C virus core protein, which localizes onto LDs, and thus may modify their protein coat and decrease TRL secretion. We compared the proteome of LD fractions isolated from Caco-2/TC7 enterocytes expressing or not hepatitis C virus core protein by a differential proteomic approach (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ labeling coupled with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 42 proteins, 21 being involved in lipid metabolism. Perilipin-2/ADRP, which is suggested to stabilize long term-stored TAG, was enriched in LD fractions isolated from Caco-2/TC7 expressing core protein while perilipin-3/TIP47, which is involved in LD synthesis from newly synthesized TAG, was decreased. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated proteins were strongly decreased, suggesting reduced interactions between LD and endoplasmic reticulum, where TRL assembly occurs. For the first time, we show that 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (DHB2, which catalyzes the conversion of 17-keto to 17 β-hydroxysteroids and which was the most highly enriched protein in core expressing cells, is localized to LD and interferes with TAG secretion, probably through its capacity to inactivate testosterone. Overall, we identified potential new players of lipid droplet dynamics, which may be involved in the balance between lipid storage and secretion, and may be altered in enterocytes in pathological conditions such as insulin resistance, type II diabetes and obesity.

  6. Distribution of neutral lipids in the lipid droplet core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    Cholesteryl esters (CEs) are a form of cholesterol (CHOL) storage in the living cells, as opposed to free CHOL. CEs are major constituents of low density lipoprotein particles. Therefore, CEs are implicated in provoking atherosclerosis. Arranged into cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs), CEs are stored...... intracellularly. They can also be transported extracellularly by means of lipoproteins. In this work, large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the molecular structure of LDs containing various fractions (10-50 mol %) of cholesteryl oleate (CO) with respect to triolein (TO) fraction...... the phospholipid interface, resulting from the structuring of hydrophilic groups. This structuring slowly decays in the direction toward the LD center of mass. No sorting of TO and CO is detected, irrespective of the molar fractions simulated. The distribution of CO within the LDs is significant in determining...

  7. Natural lipids in nanostructured lipid carriers and its cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Paula A.; Rampazo, Caroline A. D.; Costa, Amanda F.; Rodrigues, Tiago; Watashi, Carolina M.; Durán, Nelson

    2017-06-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) are active carrier systems which modulate the sustained release of actives and protect unstable compounds against degradation. NLCs can also protect skin from sun light, due to its particulates nature, which gives them intrinsic scattering properties. In this work, we present the preparation of NLCs using natural lipids and its cytotoxicity profile. It was used a vegetal butter with melting point (m.p.) ~32-40°C, an animal wax (m.p. 35-40°C) and a vegetal oil (boiling point ~120-150°C). NLCs were prepared by hot high pressure homogenization method and particles were characterized by average size (Zave), polydispersity index (PDI) and zeta potential (PZ) (Fig.1). The thermal behavior of the NLCs was studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). All the formulations were followed up for 60 days in order to evaluate their stability. NLCs exhibited a Zave around 150-200 nm, PDI less than 0.2 and PZ varying from -25 to -40 mV. The m.p. for the lyophilized NLCs was about 40-56°C. Cytotoxicity of the formulations were evaluated for human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and melanocytes (Melan-A) in the exponential growth phase. Cell viability was used as indicator of cytotoxicity and determined after 4 days of culture by MTT assay. It was found that the NLC formulations were not toxic against HaCaT and Melan-A cells. Results showed that the NLCs produced are potential carriers for nanocosmetics and sunscreen products.

  8. Inclusion of the helper lipid dioleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine in solid lipid nanoparticles inhibits their transfection efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jesus, Marcelo B.; Radaic, Allan; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Ferreira, Carmen V; de Paula, Eneida; Hoekstra, Dirk; Zuhorn, Inge S

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are a promising system for the delivery of lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs. They consist of a solid lipid core that is stabilized by a layer of surfactants. By the incorporation of cationic lipids in the formulation, positively charged SLNs can be generated, that

  9. Lipid polymorphism and the functional roles of lipids in biological membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cullis, P.R.; Kruijff, B. de

    1979-01-01

    The reasons for the great variety of lipids found in biological membranes, and the relations between lipid composition and membrane function pose major unsolved problems in membrane biology. Perhaps the only major functional role of lipids which may be regarded as firmly established involves the

  10. Fluorescent lipid probes : some properties and applications (a review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, O; Oberle, [No Value; Hoekstra, D

    Odd as it may seem, experimental challenges in lipid research are often hampered by the simplicity of the lipid structure. Since, as in protein research. mutants or overexpression of lipids are not realistic, a considerable amount of lipid research relies on the use Of tagged lipid analogues.

  11. ORF Sequence: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002655 gi|15804385 >gi|15804385|ref|NP_290425.1| TDP-Fuc4NAc:lipidII transferase; synthesis of enterobac...terial common antigen (ECA) [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] MSLLQFSGLFVVWLLCTLFIA

  12. Tomo II

    OpenAIRE

    Llano Zapata, José Eusebio

    2015-01-01

    Memorias, histórico, físicas, crítico, apologéticas de la América Meridional con unas breves advertencias y noticias útiles, a los que de orden de Su Majestad hubiesen de viajar y describir aquellas vastas regiones. Reino Vegetal, Tomo II. Por un anónimo americano en Cádiz por los años de 1757. Muy Señor mío, juzgo que los 20 artículos del libro que remití a Vuestra Merced le habrán hecho formar el concepto que merece la fecundidad de aquellos países en las producciones minerales. Y siendo es...

  13. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction...... of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol....

  14. Computational Modeling of Lipid Metabolism in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Schützhold

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipid metabolism is essential for all major cell functions and has recently gained increasing attention in research and health studies. However, mathematical modeling by means of classical approaches such as stoichiometric networks and ordinary differential equation systems has not yet provided satisfactory insights, due to the complexity of lipid metabolism characterized by many different species with only slight differences and by promiscuous multifunctional enzymes.Here, we present a object-oriented stochastic model approach as a way to cope with the complex lipid metabolic network. While all lipid species are treated objects in the model, they can be modified by the respective converting reactions based on reaction rules, a hybrid method that integrates benefits of agent-based and classical stochastic simulation. This approach allows to follow the dynamics of all lipid species with different fatty acids, different degrees of saturation and different headgroups over time and to analyze the effect of parameter changes, potential mutations in the catalyzing enzymes or provision of different precursors. Applied to yeast metabolism during one cell cycle period, we could analyze the distribution of all lipids to the various membranes in time-dependent manner.The presented approach allows to efficiently treat the complexity of cellular lipid metabolism and to derive conclusions on the time- and location-dependent distributions of lipid species and their properties such as saturation. It is widely applicable, easily extendable and will provide further insights in healthy and diseased states of cell metabolism.

  15. A comprehensive classification system for lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahy, E.; Subramaniam, S.; Brown, H.A.; Glass, C.K.; Merrill, A.H.; Murphy, R.C.; Raetz, C.R.H.; Russell, D.W.; Seyama, Y.; Shaw, W.; Shimizu, T.; Spener, F.; van Meer, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068570368; VanNieuwenhze, M.S.; White, S.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304843539; Witztum, J.; Dennis, E.A.

    2005-01-01

    Lipids are produced, transported, and recognized by the concerted actions of numerous enzymes, binding proteins, and receptors. A comprehensive analysis of lipid molecules, “lipidomics,” in the context of genomics and proteomics is crucial to understanding cellular physiology and pathology;

  16. GABA interaction with lipids in organic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltramo, D.; Kivatinitz, S.; Lassaga, E.; Arce, A.

    1987-01-01

    The interaction of 3 H-GABA and 14 C-glutamate with lipids in an aqueous organic partition system was studied. With this partition system 3 H-GABA and 14 C-glutamate were able to interact with sphingomyelin, sulfatide, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid but not with cholesterol or ceramide. In an homogeneous aqueous medium the authors could not demonstrate any interaction between 3 H-GABA-lipids. The apparent dissociation constants (K/sub d/) for 3 H-GABA-lipids or 14 C-glutamate-lipids interactions inorganic medium were in the millimolar range and maximal charge between 3 and 7 moles of GABA or glutamate by mole of lipid. Amino acids such as glutamic acid, β-alanine and glycine displaced 3 H-GABA with the same potency as GABA itself; thus these results show that the interaction lacks pharmacological specificity. To detect this interaction lipid concentrations higher than 2 μM were required and in the partition system 3 H-GABA and lipid phosphorus were both concentrated at the interface. Therefore, lipids tested with a biphasic partition system do not fulfill the classical criteria for a neurotransmitter receptor at least not for GABA and glutamate. 15 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  17. Lipid transport and human brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsholtz, Christer

    2015-07-01

    How the human brain rapidly builds up its lipid content during brain growth and maintains its lipids in adulthood has remained elusive. Two new studies show that inactivating mutations in MFSD2A, known to be expressed specifically at the blood-brain barrier, lead to microcephaly, thereby offering a simple and surprising solution to an old enigma.

  18. Lateral pressure profiles in lipid monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Marrink, Siewert J.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2010-01-01

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations with coarse-grained and atomistic models to study the lateral pressure profiles in lipid monolayers. We first consider simple oil/air and oil/water interfaces, and then proceed to lipid monolayers at air/water and oil/water interfaces. The results are

  19. Amylose folding under the influence of lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez, Cesar A.; de Vries, Alex H.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular dynamics simulation technique was used to study the folding and complexation process of a short amylose fragment in the presence of lipids. In aqueous solution, the amylose chain remains as an extended left-handed helix. After the addition of lipids in the system, however, we observe

  20. Preservation of Microbial Lipids in Geothermal Sinters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaur, G.; Mountain, B.W.; Hopmans, E.C.; Pancost, R.D.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers are widely used to study the earliest life on Earth and have been invoked as potential astrobiological markers, but few studies have assessed their survival and persistence in geothermal settings. Here, we investigate lipid preservation in active and inactive geothermal silica

  1. Multifaceted role of lipids in Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurkamaljit; Kaur, Jagdeep

    2017-03-01

    Mycobacterium leprae must adopt a metabolic strategy and undergo various metabolic alterations upon infection to survive inside the human body for years in a dormant state. A change in lipid homeostasis upon infection is highly pronounced in Mycobacterium leprae. Lipids play an essential role in the survival and pathogenesis of mycobacteria. Lipids are present in several forms and serve multiple roles from being a source of nutrition, providing rigidity, evading the host immune response to serving as virulence factors, etc. The synthesis and degradation of lipids is a highly regulated process and is the key to future drug designing and diagnosis for mycobacteria. In the current review, an account of the distinct roles served by lipids, the mechanism of their synthesis and degradation has been elucidated.

  2. Computer Simulations of Lipid Bilayers and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    The importance of computer simulations in lipid bilayer research has become more prominent for the last couple of decades and as computers get even faster, simulations will play an increasingly important part of understanding the processes that take place in and across cell membranes. This thesis...... entitled Computer simulations of lipid bilayers and proteins describes two molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of pure lipid bilayers as well as a study of a transmembrane protein embedded in a lipid bilayer matrix. Below follows a brief overview of the thesis. Chapter 1. This chapter is a short...... in the succeeding chapters is presented. Details on system setups, simulation parameters and other technicalities can be found in the relevant chapters. Chapter 3, DPPC lipid parameters: The quality of MD simulations is intimately dependent on the empirical potential energy function and its parameters, i...

  3. Role of lipids in bacterial radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abushady, M.R.; Fawkia, M.E.; Tawfik, Z.S.

    1992-01-01

    The radioresistance of three bacterial isolates was determined. S. aureus was the most sensitive one (D 1 0 value 0.14 KGy), B. coagulans was moderate resistant (D 1 0 value 3.3 KGy) and the most resistant one was B.megaterium (D 1 0 value 3.7 KGy). Total lipids and lipid patterns of these bacteria were determined and the role of lipids in radioresistance was investigated. Least amount of total lipids was detected in the most sensitive organism (S. aureus). The increase in the bacterial content of total lipids was concomitant with high degrees of radioresistance. The most resistant organism (B. megaterium was characterized by high content of methyl esters of fatty acids, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, followed by appreciable amounts in the moderate resistant (B. coagulans) and the least amounts were detected in the most sensitive organism (S.aureus).6 fig., 3 tab

  4. [Germ cell membrane lipids in spermatogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Shi, Xiao; Quan, Song

    2016-05-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex developmental process in which a diploid progenitor germ cell transforms into highly specialized spermatozoa. During spermatogenesis, membrane remodeling takes place, and cell membrane permeability and liquidity undergo phase-specific changes, which are all associated with the alteration of membrane lipids. Lipids are important components of the germ cell membrane, whose volume and ratio fluctuate in different phases of spermatogenesis. Abnormal lipid metabolism can cause spermatogenic dysfunction and consequently male infertility. Germ cell membrane lipids are mainly composed of cholesterol, phospholipids and glycolipids, which play critical roles in cell adhesion and signal transduction during spermatogenesis. An insight into the correlation of membrane lipids with spermatogenesis helps us to better understand the mechanisms of spermatogenesis and provide new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility.

  5. New lipid family that forms inverted cubic phases in equilibrium with excess water: molecular structure-aqueous phase structure relationship for lipids with 5,9,13,17-tetramethyloctadecyl and 5,9,13,17-tetramethyloctadecanoyl chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Jun; Shiono, Manzo; Hato, Masakatsu

    2008-10-02

    With a view to discovering a new family of lipids that form inverted cubic phases, the aqueous phase behavior of a series of lipids with isoprenoid-type hydrophobic chains has been examined over a temperature range from -40 to 65 degrees C by using optical microscopy, DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), and SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) techniques. The lipids examined are those with 5,9,13,17-tetramethyloctadecyl and 5,9,13,17-tetramethyloctadecanoyl chains linked to a series of headgroups, that is, erythritol, pentaerythritol, xylose, and glucose. All of the lipid/water systems displayed a "water + liquid crystalline phase" two-phase coexistence state when sufficiently diluted. The aqueous phase structures of the most diluted liquid crystalline phases in equilibrium with excess water depend both on the lipid molecular structure and on the temperature. Given an isoprenoid chain, the preferred phase consistently follows a phase sequence of an H II (an inverted hexagonal phase) to a Q II (an inverted bicontinuous cubic phase) to an L alpha (a lamellar phase) as A* (cross-section area of the headgroup) increases. For a given lipid/water system, the phase sequence observed as the temperature increases is L alpha to Q II to H II. The present study allowed us to find four cubic phase-forming lipid species, PEOC 18+4 [mono- O-(5,9,13,17-tetramethyloctadecyl)pentaerythritol], beta-XylOC 18+4 [1- O-(5,9,13,17-tetramethyloctadecyl)-beta- d-xylopyranoside], EROCOC 17+4 [1- O-(5,9,13,17-tetramethyloctadecanoyl)erythritol], and PEOCOC 17+4 [mono- O-(5,9,13,17-tetramethyloctadecanoyl)pentaerythritol]. The values of T K (hydrated solid-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature) of the cubic phase-forming lipids are all below 0 degrees C. Quantitative analyses of the lipid molecular structure-aqueous phase structure relationship in terms of the experimentally evaluated "surfactant parameter" allow us to rationally select an optimum combination of hydrophilic

  6. Hemorrhage in mouse tumors induced by dodecaborate cluster lipids intended for boron neutron capture therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaffran T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tanja Schaffran,1 Nan Jiang,1 Markus Bergmann,2,3 Ekkehard Küstermann,4 Regine Süss,5 Rolf Schubert,5 Franz M Wagner,6 Doaa Awad,7 Detlef Gabel1,2,8 1Department of Chemistry, University of Bremen, 2Institute of Neuropathology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte; 3Cooperative Center Medicine, University of Bremen, 4“In-vivo-MR” AG, FB2, University of Bremen, Bremen, 5Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau, 6Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II, Technische Unversitaet Muenchen, Garching, Germany; 7Department of Biochemistry, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt; 8School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University Bremen, Bremen, Germany Abstract: The potential of boron-containing lipids with three different structures, which were intended for use in boron neutron capture therapy, was investigated. All three types of boron lipids contained the anionic dodecaborate cluster as the headgroup. Their effects on two different tumor models in mice following intravenous injection were tested; for this, liposomes with boron lipid, distearoyl phosphatidylcholine, and cholesterol as helper lipids, and containing a polyethylene glycol lipid for steric protection, were administered intravenously into tumor-bearing mice (C3H mice for SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma and BALB/c mice for CT26/WT colon carcinoma. With the exception of one lipid (B-THF-14, the lipids were well tolerated, and no other animal was lost due to systemic toxicity. The lipid which led to death was not found to be much more toxic in cell culture than the other boron lipids. All of the lipids that were well tolerated showed hemorrhage in both tumor models within a few hours after administration. The hemorrhage could be seen by in vivo magnetic resonance and histology, and was found to occur within a few hours. The degree of hemorrhage depended on the amount of boron administered and on the tumor model. The observed unwanted effect of the lipids

  7. KADAR HbA1c DAN RASIO LIPID PADA WANITA DEWASA DENGAN OBESITAS SENTRAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Sudaryanto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Central obesity was accumulation of fat in the abdominal region. Many studies showed correlations between central obesity and cardiovascular diseases, e.g. diabetes and dyslipidemia.  This study was conducted to know the difference between HbA1c and lipid profil between the women with and without central obesity. This study was an analytic observational study with cross-sectional design. Subjects of 52 respondents were healthy adult women staff in campus I, II, III Sanata Dharma University in Yogyakarta and selected using purposive sampling technique. The data of waist circumference, pelvic/hip circumference, HbA1c and lipid profile were collected among the subjects and analyzed with computer with 95% confidence interval. The results of this study showed HbA1c levels and lipid profile were different between the women with and without central obesity, although the difference was not statistically significant.

  8. Lipid alterations in lipid rafts from Alzheimer's disease human brain cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Virginia; Fabelo, Noemí; Santpere, Gabriel; Puig, Berta; Marín, Raquel; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains intimately associated with cell signaling. These biochemical microstructures are characterized by their high contents of sphingolipids, cholesterol and saturated fatty acids and a reduced content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Here, we have purified lipid rafts of human frontal brain cortex from normal and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and characterized their biochemical lipid composition. The results revealed that lipid rafts from AD brains exhibit aberrant lipid profiles compared to healthy brains. In particular, lipid rafts from AD brains displayed abnormally low levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA, mainly 22:6n-3, docosahexaenoic acid) and monoenes (mainly 18:1n-9, oleic acid), as well as reduced unsaturation and peroxidability indexes. Also, multiple relationships between phospholipids and fatty acids were altered in AD lipid rafts. Importantly, no changes were observed in the mole percentage of lipid classes and fatty acids in rafts from normal brains throughout the lifespan (24-85 years). These indications point to the existence of homeostatic mechanisms preserving lipid raft status in normal frontal cortex. The disruption of such mechanisms in AD brains leads to a considerable increase in lipid raft order and viscosity, which may explain the alterations in lipid raft signaling observed in AD.

  9. Study of the ion-channel behavior on glassy carbon electrode supported bilayer lipid membranes stimulated by perchlorate anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhiquan; Shi, Jun; Huang, Weimin, E-mail: huangwm@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a kind of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) layer membranes was supported on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). We studied the ion channel behavior of the supported bilayer lipid membrane by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SCEM) in tris(2,2′-bipyridine) ruthenium(II) solution. Perchlorate anion was used as a presence of stimulus and ruthenium(II) complex cations as the probing ions for the measurement of SECM, the lipid membrane channel was opened and exhibited the behavior of distinct SECM positive feedback curve. The channel was in a closed state in the absence of perchlorate anions while reflected the behavior of SECM negative feedback curve. The rates of electron transfer reaction in the lipid membranes surface were detected and it was dependant on the potential of SECM. - Highlights: • The rates of electron transfer reaction in the lipid membranes surface were detected. • Dynamic investigations of ion-channel behavior of supported bilayer lipid membranes by scanning electrochemical microscopy • A novel way to explore the interaction between molecules and supported bilayer lipid membranes.

  10. Insulin suppresses the AMPK signaling pathway to regulate lipid metabolism in primary cultured hepatocytes of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinwei; Li, Yu; Ding, Hongyan; Dong, Jihong; Zhang, Renhe; Huang, Dan; Lei, Lin; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Guowen; Li, Xiaobing

    2018-05-01

    Dairy cows with type II ketosis display hepatic fat accumulation and hyperinsulinemia, but the underlying mechanism is not completely clear. This study aimed to clarify the regulation of lipid metabolism by insulin in cow hepatocytes. In vitro, cow hepatocytes were treated with 0, 1, 10, or 100 nm insulin in the presence or absence of AICAR (an AMP-activated protein kinase alpha (AMPKα) activator). The results showed that insulin decreased AMPKα phosphorylation. This inactivation of AMPKα increased the gene and protein expression levels of carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), which downregulated the expression of lipogenic genes, thereby decreasing lipid biosynthesis. Furthermore, AMPKα inactivation decreased the gene and protein expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα), which upregulated the expression of lipid oxidation genes, thereby increasing lipid oxidation. In addition, insulin decreased the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) assembly. Consequently, triglyceride content was significantly increased in insulin treated hepatocytes. Activation of AMPKα induced by AICAR could reverse the effect of insulin on PPARα, SREBP-1c, and ChREBP, thereby decreasing triglyceride content. These results indicate that insulin inhibits the AMPKα signaling pathway to increase lipid synthesis and decrease lipid oxidation and VLDL assembly in cow hepatocytes, thereby inducing TG accumulation. This mechanism could partly explain the causal relationship between hepatic fat accumulation and hyperinsulinemia in dairy cows with type II ketosis.

  11. Using fluorescent lipids in live zebrafish larvae: From imaging whole animal physiology to subcellular lipid trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J L; Carten, J D; Farber, S A

    2016-01-01

    Lipids serve essential functions in cells as signaling molecules, membrane components, and sources of energy. Defects in lipid metabolism are implicated in a number of pandemic human diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and hypercholesterolemia. Many aspects of how fatty acids and cholesterol are absorbed and processed by intestinal cells remain unclear and present a hurdle to developing approaches for disease prevention and treatment. Numerous studies have shown that the zebrafish is an excellent model for vertebrate lipid metabolism. In this chapter, we review commercially available fluorescent lipids that can be deployed in live zebrafish to better understand lipid signaling and metabolism. In this chapter, we present criteria one should consider when selecting specific fluorescent lipids for the study of digestive physiology or lipid metabolism in larval zebrafish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 2011 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism, & Function Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Benning

    2011-02-04

    This is the second Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function'. It covers current topics in lipid structure, metabolism and function in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms including seed plants, algae, mosses and ferns. Work in photosynthetic bacteria is considered as well as it serves the understanding of specific aspects of lipid metabolism in plants. Breakthroughs are discussed in research on plant lipids as diverse as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, lipids of the cell surface, isoprenoids, fatty acids and their derivatives. The program covers nine concepts at the forefront of research under which afore mentioned plant lipid classes are discussed. The goal is to integrate areas such as lipid signaling, basic lipid metabolism, membrane function, lipid analysis, and lipid engineering to achieve a high level of stimulating interaction among diverse researchers with interests in plant lipids. One Emphasis is on the dynamics and regulation of lipid metabolism during plant cell development and in response to environmental factors.

  13. Non-Water-Suppressed 1H MR Spectroscopy with Orientational Prior Knowledge Shows Potential for Separating Intra- and Extramyocellular Lipid Signals in Human Myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmer, Ariane; Hock, Andreas; Cameron, Donnie; Henning, Anke

    2017-12-04

    Conditions such as type II diabetes are linked with elevated lipid levels in the heart, and significantly increased risk of heart failure; however, metabolic processes underlying the development of cardiac disease in type II diabetes are not fully understood. Here we present a non-invasive method for in vivo investigation of cardiac lipid metabolism: namely, IVS-McPRESS. This technique uses metabolite-cycled, non-water suppressed 1 H cardiac magnetic resonance spectroscopy with prospective and retrospective motion correction. High-quality IVS-McPRESS data acquired from healthy volunteers allowed us to investigate the frequency shift of extramyocellular lipid signals, which depends on the myocardial fibre orientation. Assuming consistent voxel positioning relative to myofibres, the myofibre angle with the magnetic field was derived from the voxel orientation. For separation and individual analysis of intra- and extramyocellular lipid signals, the angle myocardial fibres in the spectroscopy voxel take with the magnetic field should be within ±24.5°. Metabolite and lipid concentrations were analysed with respect to BMI. Significant correlations between BMI and unsaturated fatty acids in intramyocellular lipids, and methylene groups in extramyocellular lipids were found. The proposed IVS-McPRESS technique enables non-invasive investigation of cardiac lipid metabolism and may thus be a useful tool to study healthy and pathological conditions.

  14. Production and Early Preservation of Lipid Biomarkers in Iron Hot Springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parenteau, Mary N.; Jahnke, Linda L.; Farmer, Jack D.; Cady, Sherry L.

    2014-06-01

    The bicarbonate-buffered anoxic vent waters at Chocolate Pots hot springs in Yellowstone National Park are 51–54°C, pH 5.5–6.0, and are very high in dissolved Fe(II) at 5.8–5.9 mg/L. The aqueous Fe(II) is oxidized by a combination of biotic and abiotic mechanisms and precipitated as primary siliceous nanophase iron oxyhydroxides (ferrihydrite). Four distinct prokaryotic photosynthetic microbial mat types grow on top of these iron deposits. Lipids were used to characterize the community composition of the microbial mats, link source organisms to geologically significant biomarkers, and investigate how iron mineralization degrades the lipid signature of the community. The phospholipid and glycolipid fatty acid profiles of the highest-temperature mats indicate that they are dominated by cyanobacteria and green nonsulfur filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs (FAPs). Diagnostic lipid biomarkers of the cyanobacteria include midchain branched mono- and dimethylalkanes and, most notably, 2-methylbacteriohopanepolyol. Diagnostic lipid biomarkers of the FAPs (Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus spp.) include wax esters and a long-chain tri-unsaturated alkene. Surprisingly, the lipid biomarkers resisted the earliest stages of microbial degradation and diagenesis to survive in the iron oxides beneath the mats. Understanding the potential of particular sedimentary environments to capture and preserve fossil biosignatures is of vital importance in the selection of the best landing sites for future astrobiological missions to Mars. Finally, this study explores the nature of organic degradation processes in moderately thermal Fe(II)-rich groundwater springs—environmental conditions that have been previously identified as highly relevant for Mars exploration.

  15. A lipid E-MAP identifies Ubx2 as a critical regulator of lipid saturation and lipid bilayer stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surma, Michal A; Klose, Christian; Peng, Debby

    2013-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex, and the mechanisms underlying their homeostasis are incompletely understood. Here, we present a quantitative genetic interaction map (E-MAP) focused on various aspects of lipid biology, including lipid metabolism, sorting, and trafficking. This E-MAP contains ∼250......,000 negative and positive genetic interaction scores and identifies a molecular crosstalk of protein quality control pathways with lipid bilayer homeostasis. Ubx2p, a component of the endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation pathway, surfaces as a key upstream regulator of the essential fatty acid (FA...

  16. Triglyceride Blisters in Lipid Bilayers: Implications for Lipid Droplet Biogenesis and the Mobile Lipid Signal in Cancer Cell Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Duelund, Lars; Pakkanen, Kirsi Inkeri

    2010-01-01

    triolein molecules to the bilayer center in the form of a disordered, isotropic, mobile neutral lipid aggregate, at least 17 nm in diameter, which forms spontaneously, and remains stable on at least the microsecond time scale. The results give credence to the hotly debated existence of mobile neutral lipid...... aggregates of unknown function present in malignant cells, and to the early biogenesis of lipid droplets accommodated between the two leaflets of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The TO aggregates give the bilayer a blister-like appearance, and will hinder the formation of multi-lamellar phases in model...

  17. The structural role of cholesterol in cell membranes: from condensed bilayers to lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Martin R; Regen, Steven L

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Defining the two-dimensional structure of cell membranes represents one of the most daunting challenges currently facing chemists, biochemists, and biophysicists. In particular, the time-averaged lateral organization of the lipids and proteins that make up these natural enclosures has yet to be established. As the classic Singer-Nicolson model of cell membranes has evolved over the past 40 years, special attention has focused on the structural role played by cholesterol, a key component that represents ca. 30% of the total lipids that are present. Despite extensive studies with model membranes, two fundamental issues have remained a mystery: (i) the mechanism by which cholesterol condenses low-melting lipids by uncoiling their acyl chains and (ii) the thermodynamics of the interaction between cholesterol and high- and low-melting lipids. The latter bears directly on one of the most popular notions in modern cell biology, that is, the lipid raft hypothesis, whereby cholesterol is thought to combine with high-melting lipids to form "lipid rafts" that float in a "sea" of low-melting lipids. In this Account, we first describe a chemical approach that we have developed in our laboratories that has allowed us to quantify the interactions between exchangeable mimics of cholesterol and low- and high-melting lipids in model membranes. In essence, this "nearest-neighbor recognition" (NNR) method involves the synthesis of dimeric forms of these lipids that contain a disulfide moiety as a linker. By means of thiolate-disulfide interchange reactions, equilibrium mixtures of dimers are then formed. These exchange reactions are initiated either by adding dithiothreitol to a liposomal dispersion to generate a small amount of thiol monomer or by including a small amount of thiol monomer in the liposomes at pH 5.0 and then raising the pH to 7.4. We then show how such NNR measurements have allowed us to distinguish between two very different mechanisms that have been

  18. The multifaceted interplay between lipids and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, Koen F; Slagboom, P Eline; Jukema, J Wouter; Heijmans, Bastiaan T

    2016-06-01

    The interplay between lipids and epigenetic mechanisms has recently gained increased interest because of its relevance for common diseases and most notably atherosclerosis. This review discusses recent advances in unravelling this interplay with a particular focus on promising approaches and methods that will be able to establish causal relationships. Complementary approaches uncovered close links between circulating lipids and epigenetic mechanisms at multiple levels. A characterization of lipid-associated genetic variants suggests that these variants exert their influence on lipid levels through epigenetic changes in the liver. Moreover, exposure of monocytes to lipids persistently alters their epigenetic makeup resulting in more proinflammatory cells. Hence, epigenetic changes can both impact on and be induced by lipids. It is the combined application of technological advances to probe epigenetic modifications at a genome-wide scale and methodological advances aimed at causal inference (including Mendelian randomization and integrative genomics) that will elucidate the interplay between circulating lipids and epigenetics. Understanding its role in the development of atherosclerosis holds the promise of identifying a new category of therapeutic targets, since epigenetic changes are amenable to reversal.

  19. Stiffnites. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Pareschi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The dynamics of a stiffnite are here inferred. A stiffnite is a sheet-shaped, gravity-driven submarine sediment flow, with a fabric made up of marine ooze. To infer stiffnite dynamics, order of magnitude estimations are used. Field deposits and experiments on materials taken from the literature are also used. Stiffnites can be tens or hundreds of kilometers wide, and a few centimeters/ meters thick. They move on the sea slopes over hundreds of kilometers, reaching submarine velocities as high as 100 m/s. Hard grain friction favors grain fragmentation and formation of triboelectrically electrified particles and triboplasma (i.e., ions + electrons. Marine lipids favor isolation of electrical charges. At first, two basic assumptions are introduced, and checked a posteriori: (a in a flowing stiffnite, magnetic dipole moments develop, with the magnetization proportional to the shear rate. I have named those dipoles as Ambigua. (b Ambigua are ‘vertically frozen’ along stiffnite streamlines. From (a and (b, it follows that: (i Ambigua create a magnetic field (at peak, >1 T. (ii Lorentz forces sort stiffnite particles into two superimposed sheets. The lower sheet, L+, has a sandy granulometry and a net positive electrical charge density. The upper sheet, L–, has a silty muddy granulometry and a net negative electrical charge density; the grains of sheet L– become finer upwards. (iii Faraday forces push ferromagnetic grains towards the base of a stiffnite, so that a peak of magnetic susceptibility characterizes a stiffnite deposit. (iv Stiffnites harden considerably during their motion, due to magnetic confinement. Stiffnite deposits and inferred stiffnite characteristics are compatible with a stable flow behavior against bending, pinch, or other macro instabilities. In the present report, a consistent hypothesis about the nature of Ambigua is provided.

  20. Stratification of archaeal membrane lipids in the ocean and implications for adaptation and chemotaxonomy of planktonic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chun; Wakeham, Stuart G; Elling, Felix J; Basse, Andreas; Mollenhauer, Gesine; Versteegh, Gerard J M; Könneke, Martin; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-12-01

    Membrane lipids of marine planktonic archaea have provided unique insights into archaeal ecology and paleoceanography. However, past studies of archaeal lipids in suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediments mainly focused on a small class of fully saturated glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) homologues identified decades ago. The apparent low structural diversity of GDGTs is in strong contrast to the high diversity of metabolism and taxonomy among planktonic archaea. Furthermore, adaptation of archaeal lipids in the deep ocean remains poorly constrained. We report the archaeal lipidome in SPM from diverse oceanic regimes. We extend the known inventory of planktonic archaeal lipids to include numerous unsaturated archaeal ether lipids (uns-AELs). We further reveal (i) different thermal regulations and polar headgroup compositions of membrane lipids between the epipelagic (≤ 100 m) and deep (>100 m) populations of archaea, (ii) stratification of unsaturated GDGTs with varying redox conditions, and (iii) enrichment of tetra-unsaturated archaeol and fully saturated GDGTs in epipelagic and deep oxygenated waters, respectively. Such stratified lipid patterns are consistent with the typical distribution of archaeal phylotypes in marine environments. We, thus, provide an ecological context for GDGT-based paleoclimatology and bring about the potential use of uns-AELs as biomarkers for planktonic Euryarchaeota. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The action of polyene antibiotics on lipid bilayer membranes in the presence of several cations and anions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zutphen, H. van; Demel, R.A.; Norman, A.W.; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1971-01-01

    1. 1. Filipin complex, filipin II, filipin III, nystatin, etruscomycin, and pimaricin at concentrations of 10−5 M were able to disrupt bimolecular lipid films containing lecithin and cholesterol in a 1:1 molar ratio. 2. 2. The above antibiotics were not able to disrupt lecithin bilayer

  2. Temperature dependent heterogeneous rotational correlation in lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadashvand, Neda; Othon, Christina M

    2016-11-15

    Lipid structures exhibit complex and highly dynamic lateral structure; and changes in lipid density and fluidity are believed to play an essential role in membrane targeting and function. The dynamic structure of liquids on the molecular scale can exhibit complex transient density fluctuations. Here the lateral heterogeneity of lipid dynamics is explored in free standing lipid monolayers. As the temperature is lowered the probes exhibit increasingly broad and heterogeneous rotational correlation. This increase in heterogeneity appears to exhibit a critical onset, similar to those observed for glass forming fluids. We explore heterogeneous relaxation in in a single constituent lipid monolayer of 1, 2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine  by measuring the rotational diffusion of a fluorescent probe (1-palmitoyl-2-[1]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), which is embedded in the lipid monolayer at low labeling density. Dynamic distributions are measured using wide-field time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. The observed relaxation exhibits a narrow, liquid-like distribution at high temperatures (τ ∼ 2.4 ns), consistent with previous experimental measures (Dadashvand et al 2014 Struct. Dyn. 1 054701, Loura and Ramalho 2007 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1768 467-478). However, as the temperature is quenched, the distribution broadens, and we observe the appearance of a long relaxation population (τ ∼ 16.5 ns). This supports the heterogeneity observed for lipids at high packing densities, and demonstrates that the nanoscale diffusion and reorganization in lipid structures can be significantly complex, even in the simplest amorphous architectures. Dynamical heterogeneity of this form can have a significant impact on the organization, permeability and energetics of lipid membrane structures.

  3. DNA release from lipoplexes by anionic lipids: correlation with lipid mesomorphism, interfacial curvature, and membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarahovsky, Yury S.; Koynova, Rumiana; MacDonald, Robert C. (Northwestern)

    2010-01-18

    DNA release from lipoplexes is an essential step during lipofection and is probably a result of charge neutralization by cellular anionic lipids. As a model system to test this possibility, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between DNA and lipid covalently labeled with Cy3 and BODIPY, respectively, was used to monitor the release of DNA from lipid surfaces induced by anionic liposomes. The separation of DNA from lipid measured this way was considerably slower and less complete than that estimated with noncovalently labeled DNA, and depends on the lipid composition of both lipoplexes and anionic liposomes. This result was confirmed by centrifugal separation of released DNA and lipid. X-ray diffraction revealed a clear correlation of the DNA release capacity of the anionic lipids with the interfacial curvature of the mesomorphic structures developed when the anionic and cationic liposomes were mixed. DNA release also correlated with the rate of fusion of anionic liposomes with lipoplexes. It is concluded that the tendency to fuse and the phase preference of the mixed lipid membranes are key factors for the rate and extent of DNA release. The approach presented emphasizes the importance of the lipid composition of both lipoplexes and target membranes and suggests optimal transfection may be obtained by tailoring lipoplex composition to the lipid composition of target cells.

  4. Metabolic response to lipid infusion in fasting winter-acclimatized king penguin chicks (Aptenodytes patagonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulier, Loïc; Tornos, Jérémy; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Rey, Benjamin; Roussel, Damien

    2013-05-01

    During the cold austral winter, king penguin chicks are infrequently fed by their parents and thus experience severe nutritional deprivation under harsh environmental conditions. These energetic constraints lead to a range of energy sparing mechanisms balanced by the maintenance of efficient thermogenic processes. The present work investigated whether the high thermogenic capacities exhibited by winter-acclimatized king penguin chicks could be related to an increase in lipid substrate supply and oxidation in skeletal muscle, the main site of thermogenesis in birds. To test this hypothesis, we examined i) the effect of an experimental rise in plasma triglyceride on the whole metabolic rate in winter-acclimatized (WA) and de-acclimatized king penguin chicks kept at thermoneutrality (TN), and ii) investigated the fuel preference of muscle mitochondria. In vivo, a perfusion of a lipid emulsion induced a small 10% increase of metabolic rate in WA chicks but not in TN group. In vitro, the oxidation rate of muscle mitochondria respiring on lipid-derived substrate was +40% higher in WA chicks than in TN, while no differences were found between groups when mitochondria oxidized carbohydrate-derived substrate or succinate. Despite an enhanced fuel selection towards lipid oxidation in skeletal muscle, a rise of circulating lipids per se was not sufficient to fully unravel the thermogenic capacity of winter-acclimatized king penguin chicks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydrogel Micro-/Nanosphere Coated by a Lipid Bilayer: Preparation and Microscopic Probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Rahni

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The result of polymeric nanogels and lipid vesicles interaction—lipobeads—can be considered as multipurpose containers for future therapeutic applications, such as targeted anticancer chemotherapy with superior tumor response and minimum side effects. In this work, micrometer sized lipobeads were synthesized by two methods: (i mixing separately prepared microgels made of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPA and phospholipid vesicles of micrometer or nanometer size and (ii polymerization within the lipid vesicles. For the first time, a high vacuum scanning electron microscopy was shown to be suitable for a quick validation of the structural organization of wet lipobeads and their constituents without special sample preparation. In particular, the structural difference of microgels prepared by thermal and UV-polymerization in different solvents was revealed and three types of giant liposomes were recognized under high vacuum in conjunction with their size, composition, and method of preparation. Importantly, the substructure of the hydrogel core and multi- and unilamellar constructions of the peripheral lipid part were explicitly distinguished on the SEM images of lipobeads, justifying the spontaneous formation of a lipid bilayer on the surface of microgels and evidencing an energetically favorable structural organization of the hydrogel/lipid bilayer assembly. This key property can facilitate lipobeads’ preparation and decrease technological expenses on their scaled production. The comparison of the SEM imaging with the scanning confocal and atomic force microscopies data are also presented in the discussion.

  6. Beyond liposomes: Recent advances on lipid based nanostructures for poorly soluble/poorly permeable drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, M C; Carbone, C; Souto, E B

    2017-10-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) and hybrid nanoparticles, have gained increasing interest as drug delivery systems because of their potential to load and release drugs from the Biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) of class II (low solubility and high permeability) and of class IV (low solubility and low permeability). Lipid properties (e.g. high solubilizing potential, biocompatibility, biotolerability, biodegradability and distinct route of absorption) contribute for the improvement of the bioavailability of these drugs for a set of administration routes. Their interest continues to grow, as translated by the number of patents being field worldwide. This paper discusses the recent advances on the use of SLN, NLC and lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles for the loading of lipophilic, poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs, being developed for oral, topical, parenteral and ocular administration, also discussing the industrial applications of these systems. A review of the patents filled between 2014 and 2017, concerning the original inventions of lipid nanocarriers, is also provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF LIPID PROFILE IN SEDENTARY AND ACTIVE ADULT FEMALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhasini Sanda

    2018-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Lipids and lipoproteins are essential constituents of the body and their activities assist in maintenance of body homeostasis. Sedentary lifestyle has been shown to lead to inactivity, which could lead to lipid disorders. Hyperlipidaemias is one of the major independent risk factor, which affects the cardiovascular system adversely resulting eventually damage to various organs most notably heart, kidneys and brain. The present study is therefore designed to ascertain the effect of sedentary lifestyle on lipid status of sedentary adult females when compared to that of the lipid status of active adult females. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study comprised of Group I - 50 sedentary adult females and Group II - 50 active adult females aged between 30 to 60 years. The subjects selected in both groups were matched for age and dietary habits. The subjects with hypertension, diabetes, smokers, pregnancy and subjects with Body Mass Index (BMI greater than 30 are excluded. After overnight fasting of 12 to 14 hours, 5 mL of blood is collected from the subjects and fasting Total Serum Cholesterol (TC, Total Serum Triglycerides (TG, HDL cholesterol (HDL-C, LDL cholesterol (LDL-C and total serum cholesterol/HDL-C ratio are measured and data is statistically analysed. RESULTS The evaluation of lipid profile patterns in above subjects showed hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, increased LDLC and total serum cholesterol/HDL-C ratio in sedentary adult females and also decreased HDL-C levels in them when compared to the normal healthy lipid profile patterns in active adult females. A statistically significant increased lipid profiles (P-value <0.001 was observed in the sedentary adult females than in active adult females. CONCLUSION This study shows that sedentary lifestyle predisposes to hyperlipidaemias, one of the major risk factor of cardiovascular disease and lack of exercise worsens the situation.

  8. An ER Protein Functionally Couples Neutral Lipid Metabolism on Lipid Droplets to Membrane Lipid Synthesis in the ER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markgraf, Daniel F; Klemm, Robin W; Junker, Mirco

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells store neutral lipids such as triacylglycerol (TAG) in lipid droplets (LDs). Here, we have addressed how LDs are functionally linked to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We show that, in S. cerevisiae, LD growth is sustained by LD-localized enzymes. When LDs grow in early stationary...... phase, the diacylglycerol acyl-transferase Dga1p moves from the ER to LDs and is responsible for all TAG synthesis from diacylglycerol (DAG). During LD breakdown in early exponential phase, an ER membrane protein (Ice2p) facilitates TAG utilization for membrane-lipid synthesis. Ice2p has a cytosolic...... and explain how cells switch neutral lipid metabolism from storage to consumption....

  9. Lipid Configurations from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pezeshkian, Weria; Khandelia, Himanshu; Marsh, Derek

    2018-01-01

    of dihedral angles in palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine from molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated fluid bilayer membranes. We compare results from the widely used lipid force field of Berger et al. with those from the most recent C36 release of the CHARMM force field for lipids. Only the CHARMM force......The extent to which current force fields faithfully reproduce conformational properties of lipids in bilayer membranes, and whether these reflect the structural principles established for phospholipids in bilayer crystals, are central to biomembrane simulations. We determine the distribution...

  10. Cd(II), Cu(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Depending on the way goethite was pretreated with oxalic acid, affinity for Cd(II) varied ...... Effects and mechanisms of oxalate on Cd(II) adsorption on goethite at different ... precipitation, surfactant mediation, hydrothermal and micro-emulsion.

  11. Enhanced rifampicin delivery to alveolar macrophages by solid lipid nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuan Junlan [West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Key Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery System, Ministry of Education (China); Li Yanzhen [Tianjin Institute of Pharmaceutical Research, State Key Laboratory of Drug Delivery Technology and Pharmacokinetics (China); Yang Likai; Sun Xun [West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Key Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery System, Ministry of Education (China); Zhang Qiang [Peking University, State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (China); Gong Tao, E-mail: gongtaoy@126.com; Zhang Zhirong, E-mail: zrzzl@vip.sina.com [West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Key Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery System, Ministry of Education (China)

    2013-05-15

    The present study aimed at developing a drug delivery system targeting the densest site of tuberculosis infection, the alveolar macrophages (AMs). Rifampicin (RFP)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (RFP-SLNs) with an average size of 829.6 {+-} 16.1 nm were prepared by a modified lipid film hydration method. The cytotoxicity of RFP-SLNs to AMs and alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECs) was examined using MTT assays. The viability of AMs and AECs was above 80 % after treatment with RFP-SLNs, which showed low toxicity to both AMs and AECs. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy was employed to observe the interaction between RFP-SLNs and both AMs and AECs. After incubating the cells with RFP-SLNs for 2 h, the fluorescent intensity in AMs was more and remained longer (from 0.5 to 12 h) when compared with that in AECs (from 0.5 to 8 h). In vitro uptake characteristics of RFP-SLNs in AMs and AECs were also investigated by detection of intracellular RFP by High performance liquid chromatography. Results showed that RFP-SLNs delivered markedly higher RFP into AMs (691.7 ng/mg in cultured AMs, 662.6 ng/mg in primary AMs) than that into AECs (319.2 ng/mg in cultured AECs, 287.2 ng/mg in primary AECs). Subsequently, in vivo delivery efficiency and the selectivity of RFP-SLNs were further verified in Sprague-Dawley rats. Under pulmonary administration of RFP-SLNs, the amount of RFP in AMs was significantly higher than that in AECs at each time point. Our results demonstrated that solid lipid nanoparticles are a promising strategy for the delivery of rifampicin to alveolar macrophages selectively.

  12. Spastin binds to lipid droplets and affects lipid metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisovalantis Papadopoulos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in SPAST, encoding spastin, are the most common cause of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP. HSP is characterized by weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs, owing to progressive retrograde degeneration of the long corticospinal axons. Spastin is a conserved microtubule (MT-severing protein, involved in processes requiring rearrangement of the cytoskeleton in concert to membrane remodeling, such as neurite branching, axonal growth, midbody abscission, and endosome tubulation. Two isoforms of spastin are synthesized from alternative initiation codons (M1 and M87. We now show that spastin-M1 can sort from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to pre- and mature lipid droplets (LDs. A hydrophobic motif comprised of amino acids 57 through 86 of spastin was sufficient to direct a reporter protein to LDs, while mutation of arginine 65 to glycine abolished LD targeting. Increased levels of spastin-M1 expression reduced the number but increased the size of LDs. Expression of a mutant unable to bind and sever MTs caused clustering of LDs. Consistent with these findings, ubiquitous overexpression of Dspastin in Drosophila led to bigger and less numerous LDs in the fat bodies and increased triacylglycerol levels. In contrast, Dspastin overexpression increased LD number when expressed specifically in skeletal muscles or nerves. Downregulation of Dspastin and expression of a dominant-negative variant decreased LD number in Drosophila nerves, skeletal muscle and fat bodies, and reduced triacylglycerol levels in the larvae. Moreover, we found reduced amount of fat stores in intestinal cells of worms in which the spas-1 homologue was either depleted by RNA interference or deleted. Taken together, our data uncovers an evolutionarily conserved role of spastin as a positive regulator of LD metabolism and open up the possibility that dysfunction of LDs in axons may contribute to the pathogenesis of HSP.

  13. Cu(II) AND Zn(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    SYNTHESIS OF 2,2-DIMETHYL-4-PHENYL-[1,3]-DIOXOLANE USING ZEOLITE. ENCAPSULATED Co(II), Cu(II) AND Zn(II) COMPLEXES. B.P. Nethravathi1, K. Rama Krishna Reddy2 and K.N. Mahendra1*. 1Department of Chemistry, Bangalore University, Bangalore-560001, India. 2Department of Chemistry, Government ...

  14. Elizabeth II uus kunstigalerii

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Tähistamaks oma troonile asumise 50. aastapäeva, avab Elizabeth II 6. II 2002 Buckinghami palees uue kunstigalerii, mis ehitatakse palee tiibhoonena. Arhitekt John Simpson. Elizabeth II kunstikogust

  15. Scavenger receptor AI/II truncation, lung function and COPD: a large population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M; Nordestgaard, B G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The scavenger receptor A-I/II (SRA-I/II) on alveolar macrophages is involved in recognition and clearance of modified lipids and inhaled particulates. A rare variant of the SRA-I/II gene, Arg293X, truncates the distal collagen-like domain, which is essential for ligand recognition. We tested...... whether the Arg293X variant is associated with reduced lung function and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the general population....

  16. Lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in dividing Xenopus eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteroo, P A; Bluemink, J G; Dictus, W J; van Zoelen, E J; de Laat, S W

    1984-07-01

    The lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids was analyzed during first cleavage of Xenopus laevis eggs by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) measurements, using the lipid analogs 5-(N-hexadecanoyl)aminofluorescein ("HEDAF") and 5-(N-tetradecanoyl)aminofluorescein ("TEDAF") as probes. The preexisting plasma membrane of the animal side showed an inhomogeneous, dotted fluorescence pattern after labeling and the lateral mobility of both probes used was below the detection limits of the FPR method (D much less than 10(-10) cm2/sec). In contrast, the preexisting plasma membrane of the vegetal side exhibited homogeneous fluorescence and the lateral diffusion coefficient of both probes used was relatively high (HEDAF, D = 2.8 X 10(-8) cm2/sec; TEDAF, D = 2.4 X 10(-8) cm2/sec). In the cleaving egg visible transfer of HEDAF or TEDAF from prelabeled plasma membrane to the new membrane in the furrow did not occur, even on the vegetal side. Upon labeling during cleavage, however, the new membrane was uniformly labeled and both probes were mobile, as in the vegetal preexisting plasma membrane. These data show that the membrane of the dividing Xenopus egg comprises three macrodomains: (i) the animal preexisting plasma membrane; (ii) the vegetal preexisting plasma membrane; (iii) the new furrow membrane.

  17. Combined effects of headgroup charge and tail unsaturation of lipids on lateral organization and diffusion of lipids in model biomembranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiao-Jie; Liang Qing

    2017-01-01

    Lateral organization and dynamics of lipids in plasma membranes are crucial for several cellular processes such as signal transduction across the membrane and still remain elusive. In this paper, using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation, we theoretically study the combined effects of headgroup charge and tail unsaturation of lipids on the lateral organization and diffusion of lipids in ternary lipid bilayers. In neutral ternary lipid bilayers composed of saturated lipids, unsaturated lipids, and cholesterols, under the conditions of given temperature and components, the main factor for the phase separation is the unsaturation of unsaturated lipids and the bilayers can be separated into liquid-ordered domains enriched in saturated lipids and cholesterols and liquid-disordered domains enriched in unsaturated lipids. Once the headgroup charge is introduced, the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged lipid headgroups will increase the distance between the charged lipids. We find that the lateral organization and diffusion of the lipids in the (partially) charged ternary lipid bilayers are determined by the competition between the headgroup charge and the unsaturation of the unsaturated lipids. In the bilayers containing unsaturated lipids with lower unsaturation, the headgroup charge plays a crucial role in the lateral organization and diffusion of lipids. The headgroup charge may make the lipid domains unstable and even can suppress phase separation of the lipids in some systems. However, in the bilayers containing highly unsaturated lipids, the lateral organization and diffusion of lipids are mainly dominated by the unsaturation of the unsaturated lipids. This work may provide some theoretical insights into understanding the formation of nanosized domains and lateral diffusion of lipids in plasma membranes. (paper)

  18. Radiation-induced lipid peroxidation: influence of oxygen concentration and membrane lipid composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolters, H.; Tilburg, C.A.M. van; Konings, A.W.T.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation -induced lipid peroxidation phospholipid liposomes was investigated in terms of its dependence on lipid composition and oxygen concentration. Non-peroxidizable lipid incorporated in the liposomes reduced the rate of peroxidation of the peroxidizable phospholipid acyl chains, possibly by restricting the length of chain reactions. The latter effect is believed to be caused by interference of the non-peroxidizable lipids in the bilayer. At low oxygen concentration lipid peroxidation was reduced. The cause of this limited peroxidation may be a reduced number of radical initiation reactions possibly involving oxygen-derived superoxide radicals. Killing of proliferating mammalian cells, irradiated at oxygen concentrations ranging from 0 to 100%, appeared to be independent of the concentration of peroxidizable phospholipids in the cell membranes. This indicates that lipid peroxidation is not the determining process in radiation-induced reproductive cell death. (author)

  19. Lipid measures and cardiovascular disease prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, D.F.; Stroes, E.S.G.; Kastelein, J.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Traditional lipid measures are the cornerstone of risk assessment and treatment goals in cardiovascular prevention. Whereas the association between total, LDL-, HDL-cholesterol and cardiovascular disease risk has been generally acknowledged, the rather poor capacity to distinguish between patients

  20. Novel approaches to lipid-lowering therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lines, ezetimibe is recommended as an add-on therapy for patients on ... 2 Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism Research Unit and Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism ... acting at the level of protein translation via RNA interference in the.

  1. Artificial Lipid Membranes: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siontorou, Christina G; Nikoleli, Georgia-Paraskevi; Nikolelis, Dimitrios P; Karapetis, Stefanos K

    2017-07-26

    The multifaceted role of biological membranes prompted early the development of artificial lipid-based models with a primary view of reconstituting the natural functions in vitro so as to study and exploit chemoreception for sensor engineering. Over the years, a fair amount of knowledge on the artificial lipid membranes, as both, suspended or supported lipid films and liposomes, has been disseminated and has helped to diversify and expand initial scopes. Artificial lipid membranes can be constructed by several methods, stabilized by various means, functionalized in a variety of ways, experimented upon intensively, and broadly utilized in sensor development, drug testing, drug discovery or as molecular tools and research probes for elucidating the mechanics and the mechanisms of biological membranes. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art, discusses the diversity of applications, and presents future perspectives. The newly-introduced field of artificial cells further broadens the applicability of artificial membranes in studying the evolution of life.

  2. Homogenization of the lipid profile values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro-Botet, Juan; Rodríguez-Padial, Luis; Brotons, Carlos; Esteban-Salán, Margarita; García-Lerín, Aurora; Pintó, Xavier; Lekuona, Iñaki; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi

    Analytical reports from the clinical laboratory are essential to guide clinicians about what lipid profile values should be considered altered and, therefore, require intervention. Unfortunately, there is a great heterogeneity in the lipid values reported as "normal, desirable, recommended or referenced" by clinical laboratories. This can difficult clinical decisions and be a barrier to achieve the therapeutic goals for cardiovascular prevention. A recent international recommendation has added a new heterogeneity factor for the interpretation of lipid profile, such as the possibility of measuring it without previous fasting. All this justifies the need to develop a document that adapts the existing knowledge to the clinical practice of our health system. In this regard, professionals from different scientific societies involved in the measurement and use of lipid profile data have developed this document to establish recommendations that facilitate their homogenization. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  3. Lipid Bilayer Formation on Organic Electronic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yi; Wustoni, Shofarul; Savva, Achilleas; Giovannitti, Alexander; McCulloch, Iain; Inal, Sahika

    2018-01-01

    The lipid bilayer is the elemental structure of cell membrane, forming a stable barrier between the interior and exterior of the cell while hosting membrane proteins that enable selective transport of biologically important compounds and cellular

  4. A STUDY OF LIPID PROFILE IN PREDIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Lipid abnormalities are common in diabetes mellitus and play an important role in acceleration of atherosclerosis leading to increased cardiovascular diseases. Due to increasing burden of diabetes, it is becoming important to identify dyslipidaemia in high-risk state for diabetes especially prediabetes so that early intervention can reduce cardiovascular risk. AIM To study lipid profile in prediabetes individuals. METHODS This study was a cross-sectional case control study which included 107 prediabetes and 101 healthy controls. Lipid profile of prediabetes and controls were measured and statistically analysed. RESULT Total cholesterol, LDL, triglycerides, VLDL, TG/HDL ratio, and LDL/HDL ratio were significantly high whereas HDL was significantly low in prediabetes subjects as compared to controls. CONCLUSION This study showed significant lipid abnormalities in prediabetes subjects. Because of these they are at high risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, proper screening and appropriate therapy of these conditions becomes important.

  5. Overview of Cholesterol and Lipid Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professor of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Lipid Research, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version ... Cholesterol and triglycerides are important ...

  6. Thyroid hormones and lipid phosphorus in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakare, U R; Ganatra, R D; Shah, D H [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiation Medicine Centre

    1978-04-01

    In vivo studies in mice injected intravenously with /sup 125/I-triiodothyronine (T-3) showed a linear relationship between the uptake of the labelled hormone by the tissue and the lipid phosphorous content of the same tissue. However, studies with /sup 125/I-thyroxine failed to show a similar relationship between the lipid phosphorous content of the organ and the uptake of radioactive hormone by the same organ. In vitro studies using equilibrium dialysis technique with isolated lipid extracts of various organs and radioactive thyroid hormones (T-3 and T-4) did not show any relation between the lipid P and the uptake of labelled hormone. On the basis of the observed discrepancy between in vivo and in vitro studies, it is postulated that an organized lipoprotein structure at the cell membrane may be responsible for the entry of the thyroid hormones.

  7. Supramolecular protein immobilization on lipid bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, R.P.G.; Hendriksen, W.E.; Verheijden, Mark Lloyd; Eelkema, R.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; van Esch, J.H.; Brunsveld, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Protein immobilization on surfaces, and on lipid bilayers specifically, has great potential in biomolecular and biotechnological research. Of current special interest is the immobilization of proteins using supramolecular noncovalent interactions. This allows for a reversible immobilization and

  8. Assessing the nature of lipid raft membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemelä, Perttu S; Ollila, Samuli; Hyvönen, Marja T

    2007-01-01

    of highly ordered lateral domains rich in sphingomyelin and cholesterol (CHOL). These domains, called functional lipid rafts, have been suggested to take part in a variety of dynamic cellular processes such as membrane trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the activity of membrane proteins......-scale simulations to elucidate the properties of ternary raft mixtures with CHOL, palmitoylsphingomyelin (PSM), and palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine. We simulate two bilayers of 1,024 lipids for 100 ns in the liquid-ordered phase and one system of the same size in the liquid-disordered phase. The studies provide...... heterogeneity more difficult. The findings reveal aspects of the role of favored (specific) lipid-lipid interactions within rafts and clarify the prominent role of CHOL in altering the properties of the membrane locally in its neighborhood. Also, we show that the presence of PSM and CHOL in rafts leads...

  9. Voltage-gated lipid ion channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blicher, Andreas; Heimburg, Thomas Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic lipid membranes can display channel-like ion conduction events even in the absence of proteins. We show here that these events are voltage-gated with a quadratic voltage dependence as expected from electrostatic theory of capacitors. To this end, we recorded channel traces and current...... histograms in patch-experiments on lipid membranes. We derived a theoretical current-voltage relationship for pores in lipid membranes that describes the experimental data very well when assuming an asymmetric membrane. We determined the equilibrium constant between closed and open state and the open...... probability as a function of voltage. The voltage-dependence of the lipid pores is found comparable to that of protein channels. Lifetime distributions of open and closed events indicate that the channel open distribution does not follow exponential statistics but rather power law behavior for long open times...

  10. Improved characterization of EV preparations based on protein to lipid ratio and lipid properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xabier Osteikoetxea

    Full Text Available In recent years the study of extracellular vesicles has gathered much scientific and clinical interest. As the field is expanding, it is becoming clear that better methods for characterization and quantification of extracellular vesicles as well as better standards to compare studies are warranted. The goal of the present work was to find improved parameters to characterize extracellular vesicle preparations. Here we introduce a simple 96 well plate-based total lipid assay for determination of lipid content and protein to lipid ratios of extracellular vesicle preparations from various myeloid and lymphoid cell lines as well as blood plasma. These preparations included apoptotic bodies, microvesicles/microparticles, and exosomes isolated by size-based fractionation. We also investigated lipid bilayer order of extracellular vesicle subpopulations using Di-4-ANEPPDHQ lipid probe, and lipid composition using affinity reagents to clustered cholesterol (monoclonal anti-cholesterol antibody and ganglioside GM1 (cholera toxin subunit B. We have consistently found different protein to lipid ratios characteristic for the investigated extracellular vesicle subpopulations which were substantially altered in the case of vesicular damage or protein contamination. Spectral ratiometric imaging and flow cytometric analysis also revealed marked differences between the various vesicle populations in their lipid order and their clustered membrane cholesterol and GM1 content. Our study introduces for the first time a simple and readily available lipid assay to complement the widely used protein assays in order to better characterize extracellular vesicle preparations. Besides differentiating extracellular vesicle subpopulations, the novel parameters introduced in this work (protein to lipid ratio, lipid bilayer order, and lipid composition, may prove useful for quality control of extracellular vesicle related basic and clinical studies.

  11. GPS-Lipid: a robust tool for the prediction of multiple lipid modification sites

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Yubin; Zheng, Yueyuan; Li, Hongyu; Luo, Xiaotong; He, Zhihao; Cao, Shuo; Shi, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Xue, Yu; Zuo, Zhixiang; Ren, Jian

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most common post-translational modifications in eukaryotic cells, lipid modification is an important mechanism for the regulation of variety aspects of protein function. Over the last decades, three classes of lipid modifications have been increasingly studied. The co-regulation of these different lipid modifications is beginning to be noticed. However, due to the lack of integrated bioinformatics resources, the studies of co-regulatory mechanisms are still very limited. In this...

  12. Exogenous ether lipids predominantly target mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuerschner, Lars; Richter, Doris; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Ether lipids are ubiquitous constituents of cellular membranes with no discrete cell biological function assigned yet. Using fluorescent polyene-ether lipids we analyzed their intracellular distribution in living cells by microscopy. Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum accumulated high......, accumulated to mitochondria and induced morphological changes and cellular apoptosis. These data indicate that edelfosine could exert its pro-apoptotic power by targeting and damaging mitochondria and thereby inducing cellular apoptosis. In general, this study implies an important role of mitochondria...

  13. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samta eJain

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether bond to the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone. In bacteria and eukarya on the other hand, fatty acid side chains are linked via an ester bond to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbone. The polar head groups are globally shared in the three domains of life. The unique membrane lipids of archaea have been implicated not only in the survival and adaptation of the organisms to extreme environments but also to form the basis of the membrane composition of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA. In nature, a diverse range of archaeal lipids is found, the most common are the diether (or archaeol and the tetraether (or caldarchaeol lipids that form a monolayer. Variations in chain length, cyclization and other modifications lead to diversification of these lipids. The biosynthesis of these lipids is not yet well understood however progress in the last decade has led to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of archaeol. This review describes the current knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of archaeal ether lipids; insights on the stability and robustness of archaeal lipid membranes; and evolutionary aspects of the lipid divide and the last universal common ancestor LUCA. It examines recent advances made in the field of pathway reconstruction in bacteria.

  14. Lipid Microarray Biosensor for Biotoxin Detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Anup K.; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Moran-Mirabal, Jose C.; Edel, Joshua B.; Meyer, Grant D.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2006-05-01

    We present the use of micron-sized lipid domains, patterned onto planar substrates and within microfluidic channels, to assay the binding of bacterial toxins via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The lipid domains were patterned using a polymer lift-off technique and consisted of ganglioside-populated DSPC:cholesterol supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). Lipid patterns were formed on the substrates by vesicle fusion followed by polymer lift-off, which revealed micron-sized SLBs containing either ganglioside GT1b or GM1. The ganglioside-populated SLB arrays were then exposed to either Cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) or Tetanus toxin fragment C (TTC). Binding was assayed on planar substrates by TIRFM down to 1 nM concentration for CTB and 100 nM for TTC. Apparent binding constants extracted from three different models applied to the binding curves suggest that binding of a protein to a lipid-based receptor is strongly affected by the lipid composition of the SLB and by the substrate on which the bilayer is formed. Patterning of SLBs inside microfluidic channels also allowed the preparation of lipid domains with different compositions on a single device. Arrays within microfluidic channels were used to achieve segregation and selective binding from a binary mixture of the toxin fragments in one device. The binding and segregation within the microfluidic channels was assayed with epifluorescence as proof of concept. We propose that the method used for patterning the lipid microarrays on planar substrates and within microfluidic channels can be easily adapted to proteins or nucleic acids and can be used for biosensor applications and cell stimulation assays under different flow conditions. KEYWORDS. Microarray, ganglioside, polymer lift-off, cholera toxin, tetanus toxin, TIRFM, binding constant.4

  15. Lipoprotein lipase: genetics, lipid uptake, and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Martin; Eckel, Robert H; Goldberg, Ira J

    2002-12-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) regulates the plasma levels of triglyceride and HDL. Three aspects are reviewed. 1) Clinical implications of human LPL gene variations: common mutations and their effects on plasma lipids and coronary heart disease are discussed. 2) LPL actions in the nervous system, liver, and heart: the discussion focuses on LPL and tissue lipid uptake. 3) LPL gene regulation: the LPL promoter and its regulatory elements are described.

  16. Rapid modification of retroviruses using lipid conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Nimisha G; Le Doux, Joseph M; Andrew Lyon, L

    2009-01-01

    Methods are needed to manipulate natural nanoparticles. Viruses are particularly interesting because they can act as therapeutic cellular delivery agents. Here we examine a new method for rapidly modifying retroviruses that uses lipid conjugates composed of a lipid anchor (1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine), a polyethylene glycol chain, and biotin. The conjugates rapidly and stably modified retroviruses and enabled them to bind streptavidin. The implication of this work for modifying viruses for gene therapy and vaccination protocols is discussed.

  17. PENGEMBANGAN SISTEM NANOSTRUCTURED LIPID CARRIERS (NLC) MELOXICAM DENGAN LIPID MONOSTEARIN DAN MIGLYOL 808 MENGGUNAKAN METODE EMULSIFIKASI

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmi Annisa; Esti Hendradi; Dewi Melani

    2016-01-01

    The aim this study was to determine the effect of Monostearin and Miglyol 808 lipid ratio in NLC system formulation resulting in physicochemical characteristics, release rate, and penetration rate. The NLC making was done by using emulsification method. In the formulation of NLC meloxicam, 3 different lipid ratios were used, including ratios of 6:4, 7:3, 8:2.  Meloxicam served as active ingredient, monostearin served as solid lipid, miglyol 808 served as a liquid lipid, and tween 80 was surfa...

  18. Lipid stability in meat and meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, P A; Sheehy, P J; Galvin, K; Kerry, J P; Buckley, D J

    1998-01-01

    Lipid oxidation is one of the main factors limiting the quality and acceptability of meats and meat products. Oxidative damage to lipids occurs in the living animal because of an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species and the animal's defence mechanisms. This may be brought about by a high intake of oxidized lipids or poly-unsaturated fatty acids, or a low intake of nutrients involved in the antioxidant defence system. Damage to lipids may be accentuated in the immediate post-slaughter period and, in particular, during handling, processing, storage and cooking. In recent years, pressure to reduce artificial additive use in foods has led to attempts to increase meat stability by dietary strategies. These include supplementation of animal diets with vitamin E, ascorbic acid, or carotenoids, or withdrawal of trace mineral supplements. Dietary vitamin E supplementation reduces lipid and myoglobin oxidation, and, in certain situations, drip losses in meats. However, vitamin C supplementation appears to have little, if any, beneficial effects on meat stability. The effect of feeding higher levels of carotenoids on meat stability requires further study. Some studies have demonstrated that reducing the iron and copper content of feeds improves meat stability. Post-slaughter carnosine addition may be an effective means of improving lipid stability in processed meats, perhaps in combination with dietary vitamin E supplementation.

  19. LIPID SYNTHESIS, INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT, AND SECRETION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Olga; Stein, Yechezkiel

    1967-01-01

    In the mammary glands of lactating albino mice injected intravenously with 9, 10-oleic acid-3H or 9, 10-palmitic acid-3H, it has been shown that the labeled fatty acids are incorporated into mammary gland glycerides. The labeled lipid in the mammary gland 1 min after injection was in esterified form (> 95%), and the radioautographic reaction was seen over the rough endoplasmic reticulum and over lipid droplets, both intracellular and intraluminal. At 10–60 min after injection, the silver grains were concentrated predominantly over lipid droplets. There was no concentration of radioactivity over the granules in the Golgi apparatus, at any time interval studied. These findings were interpreted to indicate that after esterification of the fatty acid into glycerides in the rough endoplasmic reticulum an in situ aggregation of lipid occurs, with acquisition of droplet form. The release of the lipid into the lumen proceeds directly and not through the Golgi apparatus, in contradistinction to the mode of secretion of casein in the mammary gland or of lipoprotein in the liver. The presence of strands of endoplasmic reticulum attached to intraluminal lipid droplets provides a structural counterpart to the milk microsomes described in ruminant milk. PMID:6033535

  20. Lipid Droplets and Mycobacterium leprae Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, Ayssar A.; Stehr, Matthias; Singh, Mahavir

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease and is a major source of morbidity in developing countries. Leprosy is caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Mycobacterium leprae, which infects as primary target Schwann cells. Lepromatous leprosy exhibits multiple lesions of the skin, eyes, nerves, and lymph nodes. The sites of infection are characterized by the presence of foamy macrophages, fully packed with lipid droplets (LDs), which are induced by M. leprae. In the last years, it has become evident that M. tuberculosis imports lipids from foamy macrophages and is dependent on fatty acids for growth in infected macrophages. M. leprae seems to have similar mechanisms for scavenging lipids from the host. But due to the inability to culture M. leprae on laboratory media, research progresses only slowly. However, in the last years, substantial progress has been made in the field of lipid metabolism in M. leprae. Herein, we will present and summarize the lipid droplets formation and the metabolism of lipids during M. leprae infection. PMID:23209912

  1. Lipid Raft, Regulator of Plasmodesmal Callose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Bagus Boedi Iswanto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts are enriched by sterols and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts facilitate cellular signal transduction by controlling the assembly of signaling molecules and membrane protein trafficking. Another specialized compartment of plant cells, the plasmodesmata (PD, which regulates the symplasmic intercellular movement of certain molecules between adjacent cells, also contains a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The dynamic permeability of plasmodesmata (PDs is highly controlled by plasmodesmata callose (PDC, which is synthesized by callose synthases (CalS and degraded by β-1,3-glucanases (BGs. In recent studies, remarkable observations regarding the correlation between lipid raft formation and symplasmic intracellular trafficking have been reported, and the PDC has been suggested to be the regulator of the size exclusion limit of PDs. It has been suggested that the alteration of lipid raft substances impairs PDC homeostasis, subsequently affecting PD functions. In this review, we discuss the substantial role of membrane lipid rafts in PDC homeostasis and provide avenues for understanding the fundamental behavior of the lipid raft–processed PDC.

  2. Lipid Raft, Regulator of Plasmodesmal Callose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iswanto, Arya Bagus Boedi; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2017-04-03

    A bstract: The specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts are enriched by sterols and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts facilitate cellular signal transduction by controlling the assembly of signaling molecules and membrane protein trafficking. Another specialized compartment of plant cells, the plasmodesmata (PD), which regulates the symplasmic intercellular movement of certain molecules between adjacent cells, also contains a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The dynamic permeability of plasmodesmata (PDs) is highly controlled by plasmodesmata callose (PDC), which is synthesized by callose synthases (CalS) and degraded by β-1,3-glucanases (BGs). In recent studies, remarkable observations regarding the correlation between lipid raft formation and symplasmic intracellular trafficking have been reported, and the PDC has been suggested to be the regulator of the size exclusion limit of PDs. It has been suggested that the alteration of lipid raft substances impairs PDC homeostasis, subsequently affecting PD functions. In this review, we discuss the substantial role of membrane lipid rafts in PDC homeostasis and provide avenues for understanding the fundamental behavior of the lipid raft-processed PDC.

  3. Rhodopsin-lipid interactions studied by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the lipid matrix are known to influence function of integral membrane proteins. We report on a sample preparation method for reconstitution of membrane proteins which uses porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) filters with 200-nm-wide pores of high density. The substrate permits formation of tubular, single membranes that line the inner surface of pores. One square centimeter of filter with a thickness of 60μm yields on the order of 500cm(2) of solid-supported single bilayer surface, sufficient for NMR studies. The tubular bilayers are free of detergent, fully hydrated, and accessible for ligands from one side of the membrane. The use of AAO filters greatly improves reproducibility of the reconstitution process such that the influence of protein on lipid order parameters can be studied with high resolution. As an example, results for the G protein-coupled receptor of class A, bovine rhodopsin, are shown. By (2)H NMR order parameter measurements, it is detected that rhodopsin insertion elastically deforms membranes near the protein. Furthermore, by (1)H saturation-transfer NMR under conditions of magic angle spinning, we demonstrate detection of preferences in interactions of rhodopsin with particular lipid species. It is assumed that function of integral membrane proteins depends on both protein-induced elastic deformations of the lipid matrix and preferences for interaction of the protein with particular lipid species in the first layer of lipids surrounding the protein. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lipids of Parasitic and Saprophytic Leptospires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. C.; Livermore, B. P.; Walby, Judith K.; Jenkin, H. M.

    1970-01-01

    The lipid composition of five parasitic and six saprophytic leptospires was compared. Lipids comprise 18 to 26% of the dry weight of the cells after chloroform-methanol extraction. No residual (bound) lipid was found after acid or alkaline hydrolysis of the extracted residue. The total lipid was composed of 60 to 70% phospholipid, and the remaining lipid was free fatty acids. The phospholipid fraction contained phosphatidylethanolamine as the major component, and phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol were minor components with traces of lysophatidylethanolamine sometimes found. The major fatty acids of leptospires were hexadecanoic, hexadecenoic, and octadecenoic acids. Both the unusual cis-11-hexadecenoic acid and the more common cis-9-hexadecenoic acid were synthesized by the leptospires. Neither the parasitic nor the saprophytic leptospires can chain elongate fatty acids. However, they were capable of β-oxidation of fatty acids. Both groups of leptospires desaturate fatty acids by an aerobic pathway. When the parasite canicola was cultivated on octadecanoic acid, 87% of the hexadecenoic acid was the 11 isomer, whereas the saprophyte semeranga consisted of 10% of this isomer. In addition, the saprophytic leptospires contained more tetradecanoic acid than the parasites. No differences were observed in the lipid composition of virulent and avirulent strains of canicola. PMID:16557833

  5. Synthesis and characterisation of Cu(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), Zn(II) and VO(II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Synthesis and characterisation of Cu(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), Zn(II) and VO(II) Schiff base complexes derived from o-phenylenediamine and acetoacetanilide. N RAMAN*, Y PITCHAIKANI RAJA and A KULANDAISAMY. Department of Chemistry, VHNSN College, Virudhunagar 626 001, India e-mail: ra_man@123india.com.

  6. Effects of lipid emulsion particle size on satiety and energy intake: a randomised cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppitt, Sally D; Budgett, Stephanie C; MacGibbon, Alastair K; Quek, Siew-Young; Kindleysides, Sophie; Wiessing, Katy R

    2018-03-01

    Emulsified lipids, with central lipid core surrounded by polar lipid 'protective coat', have been proposed to stimulate the ileal brake, alter appetite, food intake and aid weight control. In addition to lipid composition, emulsion particle size may contribute to efficacy with small droplets providing a larger surface area for gastrointestinal (GI) lipase action and larger droplets prolonging and delaying digestion in the GI tract. Tube feeding studies delivering emulsions directly into the small intestine show clear effects of smaller particle size on appetite and food intake, but evidence from oral feeding studies is sparse. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of lipid emulsion particle size on appetite response and food intake. In a three-arm randomised cross-over, high-phospholipid (PL) dairy lipid emulsions or matched control were consumed at breakfast within a yoghurt smoothie: (i) large-particle size emulsion, LPE (diameter 0.759 µm, 10 g lipid emulsion, 190 g yoghurt), (ii) small-particle size emulsion, SPE (diameter 0.290 µm, 10 g lipid emulsion, 190 g yoghurt), (iii) control non-emulsion, NE (10 g non-emulsion lipid, 190 g yoghurt). Twenty male participants completed the study, where postprandial appetite response was rated using visual analogue scales (VAS) and ad libitum energy intake at a lunch meal measured 3 h later. There was a trend for LPE to suppress hunger (P = 0.08) and enhance fullness (P = 0.24) relative to both SPE and NE but not statistically significant, and no significant effect of either emulsion on food intake at the lunch meal (P > 0.05). Altering particle size of a high-PL emulsion did not enhance satiety or alter eating behaviour in a group of lean men.

  7. Evaluation of dyslipidemia, lipid ratios, and atherogenic index as cardiovascular risk factors among semi-urban dwellers in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olamoyegun, Michael Adeyemi; Oluyombo, Rotimi; Asaolu, Stephen Olabode

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The increasing frequency of cardiovascular disease (CVD) rests on the presence of major cardiovascular risk factors including dyslipidemia. This dyslipidemia is also a target for the prevention and treatment of many cardiovascular diseases. Hence, identification of individuals at risk of CVD is needed for early identification and prevention. The study was carried out to evaluate dyslipidemia using the lipid ratios and indices instead of just the conventional lipid profile. Methodology: It was a cross-sectional study with 699 participants recruited from semi-urban communities in Nigeria. Anthropometric indices, blood pressure, and fasting lipid profiles were determined. Abnormalities in lipid indices and lipid ratios with atherogenic index were also determined. SPSS software version 17.0 were used for analysis, P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: There were 699 participants with a mean age of 64.45 ± 15.53 years. Elevated total cholesterol, high low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, elevated triglyceride, and low high-density lipoprotein were seen in 5.3%, 19.3%, 4.4%, and 76.3% of the participants, respectively. The Castelli's risk index-I (CRI-I) predicted the highest prevalence of predisposition to cardiovascular risk (47.8%) with females being at significantly higher risk (55.2% vs. 29.3%, P < 0.001). Atherogenic coefficient, CRI-II, CHOLIndex, atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) predicted a cardiovascular risk prevalence of 22.5%, 15.9%, 11.2%, and 11.0%, respectively, with no significant difference in between the sexes. Conclusions: Serum lipid ratios and AIP may be used in addition to lipid parameters in clinical practice to assess cardiovascular risks even when lipid profiles are apparently normal. AIP was more gender specific amidst the lipid ratios. PMID:27853034

  8. Microalgal lipids biochemistry and biotechnological perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellou, Stamatia; Baeshen, Mohammed N; Elazzazy, Ahmed M; Aggeli, Dimitra; Sayegh, Fotoon; Aggelis, George

    2014-12-01

    In the last few years, there has been an intense interest in using microalgal lipids in food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries and cosmetology, while a noteworthy research has been performed focusing on all aspects of microalgal lipid production. This includes basic research on the pathways of solar energy conversion and on lipid biosynthesis and catabolism, and applied research dealing with the various biological and technical bottlenecks of the lipid production process. In here, we review the current knowledge in microalgal lipids with respect to their metabolism and various biotechnological applications, and we discuss potential future perspectives. The committing step in fatty acid biosynthesis is the carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA that is then introduced in the fatty acid synthesis cycle leading to the formation of palmitic and stearic acids. Oleic acid may also be synthesized after stearic acid desaturation while further conversions of the fatty acids (i.e. desaturations, elongations) occur after their esterification with structural lipids of both plastids and the endoplasmic reticulum. The aliphatic chains are also used as building blocks for structuring storage acylglycerols via the Kennedy pathway. Current research, aiming to enhance lipogenesis in the microalgal cell, is focusing on over-expressing key-enzymes involved in the earlier steps of the pathway of fatty acid synthesis. A complementary plan would be the repression of lipid catabolism by down-regulating acylglycerol hydrolysis and/or β-oxidation. The tendency of oleaginous microalgae to synthesize, apart from lipids, significant amounts of other energy-rich compounds such as sugars, in processes competitive to lipogenesis, deserves attention since the lipid yield may be considerably increased by blocking competitive metabolic pathways. The majority of microalgal production occurs in outdoor cultivation and for this reason biotechnological applications face some difficulties

  9. Ionizing radiation and lipid peroxidation in human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubileo, Gianfranco

    1997-07-01

    Lipids are organic compounds constituting the living cells. Lipid molecules can be disassembled through peroxidative pathways and hydrocarbons can be bred as end-product of lipid peroxidation in vivo. Lipid peroxidation can be started by an indirect effect of ionizing radiation. So a radioinduced cellular damage in human body can be detected by monitoring the production of specific hydrocarbons

  10. Protein-lipid interactions: from membrane domains to cellular networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tamm, Lukas K

    2005-01-01

    ... membranes is the lipid bilayer. Embedded in the fluid lipid bilayer are proteins of various shapes and traits. This volume illuminates from physical, chemical and biological angles the numerous - mostly quite weak - interactions between lipids, proteins, and proteins and lipids that define the delicate, highly dynamic and yet so stable fabri...

  11. Archaeal lipids in oral delivery of therapeutic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ann-Christin; Jensen, Sara M; Fricker, Gert

    2017-01-01

    Archaea contain membrane lipids that differ from those found in the other domains of life (Eukarya and Bacteria). These lipids consist of isoprenoid chains attached via ether bonds to the glycerol carbons at the sn-2,3 positions. Two types of ether lipids are known, polar diether lipids and bipolar...

  12. Research progress on polar lipids of deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Qiong; Tian Bing; Hua Yuejin

    2013-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is extremely resistant to radiation, desiccation, oxidizing agents and other extreme conditions. One of the unique lipids in Deinococcus radiodurans is the polar lipid phosphoglycolipid with alkylamine as the main component. Alkylamine derived from fatty acids. The composition characteristic of lipids is one of the classification criterias of Deinococcus. This article provided an overview of the main features of the Deinococcus radiodurans and introduced special polar lipids that have been found as well as the taxonomy significances of such lipids. The research progress of the relationship between lipids and their resistance mechanisms and the prospects of special lipids in Deinococcus radidurans have also been discussed. (authors)

  13. Water insoluble and soluble lipids for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Ram I

    2005-04-05

    Among various synthetic gene carriers currently in use, liposomes composed of cationic lipids and co-lipids remain the most efficient transfection reagents. Physicochemical properties of lipid/plasmid complexes, such as cationic lipid structure, cationic lipid to co-lipid ratio, charge ratio, particle size and zeta potential have significant influence on gene expression and biodistribution. However, most cationic lipids are toxic and cationic liposomes/plasmid complexes do not disperse well inside the target tissues because of their large particle size. To overcome the problems associated with cationic lipids, we designed water soluble lipopolymers for gene delivery to various cells and tissues. This review provides a critical discussion on how the components of water insoluble and soluble lipids affect their transfection efficiency and biodistribution of lipid/plasmid complexes.

  14. The dynamic of lipid oxidation in human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Both endogenous and exogenous lipid levels may be regulators of total lipid oxidation in skeletal muscles. We studied the dynamics of lipid oxidation in human myotubes established from healthy, lean subjects exposed to acutely and chronically increased palmitate concentrations. The intramyocellular...... triacylglycerol content increased with chronic palmitate exposure. Both, ectopically increased intracellular and extracellular lipid levels were simultaneously oxidized and could partly suppress each other's oxidation. Overall, the highest acute palmitate treatments stimulated fatty acid oxidation whilst...... the highest chronic treatments decreased total lipid oxidation. Intracellular lipids showed a more complete oxidation than exogenous lipids. Endogenous lipids reduced insulin-mediated glucose oxidation. Thus, both endogenous and exogenous lipid concentrations regulated each other's oxidation and total lipid...

  15. Lxr-driven enterocyte lipid droplet formation delays transport of ingested lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Garcia, Lourdes; Schlegel, Amnon

    2014-09-01

    Liver X receptors (Lxrs) are master regulators of cholesterol catabolism, driving the elimination of cholesterol from the periphery to the lumen of the intestine. Development of pharmacological agents to activate Lxrs has been hindered by synthetic Lxr agonists' induction of hepatic lipogenesis and hypertriglyceridemia. Elucidating the function of Lxrs in regulating enterocyte lipid handling might identify novel aspects of lipid metabolism that are pharmacologically amenable. We took a genetic approach centered on the single Lxr gene nr1h3 in zebrafish to study the role of Lxr in enterocyte lipid metabolism. Loss of nr1h3 function causes anticipated gene regulatory changes and cholesterol intolerance, collectively reflecting high evolutionary conservation of zebrafish Lxra function. Intestinal nr1h3 activation delays transport of absorbed neutral lipids, with accumulation of neutral lipids in enterocyte cytoplasmic droplets. This delay in transport of ingested neutral lipids protects animals from hypercholesterolemia and hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet. On a gene regulatory level, Lxra induces expression of acsl3a, which encodes acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 3a, a lipid droplet-anchored protein that directs fatty acyl chains into lipids. Forced overexpression of acls3a in enterocytes delays, in part, the appearance of neutral lipids in the vasculature of zebrafish larvae. Activation of Lxr in the intestine cell-autonomously regulates the rate of delivery of absorbed lipids by inducting a temporary lipid intestinal droplet storage depot. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Triglyceride blisters in lipid bilayers: implications for lipid droplet biogenesis and the mobile lipid signal in cancer cell membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Khandelia

    Full Text Available Triglycerides have a limited solubility, around 3%, in phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. Using millisecond-scale course grained molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the model lipid bilayer can accommodate a higher concentration of triolein (TO than earlier anticipated, by sequestering triolein molecules to the bilayer center in the form of a disordered, isotropic, mobile neutral lipid aggregate, at least 17 nm in diameter, which forms spontaneously, and remains stable on at least the microsecond time scale. The results give credence to the hotly debated existence of mobile neutral lipid aggregates of unknown function present in malignant cells, and to the early biogenesis of lipid droplets accommodated between the two leaflets of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The TO aggregates give the bilayer a blister-like appearance, and will hinder the formation of multi-lamellar phases in model, and possibly living membranes. The blisters will result in anomalous membrane probe partitioning, which should be accounted for in the interpretation of probe-related measurements.

  17. Pengaruh pemberian yogurt sinbiotik tepung pisang tanduk terhadap profil lipid tikus sindrom metabolik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zana Fitriana Octavia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The metabolic syndrome, which is characterized by hyperglycemia, obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, prothrombic and proinflamatory state, is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. The synbiotic yogurt of tanduk banana (Musa paradisiaca fa. corniculata flour contains lactic acid bacteria, fructooligosaccarides, flavonoids, and vitamin C which all of them play role in improving the lipid profile. Objective: The aim of this study was to prove the effect of synbiotic yogurt of tanduk banana flour on lipid profile of metabolic syndrome rats. Method: This study was an true experimental with pre-post test  control group design. The subject of this study were 18 metabolic syndrome male Wistar rats divided into 3 groups,i.e control group (standart diet, intervention group I (standart diet and synbiotic yogurt of banana flour 0,009 ml/g weight/day, and intervention group II (standart diet and synbiotic yogurt of banana flour 0,018 ml/g weight/day. The intervention period was 2 weeks. Different test before and after intervention used paired t-test. The difference test between groups used One-Way ANOVA and Kruskal wallis. Results: The result showed that both of intervention group improved lipid profile significantly (p<0,05. The intervention group II showed more effective improvement of lipid profile significantly (p<0,05 than intervention group I. The intervention group II decreased triglycerides level 41,56%; total cholesterol level 41,39%; LDL-cholesterol level 57,5%; and increased HDL-cholesterol level 139,62%. Conclucion: The intervention of synbiotic yogurt of  tanduk banana flour can decrease triglyceride level, total cholesterol level, LDL-cholesterol level, and increase HDL-cholesterol level.

  18. Incorporation of liquid lipid in lipid nanoparticles for ocular drug delivery enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jie; Sun Minjie; Ping Qineng; Ying Zhi; Liu Wen

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigates the effect of liquid lipid incorporation on the physicochemical properties and ocular drug delivery enhancement of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) and attempts to elucidate in vitro and in vivo the potential of NLCs for ocular drug delivery. The CyA-loaded or fluorescein-marked nanocarriers composed of Precifac ATO 5 and Miglyol 840 (as liquid lipid) were prepared by melting-emulsion technology, and the physicochemical properties of nanocarriers were determined. The uptake of nanocarriers by human corneal epithelia cell lines (SDHCEC) and rabbit cornea was examined. Ex vivo fluorescence imaging was used to investigate the ocular distribution of nanocarriers. The in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo acute tolerance were evaluated. The higher drug loading capacity and improved in vitro sustained drug release behavior of lipid nanoparticles was found with the incorporation of liquid lipid in lipid nanoparticles. The uptake of nanocarriers by the SDHCEC was increased with the increase in liquid lipid loading. The ex vivo fluorescence imaging of the ocular tissues indicated that the liquid lipid incorporation could improve the ocular retention and penetration of ocular therapeutics. No alternation was macroscopically observed in vivo after ocular surface exposure to nanocarriers. These results indicated that NLC was a biocompatible and potential nanocarrier for ocular drug delivery enhancement.

  19. Incorporation of liquid lipid in lipid nanoparticles for ocular drug delivery enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Jie; Sun Minjie; Ping Qineng; Ying Zhi; Liu Wen, E-mail: Pingqn2004@yahoo.com.cn [School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjia Xiang, Nanjing (China)

    2010-01-15

    The present work investigates the effect of liquid lipid incorporation on the physicochemical properties and ocular drug delivery enhancement of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) and attempts to elucidate in vitro and in vivo the potential of NLCs for ocular drug delivery. The CyA-loaded or fluorescein-marked nanocarriers composed of Precifac ATO 5 and Miglyol 840 (as liquid lipid) were prepared by melting-emulsion technology, and the physicochemical properties of nanocarriers were determined. The uptake of nanocarriers by human corneal epithelia cell lines (SDHCEC) and rabbit cornea was examined. Ex vivo fluorescence imaging was used to investigate the ocular distribution of nanocarriers. The in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo acute tolerance were evaluated. The higher drug loading capacity and improved in vitro sustained drug release behavior of lipid nanoparticles was found with the incorporation of liquid lipid in lipid nanoparticles. The uptake of nanocarriers by the SDHCEC was increased with the increase in liquid lipid loading. The ex vivo fluorescence imaging of the ocular tissues indicated that the liquid lipid incorporation could improve the ocular retention and penetration of ocular therapeutics. No alternation was macroscopically observed in vivo after ocular surface exposure to nanocarriers. These results indicated that NLC was a biocompatible and potential nanocarrier for ocular drug delivery enhancement.

  20. Membrane-spanning lipids for an uncompromised monitoring of membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzmann, Günter; Breiden, Bernadette; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    A Förster resonance energy transfer-based fusion and transfer assay was developed to study, in model membranes, protein-mediated membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer of fluorescent sphingolipid analogs. For this assay, it became necessary to apply labeled reporter molecules that are resistant to spontaneous as well as protein-mediated intermembrane transfer. The novelty of this assay is the use of nonextractable fluorescent membrane-spanning bipolar lipids. Starting from the tetraether lipid caldarchaeol, we synthesized fluorescent analogs with fluorophores at both polar ends. In addition, we synthesized radioactive glycosylated caldarchaeols. These labeled lipids were shown to stretch through bilayer membranes rather than to loop within a single lipid layer of liposomes. More important, the membrane-spanning lipids (MSLs) in contrast to phosphoglycerides proved to be nonextractable by proteins. We could show that the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) is promiscuous with respect to glycero- and sphingolipid transfer. Saposin (Sap) B also transferred sphingolipids albeit with kinetics different from GM2AP. In addition, we could unambiguously show that the recombinant activator protein Sap C x His6 induced membrane fusion rather than intermembrane lipid transfer. These findings showed that these novel MSLs, in contrast with fluorescent phosphoglycerolipids, are well suited for an uncompromised monitoring of membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer. PMID:26269359

  1. Membrane-spanning lipids for an uncompromised monitoring of membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzmann, Günter; Breiden, Bernadette; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-10-01

    A Förster resonance energy transfer-based fusion and transfer assay was developed to study, in model membranes, protein-mediated membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer of fluorescent sphingolipid analogs. For this assay, it became necessary to apply labeled reporter molecules that are resistant to spontaneous as well as protein-mediated intermembrane transfer. The novelty of this assay is the use of nonextractable fluorescent membrane-spanning bipolar lipids. Starting from the tetraether lipid caldarchaeol, we synthesized fluorescent analogs with fluorophores at both polar ends. In addition, we synthesized radioactive glycosylated caldarchaeols. These labeled lipids were shown to stretch through bilayer membranes rather than to loop within a single lipid layer of liposomes. More important, the membrane-spanning lipids (MSLs) in contrast to phosphoglycerides proved to be nonextractable by proteins. We could show that the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) is promiscuous with respect to glycero- and sphingolipid transfer. Saposin (Sap) B also transferred sphingolipids albeit with kinetics different from GM2AP. In addition, we could unambiguously show that the recombinant activator protein Sap C x His6 induced membrane fusion rather than intermembrane lipid transfer. These findings showed that these novel MSLs, in contrast with fluorescent phosphoglycerolipids, are well suited for an uncompromised monitoring of membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Lipid clustering correlates with membrane curvature as revealed by molecular simulations of complex lipid bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Koldsø

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell membranes are complex multicomponent systems, which are highly heterogeneous in the lipid distribution and composition. To date, most molecular simulations have focussed on relatively simple lipid compositions, helping to inform our understanding of in vitro experimental studies. Here we describe on simulations of complex asymmetric plasma membrane model, which contains seven different lipids species including the glycolipid GM3 in the outer leaflet and the anionic lipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphophate (PIP2, in the inner leaflet. Plasma membrane models consisting of 1500 lipids and resembling the in vivo composition were constructed and simulations were run for 5 µs. In these simulations the most striking feature was the formation of nano-clusters of GM3 within the outer leaflet. In simulations of protein interactions within a plasma membrane model, GM3, PIP2, and cholesterol all formed favorable interactions with the model α-helical protein. A larger scale simulation of a model plasma membrane containing 6000 lipid molecules revealed correlations between curvature of the bilayer surface and clustering of lipid molecules. In particular, the concave (when viewed from the extracellular side regions of the bilayer surface were locally enriched in GM3. In summary, these simulations explore the nanoscale dynamics of model bilayers which mimic the in vivo lipid composition of mammalian plasma membranes, revealing emergent nanoscale membrane organization which may be coupled both to fluctuations in local membrane geometry and to interactions with proteins.

  3. Effect of soy protein on serum lipid profile and some lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of soy protein on serum lipid profile and some lipid metabolizing enzymes in rats fed with cholesterol diets was examined in this study. Rats were subjected to feeding trial over a period of six weeks on formulated diets containing: 20% soy protein with 0% cholesterol (group A), 20% soy protein with 5% cholesterol ...

  4. Effect of cadmium on lipid metabolism of brain. In vivo incorporation of labelled acetate into lipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulati, S; Gill, K D; Nath, R

    1987-01-01

    The effect of early postnatal cadmium exposure on the in vivo incorporation of (1-/sup 14/C) sodium acetate into various lipid classes of the weanling rat brain was studied. A stimulated incorporation of the label was observed in total lipids, phospholipids, cholesterol, cerebrosides and sulphatides of the brain of Cd-exposed animals compared to controls.

  5. Effect of lipid composition and packing on the adsorption of apolipoproteins to lipid monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibdah, J.A.; Lund-Katz, S.; Phillips, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    The monolayer system has been used to study the effects of lipoprotein surface lipid composition and packing on the affinities of apolipoproteins for the surfaces of lipoprotein particles. The adsorption of apolipoproteins injected beneath lipid monolayers prepared with pure lipids or lipoprotein surface lipids is evaluated by monitoring the surface pressure of the film and the surface concentration (Gamma) of 14 C-labelled apolipoprotein. At a given initial film pressure (π/sub i/) there is a higher adsorption of human apo A-I to unsaturated phosphatidylcholine (PC) monolayers compared to saturated PC monolayers (e.g., at π/sub i/ = 10 mN/m, Gamma = 0.35 and 0.06 mg/m 2 for egg PC and distearoyl PC, respectively, with 3 x 10 -4 mg/ml apo A-I in the subphase). In addition, adsorption of apo A-I is less to an egg sphingomyelin monolayer than to an egg PC monolayer. The adsorption of apo A-I to PC monolayers is decreased by addition of cholesterol. Generally, apo A-I adsorption diminishes as the lipid molecular area decreases. Apo A-I adsorbs more to monolayers prepared with HDL 3 surface lipids than with LDL surface lipids. These studies suggest that lipoprotein surface lipid composition and packing are crucial factors influencing the transfer and exchange of apolipoproteins among various lipoprotein classes during metabolism of lipoprotein particles

  6. Reprogramming neutral lipid metabolism in mouse dendritic leucocytes hosting live Leishmania amazonensis amastigotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Lecoeur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: After loading with live Leishmania (L amazonensis amastigotes, mouse myeloid dendritic leucocytes/DLs are known to undergo reprogramming of their immune functions. In the study reported here, we investigated whether the presence of live L. amazonensis amastigotes in mouse bone marrow-derived DLs is able to trigger re-programming of DL lipid, and particularly neutral lipid metabolism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Affymetrix-based transcriptional profiles were determined in C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mouse bone marrow-derived DLs that had been sorted from cultures exposed or not to live L. amazonensis amastigotes. This showed that live amastigote-hosting DLs exhibited a coordinated increase in: (i long-chain fatty acids (LCFA and cholesterol uptake/transport, (ii LCFA and cholesterol (re-esterification to triacyl-sn-glycerol (TAG and cholesteryl esters (CE, respectively. As these neutral lipids are known to make up the lipid body (LB core, oleic acid was added to DL cultures and LB accumulation was compared in live amastigote-hosting versus amastigote-free DLs by epi-fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. This showed that LBs were both significantly larger and more numerous in live amastigote-hosting mouse dendritic leucocytes. Moreover, many of the larger LB showed intimate contact with the membrane of the parasitophorous vacuoles hosting the live L. amazonensis amastigotes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As leucocyte LBs are known to be more than simple neutral lipid repositories, we set about addressing two related questions. Could LBs provide lipids to live amastigotes hosted within the DL parasitophorous vacuole and also deliver? Could LBs impact either directly or indirectly on the persistence of L. amazonensis amastigotes in rodent skin?

  7. Comparison of pinniped and cetacean prey tissue lipids with lipids of their elasmobranch predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Bruce; Cliff, Geremy

    2014-01-01

    The great white shark is known to include pinnipeds and cetaceans in its diet. Both groups of marine mammals deposit thick blubber layers around their bodies. Elasmobranchs do not produce adipose tissue, but rather store lipid in their livers, thus a great white predating on a marine mammal will deposit the lipids in its liver until required. Samples from great white liver and muscle, Cape fur seal, Indian Ocean bottlenose dolphin and common dolphin liver, muscle and blubber were analyzed for their lipid and fatty acid profiles. The great white liver and marine mammal blubber samples showed a considerable degree of homogeneity, but there were significant differences when comparing between the muscle samples. Blubber from all three marine mammal species was calculated to provide greater than 95% of lipid intake for the great white shark from the tissues analyzed. Sampling of prey blubber may give a good indication of the lipids provided to the shark predator.

  8. The impact of lipid composition on the stability of the tear fluid lipid layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulovesi, P.; Telenius, J.; Koivuniemi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The tear fluid protects the corneal epithelium from drying and pathogens and it also provides nutrients to these cells. Tear fluid is composed of an aqueous layer as well as a lipid layer that resides at the air-tear interface. The function of the lipid layer is to lower the surface tension of th......-neutral lipid ratio. The results provide a plausible rationale for the development of dry eye syndrome in blepharitis patients.......The tear fluid protects the corneal epithelium from drying and pathogens and it also provides nutrients to these cells. Tear fluid is composed of an aqueous layer as well as a lipid layer that resides at the air-tear interface. The function of the lipid layer is to lower the surface tension...

  9. Effect of tetrahydrocurcumin on lipid peroxidation and lipids in streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Pidaran; Pari, Leelavinothan

    2006-08-01

    Hyperlipidaemia is an associated complication of diabetes mellitus. We recently reported that tetrahydrocurcumin lowered the blood glucose in diabetic rats. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of tetrahydrocurcumin, one of the active metabolites of curcumin on lipid profile and lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats. Tetrahydrocurcumin 80 mg/kg body weight was administered orally to diabetic rats for 45 days, resulted a significant reduction in blood glucose and significant increase in plasma insulin in diabetic rats, which proved its antidiabetic effect. Tetrahydrocurcumin also caused a significant reduction in lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and hydroperoxides) and lipids (cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids and phospholipids) in serum and tissues, suggesting its role in protection against lipid peroxidation and its antihyperlipidemic effect. Tetrahydrocurcumin showed a better effect when compared with curcumin. Results of the present study indicate that tetrahydrocurcumin showed antihyperlipidaemic effect in addition to its antidiabetic effect in type 2 diabetic rats.

  10. Characterization of cloned cells from an immortalized fetal pulmonary type II cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, R.F.; Waide, J.J.; Lechner, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    A cultured cell line that maintained expression of pulmonary type II cell markers of differentiation would be advantageous to generate a large number of homogenous cells in which to study the biochemical functions of type II cells. Type II epithelial cells are the source of pulmonary surfactant and a cell of origin for pulmonary adenomas. Last year our laboratory reported the induction of expression of two phenotypic markers of pulmonary type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and surfactant lipid synthesis) in cultured fetal rat lung epithelial (FRLE) cells, a spontaneously immortalized cell line of fetal rat lung type II cell origin. Subsequently, the induction of the ability to synthesize surfactant lipid became difficult to repeat. We hypothesized that the cell line was heterogenuous and some cells were more like type II cells than others. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis and to obtain a cultured cell line with type II cell phenotypic markers by cloning several FRLE cells and characterizing them for phenotypic markers of type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and presence of surfactant lipids). Thirty cloned cell lines were analyzed for induced alkaline phosphatase activity (on x-axis) and for percent of phospholipids that were disaturated (i.e., surfactant).

  11. Interaction of antimicrobial peptides with lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanulova, Maria

    2008-12-15

    This study aims to investigate the difference in the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with two classes of zwitterionic peptides, phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) and phosphatidylcholines (PC). Further experiments were performed on model membranes prepared from specific bacterial lipids, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) isolated from Salmonella minnesota. The structure of the lipid-peptide aqueous dispersions was studied by small-and wide-angle X-ray diffraction during heating and cooling from 5 to 85 C. The lipids and peptides were mixed at lipid-to-peptide ratios 10-10000 (POPE and POPC) or 2-50 (LPS). All experiments were performed at synchrotron soft condensed matter beamline A2 in Hasylab at Desy in Hamburg, Germany. The phases were identified and the lattice parameters were calculated. Alamethicin and melittin interact in similar ways with the lipids. Pure POPC forms only lamellar phases. POPE forms lamellar phases at low temperatures that upon heating transform into a highly curved inverse hexagonal phase. Insertion of the peptide induced inverse bicontinuous cubic phases which are an ideal compromise between the curvature stress and the packing frustration. Melittin usually induced a mixture of two cubic phases, Im3m and Pn3m, with a ratio of lattice parameters close to 1.279, related to the underlying minimal surfaces. They formed during the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition and persisted during cooling till the onset of the gel phase. The phases formed at different lipid-to-peptide ratios had very similar lattice parameters. Epitaxial relationships existed between coexisting cubic phases and hexagonal or lamellar phases due to confinement of all phases to an onion vesicle, a vesicle with several layers consisting of different lipid phases. Alamethicin induced the same cubic phases, although their formation and lattice parameters were dependent on the peptide concentration. The cubic phases formed during heating from the lamellar phase and their onset

  12. Interaction of antimicrobial peptides with lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanulova, Maria

    2008-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the difference in the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with two classes of zwitterionic peptides, phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) and phosphatidylcholines (PC). Further experiments were performed on model membranes prepared from specific bacterial lipids, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) isolated from Salmonella minnesota. The structure of the lipid-peptide aqueous dispersions was studied by small-and wide-angle X-ray diffraction during heating and cooling from 5 to 85 C. The lipids and peptides were mixed at lipid-to-peptide ratios 10-10000 (POPE and POPC) or 2-50 (LPS). All experiments were performed at synchrotron soft condensed matter beamline A2 in Hasylab at Desy in Hamburg, Germany. The phases were identified and the lattice parameters were calculated. Alamethicin and melittin interact in similar ways with the lipids. Pure POPC forms only lamellar phases. POPE forms lamellar phases at low temperatures that upon heating transform into a highly curved inverse hexagonal phase. Insertion of the peptide induced inverse bicontinuous cubic phases which are an ideal compromise between the curvature stress and the packing frustration. Melittin usually induced a mixture of two cubic phases, Im3m and Pn3m, with a ratio of lattice parameters close to 1.279, related to the underlying minimal surfaces. They formed during the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition and persisted during cooling till the onset of the gel phase. The phases formed at different lipid-to-peptide ratios had very similar lattice parameters. Epitaxial relationships existed between coexisting cubic phases and hexagonal or lamellar phases due to confinement of all phases to an onion vesicle, a vesicle with several layers consisting of different lipid phases. Alamethicin induced the same cubic phases, although their formation and lattice parameters were dependent on the peptide concentration. The cubic phases formed during heating from the lamellar phase and their onset

  13. Design of nanocarriers for nanoscale drug delivery to enhance cancer treatment using hybrid polymer and lipid building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui Xue; Ahmed, Taksim; Li, Lily Yi; Li, Jason; Abbasi, Azhar Z; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2017-01-26

    Polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles (PLN) are an emerging nanocarrier platform made from building blocks of polymers and lipids. PLN integrate the advantages of biomimetic lipid-based nanoparticles (i.e. solid lipid nanoparticles and liposomes) and biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles. PLN are constructed from diverse polymers and lipids and their numerous combinations, which imparts PLN with great versatility for delivering drugs of various properties to their nanoscale targets. PLN can be classified into two types based on their hybrid nanoscopic structure and assembly methods: Type-I monolithic matrix and Type-II core-shell systems. This article reviews the history of PLN development, types of PLN, lipid and polymer candidates, fabrication methods, and unique properties of PLN. The applications of PLN in delivery of therapeutic or imaging agents alone or in combination for cancer treatment are summarized and illustrated with examples. Important considerations for the rational design of PLN for advanced nanoscale drug delivery are discussed, including selection of excipients, synthesis processes governing formulation parameters, optimization of nanoparticle properties, improvement of particle surface functionality to overcome macroscopic, microscopic and cellular biological barriers. Future directions and potential clinical translation of PLN are also suggested.

  14. Radioprotective properties of detoxified lipid A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S.L.; Walden, T.L. Jr.; Patchen, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    Endotoxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has long been known to possess radioprotective properties. Nevertheless, the toxicity of LPS, or its principal bioactive component, Lipid A, has detracted from its potential use as a radioprotectant. Recently, a relatively non-toxic monophosphoryl Lipid A that retains many of the immunobiological properties of native LPS has been prepared from a polyaccharide-deficient and heptoseless Re mutant strain of S. minnesota. The authors conducted experiments that evaluated and compared the radioprotective efficiency of native endotoxin, as well as the mono (detoxified) and diphosphoryl (toxic) forms of Lipid A, in both responder (CD2F1 and C3H/HeN) and non-responder (C3H/HeJ) mice. It has been found that the optimal dose for the mono- and diphosphoryl Lipid A are approximately the same (800 μg/kg in CD2F1 mice), and that both compounds provide maximum protection when administered 24 h before exposure to an LD100 dose of cobalt - 60 gamma radiation. Possible mechanisms for the radioprotective action of detoxified Lipid A are suggested

  15. Atomistic Monte Carlo Simulation of Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wüstner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches. We use our recently devised chain breakage/closure (CBC local move set in the bond-/torsion angle space with the constant-bond-length approximation (CBLA for the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC. We demonstrate rapid conformational equilibration for a single DPPC molecule, as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol.

  16. Infrared spectroscopy of fluid lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Marshall C; Cambrea, Lee R; Hovis, Jennifer S

    2005-09-15

    Infrared spectroscopy is a powerful technique for examining lipid bilayers; however, it says little about the fluidity of the bilayer-a key physical aspect. It is shown here that it is possible to both acquire spectroscopic data of supported lipid bilayer samples and make measurements of the membrane fluidity. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT-IR) is used to obtain the spectroscopic information and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is used to determine the fluidity of the samples. In the infrared spectra of lipid bilayers composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the following major peaks were observed; nu(as)(CH3) 2954 cm(-1), nu(s)(CH3) 2870 cm(-1), nu(as)(CH2) 2924 cm(-1), nu(s)(CH2) 2852 cm(-1), nu(C=O) 1734 cm(-1), delta(CH2) 1463-1473 cm(-1), nu(as)(PO2-) 1226 cm(-1), nu(s)(PO2-) 1084 cm(-1), and nu(as)(N+(CH3)3) 973 cm(-1). The diffusion coefficient of the same lipid bilayer was measured to be 3.5 +/- 0.5 micom(2)/s with visual recovery also noted through use of epifluorescence microscopy. FRAP and visual data confirm the formation of a uniform, mobile supported lipid bilayer. The combination of ATR-FT-IR and FRAP provides complementary data giving a more complete picture of fully hydrated model membrane systems.

  17. Do lipids shape the eukaryotic cell cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furse, Samuel; Shearman, Gemma C

    2018-01-01

    Successful passage through the cell cycle presents a number of structural challenges to the cell. Inceptive studies carried out in the last five years have produced clear evidence of modulations in the lipid profile (sometimes referred to as the lipidome) of eukaryotes as a function of the cell cycle. This mounting body of evidence indicates that lipids play key roles in the structural transformations seen across the cycle. The accumulation of this evidence coincides with a revolution in our understanding of how lipid composition regulates a plethora of biological processes ranging from protein activity through to cellular signalling and membrane compartmentalisation. In this review, we discuss evidence from biological, chemical and physical studies of the lipid fraction across the cell cycle that demonstrate that lipids are well-developed cellular components at the heart of the biological machinery responsible for managing progress through the cell cycle. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanisms by which this careful control is exercised. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Intravenous Lipids for Preterm Infants: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan S. A. Salama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW are born at a time when the fetus is undergoing rapid intrauterine brain and body growth. Continuation of this growth in the first several weeks postnatally during the time these infants are on ventilator support and receiving critical care is often a challenge. These infants are usually highly stressed and at risk for catabolism. Parenteral nutrition is needed in these infants because most cannot meet the majority of their nutritional needs using the enteral route. Despite adoption of a more aggressive approach with amino acid infusions, there still appears to be a reluctance to use early intravenous lipids. This is based on several dogmas that suggest that lipid infusions may be associated with the development or exacerbation of lung disease, displace bilirubin from albumin, exacerbate sepsis, and cause CNS injury and thrombocytopena. Several recent reviews have focused on intravenous nutrition for premature neonate, but very little exists that provides a comprehensive review of intravenous lipid for very low birth and other critically ill neonates. Here, we would like to provide a brief basic overview, of lipid biochemistry and metabolism of lipids, especially as they pertain to the preterm infant, discuss the origin of some of the current clinical practices, and provide a review of the literature, that can be used as a basis for revising clinical care, and provide some clarity in this controversial area, where clinical care is often based more on tradition and dogma than science.

  19. A model of lipid rearrangements during pore formation in the DPPC lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrona, Artur; Kubica, Krystian

    2017-07-10

    The molecular bases of pore formation in the lipid bilayer remain unclear, as do the exact characteristics of their sizes and distributions. To understand this process, numerous studies have been performed on model lipid membranes including cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV). The effect of an electric field on DPPC GUV depends on the lipid membrane state: in the liquid crystalline phase the created pores have a cylinder-like shape, whereas in the gel phase a crack has been observed. The aim of the study was to investigate the geometry of pores created in a lipid bilayer in gel and liquid crystalline phases in reference to literature experimental data. A mathematical model of the pore in a DPPC lipid bilayer developed based on the law of conservation of mass and the assumption of constant volume of lipid molecules, independent of their conformation, allows for analysis of pore shape and accompanying molecular rearrangements. The membrane area occupied by the pore of a cylinder-like shape is greater than the membrane area occupied by lipid molecules creating the pore structure (before pore appearance). Creation of such pores requires more space, which can be achieved by conformational changes of lipid chains toward a more compact state. This process is impossible for a membrane in the most compact, gel phase. We show that the geometry of the pores formed in the lipid bilayer in the gel phase must be different from the cylinder shape formed in the lipid bilayer in a liquid crystalline state, confirming experimental studies. Furthermore, we characterize the occurrence of the 'buffer' zone surrounding pores in the liquid crystalline phase as a mechanism of separation of neighbouring pores.

  20. On the interaction between fluoxetine and lipid membranes: Effect of the lipid composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Vy T.; Nguyen, Trinh Q.; Dao, Uyen P. N.; Nguyen, Trang T.

    2018-02-01

    Molecular interaction between the antidepressant fluoxetine and lipid bilayers was investigated in order to provide insights into the drug's incorporation to lipid membranes. In particular, the effects of lipid's unsaturation degree and cholesterol content on the partitioning of fluoxetine into large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) comprised of unsaturated 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and saturated 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) were evaluated using second derivative spectrophotometry and Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). It was found that fluoxetine partitioned to a greater extent into the liquid-crystalline DOPC LUVs than into the solid-gel DPPC LUVs. The lipid physical state dependence of drug partitioning was verified by increasing the temperature in which the partition coefficient of fluoxetine significantly increased upon the change of the lipid phase from solid-gel to liquid-crystalline. The incorporation of 28 mol% cholesterol into the LUVs exerted a significant influence on the drug partitioning into both DOPC and DPPC LUVs. The ATR-FTIR study revealed that fluoxetine perturbed the conformation of DOPC more strongly than that of DPPC due to the cis-double bonds in the lipid acyl chains. Fluoxetine possibly bound to the carbonyl moiety of the lipids through the hydrogen bonding formation while displaced some water molecules surrounding the PO2- regions of the lipid head groups. Cholesterol, however, could lessen the interaction between fluoxetine and the carbonyl groups of both DOPC and DPPC LUVs. These findings provided a better understanding of the role of lipid structure and cholesterol on the interaction between fluoxetine and lipid membranes, shedding more light into the drug's therapeutic action.

  1. Arabidopsis lipid droplet-associated protein (LDAP)–interacting protein (LDIP) influences lipid droplet size and neutral lipid homeostasis in both leaves and seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) are found in all types of plant cells where they are derived from the endoplasmic reticulum and function as a repository for neutral lipids, as well as serving in lipid remodelling and signalling. However, the mechanisms underlying the formation and functioning of pl...

  2. Parenteral lipid administration to very-low-birth-weight infants-early introduction of lipids and use of new lipid emulsions: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; Veldhorst, Margriet A. B.; Spronk, Sandra; van den Akker, Chris H. P.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The use of intravenous lipid emulsions in preterm infants has been limited by concerns regarding impaired lipid tolerance. As a result, the time of initiation of parenteral lipid infusion to very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants varies widely among different neonatal intensive care units.

  3. Lipid Bilayer Composition Affects Transmembrane Protein Orientation and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie D. Hickey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm membranes change in structure and composition upon ejaculation to undergo capacitation, a molecular transformation which enables spermatozoa to undergo the acrosome reaction and be capable of fertilization. Changes to the membrane environment including lipid composition, specifically lipid microdomains, may be responsible for enabling capacitation. To study the effect of lipid environment on proteins, liposomes were created using lipids extracted from bull sperm membranes, with or without a protein (Na+ K+-ATPase or -amylase. Protein incorporation, function, and orientation were determined. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET confirmed protein inclusion in the lipid bilayer, and protein function was confirmed using a colourometric assay of phosphate production from ATP cleavage. In the native lipid liposomes, ATPase was oriented with the subunit facing the outer leaflet, while changing the lipid composition to 50% native lipids and 50% exogenous lipids significantly altered this orientation of Na+ K+-ATPase within the membranes.

  4. Apolipoprotein gene involved in lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Edward; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2007-07-03

    Methods and materials for studying the effects of a newly identified human gene, APOAV, and the corresponding mouse gene apoAV. The sequences of the genes are given, and transgenic animals which either contain the gene or have the endogenous gene knocked out are described. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene are described and characterized. It is demonstrated that certain SNPs are associated with diseases involving lipids and triglycerides and other metabolic diseases. These SNPs may be used alone or with SNPs from other genes to study individual risk factors. Methods for intervention in lipid diseases, including the screening of drugs to treat lipid-related or diabetic diseases are also disclosed.

  5. ER Stress and Lipid Metabolism in Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth S. Zha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is a rapidly emerging field of interest in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. Recent studies have shown that chronic activation of ER stress is closely linked to dysregulation of lipid metabolism in several metabolically important cells including hepatocytes, macrophages, β-cells, and adipocytes. Adipocytes are one of the major cell types involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Recent advances in dissecting the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of adipogenesis and lipid metabolism indicate that activation of ER stress plays a central role in regulating adipocyte function. In this paper, we discuss the current understanding of the potential role of ER stress in lipid metabolism in adipocytes. In addition, we touch upon the interaction of ER stress and autophagy as well as inflammation. Inhibition of ER stress has the potential of decreasing the pathology in adipose tissue that is seen with energy overbalance.

  6. Autophagy, lipophagy and lysosomal lipid storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Carl; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Otten, Elsje G; Carroll, Bernadette; Maetzel, Dorothea; Singh, Rajat; Sarkar, Sovan; Korolchuk, Viktor I

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process with an essential function in the maintenance of cellular and tissue homeostasis. It is primarily recognised for its role in the degradation of dysfunctional proteins and unwanted organelles, however in recent years the range of autophagy substrates has also been extended to lipids. Degradation of lipids via autophagy is termed lipophagy. The ability of autophagy to contribute to the maintenance of lipo-homeostasis becomes particularly relevant in the context of genetic lysosomal storage disorders where perturbations of autophagic flux have been suggested to contribute to the disease aetiology. Here we review recent discoveries of the molecular mechanisms mediating lipid turnover by the autophagy pathways. We further focus on the relevance of autophagy, and specifically lipophagy, to the disease mechanisms. Moreover, autophagy is also discussed as a potential therapeutic target in several key lysosomal storage disorders. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Lipids and fatty acids in roasted chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, S A; Visentainer, J V; Matsushita, M; Souza, N E

    1999-09-01

    Total lipids from meat portions of breast, thigh, wing, side and back with and without skin from 10 roasted chickens were extracted with chloroform and methanol and gravimetrically determined, and their fatty acids were analysed as methyl esters by gaseous chromatography, using a flame ionization detector and capillary column. The main fatty acids found were: C16:0, C18:1 omega 9, and C18:2 omega 6. The average ratio observed between PUFA/SFA was of 0.98, mainly due to the great concentration of the C18:2 omega 6 fatty acid, with an average of 26.75%. Regarding to the lipids content, the skinless breast showed the lowest content, 0.78 g/100 g, while the back with skin was the one with the highest content, 12.13 g/100 g except for the pure skin, with 26.54 grams of lipids by 100 grams.

  8. Biosynthesis and function of plant lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, W.W.; Mudd, J.B.; Gibbs, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Sixth Annual Symposium in Botany and Plant Physiology was held January 13-15, 1983, at the University of California, Riverside. This volume comprises the papers that were presented. Subjects discussed at the symposium covered a wide range in the field of plant lipids. Biosynthesis of lipids occupied an important fraction of the presentations at the symposium. Subjects included detailed studies of the enzymes of fatty acid synthesis, several discussions of the incorporation of fatty acids into glycerolipids and the further modification of the fatty acids, and the synthesis of glycerolipids and desaturation of fatty acids in both maturing oilseeds and chloroplasts. The physicochemical studies of glycerolipids and sterols in artificial membranes have led to distinct conclusions about their behaviour which must be relevant in the biological membrane. Results on the functional consequences of modifying the galactolipid composition in the chloroplast were an encouraging sign of progress in the attempts to relate membrane lipid composition to physiological function

  9. Bioactive lipids in kidney physiology and pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Sałata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipids not only have structural functions, but also play an important role as signaling and regulatory molecules and participate in many cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. Bioactive lipids act both as extracellular mediators, which are associated with receptors on the surface of cells, and intracellular mediators triggering different signal pathways. They are present and active in physiological conditions, and are also involved in the pathogenesis of inflammation, asthma, cancer, diabetes, and hypertension. Bioactive lipids such as derivatives of arachidonic acid and sphingolipids have an important role in renal development, physiology and in many renal diseases. Some of them are potential indicators of kidney damage degree and/or function of the transplanted kidneys.

  10. Serum lipids in hypothyroidism: Our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Archana; Lal, Ashok Kumar

    2006-09-01

    In order to determine whether the screening of lipid profile is justified in patients with hypothyroidism we estimated serum lipids in cases having different levels of serum TSH. 60 patients of hypothyroidism in the age group of 20 to 60 yrs were studied for thyroid profile over a period of one year. On the basis of serum TSH level the cases were divided into three groups: In the first group TSH concentration was 8.8±2.99 μlU/ml, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 8.8±1.07, whereas serum total cholesterol and LDL-chol levels were 196±37.22 and 126±29.17 mg/dl respectively. The statistical analysis of these two groups showed a significant correlation between raised TSH levels and serum total cholesterol and LDL-chol (Phypothyrodism is associated with changes in lipid profile.

  11. Shape transitions in anisotropic multicomponent lipid tubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eAtherton

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ternary mixtures of saturated and unsaturated lipids together with cholesterol can be induced to phase separate by photo-peroxidation into lipid-ordered Lo and lipid-disordered Ld domains. Because these have different mechanical properties, the phase separation is accompanied by dramatic changes in morphology. This work considers a tubule composed of Ld phase with Lo phase inclusions that possess greater rigidity; this system has been shown experimentally by Yuan and coworkers to spontaneously adopt either banded or disc configurations following phase separation. The static behaviour of inter-domain interactions is analyzed in each of these geometries by solving the linearized shape equations. These calculations suggest a possible mechanism by which the two structures form.

  12. Incorporation of glucose carbons into rat lung lipids after exposure to 0.6 ppm ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, D.J.; Rabinowitz, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Continuous exposure to low concentrations of ozone has previously been associated with proliferation of lung alveolar type II epithelial cells. In this study, 14 C incorporation into tissue lipids was determined in isolated rat lungs by perfusion with [U- 14 C]glucose, at a time of maximal hyperplasia brought about by 3 days continuous exposure to 0.6 ppm ozone. Ozone exposed lungs exhibited increased rates of glycolytic energy production, indicated by an 89% increase in 3 H 2 O generation on perfusion with [5-3H]glucose. Ozone exposure resulted in enhanced 14 C incorporations into glyceride-glycerol and fatty acid moieties of lung lipids of 95 and 180%, respectively, with a greater proportion of label being recovered in shorter chain fatty acids. Although increased labeling was observed in both neutral and phospholipids, the pattern of 14 C recovery suggested a relative increased glucose carbon incorporation into lung free fatty acids, phosphatidic acid, and such membrane associated lipids as phosphatidylinositol and those containing sphingosine. These results are consistent with the needs of a dividing cell population for enhanced energy production and synthesis of new lipids

  13. The Effect of Buckwheat Hull Extract on Lipid Oxidation in Frozen-Stored Meat Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hęś, Marzanna; Szwengiel, Artur; Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Le Thanh-Blicharz, Joanna; Kmiecik, Dominik; Górecka, Danuta

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of antioxidants on lipid stability of frozen-stored meat products. Buckwheat hull extract was used to enrich fried meatballs made from ground pork. During 180-d storage of meat products, lipid oxidation (peroxide and 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances [TBARS] value) was periodically monitored. The results were compared with butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The addition of antioxidants decreased lipid oxidation in stored meatballs. The highest ability to control peroxide and TBARS values was demonstrated for buckwheat hull extract. Moreover, buckwheat hull extract showed a higher 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging activity as well as higher Fe(II) ion chelating ability, as compared with BHT. The total content of phenolic compounds are highly correlated to the individual polyphenols in extract of buckwheat hull, among which the following were assayed: 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, gallic acid, isovanillic acid and p-coumaric acid, and flavonoids: isoorientin, quercetin, quercetin 3-d-glucoside, rutin, and vitexin. These results indicate that plant extracts can be used to prolong shelf life of products by protecting them against lipid oxidation and deterioration of their nutritional quality. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  14. Globule-size distribution in injectable 20% lipid emulsions: Compliance with USP requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, David F

    2007-10-01

    The compliance of injectable 20% lipid emulsions with the globule-size limits in chapter 729 of the U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) was examined. As established in chapter 729, dynamic light scattering was applied to determine mean droplet diameter (MDD), with an upper limit of 500 nm. Light obscuration was used to determine the size of fat globules found in the large-diameter tail, expressed as the volume-weighted percent fat exceeding 5 microm (PFAT(5)), with an upper limit of 0.05%. Compliance of seven different emulsions, six of which were stored in plastic bags, with USP limits was assessed. To avoid reaching coincidence limits during the application of method II from overly concentrated emulsion samples, a variable dilution scheme was used to optimize the globule-size measurements for each emulsion. One-way analysis of variance of globule-size distribution (GSD) data was conducted if any results of method I or II exceeded the respective upper limits. Most injectable lipid emulsions complied with limits established by USP chapter 729, with the exception of those of one manufacturer, which failed limits as proposed for to meet the PFAT(5) three of the emulsions tested. In contrast, all others studied (one packaged in glass and three packaged in plastic) met both criteria. Among seven injectable lipid emulsions tested for GSD, all met USP chapter 729 MDD requirements and three, all from the same manufacturer and packaged in plastic, did not meet PFAT(5) requirements.

  15. Enhancing anaerobic digestion performance of crude lipid in food waste by enzymatic pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ying; Luan, Fubo; Yuan, Hairong; Chen, Xue; Li, Xiujin

    2017-01-01

    Three lipases were applied to hydrolyze the floatable grease (FG) in the food waste for eliminating FG inhibition and enhancing digestion performance in anaerobic process. Lipase-I, Lipase-II, and Lipase-III obtained from different sources were used. Animal fat (AF) and vegetable oil (VO) are major crude lipids in Chinese food waste, therefore, applied as substrates for anaerobic digestion tests. The results showed that Lipase-I and Lipase-II were capable of obviously releasing long chain fatty acid in AF, VO, and FG when hydrolyzed in the conditions of 24h, 1000-1500μL and 40-50°C. Compared to the untreated controls, the biomethane production rate were increased by 80.8-157.7%, 26.9-53.8%, and 37.0-40.7% for AF, VO, and FG, respectively, and the digestion time was shortened by 10-40d. The finding suggests that pretreating lipids with appropriate lipase could be one of effective methods for enhancing anaerobic digestion of food waste rich in crude lipid. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Oxidative status and lipid profile in metabolic syndrome: gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Aysem; Uzunhasan, Isil; Baskurt, Murat; Ozkan, Alev; Ataoglu, Esra; Okcun, Baris; Yigit, Zerrin

    2010-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with cardiovascular disease and oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences of novel oxidative stress parameters and lipid profiles in men and women with metabolic syndrome. The study population included 88 patients with metabolic syndrome, consisting of 48 postmenauposal women (group I) and 40 men (group II). Premenauposal women were excluded. Plasma levels of total antioxidant status (TAS) and total oxidative status (TOS) were determined by using the Erel automated measurement method, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. To perform the calculation, the resulting unit of TAS, mmol Trolox equivalent/L, was converted to micromol equivalent/L and the OSI value was calculated as: OSI = [(TOS, micromol/L)/(TAS, mmol Trolox equivalent/L) x 100]. The Student t-test, Mann-Whitney-U test, and chi-squared test were used for statistical analysis; the Pearson correlation coefficient and Spearman rank test were used for correlation analysis. P women and men had similar properties regarding demographic characteristics and biochemical work up. Group II had significantly lower levels of antioxidant levels of TAS and lower levels of TOS and OSI compared with group I (P = 0.0001, P = 0.0035, and P = 0,0001). Apolipoprotein A (ApoA) levels were significantly higher in group I compared with group II. Our findings indicate that women with metabolic syndrome have a better antioxidant status and higher ApoA levels compared with men. Our findings suggest the existence of a higher oxidative stress index in men with metabolic syndrome. Considering the higher risk of atherosclerosis associated with men, these novel oxidative stress parameters may be valuable in the evaluation of patients with metabolic sydrome.

  17. Radiation induced peroxidation in model lipid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlan, K.Z.B.H.M.

    1981-08-01

    In the studies of radiation induced lipid peroxidation, lecithin-liposomes and aqueous micellar solutions of sodium linoleate (or linoleic acid) have been used as models of lipid membrane systems. The liposomes and aqueous linoleate micelles were irradiated in the presence of O 2 and N 2 O/O 2 (80/20 v/v). The peroxidation was initiated using gamma radiation from 60 Co radiation source and was monitored by measuring the increase in absorbance of conjugated diene at 232 nm and by the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test. The oxidation products were also identified by GLC and GLC-MS analysis. (author)

  18. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction...... into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches...

  19. Binding of Neurotransmitters to Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Werge, Mikkel; Elf-Lind, Maria Northved

    2014-01-01

    / acetylated g-aminobutyrate (GABAneu) with a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer. This study was motivated by recent research results that suggested that neural transmission may also be affected by nonspecific interactions of NTs with the lipid matrix of the synaptic membrane. Our results revealed...... backbone of the phospholipids. It is surprising that hydrophilic solutes can deeply penetrate into the membrane pointing to the fact that membrane affinity is governed by specific interactions. Our MD simulations identified the salt-bridge between the primary amine of NTs and the lipid phosphate group...

  20. Radiation induced lipid oxidation in fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snauwaert, F.; Tobback, P.; Maes, E.; Thyssen, J.

    1977-01-01

    Oxidative rancidity in herring and redfish was studied as a function of the applied irradiation dose, the storage time and storage temperature and the packaging conditions. - Measurements of the TBA (thiobarbituric acid) value and the peroxide value were used to evaluate the degree of oxidation of lipids, and were related with sensory scores. - Especially for the fatty fish species (herring) irradiation accelerated lipid oxidation and induced oxidative rancidity. Irradiation of vacuum-packed herring fillets and subsequent storage at +2 C seems to be an interesting process. For the experiments conducted on a semi-fatty fish (redfish), oxidative rancidity was never the limiting factor for organoleptic acceptability. (orig.) [de

  1. Serum lipids in hypothyroidism: Our experience

    OpenAIRE

    Prakash, Archana; Lal, Ashok Kumar

    2006-01-01

    In order to determine whether the screening of lipid profile is justified in patients with hypothyroidism we estimated serum lipids in cases having different levels of serum TSH. 60 patients of hypothyroidism in the age group of 20 to 60 yrs were studied for thyroid profile over a period of one year. On the basis of serum TSH level the cases were divided into three groups: In the first group TSH concentration was 8.8±2.99 μlU/ml, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 8.8±1.07, whereas serum total chol...

  2. PENGEMBANGAN SISTEM NANOSTRUCTURED LIPID CARRIERS (NLC MELOXICAM DENGAN LIPID MONOSTEARIN DAN MIGLYOL 808 MENGGUNAKAN METODE EMULSIFIKASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Annisa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim this study was to determine the effect of Monostearin and Miglyol 808 lipid ratio in NLC system formulation resulting in physicochemical characteristics, release rate, and penetration rate. The NLC making was done by using emulsification method. In the formulation of NLC meloxicam, 3 different lipid ratios were used, including ratios of 6:4, 7:3, 8:2.  Meloxicam served as active ingredient, monostearin served as solid lipid, miglyol 808 served as a liquid lipid, and tween 80 was surfactant. NLC meloxicam physicochemical characteristics include tests of organoleptic, pH, viscosity, particle size, particle morphology and entrapment efficiency. NLC meloxicam belongs to semisolid preparations with pH value range of 5,72-5,87. Increasing viscosity of NLC system are cause by increase of solid lipid. The measurement results of particle size of three different lipid formulas indicated that the lipid particle size was 80%. The determination of release rate (flux and penetration rate (flux was conducted by using Franz diffusion cells with a cellophane membrane for the release and Wistar rat’s skin membrane for the penetration. The release rate values of three NLC meloxicam formulas showed p value (sig 0,005, while the penetration rate obtained p value (sig 0,091. Keywords: NLC, meloxicam, physicochemical characterization, release rate and penetration rate

  3. A comparative study: the impact of different lipid extraction methods on current microalgal lipid research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae cells have the potential to rapidly accumulate lipids, such as triacylglycerides that contain fatty acids important for high value fatty acids (e.g., EPA and DHA) and/or biodiesel production. However, lipid extraction methods for microalgae cells are not well established, and there is currently no standard extraction method for the determination of the fatty acid content of microalgae. This has caused a few problems in microlagal biofuel research due to the bias derived from different extraction methods. Therefore, this study used several extraction methods for fatty acid analysis on marine microalga Tetraselmis sp. M8, aiming to assess the potential impact of different extractions on current microalgal lipid research. These methods included classical Bligh & Dyer lipid extraction, two other chemical extractions using different solvents and sonication, direct saponification and supercritical CO2 extraction. Soxhlet-based extraction was used to weigh out the importance of solvent polarity in the algal oil extraction. Coupled with GC/MS, a Thermogravimetric Analyser was used to improve the quantification of microalgal lipid extractions. Among these extractions, significant differences were observed in both, extract yield and fatty acid composition. The supercritical extraction technique stood out most for effective extraction of microalgal lipids, especially for long chain unsaturated fatty acids. The results highlight the necessity for comparative analyses of microalgae fatty acids and careful choice and validation of analytical methodology in microalgal lipid research. PMID:24456581

  4. Single Lipid Molecule Dynamics on Supported Lipid Bilayers with Membrane Curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip P. Cheney

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane is a highly compartmentalized, dynamic material and this organization is essential for a wide variety of cellular processes. Nanoscale domains allow proteins to organize for cell signaling, endo- and exocytosis, and other essential processes. Even in the absence of proteins, lipids have the ability to organize into domains as a result of a variety of chemical and physical interactions. One feature of membranes that affects lipid domain formation is membrane curvature. To directly test the role of curvature in lipid sorting, we measured the accumulation of two similar lipids, 1,2-Dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DHPE and hexadecanoic acid (HDA, using a supported lipid bilayer that was assembled over a nanopatterned surface to obtain regions of membrane curvature. Both lipids studied contain 16 carbon, saturated tails and a head group tag for fluorescence microscopy measurements. The accumulation of lipids at curvatures ranging from 28 nm to 55 nm radii was measured and fluorescein labeled DHPE accumulated more than fluorescein labeled HDA at regions of membrane curvature. We then tested whether single biotinylated DHPE molecules sense curvature using single particle tracking methods. Similar to groups of fluorescein labeled DHPE accumulating at curvature, the dynamics of single molecules of biotinylated DHPE was also affected by membrane curvature and highly confined motion was observed.

  5. Influences of the Structure of Lipids on Thermal Stability of Lipid Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai Nan-Nan; Zhou Xin; Li Ming

    2015-01-01

    The binding free energy (BFE) of lipid to lipid bilayer is a critical factor to determine the thermal or mechanical stability of the bilayer. Although the molecular structure of lipids has significant impacts on BFE of the lipid, there lacks a systematic study on this issue. In this paper we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation to investigate this problem for several typical phospholipids. We find that both the tail length and tail unsaturation can significantly affect the BFE of lipids but in opposite way, namely, BFE decreases linearly with increasing length, but increases linearly with addition of unsaturated bonds. Inspired by the specific structure of cholesterol which is a crucial component of biomembrane, we also find that introduction of carbo-ring-like structures to the lipid tail or to the bilayer may greatly enhance the stability of the bilayer. Our simulation also shows that temperature can influence the bilayer stability and this effect can be significant when the bilayer undergoes phase transition. These results may be helpful to the design of liposome or other self-assembled lipid systems. (paper)

  6. An ER protein functionally couples neutral lipid metabolism on lipid droplets to membrane lipid synthesis in the ER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markgraf, Daniel F; Klemm, Robin W; Junker, Mirco; Hannibal-Bach, Hans K; Ejsing, Christer S; Rapoport, Tom A

    2014-01-16

    Eukaryotic cells store neutral lipids such as triacylglycerol (TAG) in lipid droplets (LDs). Here, we have addressed how LDs are functionally linked to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We show that, in S. cerevisiae, LD growth is sustained by LD-localized enzymes. When LDs grow in early stationary phase, the diacylglycerol acyl-transferase Dga1p moves from the ER to LDs and is responsible for all TAG synthesis from diacylglycerol (DAG). During LD breakdown in early exponential phase, an ER membrane protein (Ice2p) facilitates TAG utilization for membrane-lipid synthesis. Ice2p has a cytosolic domain with affinity for LDs and is required for the efficient utilization of LD-derived DAG in the ER. Ice2p breaks a futile cycle on LDs between TAG degradation and synthesis, promoting the rapid relocalization of Dga1p to the ER. Our results show that Ice2p functionally links LDs with the ER and explain how cells switch neutral lipid metabolism from storage to consumption. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An ER Protein Functionally Couples Neutral Lipid Metabolism on Lipid Droplets to Membrane Lipid Synthesis in the ER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Markgraf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells store neutral lipids such as triacylglycerol (TAG in lipid droplets (LDs. Here, we have addressed how LDs are functionally linked to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. We show that, in S. cerevisiae, LD growth is sustained by LD-localized enzymes. When LDs grow in early stationary phase, the diacylglycerol acyl-transferase Dga1p moves from the ER to LDs and is responsible for all TAG synthesis from diacylglycerol (DAG. During LD breakdown in early exponential phase, an ER membrane protein (Ice2p facilitates TAG utilization for membrane-lipid synthesis. Ice2p has a cytosolic domain with affinity for LDs and is required for the efficient utilization of LD-derived DAG in the ER. Ice2p breaks a futile cycle on LDs between TAG degradation and synthesis, promoting the rapid relocalization of Dga1p to the ER. Our results show that Ice2p functionally links LDs with the ER and explain how cells switch neutral lipid metabolism from storage to consumption.

  8. Lipid corralling and poloxamer squeeze-out in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, G.H.; Majewski, J.; Ege, C.

    2004-01-01

    Using x-ray scattering measurements we have quantitatively determined the effect of poloxamer 188 (P188), a polymer known to seal damaged membranes, on the structure of lipid monolayers. P188 selectively inserts into low lipid-density regions of the membrane and "corrals" lipid molecules to pack...... tightly, leading to unexpected Bragg peaks at low nominal lipid density and inducing lipid/poloxamer phase separation. At tighter lipid packing, the once inserted P188 is squeezed out, allowing the poloxamer to gracefully exit when the membrane integrity is restored....

  9. Lipidomics in research on yeast membrane lipid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2017-08-01

    Mass spectrometry is increasingly used in research on membrane lipid homeostasis, both in analyses of the steady state lipidome at the level of molecular lipid species, and in pulse-chase approaches employing stable isotope-labeled lipid precursors addressing the dynamics of lipid metabolism. Here my experience with, and view on mass spectrometry-based lipid analysis is presented, with emphasis on aspects of quantification of membrane lipid composition of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: BBALIP_Lipidomics Opinion Articles edited by Sepp Kohlwein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  11. Arrhythmia causes lipid accumulation and reduced glucose uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenski, Matthias; Schleider, Gregor; Kohlhaas, Michael; Adrian, Lucas; Adam, Oliver; Tian, Qinghai; Kaestner, Lars; Lipp, Peter; Lehrke, Michael; Maack, Christoph; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is characterized by irregular contractions of atrial cardiomyocytes and increased energy demand. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of arrhythmia on glucose and fatty acid (FA) metabolism in cardiomyocytes, mice and human left atrial myocardium. Compared to regular pacing, irregular (pseudo-random variation at the same number of contractions/min) pacing of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes induced shorter action potential durations and effective refractory periods and increased diastolic [Ca(2+)]c. This was associated with the activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Membrane expression of fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) and (14)C-palmitic acid uptake were augmented while membrane expression of glucose transporter subtype 4 (GLUT-4) as well as (3)H-glucose uptake were reduced. Inhibition of AMPK and CaMKII prevented these arrhythmia-induced metabolic changes. Similar alterations of FA metabolism were observed in a transgenic mouse model (RacET) for spontaneous AF. Consistent with these findings samples of left atrial myocardium of patients with AF compared to matched samples of patients with sinus rhythm showed up-regulation of CaMKII and AMPK and increased membrane expression of FAT/CD36, resulting in lipid accumulation. These changes of FA metabolism were accompanied by decreased membrane expression of GLUT-4, increased glycogen content and increased expression of the pro-apoptotic protein bax. Irregular pacing of cardiomyocytes increases diastolic [Ca(2+)]c and activation of CaMKII and AMPK resulting in lipid accumulation, reduced glucose uptake and increased glycogen synthesis. These metabolic changes are accompanied by an activation of pro-apoptotic signalling pathways.

  12. Hormonal, anthropometric and lipid factors associated with idiopathic pubertal gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Alwan, Ibrahim; Al Azkawi, Hanan; Badri, Motasim; Tamim, Hani; Al Dubayee, Mohammed; Tamimi, Waleed

    2013-01-01

    To determine factors associated with pubertal gynecomastia. A cross-sectional study among healthy male school children and adolescents in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Subjects were selected from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. Tanner stage, height, weight, blood hormonal levels (leutilizing hormone [LH], follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH], total testosterone, and estradiol), and anthropometric and lipid parameters (body mass index [BMI], triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein [HDL], and low-density lipoprotein [LDL]), were collected and compared in children with and without gynecomastia. The study included 542 children and adolescents. Median (interquartile range) age in the whole group was 11(8-13) years. The prevalence of gynecomastia was 185/542 (34%), with a peak at age 14. The 2 groups compared had nonsignificant difference in cholesterol (P=.331), LH (P=.215) and FSH (P=.571) levels. Those with gynecomastia were significantly older, had lower gonad stage, had higher anthropometric (height, weight, and BMI), and lipid (triglycerides, HDL, and LDL) values. In multivariate regression analysis, factors significantly associated with gynecomastia were BMI (odds ratio [OR]=1.05; 95%CI 1.00-1.10; P=.013), HDL (OR=0.42; 95%CI 0.19-0.92; P=.03), and gonad (Stage II OR=2.23; 95%CI 1.27-3.92; P=.005, Stage III OR=6.40; 95%CI 2.70-15.0; P gynecomastia tends to increase in mid-puberty. In our setting, BMI, HDL, and gonad stage were the major factors associated with the development of pubertal gynecomastia.

  13. Fragmented state of lipid bilayers in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helfrich, W.; Thimmel, J.; Klösgen, Beate Maria

    1999-01-01

    The bilayers of some typical biological membrane lipids such as PC and DGDG disintegrate in a large excess of water to form an optically invisible dispersive bilayer phase. `Dark bodies' can be reversibly precipitated from it by raising the temperature. The dispersive phase probably consists...

  14. Body mass index and serum lipid levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Javier Navarrete Mejía

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the association between the body mass index (BMI and serum lipid levels in adult people. Material and Methods: Observational, transversal and retrospective study. Non experimental investigation design. The population was conformed for people treated in private health centers in Metropolitan Lima. The evaluations of the BMI and the laboratorial tests to know the seric concentration of lipids were taken between October 2014 and October 2015. It was determined the association between the BMI and the seric lipid levels using the Chi2 test. People with comorbidity that could modify the seric levels of lipids were excluded. Results: 39.7% of people studied were male and 60.3% were female. The average age was 34.2 years old. 40.7% (1227/3016 of population were obese and overweight. The results show a higher level of obesity or overweight in male people over female (54.6% and 33% respectively. 19.7% (594/3016 of the tested people presented high triglycerides seric levels. 27.9% (841/3016 presented high cholesterol levels and 38.8% (1146/3016 presented low cHDL levels. The cLDL levels and cVLDL levels were similar in both groups (male and female. Conclusions: The investigation determined the significant statistical association between the BMI and triglycerides (p < 0.05, cholesterol (p < 0.05 and cHDL (p < 0.05.

  15. Computationally efficient prediction of area per lipid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaban, Vitaly V.

    2014-01-01

    dynamics increases exponentially with respect to temperature. APL dependence on temperature is linear over an entire temperature range. I provide numerical evidence that thermal expansion coefficient of a lipid bilayer can be computed at elevated temperatures and extrapolated to the temperature of interest...

  16. Coarse grained model for semiquantitative lipid simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, SJ; de Vries, AH; Mark, AE

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the parametrization of a new coarse grained (CG) model for lipid and surfactant systems. Reduction of the number of degrees of freedom together with the use of short range potentials makes it computationally very efficient. Compared to atomistic models a gain of 3-4 orders of

  17. Lysosomal exocytosis and lipid storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samie, Mohammad Ali; Xu, Haoxing

    2014-06-01

    Lysosomes are acidic compartments in mammalian cells that are primarily responsible for the breakdown of endocytic and autophagic substrates such as membranes, proteins, and lipids into their basic building blocks. Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of metabolic disorders caused by genetic mutations in lysosomal hydrolases required for catabolic degradation, mutations in lysosomal membrane proteins important for catabolite export or membrane trafficking, or mutations in nonlysosomal proteins indirectly affecting these lysosomal functions. A hallmark feature of LSDs is the primary and secondary excessive accumulation of undigested lipids in the lysosome, which causes lysosomal dysfunction and cell death, and subsequently pathological symptoms in various tissues and organs. There are more than 60 types of LSDs, but an effective therapeutic strategy is still lacking for most of them. Several recent in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that induction of lysosomal exocytosis could effectively reduce the accumulation of the storage materials. Meanwhile, the molecular machinery and regulatory mechanisms for lysosomal exocytosis are beginning to be revealed. In this paper, we first discuss these recent developments with the focus on the functional interactions between lipid storage and lysosomal exocytosis. We then discuss whether lysosomal exocytosis can be manipulated to correct lysosomal and cellular dysfunction caused by excessive lipid storage, providing a potentially general therapeutic approach for LSDs. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Lipid-lowering treatment to the end?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Line Kirkeby; Christensen, Kaare; Kragstrup, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    People aged 80 or older are the fastest growing population in high-income countries. One of the most common causes of death among the elderly is the cardiovascular disease (CVD). Lipid-lowering treatment is common, e.g. one-third of 75-84-year-old Swedes are treated with statins. The assumption...

  19. Peroxisomes, lipid metabolism, and human disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    In the past few years, much has been learned about the metabolic functions of peroxisomes. These studies have shown that peroxisomes play a major role in lipid metabolism, including fatty acid beta-oxidation, etherphospholipid biosynthesis, and phytanic acid alpha-oxidation. This article describes

  20. Fastende og ikkefastende lipider--sekundaerpublikation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, Anne; Freiberg, Jacob J; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that lipid levels change minimally in response to normal food intake and that nonfasting levels predict cardiovascular events. The maximum changes after normal food intake from fasting levels were as follows: total cholesterol -0.2 mmol/l, LDL cholesterol -0.2 mmol/l, HDL...

  1. DNA nanotechnology: Bringing lipid bilayers into shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Lipid bilayers form the thin and floppy membranes that define the boundary of compartments such as cells. Now, a method to control the shape and size of bilayers using DNA nanoscaffolds has been developed. Such designer materials advance synthetic biology and could find use in membrane research.

  2. Molecular Transport Studies Through Unsupported Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, William; Parekh, Sapun; Bonn, Mischa

    2014-03-01

    Dendrimers, spherical polymeric nanoparticles made from branched monomers around a central core, show great promise as drug delivery vehicles. Dendrimer size, core contents, and surface functionality can be synthetically tuned, providing unprecedented versatility. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers have been shown to enter cells; however, questions remain about their biophysical interactions with the cell membrane, specifically about the presence and size of transient pores. We monitor dendrimer-lipid bilayer interactions using unsupported black lipid membranes (BLMs) as model cell membranes. Custom bilayer slides contain two vertically stacked aqueous chambers separated by a 25 μm Teflon sheet with a 120 μm aperture where the bilayer is formed. We vary the composition of model membranes (cholesterol content and lipid phase) to create biomimetic systems and study the interaction of PAMAM G6 and G3 dendrimers with these bilayers. Dendrimers, dextran cargo, and bilayers are monitored and quantified using time-lapse fluorescence imaging. Electrical capacitance measurements are simultaneously recorded to determine if the membrane is porous, and the pore size is deduced by monitoring transport of fluorescent dextrans of increasing molecular weight. These experiments shed light on the importance of cholesterol content and lipid phase on the interaction of dendrimer nanoparticles with membranes.

  3. The Mediator Complex and Lipid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Xiaoli; Zhao, Xiaoping; Yang, Fajun

    2013-03-01

    The precise control of gene expression is essential for all biological processes. In addition to DNA-binding transcription factors, numerous transcription cofactors contribute another layer of regulation of gene transcription in eukaryotic cells. One of such transcription cofactors is the highly conserved Mediator complex, which has multiple subunits and is involved in various biological processes through directly interacting with relevant transcription factors. Although the current understanding on the biological functions of Mediator remains incomplete, research in the past decade has revealed an important role of Mediator in regulating lipid metabolism. Such function of Mediator is dependent on specific transcription factors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) and sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), which represent the master regulators of lipid metabolism. The medical significance of these findings is apparent, as aberrant lipid metabolism is intimately linked to major human diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Here, we briefly review the functions and molecular mechanisms of Mediator in regulation of lipid metabolism.

  4. Design of lipid matrix particles for fenofibrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Dengning; Cui, Fude; Gan, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The effect of polymorphism of glycerol monostearate (GMS) on drug incorporation and release from lipid matrix particles (LMPs) was investigated using fenofibrate as a model drug. X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry were used to study the polymorphism change of GMS and t...

  5. Lipid contents of the sponge Haliclona sp.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parameswaran, P.S.; Das, B.; Kamat, S.Y.

    Several fatty acids, sterols, batyl alcohol and its analogs and an N-acylated sphingosine (ceramide) have been isolated from the lipid fraction of the extract of the sponge Haliclona sp. The major sterol is found to be cholesterol (54%), followed...

  6. Lysosomal exocytosis and lipid storage disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samie, Mohammad Ali; Xu, Haoxing

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic compartments in mammalian cells that are primarily responsible for the breakdown of endocytic and autophagic substrates such as membranes, proteins, and lipids into their basic building blocks. Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of metabolic disorders caused by genetic mutations in lysosomal hydrolases required for catabolic degradation, mutations in lysosomal membrane proteins important for catabolite export or membrane trafficking, or mutations in nonlysosomal proteins indirectly affecting these lysosomal functions. A hallmark feature of LSDs is the primary and secondary excessive accumulation of undigested lipids in the lysosome, which causes lysosomal dysfunction and cell death, and subsequently pathological symptoms in various tissues and organs. There are more than 60 types of LSDs, but an effective therapeutic strategy is still lacking for most of them. Several recent in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that induction of lysosomal exocytosis could effectively reduce the accumulation of the storage materials. Meanwhile, the molecular machinery and regulatory mechanisms for lysosomal exocytosis are beginning to be revealed. In this paper, we first discuss these recent developments with the focus on the functional interactions between lipid storage and lysosomal exocytosis. We then discuss whether lysosomal exocytosis can be manipulated to correct lysosomal and cellular dysfunction caused by excessive lipid storage, providing a potentially general therapeutic approach for LSDs. PMID:24668941

  7. Pollen viability and membrane lipid composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilsen, van D.G.J.L.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis membrane lipid composition is studied in relation to pollen viability during storage. Chapter 1 reviews pollen viability, membranes in the dry state and membrane changes associated with cellular aging. This chapter is followed by a study of age-related changes in phospholipid

  8. Lipid organization of the plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Melo, Manuel N; van Eerden, Floris J; Arnarez, Clément; Lopez, Cesar A; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; Periole, Xavier; de Vries, Alex H; Tieleman, D Peter; Marrink, Siewert J

    2014-01-01

    The detailed organization of cellular membranes remains rather elusive. Based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we provide a high-resolution view of the lipid organization of a plasma membrane at an unprecedented level of complexity. Our plasma membrane model consists of 63 different

  9. Lipid map of the mammalian cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, G.; de Kroon, A.I.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Technological developments, especially in mass spectrometry and bioinformatics, have revealed that living cells contain thousands rather than dozens of different lipids [for classification and nomenclature, see Fahy et al. (Fahy et al., 2009)]. Now, the resulting questions are what is the relevance

  10. Learning the lipid language of plant signalling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, W.; Okresz, L.; Bogre, L.; Munnik, T.

    2004-01-01

    Plant cells respond to different biotic and abiotic stresses by producing various uncommon phospholipids that are believed to play key roles in cell signalling. We can predict how they work because animal and yeast proteins have been shown to have specific lipid-binding domains, which act as docking

  11. Nanoplasmonic ruler to measure lipid vesicle deformation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jackman, J.A.; Špačková, Barbora; Linardy, E.; Kim, M.C.; Yoon, B.K.; Homola, Jiří; Cho, N.J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2016), s. 76-79 ISSN 1359-7345 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP205/12/G118 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : nanomaterial * silicon * lipid vesicle Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 6.319, year: 2016

  12. (II) COMPLEX COMPOUND

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    electrochemical sensors, as well as in various chromatographic ... were carried out using Jenway pH meter Model 3320 and a conductivity ... Figure 1: the proposed molecular structure of the copper (II) Schiff base complex. M = Cu (II) or Mn (II).

  13. and copper(II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    (II) and copper(II)–zinc(II) complexes. SUBODH KUMAR1, R N PATEL1*, P V KHADIKAR1 and. K B PANDEYA2. 1 Department of Chemistry, APS University, Rewa 486 003, India. 2 CSJM University, Kanpur 208 016, India e-mail: (R N Patel) ...

  14. Blood pressure and lipid profiles in adolescents with hypertensive parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Fitriany

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Adolescent hypertension is a significant health problem of increasing prevalence and causes high morbidity and mortality. It is found primarily in young males, with a familial history of hypertension and/or cardiovascular disease. Examination of lipid profiles has been used to detect the risk of hypertension in adolescents. Objective To compare blood pressure and lipid profiles in adolescents with and without a parental history of hypertension. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted from January to February 2012 on students from a senior high school in the Toba Samosir District, North Sumatera. Sixty-eight adolescents were included, aged 15 to 18 years. Group I comprised 34 adolescents with hypertensive parents, and group II comprised 34 adolescents with normotensive parents. Subjects were selected based on questionnaires. Subjects’ blood pressures were measured at rest. Three measurements were made in intervals of 10-15 minutes, then averaged for both systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Lipid profiles were measured using the CardioCheck cholesterol test after subjects had fasted for 12 hours. Results The median systolic blood pressures (SBP in groups I and II were 110 mmHg (range 93.3-123.3 and 106.7 mmHg (range 96.7-123.3, respectively, (P=0.584. The median diastolic blood pressures (DBP were 73.3 mmHg (range 66.7-83.3 and 71.7 mmHg (range 63.3-80.0, respectively, (P=0.953. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C levels in group I were significantly higher than those levels in group II [median total cholesterol: 162.0 (range 158-170 vs. 159.0 (range 150-170, respectively; (P=0.001; and mean LDL-C: 103.5 (SD 3.72 vs. 99.1 (SD 4.63, respectively; (P=0.001. Multivariate analysis revealed a correlation of moderate strength between parental history of hypertension and increased LDL-C (P<0.001 in adolescents. Conclusion Adolescents with and without familial history of hypertension have no

  15. Atomistic study of lipid membranes containing chloroform: looking for a lipid-mediated mechanism of anesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Reigada

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism of general anesthesia is still a controversial issue. Direct effect by linking of anesthetics to proteins and indirect action on the lipid membrane properties are the two hypotheses in conflict. Atomistic simulations of different lipid membranes subjected to the effect of small volatile organohalogen compounds are used to explore plausible lipid-mediated mechanisms. Simulations of homogeneous membranes reveal that electrostatic potential and lateral pressure transversal profiles are affected differently by chloroform (anesthetic and carbon tetrachloride (non-anesthetic. Simulations of structured membranes that combine ordered and disordered regions show that chloroform molecules accumulate preferentially in highly disordered lipid domains, suggesting that the combination of both lateral and transversal partitioning of chloroform in the cell membrane could be responsible of its anesthetic action.

  16. Lipid-related markers and cardiovascular disease prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Gao, Pei; Pennells, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    The value of assessing various emerging lipid-related markers for prediction of first cardiovascular events is debated.......The value of assessing various emerging lipid-related markers for prediction of first cardiovascular events is debated....

  17. Preparation and evaluation of carvedilol-loaded solid lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Carvedilol, Solid lipid nanoparticles, Antihypertensive, Sustained release. Tropical Journal of ... Lipid particles are of great importance to drug researchers and ... toxic for human use and officially recognized as a pharmaceutical ...

  18. Structural and physicochemical properties of polar lipids from thermophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrih, Natasa Poklar; Gmajner, Dejan; Raspor, Peter

    2009-08-01

    The essential general features required for lipid membranes of extremophilic archaea to fulfill biological functions are that they are in the liquid crystalline phase and have extremely low permeability of solutes that is much less temperature sensitive due to a lack of lipid-phase transition and highly branched isoprenoid chains. Many accumulated data indicate that the organism's response to extremely low pH is the opposite of that to high temperature. The high temperature adaptation does not require the tetraether lipids, while the adaptation of thermophiles to acidic environment requires the tetraether polar lipids. The presence of cyclopentane rings and the role of polar heads are not so straightforward regarding the correlations between fluidity and permeability of the lipid membrane. Due to the unique lipid structures and properties of archaeal lipids, they are a valuable resource in the development of novel biotechnological processes. This microreview focuses primarily on structural and physicochemical properties of polar lipids of (hyper)thermophilic archaea.

  19. The role of the kidney in lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moestrup, Søren K; Nielsen, Lars Bo

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cellular uptake of plasma lipids is to a large extent mediated by specific membrane-associated proteins that recognize lipid-protein complexes. In the kidney, the apical surface of proximal tubules has a high capacity for receptor-mediated uptake of filtered lipid-binding plasma...... proteins. We describe the renal receptor system and its role in lipid metabolism in health and disease, and discuss the general effect of the diseased kidney on lipid metabolism. RECENT FINDINGS: Megalin and cubilin are receptors in the proximal tubules. An accumulating number of lipid......-binding and regulating proteins (e.g. albumin, apolipoprotein A-I and leptin) have been identified as ligands, suggesting that their receptors may directly take up lipids in the proximal tubules and indirectly affect plasma and tissue lipid metabolism. Recently, the amnionless protein was shown to be essential...

  20. Lipid Raft: A Floating Island Of Death or Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kimberly S.; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-01-01

    Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, and play an important role in the initiation of many pharmacological agent-induced signaling pathways and toxicological effects. The structure of lipid rafts is dynamic, resulting in an ever-changing content of both lipids and proteins. Cholesterol, as a major component of lipid rafts, is critical for the formation and configuration of lipid rafts microdomains, which provide signaling platforms capable of activating both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. A change of cholesterol level can result in lipid rafts disruption and activate or deactivate raft-associated proteins, such as death receptor proteins, protein kinases, and calcium channels. Several anti-cancer drugs are able to suppress growth and induce apoptosis of tumor cells through alteration of lipid raft contents via disrupting lipid raft integrity. PMID:22289360

  1. Irregular bilayer structure in vesicles prepared from Halobacterium cutirubrum lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Fluorescent probes were used to study the structure of the cell envelope of Halobacterium cutirubrum, and, in particular, to explore the effect of the heterogeneity of the lipids in this organism on the structure of the bilayers. The fluorescence polarization of perylene was followed in vesicles of unfractionated lipids and polar lipids as a function of temperature in 3.4 M solutions of NaCl, NaNO3, and KSCN, and it was found that vesicles of unfractionated lipids were more perturbed by chaotropic agents than polar lipids. The dependence of the relaxation times of perylene on temperature was studied in cell envelopes and in vesicles prepared from polar lipids, unfractionated lipids, and mixtures of polar and neutral lipids.

  2. The effects of therapeutic concentrations ofamisulpride andrisperidone on human plasma lipid peroxidation – invitro studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dietrich-Muszalska

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antipsychotics may in different ways affect the oxidative stress measured by plasma lipid peroxidation. Probably some of them may intensify the oxidative balance disturbances occurring in schizophrenia. The effects of amisulpride and risperidone on redox processes are not known sufficiently yet. Aim of the study: Establishment of the effects of amisulpride and risperidone on human plasma lipid peroxidation measured by determination of the level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS, in vitro. Material and methods: Blood for the studies was collected from healthy volunteers (aged 24-26 years for ACD solution. Active substances of the examined drugs were dissolved in 0.01% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO to the final concentrations (of amisulpride 578 ng/ml and risperidone 64 ng/ml and incubated with plasma for 1 and 24 hours at 37ºC. For each experiment the control samples of plasma with DMSO (without the drug were performed. The lipid peroxidation level was measured in plasma by determining the TBARS concentration, using the spectrophotometric method (acc. to Rice-Evans, 1991. The results were analysed using the following statistical methods: the paired Student t-test and ANOVA II variance analysis and NIR test (StatSoft Inc., Statistica v. 6.0. Results: The ANOVA II variance analysis indicated significant differences in the effects of both drugs on TBARS level (F=4.26; df=2, p0.05. Conclusion: Amisulpride and risperidone in concentrations corresponding to doses recommended for treatment of acute episode of schizophrenia do not induce oxidative stress measured by lipid peroxidation. Unlike risperidone, amisulpride exhibits antioxidative effects.

  3. Lxr-driven enterocyte lipid droplet formation delays transport of ingested lipids[S

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz-Garcia, Lourdes; Schlegel, Amnon

    2014-01-01

    Liver X receptors (Lxrs) are master regulators of cholesterol catabolism, driving the elimination of cholesterol from the periphery to the lumen of the intestine. Development of pharmacological agents to activate Lxrs has been hindered by synthetic Lxr agonists’ induction of hepatic lipogenesis and hypertriglyceridemia. Elucidating the function of Lxrs in regulating enterocyte lipid handling might identify novel aspects of lipid metabolism that are pharmacologically amenable. We took a geneti...

  4. Bioactivities of Milk Polar Lipids in Influencing Intestinal Barrier Integrity, Systemic Inflammation, and Lipid Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Albert Lihong

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of lactation is for nutrient provision and also importantly for protection from various environmental stressors. Milk polar lipids reduce cholesterol, protect against bacterial infection, reduce inflammation and help maintain gut integrity. Dynamic interactions within dietary fat, lipid metabolism, gut permeability and inflammatory cytokines remain unclear in the context of obesity and systemic inflammation. A rat model and three mouse models were developed to test the hypotheses ...

  5. JAZF1 can regulate the expression of lipid metabolic genes and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Guang-feng [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Department of Critical Care Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008, Hunan (China); Xiao, Di; Gong, Wei-jing [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Liu, Hui-xia; Liu, Jun [Department of Geriatrics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008, Hunan (China); Zhou, Hong-hao [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Liu, Zhao-qian, E-mail: liuzhaoqian63@126.com [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China)

    2014-03-14

    Highlights: • JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited the expression of SREBP1, ACC, and FAS. • JAZF1 overexpression upregulated the expression of HSL and ATGL. • SREBP1 and JAZF1 could regulate each other in adipocytes. - Abstract: JAZF1 is a newly identified gene with unknown functions. A recent genome-wide association study showed that JAZF1 is associated with type 2 diabetes and is highly expressed in liver and adipose tissue. Studies have demonstrated that JAZF1 is the co-repressor for nuclear orphan receptor TAK1, whereas most nuclear orphan receptor family members are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Therefore, JAZF1 could be closely related to glycolipid metabolism. In this study, JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the induced differentiation process of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The overexpression of JAZF1 inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes and significantly inhibited the expression of SREBPl, ACC, and FAS, which were important in lipid synthesis, while upregulating the expression of key enzyme hormone-sensitive lipase in lipoclasis. Moreover, SREBPl exhibited an inhibitory function on the expression of JAZF1. SREBP1 reversed the inhibitory action on lipid accumulation of JAZF1. SREBP1 and JAZF1 were observed to regulate each other in adipocytes. Therefore, JAZF1 could regulate the expression of particular genes related to lipid metabolism and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes. This result suggests that JAZF1 may be a potential target for the treatment of diseases, such as obesity and lipid metabolism disorders.

  6. JAZF1 can regulate the expression of lipid metabolic genes and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming, Guang-feng; Xiao, Di; Gong, Wei-jing; Liu, Hui-xia; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Hong-hao; Liu, Zhao-qian

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited the expression of SREBP1, ACC, and FAS. • JAZF1 overexpression upregulated the expression of HSL and ATGL. • SREBP1 and JAZF1 could regulate each other in adipocytes. - Abstract: JAZF1 is a newly identified gene with unknown functions. A recent genome-wide association study showed that JAZF1 is associated with type 2 diabetes and is highly expressed in liver and adipose tissue. Studies have demonstrated that JAZF1 is the co-repressor for nuclear orphan receptor TAK1, whereas most nuclear orphan receptor family members are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Therefore, JAZF1 could be closely related to glycolipid metabolism. In this study, JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the induced differentiation process of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The overexpression of JAZF1 inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes and significantly inhibited the expression of SREBPl, ACC, and FAS, which were important in lipid synthesis, while upregulating the expression of key enzyme hormone-sensitive lipase in lipoclasis. Moreover, SREBPl exhibited an inhibitory function on the expression of JAZF1. SREBP1 reversed the inhibitory action on lipid accumulation of JAZF1. SREBP1 and JAZF1 were observed to regulate each other in adipocytes. Therefore, JAZF1 could regulate the expression of particular genes related to lipid metabolism and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes. This result suggests that JAZF1 may be a potential target for the treatment of diseases, such as obesity and lipid metabolism disorders

  7. Characteristics of lipids and their feeding value in swine diets

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, Brian J.; Kellner, Trey A.; Shurson, Gerald C.

    2015-01-01

    In livestock diets, energy is one of the most expensive nutritional components of feed formulation. Because lipids are a concentrated energy source, inclusion of lipids are known to affect growth rate and feed efficiency, but are also known to affect diet palatability, feed dustiness, and pellet quality. In reviewing the literature, the majority of research studies conducted on the subject of lipids have focused mainly on the effects of feeding presumably high quality lipids on growth perform...

  8. Study of inhibition on lipid oxidation of irradiated pork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha Yiming

    2006-03-01

    It was studied that the effect factors of irradiation dose, preservation temperature, oxygen content and antioxidant on lipid oxidation of irradiated pork. A mechanism was explained on lipid oxidation of irradiated pork. The results showed that irradiation might aggravate lipid oxidation of pork and that decreased preservation temperature and oxygen content of the packaging, added antioxidant also could effectively inhibit lipid oxidation of irradiated pork. (authors)

  9. Subretinal lipid exudation associated with untreated choroidal melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C K Minija

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Subretinal lipid exudation in an untreated choroidal melanoma is very rare. It is seen following plaque radiotherapy in choroidal melanoma. There is only one case report of untreated choroidal melanoma with massive lipid exudation in a patient with metastatic hypernephroma. We report here a rare case of untreated choroidal melanoma with lipid exudation. Subretinal exudation that is rarely seen following plaque brachytherapy was noted at the borders of this untreated tumor. Lipid exudation partially resolved following brachytherapy.

  10. Regulation of AMPA receptor localization in lipid rafts

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Qingming; Huang, Yunfei; Amato, Stephen; Snyder, Solomon H.; Huganir, Richard L.; Man, Heng-Ye

    2008-01-01

    Lipid rafts are special microdomains enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and certain proteins, and play important roles in a variety of cellular functions including signal transduction and protein trafficking. We report that in cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons the distribution of lipid rafts is development-dependent. Lipid rafts in mature neurons exist on the entire cell-surface and display a high degree of mobility. AMPA receptors co-localize and associate with lipid rafts in the...

  11. Pius II. a utrakvismus

    OpenAIRE

    Šimek, Milan

    2009-01-01

    Milan Šimek Pius II. a utrakvismus Pius II. and utraquism Based on sources work - out, the thesis aims the description and analysis of the attitude alternation of Enea Sylvio Piccolomini - Pius II to the utraquism. The conclusions stress the postulate that Pius II. did not change that attitude, but just did not succed in quelling the utraquist movement. In the sense of political background that finally led to fatal dissention among both leaders, king Jiří of Poděbrady and pope Pius II.

  12. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) versus solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) for topical delivery of meloxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Rawia M; Abd-Elbary, A; Kassem, Mahfoz A; Ghorab, Mamdouh M; Basha, Mona

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) as well as solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and evaluate their potential in the topical delivery of meloxicam (MLX). The effect of various compositional variations on their physicochemical properties was investigated. Furthermore, MLX-loaded lipid nanoparticles-based hydrogels were formulated and the gels were evaluated as vehicles for topical application. The results showed that NLC and SLN dispersions had spherical shapes with an average size between 215 and 430 nm. High entrapment efficiency was obtained ranging from 61.94 to 90.38% with negatively charged zeta potential in the range of -19.1 to -25.7 mV. The release profiles of all formulations exhibited sustained release characteristics over 48 h and the release rates increased as the amount of liquid lipid in lipid core increased. Finally, Precirol NLC with 50% Miglyol® 812 and its corresponding SLN were incorporated in hydrogels. The gels showed adequate pH, non-Newtonian flow with shear-thinning behavior and controlled release profiles. The biological evaluation revealed that MLX-loaded NLC gel showed more pronounced effect compared to MLX-loaded SLN gel. It can be concluded that lipid nanoparticles represent promising particulate carriers for topical application.

  13. Discovery of Novel Lipid Profiles in PCOS: Do Insulin and Androgen Oppositely Regulate Bioactive Lipid Production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengxian; Chu, Qianqian; Ma, Jing; Sun, Yun; Tao, Tao; Huang, Rong; Liao, Yu; Yue, Jiang; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Lihua; Xue, Xinli; Zhu, Mingjiang; Kang, Xiaonan; Yin, Huiyong; Liu, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex syndrome showing clinical features of an endocrine/metabolic disorder, including hyperinsulinemia and hyperandrogenism. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and their derivatives, both tightly linked to PCOS and obesity, play important roles in inflammation and reproduction. This study aimed to investigate serum lipid profiles in newly diagnosed patients with PCOS using lipidomics and correlate these features with the hyperinsulinemia and hyperandrogenism associated with PCOS and obesity. Thirty-two newly diagnosed women with PCOS and 34 controls were divided into obese and lean subgroups. A PCOS rat model was used to validate results of the human studies. Serum lipid profiles, including phospholipids, free fatty acids (FFAs), and bioactive lipids, were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS) and liquid chromatography-MS. Elevation in phosphatidylcholine and a concomitant decrease in lysophospholipid were found in obese patients with PCOS vs lean controls. Obese patients with PCOS had decreased PUFA levels and increased levels of long-chain saturated fatty acids vs lean controls. Serum bioactive lipids downstream of arachidonic acid were increased in obese controls, but reduced in both obese and lean patients with PCOS vs their respective controls. Patients with PCOS showed abnormal levels of phosphatidylcholine, FFAs, and PUFA metabolites. Circulating insulin and androgens may have opposing effects on lipid profiles in patients with PCOS, particularly on the bioactive lipid metabolites derived from PUFAs. These clinical observations warrant further studies of the molecular mechanisms and clinical implications of PCOS and obesity. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  14. Formation of supported lipid bilayers of charged E. coli lipids on modified gold by vesicle fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana F. Márquez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a simple way of fusing E. coli lipid vesicles onto a gold surface. Supported lipid bilayers on metal surfaces are interesting for several reasons: transducing a biological signal to an electric readout, using surface analytical tools such as Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR, Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy, Neutron Reflectivity or Electrochemistry. The most widely used method to prepare supported lipid membranes is fusion of preexisting liposomes. It is quite efficient on hydrophilic surfaces such as glass, mica or SiO2, but vesicle fusion on metals and metal oxide surfaces (as gold, titanium oxide or indium tin oxide, remains a challenge, particularly for vesicles containing charged lipids, as is the case of bacterial lipids. We describe a simple method based on modifying the gold surface with a charged mercaptopropionic acid self-assembled monolayer and liposomes partially solubilized with detergent. The formed bilayers were characterized using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. Some advantages of this protocol are that the stability of the self-assembled monolayer allows for repeated use of the substrate after detergent removal of the bilayer and that the amount of detergent required for optimal fusion can be determined previously using the lipid-detergent solubility curve.

  15. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles of Guggul Lipid as Drug Carrier for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kumar Gaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diclofenac sodium loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs were formulated using guggul lipid as major lipid component and analyzed for physical parameters, permeation profile, and anti-inflammatory activity. The SLNs were prepared using melt-emulsion sonication/low temperature-solidification method and characterized for physical parameters, in vitro drug release, and accelerated stability studies, and formulated into gel. Respective gels were compared with a commercial emulgel (CEG and plain carbopol gel containing drug (CG for ex vivo and in vivo drug permeation and anti-inflammatory activity. The SLNs were stable with optimum physical parameters. GMS nanoparticle 1 (GMN-1 and stearic acid nanoparticle 1 (SAN-1 gave the highest in vitro drug release. Guggul lipid nanoparticle gel 3 (GLNG-3 showed 104.68 times higher drug content than CEG in receptor fluid. The enhancement ratio of GLNG-3 was 39.43 with respect to CG. GLNG-3 showed almost 8.12 times higher Cmax than CEG at 4 hours. The AUC value of GLNG-3 was 15.28 times higher than the AUC of CEG. GLNG-3 showed edema inhibition up to 69.47% in the first hour. Physicochemical properties of major lipid component govern the properties of SLN. SLN made up of guggul lipid showed good physical properties with acceptable stability. Furthermore, it showed a controlled drug release profile along with a promising permeation profile.

  16. Lipid-lowering nutraceuticals in clinical practice: position paper from an International Lipid Expert Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Arrigo F G; Colletti, Alessandro; Bajraktari, Gani; Descamps, Olivier; Djuric, Dragan M; Ezhov, Marat; Fras, Zlatko; Katsiki, Niki; Langlois, Michel; Latkovskis, Gustavs; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Paragh, Gyorgy; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Mitchenko, Olena; Paulweber, Bernhard; Pella, Daniel; Pitsavos, Christos; Reiner, Željko; Ray, Kausik K; Rizzo, Manfredi; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Serban, Maria-Corina; Sperling, Laurence S; Toth, Peter P; Vinereanu, Dragos; Vrablík, Michal; Wong, Nathan D; Banach, Maciej

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in the possible use of nutraceuticals to improve and optimize dyslipidemia control and therapy. Based on the data from available studies, nutraceuticals might help patients obtain theraputic lipid goals and reduce cardiovascular residual risk. Some nutraceuticals have essential lipid-lowering properties confirmed in studies; some might also have possible positive effects on nonlipid cardiovascular risk factors and have been shown to improve early markers of vascular health such as endothelial function and pulse wave velocity. However, the clinical evidence supporting the use of a single lipid-lowering nutraceutical or a combination of them is largely variable and, for many of the nutraceuticals, the evidence is very limited and, therefore, often debatable. The purpose of this position paper is to provide consensus-based recommendations for the optimal use of lipid-lowering nutraceuticals to manage dyslipidemia in patients who are still not on statin therapy, patients who are on statin or combination therapy but have not achieved lipid goals, and patients with statin intolerance. This statement is intended for physicians and other healthcare professionals engaged in the diagnosis and management of patients with lipid disorders, especially in the primary care setting. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Effect of cadmium exposure on lipids, lipid peroxidation and metal distribution in rat brain regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, T; Ali, M M; Chandra, S V

    1985-01-01

    Effect of cadmium treatment on brain lipids, lipid peroxidation and distribution of Zn, Cu and Fe in rat brain regions was investigated. Adult male rats were exposed to Cd (100 ppm Cd as cadmium acetate) in drinking water for 30 days. The Cd exposure resulted in a significant decrease in the phospholipid content and an increase in the lipid peroxidation in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. The total lipid content was not affected in any of the regions but a significant decrease in cholesterol and cerebroside contents were observed only in the cerebral cortex. A positive correlation between the increase in lipid peroxidation and decrease in the phospholipid content in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum was observed. A maximum accumulation of Cd occurred in the cerebral cortex. The Cu and Fe contents were significantly increased but the Zn levels decreased in the Cd-treated rats in all but the midbrain region. Results suggest that the increased peroxidation decomposition of structural lipids and the altered distribution of the essential trace metals in brain may play a significant role in Cd-induced neurotoxicity. 27 references, 2 tables.

  18. Complexes of cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II) and dioxouranium(II) with thiophene-2-aldehydethiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Balwan; Misra, Harihar

    1986-01-01

    Metal complexes of thiosemicarbazides have been known for their pharmacological applications. Significant antitubercular, fungicidal and antiviral activities have been reported for thiosemicarbazides and their derivatives. The present study describes the systhesis and characterisation of complexes of Co II , Cu II , Zn II ,Cd II and UO II with thiosemicarbazone obtained by condensing thiophene-2-aldehyde with thiosemicarbazide. 17 refs., 2 tables. (author)

  19. A comparative study of lipids in Sphagnum species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Baas, M.; Pancost, R.D.; Geel, B. van

    2000-01-01

    The free lipid compositions of twelve species of Sphagnum were determined by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry as part of a study to identify characteristic lipids for Sphagnum in peat bogs. Complex mixtures of lipids, comprised of C28 C29 sterols, C30 triterpenoids, C16 C30 fatty

  20. Extraction and classification of lipids from seeds of persea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seed lipids of Persea americana and Chrysophyllum albidum were studied. Lipids were extracted with chloroform-methanol, analysed with silicic column chromatography and thin layer chromatography. The total lipid content of Persea americana was 10.8% while that of Chrysophyllum albidum was 7.7%. Fractionation of ...

  1. Lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition: does one size fits all ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dietary lipids significantly contribute to preserve the efficiency of human metabolism and restore it during disease. Therefore, in the absence of absolute contraindications, it would not appear reasonable to exclude lipid emulsions when prescribing parenteral nutrition (PN). The metabolic role of lipids has been elucidated, ...

  2. Microemulsion extrusion technique : a new method to produce lipid nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Radaic, Allan; Zuhorn, Inge S.; de Paula, Eneida

    2013-01-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and nano-structured lipid carriers (NLC) have been intensively investigated for different applications, including their use as drug and gene delivery systems. Different techniques have been employed to produce lipid nanoparticles, of which high pressure homogenization

  3. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis.

  4. Final Report: 17th international Symposium on Plant Lipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christoph Benning

    2007-03-07

    This meeting covered several emerging areas in the plant lipid field such as the biosynthesis of cuticle components, interorganelle lipid trafficking, the regulation of lipid homeostasis, and the utilization of algal models. Stimulating new insights were provided not only based on research reports based on plant models, but also due to several excellent talks by experts from the yeast field.

  5. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    prostatectomy samples, intraprostatic lipid as measured by MRSI and prostate tumor aggressiveness. 3) To quantify key metabolic intermediates involved in...lipid as measured by 1H MRSI, and prostate tumor aggressiveness; and 3) quantify the association between key metabolic intermediates involved in lipid

  6. Increasing the extraction efficiency of algal lipid for biodiesel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various studies have been conducted recently using microalgal system for the production of algal lipid for biodiesel production. This study aimed at increasing the extraction efficiency of algal lipid from Chlorella sp. by the application of Chlorella viruses. The calorific value of lipid from Chlorella sp. has been reported to be ...

  7. Lipids from yeasts and fungi: Tomorrow's source of Biodiesel?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwse, P.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Tramper, J.; Rinzema, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the search for new transport fuels from renewable resources, biodiesel from microbial lipids comes into view. We have evaluated the lipid yield and energy use of a process for production of biodiesel from agricultural waste using lipid-accumulating yeast and fungi. We included different

  8. Structured lipid emulsion as nutritional therapy for the elderly patients with severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Yan, Jing; Cai, Guo-Long; Xu, Qiang-Hong; Gong, Shi-Jin; Dai, Hai-Wen; Yu, Yi-Hua; Li, Li

    2013-06-01

    The nutritional support is one of the important therapeutic strategies for the elderly patients with severe sepsis, but there is controversial in choosing a parenteral nutrition formulation. This study was designed to compare the therapeutic effects of structured lipid emulsion, physically mixed medium, and long-chain fat emulsion in the treatment of severe sepsis in elderly patients. A total number of 64 elder patients with severe sepsis were enrolled in the study. After a week of enteral nutritional support, the patients were randomly divided into research (structured lipid emulsion as parenteral alimentation) and control groups (physically mixed medium and long-chain fat emulsion as parenteral alimentation). The alterations of plasma albumin, lipid metabolism, and blood glucose level were recorded after parenteral alimentation and were compared between the two groups. The plasma levels of albumin, prealbumin, cholesterol, and triglyceride were decreased in all the patients after one week of enteral nutritional support treatment (t = 7.78, P = 0.000; t = 10.21, P = 0.000; t = 7.99, P = 0.000; and t = 10.99, P = 0.000). Further parenteral alimentation with different lipid emulsions had significant effects on the serum prealbumin and albumin (t = 3.316, P = 0.002; t = 3.200, P = 0.002), whilst had no effects on the blood glucose and triglyceride level (t = 7.78, P = 0.000; t = 4.228, P = 0.000). In addition, the two groups had a significantly different Apache II score, ventilator time, and hospital stay time (t = -2.213, P = 0.031; t = 2.317, P = 0.024; t = 2.514, P = 0.015). The structured lipid emulsion was safe as parenteral nutrition for elderly patients with severe sepsis. It was demonstrated to be superior to the physically mixed medium and long-chain fat emulsion with respect to the protein synthesis and prognosis.

  9. Dietary fiber and lipid peroxidation: effect of dietary fiber on levels of lipids and lipid peroxides in high fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thampi, B S; Manoj, G; Leelamma, S; Menon, V P

    1991-06-01

    Effect of feeding coconut and blackgram fiber isolated as neutral detergent fiber (NDF) on the levels of lipids and lipid peroxides was studied in rats given a high fat diet. Concentration of cholesterol, free falty acid and phospholipids showed significant decrease in the serum, liver aorta and intestine of coconut and blackgram fiber groups. Concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes was significantly decreased in liver and intestine of both fiber groups, while hydroperoxides showed significant increase in liver and heart of both the fiber groups. SOD and catalase activity was found to be increased in liver, intestine, heart proximal colon and distal colon of both the fiber groups. Serum ceruloplasmin levels showed a slight increase in animals fed coconut and blackgram fiber groups. Glutathione levels in liver, intestine proximal colon, distal colon and heart also showed a significant decrease in the animals of both the fiber groups.

  10. Alterations in lipids & lipid peroxidation in rats fed with flavonoid rich fraction of banana (Musa paradisiaca) from high background radiation area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Kripa; Vijayalakshmi, N R

    2005-12-01

    A group of villages in Kollam district of Kerala, southern part of India are exposed to a higher dose of natural radiation than global average. Yet no adverse health effects have been found in humans, animals and plants in these areas. The present study was carried out to understand whether radiation affects the quantity and quality of flavonoids in plants grown in this area of high radiation, and to assess the effect of feeding flavonoid rich fraction (FRF) of the two varieties of banana to rats on their biochemical parameters like lipids, lipid peroxides and antioxidant enzyme levels. A total of 42 albino rats were equally divided into 7 groups. Rats fed laboratory diet alone were grouped under group I (normal control). Groups II and V received flavonoid rich fraction (FRF) from the fruits of two varieties of Musa paradisiaca, Palayamkodan and Rasakadali respectively from normal background radiation area (Veli) and treated as controls. Rats of groups III and IV received FRF of Palayamkodan from high background radiation areas (HBRAs) - Neendakara and Karunagappally respectively while groups VI and VII received FRF of Rasakadali from HBRAs. At the end of the experimental period of 45 days, lipids, lipid peroxides and antioxidant enzymes from liver, heart and kidney were analyzed. FRF of Palayamkodan and Rasakadali varieties showed significant hypolipidaemic and antioxidant activities. But these activities were found to be lowered in plants grown in HBRAs, particularly in Karunagappally area. Of the two, Palayamkodan variety was more effective in reducing lipids and lipid peroxides. MDA and hydroperoxides were significantly diminished in rats given FRF of banana from Veli (control area) only. FRF from plants grown in HBRAs exerted inhibition in the activities of antioxidant enzymes in the liver of rats and this inhibitory effect was maximum in rats fed FRF from Karunagappally. Banana grown in HBRAs is of lower quality with less efficient antioxidant system

  11. Equilibrium Sampling of Persistent and Bioaccumulative Compounds in Soil and Sediment: Comparison of Two Approaches To Determine Equilibrium Partitioning Concentrations in Lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäenpää, Kimmo; Leppänen, Matti T.; Reichenberg, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    with respect to equilibrium partitioning concentrations in lipids (Clipid,partitioning): (i) Solid phase microextraction in the headspace above the sample (HS-SPME) required optimization for its application to PCBs, and it was calibrated above external partitioning standards in olive oil. (ii) Equilibrium...

  12. Autoimmune severe hypertriglyceridemia induced by anti-apolipoprotein C-II antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Minoru; Yoshiga, Satomi; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro; Kihara, Shinji

    2014-05-01

    Among type V hyperlipoproteinemias, only one-fourth of the patients have genetic defects in lipoprotein lipase (LPL) or in its associated molecules; the exact mechanism in other patients is usually unknown. The aim of the study was to report a case of severe hypertriglyceridemia induced by anti-apolipoprotein (apo) C-II autoantibody and to clarify its pathogenesis. A 29-year-old Japanese woman presented with severe persistent hypertriglyceridemia since the age of 20 years. The past history was negative for acute pancreatitis, eruptive xanthomas, or lipemia retinalis. LPL mass and activities were normal. Plasma apo C-II levels were extremely low, but no mutation was observed in APOC2. Apo C-II protein was detected in the serum by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. Large amounts of IgG and IgM were incorporated with apo C-II protein coimmunoprecipitated by anti-apo C-II antibody. IgG, but not IgM, purified from the serum prevented interaction of apo C-II with lipid substrate and diminished LPL hydrolysis activity. We identified anti-apo C-II antibody in a myeloma-unrelated severe hypertriglyceridemic patient. In vitro analysis confirmed that the autoantibody disrupted the interaction between apo C-II and lipid substrate, suggesting the etiological role of anti-apo C-II antibody in severe hypertriglyceridemia in this patient.

  13. Type II NKT cells: a distinct CD1d-restricted immune regulatory NKT cell subset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Suryasarathi; Kumar, Vipin

    2016-08-01

    Type II natural killer T cells (NKT) are a subset of the innate-like CD1d-restricted lymphocytes that are reactive to lipid antigens. Unlike the type I NKT cells, which express a semi-invariant TCR, type II NKT cells express a broader TCR repertoire. Additionally, other features, such as their predominance over type I cells in humans versus mice, the nature of their ligands, CD1d/lipid/TCR binding, and modulation of immune responses, distinguish type II NKT cells from type I NKT cells. Interestingly, it is the self-lipid-reactivity of type II NKT cells that has helped define their physiological role in health and in disease. The discovery of sulfatide as one of the major antigens for CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells in mice has been instrumental in the characterization of these cells, including the TCR repertoire, the crystal structure of the CD1d/lipid/TCR complex, and their function. Subsequently, several other glycolipids and phospholipids from both endogenous and microbial sources have been shown to activate type II NKT cells. The activation of a specific subset of type II NKT cells following administration with sulfatide or lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) leads to engagement of a dominant immunoregulatory pathway associated with the inactivation of type I NKT cells, conventional dendritic cells, and inhibition of the proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cells. Thus, type II NKT cells have been shown to be immunosuppressive in autoimmune diseases, inflammatory liver diseases, and in cancer. Knowing their relatively higher prevalence in human than type I NKT cells, understanding their biology is imperative for health and disease.

  14. Lipid chain geometry of C14 glycerol-based lipids: effect on lipoplex structure and transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudsiova, Laila; Ho, Jimmy; Fridrich, Barbara; Harvey, Richard; Keppler, Melanie; Ng, Tony; Hart, Stephen L; Tabor, Alethea B; Hailes, Helen C; Lawrence, M Jayne

    2011-02-01

    The effects have been determined of a systematic alteration of the alkyl chain geometry of a C14 analogue of DOTMA on the detailed molecular architecture of the resulting cationic vesicles formed both in the absence and presence of 50 mol% DOPE, and of the lipoplexes prepared from these vesicles using either calf thymus or plasmid DNA. The C14 DOTMA analogues studied involved cis- or trans-double bonds at positions Δ9 or Δ11, and a compound (ALK) featuring an alkyne at position C9. For all of these analogues, examination by light scattering and neutron scattering, zeta potential measurement, and negative staining electron microscopy showed that there were no significant differences in the structures or charges of the vesicles or of the resulting lipoplexes, regardless of the nature of the DNA incorporated. Differences were observed, however, between the complexes formed by the various lipids when examining the extent of complexation and release by gel electrophoresis, where the E-lipids appeared to complex the DNA more efficiently than all other lipids tested. Moreover, the lipoplexes prepared from the E-lipids were the most effective in transfection of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. As indicated through confocal microscopy studies, the E-lipids also showed a higher internalisation capacity and a more diffuse cellular distribution, possibly indicating a greater degree of endosomal escape and/or nuclear import. These observations suggest that the extent of complexation is the most important factor in determining the transfection efficiency of the complexes tested. At present it is unclear why the E-lipids were more effective at complexing DNA, although it is thought that the effective area per molecule occupied by the cationic lipid and DOPE head groups, and therefore the density of positive charges on the surface of the bilayer most closely matches the negative charge density of the DNA molecule. From a consideration of the geometry of the cationic lipids it is

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands regulate lipid content, metabolism, and composition in fetal lungs of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, M; Capobianco, E; Careaga, V; Martinez, N; Mazzucco, M B; Maier, M; Jawerbaum, A

    2014-03-01

    Maternal diabetes impairs fetal lung development. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors relevant in lipid homeostasis and lung development. This study aims to evaluate the effect of in vivo activation of PPARs on lipid homeostasis in fetal lungs of diabetic rats. To this end, we studied lipid concentrations, expression of lipid metabolizing enzymes and fatty acid composition in fetal lungs of control and diabetic rats i) after injections of the fetuses with Leukotriene B4 (LTB4, PPARα ligand) or 15deoxyΔ(12,14)prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2, PPARγ ligand) and ii) fed during pregnancy with 6% olive oil- or 6% safflower oil-supplemented diets, enriched with PPAR ligands were studied. Maternal diabetes increased triglyceride concentrations and decreased expression of lipid-oxidizing enzymes in fetal lungs of diabetic rats, an expression further decreased by LTB4 and partially restored by 15dPGJ2 in lungs of male fetuses in the diabetic group. In lungs of female fetuses in the diabetic group, maternal diets enriched with olive oil increased triglyceride concentrations and fatty acid synthase expression, while those enriched with safflower oil increased triglyceride concentrations and fatty acid transporter expression. Both olive oil- and safflower oil-supplemented diets decreased cholesterol and cholesteryl ester concentrations and increased the expression of the reverse cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 in fetal lungs of female fetuses of diabetic rats. In fetal lungs of control and diabetic rats, the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids increased with the maternal diets enriched with olive and safflower oils. Our results revealed important changes in lipid metabolism in fetal lungs of diabetic rats, and in the ability of PPAR ligands to modulate the composition of lipid species relevant in the lung during the perinatal period.

  16. Quantitative Profiling of Major Neutral Lipid Classes in Human Meibum by Direct Infusion Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Green, Kari B.; Nichols, Kelly K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this investigation was to better understand lipid composition in human meibum. Methods. Intact lipids in meibum samples were detected by direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis in positive detection mode using sodium iodide (NaI) as an additive. The peak intensities of all major types of lipid species, that is, wax esters (WEs), cholesteryl esters (CEs), and diesters (DEs) were corrected for peak overlapping and isotopic distribution; an additional ionization efficiency correction was performed for WEs and CEs, which was simplified by the observation that the corresponding ionization efficiency was primarily dependent on the specific lipid class and saturation degree of the lipids while independent of the carbon chain length. A set of WE and CE standards was spiked in meibum samples for ionization efficiency determination and absolute quantitation. Results. The absolute amount (μmol/mg) for each of 51 WEs and 31 CEs in meibum samples was determined. The summed masses for 51 WEs and 31 CEs accounted for 48 ± 4% and 40 ± 2%, respectively, of the total meibum lipids. The mass percentages of saturated and unsaturated species were determined to be 75 ± 2% and 25 ± 1% for CEs and 14 ± 1% and 86 ± 1% for WEs. The profiles for two types of DEs were also obtained, which include 42 α,ω Type II DEs, and 21 ω Type I-St DEs. Conclusions. Major neutral lipid classes in meibum samples were quantitatively profiled by ESI-MS analysis with NaI additive. PMID:23847307

  17. Adsorption of human tear lipocalin to human meibomian lipid films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Thomas J; Mudgil, Poonam; Butovich, Igor A; Palaniappan, Chendur K

    2009-01-01

    Tear lipocalin (Tlc) is a major lipid binding protein in tears and is thought to have an important role in stabilizing the Meibomian lipid layer by transferring lipids to it from the aqueous layer or ocular surface, or by adsorbing to it directly. These possible roles have been investigated in vitro using human Tlc. Tlc was purified from human tears by size exclusion chromatography followed by ion exchange chromatography. Three additional samples of the Tlc were prepared by lipidation, delipidation, and relipidation. The lipids extracted from the purified Tlc were analyzed by HPLC-MS followed by fragmentation. Adsorption of these different forms of Tlc to a human Meibomian lipid film spread on the surface of an artificial tear buffer in a Langmuir trough were observed by recording changes in the pressure with time (Pi-T profile) and monitoring the appearance of the film microscopically. These results were compared with similar experiments using a bovine Meibomian lipid film. The results indicated that Tlc binds slowly to a human Meibomian lipid film compared with lysozyme or lactoferrin, even at 37 degrees C. The adsorption of Tlc to a human Meibomian lipid film was very different from its adsorption to a bovine Meibomian lipid film, indicating the nature of the lipids in the film is critical to the adsorption process. Similarly, the different forms of Tlc had quite distinct adsorption patterns, as indicated both by changes in Pi-T profiles and the microscopic appearance of the films. It was concluded that human Tlc was capable of adsorbing to and penetrating into a Meibomian lipid layer, but this process is very complex and depends on both the types of lipids bound to Tlc and the lipid complement comprising the Meibomian lipid film.

  18. Adsorption of Human Tear Lipocalin to Human Meibomian Lipid Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Thomas J.; Mudgil, Poonam; Butovich, Igor A.; Palaniappan, Chendur K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Tear lipocalin (Tlc) is a major lipid binding protein in tears and is thought to have an important role in stabilizing the Meibomian lipid layer by transferring lipids to it from the aqueous layer or ocular surface, or by adsorbing to it directly. These possible roles have been investigated in vitro using human Tlc. Methods Tlc was purified from human tears by size exclusion chromatography followed by ion exchange chromatography. Three additional samples of the Tlc were prepared by lipidation, delipidation, and relipidation. The lipids extracted from the purified Tlc were analyzed by HPLC-MS followed by fragmentation. Adsorption of these different forms of Tlc to a human Meibomian lipid film spread on the surface of an artificial tear buffer in a Langmuir trough were observed by recording changes in the pressure with time (∏-T profile) and monitoring the appearance of the film microscopically. These results were compared with similar experiments using a bovine Meibomian lipid film. Results The results indicated that Tlc binds slowly to a human Meibomian lipid film compared with lysozyme or lactoferrin, even at 37°C. The adsorption of Tlc to a human Meibomian lipid film was very different from its adsorption to a bovine Meibomian lipid film, indicating the nature of the lipids in the film is critical to the adsorption process. Similarly, the different forms of Tlc had quite distinct adsorption patterns, as indicated both by changes in ∏-T profiles and the microscopic appearance of the films. Conclusions It was concluded that human Tlc was capable of adsorbing to and penetrating into a Meibomian lipid layer, but this process is very complex and depends on both the types of lipids bound to Tlc and the lipid complement comprising the Meibomian lipid film. PMID:18757516

  19. Characterization of the Lateral Distribution of Fluorescent Lipid in Binary-Constituent Lipid Monolayers by Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István P. Sugár

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid lateral organization in binary-constituent monolayers consisting of fluorescent and nonfluorescent lipids has been investigated by acquiring multiple emission spectra during measurement of each force-area isotherm. The emission spectra reflect BODIPY-labeled lipid surface concentration and lateral mixing with different nonfluorescent lipid species. Using principal component analysis (PCA each spectrum could be approximated as the linear combination of only two principal vectors. One point on a plane could be associated with each spectrum, where the coordinates of the point are the coefficients of the linear combination. Points belonging to the same lipid constituents and experimental conditions form a curve on the plane, where each point belongs to a different mole fraction. The location and shape of the curve reflects the lateral organization of the fluorescent lipid mixed with a specific nonfluorescent lipid. The method provides massive data compression that preserves and emphasizes key information pertaining to lipid distribution in different lipid monolayer phases. Collectively, the capacity of PCA for handling large spectral data sets, the nanoscale resolution afforded by the fluorescence signal, and the inherent versatility of monolayers for characterization of lipid lateral interactions enable significantly enhanced resolution of lipid lateral organizational changes induced by different lipid compositions.

  20. Exercise Intensity Modulation of Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio S. Lira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid metabolism in the liver is complex and involves the synthesis and secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL, ketone bodies, and high rates of fatty acid oxidation, synthesis, and esterification. Exercise training induces several changes in lipid metabolism in the liver and affects VLDL secretion and fatty acid oxidation. These alterations are even more conspicuous in disease, as in obesity, and cancer cachexia. Our understanding of the mechanisms leading to metabolic adaptations in the liver as induced by exercise training has advanced considerably in the recent years, but much remains to be addressed. More recently, the adoption of high intensity exercise training has been put forward as a means of modulating hepatic metabolism. The purpose of the present paper is to summarise and discuss the merit of such new knowledge.

  1. Lipid-Based Passivation in Nanofluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Stretching DNA in nanochannels is a useful tool for direct, visual studies of genomic DNA at the single molecule level. To facilitate the study of the interaction of linear DNA with proteins in nanochannels, we have implemented a highly effective passivation scheme based on lipid bilayers. We demonstrate virtually complete long-term passivation of nanochannel surfaces to a range of relevant reagents, including streptavidin-coated quantum dots, RecA proteins, and RecA–DNA complexes. We show that the performance of the lipid bilayer is significantly better than that of standard bovine serum albumin-based passivation. Finally, we show how the passivated devices allow us to monitor single DNA cleavage events during enzymatic degradation by DNase I. We expect that our approach will open up for detailed, systematic studies of a wide range of protein–DNA interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:22432814

  2. Solid lipid nanoparticles: A drug carrier system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi R Kokardekar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN are a type of nanoparticles. They are submicron colloidal carriers which are composed of physiological lipids, dispersed in water or in aqueous surfactant solutions. SLN have wide range of advantages over other types of nanoparticles. These include availability of large-scale production methods and no signs of cytotoxicity, which are main hindrances in the application of other types of nanoparticles. Hot and cold homogenization techniques are mainly employed for its production. They are mainly evaluated on the basis of their drug release profile and particle internal structure. The products based on SLN are under development. They have a very wide range of applications in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. They can be applied for any purpose, for which nanoparticles have a distinct advantage. Thus, SLN can be used extensively as an alternative to the existing drug carrier systems, providing more flexibility with respect to the area of applications and also aspects for commercialization.

  3. Consistent thermodynamic properties of lipids systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunico, Larissa; Ceriani, Roberta; Sarup, Bent

    different pressures, with azeotrope behavior observed. Available thermodynamic consistency tests for TPx data were applied before performing parameter regressions for Wilson, NRTL, UNIQUAC and original UNIFAC models. The relevance of enlarging experimental databank of lipids systems data in order to improve......Physical and thermodynamic properties of pure components and their mixtures are the basic requirement for process design, simulation, and optimization. In the case of lipids, our previous works[1-3] have indicated a lack of experimental data for pure components and also for their mixtures...... the performance of predictive thermodynamic models was confirmed in this work by analyzing the calculated values of original UNIFAC model. For solid-liquid equilibrium (SLE) data, new consistency tests have been developed [2]. Some of the developed tests were based in the quality tests proposed for VLE data...

  4. Glioblastoma Multiforme and Lipid Nanocapsules: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio-Blanco, Juan; Torres-Suárez, Ana-Isabel

    2015-08-01

    Epidemiological data on central nervous system disorders call for a focus on the major hindrance to brain drug delivery, blood-central nervous system barriers. Otherwise, there is little chance of improving the short-term survival of patients with diseases such as glioblastoma multiforme, which is one of the brain disorders associated with many years of life lost. Targetable nanocarriers for treating malignant gliomas are a unique way to overcome low chemotherapeutic levels at target sites devoid of systemic toxicity. This review describes the currently available targetable nanocarriers, focusing particularly on one of the newest nanocarriers, lipid nanocapsules. All of the strategies that are likely to be exploited by lipid nanocapsules to bypass blood-central nervous system barriers, including the most recent targeting approaches (mesenchymal cells), and novel administration routes (convection enhanced delivery) are discussed, together with their most remarkable achievements in glioma-implanted animal models. Although these systems are promising, much research remains to be done in this field.

  5. Ageing mechanisms and associated lipid changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolovou, Genovefa; Katsiki, Niki; Pavlidis, Antonis; Bilianou, Helen; Goumas, George; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2014-01-01

    Ageing is related to slowdown/breakdown of the somatotropic axis (i.e. the somatopause) leading to many physiological changes. The somatopause is accompanied by DNA and other macromolecule damage, and is characterized by a progressive decline in vitality and tissue function. We still do not have a definitive understanding of the mechanism( s) of ageing. Several overlapping theories have been proposed such as: 1) The free radical theory, 2) Mitochondrial Ageing, 3) The Glycation Theory, 4) Protein Damage and Maintenance in Ageing, and, 5) DNA Damage and Repair. Furthermore, several models of ageing were introduced such as genetically programmed senescence, telomere shortening, genomic instability, heterochromatin loss, altered epigenetic patterns and long lived cells. There are certain lipid modifications associated with the somatopause, characterized mainly by an increase in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels in both genders. In this review we consider the mechanisms of ageing and the associated changes in lipid metabolism according to gender.

  6. Effects of gamma radiation on fish lipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofyan, R [National Atomic Energy Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia). Pasar Djumat Research Centre

    1982-04-01

    Investigations on the changes of free fatty acid (FFA) value and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) value of fish muscle lipids during chilled storage were carried out. Experimental results showed significant increases in FFA and TBA values during storage. The FFA and TBA values of unirradiated fish were also determined. It was observed that radiation treatments at doses of 2.5 and 5.0 kGy gave no significant effects on FFA values. On the other hand the TBA values of irradiated samples were significantly higher than those of unirradiated samples, indicating that oxidative changes have occured due to radiation. TLC investigations on muscle nonpolar-, phospho- and glycolipids of control and fish samples, irradiated at doses up to 10 kGy revealed that the lipid components or irradiated fish were identical with those of control.

  7. Binding of Serotonin to Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Wang, Chunhua; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a prevalent neurotransmitter throughout the animal kingdom. It exerts its effect through the specific binding to the serotonin receptor, but recent research has suggested that neural transmission may also be affected by its nonspecific interactions...... with the lipid matrix of the synaptic membrane. However, membrane–5-HT interactions remain controversial and superficially investigated. Fundamental knowledge of this interaction appears vital in discussions of putative roles of 5-HT, and we have addressed this by thermodynamic measurements and molecular...... dynamics (MD) simulations. 5-HT was found to interact strongly with lipid bilayers (partitioning coefficient ∼1200 in mole fraction units), and this is highly unusual for a hydrophilic solute like 5-HT which has a bulk, oil–water partitioning coefficient well below unity. It follows that membrane affinity...

  8. Self-assembled tethered bimolecular lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Ritz, Sandra; Naumann, Renate; Schiller, Stefan; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the strategies developed in our group for designing, constructing and structurally and functionally characterizing tethered bimolecular lipid membranes (tBLM). We introduce this platform as a novel model membrane system that complements the existing ones, for example, Langmuir monolayers, vesicular liposomal dispersions and bimolecular ("black") lipid membranes. Moreover, it offers the additional advantage of allowing for studies of the influence of membrane structure and order on the function of integral proteins, for example, on how the composition and organization of lipids in a mixed membrane influence the ion translocation activity of integral channel proteins. The first strategy that we introduce concerns the preparation of tethered monolayers by the self-assembly of telechelics. Their molecular architecture with a headgroup, a spacer unit (the "tether") and the amphiphile that mimics the lipid molecule allows them to bind specifically to the solid support thus forming the proximal layer of the final architecture. After fusion of vesicles that could contain reconstituted proteins from a liposomal dispersion in contact to this monolayer the tethered bimolecular lipid membrane is obtained. This can then be characterized by a broad range of surface analytical techniques, including surface plasmon spectroscopies, the quartz crystal microbalance, fluorescence and IR spectroscopies, and electrochemical techniques, to mention a few. It is shown that this concept allows for the construction of tethered lipid bilayers with outstanding electrical properties including resistivities in excess of 10 MOmega cm2. A modified strategy uses the assembly of peptides as spacers that couple covalently via their engineered sulfhydryl or lipoic acid groups at the N-terminus to the employed gold substrate, while their C-terminus is being activated afterward for the coupling of, for example, dimyristoylphosphatidylethanol amine (DMPE) lipid molecules

  9. The role of lipids in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Baran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis, affecting 2–4% of the world’s population, is a chronic recurrent inflammatory skin disease. Its multifactorial aetiopathogenesis consists of, for example, abnormal epidermal proliferation, immune disturbances, and genetic, psychosomatic, environmental and hormonal factors. Psoriasis is also considered to be a systemic disorder closely associated with cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, obesity or metabolic syndrome. Lipids have a variety of biological functions. They participate not only in energy storage and expenditure or the formation of cell membranes, but also in inflammatory and metabolic signalling pathways. Disturbances in their homeostasis lead to the development of immunometabolic disorders, including psoriasis. Based on the available literature, this article presents selected molecular and clinical aspects involved in the multidirectional effect of lipids on psoriasis.

  10. Structures and shear response of lipid monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, P.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1993-02-01

    This report discusses our work during the last 3 years using x-ray diffraction and shear measurements to study lipid monolayers (membranes). The report is divided into: (1) structure: phase diagram of saturated fatty acid Langmuir monolayers, effect of head group interactions, studies of transferred monolayers (LB films); (2) mechanical properties: fiber=optic capillary wave probe and centrosymmetric trough, mechanical behavior of heneicosanoic acid monolayer phases

  11. Stabilization of Lipid Membranes With Dendritic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Langmuir - Blodgett (Takamato, et al., 2001) and solution techniques (Johnson, et al., 2002). However, BLMs are too unstable to be used to make effective...J.A., Ivanova, A.T., Schwartz, D.K., Yang, T., and Cremer, P.S., 2001: Stable Ordering in Langmuir - Blodgett Films, Science, 293, 1292-1295. Tully...Various dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers were evaluated. In addition, lipids with different head groups were used to probe the underlying

  12. Collection and conversion of algal lipid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Chieh

    Sustainable economic activities mandate a significant replacement of fossil energy by renewable forms. Algae-derived biofuels are increasingly seen as an alternative source of energy with potential to supplement the world's ever increasing demand. Our primary objective is, once the algae were cultivated, to eliminate or make more efficient energy-intensive processing steps of collection, drying, grinding, and solvent extraction prior to conversion. To overcome the processing barrier, we propose to streamline from cultivated algae to biodiesel via algal biomass collection by sand filtration, cell rupturing with ozone, and immediate transesterification. To collect the algal biomass, the specific Chlorococcum aquaticum suspension was acidified to pH 3.3 to promote agglomeration prior to sand filtration. The algae-loaded filter bed was drained of free water and added with methanol and ozonated for 2 min to rupture cell membrane to accelerate release of the cellular contents. The methanol solution now containing the dissolved lipid product was collected by draining, while the filter bed was regenerated by further ozonation when needed. The results showed 95% collection of the algal biomass from the suspension and a 16% yield of lipid from the algae, as well as restoration of filtration velocity of the sand bed via ozonation. The results further showed increased lipid yield upon cell rupturing and transesterified products composed entirely of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) compounds, demonstrating that the rupture and transesterification processes could proceed consecutively in the same medium, requiring no separate steps of drying, extraction, and conversion. The FAME products from algae without exposure to ozone were mainly of 16 to 18 carbons containing up to 3 double bonds, while those from algae having been ozonated were smaller, highly saturated hydrocarbons. The new technique streamlines individual steps from cultivated algal lipid to transesterified products and

  13. microRNAs and lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Binod; Singh, Abhishek K.; Rotllan, Noemi; Price, Nathan; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Work over the last decade has identified the important role of microRNAs (miRNAS) in regulating lipoprotein metabolism and associated disorders including metabolic syndrome, obesity and atherosclerosis. This review summarizes the most recent findings in the field, highlighting the contribution of miRNAs in controlling low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Recent findings A number of miRNAs have emerged as important regulators of lipid metabolism, including miR-122 and miR-33. Work over the last two years has identified additional functions of miR-33 including the regulation of macrophage activation and mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, it has recently been shown that miR-33 regulates vascular homeostasis and cardiac adaptation in response to pressure overload. In addition to miR-33 and miR-122, recent GWAS have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the proximity of miRNAs genes associated with abnormal levels of circulating lipids in humans. Several of these miRNA, such as miR-148a and miR-128-1, target important proteins that regulate cellular cholesterol metabolism, including the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and the ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1). Summary microRNAs have emerged as critical regulators of cholesterol metabolism and promising therapeutic targets for treating cardiometabolic disorders including atherosclerosis. Here, we discuss the recent findings in the field highlighting the novel mechanisms by which miR-33 controls lipid metabolism and atherogenesis and the identification of novel miRNAs that regulate LDL metabolism. Finally, we summarize the recent findings that identified miR-33 as an important non-coding RNA that controls cardiovascular homeostasis independent of its role in regulating lipid metabolism. PMID:28333713

  14. Probing Lipid Bilayers under Ionic Imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiaqi; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2016-12-06

    Biological membranes are normally under a resting transmembrane potential (TMP), which originates from the ionic imbalance between extracellular fluids and cytosols, and serves as electric power storage for cells. In cell electroporation, the ionic imbalance builds up a high TMP, resulting in the poration of cell membranes. However, the relationship between ionic imbalance and TMP is not clearly understood, and little is known about the effect of ionic imbalance on the structure and dynamics of biological membranes. In this study, we used coarse-grained molecular dynamics to characterize a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer system under ionic imbalances ranging from 0 to ∼0.06 e charges per lipid (e/Lip). We found that the TMP displayed three distinct regimes: 1) a linear regime between 0 and 0.045 e/Lip, where the TMP increased linearly with ionic imbalance; 2) a yielding regime between ∼0.045 and 0.060 e/Lip, where the TMP displayed a plateau; and 3) a poration regime above ∼0.060 e/Lip, where we observed pore formation within the sampling time (80 ns). We found no structural changes in the linear regime, apart from a nonlinear increase in the area per lipid, whereas in the yielding regime the bilayer exhibited substantial thinning, leading to an excess of water and Na + within the bilayer, as well as significant misalignment of the lipid tails. In the poration regime, lipid molecules diffused slightly faster. We also found that the fluid-to-gel phase transition temperature of the bilayer dropped below the normal value with increased ionic imbalances. Our results show that a high ionic imbalance can substantially alter the essential properties of the bilayer, making the bilayer more fluid like, or conversely, depolarization of a cell could in principle lead to membrane stiffening. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biosynthesis of lipids by bovine meibomian glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolattukudy, P.E.; Rogers, L.M.; Nicolaides, N.

    1985-01-01

    Isolated bovine meibomian glands incorporated exogenous [1- 14 C]acetate into lipids. Thin layer chromatographic analysis of the lipids showed that wax esters and sterol esters contained 61% of the total label. Radio gas liquid chromatographic analysis of the acid and alcohol moieties of both ester fractions showed the label was distributed equally between the two portions of the ester in both cases. Cholesterol and 5-alpha-cholest-7-en-3 beta-ol were the major labeled sterols, and anteiso-C25, anteiso-C27 and anteiso-C23 were the most highly labeled alcohols. The major labeled fatty acids in the wax esters were anteiso-C15, n-C16, anteiso-C17 and n-C18:1, whereas anteiso-C25 and anteiso-C27 were the major labeled acids in the sterol esters. The diester region with 6% of the total label contained labeled fatty acids and fatty alcohols each with anteiso-C25 as the major component and omega-hydroxy acids in which n-C32:1 was the major labeled component. The triglyceride fraction which contained 8% of the total lipids was composed of labeled fatty acids similar to those found in both sterol and wax ester fractions. Chromatographic analyses of the labeled lipids derived from exogenous labeled isoleucine showed that anteiso-branched products were preferentially labeled. The labeled triglyceride fraction derived from [U- 14 C] isoleucine also contained esterified C15, C13, C11, C9, C7 and possibly shorter anteiso-branched acids

  16. Gemfibrozil, stretching arms beyond lipid lowering

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Avik; Pahan, Kalipada

    2009-01-01

    Gemfibrozil is long known for its ability to reduce the level of triglycerides in the blood circulation and to decrease the risk of hyperlipidemia. However, a number of recent studies reveal that apart from its lipid-lowering effects, gemfibrozil can also regulate many other signaling pathways responsible for inflammation, switching of T-helper cells, cell-to-cell contact, migration, and oxidative stress. In this review, we have made an honest attempt to analyze various biological activities ...

  17. Antimicrobial role of human meibomian lipids at the ocular surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Poonam

    2014-10-14

    Human meibomian lipids form the outermost lipid layer of the tear film and serve many important functions to maintain its integrity. Although not investigated earlier, these lipids may have antimicrobial properties that help in strengthening the innate host defense of tears at the ocular surface. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial role of human meibomian lipids. Ocular pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus 31, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 19, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 20, and Serratia marcescens 35, were grown in the presence and absence of human meibomian lipids in an artificial tear solution at the physiological temperature. Viable counts were obtained to note the number of bacteria surviving the treatment with meibomian lipids. Bacterial cells were imaged using scanning electron microscopy to observe the damages caused by meibomian lipids. Viable count results showed that in the presence of meibomian lipids, growth of all bacteria was considerably lower. Scanning electron microscopy showed that meibomian lipids caused extensive cellular damage to bacteria as manifested in smaller size, loss of aggregation, abnormal phenotype, cellular distortion, damaged cell wall, and cell lysis. This is the first-ever report of the antimicrobial role of human meibomian lipids. These lipids possess antimicrobial properties against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and are involved in the innate host defense of tears in protecting the ocular surface against microbial pathogens. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  18. Lipid dip-pen nanolithography on self-assembled monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavutis, Martynas; Navikas, Vytautas; Rakickas, Tomas; Vaitekonis, Šarūnas; Valiokas, Ramūnas

    2016-01-01

    Dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) with lipids as an ink enables functional micro/nanopatterning on different substrates at high process speeds. However, only a few studies have addressed the influence of the physicochemical properties of the surface on the structure and phase behavior of DPN-printed lipid assemblies. Therefore, by combining the scanning probe and optical imaging techniques in this work we have analyzed lipid microdomain formation on the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold as well-defined model surfaces that displayed hydrophilic (protein-repellent) or hydrophobic (protein-adhesive) characteristics. We have found that on the tri(ethylene glycol)-terminated SAM the lipid ink transfer was fast (∼10 –1 μm 3 s −1 ), quasi-linear and it yielded unstable, sparsely packed lipid microspots. Contrary to this, on the methyl-terminated SAM the lipid transfer was ∼20 times slower, nonlinear, and the obtained stable dots of ∼1 μm in diameter consisted of lipid multilayers. Our comparative analysis indicated that the measured lipid transfer was consistent with the previously reported so-called polymer transfer model (Felts et al 2012, Nanotechnology 23 215301). Further on, by employing the observed distinct contrast in the DPN ink behavior we constructed confined lipid microdomains on pre-patterned SAMs, in which the lipids assembled either into monolayer or multilamellar phases. Such microdomains can be further utilized for lipid membrane mimetics in microarray and lab-on-a-chip device formats. (paper)

  19. Lipid imaging by mass spectrometry - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gode, David; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2013-03-07

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has proven to be extremely useful for applications such as the spatial analysis of peptides and proteins in biological tissue, the performance assessment of drugs in vivo or the measurement of protein or metabolite expression as tissue classifiers or biomarkers from disease versus control tissue comparisons. The most popular MSI technique is MALDI mass spectrometry. First invented by Richard Caprioli in the mid-1990s, it is the highest performing MSI technique in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity for intact biomolecules and application range today. The unique ability to identify and spatially resolve numerous compounds simultaneously, based on m/z values has inter alia been applied to untargeted and targeted chemical mapping of biological compartments, revealing changes of physiological states, disease pathologies and metabolic faith and distribution of xenobiotics. Many MSI applications focus on lipid species because of the lipids' diverse roles as structural components of cell membranes, their function in the surfactant cycle, and their involvement as second messengers in signalling cascades of tissues and cells. This article gives a comprehensive overview of lipid imaging techniques and applications using established MALDI and SIMS methods but also other promising MSI techniques such as DESI.

  20. Applications of lipid nanoparticles in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Solinís, María Ángeles; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia

    2016-12-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) have been recognized, among the large number of non-viral vectors for gene transfection, as an effective and safety alternative to potentially treat both genetic and not genetic diseases. A key feature is the possibility to be designed to overcome the numerous challenges for successful gene delivery. Lipid nanoparticles (LNs) are able to overcome the main biological barriers for cell transfection, including degradation by nucleases, cell internalization intracellular trafficking, and selectively targeting to a specific cell type. Additionally, they present important advantages: from a safety point of view LNs are prepared with well tolerated components, and from a technological point of view, they can be easily produced at large-scale, can be subjected to sterilization and lyophilization, and have shown good storage stability. This review focuses on the potential of SLNs and NLCs for gene therapy, including the main advances in their application for the treatment of ocular diseases, infectious diseases, lysosomal storage disorders and cancer, and current research for their future clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.