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Sample records for links patient support

  1. Patient support systems

    Braden, A.B.; McBride, T.R.; Styblo, D.J.; Taylor, S.K.; Richey, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    A patient support system for use in computerized tomography (CT) is described. The system is particularly useful for CT scanning of the brain and also of the abdominal area. The support system consists of two moveable tables which may be translated into position for X-ray scanning of the patient's body and which may be translated incrementally and automatically to obtain scans at adjacent locations. For use with brain scans, the second table is replaced by a detachable restraint assembly which is described in detail. The support system is so designed that only a small volume of low density material will intercept the X-ray beam. (UK)

  2. Patients requests and needs for culturally and individually adapted supportive care in type 2 diabetes patients: A comparative study between Nordic and non-Nordic patients in a social economical vulnerable area of Linköping, Sweden.

    Staff, Angelica; Garvin, Peter; Wiréhn, Ann-Britt; Yngman-Uhlin, Pia

    2017-12-01

    This study sought to determine and compare the metabolic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in non-Nordic immigrants and native Nordics. The aim was also to describe and compare the request of supportive care between these two groups. One hundred and eighty-four patients (n=184) coming to a routine check-up in a primary healthcare setting (PHC), were consecutively enrolled to the study during a period of one year. Data on therapeutic interventions, clinical measurements, healthcare consumption, and adherence to standard diabetes healthcare program were extracted from the patientś medical record. Structured interviews on supportive care were conducted by diabetes trained nurses. If needed, a qualified interpreter was used. Comparisons were made between Nordic patients (n=151) and non-Nordic patients (n=33). Among T2DM patients in a setting of PHC, there was a difference in meeting the metabolic target HbA1c, between native Nordics and non-Nordic immigrants. There was also a difference in request on supportive care. The non-Nordic group significantly requested more and different supportive care. They also attended the standard diabetes program to a lesser degree. Culturally/individually adapted prevention is not only medically warranted but also requested by the patients themselves. Copyright © 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Microwave Photonics Techniques Supporting Flexible Wireless Communications Links

    Rommel, Simon; Cavalcante, Lucas Costa Pereira; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    Wireless data communication links supporting the next generation 5G and beyond mobile networking face a set of engineering challenges related to the mandatory operation at mmw and higher frequency bands, provide capacities above 10 Gb/s, satisfy latency, robustness, flexibility and low complexity...

  4. Nutritional support of reptile patients.

    De Voe, Ryan S

    2014-05-01

    Providing nutritional support to reptile patients is a challenging and often misunderstood task. Ill reptiles are frequently anorexic and can benefit greatly from appropriate nutrition delivered via a variety of assist-feeding techniques. Neonatal reptiles can also be very challenging patients because many fail to thrive without significant efforts to establish normal feeding behaviors. This article presents ideas supporting the benefit of timely nutritional support as well as specific recommendations for implementation of assist feeding. Also discussed are a few nutritional issues that affect captive reptile species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Patient positioning and supporting arrangement

    Heavens, M.; James, R.C.; Slinn, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    This patent specification describes an E.M.I. claim relating to a patient positioning and support arrangement for a computerised axial tomography system, the arrangement comprising a curved platter upon which the patient can be disposed, a table having a curved groove to accommodate the platter, and means for driving the platter slidably along the groove; the platter being formed of a substantially rigid platform shaped to conform to the groove, and a shroud, secured to the platter and disposed between the platter and the surface of the groove, so as to permit the platter to slide smoothly. (U.K.)

  6. Practice insights on patient care-management overview for chemoradiation toxic mucositis-guidelines, guideline-supported therapies and high potency polymerized cross-linked sucralfate (ProThelial).

    McCullough, Ricky W

    2018-01-01

    Aim To offer a practice insight for the management of chemoradiation toxic mucositis. Method Review chemoradiation toxic mucositis, its pathobiology and breadth of symptom presentation. Review mucositis guidelines and guideline-supported anti-mucositis therapies. Offer guidance on guidelines and an abbreviated review of high potency cross-linked sucralfate for management of chemoradiation toxic mucositis. Result There are six major mucositis guidelines but only one that is current and regularly updated. Guidelines from the Multinational Association Supportive Cancer Care suggest 14 interventions gleaned from controlled trials, 12 of which are off-label uses of therapies that offer statistically significant but incrementally beneficial outcomes. Several evidence-based limitations of guidelines are discussed. Data on high potency polymerized cross-linked sucralfate confirming complete prevention and rapid (2-3 days) elimination, sustained throughout cancer treatment is verified as high quality evidence in accordance to standards adopted by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. A 96-97% reduction in mucositis duration qualifies as a positive Glasziou treatment effect, which is discussed as an additional measure of evidence-based medicine. Conclusion Statistically significant but fractional treatment effects of guideline-supported interventions are not likely to substantially alter the course of mucositis when it occurs nor completely prevent its onset. Complete prevention and rapid sustained elimination should be the goal, therefore high potency polymerized cross-linked sucralfate may be useful. Where guidelines fail, institution-based protocols led by oncology pharmacists could succeed. In an effort to eliminate toxic mucositis, enhance compliance to chemoradiation regimens, and improve survival, such protocols for practice may verify pharmacoeconomic benefits, if any, in using high potency polymerized cross-linked sucralfate to manage toxic mucositis.

  7. A hybrid linked data approach to support asset management

    Luiten, G.T.; Bohms, H.M.; O'Keeffe, A.; Nederveen, S. van; Bakker, J.; Wikstrom, L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates experiences with applying a linked data approach for coping with the many challenges for information management in asset management from the perspective of National Road Authorities (NRAs). As influential players, NRAs are often the initiators of innovation in the civil

  8. Self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: can they successfully prevent and treat diabetes?

    Kaufman, Neal D; Woodley, Paula D Patnoe

    2011-05-01

    Patients with diabetes need a complex set of services and supports. The challenge of integrating these services into the diabetes regimen can be successfully overcome through self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: self-management support because patients need help mastering the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors so necessary for good outcomes; interventions because comprehensive theory-based, evidence-proven, long-term, longitudinal interventions work better than direct-to-consumer or nonplanned health promotion approaches; clinically linked because patients are more likely to adopt new behaviors when the approach is in the context of a trusted therapeutic relationship and within an effective medical care system; and technology enabled because capitalizing on the amazing power of information technology leads to the delivery of cost-effective, scalable, engaging solutions that prevent and manage diabetes. © 2011 Diabetes Technology Society.

  9. Supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients

    Azad Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A supportive needs assessment is an essential component of any care program. There is no research evidence regarding the supportive care needs of cancer patients in Iran or other Middle Eastern countries. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a referral medical center in the northwest of Iran. A total of 274 cancer patients completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-59. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: In 18 items of the SCNS, more than 50% of the participants reported that their needs were unmet. Most frequently, unmet needs were related to the health system, information, physical, and daily living domains, and most met needs were related to sexuality, patient care, and support domains. Conclusions: Iranian cancer patients experience many unmet needs and there is an urgent need for establishing additional supportive care services in Iran.

  10. Clarifying the links between social support and health: culture, stress, and neuroticism matter.

    Park, Jiyoung; Kitayama, Shinobu; Karasawa, Mayumi; Curhan, Katherine; Markus, Hazel R; Kawakami, Norito; Miyamoto, Yuri; Love, Gayle D; Coe, Christopher L; Ryff, Carol D

    2013-02-01

    Although it is commonly assumed that social support positively predicts health, the empirical evidence has been inconsistent. We argue that three moderating factors must be considered: (1) support-approving norms (cultural context); (2) support-requiring situations (stressful events); and (3) support-accepting personal style (low neuroticism). Our large-scale cross-cultural survey of Japanese and US adults found significant associations between perceived support and health. The association was more strongly evident among Japanese (from a support-approving cultural context) who reported high life stress (in a support-requiring situation). Moreover, the link between support and health was especially pronounced if these Japanese were low in neuroticism.

  11. Perceived Social Support among Mentally Ill Patients

    Bandana Pokharel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social support is the perception that one is cared for, has assistance available from significant others and its benefit is by buffering stress by influencing the ability to adjust and live with illness. Social support can uplift the quality and subjective wellbeing of people. The objective of this study was to examine the perceived social support and factors influencing it among mentally ill patients. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out. Ninety cases aged more than 18 years visiting outpatient of psychiatric department and diagnosed as a case of mental illness for at least a year were included. Instruments used were self-developed proforma and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Interview technique was used to collect the data. Results: Majority (60% of the patients perceive social support from family, 28% of the patients perceive social support from significant others. Regression analysis showed that the perceived social support is influenced by employment status, type of family one lives in and physical illness. It is not influenced by gender, subjective financial status and frequency of hospitalization. Conclusion: Perceived social support is influenced by employment status, type of family one lives in and physical illness. Majority (60% of the patients perceive social support from family.

  12. Culture, language, and patient safety: Making the link.

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2006-10-01

    It has been well recognized internationally that hospitals are not as safe as they should be. In order to redress this situation, health care services around the world have turned their attention to strategically implementing robust patient safety and quality care programmes to identify circumstances that put patients at risk of harm and then acting to prevent or control those risks. Despite the progress that has been made in improving hospital safety in recent years, there is emerging evidence that patients of minority cultural and language backgrounds are disproportionately at risk of experiencing preventable adverse events while in hospital compared with mainstream patient groups. One reason for this is that patient safety programmes have tended to underestimate and understate the critical relationship that exists between culture, language, and the safety and quality of care of patients from minority racial, ethno-cultural, and language backgrounds. This article suggests that the failure to recognize the critical link between culture and language (of both the providers and recipients of health care) and patient safety stands as a 'resident pathogen' within the health care system that, if not addressed, unacceptably exposes patients from minority ethno-cultural and language backgrounds to preventable adverse events in hospital contexts. It is further suggested that in order to ensure that minority as well as majority patient interests in receiving safe and quality care are properly protected, the culture-language-patient-safety link needs to be formally recognized and the vulnerabilities of patients from minority cultural and language backgrounds explicitly identified and actively addressed in patient safety systems and processes.

  13. A Curriculum-Linked Professional Development Approach to Support Teachers' Adoption of Web GIS Tectonics Investigations

    Bodzin, Alec; Anastasio, David; Sahagian, Dork; Henry, Jill Burrows

    2016-01-01

    A curriculum-linked professional development approach designed to support middle level science teachers' understandings about tectonics and geospatial pedagogical content knowledge was developed. This approach takes into account limited face-to-face professional development time and instead provides pedagogical support within the design of a…

  14. Extracorporeal respiratory support in adult patients

    Thiago Gomes Romano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In patients with severe respiratory failure, either hypoxemic or hypercapnic, life support with mechanical ventilation alone can be insufficient to meet their needs, especially if one tries to avoid ventilator settings that can cause injury to the lungs. In those patients, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, which is also very effective in removing carbon dioxide from the blood, can provide life support, allowing the application of protective lung ventilation. In this review article, we aim to explore some of the most relevant aspects of using ECMO for respiratory support. We discuss the history of respiratory support using ECMO in adults, as well as the clinical evidence; costs; indications; installation of the equipment; ventilator settings; daily care of the patient and the system; common troubleshooting; weaning; and discontinuation.

  15. Childhood Social Anxiety and Social Support-Seeking: Distinctive Links with Perceived Support from Teachers

    Leeves, Sylvia; Banerjee, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Social support-seeking is recognised as an important strategy used by children to cope with negative emotions. However, there are important gaps in our knowledge about children's perceptions of different sources of social support, and the associations that these perceptions have with individual differences in socio-emotional functioning. The…

  16. Participation in online patient support groups endorses patients' empowerment

    van Uden-Kraan, C. F.; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, E; Seydel, E. R.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    Objective: Although much has been expected of the empowering effect of taking part in online patient support groups, there is no direct evidence thus far for the effects of participation on patient empowerment. Hence our exploring to what extent patients feel empowered by their participation in

  17. Diaspora and peer support working: benefits of and challenges for the Butabika-East London Link.

    Baillie, Dave; Aligawesa, Mariam; Birabwa-Oketcho, Harriet; Hall, Cerdic; Kyaligonza, David; Mpango, Richard; Mulimira, Moses; Boardman, Jed

    2015-02-01

    The International Health Partnership ('the Link') between the East London NHS Foundation Trust and Butabika Hospital in Uganda was set up in 2005. It has facilitated staff exchanges and set up many workstreams (e.g. in child and adolescent psychiatry, nursing and psychology) and projects (e.g. a peer support worker project and a violence reduction programme). The Link has been collaborative and mutually beneficial. The authors describe benefits and challenges at individual and organisational levels. Notably, the Link has achieved a commitment to service user involvement and an increasingly central involvement of the Ugandan diaspora working in mental health in the UK.

  18. Multi-purpose HealthCare Telemedicine Systems with mobile communication link support

    Karayiannis D

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The provision of effective emergency telemedicine and home monitoring solutions are the major fields of interest discussed in this study. Ambulances, Rural Health Centers (RHC or other remote health location such as Ships navigating in wide seas are common examples of possible emergency sites, while critical care telemetry and telemedicine home follow-ups are important issues of telemonitoring. In order to support the above different growing application fields we created a combined real-time and store and forward facility that consists of a base unit and a telemedicine (mobile unit. This integrated system: can be used when handling emergency cases in ambulances, RHC or ships by using a mobile telemedicine unit at the emergency site and a base unit at the hospital-expert's site, enhances intensive health care provision by giving a mobile base unit to the ICU doctor while the telemedicine unit remains at the ICU patient site and enables home telemonitoring, by installing the telemedicine unit at the patient's home while the base unit remains at the physician's office or hospital. The system allows the transmission of vital biosignals (3–12 lead ECG, SPO2, NIBP, IBP, Temp and still images of the patient. The transmission is performed through GSM mobile telecommunication network, through satellite links (where GSM is not available or through Plain Old Telephony Systems (POTS where available. Using this device a specialist doctor can telematically "move" to the patient's site and instruct unspecialized personnel when handling an emergency or telemonitoring case. Due to the need of storing and archiving of all data interchanged during the telemedicine sessions, we have equipped the consultation site with a multimedia database able to store and manage the data collected by the system. The performance of the system has been technically tested over several telecommunication means; in addition the system has been clinically validated in three

  19. Support needs of Chinese immigrant cancer patients.

    Leng, Jennifer; Lee, Trevor; Li, Yanjun; Stern, Charles; Chen, Mei Hsuan; Winkel, Gary; Gany, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    To enable better psychosocial, informational, and practical support of Chinese patients with cancer, this study was conducted to identify the specific support needs of Chinese immigrant cancer patients. The Cancer Portal Project at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's Center for Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities is a patient navigation program that assists underserved and minority cancer patients in obtaining social and economic assistance at ten New York City cancer clinics. This need assessment was conducted as part of the Portal Project. Sixty-four questions were added to the existing Portal Intake Form about the needs and preferences for Chinese-language support and survivorship services. Descriptive analysis was performed, as well as an exploratory principal component's factor analysis to determine if there were any patterns in the services and programs in which patients were interested. Ninety-six patients were approached for participation; 59 agreed to participate. Eighty-eight percent of participants were born in China. Ninety-seven percent preferred to speak Mandarin, Cantonese, or Fujianese in the healthcare setting. When asked about general interest in support programs, 53 % of the participants were "very interested," 27 % were "maybe interested," and 17 % were "not interested." Programs in which more participants were "very interested" included those that would provide information about obtaining financial assistance (79 %) and social assistance (74 %), information on treatment options (67 %), help in coping with the burden of illness on the family (65 %), and information about general healthcare (63 %). The factor analysis resulted in the identification of five factors: social/financial/treatment and care issues, nutrition and exercise/networking/general health care, coping with fear and stress, herbs and dietary supplements, and acupuncture and acupressure. In this study, 80 % of the participants expressed interest in programs tailored for

  20. Patient experience and hospital profitability: Is there a link?

    Richter, Jason P; Muhlestein, David B

    Patient experience has had a direct financial impact on hospitals since value-based purchasing was instituted by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services in 2013 as a method to reward or punish hospitals based on performance on various measures, including patient experience. Although other industries have shown an indirect impact of customer experience on overall profitability, that link has not been well established in the health care industry. Return-to-provider rate and perceptions of health quality have been associated with profitability in the health care industry. Our aims were to assess whether, independent of a direct financial impact, a more positive patient experience is associated with increased profitability and whether a more negative patient experience is associated with decreased profitability. We used a sample of 19,792 observations from 3767 hospitals over the 6-year period 2007-2012. The data were sourced from Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems. Using generalized estimating equations to account for repeated measures, we fit four separate models for three dependent variables: net patient revenue, net income, and operating margin. Each model included one of the following independent variables of interest: percentage of patients who definitely recommend the hospital, percentage of patients who definitely would not recommend the hospital, percentage of patients who rated the hospital 9 or 10, and percentage of patients who rated the hospital 6 or lower. We identified that a positive patient experience is associated with increased profitability and a negative patient experience is even more strongly associated with decreased profitability. Management should have greater justification for incurring costs associated with bolstering patient experience programs. Improvements in training, technology, and staffing can be justified as a way to improve not only quality but now

  1. Clarifying the links between social support and health: Culture, stress, and neuroticism matter

    Park, Jiyoung; Kitayama, Shinobu; Karasawa, Mayumi; Curhan, Katherine; Markus, Hazel R; Kawakami, Norito; Miyamoto, Yuri; Love, Gayle D; Coe, Christopher L; Ryff, Carol D

    2012-01-01

    Although it is commonly assumed that social support positively predicts health, the empirical evidence has been inconsistent. We argue that three moderating factors must be considered: (1) support-approving norms (cultural context); (2) support-requiring situations (stressful events); and (3) support-accepting personal style (low neuroticism). Our large-scale cross-cultural survey of Japanese and US adults found significant associations between perceived support and health. The association was more strongly evident among Japanese (from a support-approving cultural context) who reported high life stress (in a support-requiring situation). Moreover, the link between support and health was especially pronounced if these Japanese were low in neuroticism. PMID:22419414

  2. [Organising nutritional support for patients with anorexia].

    Satori, Nadine

    Nutritional care in the Eating Disorder unit of Sainte-Anne general hospital in Paris, is organised around a care model based on cognitive behavioural therapy. Hospitalisation is generally prepared beforehand and aims to draw on patients' resources enabling them to clarify a request for help. A care contract can be drawn up to provide step-by-step support for the patient in terms of the goals to achieve. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Preventing persistent organ support in ICU patients

    de Lange, D W; Flaatten, H

    Editorial to: Mehoff et al. Use of life support in acutely admitted ICU patients. An international cohort study. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 2017;….etc. Conflict of interest Both authors declared no conflict of interest regarding the preparation of this manuscript.

  4. Decision support for patient care: implementing cybernetics.

    Ozbolt, Judy; Ozdas, Asli; Waitman, Lemuel R; Smith, Janis B; Brennan, Grace V; Miller, Randolph A

    2004-01-01

    The application of principles and methods of cybernetics permits clinicians and managers to use feedback about care effectiveness and resource expenditure to improve quality and to control costs. Keys to the process are the specification of therapeutic goals and the creation of an organizational culture that supports the use of feedback to improve care. Daily feedback on the achievement of each patient's therapeutic goals provides tactical decision support, enabling clinicians to adjust care as needed. Monthly or quarterly feedback on aggregated goal achievement for all patients on a clinical pathway provides strategic decision support, enabling clinicians and managers to identify problems with supposed "best practices" and to test hypotheses about solutions. Work is underway at Vanderbilt University Medical Center to implement feedback loops in care and management processes and to evaluate the effects.

  5. Linking Hospital and Tax data to support research on the economic impacts of hospitalization

    Claudia Sanmartin

    2017-04-01

    This project has created a unique linked database that will support research on the economic consequences of ‘health shocks’ for individuals and their families, and the implications for income, labour and health policies. This database represents a new and unique resource that will fill an important national data gap, and enable a wide range of relevant research.

  6. Nutritional support for malnourished patients with cancer.

    Baldwin, Christine

    2011-03-01

    Cancer and its treatments frequently have a negative impact on the weight and nutritional status of patients. Weight loss is associated with reduced survival and poorer outcomes of treatment but is not well characterized and frequently confused with cachexia, which may complicate the interpretation of studies of nutritional support. The aims of this review were to examine the impact of cancer on nutritional status and to review the role of simple oral nutritional interventions and novel agents. The terms weight loss, malnutrition and cachexia refer to different entities and new definitions have recently been proposed that take account of the role of the underlying inflammatory processes. Oral nutritional interventions are widely recommended for malnourished cancer patients, but the evidence for their benefits to clinical, nutritional and patient-centred outcomes is limited. Meta-analysis has highlighted the variability in response to simple nutritional interventions of different cohorts of cancer patients and suggested that improvements in nutritional endpoints and aspects of quality of life may be achieved in some patients. Recent research has largely focused on treatments aiming to modulate the inflammatory processes associated with cachexia, but to date has not identified a single treatment with clear efficacy. Studies characterizing the potential for nutritional support in combination with anti-inflammatory agents in defined patient groups are defined to advance the evidence base in this area.

  7. Supporting the Support System: How Assessment and Communication Can Help Patients and Their Support Systems.

    Harkey, Jane; Young, Jared; Carter, Jolynne Jo; Demoratz, Michael

    The benefits of having a support system, such as social relationships with close friends and family, have been well documented for patients with serious health issues. As scientific evidence has shown, individuals who have the lowest level of involvement in social relationships face a greater mortality risk. Support systems, however, are not infallible. Relationship stress can have a negative impact on people-patient and caregiver alike-behaviorally, psychosocially, and physiologically. The purpose of this article is to encourage case managers who take a patient-centered approach to also consider the existence and extent of the support system, as well as any stresses or tensions that are observable within the support system. Although the case manager is ethically obliged to advocate for the individual receiving case management services, that advocacy can be extended to the support system for the good of all. This discussion applies to numerous case management practices and work settings including (but not limited to) hospital-based case management, home health, geriatrics, catastrophic case management, mental health, palliative care, and end of life/hospice. As part of the assessment phase of the case management process, case managers determine the extent of the patient's support system or social support network such as family and close friends. Although their advocacy is primarily for the patient receiving case management services, case managers also become aware of the needs of the support system members as they face their loved one's serious illness, severe injury, geriatric care demands, or end of life. Case managers can use their communication skills, especially motivational interviewing, with patients and their support systems to identify stresses and issues that can impact the pursuit of health goals. In addition, case managers ensure that individuals and their support systems are kept informed such as about the health condition, stage of disease, plan of

  8. Dynamic Use of Digital Library Material - Supporting Users with Typed Links in Open Hypermedia

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Yndigegn, Christian

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach to supporting digital library users in organising and annotating material. We have extended the concept of open hypermedia by introducing typed links, which support: addition of (user-defined) semantics to hypertexts, user navigation, and machine supported...... analysis and synthesis of hypermedia structures. The Webvise open hypermedia system is integrated with the World Wide Web, and has been augmented with a type system. We illustrate the potential use in the context of digital libraries with a scenario of teachers jointly preparing a course based on digital...... library material....

  9. Early nutritional support in severe traumatic patients.

    Chuntrasakul, C; Siltharm, S; Chinswangwatanakul, V; Pongprasobchai, T; Chockvivatanavanit, S; Bunnak, A

    1996-01-01

    Multiple trauma is associated with altered metabolism, wasting of the lean body mass and compromised wound healing. Nutritional support is one way to improve the condition of these critically ill patients. We performed a prospective randomized study on the effect of early nutritional support in severely injured patients admitted to the Division of Traumatic Surgery, Siriraj Hospital between June 1992 and January 1994. Thirty-eight severe traumatic patients with ISS between 20-40 were randomly divided into control and study group. The 17 patients in the control group were treated in the conventional method with administration of hypo caloric intravenous regimen and supplement with oral diet as soon as the bowel function was returned. The 21 patients of the study group were fed either by enteral or parenteral feeding or both with an appropriate caloric and protein requirement as soon as hemodynamic status was stabilized. We found the study group had a lower mortality rate, a lower complication rate, a shorter period of ICU stay, and an earlier weaning from the ventilator than the control group. The study group also lost less weight than the control group. Nitrogen balance in the study group was significantly lower than the control group.

  10. Diaspora and peer support working: benefits of and challenges for the Butabika–East London Link

    Baillie, Dave; Aligawesa, Mariam; Birabwa-Oketcho, Harriet; Hall, Cerdic; Kyaligonza, David; Mpango, Richard; Mulimira, Moses; Boardman, Jed

    2015-01-01

    The International Health Partnership (‘the Link’) between the East London NHS Foundation Trust and Butabika Hospital in Uganda was set up in 2005. It has facilitated staff exchanges and set up many workstreams (e.g. in child and adolescent psychiatry, nursing and psychology) and projects (e.g. a peer support worker project and a violence reduction programme). The Link has been collaborative and mutually beneficial. The authors describe benefits and challenges at individual and organisational levels. Notably, the Link has achieved a commitment to service user involvement and an increasingly central involvement of the Ugandan diaspora working in mental health in the UK. PMID:29093835

  11. Publication, discovery and interoperability of Clinical Decision Support Systems: A Linked Data approach.

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Pedrinaci, Carlos; Maldonado, J A; Panziera, Luca; Chen, Rong; Bellika, J Gustav

    2016-08-01

    The high costs involved in the development of Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) make it necessary to share their functionality across different systems and organizations. Service Oriented Architectures (SOA) have been proposed to allow reusing CDSS by encapsulating them in a Web service. However, strong barriers in sharing CDS functionality are still present as a consequence of lack of expressiveness of services' interfaces. Linked Services are the evolution of the Semantic Web Services paradigm to process Linked Data. They aim to provide semantic descriptions over SOA implementations to overcome the limitations derived from the syntactic nature of Web services technologies. To facilitate the publication, discovery and interoperability of CDS services by evolving them into Linked Services that expose their interfaces as Linked Data. We developed methods and models to enhance CDS SOA as Linked Services that define a rich semantic layer based on machine interpretable ontologies that powers their interoperability and reuse. These ontologies provided unambiguous descriptions of CDS services properties to expose them to the Web of Data. We developed models compliant with Linked Data principles to create a semantic representation of the components that compose CDS services. To evaluate our approach we implemented a set of CDS Linked Services using a Web service definition ontology. The definitions of Web services were linked to the models developed in order to attach unambiguous semantics to the service components. All models were bound to SNOMED-CT and public ontologies (e.g. Dublin Core) in order to count on a lingua franca to explore them. Discovery and analysis of CDS services based on machine interpretable models was performed reasoning over the ontologies built. Linked Services can be used effectively to expose CDS services to the Web of Data by building on current CDS standards. This allows building shared Linked Knowledge Bases to provide machine

  12. Dental management of patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia

    Bin-Na Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH is a hereditary metabolic disease caused by the loss of phosphate through the renal tubules into the urine, and an associated decrease in serum calcium and potassium phosphate. Its dental features include spontaneous dental abscesses that occur in the absence of trauma or dental caries. The aim of this case report was to describe the dental problems of XLH patients and to evaluate limitations in their treatment. A 14 year old male and a 38 year old female with XLH were referred to the Department of Conservative Dentistry for endodontic treatment. The dental findings were periapical abscesses without obvious trauma or caries. Conservative endodontic treatment was performed in teeth with pulp necrosis and abscess. In case 1, the treated teeth showed improvements in bone healing, without clinical symptoms. However, in case 2, the implants and the treated tooth showed hypermobility, and the final restoration was therefore postponed. Early diagnosis, periodic examinations, and communication with the patient's pediatrician are important in the dental management of patients with XLH

  13. A conceptual knowledge-link model for supporting dental implant process

    Szejka , Anderson Luis; Canciglieri , Osiris ,; Rudek , Marcelo; Panetto , Hervé

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Computer aided techniques widely used as diagnostic and surgical procedures tools are scarcely applied in implantology, which continues using visualization of CT images to define the parameters for dental implant process leaving to the dentist discretion the implant determination, since only the images analysis is non-deterministic. Thus, this research proposes the development of a knowledge-link model integrated to a reasoner system to support dental implant process t...

  14. The supportive spouse at work: Does being work-linked help?

    Ferguson, Merideth; Carlson, Dawn; Kacmar, K Michele; Halbesleben, Jonathon R B

    2016-01-01

    Using a sample of 639 dual-career couples, we examined the role of work-related spousal support on work-family balance and subsequent outcomes for both the job incumbent as well as his or her spouse. We further investigated whether the resource of work-related spousal support contributed to greater balance for those couples who were work-linked (work in same organization, same occupation, or both) and those who were not. We found work-related spousal support contributed to work-family balance and subsequent improved family satisfaction and job satisfaction of the job incumbent. Furthermore, support crossed over to the spouse through increased work-family balance to decrease stress transmission to enhance family satisfaction and reduce relationship tension of the spouse. Implications for researchers and organizational leaders are discussed. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Patient aggression perceived by community support workers.

    Gale, Christopher; Hannah, Annette; Swain, Nicola; Gray, Andrew; Coverdale, John; Oud, Nico

    2009-12-01

    Objective: Aggression by patients is a known risk factor for hospital workers. Within New Zealand, the bulk of ongoing care for physical and mental disabilities and health issues is not hospital based, but contracted to various non-governmental agencies. The rate of client aggression towards care workers from these organizations, to our knowledge, has not been assessed. Method: Two hundred and forty-two support workers in non-governmental agencies caring for people with disabilities responded to an anonymous mailed survey on client aggression, personal distress, and communication style. Results: Most support workers did experience verbal forms of aggression or destructive behaviour, fewer experienced physical aggression, and a minority were injured, sexually harassed, stalked or harassed by means of formal complaint. The median total violence score was five (interquartile range 12.25). A higher total violence score (using the POPAS-NZ) was associated with age and gender, the primary disability of clients, and the numbers of hours worked. The length of time worked was not associated with total violence risk. Communication style, after correcting for other factors, was a predictor of aggression. Almost 6% of care workers reported distress symptoms at a level associated with clinically significant stress reactions. Conclusions: Patient aggression is common among care workers, and can cause distress in the minority. We suggest that further research to clarify risk factors and develop interventions for care workers is needed.

  16. Extracorporeal respiratory support in adult patients.

    Romano, Thiago Gomes; Mendes, Pedro Vitale; Park, Marcelo; Costa, Eduardo Leite Vieira

    2017-01-01

    In patients with severe respiratory failure, either hypoxemic or hypercapnic, life support with mechanical ventilation alone can be insufficient to meet their needs, especially if one tries to avoid ventilator settings that can cause injury to the lungs. In those patients, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), which is also very effective in removing carbon dioxide from the blood, can provide life support, allowing the application of protective lung ventilation. In this review article, we aim to explore some of the most relevant aspects of using ECMO for respiratory support. We discuss the history of respiratory support using ECMO in adults, as well as the clinical evidence; costs; indications; installation of the equipment; ventilator settings; daily care of the patient and the system; common troubleshooting; weaning; and discontinuation. RESUMO Em pacientes com insuficiência respiratória grave (hipoxêmica ou hipercápnica), o suporte somente com ventilação mecânica pode ser insuficiente para suas necessidades, especialmente quando se tenta evitar o uso de parâmetros ventilatórios que possam causar danos aos pulmões. Nesses pacientes, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, oxigenação extracorpórea por membrana), que também é muito eficaz na remoção de dióxido de carbono do sangue, pode manter a vida, permitindo o uso de ventilação pulmonar protetora. No presente artigo de revisão, objetivamos explorar alguns dos aspectos mais relevantes do suporte respiratório por ECMO. Discutimos a história do suporte respiratório por ECMO em adultos; evidências clínicas; custos; indicações; instalação do equipamento; parâmetros ventilatórios; cuidado diário do paciente e do sistema; solução de problemas comuns; desmame e descontinuação.

  17. Linking patient satisfaction with nursing care: the case of care rationing - a correlational study

    2014-01-01

    Background Implicit rationing of nursing care is the withholding of or failure to carry out all necessary nursing measures due to lack of resources. There is evidence supporting a link between rationing of nursing care, nurses’ perceptions of their professional environment, negative patient outcomes, and placing patient safety at risk. The aims of the study were: a) To explore whether patient satisfaction is linked to nurse-reported rationing of nursing care and to nurses’ perceptions of their practice environment while adjusting for patient and nurse characteristics. b) To identify the threshold score of rationing by comparing the level of patient satisfaction factors across rationing levels. Methods A descriptive, correlational design was employed. Participants in this study included 352 patients and 318 nurses from ten medical and surgical units of five general hospitals. Three measurement instruments were used: the BERNCA scale for rationing of care, the RPPE scale to explore nurses’ perceptions of their work environment and the Patient Satisfaction scale to assess the level of patient satisfaction with nursing care. The statistical analysis included the use of Kendall’s correlation coefficient to explore a possible relationship between the variables and multiple regression analysis to assess the effects of implicit rationing of nursing care together with organizational characteristics on patient satisfaction. Results The mean score of implicit rationing of nursing care was 0.83 (SD = 0.52, range = 0–3), the overall mean of RPPE was 2.76 (SD = 0.32, range = 1.28 – 3.69) and the two scales were significantly correlated (τ = −0.234, p patient satisfaction, even after controlling for nurse and patient characteristics. The results from the adjusted regression models showed that even at the lowest level of rationing (i.e. 0.5) patients indicated low satisfaction. Conclusions The results support the relationships between

  18. Nutritional support in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; Puig, Celia; Soldevillla, Cristina; Barata, Anna; Cuquet, Jordi; Recasens, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease which involves the gastrointestinal tract in about 90% of cases. It may contribute to nutritional deterioration. To assess whether the application of a nutritional support protocol to these patients could improve their nutritional status and quality of life. Single center prospective study, performed on an outpatient basis, in a county hospital. The Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) was used to screen risk for malnutrition. Health questionnaire SF-36 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used to assess quality of life and psychopathology respectively. Weight, height, energy and protein requirements, macronutrient intake and nutritional biochemical parameters were evaluated. Nutritional intervention was performed in patients at risk for malnutrition. Of the 72 patients, 12.5% were at risk for malnutrition. Iron deficiency anemia (18.35%) and vitamin D deficiency (54%) were the most frequently observed nutritional deficits. The questionnaires on psychopathology and quality of life showed a high prevalence of anxiety and depression, and lower level poor quality of life in the physical and mental component. No significant improvements were observed in the weight, food intake, nutritional biochemical parameters, psychopathology and quality of life follow-up. Dietary intervention was able to maintain body weight and food intake. Iron deficiency anemia and vitamin D deficiency improved with iron and vitamine D supplements. No deterioration was observed in psychological assessment or quality of life. Studies with larger numbers of patients are needed to assess the efficacy of this intervention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Extracorporeal life support in pediatric cardiac patients

    Matteo Di NARDO

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal Life Support (ECLS is a valuable tool in the management of neonates and older children with severe cardiac or respiratory failure. In this review, we focus on ECLS when used for neonatal and pediatric cardiac disease. Strict selection of patients and timely deployment are necessary to optimize outcomes. Although every attempt should be made to deploy ECLS urgently rather than emergently, extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR is being increasingly used and reasonable survival rates have been achieved after initiation of ECLS during active compressions of the chest following in-hospital cardiac arrest. Contraindications to ECLS are falling over time, although lethal chromosomal abnormalities, severe irreversible brain injury, and extremely low gestational age and weight (<32 weeks gestation or <1.5 kg remain firm contraindications.

  20. Early Home Supported Discharge of Stroke Patients:

    Larsen, Torben; Olsen, T. Skyhøj; Sørensen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    : A systematic literature search for randomized trials (RCTs) on "early supported discharge" was closed in April 2005. RCTs on EHSD without information on (i) death or institution at follow-up, (ii) change in Barthél Index, (iii) length of hospital stay, (iv) intensity of home rehabilitation, or (v) baseline...... data are excluded. Seven RCTs on EHSD with 1,108 patients followed 3-12 months after discharge are selected for statistical meta-analysis of outcomes. The costs are calculated as a function of the average number of home training sessions. Economic evaluation is organized as a test of dominance (both...... of death is not significant. Length of stay is significantly reduced by 10 days (CI, 2.6-18 days). All outcomes have a nonsignificant positive covariance. The median number of home sessions is eleven, and the average cost per EHSD is 1,340 USD. The "action mechanism" and financial barriers to EHSD...

  1. Mental health and psychosocial support in humanitarian settings: linking practice and research.

    Tol, Wietse A; Barbui, Corrado; Galappatti, Ananda; Silove, Derrick; Betancourt, Theresa S; Souza, Renato; Golaz, Anne; van Ommeren, Mark

    2011-10-29

    This review links practice, funding, and evidence for interventions for mental health and psychosocial wellbeing in humanitarian settings. We studied practice by reviewing reports of mental health and psychosocial support activities (2007-10); funding by analysis of the financial tracking service and the creditor reporting system (2007-09); and interventions by systematic review and meta-analysis. In 160 reports, the five most commonly reported activities were basic counselling for individuals (39%); facilitation of community support of vulnerable individuals (23%); provision of child-friendly spaces (21%); support of community-initiated social support (21%); and basic counselling for groups and families (20%). Most interventions took place and were funded outside national mental health and protection systems. 32 controlled studies of interventions were identified, 13 of which were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that met the criteria for meta-analysis. Two studies showed promising effects for strengthening community and family supports. Psychosocial wellbeing was not included as an outcome in the meta-analysis, because its definition varied across studies. In adults with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), meta-analysis of seven RCTs showed beneficial effects for several interventions (psychotherapy and psychosocial supports) compared with usual care or waiting list (standardised mean difference [SMD] -0·38, 95% CI -0·55 to -0·20). In children, meta-analysis of four RCTs failed to show an effect for symptoms of PTSD (-0·36, -0·83 to 0·10), but showed a beneficial effect of interventions (group psychotherapy, school-based support, and other psychosocial support) for internalising symptoms (six RCTs; SMD -0·24, -0·40 to -0·09). Overall, research and evidence focuses on interventions that are infrequently implemented, whereas the most commonly used interventions have had little rigorous scrutiny. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All

  2. Mental health and psychosocial support in humanitarian settings: linking practice and research

    Tol, Wietse A; Barbui, Corrado; Galappatti, Ananda; Silove, Derrick; Betancourt, Theresa S; Souza, Renato; Golaz, Anne; van Ommeren, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This review links practice, funding, and evidence for interventions for mental health and psychosocial wellbeing in humanitarian settings. We studied practice by reviewing reports of mental health and psychosocial support activities (2007–10); funding by analysis of the financial tracking service and the creditor reporting system (2007–09); and interventions by systematic review and meta-analysis. In 160 reports, the five most commonly reported activities were basic counselling for individuals (39%); facilitation of community support of vulnerable individuals (23%); provision of child-friendly spaces (21%); support of community-initiated social support (21%); and basic counselling for groups and families (20%). Most interventions took place and were funded outside national mental health and protection systems. 32 controlled studies of interventions were identified, 13 of which were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that met the criteria for meta-analysis. Two studies showed promising effects for strengthening community and family supports. Psychosocial wellbeing was not included as an outcome in the meta-analysis, because its definition varied across studies. In adults with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), meta-analysis of seven RCTs showed beneficial effects for several interventions (psychotherapy and psychosocial supports) compared with usual care or waiting list (standardised mean difference [SMD] −0.38, 95% CI −0.55 to −0.20). In children, meta-analysis of four RCTs failed to show an effect for symptoms of PTSD (−0.36, −0.83 to 0.10), but showed a beneficial effect of interventions (group psychotherapy, school-based support, and other psychosocial support) for internalising symptoms (six RCTs; SMD −0.24, −0.40 to −0.09). Overall, research and evidence focuses on interventions that are infrequently implemented, whereas the most commonly used interventions have had little rigorous scrutiny. PMID:22008428

  3. Ontobee: A linked ontology data server to support ontology term dereferencing, linkage, query and integration

    Ong, Edison; Xiang, Zuoshuang; Zhao, Bin; Liu, Yue; Lin, Yu; Zheng, Jie; Mungall, Chris; Courtot, Mélanie; Ruttenberg, Alan; He, Yongqun

    2017-01-01

    Linked Data (LD) aims to achieve interconnected data by representing entities using Unified Resource Identifiers (URIs), and sharing information using Resource Description Frameworks (RDFs) and HTTP. Ontologies, which logically represent entities and relations in specific domains, are the basis of LD. Ontobee (http://www.ontobee.org/) is a linked ontology data server that stores ontology information using RDF triple store technology and supports query, visualization and linkage of ontology terms. Ontobee is also the default linked data server for publishing and browsing biomedical ontologies in the Open Biological Ontology (OBO) Foundry (http://obofoundry.org) library. Ontobee currently hosts more than 180 ontologies (including 131 OBO Foundry Library ontologies) with over four million terms. Ontobee provides a user-friendly web interface for querying and visualizing the details and hierarchy of a specific ontology term. Using the eXtensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) technology, Ontobee is able to dereference a single ontology term URI, and then output RDF/eXtensible Markup Language (XML) for computer processing or display the HTML information on a web browser for human users. Statistics and detailed information are generated and displayed for each ontology listed in Ontobee. In addition, a SPARQL web interface is provided for custom advanced SPARQL queries of one or multiple ontologies. PMID:27733503

  4. Ontobee: A linked ontology data server to support ontology term dereferencing, linkage, query and integration.

    Ong, Edison; Xiang, Zuoshuang; Zhao, Bin; Liu, Yue; Lin, Yu; Zheng, Jie; Mungall, Chris; Courtot, Mélanie; Ruttenberg, Alan; He, Yongqun

    2017-01-04

    Linked Data (LD) aims to achieve interconnected data by representing entities using Unified Resource Identifiers (URIs), and sharing information using Resource Description Frameworks (RDFs) and HTTP. Ontologies, which logically represent entities and relations in specific domains, are the basis of LD. Ontobee (http://www.ontobee.org/) is a linked ontology data server that stores ontology information using RDF triple store technology and supports query, visualization and linkage of ontology terms. Ontobee is also the default linked data server for publishing and browsing biomedical ontologies in the Open Biological Ontology (OBO) Foundry (http://obofoundry.org) library. Ontobee currently hosts more than 180 ontologies (including 131 OBO Foundry Library ontologies) with over four million terms. Ontobee provides a user-friendly web interface for querying and visualizing the details and hierarchy of a specific ontology term. Using the eXtensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) technology, Ontobee is able to dereference a single ontology term URI, and then output RDF/eXtensible Markup Language (XML) for computer processing or display the HTML information on a web browser for human users. Statistics and detailed information are generated and displayed for each ontology listed in Ontobee. In addition, a SPARQL web interface is provided for custom advanced SPARQL queries of one or multiple ontologies. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Pediatric Supportive Care (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Pediatric supportive care is an important aspect of cancer care as children and adolescents face unique challenges compared to adult patients. Learn more about supportive care for pediatric patients during and after treatment in this expert-reviewed summary.

  6. Knee osteoarthritis and perceived social support amongst patients in ...

    Temitope Ilori

    2016-06-29

    Jun 29, 2016 ... long been linked with health and illness; for instance married adults have a lower ... recover faster than unmarried adults.13 Social support can be defined as those ..... Martire LM, Lustig AP, Schulz R, Miller GE, Helgeson VS.

  7. Supporting inter-topic entity search for biomedical Linked Data based on heterogeneous relationships.

    Zong, Nansu; Lee, Sungin; Ahn, Jinhyun; Kim, Hong-Gee

    2017-08-01

    The keyword-based entity search restricts search space based on the preference of search. When given keywords and preferences are not related to the same biomedical topic, existing biomedical Linked Data search engines fail to deliver satisfactory results. This research aims to tackle this issue by supporting an inter-topic search-improving search with inputs, keywords and preferences, under different topics. This study developed an effective algorithm in which the relations between biomedical entities were used in tandem with a keyword-based entity search, Siren. The algorithm, PERank, which is an adaptation of Personalized PageRank (PPR), uses a pair of input: (1) search preferences, and (2) entities from a keyword-based entity search with a keyword query, to formalize the search results on-the-fly based on the index of the precomputed Individual Personalized PageRank Vectors (IPPVs). Our experiments were performed over ten linked life datasets for two query sets, one with keyword-preference topic correspondence (intra-topic search), and the other without (inter-topic search). The experiments showed that the proposed method achieved better search results, for example a 14% increase in precision for the inter-topic search than the baseline keyword-based search engine. The proposed method improved the keyword-based biomedical entity search by supporting the inter-topic search without affecting the intra-topic search based on the relations between different entities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 21 CFR 868.6820 - Patient position support.

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6820 Patient position support. (a) Identification. A patient position support is a device intended to maintain the position of an anesthetized... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient position support. 868.6820 Section 868...

  9. Individuals' quality of life linked to major life events, perceived social support, and personality traits.

    Pocnet, Cornelia; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Strippoli, Marie-Pierre F; Glaus, Jennifer; Preisig, Martin; Rossier, Jérôme

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between major recent life events that occurred during the last 5 years, social and personal resources, and subjective quality of life (QoL). A total of 1801 participants from the general population (CoLaus/PsyCoLaus study) completed the Life Events Questionnaire, the Social Support Questionnaire, the NEO Five-Factor Inventory Revised, and the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life. Major life events were modestly associated with the QoL (about 5 % of the explained variance). However, QoL was significantly related to perceived social support and personality traits (about 37 % of the explained variance). Particularly, perceived social support, extraversion and conscientiousness personality dimensions were positively linked to life satisfaction, whereas a high level of neuroticism was negatively associated with QoL. This study highlights the negative but temporary association between critical events and QoL. However, a combination of high conscientiousness and extraversion, and positive social support may explain better variances for a high-perceived QoL.

  10. Relational Regulation Theory : A New Approach to Explain the Link Between Perceived Social Support and Mental Health

    Lakey, Brian; Orehek, Edward

    Perceived support is consistently linked to good mental health, which is typically explained as resulting from objectively supportive actions that buffer stress. Yet this explanation has difficulty accounting for the often-observed main effects between support and mental health. Relational

  11. Proceedings of the Workshop on Methods & Tools for Computer Supported Collaborative Creativity Process: Linking creativity & informal learning

    Retalis, Symeon; Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Retalis, S., & Sloep, P. B. (Eds.) (2009). Collection of 4 symposium papers at EC-TEL 2009. Proceedings of the Workshop on Methods & Tools for Computer Supported Collaborative Creativity Process: Linking creativity & informal learning. September, 30, 2009, Nice,

  12. ReefLink Database: A decision support tool for Linking Coral Reefs and Society Through Systems Thinking

    Coral reefs provide the ecological foundation for productive and diverse fish and invertebrate communities that support multibillion dollar reef fishing and tourism industries. Yet reefs are threatened by growing coastal development, climate change, and over-exploitation. A key i...

  13. Ingroup-outgroup bias in contagious yawning by chimpanzees supports link to empathy.

    Matthew W Campbell

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Humans favor others seen as similar to themselves (ingroup over people seen as different (outgroup, even without explicitly stated bias. Ingroup-outgroup bias extends to involuntary responses, such as empathy for pain. However, empathy biases have not been tested in our close primate relatives. Contagious yawning has been theoretically and empirically linked to empathy. If empathy underlies contagious yawning, we predict that subjects should show an ingroup-outgroup bias by yawning more in response to watching ingroup members yawn than outgroup. Twenty-three chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes from two separate groups watched videos of familiar and unfamiliar individuals yawning or at rest (control. The chimpanzees yawned more when watching the familiar yawns than the familiar control or the unfamiliar yawns, demonstrating an ingroup-outgroup bias in contagious yawning. These results provide further empirical support that contagious yawning is a measure of empathy, which may be useful for evolutionary biology and mental health.

  14. The meaning of social support for the critically ill patient.

    Hupcey, J E

    2001-08-01

    Social support has been shown to be important for the critically ill patient. However, what constitutes adequate support for these patients has not been investigated. Thus, the purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate patients' perceptions of their need for and adequacy of the social support received while they were critically ill. Thirty adult patients who were critical during some point of their stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) stay were interviewed, once stable. Interviews were tape-recorded and began with an open-ended question regarding the ICU experience. This was followed by open-ended focused questions regarding social support, such as 'Who were your greatest sources of social support while you were critically ill?' 'What did they do that was supportive or unsupportive?' Data were analyzed according to Miles and Huberman (1994). The categories that emerged were need for social support based on patient perceptions (not number of visitors), quality of support (based on perceptions of positive and negative behaviors of supporters) and lack of support. This study found that quality of support was more important than the actual number of visitors. Patients with few visitors may have felt supported, while those with numerous visitors felt unsupported. Patients who felt unsupported also were more critical of the staff and the care they received. Nurses need to individually assess patients regarding their need for support, and assist family/friends to meet these needs.

  15. Scotland's Water Map: Understanding water sector links to support decision making for the Hydro Nation Agenda

    Falconer, Ruth E.; Gilmour, Daniel; Duffy, Alison; Isaacs, John; Stojanovic, Vladeta; O'Keeffe, Juliette; Blackwood, David

    2015-04-01

    The value of Scotland's water and sewerage market is projected to grow to £1.24bn by 2016/17. Developing future opportunities must take place alongside maintaining current service provision; however the demand on water and waste water services is constantly evolving. An integrated approach to water management requires an understanding of complex interactions that exist between key actors in the sector to allow water management strategies to exploit inter-sectorial links. Successful integrated analysis of the water sector in Scotland will support management activities key to responding to the Hydro Nation themes of 1) Governance and international development 2) Environmental protection 3) Economic opportunities 4) Research development. In order to deliver on these objectives an approach is required to capture and communicate the scope and scale of the water sector and its interconnectedness. The methodology required to determine scope, scale and interconnectedness of water sector involved the identification and application of an appropriate range of techniques from the Information and Knowledge Management disciplines combined with the Information Visualisation field. Scope and scale of the water sector was identified by a desk based study and this data was visualized using a geographic map. Sector interconnectedness was determined by interviewing key actors. The interviews identified the stakeholders associated with information flows, and the purpose of the information transfer through Reporting/Managing (R/M), Influence and Information sharing (I) or Control (C) activities. Primary information flows were also scored with respect to importance against the 4 key Hydro Nation agenda themes. Many organisations were identified who interact within Scotland's water sector including the Scottish Government and Ministers, the Regulators (WICS, DWQR, SEPA), Scottish Water (core and non-core functions), plus many other stakeholders ranging from research institutions to

  16. Design of a consumer health record for supporting the patient-centered management of chronic diseases.

    de Clerq, P.A.; Hasman, A.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.

    2001-01-01

    : Medinfo 2001;10(Pt 2):1445-9 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut Design of a consumer health record for supporting the patient-centered management of chronic diseases. de Clercq PA, Hasman A, Wolffenbuttel BH. Department of Medical Informatics, University of Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

  17. Linked Registries: Connecting Rare Diseases Patient Registries through a Semantic Web Layer.

    Sernadela, Pedro; González-Castro, Lorena; Carta, Claudio; van der Horst, Eelke; Lopes, Pedro; Kaliyaperumal, Rajaram; Thompson, Mark; Thompson, Rachel; Queralt-Rosinach, Núria; Lopez, Estrella; Wood, Libby; Robertson, Agata; Lamanna, Claudia; Gilling, Mette; Orth, Michael; Merino-Martinez, Roxana; Posada, Manuel; Taruscio, Domenica; Lochmüller, Hanns; Robinson, Peter; Roos, Marco; Oliveira, José Luís

    2017-01-01

    Patient registries are an essential tool to increase current knowledge regarding rare diseases. Understanding these data is a vital step to improve patient treatments and to create the most adequate tools for personalized medicine. However, the growing number of disease-specific patient registries brings also new technical challenges. Usually, these systems are developed as closed data silos, with independent formats and models, lacking comprehensive mechanisms to enable data sharing. To tackle these challenges, we developed a Semantic Web based solution that allows connecting distributed and heterogeneous registries, enabling the federation of knowledge between multiple independent environments. This semantic layer creates a holistic view over a set of anonymised registries, supporting semantic data representation, integrated access, and querying. The implemented system gave us the opportunity to answer challenging questions across disperse rare disease patient registries. The interconnection between those registries using Semantic Web technologies benefits our final solution in a way that we can query single or multiple instances according to our needs. The outcome is a unique semantic layer, connecting miscellaneous registries and delivering a lightweight holistic perspective over the wealth of knowledge stemming from linked rare disease patient registries.

  18. Automatic Decision Support for Clinical Diagnostic Literature Using Link Analysis in a Weighted Keyword Network.

    Li, Shuqing; Sun, Ying; Soergel, Dagobert

    2017-12-23

    We present a novel approach to recommending articles from the medical literature that support clinical diagnostic decision-making, giving detailed descriptions of the associated ideas and principles. The specific goal is to retrieve biomedical articles that help answer questions of a specified type about a particular case. Based on the filtered keywords, MeSH(Medical Subject Headings) lexicon and the automatically extracted acronyms, the relationship between keywords and articles was built. The paper gives a detailed description of the process of by which keywords were measured and relevant articles identified based on link analysis in a weighted keywords network. Some important challenges identified in this study include the extraction of diagnosis-related keywords and a collection of valid sentences based on the keyword co-occurrence analysis and existing descriptions of symptoms. All data were taken from medical articles provided in the TREC (Text Retrieval Conference) clinical decision support track 2015. Ten standard topics and one demonstration topic were tested. In each case, a maximum of five articles with the highest relevance were returned. The total user satisfaction of 3.98 was 33% higher than average. The results also suggested that the smaller the number of results, the higher the average satisfaction. However, a few shortcomings were also revealed since medical literature recommendation for clinical diagnostic decision support is so complex a topic that it cannot be fully addressed through the semantic information carried solely by keywords in existing descriptions of symptoms. Nevertheless, the fact that these articles are actually relevant will no doubt inspire future research.

  19. Middle Childhood Support-Seeking Behavior during Stress: Links with Self-Reported Attachment and Future Depressive Symptoms

    Dujardin, Adinda; Santens, Tara; Braet, Caroline; De Raedt, Rudi; Vos, Pieter; Maes, Bea; Bosmans, Guy

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether children's more anxious and avoidant attachment is linked to decreased support-seeking behavior toward their mother during stress in middle childhood, and whether children's decreased support-seeking behavior enhances the impact of experiencing life events on the increase of depressive symptoms 18 months later.…

  20. Nurse dose: linking staffing variables to adverse patient outcomes.

    Manojlovich, Milisa; Sidani, Souraya; Covell, Christine L; Antonakos, Cathy L

    2011-01-01

    Inconsistent findings in more than 100 studies have made it difficult to explain how variation in nurse staffing affects patient outcomes. Nurse dose, defined as the level of nurses required to provide patient care in hospital settings, draws on variables used in staffing studies to describe the influence of many staffing variables on outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the construct validity of nurse dose by determining its association with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections and reported patient falls on a sample of inpatient adult acute care units. Staffing data came from 26 units in Ontario, Canada, and Michigan. Financial and human resource data were data sources for staffing variables. Sources of data for MRSA came from infection control departments. Incident reports were the data source for patient falls. Data analysis consisted of bivariate correlations and Poisson regression. Bivariate correlations revealed that nurse dose attributes (active ingredient and intensity) were associated significantly with both outcomes. Active ingredient (education, experience, skill mix) and intensity (full-time employees, registered nurse [RN]:patient ratio, RN hours per patient day) were significant predictors of MRSA. Coefficients for both attributes were negative and almost identical. Both attributes were significant predictors of reported patient falls, and coefficients were again negative, but coefficient sizes differed. By conceptualizing nurse and staffing variables (education, experience, skill mix, full-time employees, RN:patient ratio, RN hours per patient day) as attributes of nurse dose and by including these in the same analysis, it is possible to determine their relative influence on MRSA infections and reported patient falls.

  1. CMS proposes prioritizing patient preferences, linking patients to follow-up care in discharge planning process.

    2016-03-01

    Hospital providers voice concerns about a proposed rule by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) that would require providers to devote more resources to discharge planning. The rule would apply to inpatients as well as emergency patients requiring comprehensive discharge plans as opposed to discharge instructions. CMS states that the rule would ensure the prioritization of patient preferences and goals in the discharge planning process, and also would prevent avoidable complications and readmissions. However, hospital and emergency medicine leaders worry that community resources are not yet in place to facilitate the links and follow-up required in the proposed rule, and that the costs associated with implementation would be prohibitive. The proposed rule would apply to acute care hospitals, EDs, long-term care facilities, inpatient rehabilitation centers, and home health agencies. Regardless of the setting, though, CMS is driving home the message that patient preferences should be given more weight during the discharge planning process. Under the rule, hospitals or EDs would need to develop a patient-centered discharge plan within 24 hours of admission or registration, and complete the plan prior to discharge or transfer to another facility. Under the rule, emergency physicians would determine which patients require a comprehensive discharge plan. Both the American Hospital Association and the American College of Emergency Physicians worry that hospitals will have to take on more staff, invest in training, and make changes to their electronic medical record systems to implement the provisions in the proposed rule.

  2. Supporting open collaboration in science through explicit and linked semantic description of processes

    Gil, Yolanda; Michel, Felix; Ratnakar, Varun; Read, Jordan S.; Hauder, Matheus; Duffy, Christopher; Hanson, Paul C.; Dugan, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    The Web was originally developed to support collaboration in science. Although scientists benefit from many forms of collaboration on the Web (e.g., blogs, wikis, forums, code sharing, etc.), most collaborative projects are coordinated over email, phone calls, and in-person meetings. Our goal is to develop a collaborative infrastructure for scientists to work on complex science questions that require multi-disciplinary contributions to gather and analyze data, that cannot occur without significant coordination to synthesize findings, and that grow organically to accommodate new contributors as needed as the work evolves over time. Our approach is to develop an organic data science framework based on a task-centered organization of the collaboration, includes principles from social sciences for successful on-line communities, and exposes an open science process. Our approach is implemented as an extension of a semantic wiki platform, and captures formal representations of task decomposition structures, relations between tasks and users, and other properties of tasks, data, and other relevant science objects. All these entities are captured through the semantic wiki user interface, represented as semantic web objects, and exported as linked data.

  3. Automated and comprehensive link engineering supporting branched, ring, and mesh network topologies

    Farina, J.; Khomchenko, D.; Yevseyenko, D.; Meester, J.; Richter, A.

    2016-02-01

    Link design, while relatively easy in the past, can become quite cumbersome with complex channel plans and equipment configurations. The task of designing optical transport systems and selecting equipment is often performed by an applications or sales engineer using simple tools, such as custom Excel spreadsheets. Eventually, every individual has their own version of the spreadsheet as well as their own methodology for building the network. This approach becomes unmanageable very quickly and leads to mistakes, bending of the engineering rules and installations that do not perform as expected. We demonstrate a comprehensive planning environment, which offers an efficient approach to unify, control and expedite the design process by controlling libraries of equipment and engineering methodologies, automating the process and providing the analysis tools necessary to predict system performance throughout the system and for all channels. In addition to the placement of EDFAs and DCEs, performance analysis metrics are provided at every step of the way. Metrics that can be tracked include power, CD and OSNR, SPM, XPM, FWM and SBS. Automated routine steps assist in design aspects such as equalization, padding and gain setting for EDFAs, the placement of ROADMs and transceivers, and creating regeneration points. DWDM networks consisting of a large number of nodes and repeater huts, interconnected in linear, branched, mesh and ring network topologies, can be designed much faster when compared with conventional design methods. Using flexible templates for all major optical components, our technology-agnostic planning approach supports the constant advances in optical communications.

  4. Early Home Supported Discharge of Stroke Patients:

    Larsen, Torben; Olsen, T. Skyhøj; Sørensen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A comprehensive and systematic assessment (HTA) of early home-supported discharge by a multidisciplinary team that plans, coordinates, and delivers care at home (EHSD) was undertaken and the results were compared with that of conventional rehabilitation at stroke units. METHODS......: A systematic literature search for randomized trials (RCTs) on "early supported discharge" was closed in April 2005. RCTs on EHSD without information on (i) death or institution at follow-up, (ii) change in Barthél Index, (iii) length of hospital stay, (iv) intensity of home rehabilitation, or (v) baseline...... are discussed. CONCLUSIONS: EHSD is evidenced as a dominant health intervention. However, financial barriers between municipalities and health authorities have to be overcome. For qualitative reasons, a learning path of implementation is recommended where one stroke unit in a region initiates EHSD...

  5. The missing link to patient engagement in Italy.

    Palumbo, Rocco; Annarumma, Carmela; Adinolfi, Paola; Musella, Marco

    2016-11-21

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to discuss the changing patterns of users' behavior in the health care service system. Although patient engagement and health services' co-production are understood as essential ingredients in the recipe for sustainable health systems, some determinants to patient involvement are still widely neglected by both policy makers and health care professionals. Among others, inadequate health literacy performs as a significant barrier to patient empowerment. Design/methodology/approach A survey aimed at objectively measuring health literacy-related skills was administered to a random sample of 600 Italian patients. The Italian version of the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) was used to assess the ability of the respondents to deal with written health information. Moreover, the respondents were asked to self-report their ability to navigate the health system. It was presumed that inadequate health literacy as measured by the NVS is related with impaired self-reported functional, interactive, and critical health-related competencies, paving the way for the inability and the unwillingness of patients to be involved in the health care provision. Findings About half of the sample showed inadequate health literacy. However, poor NVS scores were only slightly associated with limited self-reported functional, interactive, and critical health-related competencies. In general, patients with inadequate health-related skills were not likely to be engaged in the provision of health services. Elderly, people suffering from financial deprivation and less educated individuals were found to be at special risk of living with limited health literacy. Practical implications Limited health literacy is a common and relevant issue among people dealing with the health care service system. The impaired ability to collect, process, and use health information produces barriers to patient engagement and prevents the evolution of patients' behavior toward health care co

  6. Link for Injured Kids: A Patient-Centered Program of Psychological First Aid After Trauma.

    Ramirez, Marizen; Toussaint, Maisha; Woods-Jaeger, Briana; Harland, Karisa; Wetjen, Kristel; Wilgenbusch, Tammy; Pitcher, Graeme; Jennissen, Charles

    2017-08-01

    Injury, the most common type of pediatric trauma, can lead to a number of adverse psychosocial outcomes, including posttraumatic stress disorder. Currently, few evidence-based parent programs exist to support children hospitalized after a traumatic injury. Using methods in evaluation and intervention research, we completed a formative research study to develop a new program of psychological first aid, Link for Injured Kids, aimed to educate parents in supporting their children after a severe traumatic injury. Using qualitative methods, we held focus groups with parents and pediatric trauma providers of children hospitalized at a Level I Children's Hospital because of an injury in 2012. We asked focus group participants to describe reactions to trauma and review drafts of our intervention materials. Health professionals and caregivers reported a broad spectrum of emotional responses by their children or patients; however, difficulties were experienced during recovery at home and upon returning to school. All parents and health professionals recommended that interventions be offered to parents either in the emergency department or close to discharge among admissions. Results from this study strongly indicate a need for posttrauma interventions, particularly in rural settings, to support families of children to address the psychosocial outcomes in the aftermath of an injury. Findings presented here describe the process of intervention development that responds to the needs of an affected population.

  7. [Perception of social support in the aspect of a cognitive style of patients with affective disorders].

    Poradowska-Trzos, Magdalena; Dudek, Dominika; Rogoz, Monika; Zieba, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    According to Aaron Beck, dysfunctional thinking patterns appear also in euthymic patients, after withdrawal of acute diseases symptoms. Patients have a disordered, negative image of themselves, of their future and the surrounding world. It has been shown that a way a man perceives possessed social support has a basic meaning for him. The purpose of the research was to analyze the relationship between perceived social support and the patient's cognitive style. The study group consisted of euthymic outpatients diagnosed with recurrent depressive disorder (UID) or bipolar affective disorder (BID). Assessment of a cognitive style was made according to the Rosenberg Scale, Hopelessness Scale HS-20 and Automatique Thoughts Questionnaire ATQ 30, assessment of the amount of received support - according to Cohen's ISEL. The presented study revealed that, in both groups of patients, a thinking style is disturbed and that there is a link between a cognitive style and the perception of the level of received support. The link was stronger in the group of patients with unipolar affective disorder. In both groups, correlations concerning emotional support were the highest.

  8. LINK BETWEEN SKELETAL RELATIONS AND ROOT RESORPTION IN ORTHODONTIC PATIENTS

    Cristina Teodora Preoteasa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available External root resorption is one of the possible complications of the orthodontic treatment, severe cases presenting a higher frequency. The aim of the present study was to test the existence of a relation between the severity of root resorption and the sagittal or vertical skeletal relations. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a group of 55 patients with fixed orthodontic devices, applied bimaxillarily for at least 6 months. The sample presented mostly mild or moderate apical root resorption, with an average value of 1.31 mm (standard deviation 0.60. Patients with abnormal sagittal skeletal relations presented a more severe root resorption compared to those with a normal pattern. The tendency towards more severe external root resorption was also noticed in cases with mandibular clockwise rotation and hiperdivergent facial pattern. A good knowledge on the variables associated to severe root resorption is essential for the identification of the high risk patients, as well as for the selection of the best suited treatment alternative in terms of low probability of root resorption occurrence.

  9. Mission Control Operations: Employing a New High Performance Design for Communications Links Supporting Exploration Programs

    Jackson, Dan E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The planetary exploration programs demand a totally new examination of data multiplexing, digital communications protocols and data transmission principles for both ground and spacecraft operations. Highly adaptive communications devices on-board and on the ground must provide the greatest possible transmitted data density between deployed crew personnel, spacecraft and ground control teams. Regarding these requirements, this proposal borrows from research into quantum mechanical computing by applying the concept of a qubit, a single bit that represents 16 states, to radio frequency (RF) communications link design for exploration programs. This concept of placing multiple character values into a single data bit can easily make the evolutionary steps needed to meet exploration mission demands. To move the qubit from the quantum mechanical research laboratory into long distance RF data transmission, this proposal utilizes polarization modulation of the RF carrier signal to represent numbers from zero to fifteen. It introduces the concept of a binary-to-hexadecimal converter that quickly chops any data stream into 16-bit words and connects variously polarized feedhorns to a single-frequency radio transmitter. Further, the concept relies on development of a receiver that uses low-noise amplifiers and an antenna array to quickly assess carrier polarity and perform hexadecimal to binary conversion. Early testbed experiments using the International Space Station (ISS) as an operations laboratory can be implemented to provide the most cost-effective return for research investment. The improvement in signal-to-noise ratio while supporting greater baseband data rates that could be achieved through this concept justifies its consideration for long-distance exploration programs.

  10. Linked hydrologic and social systems that support resilience of traditional irrigation communities

    Fernald, A.; Guldan, S.; Boykin, K.; Cibils, A.; Gonzales, M.; Hurd, B.; Lopez, S.; Ochoa, C.; Ortiz, M.; Rivera, J.; Rodriguez, S.; Steele, C.

    2015-01-01

    Southwestern US irrigated landscapes are facing upheaval due to water scarcity and land use conversion associated with climate change, population growth, and changing economics. In the traditionally irrigated valleys of northern New Mexico, these stresses, as well as instances of community longevity in the face of these stresses, are apparent. Human systems have interacted with hydrologic processes over the last 400 years in river-fed irrigated valleys to create linked systems. In this study, we ask if concurrent data from multiple disciplines could show that human-adapted hydrologic and socioeconomic systems have created conditions for resilience. Various types of resiliencies are evident in the communities. Traditional local knowledge about the hydrosocial cycle of community water management and ability to adopt new water management practices is a key response to disturbances such as low water supply from drought. Livestock producers have retained their irrigated land by adapting: changing from sheep to cattle and securing income from outside their livestock operations. Labor-intensive crops decreased as off-farm employment opportunities became available. Hydrologic resilience of the system can be affected by both human and natural elements. We find, for example, that there are multiple hydrologic benefits of traditional irrigation system water seepage: it recharges the groundwater that recharges rivers, supports threatened biodiversity by maintaining riparian vegetation, and ameliorates impacts of climate change by prolonging streamflow hydrographs. Human decisions to transfer water out of agriculture or change irrigation management, as well as natural changes such as long-term drought or climate change, can result in reduced seepage and the benefits it provides. We have worked with the communities to translate the multidisciplinary dimensions of these systems into a common language of causal loop diagrams, which form the basis for modeling future scenarios to

  11. Improving inpatient environments to support patient sleep.

    DuBose, Jennifer R; Hadi, Khatereh

    2016-10-01

    Although sleep is important for healing, sleep deprivation is a major concern for patients in hospitals. The purpose of this review is to consolidate the observational and interventional studies that have been done to understand exogenous, non-pharmacological strategies for improving sleep in hospitals. We searched Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO and the Web of Science databases for peer-reviewed articles published between 1970 and 2015 in English. A title review of 13,113 articles from four databases resulted in 783 articles that were further culled to 277 based on a review of the abstracts. The net result after reading the articles and a hand search was 42 articles. From each article we recorded the independent variables, methods used for measuring sleep and specific sleep outcomes reported. Noise is a modifiable cause of some sleep disruptions in hospitals, and when reduced can lead to more sleep. Earplugs and eye masks may help, but changing the sound and light environment is more effective. Calming music in the evening has been shown to be effective as well as daytime bright light exposure. Nursing care activities cause sleep disruption, but efforts at limiting interventions have not been demonstrated to improve sleep conditions. The research is hard to consolidate due to the multitude of independent variables and outcome metrics, but overall points to the potential for making meaningful improvements in the quality of patient sleep. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Knee osteoarthritis and perceived social support amongst patients in ...

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic disease affecting the lives of patients and their families, with the family characteristics moderating the illness course. The perceived social support received by a patient helps in determining the health and functionality of the patient. Methods: A cross-sectional study was ...

  13. Who Shapes Whom in the Family: Reciprocal Links between Autonomy Support in the Family and Parents' and Adolescents' Coping Behaviors

    Seiffge-Krenke, Inge; Pakalniskiene, Vilmante

    2011-01-01

    Coping research has neglected the study of the reciprocal links between parents' and adolescents' coping behaviors and the potential influence of parental support for the development of adolescent autonomy. This study, therefore, analyzed the coping behaviors of fathers, mothers, and children (53% females) in 196 families who participated in a…

  14. Cancer patients and the provision of informational social support.

    Robinson, James D; Tian, Yan

    2009-07-01

    Research into the impact of social support on health-care patients has focused on the benefits of receiving social support. Although recipients benefit from social support, there are also potential benefits to the providers of social support that have gone relatively unexplored. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the relationship between the reception and provision of informational social support by cancer patients. Based on the work of Gouldner (1960), this investigation attempts to examine the role reciprocity plays within the social support process. The norm of reciprocity is conceptualized as a generalized moral belief rather than as a simple pattern of exchange between caregivers and care receivers. Use of reciprocity as a generalized moral belief instead of a pattern of behavioral exchange between providers and recipients of social support allows a more thorough integration theoretically and more methodical examination of the role the relationship between providers and recipients plays in this process. Specifically, this investigation employs the notion of optimal matching as part of the mechanism underlying the satisfactions derived from informational social support. The results of the logistic regression analyses suggest that reciprocity is a viable explanation of the mechanism underlying the desire to provide social support to others among cancer patients and among adults who have never been diagnosed with cancer. This relationship between the reception and the provision of informational social support remains even after controlling for age, education, gender, race, social integration, and cancer diagnosis. Implications for the social support literature are discussed.

  15. Primary Care Perspectives on Hepatitis C Virus Screening, Diagnosis and Linking Patients to Appropriate Care.

    Lebovics, Edward; Torres, Richard; Porter, Lucinda K

    2017-02-01

    -up HCV RNA test, and every effort must be made to overcome the challenge of losing patients between these two steps. Good communication between the physician, the physician's office staff, and the patient is necessary. In addition, point-of-care tests and PCR reflex testing can alleviate the need for HCV antibody positive patients to arrange subsequent office visits to undergo confirmatory HCV RNA testing. Physician and patient perspectives are presented throughout this roundtable discussion to obtain a complete picture of the management barriers encountered prior to initiation of therapy. Physician perspectives are provided by Edward Lebovics, the Upham Professor of Gastroenterology and Director of the Sarah C. Upham Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatobiliary Diseases at New York Medical College and Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla, New York, and Richard Torres, Chief Medical Officer at Optimus Health Care and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Yale School of Medicine. Torres has been a primary care provider for 29 years, working at the largest federally qualified community health center in Southwestern CT, which provides over 240,000 patient visits annually primarily to populations that are underserved and suffering from healthcare disparities. Patient perspectives in this roundtable are provided by Lucinda K. Porter, RN, who is the author of two books for hepatitis C patients, and is a former hepatology nurse and hepatitis C patient. She has been advocating for others since 1997, and writes for the HCV Advocate. Lucinda is a contributing editor of HEP magazine, and she blogs at www.LucindaPorterRN.com. The overall goal of this video roundtable discussion is to demonstrate that when provided with appropriate clinical knowledge, and aided by supportive collaborations with appropriate specialists, primary care clinicians should be able to effectively screen, diagnose, and link patients with hepatitis C to appropriate care. While patients need to be educated

  16. Patients' and parents' views regarding supportive care in childhood cancer.

    Tenniglo, L J A; Loeffen, E A H; Kremer, L C M; Font-Gonzalez, A; Mulder, R L; Postma, A; Naafs-Wilstra, M C; Grootenhuis, M A; van de Wetering, M D; Tissing, W J E

    2017-10-01

    Intensive therapies in pediatric malignancies increased survival rates but also occurrence of treatment-related morbidities. Therefore, supportive care fulfills an increasingly important role. In planning development of guidelines with incorporation of shared decision making, we noticed that little is known about the needs and preferences of patients and their parents. Our goals were therefore to investigate (1) which supportive care topics patients and parents regard as most important and (2) the preferred role they wish to fulfill in decision making. This qualitative study consisted of three focus groups (two traditional, one online) with patients and parents of two Dutch pediatric oncology centers. Data were transcribed as simple verbatim and analyzed using thematic analysis. Eleven adolescent patients and 18 parents shared detailed views on various aspects of supportive care. Themes of major importance were communication between patient and physician (commitment, accessibility, proactive attitude of physicians), well-timed provision of information, and the suitability and accessibility of psychosocial care. In contrast to prioritized supportive care topics by medical professionals, somatic issues (e.g., febrile neutropenia) were infrequently addressed. Patients and parents preferred to be actively involved in decision making in selected topics, such as choice of analgesics and anti-emetics, but not in, e.g., choice of antibiotics. Children with cancer and parents were provided a valuable insight into their views regarding supportive care and shared decision making. These results have important implications towards improving supportive care, both in selecting topics for guideline development and incorporating preferences of patients and parents herein.

  17. Do practitioners and friends support patients with coronary heart disease in lifestyle change? a qualitative study.

    Cole, Judith A; Smith, Susan M; Hart, Nigel; Cupples, Margaret E

    2013-08-28

    Healthy lifestyles help to prevent coronary heart disease (CHD) but outcomes from secondary prevention interventions which support lifestyle change have been disappointing. This study is a novel, in-depth exploration of patient factors affecting lifestyle behaviour change within an intervention designed to improve secondary prevention for patients with CHD in primary care using personalised tailored support. We aimed to explore patients' perceptions of factors affecting lifestyle change within a trial of this intervention (the SPHERE Study), using semi-structured, one-to-one interviews, with patients in general practice. Interviews (45) were conducted in purposively selected general practices (15) which had participated in the SPHERE Study. Individuals, with CHD, were selected to include those who succeeded in improving physical activity levels and dietary fibre intake and those who did not. We explored motivations, barriers to lifestyle change and information utilised by patients. Data collection and analysis, using a thematic framework and the constant comparative method, were iterative, continuing until data saturation was achieved. We identified novel barriers to lifestyle change: such disincentives included strong negative influences of social networks, linked to cultural norms which encouraged consumption of 'delicious' but unhealthy food and discouraged engagement in physical activity. Findings illustrated how personalised support within an ongoing trusted patient-professional relationship was valued. Previously known barriers and facilitators relating to support, beliefs and information were confirmed. Intervention development in supporting lifestyle change in secondary prevention needs to more effectively address patients' difficulties in overcoming negative social influences and maintaining interest in living healthily.

  18. The link between weight shift asymmetry and gait disturbances in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients

    Szopa A

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Andrzej Szopa,1 Małgorzata Domagalska-Szopa,2 Anetta Lasek-Bal,3 Amadeusz Żak3 1Department of Physiotherapy, 2Department of Medical Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences in Katowice, 3Department of Neurology, Professor Leszek Giec Upper Silesian Medical Centre, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland Introduction: While the asymmetry of body posture and the asymmetrical nature of hemiparetic gait in poststroke (PS patients are well documented, the role of weight shift asymmetry in gait disorders after stroke remains unclear. Objective: We examined the association of weight-bearing asymmetry (WBA between paretic and nonparetic lower limbs during quiet standing with the degree of deviation of hemiplegic gait from normal gait evaluated by the Gillette Gait Index (GGI incorporating 16 distinct clinically important kinematic and temporal parameters in chronic PS patients.Participants and methods: Twenty-two ambulatory patients with chronic stroke aged between 50 and 75 years were included in this study. Fourteen patients had hemiparesis on the nondominant side and 8 on the dominant side. The mean time PS was 2 years and 6 months. The reference group consisted of 22 students from the University of the Third Age presenting no neurological disorders. The examination consisted of posturographic weight-bearing (WB distribution and 3-dimensional gait analyses.Results: A significant positive relationship between WBA and GGI was revealed. Moreover, we observed a significant negative association between WBA and paretic step length and walking speed. With regard to kinematic data, the range of motion of knee flexion and peak dorsiflexion in the swing phase of the paretic leg were significantly negatively associated with WBA.Conclusion: Although further research is needed to determine a causal link between postural control asymmetry and gait disturbance in hemiplegics, our findings support the inclusion of WB measurements between paretic and

  19. Skin barrier properties in patients with recessive X-linked ichthyosis

    Johansen, J D; Ramsing, D; Vejlsgaard, G

    1995-01-01

    Patients with X-linked recessive ichthyosis (RXLI) were studied as a model of the effect of disturbed epidermal lipid composition on skin barrier function. Thirteen patients with RXLI and 15 age- and sex-matched controls were patch-tested with sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) 0.5% for 24 h. Basal skin...

  20. Participation of chronic patients in medical consultations: patients' perceived efficacy, barriers and interest in support

    Henselmans, Inge; Heijmans, Monique; Rademakers, Jany; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Chronic patients are increasingly expected to participate actively in medical consultations. This study examined (i) patients' perceived efficacy and barriers to participation in consultations, (ii) patients' interest in communication support and (iii) correlates of perceived efficacy and barriers,

  1. Checklist and Decision Support in Nutritional Care for Burned Patients

    2016-10-01

    able to construct a checklist of a clinical and physiologic model and then a computerised decision support system that will perform two functions: the...the provision of nutritional therapy, and assessment of use by nursing and physician staff KEYWORDS Nutrition, severe burn, decision support... clinical testing. Checklist and Decision Support in Nutritional Care for Burned Patients Proposal Number: 12340011 W81XWH-12-2-0074 PI: Steven E

  2. Sense of social support in chonic pain patients

    Ancane G.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Statistical data show that one in five adults of the European citizen suffer from some type of chronic pain. One of the most common types of chronic pain is chronic low back and neck pain. Emotional factors are currently viewed as important determinants in pain perception and behaviour. The perceived social and emotional support have impact to the individual’s adaptation to chronic disease (Cohen, Wills, 1985. The material: 110 chronic low back pain (CLBP patients (48 male and 62 female; in age from 24 to 60 years, mean: 44.2±8, 0 and pilot study of 23 chronic neck pain (CNP patients (19 female and 4 male; in age from 35 to 60 years, mean: 48, 1 ±6. The assessment methods: structured interview; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. SF-36 ® Health Survey: assessment of emotional and social support. Results and conclusions: CLBP patients in presence of symptoms of depression and elevated level of anxiety matched for socio-demographic features had less sense of social support and marked pain impact to daily activities, lower self rating health relating quality of life. In CLBP patients the sense of social and emotional support had relevant interaction with level of participation in daily activities both in patients with and without mental health problems. This fact has to be considered in process of rehabilitation and in managing of health care of CLBP patients. The results of CNP patients pilot study revealed interesting trend that chronic back and neck pain patients seems to be quite different according to sense of social and emotional support, therefore sense of social and emotional support in different chronic pain patients need further research to improve the process and results of rehabilitation in these patients.

  3. The ties that bind: perceived social support, stress, and IBS in severely affected patients.

    Lackner, J M; Brasel, A M; Quigley, B M; Keefer, L; Krasner, S S; Powell, C; Katz, L A; Sitrin, M D

    2010-08-01

    This study assessed the association between social support and the severity of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms in a sample of severely affected IBS patients recruited to an NIH-funded clinical trial. In addition, we examined if the effects of social support on IBS pain are mediated through the effects on stress. Subjects were 105 Rome II diagnosed IBS patients (F = 85%) who completed seven questionnaires which were collected as part of a pretreatment baseline assessment. Partial correlations were conducted to clarify the relationships between social support and clinically relevant variables with baseline levels of psychopathology, holding constant number of comorbid medical diseases, age, gender, marital status, ethnicity, and education. Analyses indicated that social support was inversely related to IBS symptom severity. Social support was positively related with less severe pain. A similar pattern of data was found for perceived stress but not quality of life impairment. Regression analyses examined if the effects of social support on pain are mediated by stress. The effects of social support on bodily pain were mediated by stress such that the greater the social support the less stress and the less pain. This effect did not hold for symptom severity, quality of life, or psychological distress. This study links the perceived adequacy of social support to the global severity of symptoms of IBS and its cardinal symptom (pain). It also suggests that the mechanism by which social support alleviates pain is through a reduction in stress levels.

  4. Making interactive decision support for patients a reality.

    Evans, R.W.; Elwyn, G.; Edwards, A.

    2004-01-01

    Interactive decision support applications might help patients to make difficult decisions about their health care. They lie in the context of traditional decision aids, which are known to have effects on a number of patient outcomes, including knowledge and decisional conflict. The problem of

  5. Ontologies to Support RFID-Based Link between Virtual Models and Construction Components

    Sørensen, Kristian Birch; Christiansson, Per; Svidt, Kjeld

    2010-01-01

    the virtual models and the physical components in the construction process can improve the information handling and sharing in construction and building operation management. Such a link can be created by means of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology. Ontologies play an important role...

  6. Designing Grounded Feedback: Criteria for Using Linked Representations to Support Learning of Abstract Symbols

    Wiese, Eliane S.; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes "grounded feedback" as a way to provide implicit verification when students are working with a novel representation. In grounded feedback, students' responses are in the target, to-be-learned representation, and those responses are reflected in a more-accessible linked representation that is intrinsic to the domain.…

  7. Using Linked Data to Annotate and Search Educational Video Resources for Supporting Distance Learning

    Yu, Hong Qing; Pedrinaci, C.; Dietze, S.; Domingue, J.

    2012-01-01

    Multimedia educational resources play an important role in education, particularly for distance learning environments. With the rapid growth of the multimedia web, large numbers of educational video resources are increasingly being created by several different organizations. It is crucial to explore, share, reuse, and link these educational…

  8. Interest in internet lung cancer support among rural cardiothoracic patients.

    Quin, Jacquelyn; Stams, Victor; Phelps, Beth; Boley, Theresa; Hazelrigg, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    The Internet may provide an alternative option for rural lung cancer patients who lack access to on-site cancer support; however, Internet access and use among rural patients is unknown. An anonymous waiting-room survey was administered to all outpatient cardiothoracic surgery patients over 3 mo. Survey questions included age, gender, and diagnosis, possession of a home computer and Internet service, estimated Internet use, and use of the Internet for health information. Patients with known or suspected lung cancer were asked to indicate their interest in on-site and Internet cancer support. There were 597 returned surveys (response rate 96%). The mean age was 64.6 y (SE 0.55), and 58% were men. Diagnoses included known or possible lung cancer (15.4%), lung disease (9.5%), heart disease (30.4%), other diagnoses (13.9%), and undetermined (30.6%). There were 343 patients (57.4%) with a home computer and 299 (50.1%) with home Internet service. Average Internet use was 8.5 h per wk (n = 298), and 225 patients used the Internet for health information. Of the 92 patients with lung cancer, 10 indicated interest in on-site support services while 37 expressed interest in Internet-based support. Based on survey results, a slight majority of rural patients have a home computer and Internet access. Internet use for health information appears relatively common. Overall interest for support services among lung cancer patients appears modest with a greater interest in Internet-based services compared with on-site support. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Patient-Oriented Design of Online Support Communities

    Krcmar, Helmut;Leimeister, Jan Marco

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the process of designing and implementing an online support community for patients. After an introduction we describe a process for translating the socio-technical needs of cancer patients into system requirements as well as the development steps towards a functioning community platform for cancer patients. We combine a generic iterative process model for systems development with a prototyping approach towards an engineering process model for community platforms for canc...

  10. Delineation of the KIAA2022 mutation phenotype: two patients with X-linked intellectual disability and distinctive features.

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Ohashi, Ikuko; Naruto, Takuya; Ida, Kazumi; Enomoto, Yumi; Saito, Toshiyuki; Nagai, Jun-Ichi; Wada, Takahito; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing has enabled the screening for a causative mutation in X-linked intellectual disability (XLID). We identified KIAA2022 mutations in two unrelated male patients by targeted sequencing. We selected 13 Japanese male patients with severe intellectual disability (ID), including four sibling patients and nine sporadic patients. Two of thirteen had a KIAA2022 mutation. Patient 1 was a 3-year-old boy. He had severe ID with autistic behavior and hypotonia. Patient 2 was a 5-year-old boy. He also had severe ID with autistic behavior, hypotonia, central hypothyroidism, and steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome. Both patients revealed consistent distinctive features, including upswept hair, narrow forehead, downslanting eyebrows, wide palpebral fissures, long nose, hypoplastic alae nasi, open mouth, and large ears. De novo KIAA2022 mutations (p.Q705X in Patient 1, p.R322X in Patient 2) were detected by targeted sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. KIAA2022 mutations and alterations have been reported in only four families with nonsyndromic ID and epilepsy. KIAA2022 is highly expressed in the fetal and adult brain and plays a crucial role in neuronal development. These additional patients support the evidence that KIAA2022 is a causative gene for XLID. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Family and peer social support and their links to psychological distress among hurricane-exposed minority youth.

    Banks, Donice M; Weems, Carl F

    2014-07-01

    Experiencing a disaster such as a hurricane places youth at a heightened risk for psychological distress such as symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and depression. Social support may contribute to resilience following disasters, but the interrelations of different types of support, level of exposure, and different symptoms among youth is not well understood. This study examined associations among family and peer social support, level of hurricane exposure, and their links to psychological distress using both a large single-time assessment sample (N = 1,098) as well as a longitudinal sample followed over a 6-month period (n = 192). Higher levels of hurricane exposure were related to lower levels of social support from family and peers. Higher levels of family and peer social support demonstrated both concurrent and longitudinal associations with lower levels of psychological distress, with associations varying by social support source and psychological distress outcome. Findings also suggested that the protective effects of high peer social support may be diminished by high hurricane exposure. The results of this study further our understanding of the role of social support in hurricane-exposed youths' emotional functioning and point to the potential importance of efforts to bolster social support following disasters.

  12. Cross-Linked Poly-4-vinylpyridines as Useful Supports in Metal Catalysis: Micro- and Nanometer Scale Morphology.

    D'Archivio, A.A.; Tauro, L.; Galantini, L.; Panatta, A.; Tettamanti, E.; Giammatteo, M.; Jeřábek, Karel; Corain, B.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 268, 1-2 (2007) , s. 176-184 ISSN 1381-1169 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK4050111 Grant - others:MURS(IT) 2001038991 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : cross-linked functional polymers * poly-4-vinylpyridines * supported Pt(0) nanoclusters Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.707, year: 2007

  13. Palladium(II) complexes supported by a bidentate bis(secondary)phosphine linked by pyridine

    Winston, Matthew S.; Bercaw, John E.

    2014-01-01

    A series of complexes of the type (PNP-H2)PdX2 (X=Cl, Br, I) have been synthesized, where PNP-H2 is a bis(secondary)phosphine ligand linked by a pyridine, 2,6-(2'-(Ph(H)P)(C6H4))2(C5H3N). Due to chirality at phosphorus, the parent ligand exists as a

  14. Assessment of capacity support and scattering in experimental high speed vehicle to vehicle MIMO links

    Eggers, Patrick Claus F.; Brown, Tim; Olesen, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary results on the use of the vehicle to vehicle MIMO channel in a rural highway environment are presented. This is looked at both in terms of the available spatial multiplexing through singular value decomposition and also angular distribution within the channel. Results indicate a strong...... predominant line of sight link in general while instances of scattering from other vehicles will cause changes in the Doppler spectrum as well as beamforming jitter....

  15. Elaboration and Autonomy Support in Low-Income Mothers' Reminiscing: Links to Children's Autobiographical Narratives

    Leyva, Diana; Reese, Elaine; Grolnick, Wendy; Price, Carrie

    2008-01-01

    Maternal elaboration and autonomy support during reminiscing facilitate middle-class children's autobiographical narrative skills. In this study, low-income Hispanic, White, and Black mothers' elaboration and autonomy support in reminiscing were examined in relation to children's joint and independent autobiographical narratives and engagement.…

  16. Geological support for the Umbrella Effect as a link between geomagnetic field and climate

    Kitaba, Ikuko; Hyodo, Masayuki; Nakagawa, Takeshi; Katoh, Shigehiro; Dettman, David L.; Sato, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The weakening of the geomagnetic field causes an increase in galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux. Some researchers argue that enhanced GCR flux might lead to a climatic cooling by increasing low cloud formation, which enhances albedo (umbrella effect). Recent studies have reported geological evidence for a link between weakened geomagnetic field and climatic cooling. However, more work is needed on the mechanism of this link, including whether the umbrella effect is playing a central role. In this research, we present new geological evidence that GCR flux change had a greater impact on continental climate than on oceanic climate. According to pollen data from Osaka Bay, Japan, the decrease in temperature of the Siberian air mass was greater than that of the Pacific air mass during geomagnetic reversals in marine isotope stages (MIS) 19 and 31. Consequently, the summer land-ocean temperature gradient was smaller, and the summer monsoon was weaker. Greater terrestrial cooling indicates that a reduction of insolation is playing a key role in the link between the weakening of the geomagnetic field and climatic cooling. The most likely candidate for the mechanism seems to be the increased albedo of the umbrella effect. PMID:28091595

  17. Dual-earner couples' weekend recovery support, state of recovery, and work engagement: Work-linked relationship as a moderator.

    Park, YoungAh; Haun, Verena C

    2017-10-01

    Despite growing recovery research, little is known about couple-dyadic processes of recovery from work. Given that dual-earner couples experience most of their recovery opportunities during nonwork times when they are together, partners in a couple relationship may substantially affect recovery and work engagement. In this study, we propose a couple-dyadic model in which weekend partner recovery support (reported by the recipient partner) is positively related to the recipient partner's state of recovery after the weekend which, in turn, increases the recipient's work engagement the following week (actor-actor mediation effect). We also test the effect of one's state of recovery on the partner's subsequent work engagement (partner effect). Additionally, work-linked relationship status is tested as a moderator of the partner effect. Actor-partner interdependence mediation modeling is used to analyze the data from 167 dual-earner couples who answered surveys on 4 measurement occasions. The results support the indirect effect of partner recovery support on work engagement through the postweekend state of recovery. Multigroup analysis results reveal that the partner effect of state of recovery on work engagement is significant for work-linked couples only and is absent for non-work-linked couples. Theoretical and practical implications, limitations, and future research directions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Linking customisation of ERP systems to support effort: an empirical study

    Koch, Stefan; Mitteregger, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The amount of customisation to an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system has always been a major concern in the context of the implementation. This article focuses on the phase of maintenance and presents an empirical study about the relationship between the amount of customising and the resulting support effort. We establish a structural equation modelling model that explains support effort using customisation effort, organisational characteristics and scope of implementation. The findings using data from an ERP provider show that there is a statistically significant effect: with an increasing amount of customisation, the quantity of telephone calls to support increases, as well as the duration of each call.

  19. HyPR Device: Mobile Support for Hybrid Patient Records

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2014-01-01

    The patient record is one of the central artifacts in medical work that is used to organize, communicate and coordinate important information related to patient care. In many hospitals a double record consisting of an electronic and paper part is maintained. This practice introduces a number of c......PR device decreases configuration work, supports mobility in clinical work and increases awareness on patient data.......The patient record is one of the central artifacts in medical work that is used to organize, communicate and coordinate important information related to patient care. In many hospitals a double record consisting of an electronic and paper part is maintained. This practice introduces a number...... introduce the HyPR Device, a device that merges the paper and electronic patient record into one system. We provide results from a clinical simulation with eight clinicians and discuss the functional, design and infrastructural requirements of such hybrid patient records. Our study suggests that the Hy...

  20. Types of prayer and depressive symptoms among cancer patients: the mediating role of rumination and social support.

    Pérez, John E; Rex Smith, Amy; Norris, Rebecca L; Canenguez, Katia M; Tracey, Elizabeth F; Decristofaro, Susan B

    2011-12-01

    We examined the association between different types of prayer and depressive symptoms--with rumination and social support as potential mediators--in a sample of predominantly White, Christian, and female ambulatory cancer patients. In a cross-sectional design, 179 adult cancer outpatients completed measures of prayer, rumination, social support, depressive symptoms, and demographic variables. Type and stage of cancer were collected from electronic medical charts. Depressive symptoms were negatively correlated with adoration prayer (r = -.15), reception prayer (r = -.17), thanksgiving prayer (r = -.29), and prayer for the well-being of others (r = -.26). In the path analysis, rumination fully mediated the link between thanksgiving prayer and depressive symptoms (β for indirect effect = -.05), whereas social support partially mediated the link between prayer for others and depressive symptoms (β for indirect effect = -.05). These findings suggest that unique mechanisms may link different prayer types to lower depressive symptoms among cancer patients.

  1. Application of the network robustness index to identify critical links supporting Vermont's Bulk milk transportation.

    2011-08-18

    The food supply chain is an interwoven network consisting of producers, processors, : manufacturers, distributors, retailers, and consumers. With the exception of direct : marketing or community-supported agriculture systems, some or all of these int...

  2. [The psychological and social support in patients with psoriasis].

    Makara-Studzińska, Marta; Ziemecki, Piotr; Ziemecka, Anna; Partyka, Iwona

    2013-09-01

    The meaning of non medical forms of support in the treatment of psoriasis is discussed in the paper. Related with psoriasis negative self image and feeling of stigmatization cause various mental disorders. Stress, depression, mental condition affect the appearance of psoriasis. Because of numerous studies and identify the factors and relationships important for psoriasis, patients can take the appropriate psychological and social support. Relaxation techniques, cognitive-behavioral therapy and support groups have a positive effect on the treatment of psoriasis. They reduce the level of stress in the patient, learn emotional control, adequate self-esteem, which leads to the acceptance of the disease and improve the quality of life of the patient.

  3. Elastin cross-linking in the skin from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Ono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1994-01-01

    Two cross-links unique to elastin, desmosine and isodesmosine were measured and compared in skin tissue (left upper arm) from 10 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and from seven age-matched controls. The contents of desmosine and isodesmosine were significantly decreased (p elastin is affected in ALS.

  4. [Medical treatment support to tuberculous patients--from the standpoint of community support].

    2001-11-01

    A symposium with "Medical Treatment Support to Tuberculous Patients--From the standpoint of community support" as its theme was held at the 76th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis (April 20, 2001). "Once, It is infected with tuberculosis, one have to complete medication with a sensitive antituberculosis drug by observing the prescribed dose and duration for successful treatment". For this to be promoted community, it is necessary that (1) to manage patient's medication by medical facilities, (2) to support patient's medication by health center and (3) to support patient's living by welfare offices. Not that each facilities takes such responsibilities alone, but various community must fulfill them continuously in liaison with one another. On what measures should be taken to that end, reports based on practical examples from Nagoya City, Yokohama City and Kanagawa Prefecture have been compiled as follows. 1. It was in-office liaison by conference that supported the DOTS activities of health nurses. 2. It is cooperating, without health, medical treatment, and welfare going out, as follows. (1) A system for hospitals and clinics to carry out DOTS treatment consistently has been kept in good condition. (2) For a patient to take a drug in front of a nurse has become common, causing the patients to be motivated. (3) Assignment of MSW and nurses in charge of DOTS sent from hospitals has make it possible to offer or exchange information smoothly among those concerned. (4) A system for many persons concerned to support patients timely has been kept in good condition. This resulted in an increase in the cure rate of tuberculosis in the areas which have day laborers' lodgings. 3. By DOTS for in-patients, the number of self-discharges has decreased by 1/3, and the treatment completion rate was 94%. 4. In promotion of DOTS for the patients who have health problems other than tuberculosis, the role MSW plays is great. 5. As conditions for supporting DOTS

  5. Radiation oncology: An Irish hospitals approach to supporting patients

    Miller, Caragh [Cork University Hospital (Ireland)], E-mail: caragh.miller@tcd.ie

    2009-02-15

    Despite advances in medical technology, cancer is still one of the leading causes of death globally, leaving many patients to deal with the emotional and psychological aspects associated with cancer and its treatment [Department of Health and Children. A strategy for cancer control in Ireland. National Cancer Forum. Dublin; 2006]. The recognition and management of psychological conditions are an integral part of comprehensive cancer care. As a result, the Health Services Executive as part of the continuing expansion of Cork Radiation Oncology Department created the role of Information and Support Radiation Therapist. This post was specially created during June 2005 to facilitate the smooth entry into the treatment for patients and family members experiencing radiotherapy for the first time. Working alongside the oncology nurses and other health professionals the Information and Support Radiation Therapist aims to provide vital education/information and support to patients and their families. The provision of this new service for patients enables departments to adopt a holistic approach to treatment. This research identifies the cancer services and psychological support services in Ireland. Up-to-date audits of the new patient services established in the Cork Radiation Oncology Department and their psychological contribution towards cancer development and treatment are also discussed.

  6. Radiation oncology: An Irish hospitals approach to supporting patients

    Miller, Caragh

    2009-01-01

    Despite advances in medical technology, cancer is still one of the leading causes of death globally, leaving many patients to deal with the emotional and psychological aspects associated with cancer and its treatment [Department of Health and Children. A strategy for cancer control in Ireland. National Cancer Forum. Dublin; 2006]. The recognition and management of psychological conditions are an integral part of comprehensive cancer care. As a result, the Health Services Executive as part of the continuing expansion of Cork Radiation Oncology Department created the role of Information and Support Radiation Therapist. This post was specially created during June 2005 to facilitate the smooth entry into the treatment for patients and family members experiencing radiotherapy for the first time. Working alongside the oncology nurses and other health professionals the Information and Support Radiation Therapist aims to provide vital education/information and support to patients and their families. The provision of this new service for patients enables departments to adopt a holistic approach to treatment. This research identifies the cancer services and psychological support services in Ireland. Up-to-date audits of the new patient services established in the Cork Radiation Oncology Department and their psychological contribution towards cancer development and treatment are also discussed

  7. Compliance with nutrition support guidelines in acutely burned patients.

    Holt, Brennen; Graves, Caran; Faraklas, Iris; Cochran, Amalia

    2012-08-01

    Adequate and timely provision of nutritional support is a crucial component of care of the critically ill burn patient. The goal of this study was to assess a single center's consistency with Society of Critical Care Medicine/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SCCM/ASPEN) guidelines for nutritional support in critically ill patients. Acutely burned patients >45kg in weight admitted to a regional burn center during a two-year period and who required 5 or more days of full enteral nutritional support were eligible for inclusion in this retrospective review. Specific outcomes evaluated include time from admission to feeding tube placement and enteral feeding initiation and percent of nutritional goal received within the first week of hospital stay. Descriptive statistics were used for all analyses. IRB approval was obtained. Thirty-seven patients were included in this retrospective review. Median age of patients was 44.9 years (IQR: 24.2-55.1), and median burn injury size was 30% (IQR: 19-47). Median time to feeding tube placement was 31.1h post admission (IQR: 23.6-50.2h), while median time to initiation of EN was 47.9h post admission (IQR: 32.4-59.9h). The median time required for patients to reach 60% of caloric goal was 3 days post-admission (IQR: 3-4.5). The median time for initiation of enteral nutrition was within the SCCM/ASPEN guidelines for initial nutrition in the critically ill patient. This project identified a 16h time lag between placement of enteral access and initiation of enteral nutrition. Development of a protocol for feeding tube placement and enteral nutrition management may optimize early nutritional support in the acutely injured burn patient. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  8. Kundalini yoga as a support therapy for cancer patients

    Kröneck, Mia

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to describe cancer patient’s experience of kundalini yoga and its effect on their internal coping resources. The intention of this study is to put forward kundalini yoga as a support therapy for cancer patients for improving their wellbeing during active cancer treatment. This is a descriptive study. An academic literature review was conducted for cancer, cancer treatment, internal coping resources and yoga as therapy topics. Four voluntary female cancer patients (...

  9. A sequential model to link contextual risk, perception and public support for flood adaptation policy.

    Shao, Wanyun; Xian, Siyuan; Lin, Ning; Small, Mitchell J

    2017-10-01

    The economic damage from coastal flooding has dramatically increased over the past several decades, owing to rapid development in shoreline areas and possible effects of climate change. To respond to these trends, it is imperative for policy makers to understand individuals' support for flood adaptation policy. Using original survey data for all coastal counties of the United States Gulf Coast merged with contextual data on flood risk, this study investigates coastal residents' support for two adaptation policy measures: incentives for relocation and funding for educational programs on emergency planning and evacuation. Specifically, this study explores the interactive relationships among contextual flood risks, perceived flood risks and policy support for flood adaptation, with the effects of social-demographic variables being controlled. Age, gender, race and partisanship are found to significantly affect individuals' policy support for both adaptation measures. The contextual flooding risks, indicated by distance from the coast, maximum wind speed and peak height of storm surge associated with the last hurricane landfall, and percentage of high-risk flood zone per county, are shown to impact one's perceptions of risk, which in turn influence one's support for both policy measures. The key finding -risk perception mediates the impact of contextual risk conditions on public support for flood management policies - highlights the need to ensure that the public is well informed by the latest scientific, engineering and economic knowledge. To achieve this, more information on current and future flood risks and options available for mitigation as well as risk communication tools are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. African American Patients' Psychosocial Support Needs and Barriers to Treatment: Patient Needs Assessment.

    Davey, Maureen P; Bilkins, Brianna; Diamond, Guy; Willis, Alliric I; Mitchell, Edith P; Davey, Adam; Young, Faith M

    2016-09-01

    This study assessed adult patient's psychosocial support needs and treatment barriers in an urban diverse cancer center. A needs assessment was conducted with a convenience sample of adult oncology patients (n = 113; 71.7 % African American). Most patients were parenting school-age children and worried about them (96 %); 86.7 % would attend a family support program. Among patients who were married or partnered (68 %), 63.7 % were concerned about communication, coping, and emotional support; 53.9 % would attend a couple support program. Patients identified similar treatment barriers: transportation, babysitting for younger children, convenience of time/place, and refreshments. Findings suggest that behavioral health care providers should be available to screen cancer patients and improve access to appropriate psychosocial oncology support programs.

  11. Pediatric advanced life support and sedation of pediatric dental patients.

    Kim, Jongbin

    2016-03-01

    Programs provided by the Korea Association of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation include Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), and Korean Advanced Life Support (KALS). However, programs pertinent to dental care are lacking. Since 2015, related organizations have been attempting to develop a Dental Advanced Life Support (DALS) program, which can meet the needs of the dental environment. Generally, for initial management of emergency situations, basic life support is most important. However, emergencies in young children mostly involve breathing. Therefore, physicians who treat pediatric dental patients should learn PALS. It is necessary for the physician to regularly renew training every two years to be able to immediately implement professional skills in emergency situations. In order to manage emergency situations in the pediatric dental clinic, respiratory support is most important. Therefore, mastering professional PALS, which includes respiratory care and core cases, particularly upper airway obstruction and respiratory depression caused by a respiratory control problem, would be highly desirable for a physician who treats pediatric dental patients. Regular training and renewal training every two years is absolutely necessary to be able to immediately implement professional skills in emergency situations.

  12. Social Support and Relationship Satisfaction as Moderators of the Stress-Mood-Alcohol Link Association in US Navy Members.

    Kelley, Michelle L; Milletich, Robert J; Hollis, Brittany F; Veprinsky, Anna; Robbins, Allison T; Snell, Alicia K

    2017-02-01

    The present study examined associations between stress and problematic alcohol use among US Navy members anticipating deployment, whether depressive symptoms mediated the stress-alcohol link, and whether social support and relationship satisfaction moderated associations between stress, depressive symptoms, and problematic alcohol use. Participants were 108 US Navy members assigned to an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer anticipating an 8-month deployment after Operational Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom. Stress was indirectly related to problematic alcohol use such that higher levels of stress were associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms, which were further associated with higher levels of alcohol use. The indirect effect of stress to problematic alcohol use via depressive symptoms was tested at different levels of social support and relationship satisfaction. At higher levels of social support and relationship satisfaction, the association between stress and problematic alcohol use via depressive symptoms decreased. Results help identify targets for alcohol prevention efforts among current military members.

  13. Palladium(II) complexes supported by a bidentate bis(secondary)phosphine linked by pyridine

    Winston, Matthew S.

    2014-10-01

    A series of complexes of the type (PNP-H2)PdX2 (X=Cl, Br, I) have been synthesized, where PNP-H2 is a bis(secondary)phosphine ligand linked by a pyridine, 2,6-(2\\'-(Ph(H)P)(C6H4))2(C5H3N). Due to chirality at phosphorus, the parent ligand exists as a mixture of nearly equivalent rac and meso diastereomers non-interconverting at room temperature. When ligated to Pd(II) halides, however, the diastereomeric ratio is dependent upon the halide. The chloro, bromo, and iodo complexes have been characterized crystallographically. Conformationally similar meso diastereomers of each dihalide are roughly C s symmetric in the solid state, while the rac diastereomers (identified only for X=Br, I) show substantially different solid-state conformations. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Feasibility Study and Experimental Verification of Simplified Fiber-Supported 60-GHz Picocell Mobile Backhaul Links

    Lebedev, Alexander; Pang, Xiaodan; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a fiber-wireless transmission system for optimized delivery of 60-GHz radio frequency (RF) signals through picocell mobile backhaul connections. We identify advantages of 60-GHz links for utilization in short-range mobile backhaul through feasibility...... the wireless transmission distance from 4 m to a few hundred meters has been taken into account in the setup design, and the techniques to extend the wireless distance are analyzed....... analysis and comparison with an alternative E-band (60–90 GHz) technology. The 60-GHz fiber-wireless-fiber setup is then introduced: two spans of up to 20 km of optical fiber are deployed and bridged by up to 4 m of wireless distance. The 60-GHz radio-over-fiber technology is utilized in the first span...

  15. A Fine-Grained API Link Prediction Approach Supporting CMDA Mashup Recommendation

    Zhang, J.; Bao, Q.; Lee, T. J.; Ramachandran, R.; Lee, S.; Pan, L.; Gatlin, P. N.; Maskey, M.

    2017-12-01

    Service (API) discovery and recommendation is key to the wide spread of service oriented architecture and service oriented software engineering. Service recommendation typically relies on service linkage prediction calculated by the semantic distances (or similarities) among services based on their collection of inherent attributes. Given a specific context (mashup goal), however, different attributes may contribute differently to a service linkage. In this work, instead of training a model for all attributes as a whole, a novel approach is presented to simultaneously train separate models for individual attributes. Our contributions are summarized in three-fold. First is that we have developed a scalable attribute-level data model, featuring scalability and extensibility. We have extended Multiplicative Attribute Graph (MAG) model to represent node profiles featuring rich categorical attributes, while relaxing its constraint of requiring a priori knowledge of predefined attributes. LDA is leveraged to dynamically identify attributes based on attribute modeling, and multiple Gaussian fit is applied to find global optimal values. The second contribution is that we have seamlessly integrated the latent relationships between API attributes as well as observed network structure based on historical API usage data. Such a layered information model enables us to predict the probability of a link between two APIs based on their attribute link affinities carrying a variety of information including meta data, semantic data, historical usage data, as well as crowdsourcing user comments and annotations. The third contribution is that we have developed a finegrained context-aware mashup-API recommendation technique. On top of individual models trained for separate attributes, a dedicated layer is trained to represent the latent attribute distribution regarding mashup purpose, i.e., sensitivity of attributes to context. Thus, given the description of an intended mashup, the

  16. Size Matters: The Link between Staff Size and Perceived Organizational Support in Early Childhood Education

    Ho, Dora; Lee, Moosung; Teng, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between staff size and perceived organizational support (POS) in early childhood education (ECE) organizations. Design/methodology/approach: A territory-wide questionnaire survey was designed to investigate the perceptions of preschool teachers in Hong Kong on four dimensions of…

  17. Pyoderma Gangrenosum–Like Ulcer in a Patient With X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia

    Murray, Patrick R.; Jain, Ashish; Uzel, Gulbu; Ranken, Raymond; Ivy, Cristina; Blyn, Lawrence B.; Ecker, David J.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Turner, Maria L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pyoderma gangrenosum–like ulcers and cellulitis of the lower extremities associated with recurrent fevers in patients with X-linked (Bruton) agammaglobulinemia have been reported to be caused by Helicobacter bilis (formerly classified as Flexispira rappini and then Helicobacter strain flexispira taxon 8). Consistent themes in these reports are the difficulty in recovering this organism in blood and wound cultures and in maintaining isolates in vitro. We confirmed the presence of this organism in a patient’s culture by using a novel application of gene amplification polymerase chain reaction and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Observation An adolescent boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia presented with indurated plaques and a chronic leg ulcer whose origin was strongly suspected to be an H bilis organism. Histologic analysis demonstrated positive Warthin-Starry staining of curvilinear rods, which grew in culture but failed to grow when sub-cultured. They could not be identified by conventional techniques. A combination of gene amplification by polymerase chain reaction and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of this organism. Conclusions This novel technology was useful in the identification of a difficult-to-grow Helicobacter organism, the cause of pyoderma gangrenosum–like leg ulcers in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia. Correct identification of this organism as the cause of pyoderma gangrenosum–like ulcers in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia is of great importance for the early initiation of appropriate and curative antibiotic therapy. PMID:20479300

  18. Patients on weaning trials classified with support vector machines

    Garde, Ainara; Caminal, Pere; Giraldo, Beatriz F; Schroeder, Rico; Voss, Andreas; Benito, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    The process of discontinuing mechanical ventilation is called weaning and is one of the most challenging problems in intensive care. An unnecessary delay in the discontinuation process and an early weaning trial are undesirable. This study aims to characterize the respiratory pattern through features that permit the identification of patients' conditions in weaning trials. Three groups of patients have been considered: 94 patients with successful weaning trials, who could maintain spontaneous breathing after 48 h (GSucc); 39 patients who failed the weaning trial (GFail) and 21 patients who had successful weaning trials, but required reintubation in less than 48 h (GRein). Patients are characterized by their cardiorespiratory interactions, which are described by joint symbolic dynamics (JSD) applied to the cardiac interbeat and breath durations. The most discriminating features in the classification of the different groups of patients (GSucc, GFail and GRein) are identified by support vector machines (SVMs). The SVM-based feature selection algorithm has an accuracy of 81% in classifying GSucc versus the rest of the patients, 83% in classifying GRein versus GSucc patients and 81% in classifying GRein versus the rest of the patients. Moreover, a good balance between sensitivity and specificity is achieved in all classifications

  19. The supportive care needs for prostate cancer patients in Sarawak.

    Cheah, Whye Lian; Ling, Ngok Chuo; Chang, Kam Hock

    2016-02-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of unmet supportive care needs among prostate cancer patients. The cross-sectional study was conducted among all prostate cancer patients at the Sarawak General Hospital. Interview was done using the Supportive Care Needs Survey-Short Form (SCNS-SF) and the Health Service Utilization Questionnaires (HSUQ). Data were analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 20. A total of ninety-five patients participated, with majority were aged 65 and above and of primary educational level. The two most frequently reported unmet supportive care needs were "informed about cancer which is under control or diminishing" and "informed about things you can do to help yourself to get well" under the domain Health System and Information. Respondents who were older (65 years and above) had significant lower unmet needs in psychology (P<0.01), and sexuality compared to the younger group below 65 years (P<0.01). Except for physical and daily living, respondents with primary school level had significant lower unmet needs in all domains compared to secondary school level. Respondents with known stages of cancer had higher unmet needs in all domains compared to those who did not know. Healthcare providers should provide more responsive, emotionally sensitive and client-centered care to patients with prostate cancer, particularly in the area of Health System and Information, and psychological support.

  20. Online peer support for patients with somatic diseases

    Kraan, C.F.

    2008-01-01

    With the availability of the Internet, so rose the opportunity to share concerns and experiences with peers online. In this thesis the meaning of online support groups for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia and breast cancer was examined from different perspectives. To this aim, six

  1. The European Registry for Patients with Mechanical Circulatory Support (EUROMACS)

    de By, Theo M M H; Mohacsi, Paul; Gummert, Jan

    2015-01-01

    other founding international members. It aims to promote scientific research to improve care of end-stage heart failure patients with ventricular assist device or a total artificial heart as long-term mechanical circulatory support. Likewise, the organization aims to provide and maintain a registry...

  2. Diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy: Perceptions of patients and providers

    Fransen, Mirjam P.; Beune, Erik J. A. J.; Baim-Lance, Abigail M.; Bruessing, Raynold C.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore perceptions and strategies of health care providers regarding diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy (LHL), and to compare their self-management support with the needs of patients with LHL and type 2 diabetes. This study

  3. Software Process Improvement: Supporting the Linking of the Software and the Business Strategies

    Albuquerque, Adriano Bessa; Rocha, Ana Regina; Lima, Andreia Cavalcanti

    The market is becoming more and more competitive, a lot of products and services depend of the software product and the software is one of the most important assets, which influence the organizations’ businesses. Considering this context, we can observe that the companies must to deal with the software, developing or acquiring, carefully. One of the perspectives that can help to take advantage of the software, supporting effectively the business, is to invest on the organization’s software processes. This paper presents an approach to evaluate and improve the processes assets of the software organizations, based on internationally well-known standards and process models. This approach is supported by automated tools from the TABA Workstation and is part of a wider improvement strategy constituted of three layers (organizational layer, process execution layer and external entity layer). Moreover, this paper presents the experience of use and their results.

  4. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from a patient with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis

    Chi-Hsien Peng

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS is a hereditary retinal dystrophy manifested as splitting of anatomical layers of retina. In this report, we generated a patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line, TVGH-iPSC-013-05, from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a male patient with XLRS by using the Sendai-virus delivery system. We believe that XLRS patient-specific iPSCs provide a powerful in vitro model for evaluating the pathological phenotypes of the disease.

  5. Legionnaires' Disease acquired within the homes of two patients: link to the home water supply

    Stout, J.E.; Yu, V.L.; Muraca, P.

    1987-01-01

    Two patients with sporadic community-acquired legionnaires' disease are described. Legionella pneumophila was isolated from sputum specimens, and seroconversion of antibody titers was demonstrated for both patients. Legionella pneumophila was also recovered from the residential water supply of both patients. In each case, the serogroup of the environmental organism matched that of the infecting organism. In one patient, serogroup 3 was isolated - a rare cause of legionnaires' disease, and in the second case, monoclonal antibody testing confirmed that the serogroup 1 organisms isolated from sputum and residential water supply samples were identical. The incubation period of legionnaires' disease is presumed to be up to two weeks. Because of medical problems, both patients had been confined to their homes for the entire two weeks before the onset of symptoms. This is the first report that links acquisition of community-acquired legionnaires' disease to contaminated water supplies within the homes of susceptible patients

  6. Supportive and non-supportive interactions in families with a type 2 diabetes patient

    Bennich, Birgitte B; Røder, Michael E; Overgaard, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    changes and diabetes self-management. The purpose of this integrative review was to summarise and assess published studies on the intra-family perspective of supportive and non-supportive interactions in families with a type 2 diabetes patient. METHODS: Included in the review were published qualitative......BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes and its management affect the patient and the close family potentially causing either psychological distress or increased sense of responsibility and collaboration in these families. Interactions between patient and family play an important role in maintaining lifestyle...... of reference lists. Quality assessment, data extraction and analysis were undertaken on all included studies. RESULTS: We identified five eligible research papers. Employing content analysis three categories describing interactions were refined: Impact of practical action, impact of emotional involvement...

  7. Information security requirements in patient-centred healthcare support systems.

    Alsalamah, Shada; Gray, W Alex; Hilton, Jeremy; Alsalamah, Hessah

    2013-01-01

    Enabling Patient-Centred (PC) care in modern healthcare requires the flow of medical information with the patient between different healthcare providers as they follow the patient's treatment plan. However, PC care threatens the stability of the balance of information security in the support systems since legacy systems fall short of attaining a security balance when sharing their information due to compromises made between its availability, integrity, and confidentiality. Results show that the main reason for this is that information security implementation in discrete legacy systems focused mainly on information confidentiality and integrity leaving availability a challenge in collaboration. Through an empirical study using domain analysis, observations, and interviews, this paper identifies a need for six information security requirements in legacy systems to cope with this situation in order to attain the security balance in systems supporting PC care implementation in modern healthcare.

  8. Supporting cancer patients and their relatives through storytelling

    la Cour, Karen; Ledderer, Loni; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2016-01-01

    observations, informal conversations and follow-up interviews conducted one month after completing the intervention. Analysis was performed drawing on narrative theory combined with social practice theory. The results demonstrate that the use of storytelling and metaphors intertwined with other course...... activities, such as dancing and arts & crafts, provided the patients and their relatives with strategies to manage cancer-related concerns, which they were later able to apply in their everyday lives. The study results may be useful to other professionals in clinical practice for rehabilitation purposes......Previous research on psychosocial support for cancer-related concerns has primarily focused on either patients or their relatives, although limited research is available on how patients and their relatives can be supported together. The aim of this article is to explore the use of storytelling...

  9. Perception-Link Behavior Model: Supporting a Novel Operator Interface for a Customizable Anthropomorphic Telepresence Robot

    William Gu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A customizable anthropomorphic telepresence robot (CATR is an emerging medium that might have the highest degree of social presence among the existing mediated communication mediums. Unfortunately, there are problems with teleoperating a CATR, and these problems can deteriorate the gesture motion in a CATR. These problems are the disruption during decoupling, discontinuity due to the unstable transmission and jerkiness due to the reactive collision avoidance. From the review, none of the existing interfaces can simultaneously fix all of the problems. Hence, a novel framework with the perception-link behavior model (PLBM was proposed. The PLBM adopts the distributed spatiotemporal representation for all of its input signals. Equipping it with other components, the PLBM can solve the above problems with some limitations. For instance, the PLBM can retrieve missing modalities from its experience during decoupling. Next, the PLBM can handle up to a high level of drop rate in the network connection because it is dealing with gesture style and not pose. For collision prevention, the PLBM can tune the incoming gesture style so that the CATR can deliberately and smoothly avoid a collision. In summary, the framework consists of PLBM being able to increase the user’s presence on a CATR by synthesizing expressive user gestures.

  10. Development of Alarm System link Drawing for Operation Support for APR1400 Digital Main Control Room

    Kim, Ki-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Digitalized MMI(Man-Machine Interface) including Digital Main Control Room(MCR) and digital I and C system was being applied for SKN 3 and 4 Nuclear Power Plant(NPP) and subsequent APR1400 NPP type. But, operators can not easily find instrument for alarm immediately. Therefore, Alarm system is required to easily find instrument for Alarm. For this implementation, we will plan system design considering design feature without affecting network load and CPU load. We have developed Alarm system link drawing for digital MCR. Operators of the digitalized MCR navigates from their consoles to the drawings related to the plant alarms and their instruments or the operation status. Such method gives cognitive load to the operators having to travel to different locations in finding the related information. Screen Sharing System, which is the fundamental technique for Drawing Interconnection Alarm System is close to completion, and it should be functionally tested and verified by the human factor engineering. For the actual application to the operating plants, the drawings to be interconnected to the alarms and the opinions from the operators/maintenance departments for designating alarm number should be surveyed, Also, another function that allows the access to the alarm related drawings not only from the MCR but also from the other offices

  11. Development of Alarm System link Drawing for Operation Support for APR1400 Digital Main Control Room

    Kim, Ki-Hwan [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Digitalized MMI(Man-Machine Interface) including Digital Main Control Room(MCR) and digital I and C system was being applied for SKN 3 and 4 Nuclear Power Plant(NPP) and subsequent APR1400 NPP type. But, operators can not easily find instrument for alarm immediately. Therefore, Alarm system is required to easily find instrument for Alarm. For this implementation, we will plan system design considering design feature without affecting network load and CPU load. We have developed Alarm system link drawing for digital MCR. Operators of the digitalized MCR navigates from their consoles to the drawings related to the plant alarms and their instruments or the operation status. Such method gives cognitive load to the operators having to travel to different locations in finding the related information. Screen Sharing System, which is the fundamental technique for Drawing Interconnection Alarm System is close to completion, and it should be functionally tested and verified by the human factor engineering. For the actual application to the operating plants, the drawings to be interconnected to the alarms and the opinions from the operators/maintenance departments for designating alarm number should be surveyed, Also, another function that allows the access to the alarm related drawings not only from the MCR but also from the other offices.

  12. Novel enzymatically cross-linked hyaluronan hydrogels support the formation of 3D neuronal networks.

    Broguiere, Nicolas; Isenmann, Luca; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2016-08-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an essential component of the central nervous system's extracellular matrix and its high molecular weight (MW) form has anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties relevant for regenerative medicine. Here, we introduce a new hydrogel based on high MW HA which is cross-linked using the transglutaminase (TG) activity of the activated blood coagulation factor XIII (FXIIIa). These HA-TG gels have significant advantages for neural tissue engineering compared to previous HA gels. Due to their chemical inertness in the absence of FXIIIa, the material can be stored long-term, is stable in solution, and shows no cytotoxicity. The gelation is completely cell-friendly due to the specificity of the enzyme and the gelation rate can be tuned from seconds to hours at physiological pH and independently of stiffness. The gels are injectable, and attach covalently to fibrinogen and fibrin, two common bioactive components in in vitro tissue engineering, as well as proteins present in vivo, allowing the gels to covalently bind to brain or spinal cord defects. These optimal chemical and bioactive properties of HA-TG gels enabled the formation of 3D neuronal cultures of unprecedented performance, showing fast neurite outgrowth, axonal and dendritic speciation, strong synaptic connectivity in 3D networks, and rapidly-occurring and long-lasting coordinated electrical activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The need for psycho-oncological support for melanoma patients

    Mayer, Simone; Teufel, Martin; Schaeffeler, Norbert; Keim, Ulrike; Garbe, Claus; Eigentler, Thomas Kurt; Zipfel, Stephan; Forschner, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Despite an increasing number of promising treatment options, only a limited number of studies concerning melanoma patients’ psycho-oncological distress have been carried out. However, multiple screening tools are in use to assess the need for psycho-oncological support. This study aimed first to identify parameters in melanoma patients that are associated with a higher risk for being psycho-oncologically distressed and second to compare patients’ self-evaluation concerning the need for psycho-oncological support with the results of established screening tools. We performed a cross-sectional study including 254 melanoma patients from the Center for Dermatooncology at the University of Tuebingen. The study was performed between June 2010 and February 2013. Several screening instruments were included: the Distress Thermometer (DT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the patients’ subjective evaluation concerning psycho-oncological support. Binary logistic regression was performed to identify factors that indicate the need for psycho-oncological support. Patients’ subjective evaluation concerning the need for psycho-oncological support, female gender, and psychotherapeutic or psychiatric treatment at present or in the past had the highest impact on values above threshold in the DT. The odds ratio of patients’ self-evaluation (9.89) was even higher than somatic factors like female gender (1.85), duration of illness (0.99), or increasing age (0.97). Patients’ self-evaluation concerning the need for psycho-oncological support indicated a moderate correlation with the results of the screening tools included. In addition to the results obtained by screening tools like the DT, we could demonstrate that patients’ self-evaluation is an important instrument to identify patients who need psycho-oncological support. PMID:28906378

  14. Gender and the Perceived Equity - Perceived Organizational Support Link in Egypt

    Mohamed Hossameldin KHALIFA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at examining the relationships between perceived internal and external salary equities as independent variables, and perceived organizational support (POS as a dependent variable among Egyptian employees. Another objective was to investigate the moderation effect of gender on the aforementioned relationships. Data was obtained using a direct survey of 115 Egyptian employees drawn from a variety of industries. Findings suggest that both facets of perceived salary equity (internal and external have positive relationships with POS. Findings further suggest that the relationship between perceived internal salary equity and POS is stronger among males. Theoretical contributions, study limitations, as well as recommendations for future research are discussed.

  15. The link between negative emotions and eating disorder behaviour in patients with anorexia nervosa.

    Espeset, Ester M S; Gulliksen, Kjersti S; Nordbø, Ragnfrid H S; Skårderud, Finn; Holte, Arne

    2012-11-01

    Several theoretical models suggest that deficits in emotional regulation are central in the maintenance of anorexia nervosa (AN). Few studies have examined how patients view the relationship between negative affect and anorectic behaviour. We explored how patients with AN manage the aversive emotions sadness, anger, fear and disgust, and how they link these experiences to their eating disorder behaviours. Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 14 women aged 19-39 years diagnosed with AN (DSM-IV). Interviews were analyzed using Grounded Theory methods. The participants tended to inhibit expression of sadness and anger in interpersonal situations and reported high levels of anger towards themselves, self-disgust and fear of becoming fat. Different emotions were managed by means of specific eating disorder behaviours. Sadness was particularly linked to body dissatisfaction and was managed through restrictive eating and purging. Anger was avoided by means of restrictive eating and purging and released through anorectic self-control, self-harm and exercising. Fear was linked to fear of fatness and was managed through restrictive eating, purging and body checking. Participants avoided the feeling of disgust by avoiding food and body focused situations. Treatment models of eating disorders highlight the significance of working with emotional acceptance and coping in this patient group. Knowledge about how patients understand the relationships between their negative emotions and their anorectic behaviour may be an important addition to treatment programmes for AN. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  16. Implementation of telehealth support for patients with type 2 diabetes using insulin treatment: an exploratory study.

    Turner, Jane; Larsen, Mark; Tarassenko, Lionel; Neil, Andrew; Farmer, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Initiating and adjusting insulin treatment for people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) requires frequent clinician contacts both face-to-face and by telephone. We explored the use of a telehealth system to offer additional support to these patients. Twenty-three patients with uncontrolled T2D were recruited from nine general practices to assess the feasibility and acceptability of telehealth monitoring and support for insulin initiation and adjustment. The intervention included a standard algorithm for self-titration of insulin dose, a Bluetooth enabled glucose meter linked to a mobile phone, an integrated diary to record insulin dose, feedback of charted blood glucose data and telehealth nurse review with telephone follow-up. Additional contact with patients was initiated when no readings were transmitted for >3 days or when persistent hyper- or hypoglycaemia was identified. Reponses of patients and clinicians to the system were assessed informally. The mean (SD) patient age was 58 years (12) with 78% male. The mean (SD) diabetes duration was 6.4 years (4.5), HbA1c at baseline was 9.5% (2.2), and the decrease in HbA1c at three months was 0.52% (0.91) with an insulin dose increase of 9 units (26). A mean (SD) of 160 (93) blood glucose readings was transmitted per patient in these three months. Practice nurses and general practitioners (GPs) viewed the technology as having the potential to improve patient care. Most patients were able to use the equipment with training and welcomed review of their blood glucose readings by a telehealth nurse. Although the concept of telehealth monitoring is unfamiliar to most patients and practice nurses, the technology improved the support available for T2D patients commencing insulin treatment.

  17. Influence of Neighborhood-level Factors on Social Support in Early-stage Breast Cancer Patients and Controls

    Thompson, Tess; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Pérez, Maria; Struthers, Jim; Sefko, Julianne A.; Lian, Min; Schootman, Mario; Jeffe, Donna B.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Low social support has been linked to negative health outcomes in breast cancer patients. Objective We examined associations between perceived social support, neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation, and neighborhood-level social support in early-stage breast cancer patients and controls. Methods This two-year longitudinal study in the United States included information collected from telephone interviews and clinical records of 541 early-stage patients and 542 controls recruited from 2003 to 2007. Social support was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey (MOS-SS). Residential addresses were geocoded and used to develop measures including neighborhood social support (based on MOS-SS scores from nearby controls) and neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation (a composite index of census tract characteristics). Latent trajectory models were used to determine effects of neighborhood conditions on the stable (intercept) and changing (slope) aspects of social support. Results In a model with only neighborhood variables, greater socioeconomic deprivation was associated with patients’ lower stable social support (standardized estimate = −0.12, p = .027); neighborhood-level social support was associated with social support change (standardized estimate = 0.17, p = .046). After adding individual-level covariates, there were no direct neighborhood effects on social support. In patients, neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation was associated with support indirectly through marriage, insurance status, negative affect, and general health. In controls, neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation was associated with support indirectly through marriage (p social support differed in patients and controls. Psychosocial and neighborhood interventions may help patients with low social support, particularly patients without partnered relationships in deprived areas. PMID:27017091

  18. Linking nurses' perceptions of patient care quality to job satisfaction: the role of authentic leadership and empowering professional practice environments.

    Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Fida, Roberta

    2015-05-01

    A model linking authentic leadership, structural empowerment, and supportive professional practice environments to nurses' perceptions of patient care quality and job satisfaction was tested. Positive work environment characteristics are important for nurses' perceptions of patient care quality and job satisfaction (significant factors for retention). Few studies have examined the mechanism by which these characteristics operate to influence perceptions of patient care quality or job satisfaction. A cross-sectional provincial survey of 723 Canadian nurses was used to test the hypothesized models using structural equation modeling. The model was an acceptable fit and all paths were significant. Authentic leadership had a positive effect on structural empowerment, which had a positive effect on perceived support for professional practice and a negative effect on nurses' perceptions that inadequate unit staffing prevented them from providing high-quality patient care. These workplace conditions predicted job satisfaction. Authentic leaders play an important role in creating empowering professional practice environments that foster high-quality care and job satisfaction.

  19. [Suspension of Respiratory Support in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis].

    Silberberg, Agustín A; Robetto, Josefina; Achával, Mora

    2018-01-01

    Decision making in advanced Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) patients keeps on being a controversial issue. The aim of this work is to discuss ethical implications of withdrawing respiratory support treatment in patients with ALS. Through a bibliographic search on Pubmed database (2010-2016) we investigated whether or not the use of Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV) and Mechanical Ventilation (MV) would increase survival and quality of life. We included 38 review articles. From these papers, results and ethical implications of initiating and mainly withdrawing respiratory support were analyzed. Survival time increased with NIV and with MV. Quality of life, above all according to physiological criteria, improved with NIV but regarding MV it remained controversial. Implementation and future withdrawal of MV seemed open to medical and ethical discussion. From a perspective of the intrinsic dignity of every human being, whatever its quality of life was, and knowing that no effective therapies for the underlying disease are available, the decision to remove MV in a patient with advanced ALS requires: knowledge of the will of the patient and, above all, evaluating whether this respiratory support measure is becoming objectively disproportionate.

  20. Skin barrier properties in patients with recessive X-linked ichthyosis

    Johansen, J D; Ramsing, D; Vejlsgaard, G

    1995-01-01

    increased in controls compared to ichthyosis patients, when evaluated by TEWL. When evaluated by erythema index a statistically significant increase in redness was found in controls, but not in ichthyosis patients. Electrical capacitance, reflecting skin hydration, was significantly reduced in RXLI patients......Patients with X-linked recessive ichthyosis (RXLI) were studied as a model of the effect of disturbed epidermal lipid composition on skin barrier function. Thirteen patients with RXLI and 15 age- and sex-matched controls were patch-tested with sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) 0.5% for 24 h. Basal skin...... properties and skin response to SLS were studied by measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), electrical capacitance and erythema index. No statistically significant difference in basal TEWL was found between the two groups. The skin response to SLS was found to be statistically significantly...

  1. Cultural Variability in the Link Between Environmental Concern and Support for Environmental Action.

    Eom, Kimin; Kim, Heejung S; Sherman, David K; Ishii, Keiko

    2016-10-01

    Research on sustainability behaviors has been based on the assumption that increasing personal concerns about the environment will increase proenvironmental action. We tested whether this assumption is more applicable to individualistic cultures than to collectivistic cultures. In Study 1, we compared 47 countries ( N = 57,268) and found that they varied considerably in the degree to which environmental concern predicted support for proenvironmental action. National-level individualism explained the between-nation variability above and beyond the effects of other cultural values and independently of person-level individualism. In Study 2, we compared individualistic and collectivistic nations (United States vs. Japan; N = 251) and found culture-specific predictors of proenvironmental behavior. Environmental concern predicted environmentally friendly consumer choice among European Americans but not Japanese. For Japanese participants, perceived norms about environmental behavior predicted proenvironmental decision making. Facilitating sustainability across nations requires an understanding of how culture determines which psychological factors drive human action.

  2. Assessment of Preschool Early Literacy Skills: Linking Children's Educational Needs with Empirically Supported Instructional Activities.

    Lonigan, Christopher J; Allan, Nicholas P; Lerner, Matthew D

    2011-05-01

    The importance of the preschool period for becoming a skilled reader is highlighted by a significant body of evidence that preschool children's development in the areas of oral language, phonological awareness, and print knowledge is predictive of how well they will learn to read once they are exposed to formal reading instruction in elementary school. Although there are now a number of empirically supported instructional activities for helping children who are at -risk of later reading difficulties acquire these early literacy skills, limitations in instructional time and opportunities in most preschool settings requires the use of valid assessment procedures to ensure that instructional resources are utilized efficiently. In this paper, we discuss the degree to which informal, diagnostic, screening, and progress-monitoring assessments of preschool early literacy skills can inform instructional decisions by considering the strengths and weaknesses of each approach to assessment.

  3. Linking vegetable preferences, health and local food systems through community-supported agriculture.

    Wilkins, Jennifer L; Farrell, Tracy J; Rangarajan, Anusuya

    2015-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the influence of participation in community-supported agriculture (CSA) on vegetable exposure, vegetable intake during and after the CSA season, and preference related to locally produced vegetables acquired directly from CSA growers. Quantitative surveys were administered at three time points in two harvest seasons to four groups of CSA participants: new full-paying, returning full-paying, new subsidized and returning subsidized members. Questionnaires included a vegetable frequency measure and measures of new and changed vegetable preference. Comparisons were made between new and returning CSA members and between those receiving subsidies and full-paying members. The research was conducted in a rural county in New York, USA. CSA members who agreed to participate in the study. Analysis was based on 151 usable questionnaires. CSA participants reported higher intake of eleven different vegetables during the CSA season, with a sustained increase in some winter vegetables. Over half of the respondents reported trying at least one, and up to eleven, new vegetables. Sustained preferences for CSA items were reported. While those who choose to join a CSA may be more likely to acquire new and expanded vegetable preferences than those who do not, the CSA experience has the potential to enhance vegetable exposure, augment vegetable preference and increase overall vegetable consumption. Dietary patterns encouraged through CSA participation can promote preferences and consumer demand that support local production and seasonal availability. Emphasis on fresh and fresh stored locally produced vegetables is consistent with sustainable community-based food systems.

  4. A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Patients

    Fernandes, Ana S.; Alves, Pedro; Jarman, Ian H.; Etchells, Terence A.; Fonseca, José M.; Lisboa, Paulo J. G.

    This paper proposes a Web clinical decision support system for clinical oncologists and for breast cancer patients making prognostic assessments, using the particular characteristics of the individual patient. This system comprises three different prognostic modelling methodologies: the clinically widely used Nottingham prognostic index (NPI); the Cox regression modelling and a partial logistic artificial neural network with automatic relevance determination (PLANN-ARD). All three models yield a different prognostic index that can be analysed together in order to obtain a more accurate prognostic assessment of the patient. Missing data is incorporated in the mentioned models, a common issue in medical data that was overcome using multiple imputation techniques. Risk group assignments are also provided through a methodology based on regression trees, where Boolean rules can be obtained expressed with patient characteristics.

  5. Using a linked data approach to aid development of a metadata portal to support Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) implementation

    Wood, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Under the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), EU Member States are mandated to achieve or maintain 'Good Environmental Status' (GES) in their marine areas by 2020, through a series of Programme of Measures (PoMs). The Celtic Seas Partnership (CSP), an EU LIFE+ project, aims to support policy makers, special-interest groups, users of the marine environment, and other interested stakeholders on MSFD implementation in the Celtic Seas geographical area. As part of this support, a metadata portal has been built to provide a signposting service to datasets that are relevant to MSFD within the Celtic Seas. To ensure that the metadata has the widest possible reach, a linked data approach was employed to construct the database. Although the metadata are stored in a traditional RDBS, the metadata are exposed as linked data via the D2RQ platform, allowing virtual RDF graphs to be generated. SPARQL queries can be executed against the end-point allowing any user to manipulate the metadata. D2RQ's mapping language, based on turtle, was used to map a wide range of relevant ontologies to the metadata (e.g. The Provenance Ontology (prov-o), Ocean Data Ontology (odo), Dublin Core Elements and Terms (dc & dcterms), Friend of a Friend (foaf), and Geospatial ontologies (geo)) allowing users to browse the metadata, either via SPARQL queries or by using D2RQ's HTML interface. The metadata were further enhanced by mapping relevant parameters to the NERC Vocabulary Server, itself built on a SPARQL endpoint. Additionally, a custom web front-end was built to enable users to browse the metadata and express queries through an intuitive graphical user interface that requires no prior knowledge of SPARQL. As well as providing means to browse the data via MSFD-related parameters (Descriptor, Criteria, and Indicator), the metadata records include the dataset's country of origin, the list of organisations involved in the management of the data, and links to any relevant INSPIRE

  6. Mutation Analysis in Classical Phenylketonuria Patients Followed by Detecting Haplotypes Linked to Some PAH Mutations.

    Dehghanian, Fatemeh; Silawi, Mohammad; Tabei, Seyed M B

    2017-02-01

    Deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) enzyme and elevation of phenylalanine in body fluids cause phenylketonuria (PKU). The gold standard for confirming PKU and PAH deficiency is detecting causal mutations by direct sequencing of the coding exons and splicing involved sequences of the PAH gene. Furthermore, haplotype analysis could be considered as an auxiliary approach for detecting PKU causative mutations before direct sequencing of the PAH gene by making comparisons between prior detected mutation linked-haplotypes and new PKU case haplotypes with undetermined mutations. In this study, 13 unrelated classical PKU patients took part in the study detecting causative mutations. Mutations were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing in all patients. After that, haplotype analysis was performed by studying VNTR and PAHSTR markers (linked genetic markers of the PAH gene) through application of PCR and capillary electrophoresis (CE). Mutation analysis was performed successfully and the detected mutations were as follows: c.782G>A, c.754C>T, c.842C>G, c.113-115delTCT, c.688G>A, and c.696A>G. Additionally, PAHSTR/VNTR haplotypes were detected to discover haplotypes linked to each mutation. Mutation detection is the best approach for confirming PAH enzyme deficiency in PKU patients. Due to the relatively large size of the PAH gene and high cost of the direct sequencing in developing countries, haplotype analysis could be used before DNA sequencing and mutation detection for a faster and cheaper way via identifying probable mutated exons.

  7. The Link between Health Complaints and Wind Turbines: Support for the Nocebo Expectations Hypothesis.

    Crichton, Fiona; Chapman, Simon; Cundy, Tim; Petrie, Keith J

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide expansion of wind energy has met with opposition based on concerns that the infrasound generated by wind turbines causes health problems in nearby residents. In this paper, we argue that health complaints are more likely to be explained by the nocebo response, whereby adverse effects are generated by negative expectations. When individuals expect a feature of their environment or medical treatment to produce illness or symptoms, then this may start a process where the individual looks for symptoms or signs of illness to confirm these negative expectations. As physical symptoms are common in healthy people, there is considerable scope for people to match symptoms with their negative expectations. To support this hypothesis, we draw an evidence from experimental studies that show that, during exposure to wind farm sound, expectations about infrasound can influence symptoms and mood in both positive and negative directions, depending on how expectations are framed. We also consider epidemiological work showing that health complaints have primarily been located in areas that have received the most negative publicity about the harmful effects of turbines. The social aspect of symptom complaints in a community is also discussed as an important process in increasing symptom reports. Media stories, publicity, or social discourse about the reported health effects of wind turbines are likely to trigger reports of similar symptoms, regardless of exposure. Finally, we present evidence to show that the same pattern of health complaints following negative information about wind turbines has also been found in other types of environmental concerns and scares.

  8. Compliance with Supportive Periodontal Treatment in Patients with Dental Implants.

    Hu, Kai-Fang; Lin, Ying-Chu; Ho, Kun-Yen; Chou, Yu-Hsiang

    The need for dental implants is increasing, and supportive periodontal treatment can achieve long-term success and prevent peri-implantitis. Contributing factors to noncompliance with long-term scheduled supportive periodontal treatment remain unclear. To investigate whether demographic and clinical characteristics are associated with noncompliance, the authors analyzed data for patients who had received dental implants. The authors recruited patients participating in a supportive periodontal treatment program after receiving permanent prostheses on implants placed from 2005 to 2013. Demographic data and dental treatment histories were collected. Compliance was defined as a record of participation in a standard supportive periodontal treatment program for at least 1 year. The chi-square test, log-rank test, Kaplan-Meier survival curve, and Cox proportional hazards model were used for statistical analysis. The study included 120 patients (259 implants, 60% compliance). The two groups (compliant and noncompliant) differed significantly in frequency distributions for sex (P = .0017), educational level (P = .0325), and histories of substance use (P = .0016), periodontitis (P = .0005), and root planing or flap surgery (P = .0002). The Kaplan-Meier survival curves and log-rank test showed that increases in cumulative continuation rates were significantly associated with male sex (P = .0025); body mass index ≥ 24 kg/m² (P = .0093); and a history of periodontitis (P implant placement, root planing or flap surgery was the crucial factor in determining compliance with supportive periodontal treatment. However, well-designed large-scale studies with a larger sample size are needed to confirm the findings of this study.

  9. Portable, space-saving medical patient support system

    Bzorgi,; Fariborz, [Knoxville, TN

    2011-02-01

    A support platform having a stowed configuration and a deployed configuration on a floor. The support platform is related to stretcher devices that are used for transporting, confining, or conducting medical procedures on medical patients in medical emergencies. The support platform typically includes a work surface that has a geometric extent. A base that typically includes a plurality of frame members is provided, and the frame members are disposed across the geometric extent of, and proximal to, the work surface in the stowed configuration. The frame members are typically disposed on the floor in the deployed configuration. There is a foldable bracing system engaged with the work surface and engaged with the base. At least a portion of the foldable bracing system is disposed substantially inside at least a portion of the plurality of frame members in the stowed configuration. Further, the foldable bracing system is configured for translocation of the work surface distal from the base in the deployed configuration.

  10. Supporting energy initiatives in small communities by linking visions with energy scenarios and multi-criteria assessment

    Trutnevyte, Evelina; Stauffacher, Michael; Scholz, Roland W.

    2011-01-01

    Many decisions about future energy systems in small communities are based on the visions of several key actors about the ideal-type system. Although meaningful, such visions may not inclusively represent the objectives of all relevant actors. Moreover, the visions are mostly intuitively judged by these actors and reflect their experiences and concerns. Yet, analytical expertise provides essential information about the required decisions and their consequences. We argue that coming up with a number of alternative visions about a future energy system and addressing these visions from both intuitive and analytical perspectives leads to better-quality decisions. This paper presents a case study in the small Swiss community of Urnäsch, where actors from practice and academia collaborated in a transdisciplinary process to address the future energy system. Visions of these actors about the ideal-type energy system were linked both with energy scenarios that analytically specified options to implement these visions and with stakeholder-based multi-criteria assessment of the consequences. As a result, most of the involved actors adjusted their initial vision preferences. Thus, we believe this approach could lead to capacity building and formation of stable, informed preferences, which are necessary to support a transition in the coming decades. - Highlights: ► Linking energy visions with realistic options and their consequences. ► Novel methodology developed to support this. ► Applied in a case study whereby stakeholders revised visions in light of results. ► Energy initiatives in small communities are facilitated and supported analytically.

  11. The role of social support in dialysis patients' feelings of autonomy and self-esteem: is support more beneficial for patients with specific illness perceptions?

    Jansen, Daphne L; Rijken, Mieke; Kaptein, Ad A; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W; Dekker, Friedo W; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether effects of various types of support on dialysis patients' perceived autonomy and self-esteem depend on patients' perceived concerns and personal control regarding their illness. One hundred sixty-six patients completed written questionnaires. Main and interaction effects of support, concern, and personal control on autonomy and self-esteem were examined using linear regression analyses. General emotional support was positively related to autonomy in highly concerned patients (p autonomy (p emotional support (p autonomy appears to depend on patients' illness perceptions, whereas the role of support in patients' self-esteem does not. These findings suggest that dialysis patients' personal views about their illness can provide insight into whether patients could benefit from support, and that the provision of support should be tailored to patients' individual needs.

  12. Depression and family support in breast cancer patients

    Su JA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Jian-An Su,1–3,* Dah-Cherng Yeh,4,* Ching-Chi Chang,5,* Tzu-Chin Lin,6,7 Ching-Hsiang Lai,8 Pei-Yun Hu,8 Yi-Feng Ho,9 Vincent Chin-Hung Chen,1,2 Tsu-Nai Wang,10,11 Michael Gossop12 1Chang Gung Medical Foundation, Chiayi Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan; 2Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 3Department of Nursing, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 4Department of Surgery, Taichung Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, Taichung, Taiwan; 5Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University and Department of Psychiatry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 6Department of Psychiatry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 7Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 8Department of Medical Informatics, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 9Tsaotun Psychiatric Center, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Nan-Tou,Taiwan; 10Department of Public Health, College of Health Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 11Center of Excellence for Environmental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 12King’s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Among the survivors, depression is one of the most common psychiatric comorbidities. This paper reports the point prevalence of major depressive disorder among breast cancer patients and the association between family support and major depressive disorder.Methods: Clinical data were collected from a breast cancer clinic of a general hospital in central Taiwan. Participants included 300 patients who were older than 18 years and diagnosed with breast cancer. Among these individuals, we used Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (a structural diagnostic tool for

  13. Psychological Pathways Linking Social Support to Health Outcomes: A Visit with the “Ghosts” of Research Past, Present, and Future

    Uchino, Bert N.; Bowen, Kimberly; Carlisle, McKenzie; Birmingham, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary models postulate the importance of psychological mechanisms linking perceived and received social support to physical health outcomes. In this review, we examine studies that directly tested the potential psychological mechanisms responsible for links between social support and health-relevant physiological processes (1980s to 2010). Inconsistent with existing theoretical models, no evidence was found that psychological mechanisms such as depression, perceived stress, and other affective processes are directly responsible for links between support and health. We discuss the importance of considering statistical/design issues, emerging conceptual perspectives, and limitations of our existing models for future research aimed at elucidating the psychological mechanisms responsible for links between social support and physical health outcomes. PMID:22326104

  14. Evaluating the link between human resource management decisions and patient satisfaction with quality of care.

    Oppel, Eva-Maria; Winter, Vera; Schreyögg, Jonas

    Patient satisfaction with quality of care is becoming increasingly important in the competitive hospital market. Simultaneously, the growing shortage of clinical staff poses a considerable challenge to ensuring a high quality of care. In this context, a question emerges regarding whether and how human resource management (HRM) might serve as a means to reduce staff shortage problems and to increase patient satisfaction. Although considerable efforts have been devoted to understanding the concepts of patient satisfaction and HRM, little is known about the interrelationships between these concepts or about the link between staff shortage problems and patients' satisfaction with quality of care. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between strategic human resource management (SHRM), staff shortage problems, and patients' satisfaction with care. Furthermore, we analyze how the HRM decision to fill short-term vacancies through temporary staffing affects patient satisfaction. We differentiate between physicians and nurses. We develop and empirically test a theoretical model. The data (n = 165) are derived from a survey on SHRM that was sent to 732 German hospitals and from a survey on patient satisfaction that comprises 436,848 patient satisfaction ratings. We use a structural equation modeling approach to test the model. The results indicate that SHRM significantly reduces staff shortage problems for both occupational groups. Having fewer physician shortage problems is significantly associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction, whereas this effect is not significant for nurses. Furthermore, the use of temporary staffing considerably reduces patients' satisfaction with care. Hospital managers are advised to consider the effects of HRM decisions on patients' satisfaction with care. In particular, investments in SHRM targeted at physicians have significantly positive effects on patient satisfaction, whereas the temporary staffing of physicians

  15. Communication elements supporting patient safety in psychiatric inpatient care.

    Kanerva, A; Kivinen, T; Lammintakanen, J

    2015-06-01

    Communication is important for safe and quality health care. The study provides needed insight on the communication elements that support patient safety from the psychiatric care view. Fluent information transfer between the health care professionals and care units is important for care planning and maintaining practices. Information should be documented and implemented accordingly. Communication should happen in an open communication culture that enables discussion, the opportunity to have debriefing discussions and the entire staff can feel they are heard. For effective communication, it is also important that staff are active themselves in information collecting about the essential information needed in patient care. In mental health nursing, it is important to pay attention to all elements of communication and to develop processes concerning communication in multidisciplinary teams and across unit boundaries. The study aims to describe which communication elements support patient safety in psychiatric inpatient care from the viewpoint of the nursing staff. Communication is an essential part of care and one of the core competencies of the psychiatric care. It enables safe and quality patient care. Errors in health care are often connected with poor communication. The study brings needed insight from the psychiatric care view to the topic. The data were gathered from semi-structured interviews in which 26 nurses were asked to describe the elements that constitute patient safety in psychiatric inpatient care. The data were analysed inductively from the viewpoint of communication. The descriptions connected with communication formed a main category of communication elements that support patient safety; this main category was made up of three subcategories: fluent information transfer, open communication culture and being active in information collecting. Fluent information transfer consists of the practical implementation of communication; open communication

  16. Patient Segmentation Analysis Offers Significant Benefits For Integrated Care And Support.

    Vuik, Sabine I; Mayer, Erik K; Darzi, Ara

    2016-05-01

    Integrated care aims to organize care around the patient instead of the provider. It is therefore crucial to understand differences across patients and their needs. Segmentation analysis that uses big data can help divide a patient population into distinct groups, which can then be targeted with care models and intervention programs tailored to their needs. In this article we explore the potential applications of patient segmentation in integrated care. We propose a framework for population strategies in integrated care-whole populations, subpopulations, and high-risk populations-and show how patient segmentation can support these strategies. Through international case examples, we illustrate practical considerations such as choosing a segmentation logic, accessing data, and tailoring care models. Important issues for policy makers to consider are trade-offs between simplicity and precision, trade-offs between customized and off-the-shelf solutions, and the availability of linked data sets. We conclude that segmentation can provide many benefits to integrated care, and we encourage policy makers to support its use. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  17. Improved biodegradation of synthetic azo dye by horseradish peroxidase cross-linked on nano-composite support.

    Sun, Huaiyan; Jin, Xinyu; Long, Nengbing; Zhang, Ruifeng

    2017-02-01

    A ZnO nanowires/macroporous SiO 2 composite was used as support to immobilize horseradish peroxidase (HRP) by in-situ cross-linking method. Using diethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (DDE) as a long-chained cross-linker, it was adsorbed on the surface of ZnO nanowires before reaction with HRPs, the resulted composite was quite different from the traditional cross-linking enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) on both structure and catalytic performance. The immobilized HRP showed high activity in the decolorization of azo dyes. The effect of various conditions such as the loading amount of HRP, solution pH, temperature, contact time and concentration of dye were optimized on the decolorization. The decolorization percentage of Acid Blue 113 and Acid black 10 BX reached as high as 95.4% and 90.3%, respectively. The immobilized HRP gave the highest decolorization rate under dye concentration as 50mg/L and reaction time of 35min. The immobilized HRP exhibited much better resistance to temperature and pH inactivation than free HRP. The storage stability and reusability were greatly improved through the immobilization, from the decolorization of Acid blue 113 it was found that 80.4% of initial efficiency retained after incubation at 4°C for 60 days, and that 79.4% of decolorization efficiency retained after 12 cycles reuse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of Web-Based Ostomy Patient Support Resources.

    Pittman, Joyce; Nichols, Thom; Rawl, Susan M

    To evaluate currently available, no-cost, Web-based patient support resources designed for those who have recently undergone ostomy surgery. Descriptive, correlational study using telephone survey. The sample comprised 202 adults who had ostomy surgery within the previous 24 months in 1 of 5 hospitals within a large healthcare organization in the Midwestern United States. Two of the hospitals were academic teaching hospitals, and 3 were community hospitals. The study was divided into 2 phases: (1) gap analysis of 4 Web sites (labeled A-D) based on specific criteria; and (2) telephone survey of individuals with an ostomy. In phase 1, a comprehensive checklist based on best practice standards was developed to conduct the gap analysis. In phase 2, data were collected from 202 participants by trained interviewers via 1-time structured telephone interviews that required approximately 30 minutes to complete. Descriptive analyses were performed, along with correlational analysis of relationships among Web site usage, acceptability and satisfaction, demographic characteristics, and medical history. Gap analysis revealed that Web site D, managed by a patient advocacy group, received the highest total content score of 155/176 (88%) and the highest usability score of 31.7/35 (91%). Two hundred two participants completed the telephone interview, with 96 (48%) reporting that they used the Internet as a source of information. Sixty participants (30%) reported that friends or family member had searched the Internet for ostomy information on their behalf, and 148 (75%) indicated they were confident they could get information about ostomies on the Internet. Of the 90 participants (45%) who reported using the Internet to locate ostomy information, 73 (82%) found the information on the Web easy to understand, 28 (31%) reported being frustrated during their search for information, 24 (27%) indicated it took a lot of effort to get the information they needed, and 39 (43%) were

  19. Don't fret, be supportive! maternal characteristics linking child shyness to psychosocial and school adjustment in kindergarten.

    Coplan, Robert J; Arbeau, Kimberley A; Armer, Mandana

    2008-04-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the moderating role of maternal personality and parenting characteristics in the links between shyness and adjustment in kindergarten. Participants were 197 children enrolled in kindergarten programs (and their mothers and teachers). Multisource assessment was employed, including maternal ratings, behavioral observations, teacher ratings, and individual child interviews. Results indicated that shyness was associated with a wide range of socio-emotional and school adjustment difficulties in kindergarten. Moreover, support for the moderating role of parenting was also found. Relations between shyness and certain indices of maladjustment were stronger among children with mothers characterized by higher neuroticism, BIS sensitivity, and an overprotective parenting style, and weaker for mothers characterized by high agree-ableness and an authoritative parenting style.

  20. Online Social Support for Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Thematic Analysis of Messages Posted to a Virtual Support Community

    Masoumeh Abbasi Shavazi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently with the emergence of the Internet, patients have an opportunity to exchange social support online. However, little attention has been devoted to different dimensions of online social support exchanged in virtual support communities for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Methods: To provide a rich insight, the aim of this qualitative study was to explore and categorize different dimensions of online social support in messages exchanged in a virtual support community for patients with MS. A total of 548 posted messages created during one year period were selected using purposive sampling to consider the maximum variation sampling. Prior-research-driven thematic analysis was then conducted. In this regard, we used the Cutruna and Suhr’s coding system. The messages that could not be categorized with the used coding system were thematically analyzed to explore new additional social support themes. Results: The results showed that various forms of social support including informational, emotional, network, esteem and tangible support were exchanged. Moreover, new additional social support themes including sharing personal experiences, sharing coping strategies and spiritual support emerged in this virtual support community. Conclusion: The wide range of online social support exchanged in the virtual support community can be regarded as a supplementary source of social support for patients with MS. Future researches can examine online social support more comprehensively considering additional social support themes emerging in the present study.

  1. Sarcopenia is linked to treatment toxicity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Barret, Maximilien; Antoun, Sami; Dalban, Cécile; Malka, David; Mansourbakht, Touraj; Zaanan, Aziz; Latko, Ewa; Taieb, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy toxicity could be linked to decreased skeletal muscle (sarcopenia). We evaluated the effect of sarcopenia on chemotherapy toxicity among metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. All consecutive mCRC patients in 3 hospitals were enrolled in this prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter study. Several nutritional indexes and scores were generated. Computed tomography (CT) images were analyzed to evaluate cross-sectional areas of muscle tissue (MT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). Toxicities were evaluated in the 2 mo following clinical evaluation. Fifty-one mCRC patients were included in the study. Sarcopenia was observed in 71% of patients (39% of women and 82% of men) whereas only 4% and 18% were considered as underweight using body mass index (BMI) or severely malnourished using the Nutritional Risk Index (NRI), respectively. Grade 3-4 toxicities were observed in 28% of patients. In multivariate analysis including age, sex, BMI, sarcopenia, SAT, and VAT, the only factor associated with Grade 3-4 toxicities was sarcopenia (odds ratio = 13.55; 95% confidence interval [1.08; 169.31], P = 0.043). In mCRC patients undergoing chemotherapy, sarcopenia was much more frequently observed than visible malnutrition. Despite the small number of patients included in our study, we found sarcopenia to be significantly associated with severe chemotherapy toxicity.

  2. Refusal of implant supported mandibular overdentures by elderly patients.

    Ellis, Janice S; Levine, Alissa; Bedos, Christophe; Mojon, Phillippe; Rosberger, Zeer; Feine, Jocelyne; Thomason, J Mark

    2011-03-01

      The aim of this study was to gain greater in-depth understanding of why elderly patients who are currently dissatisfied with conventional dentures decline implant treatment.   There is strong evidence from high-quality randomised controlled trials to support the use of implant-supported overdentures for the restoration of the edentulous mandible. However, whilst recruiting for randomised clinical trials, researchers have found that a high proportion of potential subjects decline participation, despite the removal of financial constraints.   The study adopted a qualitative approach to provide a rich and deep understanding of people's reasons for refusal. Data were collected through focus group interviews in a two-centre study based in Montreal, Canada and Newcastle, UK. A semi-structured interview schedule was used and iteratively developed as analysis identified themes from previous focus groups. Transcripts of focus groups were coded and emergent themes determined.   Two main themes emerged; patients' fear and anxiety (relating to the pain of surgery, complications of the procedure and immediate post-surgical denture use), and the appropriateness of the procedure in an elderly person.   Fears of pain, complications and social embarrassment, exacerbated by age, are important factors that help explain refusal of implants by elderly patients. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Patient Handoffs in Obstetrics and Gynecology: A Vital Link in Patient Safety

    John Yeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate patient handoffs have been an area of focus for patient safety improvement. Insufficient communication and risks or “shortcuts” taken by staff members during handoffs could negatively affect the safety of patients in a department of obstetrics and gynecology. Other factors that contribute to inadequate handoffs are the caregiver feeling fatigued or stressed, level of urgency, volume of information, language barriers, noise, lighting, ambiguity of describing treatment, not allotting enough time for questions asked, and/or interruptions from other staff members. There have been several methods developed for improving the handoff process, such as the mnemonic devices SBAR, SHARQ, I PASS THE BATON, and the 5 P's. A new method for improving the quality of patient handoffs has been developed and presented in this article. It is a mnemonic device entitled “HANDOFFS”. It covers key aspects of what a handoff process should entail. Teamwork is essential to effective communication, and by using a mnemonic such as this, team members can work together in a more positive and accessible environment that will result in improved patient safety.

  4. Linking Workplace Aggression to Employee Well-Being and Work: The Moderating Role of Family-Supportive Supervisor Behaviors (FSSB).

    Yragui, Nanette L; Demsky, Caitlin A; Hammer, Leslie B; Van Dyck, Sarah; Neradilek, Moni B

    2017-04-01

    The present study examined the moderating effects of family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB) on the relationship between two types of workplace aggression (i.e., patient-initiated physical aggression and coworker-initiated psychological aggression) and employee well-being and work outcomes. Data were obtained from a field sample of 417 healthcare workers in two psychiatric hospitals. Hypotheses were tested using moderated multiple regression analyses. Psychiatric care providers' perceptions of FSSB moderated the relationship between patient-initiated physical aggression and physical symptoms, exhaustion and cynicism. In addition, FSSB moderated the relationship between coworker-initiated psychological aggression and physical symptoms and turnover intentions. Based on our findings, family-supportive supervision is a plausible boundary condition for the relationship between workplace aggression and well-being and work outcomes. This study suggests that, in addition to directly addressing aggression prevention and reduction, family-supportive supervision is a trainable resource that healthcare organizations should facilitate to improve employee work and well-being in settings with high workplace aggression. This is the first study to examine the role of FSSB in influencing the relationship between two forms of workplace aggression: patient-initiated physical and coworker- initiated psychological aggression and employee outcomes.

  5. Hybrid Patient Record – Supporting Hybrid Interaction in Clinical Wards

    Houben, Steven; Schmidt, Mathias; Frost, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread dissemination of the electronic health record, the paper medical record remains an important central artefact in modern clinical work. A number of new technological solutions have been proposed to mitigate some of the configuration, mobility and awareness problems that emerge...... when using this dual record setup. In this paper, we present one such technology, the HyPR device, in which a paper record is augmented with an electronic sensing platform that is designed to reduce the configuration overhead, provide awareness cues and support mobility across the patient ward. Our...

  6. Diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy: Perceptions of patients and providers.

    Fransen, Mirjam P; Beune, Erik J A J; Baim-Lance, Abigail M; Bruessing, Raynold C; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore perceptions and strategies of health care providers regarding diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy (LHL), and to compare their self-management support with the needs of patients with LHL and type 2 diabetes. This study serves as a problem analysis for systematic intervention development to improve diabetes self-management among patients with LHL. This qualitative study used in-depth interviews with general practitioners (n = 4), nurse practitioners (n = 5), and patients with LHL (n = 31). The results of the interviews with health care providers guided the patient interviews. In addition, we observed 10 general practice consultations. Providers described patients with LHL as uninvolved and less motivated patients who do not understand self-management. Their main strategy to improve self-management was to provide standard information on a repeated basis. Patients with LHL seemed to have a different view of diabetes self-management than their providers. Most demonstrated a low awareness of what self-management involves, but did not express needing more information. They reported several practical barriers to self-management, although they seemed reluctant to use the information provided to overcome them. Providing and repeating information does not fit the needs of patients with LHL regarding diabetes self-management support. Health care providers do not seem to have the insight or the tools to systematically support diabetes self-management in this group. Systematic intervention development with a focus on skills-based approaches rather than cognition development may improve diabetes self-management support of patients with LHL. © 2014 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Sensorimotor plasticity after music-supported therapy in chronic stroke patients revealed by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Julià L Amengual

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several recently developed therapies targeting motor disabilities in stroke sufferers have shown to be more effective than standard neurorehabilitation approaches. In this context, several basic studies demonstrated that music training produces rapid neuroplastic changes in motor-related brain areas. Music-supported therapy has been recently developed as a new motor rehabilitation intervention. METHODS AND RESULTS: In order to explore the plasticity effects of music-supported therapy, this therapeutic intervention was applied to twenty chronic stroke patients. Before and after the music-supported therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied for the assessment of excitability changes in the motor cortex and a 3D movement analyzer was used for the assessment of motor performance parameters such as velocity, acceleration and smoothness in a set of diadochokinetic movement tasks. Our results suggest that the music-supported therapy produces changes in cortical plasticity leading the improvement of the subjects' motor performance. CONCLUSION: Our findings represent the first evidence of the neurophysiological changes induced by this therapy in chronic stroke patients, and their link with the amelioration of motor performance. Further studies are needed to confirm our observations.

  8. Sensorimotor plasticity after music-supported therapy in chronic stroke patients revealed by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Amengual, Julià L; Rojo, Nuria; Veciana de Las Heras, Misericordia; Marco-Pallarés, Josep; Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Schneider, Sabine; Vaquero, Lucía; Juncadella, Montserrat; Montero, Jordi; Mohammadi, Bahram; Rubio, Francisco; Rueda, Nohora; Duarte, Esther; Grau, Carles; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münte, Thomas F; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Several recently developed therapies targeting motor disabilities in stroke sufferers have shown to be more effective than standard neurorehabilitation approaches. In this context, several basic studies demonstrated that music training produces rapid neuroplastic changes in motor-related brain areas. Music-supported therapy has been recently developed as a new motor rehabilitation intervention. In order to explore the plasticity effects of music-supported therapy, this therapeutic intervention was applied to twenty chronic stroke patients. Before and after the music-supported therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied for the assessment of excitability changes in the motor cortex and a 3D movement analyzer was used for the assessment of motor performance parameters such as velocity, acceleration and smoothness in a set of diadochokinetic movement tasks. Our results suggest that the music-supported therapy produces changes in cortical plasticity leading the improvement of the subjects' motor performance. Our findings represent the first evidence of the neurophysiological changes induced by this therapy in chronic stroke patients, and their link with the amelioration of motor performance. Further studies are needed to confirm our observations.

  9. Sensorimotor Plasticity after Music-Supported Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients Revealed by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Amengual, Julià L.; Rojo, Nuria; Veciana de las Heras, Misericordia; Marco-Pallarés, Josep; Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Schneider, Sabine; Vaquero, Lucía; Juncadella, Montserrat; Montero, Jordi; Mohammadi, Bahram; Rubio, Francisco; Rueda, Nohora; Duarte, Esther; Grau, Carles; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münte, Thomas F.; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Background Several recently developed therapies targeting motor disabilities in stroke sufferers have shown to be more effective than standard neurorehabilitation approaches. In this context, several basic studies demonstrated that music training produces rapid neuroplastic changes in motor-related brain areas. Music-supported therapy has been recently developed as a new motor rehabilitation intervention. Methods and Results In order to explore the plasticity effects of music-supported therapy, this therapeutic intervention was applied to twenty chronic stroke patients. Before and after the music-supported therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied for the assessment of excitability changes in the motor cortex and a 3D movement analyzer was used for the assessment of motor performance parameters such as velocity, acceleration and smoothness in a set of diadochokinetic movement tasks. Our results suggest that the music-supported therapy produces changes in cortical plasticity leading the improvement of the subjects' motor performance. Conclusion Our findings represent the first evidence of the neurophysiological changes induced by this therapy in chronic stroke patients, and their link with the amelioration of motor performance. Further studies are needed to confirm our observations. PMID:23613966

  10. Comparison of patient-reported need of psycho-oncologic support and the doctor's perspective: how do they relate to disease severity in melanoma patients?

    Nolte, Sandra; van der Mei, Sicco H; Strehl-Schwarz, Kerstin; Köster, Johanna; Bender, Armin; Rose, Matthias; Kruse, Johannes; Peters, Eva M J

    2016-11-01

    Psycho-neuro-immune research suggests an association between cancer outcomes and psychosocial distress. Objective criteria to determine patients' levels of distress are important to establish potential links to disease outcomes. We compared three patient-reported with one doctor-reported measures of psycho-oncologic distress frequently used in routine cancer care and investigated associations with standard disease severity parameters in melanoma patients. We enrolled n = 361 patients, successively seen at two outpatient university clinics in Germany. In the naturalistic study, n = 222 patients had been diagnosed 180 days and were in after-care (Group II). Across groups, only moderate associations were seen between patient- reported and doctor-reported measures. Regarding clinical variables, disease severity and perceived need of psycho-oncologic support reported by patients or doctors showed hardly any association. After subgroup stratification, in patients of Group II, patient-reported and doctor-reported instruments showed some small associations with disease parameters commonly linked to more rapid cancer progression in patients who are in cancer after-care. Overall, the few and low associations suggest that need of psycho-oncologic support and clinical variables were largely independent of each other and doctors' perception may not reflect the patient's view. Therefore, the assessment of the patient perspective is indispensable to ensure that melanoma patients receive appropriate support, as such need cannot be derived from other disease parameters or proxy report. More research is needed applying psychometrically robust instruments that are ideally combined with sensitive biomarkers to disentangle psycho-neuro-immune implications in melanoma patients. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. [Nutritional assessment and perioperative nutritional support in gastric cancer patients].

    Seo, Kyung Won; Yoon, Ki Young

    2013-04-01

    Weight loss and malnutrition are common in cancer patients. Although weight loss is predominantly due to loss of fat mass, the morbidity risk is given by the decrease in muscle mass. The assessment of nutritional status is essential for a diagnosis of nutritional compromise and required for the multidisciplinary approach. Subjective global assessment (SGA) is made by the patients nutritional symptoms and weight loss. The objective assessment, a significant weight loss (>10%) for 6 months is considered an indicator of nutritional deficiency. The mean body index, body fat mass and body protein mass are decreased as cancer stage increases. The biochemical data of albumin, cholesterol, triglyceride, Zn, transferrin, total lymphocyte count are decreased in advanced cancer stage. Daily energy intake, cabohyderate and Vit B1 intake is decreased according to cancer stage. The patients are divided into three groups according to SGA. The three groups showed a significant difference in body weight, 1 month weight loss%, 6 month weight loss%, body mass index, mid arm circumference, albumin, energy intake, as well as carbohyderate intake protein and energy malnutrition. Nutritional assessment is of great importance because undernutrition has been shown to be associated with increase in stomach cancer associated morbidity and mortality. The authors concluded that nutritional assessment should be done in cancer patients preoperatively, and with adequate nutritional support, the morbidity and mortality would be decreased.

  12. Hand gestures support word learning in patients with hippocampal amnesia.

    Hilverman, Caitlin; Cook, Susan Wagner; Duff, Melissa C

    2018-06-01

    Co-speech hand gesture facilitates learning and memory, yet the cognitive and neural mechanisms supporting this remain unclear. One possibility is that motor information in gesture may engage procedural memory representations. Alternatively, iconic information from gesture may contribute to declarative memory representations mediated by the hippocampus. To investigate these alternatives, we examined gesture's effects on word learning in patients with hippocampal damage and declarative memory impairment, with intact procedural memory, and in healthy and in brain-damaged comparison groups. Participants learned novel label-object pairings while producing gesture, observing gesture, or observing without gesture. After a delay, recall and object identification were assessed. Unsurprisingly, amnesic patients were unable to recall the labels at test. However, they correctly identified objects at above chance levels, but only if they produced a gesture at encoding. Comparison groups performed well above chance at both recall and object identification regardless of gesture. These findings suggest that gesture production may support word learning by engaging nondeclarative (procedural) memory. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Early supported discharge services for stroke patients: a meta-analysis of individual patients' data.

    Langhorne, Peter; Taylor, Gillian; Murray, Gordon; Dennis, Martin; Anderson, Craig; Bautz-Holter, Erik; Dey, Paola; Indredavik, Bent; Mayo, Nancy; Power, Michael; Rodgers, Helen; Ronning, Ole Morten; Rudd, Anthony; Suwanwela, Nijasri; Widen-Holmqvist, Lotta; Wolfe, Charles

    Stroke patients conventionally undergo a substantial part of their rehabilitation in hospital. Services have been developed that offer patients early discharge from hospital with rehabilitation at home (early supported discharge [ESD]). We have assessed the effects and costs of such services. We did a meta-analysis of data from individual patients who took part in randomised trials that recruited patients with stroke in hospital to receive either conventional care or any ESD service intervention that provided rehabilitation and support in a community setting with the aim of shortening the duration of hospital care. The primary outcome was death or dependency at the end of scheduled follow-up. Outcome data were available for 11 trials (1597 patients). ESD services were mostly provided by specialist multidisciplinary teams to a selected group (median 41%) of stroke patients admitted to hospital. There was a reduced risk of death or dependency equivalent to six (95% CI one to ten) fewer adverse outcomes for every 100 patients receiving an ESD service (p=0.02). The hospital stay was 8 days shorter for patients assigned ESD services than for those assigned conventional care (pstroke patients with mild to moderate disability. Appropriately resourced ESD services provided for a selected group of stroke patients can reduce long-term dependency and admission to institutional care as well as shortening hospital stays.

  14. The Kynurenine Pathway: a Proposed Mechanism Linking Diabetes and Periodontal Disease in Diabetic Patients

    Rishabh Kapila

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characte-rized by dysregulation of carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism. Diabetes could result, in part, in activation of tryptophan metabolism. Diabetic patients are more susceptible to gingivitis and periodontitis than healthy subjects. The salivary kynurenine derivatives are also implicated in the onset and development of periodontal dis-ease in humans.The hypothesis: We propose that the tryptophan metabolites via kynurenine pathway may lead to diabetes and an increased severity of periodontal disease in diabetic patients, thus linking both diabetes and periodontal disease.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Tryptophan has been found in significant amount in saliva in diabetic individuals in some studies, particularly tryptophan metabolites like kynurenine and anthranilic acid. Moreover, altered tryptophan metabolism has also been reported in the onset of periodontal disease. Thus, this correlation between diabetes mellitus, periodontal disease and salivary tryptophan metabolite levels could be related to the impaired kynurenine pathway metabolism of tryptophan.

  15. How Elsevier is supporting the value and usefulness of data with Cross-linking and Research Data Services.

    Keall, Bethan; Koers, Hylke; Marques, David

    2013-04-01

    Research in the Earth & Planetary Sciences is characterized by a wealth of observational data - ranging from observations by satellites orbiting the Earth, to borehole measurements at the bottom of the ocean, and also includes data from projects like the Rover Curiosity Landing. Thanks to technological advancements, it has become much easier for researchers over the last few decades to gather large volumes of data, analyze, and share with other researchers inside and outside the lab. With data serving such an important role in the way research is carried out, it becomes a crucial task to archive, maintain, organize, and disseminate research data in a dependable and structured manner. Subject-specific data repositories, often driven by the scientific community, are taking an increasingly prominent role in this domain, getting traction amongst researchers as the go-to place to deposit raw research data. At the same time, the scientific article remains an essential resource of scientific information. At Elsevier, we strive to continuously adapt the article format to meet the needs of modern-day researchers. This includes better support for digital content (see, e.g., http://www.elsevier.com/googlemaps), but also bidirectional linking between online articles and data repositories. In this spirit, Elsevier is collaborating with several leading data repositories, such as PANGAEA, IEDA, and NERC, to interlink articles and data for improved visibility and discoverability of both primary research data and research articles. In addition, Elsevier has formed a new group, Research Data Services, with three primary goals: • help increase the sharing and archiving of research data in discipline-specific repositories • help increase the value of shared data, particularly with annotation and provenance metadata and linking discipline-specific datasets together • help create a credit and impact assessment infrastructure to make research data independently important in its own

  16. Economic Evaluation of a Patient-Directed Music Intervention for ICU Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilatory Support.

    Chlan, Linda L; Heiderscheit, Annette; Skaar, Debra J; Neidecker, Marjorie V

    2018-05-04

    Music intervention has been shown to reduce anxiety and sedative exposure among mechanically ventilated patients. Whether music intervention reduces ICU costs is not known. The aim of this study was to examine ICU costs for patients receiving a patient-directed music intervention compared with patients who received usual ICU care. A cost-effectiveness analysis from the hospital perspective was conducted to determine if patient-directed music intervention was cost-effective in improving patient-reported anxiety. Cost savings were also evaluated. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses determined the influence of input variation on the cost-effectiveness. Midwestern ICUs. Adult ICU patients from a parent clinical trial receiving mechanical ventilatory support. Patients receiving the experimental patient-directed music intervention received a MP3 player, noise-canceling headphones, and music tailored to individual preferences by a music therapist. The base case cost-effectiveness analysis estimated patient-directed music intervention reduced anxiety by 19 points on the Visual Analogue Scale-Anxiety with a reduction in cost of $2,322/patient compared with usual ICU care, resulting in patient-directed music dominance. The probabilistic cost-effectiveness analysis found that average patient-directed music intervention costs were $2,155 less than usual ICU care and projected that cost saving is achieved in 70% of 1,000 iterations. Based on break-even analyses, cost saving is achieved if the per-patient cost of patient-directed music intervention remains below $2,651, a value eight times the base case of $329. Patient-directed music intervention is cost-effective for reducing anxiety in mechanically ventilated ICU patients.

  17. X-linked ichthyosis: clinical and molecular findings in 35 Italian patients.

    Diociaiuti, Andrea; Angioni, Adriano; Pisaneschi, Elisa; Alesi, Viola; Zambruno, Giovanna; Novelli, Antonio; El Hachem, May

    2018-04-19

    Recessive X-linked ichthyosis (XLI), the second most common ichthyosis, is caused by mutations in the STS gene encoding the steroid sulfatase enzyme. A complete deletion of the STS gene is found in 85-90% of cases. Rarely, larger deletions involving contiguous genes are detected in syndromic patients. We report the clinical and molecular genetic findings in a series of 35 consecutive Italian male patients. All patients underwent molecular testing by MLPA or aCGH, followed, in case of negative results, by next generation sequencing analysis. Neuropsychiatric, ophthalmological and pediatric evaluations were also performed. Our survey showed a frequent presence of disease manifestations at birth (42.8%). Fold and palmoplantar surfaces were involved in 18 (51%) and 7 (20%) patients, respectively. Fourteen patients (42%) presented neuropsychiatric symptoms, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and motor disabilities. In addition, two patients with mental retardation were shown to be affected by a contiguous gene syndrome. Twenty-seven patients had a complete STS deletion, one a partial deletion and 7 carried missense mutations, two of which previously unreported. In addition, a de novo STS deletion was identified in a sporadic case. The frequent presence of palmoplantar and fold involvement in XLI should be taken into account when considering the differential diagnosis with ichthyosis vulgaris. Our findings also underline the relevance of involving the neuropsychiatrist in the multidisciplinary management of XLI. Finally, we report for the first time a de novo mutation which shows that STS deletion can also occur in oogenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Emergency diagnosis of cancer and previous general practice consultations: insights from linked patient survey data.

    Abel, Gary A; Mendonca, Silvia C; McPhail, Sean; Zhou, Yin; Elliss-Brookes, Lucy; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios

    2017-06-01

    Emergency diagnosis of cancer is common and aetiologically complex. The proportion of emergency presenters who have consulted previously with relevant symptoms is uncertain. To examine how many patients with cancer, who were diagnosed as emergencies, have had previous primary care consultations with relevant symptoms; and among those, to examine how many had multiple consultations. Secondary analysis of patient survey data from the 2010 English Cancer Patient Experience Survey (CPES), previously linked to population-based data on diagnostic route. For emergency presenters with 18 different cancers, associations were examined for two outcomes (prior GP consultation status; and 'three or more consultations' among prior consultees) using logistic regression. Among 4647 emergency presenters, 1349 (29%) reported no prior consultations, being more common in males (32% versus 25% in females, P <0.001), older (44% in ≥85 versus 30% in 65-74-year-olds, P <0.001), and the most deprived (35% versus 25% least deprived, P = 0.001) patients; and highest/lowest for patients with brain cancer (46%) and mesothelioma (13%), respectively ( P <0.001 for overall variation by cancer site). Among 3298 emergency presenters with prior consultations, 1356 (41%) had three or more consultations, which were more likely in females ( P <0.001), younger ( P <0.001), and non-white patients ( P = 0.017) and those with multiple myeloma, and least likely for patients with leukaemia ( P <0.001). Contrary to suggestions that emergency presentations represent missed diagnoses, about one-third of emergency presenters (particularly those in older and more deprived groups) have no prior GP consultations. Furthermore, only about one-third report multiple (three or more) consultations, which are more likely in 'harder-to-suspect' groups. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  19. Social support and subjective health complaints among patients participating in an occupational rehabilitation program

    Øyeflaten, Irene; Gabriele, Jeanne M.; Fisher, Edwin B.; Eriksen, Hege R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To examine differences in rehabilitation patients' social support received from rehabilitation staff and from support providers outside rehabilitation, and to examine the relationships between social support and the patients' reports of subjective health complaints (SHC). Methods: 131 patients (68 % females, mean age 45 years) participating in a 4-week, inpatient, occupational rehabilitation program were included. All patients completed questionnaires on demographic variables, SHC...

  20. [Links between life events, traumatism and dementia; an open study including 565 patients with dementia].

    Charles, E; Bouby-Serieys, V; Thomas, P; Clément, J-P

    2006-10-01

    Ageing is due to a progressive loss of the person's adaptation capability, whereas during this period environmental aggression increases. In the elderly, life events re-present a psychological traumatism that overwhelms the old person and related family, disrupting and fragilising homeostatic balance. A number of authors have suggested a possible link between life traumatisms and the dementia processes. The aim of this study is to reveal the presence of life traumatisms preceding the apparition of the dementia syndrome. This is a retrospective and comparative work based on the PIXEL study on complaints and demands from the principle informal caregivers of Alzheimer patients. It includes 565 patients presenting the criterion of dementia as defined by the DSM IV, and questionnaires filled out by the principle caregivers. One item of the questionnaire referred to life events which could have played a part in the development of the disorder. In a second stage, the reported events were classified into 4 distinct categories: loss, repeated or prolonged stress, psychotraumatism and depression-inducing events. The statistics were produced using SAS and Stat 10 software. Student's test, ANOVA and chi2-test were used. 372 caregivers answered the first item (65%); 76 of them believed there was no event while 296 related the disorder to one or several life events (79% of responders, 52% of the sample). These results confirm Persson and Clement's study which evidenced a higher frequency of stressing life events for subjects afflicted with dementia as compared with older people without any psychic disorder. Reported events and their respective frequency: spouse death (15.39%), parents' death (15%), familial difficulty (10.08%), anaesthesia (8.49%), child's death (4.42%), somatic disturbance (4%), depression (3.89%), retirement (3.89%), financial problems (2.65%), loneliness (2.65%), removal (1.76%), fall (1%), alcohol (0.8%), traumatism (0.53%), spouse care (0.35%), leaving for

  1. Assessment of patient support surfaces: principle, practice and limitations.

    Rithalia, S

    2005-01-01

    Pressure ulcers cause great pain and suffering to patients as well as unnecessary strain on nursing staff. Their treatment is both costly and time consuming. Every effort therefore should be directed towards their prevention. Understanding of the aetiology of pressure ulcers is still incomplete and assessment of devices aimed at prevention is difficult. Over the years, numerous parameters, including interface pressure and transcutaneous blood gas measurements, have been used to evaluate mattresses and cushions. However, the quality of the data gathered is variable and its clinical interpretation remains unsatisfactory. It could be said that the science of evaluation of support surfaces is still at a formative stage, as clinical validation of many of the approaches has yet to be carried out.

  2. [Ebola crisis in Guinea: psychosocial support for patients and caregivers].

    Benifei, Sarah; Facon-Delahaye, Aline; Vautier, Virginie

    2016-02-01

    The experience of the French military health service in the fight against the Ebola epidemic in Guinea, highlights the importance of what favours the emergence of an institutional life in a context of care faced with numerous constraints and extraordinary challenges. The meticulous drawing up of procedures and the juxtaposition of expertise goes hand in hand with the construction of a triangular care system (caregivers-patients-families). This relational approach ensures each player in this system is able to find their place and a balance between constraints and satisfactions, losses and successes, isolation and support. This balance seems to favour individual and group resilience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Advances in ventilatory support of the pediatric surgical patient.

    Hemmila, M R; Hirschl, R B

    1999-06-01

    Severe respiratory failure in newborn and pediatric patients is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Basic science laboratory investigation has led to advances both in our understanding of ventilator-induced lung injury and in optimizing the supportive use of conventional ventilation strategies. Over the past few years, progress has been made in alternative therapies for ventilating both children and adults with severe respiratory failure. This review focuses on recent laboratory and clinical data detailing the techniques of permissive hypercapnia, high frequency oscillatory ventilation, inhaled nitric oxide, intratracheal pulmonary ventilation, and liquid ventilation. Some of these modalities are becoming commonplace, and others may have much to offer the clinician if their benefit is clearly demonstrated in future clinical trials.

  4. [Nutritional support response in critically ill patients; differences between medical and surgical patients].

    Zamora Elson, M; Serón Arbeloa, C; Labarta Monzón, L; Garrido Ramírez de Arellano, I; Lander Azcona, A; Marquina Lacueva, M I; López Claver, J C; Escós Orta, J

    2012-01-01

    To assess the nutritional response of a group of critically ill patients, as well as the differences in the response to nutritional support between medical and surgical patients. One-year long retrospective study including critically ill patients on artificial nutrition for 7 days. Throughout the first week, three nutritional biochemical controls were done that included albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, cholesterol, and electrolytes. Other data gathered were: nutritional risk index, age, gender, weight, height, APACHE, delay of onset of nutritional support, access route, predicted and real caloric intake, medical or surgical patient, hospital stay, duration of the central venous catheter, urinary tube, and/or mechanical ventilation, incidence and density of incidence of nosocomial infections. Sixty-three patients were studied, 30 (47%) medical and 33 (53%) surgical/trauma patients, with a usage of EN higher among medical patients (16/30, 53% vs. 5/33, 15%), PN higher among surgical patients (25/33, 76%), and mixed nutrition similar in both groups (5 medical and 3 surgical patients) (p = 0.001). There were no differences between medical and surgical patients regarding: both predicted and real caloric and nitrogenous intake, APACHE, delay of onset of nutrition, phosphorus, magnesium or glucose levels, mortality and incidence of nosocomial infections. There were no differences either in hospital stay or use of mechanical ventilation, although these tended to be lower in surgical patients. The baseline biochemical parameters did not show differences between both groups, although they were worse among surgical patients. These patients presented during the study period steady albumin levels with improvement in the remaining parameters, whereas medical patients showed a decrease in albumin and transferrin levels, steady prealbumin levels, and slightly improvement in cholesterol levels. We have observed higher usage of PN among surgical patients, which showed worse

  5. Concurrent audio-visual feedback for supporting drivers at intersections: A study using two linked driving simulators.

    Houtenbos, M; de Winter, J C F; Hale, A R; Wieringa, P A; Hagenzieker, M P

    2017-04-01

    A large portion of road traffic crashes occur at intersections for the reason that drivers lack necessary visual information. This research examined the effects of an audio-visual display that provides real-time sonification and visualization of the speed and direction of another car approaching the crossroads on an intersecting road. The location of red blinking lights (left vs. right on the speedometer) and the lateral input direction of beeps (left vs. right ear in headphones) corresponded to the direction from where the other car approached, and the blink and beep rates were a function of the approaching car's speed. Two driving simulators were linked so that the participant and the experimenter drove in the same virtual world. Participants (N = 25) completed four sessions (two with the audio-visual display on, two with the audio-visual display off), each session consisting of 22 intersections at which the experimenter approached from the left or right and either maintained speed or slowed down. Compared to driving with the display off, the audio-visual display resulted in enhanced traffic efficiency (i.e., greater mean speed, less coasting) while not compromising safety (i.e., the time gap between the two vehicles was equivalent). A post-experiment questionnaire showed that the beeps were regarded as more useful than the lights. It is argued that the audio-visual display is a promising means of supporting drivers until fully automated driving is technically feasible. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. A Pilot Study for Linking Adolescent Patients to an Interactive Tobacco Prevention Program

    Karen S. Calabro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: The American Academy of Pediatrics and professional guidelines recommend intervening with adolescents about avoiding tobacco use in the health-care setting. Barriers in the clinical setting limit consistent provision of this critical service. Objectives: This pilot study compared 2 approaches for referring adolescents to an evidence-based tobacco prevention and cessation program in the outpatient setting. Secondary aims assessed tobacco use, knowledge, and program evaluation. Design, Setting, and Participants: The study setting was a medical and dental clinic. Participants aged 13 to 18 received tobacco advice and instructions to work through “A Smoking Prevention Interactive Experience.” The program addresses health concerns of adolescents about tobacco use and is founded on behavioral change theories. The link to access it is featured on the website of the National Cancer Institute’s Research-Tested Interventions. Participants (N = 197 were randomized to 1 of 2 approaches (ie, a program link via e-mail or referral by a printed card. Results: The program was accessed by 57% (112 of 197 of participants. Both referral approaches were equally effective. Non-Hispanics were twice as likely to access the program as Hispanics (adjusted odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-3.8, P < .05. Over 95% of participants identified themselves as nonusers of tobacco and evaluated the program as beneficial in increasing knowledge and motivation to remain tobacco-free. Conclusion: Linking adolescent patients to an evidence-based tobacco prevention/cessation program at a community health clinic was highly promising and feasible. We present conclusions for future research.

  7. Operative Links

    Wistoft, Karen; Højlund, Holger

    2012-01-01

    educational goals, learning content, or value clarification. Health pedagogy is often a matter of retrospective rationalization rather than the starting point of planning. Health and risk behaviour approaches override health educational approaches. Conclusions: Operational links between health education......, health professionalism, and management strategies pose the foremost challenge. Operational links indicates cooperative levels that facilitate a creative and innovative effort across traditional professional boundaries. It is proposed that such links are supported by network structures, shared semantics...

  8. Misdiagnosis of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa in a choroideremia patient with heavily pigmented fundi.

    Nanda, A; Salvetti, A P; Martinez-Fernandez de la Camara, C; MacLaren, R E

    2018-06-01

    Inherited retinal diseases are thought to be the leading cause of sight loss in the working age population. Mutations found in the RPGR and CHM genes cause retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and choroideremia, respectively. In the first instance, an X-linked family history of visual field loss commonly raises the suspicion of one of these two genes. In choroideremia, the classic description of a white fundal reflex secondary to the widespread chorioretinal degeneration was made over a hundred years ago in Caucasians. But, it is not so obvious in heavily pigmented fundi. Hence, the clinical diagnosis of CHM in non-Caucasian patients may be challenging in the first stages of the disease. Here we report a case of a Southeast Asian gentleman who has a family history of X-linked retinal degeneration and was found to have a confirmed in-frame deletion of 12 DNA nucleotides in exon 15 of the RPGR gene. Later in life, however, his fundal appearance showed unusual areas of circular pigment hypertrophy and clumping. He was therefore tested for carrying a disease-causing mutation in the CHM gene and a null mutation was found. Since gene therapy trials are ongoing for both of these conditions, it has now become critically important to establish the correct genetic diagnosis in order to recruit suitable candidates. Moreover, this case demonstrates the necessity to remain vigilant in the interpretation of genetic results which are inconsistent with clinical features.

  9. Costs and difficulties of recruiting patients to provide e-health support: pilot study in one primary care trust.

    Jones, Ray B; O'Connor, Anita; Brelsford, Jade; Parsons, Neil; Skirton, Heather

    2012-03-29

    Better use of e-health services by patients could improve outcomes and reduce costs but there are concerns about inequalities of access. Previous research in outpatients suggested that anonymous personal email support may help patients with long term conditions to use e-health, but recruiting earlier in their 'journey' may benefit patients more. This pilot study explored the feasibility and cost of recruiting patients for an e-health intervention in one primary care trust. The sample comprised 46 practices with total patient population of 250,000. We approached all practices using various methods, seeking collaboration to recruit patients via methods agreed with each practice. A detailed research diary was kept of time spent recruiting practices and patients. Researcher time was used to estimate costs. Patients who consented to participate were offered email support for their use of the Internet for health. Eighteen practices agreed to take part; we recruited 27 patients, most (23/27) from five practices. Practices agreed to recruit patients for an e-health intervention via waiting room leaflets (16), posters (16), practice nurses (15), doctors giving patients leaflets (5), a study website link (7), inclusion in planned mailshots (2), and a special mailshot to patients selected from practice computers (1). After low recruitment response we also recruited directly in five practices through research assistants giving leaflets to patients in waiting rooms. Ten practices recruited no patients. Those practices that were more difficult to recruit were less likely to recruit patients. Leaving leaflets for practice staff to distribute and placing posters in the practice were not effective in recruiting patients. Leaflets handed out by practice nurses and website links were more successful. The practice with lowest costs per patient recruited (£70) used a special mailshot to selected patients. Recruitment via general practice was not successful and was therefore expensive

  10. A Novel PHEX Mutation in Japanese Patients with X-Linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    Tetsuya Kawahara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH is a dominant inherited disorder characterized by renal phosphate wasting, aberrant vitamin D metabolism, and abnormal bone mineralization. Inactivating mutations in the gene encoding phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome (PHEX have been found to be associated with XLH. Here, we report a 16-year-old female patient affected by hypophosphatemic rickets. We evaluated her serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23 levels and conducted sequence analysis of the disease-associated genes of FGF23-related hypophosphatemic rickets: PHEX, FGF23, dentin matrix protein 1, and ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1. She was diagnosed with XLH based on her clinical features and family history. Additionally, we observed elevated FGF23 levels and a novel PHEX exon 9 mutation (c.947G>T; p.Gly316Val inherited from her father. Although bioinformatics showed that the mutation was neutral, Gly316 is perfectly conserved among humans, mice, and rats, and there were no mutations in other FGF23-related rickets genes, suggesting that in silico analysis is limited in determining mutation pathogenicity. In summary, we present a female patient and her father with XLH harboring a novel PHEX mutation that appears to be causative of disease. Measurement of FGF23 for hypophosphatemic patients is therefore useful for the diagnosis of FGF23-dependent hypophosphatemia.

  11. Patients' online access to their electronic health records and linked online services: a systematic interpretative review.

    de Lusignan, Simon; Mold, Freda; Sheikh, Aziz; Majeed, Azeem; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Quinn, Tom; Cavill, Mary; Gronlund, Toto Anne; Franco, Christina; Chauhan, Umesh; Blakey, Hannah; Kataria, Neha; Barker, Fiona; Ellis, Beverley; Koczan, Phil; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; McCarthy, Mary; Jones, Simon; Rafi, Imran

    2014-09-08

    To investigate the effect of providing patients online access to their electronic health record (EHR) and linked transactional services on the provision, quality and safety of healthcare. The objectives are also to identify and understand: barriers and facilitators for providing online access to their records and services for primary care workers; and their association with organisational/IT system issues. Primary care. A total of 143 studies were included. 17 were experimental in design and subject to risk of bias assessment, which is reported in a separate paper. Detailed inclusion and exclusion criteria have also been published elsewhere in the protocol. Our primary outcome measure was change in quality or safety as a result of implementation or utilisation of online records/transactional services. No studies reported changes in health outcomes; though eight detected medication errors and seven reported improved uptake of preventative care. Professional concerns over privacy were reported in 14 studies. 18 studies reported concern over potential increased workload; with some showing an increase workload in email or online messaging; telephone contact remaining unchanged, and face-to face contact staying the same or falling. Owing to heterogeneity in reporting overall workload change was hard to predict. 10 studies reported how online access offered convenience, primarily for more advantaged patients, who were largely highly satisfied with the process when clinician responses were prompt. Patient online access and services offer increased convenience and satisfaction. However, professionals were concerned about impact on workload and risk to privacy. Studies correcting medication errors may improve patient safety. There may need to be a redesign of the business process to engage health professionals in online access and of the EHR to make it friendlier and provide equity of access to a wider group of patients. A1 SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION NUMBER: PROSPERO

  12. MIMIC II: a massive temporal ICU patient database to support research in intelligent patient monitoring

    Saeed, M.; Lieu, C.; Raber, G.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Development and evaluation of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) decision-support systems would be greatly facilitated by the availability of a large-scale ICU patient database. Following our previous efforts with the MIMIC (Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring for Intensive Care) Database, we have leveraged advances in networking and storage technologies to develop a far more massive temporal database, MIMIC II. MIMIC II is an ongoing effort: data is continuously and prospectively archived from all ICU patients in our hospital. MIMIC II now consists of over 800 ICU patient records including over 120 gigabytes of data and is growing. A customized archiving system was used to store continuously up to four waveforms and 30 different parameters from ICU patient monitors. An integrated user-friendly relational database was developed for browsing of patients' clinical information (lab results, fluid balance, medications, nurses' progress notes). Based upon its unprecedented size and scope, MIMIC II will prove to be an important resource for intelligent patient monitoring research, and will support efforts in medical data mining and knowledge-discovery.

  13. Social support in the post-abortion recovery room: evidence from patients, support persons and nurses in a Vancouver clinic.

    Veiga, Mariana B; Lam, Melanie; Gemeinhardt, Carla; Houlihan, Edwina; Fitzsimmons, Brian P; Hodgson, Zoë G

    2011-03-01

    The benefits of social support in post-surgical recovery are well documented; social support decreases preoperative stress and postoperative recovery time. However, a paucity of studies have examined the effect of social support in the context of pregnancy termination. This study is the first to examine the effect of postoperative accompaniment from the patient, support person and nurses' perspective. This study was carried out in two phases. In Phase I, no accompaniment was allowed in the post-anesthesia recovery room (PAR); in Phase II, accompaniment was permitted. All participants completed pre- and postoperative questionnaires. The perception of accompaniment was overwhelmingly positive in patients and support people. Patients in Phase II demonstrated a high (over 95%) acceptance of accompaniment in the recovery room. It was found that 96.8% reported they would choose to be accompanied in the recovery room again if they had to have another abortion. Support persons felt very strongly that their presence was helpful to the patient. The decrease in pre- to postoperative anxiety levels was significantly greater in those women who were accompanied. However, overall, nurses demonstrated a negative attitude towards accompaniment in the recovery room. In summary, the presence of a support person in the PAR was perceived in a positive manner by patients and support people. However, the reasoning behind the negative opinion of nurses requires further study before PAR accompaniment can be considered a possibility in the context of pregnancy termination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pediatric advanced life support and sedation of pediatric dental patients

    Kim, Jongbin

    2016-01-01

    Programs provided by the Korea Association of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation include Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), and Korean Advanced Life Support (KALS). However, programs pertinent to dental care are lacking. Since 2015, related organizations have been attempting to develop a Dental Advanced Life Support (DALS) program, which can meet the needs of the dental environment. Generally, for initial management of emergency ...

  15. Linked Learning as a High School Transformation Strategy: Organizational Structures and Leadership Behaviors That Support Lasting Change

    Weiss, Elizabeth Rocio

    2016-01-01

    Linked Learning is an approach that has proven effective in transforming the learning experiences for high school students. An instrumental case study was conducted in a large urban district in Southern California where district and school leaders implemented Linked Learning as a systemic high school reform initiative. Analysis of the data…

  16. Contributions to early HIV diagnosis among patients linked to care vary by testing venue

    Trott Alexander T

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Early HIV diagnosis reduces transmission and improves health outcomes; screening in non-traditional settings is increasingly advocated. We compared test venues by the number of new diagnoses successfully linked to the regional HIV treatment center and disease stage at diagnosis. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study using structured chart review of newly diagnosed HIV patients successfully referred to the region's only HIV treatment center from 1998 to 2003. Demographics, testing indication, risk profile, and initial CD4 count were recorded. Results There were 277 newly diagnosed patients meeting study criteria. Mean age was 33 years, 77% were male, and 46% were African-American. Median CD4 at diagnosis was 324. Diagnoses were earlier via partner testing at the HIV treatment center (N = 8, median CD4 648, p = 0.008 and with universal screening by the blood bank, military, and insurance companies (N = 13, median CD4 483, p = 0.05 than at other venues. Targeted testing by health care and public health entities based on patient request, risk profile, or patient condition lead to later diagnosis. Conclusion Test venues varied by the number of new diagnoses made and the stage of illness at diagnosis. To improve the rate of early diagnosis, scarce resources should be allocated to maximize the number of new diagnoses at screening venues where diagnoses are more likely to be early or alter testing strategies at test venues where diagnoses are traditionally made late. Efforts to improve early diagnosis should be coordinated longitudinally on a regional basis according to this conceptual paradigm.

  17. Demographic characteristics of patients using a fully integrated psychosocial support service for cancer patients

    Hope Teresa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychosocial support services are an important component of modern cancer treatment. A major challenge for all psychosocial services is the achievement of equity of use. Previous studies in the UK have found that women of higher socio-economic status with breast cancer were over-represented amongst those accessing support services. People with other cancer diagnoses, those from socio-economically deprived areas, and men, were under-represented. Findings The Oncology Health Service, Kingston Upon Hull, UK, delivers fully integrated psychosocial support and interventions. To assess equity of access in this service, a cross-sectional study of all patients with cancer accessing the service during a 5 day period was carried out. One hundred and forty-five patients attended. Forty four percent were male, and the types of cancer were broadly in the proportions expected on the basis of population prevalence (breast cancer 22%, colorectal cancer 21%, lung cancer 16%. Sixty six percent came from the three most deprived quintiles of the Townsend deprivation Index. Conclusions The fully integrated Oncology Health Service in Hull is accessed by a more diverse range of patients than previously reported for other services, and is an example of a model of service by which socially equitable use of psychosocial support in the National Health Service might be achieved.

  18. Impact of Pathologist Involvement in Sarcoma and Rare Tumor Patient Support Groups on Facebook: A Survey of 542 Patients and Family Members.

    Haller, Jasmine; David, Marjorie Parker; Lee, Nathan E; Shalin, Sara C; Gardner, Jerad M

    2018-01-29

    - Patients with rare tumors have difficulty finding reliable information about their disease. Facebook patient support groups allow patients to educate one another. - To investigate how these patients perceive the value of pathologists, both in Facebook groups and real-world patient care. - Survey links were posted in 12 Facebook patient groups: 6 with an active pathologist member (angiosarcoma, epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, epithelioid sarcoma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans [×2], and desmoid fibromatosis), and 6 without "active" pathologist involvement (aggressive angiomyxoma, chondrosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, and osteosarcoma). - A total of 542 people responded (403 were patients): 264 from groups with a pathologist, and 278 from groups without active pathologist involvement. Of groups with an active pathologist, respondents agreed the pathologist's posts helped them better understand their disease (107 of 119; 90%) and relieved some of their disease-related anxiety (92 of 119; 77%). And for these groups 98% (117 of 119) of respondents agreed that having a pathologist in their group was a good thing; 83% (192 of 232) wanted more pathologists involved. More respondents from groups with an active pathologist (219 of 236; 93%) than without one (215 of 252; 85%) agreed: "pathologists are an important part of the patient care team for patients with cancer and other rare tumors" ( P = .008). - This study is the first to evaluate the impact of pathologist interaction with Facebook patient support groups and to assess perceptions about the specialty of pathology from a large group of patients with rare tumors. Pathologist involvement in Facebook patient groups appears to positively influence patient perception of the importance of pathologists. We hope these data will encourage more pathologists to participate in Facebook patient support groups.

  19. Wind power: Addressing wildlife impacts, assessing effects on tourism, and examining the link between climate change perceptions and support

    Lilley, Meredith Blaydes

    incidental take permits at wind facilities. Equal protections for bats are also recommended. In examining the potential effect of offshore wind power on coastal tourism, the second paper reports the findings of a summer 2007 survey of over 1,000 out-of-state tourists at Delaware beaches. Randomly sampled beachgoers were shown photo-simulations of wind turbines at increasing distances from shore and asked how each simulation would affect visitation. With wind turbines located six miles offshore, approximately one-quarter would switch to a different beach. This stated avoidance, however, diminishes with increasing wind project distance from shore. Additionally, stated avoidance of a beach with turbines six miles offshore is exceeded by: avoidance of a beach with an equidistant, inland, fossil fuel power plant; attraction to a beach in order to see turbines six miles offshore; and the likelihood of paying for an offshore wind boat tour. Further, logistic regression modeling reveals that neither trip cost nor income significantly influences the likelihood of visiting a beach with offshore wind. These findings suggest that to limit beach avoidance, offshore wind developers could site wind facilities further from shore, particularly in areas with high recreational use. Moreover, with wind turbines six miles offshore serving more as an attraction than as a deterrent, offshore wind development may, in fact, bolster local tourism revenues. The third study examines public perceptions of climate change and the link between those perceptions and support for wind power, both in general and with respect to specific offshore sites. Analyzing data from five surveys, this research uncovers low climate awareness and concern levels overall. Respondents demonstrate a poor understanding of climate change impacts and of how to effectively address climate change. In accordance with the New Ecological Paradigm, still fewer are concerned about climate change. The issue ranks 6th in Delaware and 8th

  20. Partner support and distress in women with breast cancer : The role of patients' awareness of support and level of mastery

    Hinnen, Chris; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Baas, Pieter C.; Sanderman, Robbert; Hagedoorn, Mariet

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between partners' ways of providing support (both active engagement and protective buffering) and distress in women with breast cancer as a function of patients' awareness of the support received and their sense of mastery. These

  1. Biomass Assessment. Assessment of global biomass potentials and their links to food, water, biodiversity, energy demand and economy. Inventory and analysis of existing studies. Supporting document

    Dornburg, V.; Faaij, A.; Verweij, P.; Banse, M.; Van Diepen, K.; Van Keulen, H.; Langeveld, H.; Meeusen, M.; Van de Ven, G.; Wester, F.; Alkemade, R.; Ten Brink, B.; Van den Born, G.J.; Van Oorschot, M.; Ros, J.; Smout, F.; Van Vuuren, D.; Van den Wijngaart, R.; Aiking, H.; Londo, M.; Mozaffarian, H.; Smekens, K.; Lysen, E.

    2008-01-01

    This supporting document contains the result from the inventory phase of the biomass assessment of global biomass potentials and their links to food, water, biodiversity, energy demand and economy. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of global biomass potential estimates, focusing on the various factors affecting these potentials, such as food supplies, water use, biodiversity, energy demands and agro-economics

  2. Participation of chronic patients in medical consultations: patients’ perceived efficacy, barriers and interest in support.

    Henselmans, I.; Heijmans, M.; Rademakers, J.; Dulmen, S. van

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Chronic patients are increasingly expected to participate actively in medical consultations. This study examined (i) patients' perceived efficacy and barriers to participation in consultations, (ii) patients' interest in communication support and (iii) correlates of perceived efficacy and

  3. Intensive Nutritional Counselling And Support And Clinical Outcomes In Hemodialysis Patients

    Alessio Molfino

    2012-06-01

    In conclusion, in HD patients, nutritional counselling and nutritional support positively affect nutritional status in hypophagic patients and make the risk of morbidity and mortality in anorexic patients comparable to non-anorexic.

  4. The relationship between social support and health-related quality of life in patients with antiphospholipid (hughes) syndrome.

    Georgopoulou, Sofia; Efraimidou, Sofia; MacLennan, Sara Jane; Ibrahim, Fowzia; Cox, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Antiphospholipid (Hughes) syndrome (APS) is recognised as a systemic autoimmune disease defined by recurrent thromboembolic events and/or pregnancy morbidity. Little is known about the psychological burden of this long-term condition. This study aims to explore the relationship between social support and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with APS. A total of 270 patients with a clinical diagnosis of APS participated in a cross-sectional online questionnaire survey. Data included demographics, disease-related information, social support and HRQoL. Both perceived and ideal social support were associated with HRQoL in APS. Patients reported receiving insufficient social support. Perceived emotional support was related to physical functioning (B = 7.77, p = .006, 95% CI: 2.25, 13.29); perceived instrumental support was associated with bodily pain (B = 17.52, p support with physical and social functioning (B = -6.30, p = .05, 95% CI: -12.52, -0.08; B = 8.06, p = .02, 95% CI: 1.17, 14.94). Ideal emotional support was related to physical and social functioning (B = 5.80, p = .04, 95% CI: 0.26, 11.34; B = 7.53, p = .04, 95% CI: 0.55, 14.51); ideal instrumental support was associated with mental health (B = 4.73, p = .03, 95% CI: 0.38, 9.07) and ideal informational support with vitality (B = 5.85, p = .01, 95% CI: 1.23, 10.46). Social support was linked to HRQoL in patients with APS. Insufficient social support was associated with limitations in various HRQoL domains. Increasing social support especially through provision of disease-specific education might contribute to improving HRQoL in patients with APS. Patient-tailored interventions addressing psychosocial aspects of living with APS are needed to improve patients' psychological and physical status.

  5. [Clinical application of super-link system theory in spinal cord injury patients during rehabilitation stage].

    Chen, Hsiao-Yu

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce Super-Link System Theory, which is a theory of spinal cord injury rehabilitation. This theory has been developed using the grounded theory research method. By explaining the procedure for establishing a super-link system the paper explains the complex structure of this theory. Super-Link System Theory emphasizes that rehabilitation nurses 'build up their interpersonal relationships' with clients, family caregivers, the interdisciplinary team, and the community, and attempt to 'establish links' among them. They know these links have to be made with appropriate 'timing', and must be able to access the appropriate people when necessary. Super-link systems include the following four links: link to client with spinal cord injury, link to family caregiver, link to interdisciplinary rehabilitation team, and link to community. It can enable rehabilitation nurses to provide a better quality of nursing care to clients and their family caregivers, as well as promote their professional position in the interdisciplinary rehabilitation team.

  6. Monte Carlo calculations supporting patient plan verification in proton therapy

    Thiago Viana Miranda Lima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Patient’s treatment plan verification covers substantial amount of the quality assurance (QA resources, this is especially true for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT. The use of Monte Carlo (MC simulations in supporting QA has been widely discussed and several methods have been proposed. In this paper we studied an alternative approach from the one being currently applied clinically at Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO. We reanalysed the previously published data (Molinelli et al. 2013, where 9 patient plans were investigated in which the warning QA threshold of 3% mean dose deviation was crossed. The possibility that these differences between measurement and calculated dose were related to dose modelling (Treatment Planning Systems (TPS vs MC, limitations on dose delivery system or detectors mispositioning was originally explored but other factors such as the geometric description of the detectors were not ruled out. For the purpose of this work we compared ionisation-chambers measurements with different MC simulations results. It was also studied some physical effects introduced by this new approach for example inter detector interference and the delta ray thresholds. The simulations accounting for a detailed geometry typically are superior (statistical difference - p-value around 0.01 to most of the MC simulations used at CNAO (only inferior to the shift approach used. No real improvement were observed in reducing the current delta-ray threshold used (100 keV and no significant interference between ion chambers in the phantom were detected (p-value 0.81. In conclusion, it was observed that the detailed geometrical description improves the agreement between measurement and MC calculations in some cases. But in other cases position uncertainty represents the dominant uncertainty. The inter chamber disturbance was not detected for the therapeutic protons energies and the results from the current delta threshold are

  7. Free and open source enabling technologies for patient-centric, guideline-based clinical decision support: a survey.

    Leong, T Y; Kaiser, K; Miksch, S

    2007-01-01

    Guideline-based clinical decision support is an emerging paradigm to help reduce error, lower cost, and improve quality in evidence-based medicine. The free and open source (FOS) approach is a promising alternative for delivering cost-effective information technology (IT) solutions in health care. In this paper, we survey the current FOS enabling technologies for patient-centric, guideline-based care, and discuss the current trends and future directions of their role in clinical decision support. We searched PubMed, major biomedical informatics websites, and the web in general for papers and links related to FOS health care IT systems. We also relied on our background and knowledge for specific subtopics. We focused on the functionalities of guideline modeling tools, and briefly examined the supporting technologies for terminology, data exchange and electronic health record (EHR) standards. To effectively support patient-centric, guideline-based care, the computerized guidelines and protocols need to be integrated with existing clinical information systems or EHRs. Technologies that enable such integration should be accessible, interoperable, and scalable. A plethora of FOS tools and techniques for supporting different knowledge management and quality assurance tasks involved are available. Many challenges, however, remain in their implementation. There are active and growing trends of deploying FOS enabling technologies for integrating clinical guidelines, protocols, and pathways into the main care processes. The continuing development and maturation of such technologies are likely to make increasingly significant contributions to patient-centric, guideline-based clinical decision support.

  8. Type D personality as a predictor of self-efficacy and social support in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Shao Y

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Yechang Shao,1,2 Honglei Yin,3 Chengsong Wan4 1School of Public Health, Southern Medical University, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, 3Department of Psychiatry, Nanfang Hospital, 4Department of Microbiology, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Research, School of Public Health, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of Type D personality and assess the relationship between this personality type and self-efficacy/social support in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.Patients and methods: From January 1, 2014, to July 31, 2014, 532 consecutive patients with T2DM were recruited from two hospitals in Guangzhou, China. The participants completed questionnaires containing questions about sociodemographic characteristics, Type D personality, self-efficacy, and social support scales, and their medical records were reviewed for additional data.Results: Of the 532 patients, 18.2% had Type D personality. Patients with this personality type reported significantly lower levels of self-efficacy (P<0.001, total social support (P<0.001, subjective support (P<0.001, and support utilization (P=0.003, but similar level of objective support (P=0.314, compared to those of patients without Type D personality. Negative affectivity and social inhibition, two intrinsic traits of Type D personality, negatively correlated with self-efficacy and social support scores. Type D personality was significantly associated with less self-efficacy and social support (P<0.001, controlling for other sociodemographic factors. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels were significantly higher in T2DM patients with Type D personality than in patients with non-Type D personality.Conclusion: This study provides new evidence linking Type D personality with self-efficacy, social support, and poor

  9. Patient preferences for psychological support in inflammatory arthritis: A multicentre survey

    Dures, E.; Almeida, C.; Caesley, J.; Peterson, A.; Ambler, N.; Morris, M.; Pollock, J.; Hewlett, S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Inflammatory arthritis (IA) can lead to anxiety, depression, pain and fatigue. Psychological support can improve quality of life and self-management; and European and American guidelines recommend support be offered. This study examined patient views on psychological support for their IA.\\ud \\ud Methods: A questionnaire designed by researchers, patient partners and clinicians was administered to 2280 patients with IA.\\ud \\ud Results: 1210 patients responded (53%): 74% women; mean ...

  10. Toward an evidence-based patient-provider communication in rehabilitation: linking communication elements to better rehabilitation outcomes.

    Jesus, Tiago Silva; Silva, Isabel Lopes

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing interest in linking aspects of patient-provider communication to rehabilitation outcomes. However, the field lacks a conceptual understanding on: (a) 'how' rehabilitation outcomes can be improved by communication; and (b) through 'which' elements in particular. This article elaborates on the conceptual developments toward informing further practice and research. Existing models of communication in healthcare were adapted to rehabilitation, and its outcomes through a comprehensive literature review. After depicting mediating mechanisms and variables (e.g. therapeutic engagement, adjustment toward disability), this article presents the '4 Rehab Communication Elements' deemed likely to underpin rehabilitation outcomes. The four elements are: (a) knowing the person and building a supportive relationship; (b) effective information exchange and education; (c) shared goal-setting and action planning; and (d) fostering a more positive, yet realistic, cognitive and self-reframing. This article describes an unprecedented, outcomes-oriented approach toward the design of rehabilitation communication, which has resulted in the development of a new intervention model: the '4 Rehab Communication Elements'. Further trials are needed to evaluate the impact of this whole intervention model on rehabilitation outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Phenotypic Characteristics of a French Cohort of Patients with X-Linked Retinoschisis.

    Orès, Raphaëlle; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Antonio, Aline; Zeitz, Christina; Augstburger, Edouard; Andrieu, Camille; Sahel, José-Alain; Audo, Isabelle

    2018-05-05

    To analyze the retinal structure in patients with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) using spectral-domain OCT and to correlate the morphologic findings with visual acuity, electroretinographic results, and patient age. Retrospective, observational study. Data from 52 consecutive male patients with molecularly confirmed XLRS were collected retrospectively. Complete clinical evaluation included best-corrected visual acuity, full-field electroretinography, fundus photography, spectral-domain OCT, and fundus autofluorescence. Spectral-domain OCT images were analyzed to determine full thickness of the retina and tomographic structural changes. Relationships between age, OCT, and visual acuity were assessed. One hundred four eyes of 52 patients were included. The mean age at inclusion was 24±15 years (range, 3-57 years). The best-corrected visual acuity ranged from no light perception to 0.1 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (mean, 0.6±0.38 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution). Macular schisis was found in 88% of eyes and macular atrophy was found in 11% of eyes, whereas peripheral schisis was present in 30% of eyes. A spoke-wheel pattern of high and low intensity was the most frequently observed fundus autofluorescence abnormality (51/94 eyes [54%]). The b-to-a amplitude ratio on bright-flash dark-adapted electroretinography was reduced significantly in 45 of 64 eyes (70%). Spectral-domain OCT was available for 97 eyes and showed foveoschisis in 76 of 97 eyes (78%), parafoveal schisis in 10 of 97 eyes (10%), and foveal atrophy in 11 of 97 eyes (11%). Mean central macular thickness (CMT) was of 373.6±140 μm. Cystoid changes were localized mainly in the inner nuclear layer (85/97 eyes [88%]). Qualitative defects in photoreceptor structures were found in most eyes (79/97 eyes [81%]), and the most frequent abnormality was an interruption of the photoreceptor cell outer segment tips (79/79 eyes [100%]). Older age correlated well with lower CMT

  12. Social Support and Symptom Severity Among Patients With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder or Panic Disorder With Agoraphobia: A Systematic Review

    Véronique Palardy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD/A and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD are characterized by major behavioral dysruptions that may affect patients’ social and marital functioning. The disorders’ impact on interpersonal relationships may also affect the quality of support patients receive from their social network. The main goal of this systematic review is to determine the association between social or marital support and symptom severity among adults with PD/A or OCD. A systematic search of databases was executed and provided 35 eligible articles. Results from OCD studies indicated a negative association between marital adjustment and symptom severity, and a positive association between accommodation from relatives and symptom severity. However, results were inconclusive for negative forms of social support (e.g. criticism, hostility. Results from PD/A studies indicated a negative association between perceived social support and symptom severity. Also, results from studies using an observational measure of marital adjustment indicated a negative association between quality of support from the spouse and PD/A severity. However, results were inconclusive for perceived marital adjustment and symptom severity. In conclusion, this systematic review generally suggests a major role of social and marital support in PD/A and OCD symptomatology. However, given diversity of results and methods used in studies, more are needed to clarify the links between support and symptom severity among patients with PD/A and OCD.

  13. Measures of Patient Activation and Social Support in a Peer-Led Support Network for Women With Cardiovascular Disease.

    Witt, Dawn; Benson, Gretchen; Campbell, Susan; Sillah, Arthur; Berra, Kathy

    Social support has been associated with beneficial effects on many disease states and overall health and well-being. However, there is limited research exploring the impact of peer-led support models among women living with coronary heart disease. This study describes the structure of peer-led support groups offered by WomenHeart (WH): The National Coalition for Women Living with Heart Disease, and assesses WH participants' quality of life and social, emotional, and physical health. Participants were recruited from 50 WH groups. A 70-item online survey was administered, and the main analytic sample included 157 women. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the association between patient activation levels (lower activation levels: 1, 2 vs higher activation levels: 3, 4) and social support scores (range: lowest 8 to highest 34), adjusting for age. High levels of social support, patient activation, physical activity, and low levels of stress, anxiety, and depression were reported. Those who were at or above the median for the social support measures (indicating high levels of social support) had greater odds of high levels of patient activation (level 3 or 4) than individuals reporting low levels of social support (OR = 2.23; 95% CI, 1.04-4.76; P = .012). Women who regularly attended a support group by a trained peer leader were highly engaged in their health care and had low levels of stress, anxiety, and depression. These findings lend credibility to the value of the peer support model and could potentially be replicated in other disease states to enhance patient care.

  14. [A nurse's experience using the super-link system theory to help a T6 spinal cord injury patient return to school].

    Li, Pei-Yeh; Wu, Tzu-Jung; Sung, Shi-Hui; Chen, Hsiao-Yu

    2010-04-01

    The subject of this article is a 20 year-old female with thoracic spinal cord injury with paraplegia suffered during a car accident. The article reports on the nursing experience in helping the patient manage her autonomic dysreflexia (AD), training the patient in self-catheterization, and using relevant social resources in order to achieve a successful return to her studies at school. The authors collected data using interviews, observations, and physical assessments between November 20 and December 30, 2008. The two nursing diagnoses of AD and inadequate preparation for a successful return to school during rehabilitation hospitalization were made during caring procedures. Holistic nursing assessment was employed and the Super-Link System Theory was applied to establish a link between the hospital and school. Individual nursing interventions used included understanding the inducement and treatment of AD, performing self-catheterization, and enhancing the support system by introducing successful clients and relevant social resources in order to transition the patient successfully to her new post-injury life. The patient consequently transitioned smoothly from rehabilitation hospital to school. The authors hope this case report will provide a useful reference for nurses charged with caring for patients with spinal cord injuries while still enrolled at school.

  15. Self-reported differences in empowerment between lurkers and posters in online patient support groups.

    van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F.; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; Seydel, Erwin R.; van de Laar, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients who visit online support groups benefit in various ways. Results of our earlier study indicated that participation in online support groups had a profound effect on the participants' feelings of "being empowered." However, most studies of online patient support groups have

  16. Self-reported differences in empowerment between lurkers and posters in online patient support groups

    Kraan, C.F.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; Seydel, E.R.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2008-01-01

    Background: Patients who visit online support groups benefit in various ways. Results of our earlier study indicated that participation in online support groups had a profound effect on the participants’ feelings of “being empowered.” However, most studies of online patient support groups have

  17. Nutrition support of the pediatric patient with AIDS.

    Bentler, M; Stanish, M

    1987-04-01

    Maintaining optimal nutrition in the pediatric patient with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is challenging, but it may be one of the most effective therapies. Patients experience numerous complications that compromise nutritional status. Infection, fever, diarrhea, feeding problems, and decreased intake all contribute to malnutrition, which in turn predisposes the patient even more to infection and malabsorption. Nutrition assessment should be done routinely so that new problems may be identified and treated. High-calorie, high-protein feedings, vitamin supplementation, and, when necessary, gavage feedings or parenteral nutrition are recommended to improve nutritional status and prevent further deficits. Maintaining optimal nutrition in the pediatric patient with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) poses a significant challenge to the health care team. Patients may experience numerous complications that compromise nutritional status. The patient is at high risk for opportunistic infections, especially of the lungs, central nervous system, gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and skin. Such infections are common causes of morbidity and mortality. Impaired nutritional status may further impair the patient's immunocompetence. A study by Kotler and Gaety demonstrated severe progressive malnutrition in adult AIDS patients, with the lowest measures of lean body mass occurring in those patients close to death at the time of the study. While no studies of children with AIDS have been done to date, we have subjectively observed feeding problems, weight loss, and malnutrition in most of the patients we have seen.

  18. Self-management support for peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Sarian, Mari; Brault, Diane; Perreault, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic illnesses and kidney disease, in particular, makes it necessary to adopt new approaches towards their management (Wagner, 1998). Evidence suggests that promoting self-management improves the health status of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, as they manage upwards of 90% of their own care. Patients who are unable to self-manage suffer from various complications. This project proposes an intervention aimed at improving self-management skills among PD patients. To promote self-management in peritoneal dialysis patients. This is achieved through the following objectives: (a) develop an algorithm that can improve patients' ability to solve the specific problem of fluid balance maintenance, (b) develop an educational session for patients on how to use the algorithm, and (c) develop an implementation strategy in collaboration with the PD nurse. Three measures evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. First, a telephone call log shows that participating patients call the clinic less to inquire about fluid balance maintenance. Next, a pre- and post-intervention knowledge test measures definite knowledge increase. Finally, a Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire reveals overall satisfaction with the intervention. This project, which proved beneficial to our patient population, could be duplicated in other clinics. The algorithm "How do I choose a dialysis bag" and the slides of the educational sessions can be shared with PD nurses across the country for the benefit of PD patients.

  19. Standard work for room entry: Linking lean, hand hygiene, and patient-centeredness.

    O'Reilly, Kristin; Ruokis, Samantha; Russell, Kristin; Teves, Tim; DiLibero, Justin; Yassa, David; Berry, Hannah; Howell, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    Healthcare-associated infections are costly and fatal. Substantial front-line, administrative, regulatory, and research efforts have focused on improving hand hygiene. While broad agreement exists that hand hygiene is the most important single approach to infection prevention, compliance with hand hygiene is typically only about 40%(1). Our aim was to develop a standard process for room entry in the intensive care unit that improved compliance with hand hygiene and allowed for maximum efficiency. We recognized that hand hygiene is a single step in a substantially more complicated process of room entry. We applied Lean engineering techniques to develop a standard process that included both physical steps and also standard communication elements from provider to patients and families and created a physical environment to support this. We observed meaningful improvement in the performance of the new standard as well as time savings for clinical providers with each room entry. We also observed an increase in room entries that included verbal communication and an explanation of what the clinician was entering the room to do. The design and implementation of a standardized room entry process and the creation of an environment that supports that new process has resulted in measurable positive outcomes on the medical intensive care unit, including quality, patient experience, efficiency, and staff satisfaction. Designing a process, rather than viewing tasks that need to happen in close proximity in time (either serially or in parallel) as unrelated, simplifies work for staff and results in higher compliance to individual tasks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutation pattern in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase gene in 26 unrelated patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    Vorechovský, I; Luo, L; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1997-01-01

    Mutation pattern was characterized in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase gene (BTK) in 26 patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia, the first described immunoglobulin deficiency, and was related to BTK expression. A total of 24 different mutations were identified. Most BTK mutations were found to result...

  1. MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO SUPPORTING TREATMENT COMPLIANCE IN TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS

    T. V. Sherstneva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the algorithm for working with tuberculosis patients in TB hospital, providing implementation of multidisciplinary patient-centered activities for early diagnostics of psychiatric and social disorders, therapy and rehabilitation of concurrent psychiatric disorders and addictions. Multidisciplinary approach to activities within TB unit is aimed at improvement of treatment compliance of tuberculosis patients. The training programme has been developed in order to improve competency of medical personnel on the issue of treatment interruption prevention and motivating patients to undergo the continuous treatment.

  2. Long reach and enhanced power budget DWDM radio-over-fibre link supported by Raman amplification and coherent detection

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil; Fernandez, Amaya

    2009-01-01

    We report on a scalable and enhanced power budget radio-over-fibre system for hybrid-wireless access networks operating at 12.5 GHz DWDM spacing for 5 GHz RF carriers over a 60 km fibre link with Raman amplification....

  3. Pathways to Adolescents' Flourishing: Linking Self-Control Skills and Positivity Ratio through Social Support

    Orkibi, Hod; Hamama, Liat; Gavriel-Fried, Belle; Ronen, Tammie

    2018-01-01

    This study focused on the ability to experience a high ratio of positive to negative emotions in 807 Israeli adolescents aged 12 to 15 years (50% girls). While considering possible gender differences, we tested a model positing that adolescents' self-control skills would link to their positivity ratio and indirectly through perceived social…

  4. Left ventricular assist device management in patients chronically supported for advanced heart failure.

    Cowger, Jennifer; Romano, Matthew A; Stulak, John; Pagani, Francis D; Aaronson, Keith D

    2011-03-01

    This review summarizes management strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality in heart failure patients supported chronically with implantable left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). As the population of patients supported with long-term LVADs has grown, patient selection, operative technique, and patient management strategies have been refined, leading to improved outcomes. This review summarizes recent findings on LVAD candidate selection, and discusses outpatient strategies to optimize device performance and heart failure management. It also reviews important device complications that warrant close outpatient monitoring. Managing patients on chronic LVAD support requires regular patient follow-up, multidisciplinary care teams, and frequent laboratory and echocardiographic surveillance to ensure optimal outcomes.

  5. Is all support equal? The moderating effects of supervisor, coworker, and organizational support on the link between emotional labor and job performance

    Hyun Jeong Kim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to examine the moderating roles of perceived supervisor, coworker, and organizational support in the relationship between emotional labor and job performance in the airline service context. A sample of flight attendants working for one major airline company in South Korea participated in this study. The flight attendants’ official job performance data were provided by the airline company. For data analyses, a series of hierarchical moderated regression analyses were employed. The results showed differential moderation effects of the three sources of support at work. Specifically, the positive relationship between deep acting and job performance was strengthened by perceived supervisor and coworker support. The negative relationship between surface acting and job performance was exacerbated by perceived supervisor support, indicating the reverse buffering effect. Perceived organizational support showed only main effects on employee performance with no moderation effects.

  6. Internet delivered transdiagnostic treatment with telephone support for pain patients with emotional comorbidity: a replicated single case study

    Matilda Wurm

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In pain patients, comorbid emotional problems have been linked to negative outcomes, including suboptimal treatment gains. Developing parsimonious and accessible treatment options is therefore important. The overarching aim of this study was to test an internet delivered therapist guided transdiagnostic treatment with telephone support. An adapted version of the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatments of Emotional Disorders was used as an intervention for pain patients with residual pain problems and comorbid emotional problems after having received a multimodal pain rehabilitation. The study used a replicated AB single case experimental design (N = 5; 3 females. Outcome measures were depressive and general anxiety symptoms, pain intensity, pain coping problems, and diagnostic status. Feasibility measures (completion and compliance and patient satisfaction were also assessed. Scores on Nonoverlap of All Pairs (NAP indicate a decrease of anxiety for three participants and a decrease of depression for four participants. Decreases were small and did not always reach statistical significance. Also, Tau-U scores could only confirm a reliable trend for one participant. Two out of four patients who were diagnosed with psychiatric disorders before treatment did no longer fulfill diagnostic criteria posttreatment. No improvements could be seen on pain problems. The treatment was feasible and patient satisfaction was high. Hence, while an internet delivered transdiagnostic treatment with telephone support may be a feasible and accepted secondary intervention for pain patients with comorbid emotional problems, the effects are unclear. The gap between high patient satisfaction and small changes in symptomatology should be explored further.

  7. Supporting Asian patients with metastatic breast cancer during ixabepilone therapy.

    Bourdeanu, Laura; Wong, Siu-Fun

    2010-05-01

    Ixabepilone is currently FDA-approved in metastatic breast cancer, and most patients in the registrational trials were Caucasian. Studies in Asian populations receiving other cytotoxic agents have revealed differential pharmacokinetics and clinical outcomes. As such, clinicians should understand the possible contributions of Asian ethnicity and culture to the clinical profile of ixabepilone. Studies in Asian patients receiving other chemotherapeutics reported altered toxicity profiles for myelosuppression, neurotoxicity and gastrointestinal symptoms. Encouragingly, the limited clinical data in Asian patients receiving ixabepilone suggest that efficacy and toxicity in these women resemble those reported in the ixabepilone registrational trials. The reader will better understand how Asian genetics and culture may influence treatment outcomes and patient attitudes toward therapy and interaction with caregivers. Management of ixabepilone-related adverse events is also discussed with an emphasis on special considerations for Asian patients. Awareness of possible altered drug response in Asian patients will aid clinicians in monitoring for toxicity, recognizing the need for dose modification and educating patients. Sensitivity to cultural aspects that are unique to Asians may improve adherence, reporting of adverse events and trust among Asian patients receiving ixabepilone.

  8. Development of patient support devices for execution of clinical radiotherapy for cancer patients: A preliminary report

    Babu N

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper illustrates our attempt to design and test the reproducibility of low-cost patient positioning devices prepared in-house in our radiotherapy department. Rigid thermocole boards with angulations, scales and support were designed as breast, pelvis and head positioning devices. Reproducibility and accuracy were tested by serial electronic portal imaging detector imaging. The positioning devices (with or without superimposed moulds showed variations within 2-3 mm on serial treatment days which were within acceptable limits. It is therefore concluded that low-cost patient positioning devices for head, breast and pelvis (the common sites of treatments in radiotherapy can be fabricated from available materials in-house. These have been shown to be resulting in accurate immobilization, can be customized for particular techniques and are considerably cheaper than commercially available solutions.

  9. Linking Six Sigma to simulation: a new roadmap to improve the quality of patient care.

    Celano, Giovanni; Costa, Antonio; Fichera, Sergio; Tringali, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Improving the quality of patient care is a challenge that calls for a multidisciplinary approach, embedding a broad spectrum of knowledge and involving healthcare professionals from diverse backgrounds. The purpose of this paper is to present an innovative approach that implements discrete-event simulation (DES) as a decision-supporting tool in the management of Six Sigma quality improvement projects. A roadmap is designed to assist quality practitioners and health care professionals in the design and successful implementation of simulation models within the define-measure-analyse-design-verify (DMADV) or define-measure-analyse-improve-control (DMAIC) Six Sigma procedures. A case regarding the reorganisation of the flow of emergency patients affected by vertigo symptoms was developed in a large town hospital as a preliminary test of the roadmap. The positive feedback from professionals carrying out the project looks promising and encourages further roadmap testing in other clinical settings. The roadmap is a structured procedure that people involved in quality improvement can implement to manage projects based on the analysis and comparison of alternative scenarios. The role of Six Sigma philosophy in improvement of the quality of healthcare services is recognised both by researchers and by quality practitioners; discrete-event simulation models are commonly used to improve the key performance measures of patient care delivery. The two approaches are seldom referenced and implemented together; however, they could be successfully integrated to carry out quality improvement programs. This paper proposes an innovative approach to bridge the gap and enrich the Six Sigma toolbox of quality improvement procedures with DES.

  10. Supporting the patient's role in guideline compliance: a controlled study.

    Rosenberg, Stephen N; Shnaiden, Tatiana L; Wegh, Arnold A; Juster, Iver A

    2008-11-01

    Clinical messages alerting physicians to gaps in the care of specific patients have been shown to increase compliance with evidence-based guidelines. This study sought to measure any additional impact on compliance when alerting messages also were sent to patients. For alerts that were generated by computerized clinical rules applied to claims, compliance was determined by subsequent claims evidence (eg, that recommended tests were performed). Compliance was measured in the baseline year and the study year for 4 study group employers (combined membership >100,000) that chose to add patient messaging in the study year, and 28 similar control group employers (combined membership >700,000) that maintained physician messaging but did not add patient messaging. The impact of patient messaging was assessed by comparing changes in compliance from baseline to study year in the 2 groups. Multiple logistic regression was used to control for differences between the groups. Because a given member or physician could receive multiple alerts, generalized estimating equations with clustering by patient and physician were used. Controlling for differences in age, sex, and the severity and types of clinical alerts between the study and control groups, the addition of patient messaging increased compliance by 12.5% (P compliance with the evidence-based guidelines underlying the alerts.

  11. Management of aggressive periodontitis patient with implant supported prosthesis

    Garima Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive periodontitis (AgP comprises a group of rare, often severe, rapidly progressive forms of periodontitis which is characterized by an early age of clinical manifestations. It usually affects people under 30 years of age, but patients may be older. Microbiota associated are Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The presence of highly pathogenic bacteria, severe periodontal bone destruction and the refractory nature of this disease tends to deter the clinician from placing implants in these patients. This case report demonstrates the placement of implants in a patient with AgP with successful 18 months follow-up.

  12. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: clinical and laboratory findings in 15 Brazilian patients

    Carmen R. Vargas

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD is an X-linked recessively inherited peroxisomal disorder, phenotypically heterogeneous, characterized by progressive white-matter demyelination of the central nervous system and adrenocortical insufficiency. We investigated 15 male X-ALD patients varying in age from 7 to 39, diagnosed among 108 suspected patients referred for investigation. Plasma levels of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA were measured at our laboratory using gas chromatography (GC. Eleven cases of childhood X-ALD and four cases of adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN were diagnosed. Adrenal leukodystrophy insufficiency and limb weakness were the most frequent symptoms, appearing in 12, 8 and 6 of the patients, respectively. Physician awareness of X-ALD seems inadequate to judge by age at diagnosis and lengthy interval between the start of symptoms and diagnosis. This is the first published series of Brazilian patients with X-ALD. We determined signs and symptoms relevant for diagnosis, as early identification seems important for treatment outcome. In addition, diagnosis identifies carriers, who could benefit from genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis.Adrenoleucodistrofia (X-ALD é uma desordem peroxissomal com padrão de herança ligada ao X, fenotipicamente heterogênea, caracterizada por uma progressiva desmielinização da substância branca do sistema nervoso central e por insuficiência adrenal. Foram investigados por nós 15 pacientes do sexo masculino com sinais clínicos sugestivos de X-ALD, com idade entre 7 e 39 anos, diagnosticados entre 108 pacientes encaminhados para investigação por suspeita clínica. Os níveis plasmáticos dos ácidos graxos de cadeia muito longa (VLCFA foram dosados em nosso laboratório através de cromatografia gasosa (GC. Onze (73% casos da forma infantil de X-ALD (ALD e 4 (27% casos de adrenomieloneuropatia (AMN foram diagnosticados. Insuficiência leucodistrofia adrenal e fraqueza muscular foram os sinais mais

  13. Effect of perceived social support and dispositional optimism on the depression of burn patients.

    He, Fei; Zhou, Qin; Zhao, Zhijing; Zhang, Yuan; Guan, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Burn wounds have a significant impact on the mental health of patients. This study aimed to investigate the impact of perceived social support and dispositional optimism on depression of burn patients. A total of 246 burn patients accomplished the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, the Revised Life Orientation Test, and Depression Scale. The results revealed that both perceived social support and optimism were significantly correlated with depression. Structural equation modeling indicated that optimism partially mediated the relationship between perceived social support and depression. Implications for prevention of depression in burn patients were discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Knee osteoarthritis and perceived social support amongst patients in ...

    Temitope Ilori

    2016-06-29

    Jun 29, 2016 ... ... as marital or relationship status, and the number of children, appear to have a ... its health impact on patients with knee osteoarthritis who presented to .... Children. Spouse. Sibling. Parents. In-laws. Others. FREQUENCY %.

  15. Computer-supported patient involvement in heart rehabilitation

    Kensing, Finn

    2017-01-01

    are being collected through artifact and document analysis, and by interviews and observations in patients’ homes and in nurses’ offices over so far 6 months. The analysis is informed by medical phenomenology and by conceptual frameworks developed in earlier projects conducted by the author’s research group......Two of the five Danish regions, covering close to half of the population, are in the process of implementing a new EHR system. One of its sub-systems is a patient portal. The work-in-progress reported here is an exploratory study and a first level of analysis concerned with why, how and with which...... effects patients start to orient themselves towards this subsystem, and the degree to which this has an effect on the clinicians’ work. The overall approach is a multi-site ethnographic study involving 5 patients and 3 nurses responsible for a rehabilitation program for ischemic heart patients. Data...

  16. TeenBP: Development and Piloting of an EHR-Linked Clinical Decision Support System to Improve Recognition of Hypertension in Adolescents.

    Kharbanda, Elyse O; Nordin, James D; Sinaiko, Alan R; Ekstrom, Heidi L; Stultz, Jerry M; Sherwood, Nancy E; Fontaine, Patricia L; Asche, Steve E; Dehmer, Steven P; Amundson, Jerry H; Appana, Deepika X; Bergdall, Anna R; Hayes, Marcia G; O'Connor, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is routinely measured in children and adolescents during primary care visits. However, elevated BP or hypertension is frequently not diagnosed or evaluated further by primary care providers. Barriers to recognition include lack of clinician buy-in, competing priorities, and complexity of the standard BP tables. We have developed and piloted TeenBP- a web-based, electronic health record (EHR) linked system designed to improve recognition of prehypertension and hypertension in adolescents during primary care visits. Important steps in developing TeenBP included the following: review of national BP guidelines, consideration of clinic workflow, engagement of clinical leaders, and evaluation of the impact on clinical sites. Use of a web-based platform has facilitated updates to the TeenBP algorithm and to the message content. In addition, the web-based platform has allowed for development of a sophisticated display of patient-specific information at the point of care. In the TeenBP pilot, conducted at a single pediatric and family practice site with six clinicians, over a five-month period, more than half of BPs in the hypertensive range were clinically recognized. Furthermore, in this small pilot the TeenBP clinical decision support (CDS) was accepted by providers and clinical staff. Effectiveness of the TeenBP CDS will be determined in a two-year cluster-randomized clinical trial, currently underway at 20 primary care sites. Use of technology to extract and display clinically relevant data stored within the EHR may be a useful tool for improving recognition of adolescent hypertension during busy primary care visits. In the future, the methods developed specifically for TeenBP are likely to be translatable to a wide range of acute and chronic issues affecting children and adolescents.

  17. How Dynamics of Learning Are Linked to Innovation Support Services: Insights from a Smallholder Commercialization Project in Kenya

    Kilelu, Catherine W.; Klerkx, Laurens; Leeuwis, Cees

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The important role of learning is noted in the literature on demand-driven approaches to supporting agricultural innovation. Most of this literature has focused on macrolevel structural perspectives on the organization of pluralistic innovation support systems. This has provided little insight at the micro-level on the dynamics of demand…

  18. The Link between Perceived Maternal and Paternal Autonomy Support and Adolescent Well-Being across Three Major Educational Transitions

    Duineveld, Jasper J.; Parker, Philip D.; Ryan, Richard M.; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Salmela-Aro, Katariina

    2017-01-01

    To what extent does maternal and paternal autonomy support enhance well-being across the major transitions of high school? We tested the degree to which perceived autonomy supportive parenting facilitated positive changes in self-esteem and life satisfaction and buffered against negative changes in depressive symptoms and school related burnout in…

  19. Gastric adenocarcinoma in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia and HIV: Case report and review of the literature

    Joud Hajjar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA is an X-linked inherited disease usually caused by a germline mutation in the BTK gene leading to Bruton’s tyrosine kinase deficiency, which results in the impaired development of B-lymphocytes and a subsequent lack of immunoglobulin production. Patients with XLA have an increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections, and multiple case reports have been published regarding an association between XLA and gastrointestinal (GI malignancy. Here, we describe a case of a 25-year-old man with XLA and HIV, who developed gastric adenocarcinoma. Previously reported cases of XLA and GI malignancy are also reviewed and summarized.

  20. Patient satisfaction of tooth supported overdentures utilizing ball attachments

    Nassar, Hossam I.

    2016-01-01

    Statement of problem: Teeth retained overdenture therapy is an alternative treatment rarely used in cases with few remaining teeth. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the patient satisfaction associated with teeth retained maxillary and mandibular overdentures utilizing ready made ball attachment. Materials and methods: Thirty patients treated with teeth retained overdenture utilizing ready made ball attachment. Participants completed a series of questionnaires (OHIP-14 ques...

  1. Psychological support for orthognathic patients -- what do orthodontists want?

    Juggins, K J; Feinmann, C; Shute, J; Cunningham, S J

    2006-06-01

    (1) To evaluate consultant orthodontist opinion on referral of orthognathic patients to a liaison psychiatrist or psychologist and (2) To investigate the value of training orthodontic specialists in recognition of patients with psychological profiles that might affect orthognathic outcome. Questionnaire-based study. A structured questionnaire was distributed to all consultant orthodontists in the UK. Approximately 40% of consultants thought that up to 10% of their orthognathic patients would benefit from psychological assessment by appropriately trained personnel. Twenty per cent of consultants were not certain what proportion of their patients would benefit from referral and over half the respondents said they do not refer any orthognathic patients for assessment. The most common reasons for referral were past/current psychiatric history (36%), unrealistic expectations (32%), 'gut instinct' (14%), no significant clinical problem (13%). Reasons not to refer were: nobody to refer to (30.5%), fear of patient reacting badly (15.8%), not sure who to refer to (14.7%), response from mental health team not useful (12.4%), waiting list too long (9.6%). The majority of clinicians felt they would benefit from training in this field (84.7%), as over 80% reported no teaching or training in psychological assessment/management. Although we have no evidence to prove that interdisciplinary care is better for patients, clinical experience and reports from clinicians working in large centres, tells us there are probable advantages. The development of a training programme for both orthodontists and mental health teams would seem to be beneficial for both clinicians and patients.

  2. Palateless custom bar supported overdenture: A treatment modality to treat patient with severe gag reflex

    Kunwarjeet Singh

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Palateless custom bar supported overdenture procedure can be successfully used for the management of patients with severe gag reflex with improved denture retention, stability, chewing efficiency and comfort of the patient.

  3. Supporting patient adherence to antiretrovirals using mobile phone reminders: patient responses from South India.

    Sidney, Kristi; Antony, Jimmy; Rodrigues, Rashmi; Arumugam, Karthika; Krishnamurthy, Shubha; D'souza, George; De Costa, Ayesha; Shet, Anita

    2012-01-01

    There has been exponential growth in the use of mobile phones in India over the last few years, and their potential benefits as a healthcare tool has raised tremendous interest. We used mobile phone reminders to help support adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients at an infectious disease clinic in a tertiary hospital in Bangalore. Between March and June 2010, 139 adult HIV patients taking regular ART for at least a month received weekly reminders to support adherence. These reminders consisted of a weekly interactive call and a non-interactive neutral pictorial short message service (SMS). After four weeks of the intervention, participants were interviewed to study perceptions on preference, usefulness, potential stigma and privacy concerns associated with this intervention. Majority of the participants were urban (89%), and had at least a secondary education (85%). A total of 744 calls were made, 545 (76%) of which were received by the participants. In addition, all participants received the weekly pictorial SMS reminder. A month later, 90% of participants reported the intervention as being helpful as medication reminders, and did not feel their privacy was intruded. Participants (87%) reported that they preferred the call as reminders, just 11% favoured SMS reminders alone. Only 59% of participants viewed all the SMSs that were delivered, while 15% never viewed any at all. Participants also denied any discomfort or stigma despite 20% and 13%, respectively, reporting that another person had inadvertently received their reminder call or SMS. Mobile phone interventions are an acceptable way of supporting adherence in this setting. Voice calls rather than SMSs alone seem to be preferred as reminders. Further research to study the influence of this intervention on adherence and health maintenance is warranted.

  4. A Digital Framework to Support Providers and Patients in Diabetes Related Behavior Modification.

    Abidi, Samina; Vallis, Michael; Piccinini-Vallis, Helena; Imran, Syed Ali; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    2017-01-01

    We present Diabetes Web-Centric Information and Support Environment (D-WISE) that features: (a) Decision support tool to assist family physicians to administer Behavior Modification (BM) strategies to patients; and (b) Patient BM application that offers BM strategies and motivational interventions to engage patients. We take a knowledge management approach, using semantic web technologies, to model the social cognition theory constructs, Canadian diabetes guidelines and BM protocols used locally, in terms of a BM ontology that drives the BM decision support to physicians and BM strategy adherence monitoring and messaging to patients. We present the qualitative analysis of D-WISE usability by both physicians and patients.

  5. Family support and blood pressure pattern in adult patients ...

    The prevalence of hypertension is increasing worldwide but awareness, treatment and control rates are very poor. Hence, this study ... Data was analyzed using Stata statistical software (Version 10). Results: The mean age ... in clinical practice. Keywords: Hypertension, Family Support, Awareness, Control, Family Physician ...

  6. Screening of Nutritional Risk and Nutritional Support in General Surgery Patients: A Survey from Shanghai, China

    Jia, Zhen-Yi; Yang, Jun; Tong, Da-Nian; Peng, Jia-Yuan; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Liu, Wei-Jie; Xia, Yang; Qin, Huan-long

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of nutritional risk in surgical departments and to evaluate the impact of nutritional support on clinical outcomes. The nutritional risk in different surgical diseases and the different way of nutritional support on clinical outcomes in patients at nutritional risk remain unclear. Hospitalized patients from general surgical departments were screened using the Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS) 2002 questionnaire on admission. Data were collected on nutritional risk, complications, and length of stay (LOS). Overall, 5034 patients were recruited; the overall prevalence of nutritional risk on admission were 19.2%. The highest prevalence was found among patients with gastric cancer. At-risk patients had more complications and longer LOS than nonrisk patients. Of the at-risk patients, the complication rate was significantly lower and LOS was significantly shorter in the nutritional-support group than in the no-support group (20.9 versus 30.0%, P nutrition or who received support for 5 to 7 days, or daily support entailing 16 to 25 kcal/kg of nonprotein energy. Different surgical diseases have different levels of nutritional risk. The provision of nutritional support was associated with a lower complication rate and a shorter LOS for gastric, colorectal, and HPB cancer patients at nutritional risk. The improper use of nutritional support may not improve outcomes for at-risk patients. PMID:26011204

  7. Decreased N-TAF1 expression in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism patient-specific neural stem cells

    Naoto Ito

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (XDP is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder involving a progressive loss of striatal medium spiny neurons. The mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are not known, in part because there have been few cellular models available for studying the disease. The XDP haplotype consists of multiple sequence variations in a region of the X chromosome containing TAF1, a large gene with at least 38 exons, and a multiple transcript system (MTS composed of five unconventional exons. A previous study identified an XDP-specific insertion of a SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA-type retrotransposon in intron 32 of TAF1, as well as a neural-specific TAF1 isoform, N-TAF1, which showed decreased expression in post-mortem XDP brain compared with control tissue. Here, we generated XDP patient and control fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs in order to further probe cellular defects associated with this disease. As initial validation of the model, we compared expression of TAF1 and MTS transcripts in XDP versus control fibroblasts and iPSC-derived neural stem cells (NSCs. Compared with control cells, XDP fibroblasts exhibited decreased expression of TAF1 transcript fragments derived from exons 32-36, a region spanning the SVA insertion site. N-TAF1, which incorporates an alternative exon (exon 34′, was not expressed in fibroblasts, but was detectable in iPSC-differentiated NSCs at levels that were ∼threefold lower in XDP cells than in controls. These results support the previous findings that N-TAF1 expression is impaired in XDP, but additionally indicate that this aberrant transcription might occur in neural cells at relatively early stages of development that precede neurodegeneration.

  8. Nutritional support of the hospitalized patIent

    1983-04-16

    Apr 16, 1983 ... one ofthe earliest attempts known was that of Sir Christopher. \\\\hen, to whom 50 much ofthe architectural elegance of London can be attributed, being ..... O'Keefe SJO, Abraham R, EI-Zayadi A, Marshall W, O"'is M, Williams R. Increased plasma tyrosine concentrations in patients with cirrhosis and fulmi-.

  9. An App Supporting Psoriasis Patients Improves Adherence to Topical Treatment

    Svendsen, M T; Andersen, F; Pottegård, A

    2018-01-01

    Physician's Global Assessment (LS-PGA), and quality of life was measured by Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scales at all visits. RESULTS: Intention to treat analyses using regression was performed. PRIMARY OUTCOME: more patients in the intervention group were adherent to Cal/BD cutaneous foam...

  10. Sex Reversal and Comparative Data Undermine the W Chromosome and Support Z-linked DMRT1 as the Regulator of Gonadal Sex Differentiation in Birds.

    Hirst, Claire E; Major, Andrew T; Ayers, Katie L; Brown, Rosie J; Mariette, Mylene; Sackton, Timothy B; Smith, Craig A

    2017-09-01

    The exact genetic mechanism regulating avian gonadal sex differentiation has not been completely resolved. The most likely scenario involves a dosage mechanism, whereby the Z-linked DMRT1 gene triggers testis development. However, the possibility still exists that the female-specific W chromosome may harbor an ovarian determining factor. In this study, we provide evidence that the universal gene regulating gonadal sex differentiation in birds is Z-linked DMRT1 and not a W-linked (ovarian) factor. Three candidate W-linked ovarian determinants are HINTW, female-expressed transcript 1 (FET1), and female-associated factor (FAF). To test the association of these genes with ovarian differentiation in the chicken, we examined their expression following experimentally induced female-to-male sex reversal using the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole (FAD). Administration of FAD on day 3 of embryogenesis induced a significant loss of aromatase enzyme activity in female gonads and masculinization. However, expression levels of HINTW, FAF, and FET1 were unaltered after experimental masculinization. Furthermore, comparative analysis showed that FAF and FET1 expression could not be detected in zebra finch gonads. Additionally, an antibody raised against the predicted HINTW protein failed to detect it endogenously. These data do not support a universal role for these genes or for the W sex chromosome in ovarian development in birds. We found that DMRT1 (but not the recently identified Z-linked HEMGN gene) is male upregulated in embryonic zebra finch and emu gonads, as in the chicken. As chicken, zebra finch, and emu exemplify the major evolutionary clades of birds, we propose that Z-linked DMRT1, and not the W sex chromosome, regulates gonadal sex differentiation in birds. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  11. Tuberculosis Relief Belt Supporting Project (Tuberculosis Patient Management Project for Poverty Group).

    Kim, Jae Kyoung; Jeong, Ina; Lee, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jung Hyun; Han, Ah Yeon; Kim, So Yeon; Joh, Joon Sung

    2018-03-07

    The "Tuberculosis Relief Belt Supporting Project (Tuberculosis Patient Management Project for Poverty Groups)" is a national program for socioeconomically vulnerable tuberculosis (TB) patients. We sought to evaluate the clinical and socioeconomic characteristics of poverty-stricken TB patients, and determined the need for relief. We examined in-patients with TB, who were supported by this project at the National Medical Center from 2014 to 2015. We retrospectively investigated the patients' socioeconomic status, clinical characteristics, and project expenditures. Fifty-eight patients were enrolled. Among 55 patients with known income status, 24 (43.6%) had no income. Most patients (80%) lived alone. A total of 48 patients (82.8%) had more than one underlying disease. More than half of the enrolled patients (30 patients, 51.7%) had smear-positive TB. Cavitary disease was found in 38 patients (65.5%). Among the 38 patients with known resistance status, 19 (50%) had drug-resistant TB. In terms of disease severity, 96.6% of the cases had moderate-to-severe disease. A total of 14 patients (26.4%) died during treatment. Nursing expenses were supported for 12 patients (20.7%), with patient transportation costs reimbursed for 35 patients (60%). In terms of treatment expenses for 31 people (53.4%), 93.5% of them were supported by uninsured benefits. Underlying disease, infectivity, drug resistance, severity, and death occurred frequently in socioeconomically vulnerable patients with TB. Many uninsured treatment costs were not supported by the current government TB programs, and the "Tuberculosis Relief Belt Supporting Project" compensated for these limitations. Copyright©2018. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.

  12. Supporting wellbeing in motor neurone disease for patients, carers, social networks, and health professionals: A scoping review and synthesis.

    Harris, Melanie; Thomas, Geoff; Thomas, Mary; Cafarella, Paul; Stocks, Allegra; Greig, Julia; McEvoy, R Doug

    2018-04-01

    ABSTRACTObjective:Disease management in motor neurone disease (MND) is focused on preserving quality of life. However, the emphasis has so far been on physical symptoms and functioning and not psychosocial wellbeing. MND affects the wellbeing of carers, of family and social network members, and of healthcare providers, as well as of the patients. We therefore aimed to assess and synthesize the knowledge about maximizing MND-related psychosocial wellbeing across all these groups. We used a systematic search and selection process to assess the scope of the literature along with a narrative synthesis of recent high-quality reviews. The original studies were mainly observational studies of patients and, to a lesser extent, of carers. There were few interventional studies, mainly of patients. There were very few studies of any type on wellbeing in their wider social network or in healthcare professionals. All the review literature looked at MND patient or carer wellbeing, with some covering both. No reviews were found of wellbeing in other family members, patients' social networks, or their healthcare professionals. The reviews demonstrated wellbeing problems for patients linked to psychosocial issues. Carer wellbeing is also compromised. Psychotherapies, social supports, improved decision supports, and changes to healthcare delivery are among the suggested strategies for improved patient and carer wellbeing, but no proven interventions were identified for either. Early access to palliative care, also not well-tested but recommended, is poorly implemented. Work on interventions to deal with well-established wellbeing problems for patients and carers is now a research priority. Explicit use of current methods for patient and public involvement and for design and testing of interventions provide a toolkit for this research. Observational research is needed in other groups. There is a potential in considering needs across patients' social networks rather than looking

  13. “These patients look lost” – Community pharmacy staff's identification and support of patients with limited health literacy

    Koster, Ellen S.; Philbert, Daphne; Blom, Lyda; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To date, routine use of health literacy assessment in clinical settings is limited. The objective of this study was to explore if community pharmacy staff can identify patients with limited health literacy, how they identify patients and how they support patients to improve medication

  14. Perceived Social Support Change in Patients with Early-stage Breast Cancer and Controls

    Thompson, Tess; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Pérez, Maria; Schootman, Mario; Jeffe, Donna B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify variables associated with levels of and change in social support in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients and age-matched controls. Methods Telephone interviews measuring perceived social support and other demographic and psychosocial variables were conducted at 4–6 weeks and 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery (patients) or a normal/benign screening mammogram (controls). A latent trajectory model was used to model the intercept (starting point) and slope (changing) aspects of social support. Results Participants included 542 controls and 541 patients (77% White, 23% African American; mean age 57.7 [SD = 10.6]). Most participants reported high social support. Patients reported significantly higher levels of social support at baseline than controls. For patients, social support had a significant negative slope that significantly varied between individuals; the intercept of social support also varied significantly. Predictors of lower social support intercept in patients included not being married/partnered, being White, having lower perceived general health, and having higher negative affect (modeled as a latent variable defined by anxiety and depression symptom severity). Patients who were African American (vs. White) or had mastectomy (vs. lumpectomy) had steeper social support declines, and participants with both these characteristics had lower starting points as well as steeper declines. Social support among controls did not change significantly. Conclusions Clinicians might consider psychosocial interventions for patients reporting low social support around the time of diagnosis and surgical treatment, and for patients at risk for steeper declines in support, such as African Americans and women undergoing mastectomy. PMID:23477582

  15. Support needs of patients with COPD: a systematic literature search and narrative review.

    Gardener, A Carole; Ewing, Gail; Kuhn, Isla; Farquhar, Morag

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the breadth of patients' support needs is important for the delivery of person-centered care, particularly in progressive long-term conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Existing reviews identify important aspects of managing life with COPD with which patients may need support (support needs); however, none of these comprehensively outlines the full range of support needs that patients can experience. We therefore sought to systematically determine the full range of support needs for patients with COPD to inform development of an evidence-based tool to enable person-centered care. We conducted a systematic search and narrative review of the literature. Medline (Ovid), EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL were systematically searched for papers which included data addressing key aspects of support need, as identified by patients with COPD. Relevant data were extracted, and a narrative analysis was conducted. Thirty-one papers were included in the review, and the following 13 domains (broad areas) of support need were identified: 1) understanding COPD, 2) managing symptoms and medication, 3) healthy lifestyle, 4) managing feelings and worries, 5) living positively with COPD, 6) thinking about the future, 7) anxiety and depression, 8) practical support, 9) finance work and housing, 10) families and close relationships, 11) social and recreational life, 12) independence, and 13) navigating services. These 13 domains of support need were mapped to three of the four overarching categories of need commonly used in relevant national strategy documents (ie, physical, psychological, and social); however, support needs related to the fourth category (spiritual) were notably absent. This review systematically identifies the comprehensive set of domains of support need for patients with COPD. The findings provide the evidence base for a tool to help patients identify and express their support needs, which underpins a proposed

  16. Association of Social Support and Medication Adherence in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Gu, Linni; Wu, Shaomin; Zhao, Shuliang; Zhou, Huixuan; Zhang, Shengfa; Gao, Min; Qu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Weijun; Tian, Donghua

    2017-12-06

    The prevalence of diabetes is steadily increasing in China. When diabetes is uncontrolled, it generates dire consequences for health and well-being. Numerous studies have shown that health outcomes were associated with social support and medication adherence. Previous study confirmed that social support was associated with medication adherence in patients with heart failure, HIV diseases, and first-episode psychosis. However, the relationship between social support and medication adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is remains unclear. This study aims to examine whether social support is associated with medication adherence in patients with T2DM. This study was conducted in the First Affiliated Hospital of the General Hospital of the People's Liberation Army (PLA). In Beijing, a systematic random sample of 412 patients with T2DM over 18 years was recruited at baseline, and demographic characteristics, clinical data and their assessment of social support were collected from medical records and self-reported questionnaires. 330 of these patients completed a self-report measure of medication adherence at the sixth month after baseline data collection. Regression analysis showed that social support presented a positive effect on medication adherence, additionally, support utilization and the subscale of social support exhibited a significantly strong influence on medication adherence in patients with T2DM. Although medication adherence was influenced by multiple factors, this finding confirmed that social support must be recognized as a core element in interventions aimed at improving in the management of patients with T2DM.

  17. Impact of preoperative nutritional support on clinical outcome in abdominal surgical patients at nutritional risk

    Jie, Bin; Jiang, Zhu-Ming; Nolan, Marie T

    2012-01-01

    This multicenter, prospective cohort study evaluated the effect of preoperative nutritional support in abdominal surgical patients at nutritional risk as defined by the Nutritional Risk Screening Tool 2002 (NRS-2002).......This multicenter, prospective cohort study evaluated the effect of preoperative nutritional support in abdominal surgical patients at nutritional risk as defined by the Nutritional Risk Screening Tool 2002 (NRS-2002)....

  18. Patient factors that influence clinicians' decision making in self-management support : A clinical vignette study

    Bos-Touwen, Irene D.; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; Van Der Wulp, Ineke; Schuurmans, Marieke J.; De Wit, Niek J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Self-management support is an integral part of current chronic care guidelines. The success of self-management interventions varies between individual patients, suggesting a need for tailored self-management support. Understanding the role of patient factors in the current

  19. Individual neuropsychological support and group sessions for relatives to TBI patients

    Siert, Lars

    TITLE: Individual neuropsychological support and group sessions for relatives to TBI patients. OBJECTIVE: To describe how the neuropsychologist work with early and ongoing individual support and group sessions for relatives to adult TBI patients in the acute and sub acute phase and after discharge...

  20. The relationship between family social support and quality of life in diabetic female patients

    Ali Mousavi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Life quality of diabetic patients is always affected by psychosocial problems, physical disorders, and life style changes. It seems that the perceived social support could intervene in improving the life quality of these patients. The present study was carried out aiming to examine the relation between family social support and life quality of female patients with diabetes. This was a cross-sectional study. The statistical population included 173 diabetic females who were randomly selected from patients referred to Kermanshah diabetes research center. Data were collected using life quality questionnaire (Short Form-36 as well as perceived social support scale. The data analysis indicated that there is a significant correlation between family support and life quality of patients. Furthermore, concerning the components of life quality, there is a significant correlation between family social support and physical performance, physical limitation, tiredness, emotional health, social performance, pain, and general health of patients. However, no significant relation was found between family support and limitation of patients. Results showed that there is a direct relation between family support and the life quality in females with diabetes. Hence, it can be concluded that giving the family support to the female diabetic patients can increase their quality of life.

  1. The link between perceived maternal and paternal autonomy support and adolescent well-being across three major educational transitions.

    Duineveld, Jasper J; Parker, Philip D; Ryan, Richard M; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Salmela-Aro, Katariina

    2017-10-01

    To what extent does maternal and paternal autonomy support enhance well-being across the major transitions of high school? We tested the degree to which perceived autonomy supportive parenting facilitated positive changes in self-esteem and life satisfaction and buffered against negative changes in depressive symptoms and school related burnout in 3 Finnish longitudinal studies, each with a measurement point before and after a major transition (middle school, N1 = 760, 55.7% girls; high school, N2 = 214, 51.9% girls; post high school, N3 = 858, 47.8% girls). Results showed that perceived parental autonomy support was negatively related to depressive symptoms and positively related to self-esteem. The findings for the effects on depressive symptoms were replicated across all 3 transitions, while effects on self-esteem were only found for the high school and post high school transitions. Moreover, evidence of coregulation was found for depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms before the transition were found to decrease autonomy support after the transition for both the high school and post high school transitions. Maternal and paternal autonomy support was of equal importance. Importantly, the effects on depressive symptoms increased as children developed, suggesting the continual importance of parents throughout high school and into emerging adulthood. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Pervasive healthcare in the home Supporting patient motivation and engagement

    2010-01-01

    Currently, care and rehabilitation practices move, to a greater extent, out of hospitals and into private homes. This accelerating trend challenges healthcare systems and their patients. Heterogeneous settings such as private homes together with the diverse nature of the inhabitants and their con......Currently, care and rehabilitation practices move, to a greater extent, out of hospitals and into private homes. This accelerating trend challenges healthcare systems and their patients. Heterogeneous settings such as private homes together with the diverse nature of the inhabitants...... and their conditions create both technical and usability constraints and possibilities that can inform development of home-based care and rehabilitation applications. This workshop likes to investigate and discuss challenges, requirements and possibilities related to home-based healthcare applications, seen from...... environments such as private homes? Or, how can User Driven Innovation (UDI) and Participatory Design (PD) be used to create systems that are aesthetically and functionally accepted by persons subject to homebased healthcare and rehabilitation?...

  3. ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND MEDICAL SUPPORT OF PATIENTS WITH PERMANENT PACEMAKERS

    T. A. Derienko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to clinical problems of arterial hypertension (AH in patients with implanted pacemakers (EKS and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT. Indications for pacemaker implantation and CRT are considered, especially the purpose and effectiveness of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA, sartans, beta-blockers (BAB, diuretics, calcium channel blockers. We prove that the CRT and cardiac pacing and do not cancel, bur modify drug therapy of AH.

  4. [Depression, social support and compliance in patients with chronic heart failure].

    Reutlinger, Julia; Müller-Tasch, Thomas; Schellberg, Dieter; Frankenstein, Lutz; Zugck, Christian; Herzog, Wolfgang; Lossnitzer, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Depressive patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) show less social integration and greater physical impairment as well as poorer compliance than non depressive CHF patients. Using multiple regression analyses, this study (n=84) investigated a potential mediating effect of depression on the relationship between compliance and both social support and physical functioning. Results did not support the hypothesized mediating effect of depression. However, the variables age, depression, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and social support were associated with self-reported compliance. Therefore, a lack of social support and depression should be considered as possible reasons, if patients are noncompliant during the treatment process. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Supportive care for head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    Zenda, Sadamoto

    2015-01-01

    Recently (chemo-)radiotherapy has been widely used in head and neck cancer with definite evidence. As long survivor has increased, social problems associated with late toxicity have become more. Late toxicities induced by radiotherapy for head and neck lesion are often severe. Xerostomia is one of the severe late toxicities conventionally and dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy is a new topic. Some industrial development (ex. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy: IMRT) play a great role in toxicity management. Multidisciplinary approach (cooperation between not only physicians but also nurses and dentists) is necessary to control toxicities. The research of supportive care will be needed same as definitive treatment in the future. (author)

  6. Gender Differences in Longitudinal Links between Neighborhood Fear, Parental Support, and Depression among African American Emerging Adults

    Shervin Assari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The transition to adulthood is a developmental period marked by increased stress, especially among African Americans. In addition to stress related to emerging adulthood, neighborhood fear may contribute to depressive symptoms for African Americans. We examined gender differences in longitudinal associations between changes in perceived neighborhood fear, parental support, and depressive symptoms among African American youth who were in transition to adulthood. Five hundred and thirteen African American youths (235 males and 278 females were included in the study. An increase in perceived neighborhood fear was associated with an increase in depressive symptoms, and change in perceived maternal support was predictive of depressive symptoms among males, but not females. The findings suggest that policies and programs should help parents provide support to young adult children who live in violent neighborhoods as a strategy to prevent depressive symptoms during emerging adulthood.

  7. The coach program - a "joint" approach to patient education and support.

    Shaked, Yael; Dickson, Patricia; Workman, Kathy

    2016-12-01

    Hospital lengths of stay for orthopaedic procedures are declining internationally. Discharge home from hospital following total joint replacement surgery can be stressful due to pain and physical restrictions. Thus, many patients report experiencing increased anxiety and feeling a sudden withdrawal of support from their medical team. The Coach Program maximizes human resources and family-centred care by formally integrating an individual whom the patient identifies as their primary support into their health care team. This unique and innovative program was designed to decrease patient anxiety, increase patient confidence, enhance coping with shorter hospital lengths of stay, and smooth the discharge planning process. Anecdotal feedback from patients and staff has been overwhelmingly positive. A pilot self-reported patient survey was conducted. Future steps include distribution and analysis of a more detailed survey to a broader patient population and finding ways to address the needs of patients with limited social support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis for treatment of cleft lip and palate in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Sato, Yutaka; Mishimagi, Takashi; Katsuki, Yuko; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2014-07-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a congenital immune deficiency disorder caused by abnormal antibody production. It is a rare disease with an estimated frequency of 1 in 379,000 that has X-linked recessive heredity and develops only in males. The clinical problems include bacterial infection such as otitis media, sinusitis, and bronchitis. In recent years it has become possible to diagnose XLA in the early stage and intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy has permitted survival to adulthood. However, there have been no reports of oral surgery in patients with XLA. Here, we describe a case in which immunoglobulin replacement therapy given pre- and postoperatively was used to control infection in oral surgery and maxillary distraction osteogenesis performed for improving occlusion and appearance of a cleft lip and palate in a patient with XLA. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sources of Social Support After Patient Assault as Related to Staff Well-Being.

    Kelly, Erin L; Fenwick, Karissa M; Brekke, John S; Novaco, Raymond W

    2017-10-01

    Patient assault is a serious issue for the well-being of staff in psychiatric hospitals. To guide workplace responses to patient assault, more information is needed about social support from different sources and whether those supports are associated with staff well-being. The present study examines social support after patient assault from work-based and nonwork-based sources, and whether inpatient psychiatric staff desires support from them and perceive the support received as being effective. Received support across sources was examined in relations to staff well-being (physical health, mental health, anger, sleep quality) and perceptions of safety. Survey data was collected from 348 clinical staff in a large public forensic mental hospital. Among the 242 staff who reported an assault in the last year, 71% wanted support and 72% found effective support from at least one source. Generally, effective support from supervisors, coworkers, and their combination was associated with better well-being. Support from nonwork sources was related to less concerns about safety, but not to other well-being measures. However, 28% of staff did not receive effective support from any source postassault. Gaps in support as reported in this study and as found by other investigators call for systematic programming by hospital organizations to enhance the well-being of clinical staff, which in turn has implications for patient care.

  10. A Systematic Review of Depression and Anxiety in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: The Mind-Heart Link

    Patel, Dimpi; Mc Conkey, Nathaniel D.; Sohaney, Ryann; Mc Neil, Ashley; Jedrzejczyk, Andy; Armaganijan, Luciana

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most commonly seen arrhythmia in clinical practice. At present, few studies have been conducted centering on depression and anxiety in AF patients. Our aim in this systematic review is to use the relevant literature to (1) describe the prevalence of depression and anxiety in AF patients, (2) assess the impact that depression and anxiety have on illness perception in patients with AF, (3) provide evidence to support a hypothetical connection between the pathophy...

  11. Effects of perceived autonomy support and basic need satisfaction on quality of life in hemodialysis patients.

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Chang, Ray-E; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Hou, Ying-Hui

    2018-03-01

    Despite a growing understanding of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its determinants in hemodialysis (HD) patients, little is known about the effects and interrelationships concerning the perception of autonomy support and basic need satisfaction of HD patients on their HRQOL. Based on self-determination theory (SDT), this study examines whether HD patients' perceived autonomy support from health care practitioners (physicians and nurses) relates to the satisfaction of HD patients' basic needs and in turn influences their HRQOL. A questionnaire was administered to 250 Taiwanese HD patients recruited from multiclinical centers and regional hospitals in northern Taiwan. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis was conducted to examine the causal relationships between patient perceptions of autonomy support and HRQOL through basic need satisfaction. The empirical results of SEM indicated that the HD patients' perceived autonomy support increased the satisfaction of their basic needs (autonomy, competency, and relatedness), as expected. The higher degree of basic need satisfaction led to higher HRQOL, as measured by physical and mental component scores. Autonomy support from physicians and nurses contributes to improving HD patients' HRQOL through basic need satisfaction. This indicates that staff caring for patients with severe chronic diseases should offer considerable support for patient autonomy.

  12. A Metal Chelating Porous Polymeric Support: The Missing Link for a Defect-free Metal-Organic Framework Composite Membrane

    Barankova, Eva

    2017-02-06

    Since the discovery of size-selective metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), researchers have tried to incorporate these materials into gas separation membranes. Impressive gas selectivities were found, but these MOF membranes were mostly made on inorganic supports, which are generally too bulky and expensive for industrial gas separation. Forming MOF layers on porous polymer supports is industrially attractive but technically challenging. Two features to overcome these problems are described: 1) a metal chelating support polymer to bind the MOF layer, and 2) control of MOF crystal growth by contra-diffusion, aiming at a very thin nanocrystalline MOF layer. Using a metal chelating polythiosemicarbazide (PTSC) support and adjusting the metal and organic ligand concentrations carefully, a very compact ZIF-8 (ZIF=zeolitic imidazolate framework) layer was produced that displayed interference colors because of its smooth surface and extreme thinness-within the range of visible light. High performances were measured in terms of hydrogen/propane (8350) and propylene/propane (150) selectivity.

  13. Type D personality, illness perception, social support and quality of life in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Li, Jianying; Wu, Xiaofeng; Lin, Jianxiong; Zou, Dongmei; Yang, Xiao; Cheng, Shouzhen; Guo, Qunying

    2017-02-01

    The previous studies reported Type D was associated with poor quality of life (QoL), increased psychological distress, and impaired health status in cardiac patients. The aim of this study is to assess the relationships among Type D personality, illness perception, social support, and investigate the impact of Type D personality on QoL in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients. Type D personality was assessed by the Chinese 14-item Type D Personality Scale (DS14). Illness perceptions were assessed using the Chinese version of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ). Social support status was assessed by the well-validated social support rating scale (SSRS). Patients' QoL was assessed by using Medical Outcomes Short Form 36 (SF-36), respectively. The Type Ds had significantly lower objective support score (8.18 ± 2.56 vs. 9.67 ± 3.28, p = 0.0001), subjective support score (6.71 ± 2.0 vs. 7.62 ± 1.93, p = 0.0001) and utilization of social support score (6.76 ± 2.0 vs. 7.61 ± 1.94, p = 0.0001) than that of the non-type Ds. Type Ds believed their illness had much more serious consequences (7.67 ± 2.64 vs. 6.27 ± 3.45, p illness (6.65 ± 2.54 vs. 7.31 ± 2.36, p = 0.023). Significant differences were found between Type Ds and non-Type Ds in PCS (40.53 ± 6.42 vs. 48.54 ± 6.21 p mental component score (MCS) (r = -0.31, p social support (r = -0.24, p illness perceptions, social support and QoL in CAPD patients. The worse illness perceptions and lower social support level therefore represent possible mechanisms to explain the link between Type D and poor QoL in CAPD patients.

  14. Outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections linked to a pasteurized ice cream product served to hospitalized patients.

    Rietberg, K; Lloyd, J; Melius, B; Wyman, P; Treadwell, R; Olson, G; Kang, M-G; Duchin, J S

    2016-10-01

    Two cases of hospital-acquired listeriosis were linked to a commercially produced, pasteurized ice cream mix. Manufacturers should implement safety measures from the Food Safety Modernization Act to minimize the risk of Listeria contamination. Dietary guidelines for persons at high risk of listeriosis may need revision to recognize the potential risk from pasteurized products.

  15. MedlinePlus Connect: Linking Patient Portals and Electronic Health Records to Health Information

    ... Here: Home → MedlinePlus Connect URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/connect/overview.html MedlinePlus Connect Linking ... will change.) Old URLs New URLs Web Application https://apps.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/services/mpconnect.cfm? ...

  16. Social support and responsiveness in online patient communities: impact on service quality perceptions.

    Nambisan, Priya; Gustafson, David H; Hawkins, Robert; Pingree, Suzanne

    2016-02-01

    Hospitals frequently evaluate their service quality based on the care and services provided to patients by their clinical and non-clinical staff.(1,2) However, such evaluations do not take into consideration the many interactions that patients have in online patient communities with the health-care organization (HCO) as well as with peer patients. Patients' interactions in these online communities could impact their perceptions regarding the HCO's service quality. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the impact of social support and responsiveness that patients experience in an HCO's online community on patients' perceptions regarding the HCO's service quality. The study data are collected from CHESS, a health-care programme (Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System) run by the Centre for Health Enhancement System Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Findings show that the social support and the responsiveness received from peer patients in the online patient communities will impact patients' perceptions regarding the service quality of the HCO even when the organizational members themselves do not participate in the online discussions. The results indicate that interactions in such HCO-provided online patient communities should not be ignored as they could translate into patients' perceptions regarding HCOs' service quality. Ways to improve responsiveness and social support in an HCO's online patient community are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Optimism, social support, and mental health outcomes in patients with advanced cancer.

    Applebaum, Allison J; Stein, Emma M; Lord-Bessen, Jennifer; Pessin, Hayley; Rosenfeld, Barry; Breitbart, William

    2014-03-01

    Optimism and social support serve as protective factors against distress in medically ill patients. Very few studies have specifically explored the ways in which these variables interact to impact quality of life (QOL), particularly among patients with advanced cancer. The present study examined the role of optimism as a moderator of the relationship between social support and anxiety, depression, hopelessness, and QOL among patients with advanced cancer. Participants (N = 168) completed self-report assessments of psychosocial, spiritual, and physical well-being, including social support, optimism, hopelessness, depressive and anxious symptoms, and QOL. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine the extent to which social support and optimism were associated with depressive and anxious symptomatology, hopelessness and QOL, and the potential role of optimism as a moderator of the relationship between social support and these variables. Higher levels of optimism were significantly associated with fewer anxious and depressive symptoms, less hopelessness, and better QOL. Higher levels of perceived social support were also significantly associated with better QOL. Additionally, optimism moderated the relationship between social support and anxiety, such that there was a strong negative association between social support and anxiety for participants with low optimism. This study highlights the importance of optimism and social support in the QOL of patients with advanced cancer. As such, interventions that attend to patients' expectations for positive experiences and the expansion of social support should be the focus of future clinical and research endeavors. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Effects of Nutritional Support in Patients with Colorectal Cancer during Chemotherapy

    Dobrila Dintinjana, Renata; Guina, Tina; Krznarić, Željko; Radić, Mladen; Dintinjana, Marijan

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional support, addressing the specific needs of this patient group, is required to help improve prognosis, and reduce the consequences of cancer-associated nutritional decline. Early intervention with nutritional supplementation has been shown to halt malnutrition, and may improve outcome in some patients. In our study we tried to assess the influence of nutritional support (counseling, oral liquids, megestrol acetate) on nutritional status and symptoms prevalence in patients ...

  19. Anger expression, partner support, and quality of life in cancer patients.

    Julkunen, Juhani; Gustavsson-Lilius, Mila; Hietanen, Päivi

    2009-03-01

    Family members are the most important source of social support for cancer patients. The determinants of family support, however, are not well understood. In this study, the associations of anger-expression styles of both patients and their partners with patient-perceived partner support and the impact of these variables on long-term health-related quality of life (HRQL) of the patient were examined. The baseline data were collected at the time of diagnosis; a follow-up survey was conducted at 8 months. Questionnaires included the Spielberger AX scale, the Family Support scale, and the RAND-36 Health Survey. The sample comprised 153 patients and their partners. The theoretical model was tested with a path analysis using structural equation modeling, and gender differences were tested using multivariate analysis of covariance. Path analyses indicated that partner support was an important mediator, partly explaining the associations between anger-expression styles and HRQL. As hypothesized, anger control had a positive relationship with perceived partner support, while habitual inhibition of anger (anger-in) showed a negative correlation with partner support. Analyses by gender revealed some clear differences: for the male patients, the wife's high level of anger expression (anger-out) was significantly positively related to patient mental HRQL, whereas for the female patients, their husband's anger-out was negatively correlated with the patient's mental HRQL. In addition, patient's own anger-out had a more pronounced negative effect on HRQL for women as compared to men. The anger-expression styles of both patients and their partners seem to modify the family atmosphere, and together, they are important determinants of the long-term quality of life of the cancer patients. Interventions for couples facing cancer should include a focus on ways of dealing with anger and thereby support dyadic coping with cancer.

  20. The role of family nutritional support in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Watanabe, Koin; Kurose, Takeshi; Kitatani, Naomi; Yabe, Daisuke; Hishizawa, Masahiro; Hyo, Takanori; Seino, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the role of family support in glycemic control by nutritional self-care behavior of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. One hundred twelve Japanese out-patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited for the study at Kansai Electric Power Hospital. Interviews were conducted and HbA1c and triglyceride levels were measured. HbA1c levels were significantly related to family nutritional support. Patients under 60 years old with family nutritional support showed significantly lower HbA1c than patients without family support (p1 week) showed similar outcomes in glycemic control. Patients who appreciate the support and follow the advice showed lower HbA1c (6.88 +/- 0.22%) than (7.43 +/- 0.23%) patients who appreciate the advice but sometimes feel emotional barriers. Family nutritional support is useful in improving metabolic outcome of diabetic patients. Self-care practice in disease management should be carefully adjusted to the family setting of type 2 diabetic patients. Emotional barriers to family support may affect the metabolic consequences, especially in the Japanese elderly.

  1. Psychosocial distress and need for supportive counselling in patients during radiotherapy

    Vries, A. de; Steixner, E.; Stzankay, A.; Iglseder, W.; Soellner, W.; Auer, V.; Schiessling, G.; Lukas, P.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Psychosocial distress and patient attitude towards psychosocial support as well as the correlations with clinical and sociodemographic characteristics should be assessed. Methods: The stress due to cancer was measured in a consecutive sample of tumor patients at the start of radiotherapy (n=117) by use of the Hornheide Questionnaire. In addition, the interest of these patients in professional psychosocial support was assesed with the help of the Questionnaire for Psychosocial Support. Results: Patients in the course of radiotherapy and patients with a poor prognosis and advanced disease were more strongly distressed. 32.7% of patients wished professional psychosocial support from the oncologist treating them, 40.6% of the patients wished support from the oncologist and additionally from a psychotherapist or social worker. Interest in professional psychosocial support correlated with the amount of distress, but not with sociodemographic variables. Conclusions: Results stress the importance of training programs for oncologists in order to improve their ability to detect psychosocial distress in cancer patients and to offer adequate emotional support to them. (orig.) [de

  2. Bioartificial liver assist devices in support of patients with liver failure.

    Patzer II, John F; Lopez, Roberto C; Zhu, Yue; Wang, Zi-Fa; Mazariegos, George V; Fung, John J

    2002-02-01

    Bioartificial liver assist devices (BALs) offer an opportunity for critical care physicians and transplant surgeons to stabilize patients prior to orthotopic liver transplantation. Such devices may also act as a bridge to transplant, providing liver support to patients awaiting transplant, or as support for patients post living-related donor transplant. Four BAL devices that rely on hepatocytes cultured in hollow fiber membrane cartridges (Circe Biomedical HepatAssist(r), Vitagen ELADTM, Gerlach BELS, and Excorp Medical BLSS) are currently in various stages of clinical evaluation. Comparison of the four devices shows that several unique approaches based upon the same overall system architecture are possible. Preliminary results of the Excorp Medical BLSS Phase I safety evaluation at the University of Pittsburgh, after treating four patients (F, 41, acetominophen-induced, two support periods; M, 50, Wilson's disease, one support period; F, 53, acute alcoholic hepatitis, two support periods; F, 24, chemotherapy-induced, one support period, are presented. All patients presented with hypoglycemia and transient hypotension at the start of extracorporeal perfusion. Hypoglycemia was treated by IV dextrose and the transient hypotension responded positively to IV fluid bolus. Heparin anticoagulation was used only in the second patient. No serious or adverse events were noted in the four patients. Moderate Biochemical response to support was noted in all patients. More complete characterization of the safety of the BLSS requires completion of the Phase I safety evaluation.

  3. X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets and sagittal craniosynostosis: three patients requiring operative cranial expansion: case series and literature review.

    Jaszczuk, Phillip; Rogers, Gary F; Guzman, Raphael; Proctor, Mark R

    2016-05-01

    A defect in a phosphate-regulating gene leads to the most common form of rickets: X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH) or vitamin D-resistant rickets (VDDR). XLH has been associated with craniosynostosis, the sagittal suture being the most commonly involved. We present three patients with rickets and symptomatic sagittal suture craniosynostosis all of whom presented late (>2 years of age). Two had a severe phenotype and papilledema, while the third presented with an osseous bulging near the anterior fontanel and experienced chronic headaches. All underwent successful cranial vault expansion. Rachitic patients with scaphocephaly should be screened for craniosynostosis.

  4. Aggressive tumor growth and clinical evolution in a patient with X-linked acro-gigantism syndrome.

    Naves, Luciana A.; Daly, Adrian Francis; Dias, Luiz Augusto; Yuan, Bo; Zakir, Juliano Coelho Oliveira; Barra, Gustavo Barcellos; Palmeira, Leonor; Villa, Chiara; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Junior, Armindo Jreige; Neto, Florencio Figueiredo Cavalcante; Liu, Pengfei; Pellegata, Natalia S.; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Lupski, James R.

    2016-01-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly described disease caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 leading to copy number gain of GPR101. We describe the clinical progress of a sporadic male X-LAG syndrome patient with an Xq26.3 microduplication, highlighting the aggressive natural history of pituitary tumor growth in the absence of treatment. The patient first presented elsewhere aged 5 years 8 months with a history of excessive growth for >2 years. His height was 163 cm,...

  5. Serum cross-linked n-telopeptides of type 1 collagen (NTx in patients with solid tumors

    Fernando Jablonka

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Cross-linked N-telopeptides of type I collagen (NTx increase in concentration in situations in which bone resorption is increased, such as osteoporosis and bone metastasis (BM. We aimed to evaluate the serum concentrations of NTx in a sample of patients with several types of solid tumors. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional analytical study with a control group in a tertiary public hospital. METHODS: We performed the quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA on serum NTx levels in 19 subjects without a history of cancer and 62 patients with various solid tumors who had been referred for a bone scan. Three experienced analysts read all bone scans. RESULTS: The serum NTx levels in patients with cancer and BM, with cancer but without BM and without cancer were 46.77 ± 2.58, 32.85 ± 2.05 and 22.32 ± 2.90 respectively (P < 0.0001. We did not find any significant correlations of serum NTx with age, gender, history of bone pain, tumor type and bone alkaline phosphatase levels. We found a significant correlation between serum NTx and alkaline phosphatase levels (R² = 0.08; P = 0.022. CONCLUSIONS: Serum NTx levels are significantly higher in patients with solid tumors and bone metastases than they are in patients without bone metastases and in normal controls.

  6. The need for psycho-oncological support for melanoma patients: Central role of patients' self-evaluation.

    Mayer, Simone; Teufel, Martin; Schaeffeler, Norbert; Keim, Ulrike; Garbe, Claus; Eigentler, Thomas Kurt; Zipfel, Stephan; Forschner, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Despite an increasing number of promising treatment options, only a limited number of studies concerning melanoma patients' psycho-oncological distress have been carried out. However, multiple screening tools are in use to assess the need for psycho-oncological support. This study aimed first to identify parameters in melanoma patients that are associated with a higher risk for being psycho-oncologically distressed and second to compare patients' self-evaluation concerning the need for psycho-oncological support with the results of established screening tools.We performed a cross-sectional study including 254 melanoma patients from the Center for Dermatooncology at the University of Tuebingen. The study was performed between June 2010 and February 2013. Several screening instruments were included: the Distress Thermometer (DT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the patients' subjective evaluation concerning psycho-oncological support. Binary logistic regression was performed to identify factors that indicate the need for psycho-oncological support.Patients' subjective evaluation concerning the need for psycho-oncological support, female gender, and psychotherapeutic or psychiatric treatment at present or in the past had the highest impact on values above threshold in the DT. The odds ratio of patients' self-evaluation (9.89) was even higher than somatic factors like female gender (1.85), duration of illness (0.99), or increasing age (0.97). Patients' self-evaluation concerning the need for psycho-oncological support indicated a moderate correlation with the results of the screening tools included.In addition to the results obtained by screening tools like the DT, we could demonstrate that patients' self-evaluation is an important instrument to identify patients who need psycho-oncological support.

  7. Oncology healthcare professionals' perspectives on the psychosocial support needs of cancer patients during oncology treatment.

    Aldaz, Bruno E; Treharne, Gareth J; Knight, Robert G; Conner, Tamlin S; Perez, David

    2017-09-01

    This study explored oncology healthcare professionals' perspectives on the psychosocial support needs of diverse cancer patients during oncology treatment. Six themes were identified using thematic analysis. Healthcare professionals highlighted the importance of their sensitivity, respect and emotional tact during appointments in order to effectively identify and meet the needs of oncology patients. Participants also emphasised the importance of building rapport that recognises patients as people. Patients' acceptance of treatment-related distress and uncertainty was described as required for uptake of available psychosocial supportive services. We offer some practical implications that may help improve cancer patients' experiences during oncology treatment.

  8. An Analysis of natural mentoring relationship profiles and associations with mentees’ mental health: considering links via support from important others

    Hurd, Noelle M.; Zimmerman, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    We explored associations between natural mentoring relationship profiles and young adults’ life satisfaction and symptoms of depression via participants’ perceived support from important others accounting for participants’ perceived support and mental health prior to the onset of their natural mentoring relationships. Participants included 396 young adults (57% female; mean age = 30.97, SD = .6), the majority of whom identified as Black or African American (79% Black, 18% White, 3% Biracial). Most participants had completed high school but few participants (13%) had completed degrees from 4-year institutions. We used a latent profile approach to identify natural mentoring relationship profiles and employed structural equation modeling to test our study hypotheses. Slightly over half of study participants (53%) reported the presence of a natural mentor in their lives since the age of 14. Results suggest that natural mentoring relationships characterized by high levels of relational closeness and either extended relationship duration or frequent contact may promote improvements in psychological well-being among mentees over time via greater experiences of social support from important others. PMID:24132713

  9. The Cost of Ankylosing Spondylitis in the UK Using Linked Routine and Patient-Reported Survey Data.

    Roxanne Cooksey

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a chronic inflammatory arthritis which typically begins in early adulthood and impacts on healthcare resource utilisation and the ability to work. Previous studies examining the cost of AS have relied on patient-reported questionnaires based on recall. This study uses a combination of patient-reported and linked-routine data to examine the cost of AS in Wales, UK.Participants in an existing AS cohort study (n = 570 completed questionnaires regarding work status, out-of-pocket expenses, visits to health professionals and disease severity. Participants gave consent for their data to be linked to routine primary and secondary care clinical datasets. Health resource costs were calculated using a bottom-up micro-costing approach. Human capital costs methods were used to estimate work productivity loss costs, particularly relating to work and early retirement. Regression analyses were used to account for age, gender, disease activity.The total cost of AS in the UK is estimated at £19016 per patient per year, calculated to include GP attendance, administration costs and hospital costs derived from routine data records, plus patient-reported non-NHS costs, out-of-pocket AS-related expenses, early retirement, absenteeism, presenteeism and unpaid assistance costs. The majority of the cost (>80% was as a result of work-related costs.The major cost of AS is as a result of loss of working hours, early retirement and unpaid carer's time. Therefore, much of AS costs are hidden and not easy to quantify. Functional impairment is the main factor associated with increased cost of AS. Interventions which keep people in work to retirement age and reduce functional impairment would have the greatest impact on reducing costs of AS. The combination of patient-reported and linked routine data significantly enhanced the health economic analysis and this methodology that can be applied to other chronic conditions.

  10. The Cost of Ankylosing Spondylitis in the UK Using Linked Routine and Patient-Reported Survey Data.

    Cooksey, Roxanne; Husain, Muhammad J; Brophy, Sinead; Davies, Helen; Rahman, Muhammad A; Atkinson, Mark D; Phillips, Ceri J; Siebert, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis which typically begins in early adulthood and impacts on healthcare resource utilisation and the ability to work. Previous studies examining the cost of AS have relied on patient-reported questionnaires based on recall. This study uses a combination of patient-reported and linked-routine data to examine the cost of AS in Wales, UK. Participants in an existing AS cohort study (n = 570) completed questionnaires regarding work status, out-of-pocket expenses, visits to health professionals and disease severity. Participants gave consent for their data to be linked to routine primary and secondary care clinical datasets. Health resource costs were calculated using a bottom-up micro-costing approach. Human capital costs methods were used to estimate work productivity loss costs, particularly relating to work and early retirement. Regression analyses were used to account for age, gender, disease activity. The total cost of AS in the UK is estimated at £19016 per patient per year, calculated to include GP attendance, administration costs and hospital costs derived from routine data records, plus patient-reported non-NHS costs, out-of-pocket AS-related expenses, early retirement, absenteeism, presenteeism and unpaid assistance costs. The majority of the cost (>80%) was as a result of work-related costs. The major cost of AS is as a result of loss of working hours, early retirement and unpaid carer's time. Therefore, much of AS costs are hidden and not easy to quantify. Functional impairment is the main factor associated with increased cost of AS. Interventions which keep people in work to retirement age and reduce functional impairment would have the greatest impact on reducing costs of AS. The combination of patient-reported and linked routine data significantly enhanced the health economic analysis and this methodology that can be applied to other chronic conditions.

  11. Operative Links

    Wistoft, Karen; Højlund, Holger

    2012-01-01

    and have been the object of great expectations concerning the ability to incorporate health concerns into every welfare area through health promotion strategies. The paper draws on results and analyses of a collective research project funded by the Danish National Research Council and carried out...... links' that indicate cooperative levels which facilitate a creative and innovative effort in disease prevention and health promotion targeted at children and adolescents - across traditional professional boundaries. It is proposed that such links are supported by network structures, shared semantics...

  12. A cosmopolitan late Ediacaran biotic assemblage: new fossils from Nevada and Namibia support a global biostratigraphic link

    Smith, E. F.; Nelson, L. L.; Tweedt, S. M.; Zeng, H.; Workman, Jeremiah B.

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the lack of temporally well-constrained Ediacaran fossil localities containing overlapping biotic assemblages, it has remained uncertain if the latest Ediacaran (ca 550–541 Ma) assemblages reflect systematic biological turnover or environmental, taphonomic or biogeographic biases. Here, we report new latest Ediacaran fossil discoveries from the lower member of the Wood Canyon Formation in Nye County, Nevada, including the first figured reports of erniettomorphs, Gaojiashania, Conotubus and other problematic fossils. The fossils are spectacularly preserved in three taphonomic windows and occur in greater than 11 stratigraphic horizons, all of which are below the first appearance of Treptichnus pedum and the nadir of a large negative δ13C excursion that is a chemostratigraphic marker of the Ediacaran–Cambrian boundary. The co-occurrence of morphologically diverse tubular fossils and erniettomorphs in Nevada provides a biostratigraphic link among latest Ediacaran fossil localities globally. Integrated with a new report of Gaojiashania from Namibia, previous fossil reports and existing age constraints, these finds demonstrate a distinctive late Ediacaran fossil assemblage comprising at least two groups of macroscopic organisms with dissimilar body plans that ecologically and temporally overlapped for at least 6 Myr at the close of the Ediacaran Period. This cosmopolitan biotic assemblage disappeared from the fossil record at the end of the Ediacaran Period, prior to the Cambrian radiation.

  13. PEG encapsulated by porous triamide-linked polymers as support for solid-liquid phase change materials for energy storage

    Andriamitantsoa, Radoelizo S.; Dong, Wenjun; Gao, Hongyi; Wang, Ge

    2017-03-01

    A series of porous triamide-linked polymers labeled as PTP were prepared by condensation of 1,3,5-benzenetricarbonyl trichloride with benzene-1,4-diamine (A), 4,4‧-methylenediamine (B) and 1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triamine (C) respectively. The as-synthesized polymers exhibit permanent porosity and high surface areas which guarantee to hold polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules in their network for shape-stabilized phase change materials. They possess different effects on the phase change properties of the composite due to their different porosities. PTP-A have intrinsic well-ordered morphology, microstructure and good enough pores to keep the PCMs compared to PTP-B and PTP-C. PEG 2000 used as PCMs could be retained up to 85 wt% in PTP-A polymer materials and these composites were defined as form-stable composite PCMs without the leakage of melted PCM. The thermal study revealed a good storage effect of encapsulated polymer and the enthalpy of melting increases in the order PTP-C PCMs.

  14. Perceived social support among patients with burn injuries: A perspective from the developing world.

    Waqas, Ahmed; Turk, Marvee; Naveed, Sadiq; Amin, Atif; Kiwanuka, Harriet; Shafique, Neha; Chaudhry, Muhammad Ashraf

    2018-02-01

    Social support is among the most well-established predictors of post-burn psychopathology after burn. Despite a disproportionately large burden of burns in the developing world, the nature of social support among burn patients in this context remains elusive. We, therefore, seek to investigate social support and its biopsychosocial determinants among patients with burn injuries in Pakistan. A cross-sectional study of 343 patients presenting with burn injuries at four teaching hospitals in the Punjab province of Pakistan was conducted. Patient evaluation consisted of a multi-part survey of demographic status, clinical features, and social support as measured by the validated Urdu translation of the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS). Multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate associations between patient characteristics and MSPSS score. Mean overall MSPSS score was 57.64 (std dev 13.57). Notable positive predictors of social support include male gender, Punjabi ethnicity, burn surface area, and ego resiliency. Our study reveals a troubling pattern of inadequate social support among certain subgroups of Pakistani burn patients. Addressing these inequities in the provision of social support must be prioritized as part of the global burn care agenda. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of patient-reported outcomes in outpatient settings as a means of patient involvement and self-management support

    Mejdahl, Caroline; Nielsen, Berit Kjærside; Hjøllund, Niels Henrik Ingvar

    2016-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are being implemented in clinical practice across different healthcare settings with varying purposes. Involving patients in reporting outcomes may increase their attention to symptoms and thereby support their self-management. The ...... to strengthen patient involvement and securing benefit from PROs.......Rationale, aims and objectives: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are being implemented in clinical practice across different healthcare settings with varying purposes. Involving patients in reporting outcomes may increase their attention to symptoms and thereby support their self......-management. The aim of the present study was to describe patients’ experiences with a web-based PRO system where patients complete a PRO questionnaire at home or in the outpatient clinic prior to a consultation. Moreover, the study aimed to explore how PROs influenced the interaction between patients and clinicians...

  16. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in heterozygous female patients: women are not just carriers

    Charles Marques Lourenço

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD is a recessive X-linked disorder associated with marked phenotypic variability. Female carriers are commonly thought to be normal or only mildly affected, but their disease still needs to be better described and systematized. OBJECTIVES: To review and systematize the clinical features of heterozygous women followed in a Neurogenetics Clinic. METHODS: We reviewed the clinical, biochemical, and neuroradiological data of all women known to have X-ADL. RESULTS: The nine women identified were classified into three groups: with severe and aggressive diseases; with slowly progressive, spastic paraplegia; and with mildly decreased vibratory sensation, brisk reflexes, and no complaints. Many of these women did not have a known family history of X-ALD. CONCLUSIONS: Heterozygous women with X-ADL have a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from mild to severe phenotypes.

  17. Can social support work virtually? Evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis patients' experiences with an interactive online tool.

    Kostova, Zlatina; Caiata-Zufferey, Maria; Schulz, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    There is strong empirical evidence that the support that chronic patients receive from their environment is fundamental for the way they cope with physical and psychological suffering. Nevertheless, in the case of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), providing the appropriate social support is still a challenge, and such support has often proven to be elusive and unreliable in helping patients to manage the disease. To explore whether and how social support for RA patients can be provided online, and to assess the conditions under which such support is effective. An online support tool was designed to provide patients with both tailored information and opportunities to interact online with health professionals and fellow sufferers. The general purpose was to identify where the support provided did - or did not - help patients, and to judge whether the determinants of success lay more within patients - their engagement and willingness to participate - or within the design of the website itself. The present study reports qualitative interviews with 19 users of the tool. A more specific purpose was to elaborate qualitatively on results from a quantitative survey of users, which indicated that any positive impact was confined to practical matters of pain management rather than extending to more fundamental psychological outcomes such as acceptance. Overall, online learning and interaction can do much to help patients with the everyday stresses of their disease; however, its potential for more durable positive impact depends on various individual characteristics such as personality traits, existing social networks, and the severity and longevity of the disease.

  18. Supported Employment for Veterans With Traumatic Brain Injury: Patient Perspectives.

    Carlson, Kathleen F; Pogoda, Terri K; Gilbert, Tess A; Resnick, Sandra G; Twamley, Elizabeth W; O'Neil, Maya E; Sayer, Nina A

    2018-02-01

    To quantify the need for, and interest in, supported employment (SE) among recent military veterans with traumatic brain injury (TBI); and to examine characteristics associated with veterans' interest in SE. Stratified random sample of Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans confirmed to have TBI through the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) screening and evaluation system. Community-based via mailed survey. We recruited 1800 veterans with clinician-confirmed TBI (mild TBI: n=1080; moderate/severe TBI: n=720) through multiple mailings. Among 1451 surveys that were not returned undeliverable, N=616 (42%) responded. Not applicable. Veterans rated their interest in SE after reading a script describing the program. Additional measures assessed mental health and pain-related comorbidities, employment, financial/housing difficulties, demographics, and military service characteristics. Estimates were weighted to represent the population of veterans with VHA clinician-confirmed TBI. Unemployment was reported by 45% (95% confidence interval [CI], 43-47) of veterans with TBI. Although 42% (95% CI, 40-44) reported they would be interested in using SE if it were offered to them, only 12% had heard of SE (95% CI, 11-14) and interest in SE. However, those who were unemployed, looking for work, experiencing financial strain, or at risk for homelessness were more likely to be interested in SE. Our research highlights an important gap between veterans' vocational needs and interests and their use of SE. Systematically identifying and referring those with employment and financial/housing difficulties may help close this gap. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Effect of nutritional support on terminally ill patients with cancer in a palliative care unit.

    Amano, Koji; Morita, Tatsuya; Baba, Mika; Kawasaki, Muneyoshi; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Uemura, Minako; Kobayashi, Yuka; Hori, Moeko; Wakayama, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    The role of nutritional support on terminally ill patients with cancer in a palliative care unit has not been clarified. A total of 63 patients were retrospectively investigated; the patients receiving individualized nutritional support (intervention group [n = 22]) were compared to the others (control group [n = 41]). The intervention group received individualized nutritional support. There were no significant differences in the characteristics of patients between the groups. The prevalence of bedsores was significantly lower in the intervention group (14% vs 46%, P = .012). The prevalence of edema and the use of antibiotic therapies tended to be lower in the intervention group than in the control group (36% vs 54%, P = .19; 14% vs 27%, P = .34, respectively). Some terminally ill patients with cancer in a palliative care unit might benefit from nutritional support.

  20. The effectiveness of support groups in Asian breast cancer patients: An integrative review

    Fang-Yu Chou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer support group has been studied as an intervention to improve patient psychosocial well-being. The effectiveness of support groups among Asian breast cancer (BC patients has been unclear and received limited attention to the evidence of its effectiveness. The social-cognitive processing theory underlies the principles of support groups and advocates that a positive, supportive social environment can improve cognitive processing. The purpose of this paper is to present an integrative review of research evidence on the effectiveness of cancer support groups with Asian BC patients. Empirical studies related to support group among Asian and Asian American BC patients published between 1982 and April 2014 are reviewed. There are 15 studies selected (12 from the Asian-Pacific region and 3 from Western countries. The review includes 1 qualitative study, 3 descriptive studies, 1 mixed method design, and 10 experimental or quasi-experimental studies. The support group intervention activities include psycho-educational program such as health education, problem-solving, and stress management. These studies support the effectiveness of support group in alleviating psychological distress and supporting quality of life of Asian BC women. Overall, there is limited research on the use and effectiveness of support groups with Asians cancer patients in Asia and in Western countries. Without accounting for Asian immigrants overseas, the Asian population is expected to grow from 4.3 to 5.3 billion by 2050. As cancer patients become more diverse due to global emigration, more rigorous studies examining the effectiveness of psychosocial intervention among transcultural cancer patients are needed.

  1. The Effectiveness of Support Groups in Asian Breast Cancer Patients: An Integrative Review.

    Chou, Fang-Yu; Lee-Lin, Frances; Kuang, Lily Y

    2016-01-01

    Cancer support group has been studied as an intervention to improve patient psychosocial well-being. The effectiveness of support groups among Asian breast cancer (BC) patients has been unclear and received limited attention to the evidence of its effectiveness. The social-cognitive processing theory underlies the principles of support groups and advocates that a positive, supportive social environment can improve cognitive processing. The purpose of this paper is to present an integrative review of research evidence on the effectiveness of cancer support groups with Asian BC patients. Empirical studies related to support group among Asian and Asian American BC patients published between 1982 and April 2014 are reviewed. There are 15 studies selected (12 from the Asian-Pacific region and 3 from Western countries). The review includes 1 qualitative study, 3 descriptive studies, 1 mixed method design, and 10 experimental or quasi-experimental studies. The support group intervention activities include psycho-educational program such as health education, problem-solving, and stress management. These studies support the effectiveness of support group in alleviating psychological distress and supporting quality of life of Asian BC women. Overall, there is limited research on the use and effectiveness of support groups with Asians cancer patients in Asia and in Western countries. Without accounting for Asian immigrants overseas, the Asian population is expected to grow from 4.3 to 5.3 billion by 2050. As cancer patients become more diverse due to global emigration, more rigorous studies examining the effectiveness of psychosocial intervention among transcultural cancer patients are needed.

  2. DNA-induced inter-particle cross-linking during expanded bed adsorption chromatography - Impact on future support design

    Theodossiou, Irini; Thomas, Owen R. T.

    2002-01-01

    (M(r)similar to50 000) and the other with long dextran (M(r)similar to500000) chains weakly derivatised with DEAE. However, the ability of the surfaces of these two matrices to bring about bed contraction, was strikingly different. The highly charged surface afforded by coupling of polyethyleneimine...... exhibited a three-fold higher tendency to interact with neighbouring particles in the presence of DNA than that of the dextran DEAE support. The implications of these findings on the design of future expanded bed materials for separation of both proteins and nucleic acids are discussed....

  3. Interactive and Participatory Decision Support: Linking Cyberinfrastructure, Multi-Touch Interfaces, and Substantive Dialogue for Geothermal Systems

    Malin, R.; Pierce, S. A.; Bass, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    Socio-technical approaches to complex, ill-structured decision problems are needed to identify adaptive responses for earth resource management. This research presents a hybrid approach to create decision tools and engender dialogue among stakeholders for geothermal development in Idaho, United States and El Tatio, Chile. Based on the scarcity of data, limited information availability, and tensions across stakeholder interests we designed and constructed a decision support model that allows stakeholders to rapidly collect, input, and visualize geoscientific data to assess geothermal system impacts and possible development strategies. We have integrated this decision support model into multi-touch interfaces that can be easily used by scientists and stakeholders alike. This toolkit is part of a larger cyberinfrastructure project designed to collect and present geoscientific information to support decision making processes. Consultation with stakeholders at the El Tatio geothermal complex of northern Chile—indigenous communities, local and national government agencies, developers, and geoscientists - informed the implementation of a sustained dialogue process. The El Tatio field case juxtaposes basic parameters such as pH, spring temperature, geochemical content, and FLIR imagery with stakeholder perceptions of risks due to mineral extraction and energy exploration efforts. The results of interviews and a participatory workshop are driving the creation of three initiatives within an indigenous community group; 1) microentrepreneurial efforts for science-based tourism, 2) design of a citizen-led environmental monitoring network in the Altiplano, and 3) business planning for an indigenous renewable energy cooperative. This toolkit is also being applied in the Snake River Plain of Idaho has as part of the DOE sponsored National Student Geothermal Competition. The Idaho case extends results from the Chilean case to implement a more streamlined system to analyze

  4. Patient education and emotional support practices in abortion care facilities in the United States.

    Gould, Heather; Perrucci, Alissa; Barar, Rana; Sinkford, Danielle; Foster, Diana Greene

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about how patient education and emotional support is provided at abortion facilities. This pilot study documents 27 facilities' practices in this aspect of abortion care. We conducted confidential telephone interviews with staff from 27 abortion facilities about their practices. The majority of facilities reported they rely primarily on trained nonclinician staff to educate patients and provide emotional support. As part of their informed consent and counseling processes, facilities reported that staff always provide patients with information about the procedure (96%), assess the certainty of their abortion decisions (92%), assess their feelings and provide emotional support (74%), and provide contraceptive health education (92%). Time spent providing these components of care varied across facilities and patients. When describing their facility's care philosophy, many respondents expressed support for "patient-centered," "supportive," "nonjudgmental" care. Eighty-two percent agreed that it is the facility's role to provide counseling for emotional issues related to abortion. All facilities valued informed consent, patient education, and emotional support. Although the majority of facilities considered counseling for emotional issues to be a part of their role, some did not. Future research should examine patients' preferences regarding abortion care and counseling and how different approaches to care affect women's emotional well-being after having an abortion. This information is important in light of current, widespread legislative efforts that aim to regulate abortion counseling, which are being proposed without an understanding of patient needs or facility practices. Copyright © 2012 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Positive and problematic support, stress and quality of life in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Mazzoni, Davide; Cicognani, Elvira

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease. Previous studies showed that perceived social support has an important role in enhancing patient's quality of life (QOL). However, the precise mechanisms through which social support exerts such an effect are not completely understood. The aim of this paper is to test two alternative models explaining the relationship between social support (positive and problematic) and two dimensions of QOL: Health-Related (HR-QOL) and Non-Health-Related (NHR-QOL). Model A (mediation) hypothesized that positive support would reduce stress while problematic support would increase stress), and that this in turn would reduce QOL. Model B (moderation) hypothesized that the effect of support on QOL would be moderated by the experience of stress in that more stressed individuals would show stronger effects. Three hundred and forty-four Italian patients with SLE completed an online questionnaire. Stress partially mediated the relationship between support and QOL dimensions (either HR-QOL and NHR-QOL) thus supporting Model B. As hypothesized, positive support reduced stress, while problematic support increased stress. These findings help to explain the complex relationship between social support, stress and QOL in patients with SLE.

  6. Does Current Scientific Evidence Support a Link Between Light at Night and Breast Cancer Among Female Night-Shift Nurses?

    Dickerman, Barbra; Liu, Jianghong

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is increasingly prevalent in industrialized regions of the world, and exposure to light at night (LAN) has been proposed as a potential risk factor. Epidemiological observations have documented an increased breast cancer risk among female night-shift workers, and strong experimental evidence for this relationship has also been found in rodent models. Indirect support for the LAN hypothesis comes from studies involving blind women, sleep duration, bedroom light levels, and community nighttime light levels. This article reviews the literature, discusses possible mechanisms of action, and provides recommendations for occupational health nursing research, practice, and education. Research is needed to further explore the relationship between exposure to LAN and breast cancer risk and elucidate the mechanisms underlying this relationship before interventions can be designed for prevention and mitigation of breast cancer. PMID:22658734

  7. An 'integrative neuroscience' perspective on ADHD: linking cognition, emotion, brain and genetic measures with implications for clinical support.

    Williams, Leanne M; Tsang, Tracey W; Clarke, Simon; Kohn, Michael

    2010-10-01

    There remains a translational gap between research findings and their implementation in clinical practice that applies to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as well as to other major disorders of brain health in childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Research studies have identified potential 'markers' to support diagnostic, functional assessment and treatment decisions, but there is little consensus about these markers. Of these potential markers, cognitive measures of thinking functions, such as sustaining attention and associated electrical brain activity, show promise in complementing the clinical management process. Emerging evidence highlights the relevance of emotional, as well as thinking, functions to ADHD. Here, we outline an integrative neuroscience framework for ADHD that offers one means to bring together cognitive measures of thinking functions with measures of emotion, and their brain and genetic correlates. Understanding these measures and the relationships between them is a first step towards the development of tools that will help to assess the heterogeneity of ADHD, and aid in tailoring treatment choices.

  8. BRAIN-COMPUTER-INTERFACE – SUPPORTED MOTOR IMAGERY TRAININTG FOR PATIENTS WITH HEMIPARESIS

    O. A. Mokienko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to assess the feasibility of motor imagery supported brain-computer interface in patients with hemiparesis. 13 patients with central paresis of the hand and 15 healthy volunteers were learning to control EEG-based interface with feedback. No differences on interface control quality were found between patients and healthy subjects. The trainings were accompanied by the desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythm. In patients with cortical damage the source of EEG-activity was dislocated.

  9. The Relationship between Stroke Patients Characteristics and Family Support with Compliance Rehabilitation

    Irma Okta Wardhani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a cerebrovascular disease, it is brain function disorders associated with the disease of the blood vessels that supply the brain. The impact of stroke is paralysis. Family support is things that are needed to be considered in the treatment of stroke patients. It is very involved in the compliance rehabilitation of patients to prevent the re-occurrence of stroke. Characteristics of stroke patients may also affect the compliance rehabilitation. The purpose of this research is to determine the relationship between stroke patients characteristics and family support to compliance rehabilitation at the Medical Rehabilitation Unit RSU Haji Surabaya. This research was an analytic observational research with cross sectional design. The subjects of this research are taken using total population technique. The independent variables in this research is family support. The dependent variable is compliance rehabilitation. The results of this research are presented in the form of frequency distributions and calculate the strength of the relationship with Phi coefficient. The result of this research shows that there is a strong relationship between family support and compliance rehabilitation (r=0.582. There are weak relationship between ages (r=-0,027, gender (r=0,092, level of education (r= -0,295, work (r=0,098, and marital status (r=0,319. The conclusion is family support may affect compliance rehabilitation of stroke patients. It is recommended for health workers to provide counseling to improve family support in curing stroke patients. Keywords: depression, family support, compliance rehabilitation

  10. [Social support and cardiovascular health: Adaptation of a social support scale for hypertensive and diabetic patients in primary care, Chile].

    Poblete, Fernando; Glasinovic, Andrés; Sapag, Jaime; Barticevic, Nicolás; Arenas, Artzy; Padilla, Oslando

    2015-10-01

    Validate an instrument to measure the Perceived Social Support in outpatients who are in treatment to hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus ii. Observational and exploratory design with mixed methods, qualitative and quantitative. Two community health centers from the municipality of Puente Alto (Santiago, Chile). Hypertensive and/or diabetic patients between 18 and 65 years old. A purposive sample was undertaken for the qualitative study, and a random sample for the final survey. Focus groups and semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore the constructs of social support as perceived by patients. According to expert opinion and literature review, a scale of social support was selected and a pilot study was conducted in 40 patients, then we interviewed in depth to some of those participants. The instrument was modified according the results of this process. The final version was applied to 250 participants. The construct existence was verified in the population. In the adaptation, one item was eliminated. The alpha of Cronbach was 0.89 and the factorial analysis had the same four factors from the original study. Nine new items obtained from the focal groups were added to the instrument, obtaining an alpha of Cronbach of 0.92. The final instrument has good psychometric proprieties, and is applicable in our population. The additional items from the qualitative study improve its internal consistency, but don't add new information about Perceived Social Support. This is consistent with other studies, and suggests the application of the original version of the instrument. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of Satisfaction Level in Patients With Mandibular Implant Supported Overdentures

    Masoumeh khoshhal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Implant-supported overdentures could have many benefits for patients, especially in the lower jaws. As a matter of fact, the most common reason for prescribing mandibular overdenture is dissatisfaction of patients with mandibular dentures usually because of a lack of retention, stability and function and speech difficulties. On the other hand, patients' expectations of overdenture treatments are their main disadvantage. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the satisfaction of patients who had received mandibular implant supported overdenture treatment with different number of implants. Patients and Methods This study was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Twenty-five patients with a mean age of 62.7 years who had received mandibular implant supported overdenture treatment at the dental school of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences were enrolled. Among these patients, six had overdentures supported by one implant, nine had overdentures supported by two implants, two had overdentures supported by three implants, five had overdentures supported by four implants and three had overdentures supported by five implants. The visual analogue scale (VAS questionnaire was used to evaluate the general satisfaction, comfort, esthetic, fitness, satisfaction of chewing and social communication, and the data was analyzed by the analysis of variance (ANOVA test. Results All patients in all five groups were satisfied with their overdentures; however there was no significant relationship between the number of implants and fitness (P = 0.446, esthetic (P = 0.843, comfort (P = 0.805, satisfaction of chewing (P = 0.133, social communication (P = 0.322 and general satisfaction (P = 0.493. Conclusions There was no difference in satisfaction level of patients who had received mandibular overdentures with different number of implants.

  12. Nutrition support can bring survival benefit to high nutrition risk gastric cancer patients who received chemotherapy.

    Qiu, Miaozhen; Zhou, Yi-xin; Jin, Yin; Wang, Zi-xian; Wei, Xiao-li; Han, Hong-yu; Ye, Wen-feng; Zhou, Zhi-wei; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Wang, Feng-hua; Li, Yu-hong; Yang, Da-jun; Xu, Rui-hua

    2015-07-01

    The aim of our study is firstly to evaluate the prevalence and prognostic value of nutrition risk in gastric cancer patients and secondly to explore whether the nutrition support can prolong the survival of advanced gastric cancer patients. It contained two study periods. In the first period, we prospectively evaluated the nutritional risk of gastric adenocarcinoma patients from 2009 to 2011 using the method of European Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS) 2002. The Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to evaluate the prognostic value of high nutrition risk. The second period was between 2012 and 2013. We prospectively gave the nutrition support to stage IV gastric cancer patients whose NRS is ≥3. There were 830 patients in the first period, 50.7% patients with a NRS ≥ 3. Patients with NRS ≥ 3 presented a significantly higher percentage of stage IV diseases, elevated values of C-reactive protein, and hypoproteinemia. The median survival was significantly higher in NRS nutrition support. The median survival was 14.3 and 9.6 months for patients with and without NRS shift, respectively, P = 0.001. NRS ≥ 3 was an independent adverse prognostic factor in gastric cancer patients. For stage IV patients whose NRS ≥ 3, the nutrition support might be helpful to improve the prognosis.

  13. Nutritional support in patients with colorectal cancer during chemotherapy: does it work?

    Dobrila-Dintinjana, Renata; Trivanovic, Dragan; Zelić, Marko; Radić, Mladen; Dintinjana, Marijan; Petranović, Duška; Toni, Valković; Vukelic, Jelena; Matijasic, Nusa

    2013-05-01

    Early intervention with nutritional supplementation has been shown to halt malnutrition and may improve outcome in some patients with colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dietary counseling, oral nutrition and megestrol acetate during chemotherapy affected nutritional status and survival in patients with advanced disease. Six hundred and twenty-eight patients with colorectal advanced disease were included in the study from January 2000 through December 2009 and divided into one of two groups. Group I consisted of 315 patients who were monitored prospectively and were given nutritional support. Group II included 313 patients without nutritional counseling and support. After the completion of chemotherapy all patients were evaluated (BMI, NST, Appetite Loss Scale and ECOG). After the completion of chemotherapy, there were lower proportions of patients in Group I with a BMI=5, loss of appetite and decreased weight gain. Nutritional counseling and supplemental feeding temporarily halted weight loss and improved appetite. This improvement may have implications for patient survival. Patients with early nutritional support lived 19.1 months while patients in the control group had a survival of 12.4 months (p=0.022). This study demonstrated that concurrent individualized dietary counseling and nutritional support are effective in improving nutritional status thereby lessening chemotherapy-induced morbidity.

  14. Multimedia support in preoperative patient education for radical prostatectomy: the physicians' point of view.

    Ihrig, Andreas; Herzog, Wolfgang; Huber, Christian G; Hadaschik, Boris; Pahernik, Sascha; Hohenfellner, Markus; Huber, Johannes

    2012-05-01

    To systematically assess the physicians' point of view of multimedia support in preoperative patient education for radical prostatectomy. We evaluated the view of physicians performing multimedia supported preoperative educations within a randomized controlled trial. Therein 8 physicians educated 203 patients for radical prostatectomy. All physicians rated multimedia supported education better than the standard procedure. Main reasons were better comprehensibility, the visual presentation, and greater ease in explaining complex issues. Objective time measurement showed no difference between both educations. The major disadvantage was the impression, that multimedia supported education lasted longer. Moreover, they had the impression that some details could be further improved. Given the choice, every physician would decide for multimedia support. Physicians appreciate multimedia support in preoperative education and contrary to their impression, multimedia support does not prolong patient education. Therefore, patients and physicians likewise profit from multimedia support for education and counseling. The readiness of physicians is a possible obstacle to this improvement, as their view is a key factor for the transition to everyday routine. Therefore, our results could alleviate this possible barrier for establishing multimedia supported education in clinical routine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Is there any link between joint hypermobility and mitral valve prolapse in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome?

    Kozanoglu, Erkan; Coskun Benlidayi, Ilke; Eker Akilli, Rabia; Tasal, Abdurrahman

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine whether benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) modifies the risk of mitral valve prolapse (MVP) in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Female patients fulfilling the 1990 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for FM were included into the study. Joint hypermobility and BJHS were assessed using Beighton's scoring system and Brighton criteria, respectively. Echocardiograpic evaluation was performed in order to test the presence of MVP. Of the 75 female FM patients, 68.0 % (n = 51) and 20.0 % (n = 15) were diagnosed with BJHS and MVP, respectively. The frequencies of both MVP and BJHS seemed higher than the general population prevalence (p = 0.000 for both). The frequency of MVP was significantly higher in patients with BJHS than that in patients without BJHS (p = 0.028). In addition, BJHS was found to increase the risk of MVP approximately ninefold [odds ratio (OR) 8.7, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.1-70.7]. As a result, BJHS and MVP are both common in female patients with FM. Moreover, among the female patients with FM, those with BJHS are about nine times more prone to MVP than those without BJHS. Cardiologic assessment might be added to the routine follow-up strategies in FM patients with BJHS in order to exclude the cardiac pathologies, especially MVP.

  16. Neuronal activation by mucosal biopsy supernatants from irritable bowel syndrome patients is linked to visceral sensitivity

    Buhner, Sabine; Braak, Breg; Li, Qin; Kugler, Eva Maria; Klooker, Tamira; Wouters, Mira; Donovan, Jemma; Vignali, Sheila; Mazzuoli-Weber, Gemma; Grundy, David; Boeckxstaens, Guy; Schemann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Based on the discomfort/pain threshold during rectal distension, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients may be subtyped as normo- or hypersensitive. We previously showed that mucosal biopsy supernatants from IBS patients activated enteric and visceral afferent neurons. We tested the hypothesis that

  17. The Missing Link between Faces and Names: Evidence from Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    Calabria, Marco; Sabio, Alicia; Martin, Clara; Hernandez, Mireia; Juncadella, Montserrat; Gascon-Bayarri, Jordi; Rene, Ramon; Ortiz-Gil, Jordi; Ugas, Lidia; Costa, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Retrieval of proper names is a cause of concern and complaint among elderly adults and it is an early symptom of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). While it is well established that AD patients have deficits of proper name retrieval, the nature of such impairment is not yet fully understood.…

  18. Oxidized-low density lipoprotein in gingival crevicular fluid of patients with chronic periodontitis: a possible link to atherogenesis.

    Shah, Rucha; Thomas, Raison; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2014-02-01

    To investigate a possible link between periodontitis and atherogenesis by examining the levels of anti-oxidized low density lipoprotien (ox LDL) and low density lipoprotien (LDL) in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum of healthy subjects and chronic periodontitis patients. Sixty male subjects (35-55 years) were grouped into 30 healthy individuals and 30 subjects with chronic periodontitis. Serum and GCF samples were obtained from each subject and were assessed for anti-ox LDL and LDL levels. A significant difference (p chronic periodontitis groups. Also the ratio of GCF anti-ox LDL to GCF LDL was significantly higher (p chronic periodontitis patients as compared to the healthy group. A significant rise in ox LDL level in otherwise systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients may put these subjects at an increased risk of developing atherosclerosis.

  19. Examining the link between patient satisfaction and adherence to HIV care: a structural equation model.

    Bich N Dang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. OBJECTIVE: To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM, a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey ("Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV? and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, ("Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?". A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA <48 copies/mL at the time of the survey. We used SEM to test hypothesized relationships. RESULTS: The analyses included 489 patients (94% of eligible patients. The patient satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2 on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported "excellent" adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all p<.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Patient satisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes.

  20. Indicators for early assessment of palliative care in lung cancer patients: a population study using linked health data.

    Kelly, Maria; O'Brien, Katie M; Lucey, Michael; Clough-Gorr, Kerri; Hannigan, Ailish

    2018-02-26

    Analysing linked, routinely collected data may be useful to identify characteristics of patients with suspected lung cancer who could benefit from early assessment for palliative care. The aim of this study was to compare characteristics of newly diagnosed lung cancer patients dying within 30 days of diagnosis (short term survivors) with those surviving more than 30 days. To identify indicators for early palliative care assessment we distinguished between characteristics available at diagnosis (age, gender, smoking status, marital status, comorbid disease, admission type, tumour stage and histology) from those available post diagnosis. A second aim was to examine the association between receiving any tumour-directed treatment, place of death and survival time. A retrospective observational population based study comparing lung cancer patients who died within 30 days of diagnosis (short term survivors) with those who survived longer using Chi-squared tests and logistic regression. Incident lung cancer (ICD-03:C34) patients diagnosed 2005-2012 inclusive who died before 01-01-2014 (n = 14,228) were identified from the National Cancer Registry of Ireland linked to death certificate data and acute hospital episode data. One in five newly diagnosed lung cancer patients died within 30 days of diagnosis. After adjusting for stage and histology, death within 30 days was higher in patients who were aged 80 years or older (adjusted OR 2.46; 95%CI 2.05-3.96; p < 0.001), patients with emergency admissions at diagnosis (adjusted OR 2.96; 95%CI 2.61-3.37; p < 0.001) and patients with any comorbidities at diagnosis (adjusted OR 1.32 95%CI 1.15-1.52; p < 0.001). Overall, 75% of those who died within 30 days died in hospital compared to 43% of longer term survivors. We have shown a high proportion of lung cancer patients who die within 30 days of diagnosis are older, have comorbidities and are admitted through the emergency department. These characteristics

  1. The Evaluation of Nosocomial Infections in Pediatric Patients with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support

    Pelin Ayyıldız

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO has become a standard technique over the past few decades in intensive care unit (ICU. Objective: A review of pediatric patients who received ECMO support in the pediatric cardiac ICU was conducted to determine the incidence, risk factors and causal organisms related to acquired infections and assess the survival rates of ECMO patients with nosocomial infections. Methods: Sixty-six patients who received ECMO support in the pediatric cardiac ICU between January 2011 and June 2014 were included in the study. Demographic, echocardiographic, hemodynamic features and surgical procedures were reviewed. Results: Sixty-six patients received a total of 292.5 days of venoarterial ECMO support. Sixty were postoperative patients. Forty-five patients were weaned from ECMO support with an ECMO survival rate of 68.2%. The rate of infection was 116.2/1000 ECMO days. Prolonged ICU stay, duration of ventilation and ECMO were found associated with development of nosocomial infection and only the duration of ECMO was an independent risk factor for nosocomial infections in ECMO patients. Conclusion: The correction of the underlying process leading to ECMO support and shortening the length of ECMO duration together with stricter application of ECMO indications would improve the infection incidence and hospital surveillance of the patient group.

  2. Resistin - the link between adipose tissue dysfunction and insulin resistance in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    Cherneva Radostina Vlaeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resistin is an adipocytokine, associated with obesity and inflammation. Its exact role in insulin resistance and diabetes in the general population is still controversial. The relation between resistin plasma levels, insulin resistance and risk of impaired glucose metabolism in OSA patients has not been investigated. Materials and methods Plasma levels of resistin were measured in 67 patients with OSA and impaired glucose metabolism. 34,7% (23/67 had diabetes; 40% (27/67 patients had impаired glucose tolerance(IGT; 25,3%(17/67 had normal glucose metabolism (NGM. The association between resistin, BMI, obesity, markers of insulin resistance, oxidative stress and sleep study characteristics was analysed. The different groups of patients were compared in regards to glucometabolic parameters and biomarkers of oxidative stress – isoprostanes and insulin resistance – free fatty acids (FFA. Results Plasma levels of resistin were higher in patients with diabetes (6,12 ±5,93ng/ml, compared to those with IGT (3,85±2,81ng/ml, p-0,021 and NGM (3,77±3,23, p-0,043. Resistin did not differ between patients with IGT and NGM (p-0,954. In OSA patients with BMI>40 resistin plasma levels correlated neither to the clinical parameters (BMI, IRI, HOMA-I, HbA1C, AHI, desaturation index, nor to the biomarkers of oxidative stress and insulin resistance. Free fatty acids (0,232>0,177mmol/l, p-0,037 were higher in diabetics in comparison to NGM. Conclusions Plasma resistin levels in OSA patients with BMI>40 are independent of insulin resistance and are not associated with the parameters, characterising the oxidative stress or severity of OSA. Resistin could be used in a multiple panel of clinical and biomarkers to discern patients with diabetes from those with IGT; in OSA patients with BMI >40 resistin together with HbA1C could discern patients with diabetes from those with NGM. In OSA patients with BMI >40 FFA and HbA1C are useful clinical

  3. Social support and self-management behaviour among patients with Type 2 diabetes

    Schiøtz, M. L.; Bøgelund, M.; Almdal, T.

    2012-01-01

    Aims To investigate the relationship between structural and functional social support and patient activation, diabetes-related emotional distress, perceived diabetes care, self-management behaviour and HbA 1c levels among patients with Type2 diabetes. Methods Self-administered questionnaires were...... emotional distress, negative assessment of care, less health-promoting eating habits and less frequent foot examinations. Conclusions Good social support is significantly associated with health-promoting behaviours and well-being among patients with Type2 diabetes. However, HbA 1c levels are higher...... for cohabitant persons, indicating barriers for social support. Intervention research is needed to investigate the causal relationship between social networks and health-promoting behaviours. This knowledge should be used in clinical practice when targeting and designing education, support and care for patients...

  4. Proteins and amino acids are fundamental to optimal nutrition support in critically ill patients

    Weijs, Peter JM; Cynober, Luc; DeLegge, Mark; Kreymann, Georg; Wernerman, Jan; Wolfe, Robert R

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we present the growing scientific evidence showing the importance of protein and amino acid provision in nutritional support and their impact on preservation of muscle mass and patient outcomes.

  5. Online communication and support for cancer patients: a relationship-centric design framework.

    Weiss, Jacob B; Lorenzi, Nancy M

    2005-01-01

    Dealing with a cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment involves communication among clinicians, patients, families, friends and others affected by the illness. The hypothesis of this research is that an informatics system can effectively support the communication needs of cancer patients and their informal caregivers. Two design frameworks for online cancer communication are defined and compared. One is centered primarily on the users' interpersonal relationships, and the other is centered on the clinical data and cancer information. Five types of clinical and supportive relationships were identified and supported by in-depth interviews with cancer patients and their informal caregivers. Focusing the design of an online cancer communication system around the interpersonal relationships of patients and families may be an important step towards designing more effective paradigms for online cancer care and support.

  6. Joining forces for food security - Linking earth observation and crowd-sourcing for improved decision-support to aid organizations

    Enenkel, M.; Dorigo, W.; See, L. M.; Vinck, P.; Pham, P.

    2013-12-01

    Droughts statistically exceed all other natural disasters in spatio-temporal extent, number of people affected or financial loss. Triggered by crop failure, food insecurity is a major manifestation of agricultural drought and water scarcity. However, other socio-economic precursors, such as chronically low levels of disaster preparedness, hampered access to food security or a lack of social safety nets are equally important factors. Consequently, this study is focused on two complementary developments - a new satellite-derived agricultural drought index and a mobile phone application. The Combined Drought Index (CDI) is enhanced by replacing field measurements of temperature and rainfall modelled/assimilated data. The vegetation component is replaced by a smoothed NDVI dataset. A soil moisture component is introduced to close the gap between rainfall deficiencies and the first visible impacts of atmospheric anomalies on vegetation. The mobile phone application enables the validation of drought index outputs and gives aid organizations an opportunity to increase the speed of socio-economic vulnerability assessments. Supported by Doctors without Borders (MSF) this approach aims at decreasing uncertainties in decision-making via a more holistic risk framework.

  7. Resilience and social support as protective factors against abuse of patients with dementia: A study on family caregivers.

    Serra, Lídia; Contador, Israel; Fernández-Calvo, Bernardino; Ruisoto, Pablo; Jenaro, Cristina; Flores, Noelia; Ramos, Francisco; Rivera-Navarro, Jesús

    2018-05-24

    Scientific literature has identified different vulnerability factors associated to abuse in people with dementia (PWD), but little is known about the psychosocial protective variables against abuse. The main objective of this study is to investigate a set of caregiver and patient factors linked to abuse-related behavior of PWD. A total of 326 primary and family caregivers, residents of the Castilla and León community (Spain), were evaluated. All participants filled out a standardized protocol, which assessed the sociodemographic characteristics, patient and care-related variables, as well as the perceived burden, resilience, and social support. Abuse-related behavior was evaluated using the Caregiver Abuse Screen. Results show that the severity of cognitive impairment and behavior disorders of PWD, a greater number of caregiving hours, a worse previous relationship with the caregiver, and perceived burden are positively related with abuse. However, resilience and social support showed a negative relationship with Caregiver Abuse Screen scores, suggesting a protective effect on abuse, even after controlling the effect of a number of covariates. Indeed, resilience was the only variable that remained significant after including the effect of burden. This paper states the role of burden in abuse of PWD, while resilience and social support are abuse protective factors. These variables should be considered in future guidelines for the prevention of abuse against PWD. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Content analysis and qualitative study of hemodialysis patients, family experience and perceived social support.

    Aghakhani, Nader; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Molazem, Zahra; Habibzadeh, Hosein

    2014-03-01

    Various treatments such as hemodialysis prolong the life of chronic renal failure disease patients who must tolerate many physical, emotional, social and economic difficulties. Therefore, social support is considered as a vital area of investigation for such patients. In this qualitative research, a grounded theory approach was used and written as a content analysis form to study hemodialysis patients and family experience of perceived social support. Three nurses, 4 general practitioners, a specialist and two family members who participated were interviewed from April to September 2012 in Urmia, Iran. Interviews were guided to divulge the perception of changes in their lives, needs for social support for disease complications, and the type of treatment process. Purposive sampling continued up to data saturation. Data analysis was performed based on Strauss and Corbin Method. Constant comparison analysis was performed until data saturation. The research results are shown in 3 steps. In the first step, 113 categories and four main themes from 993 first codes were explored. Social support was explored based on the implications of five general themes including "Perceived Threats Caused by Disease Complications", "Searching for Social Support", "Accessible Social Support", "Beliefs and Values", and "Perceived Social Support". The core variable of our research is acceptance of the reality of the conditions caused by the disease. The research finalized our knowledge about patient problems regarding social support and revealed many problems of supporting patients by Health Team Members, family members and organizations. The findings suggest that individual aspects of patient experiences must be considered if social support is to be given and Healthcare Providers have to facilitate positive health services.

  9. Implementing shared governance in a patient care support industry: information technology leading the way.

    Hartley, Lou Ann

    2014-06-01

    Implementing technology in the clinical setting is not a project but rather a journey in transforming care delivery. As nursing leaders in healthcare and patient care support organizations embrace technology to drive reforms in quality and efficiency, growing opportunities exist to share experiences between these industries. This department submission describes the journey to nursing shared governance from the perspective of an information technology-based company realizing the goal of supporting patient care.

  10. Rehabilitation with implant-supported overdentures in total edentulous patients: A review

    Martínez–Lage-Azorín, Juan F.; Segura-Andrés, Gustavo; Faus-López, Joan; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The main aim of this review article is to discuss implant-supported overdentures (ISOs) as treatment in edentulous patients. Besides, we will try to discuss among the different treatment options in such patients and to analyze their validity when ISOs are compared with other clinical modalities. At the same time, we will try to suggest clinical guidelines supported by current clinical studies. Material and methods: We performed a Medline search and review of pertinent articles on ...

  11. Phenotype-Genotype Association Analysis of ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma and Its Molecular Link to Patient Osteoporosis

    Renzhi Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma, also known as Cushing disease (CD, is rare and causes metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis due to hypercortisolism. However, the molecular pathogenesis of CD is still unclear because of a lack of human cell lines and animal models. Here, we study 106 clinical characteristics and gene expression changes from 118 patients, the largest cohort of CD in a single-center. RNA deep sequencing is used to examine genotypic changes in nine paired female ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas and adjacent nontumorous pituitary tissues (ANPT. We develop a novel analysis linking disease clinical characteristics and whole transcriptomic changes, using Pearson Correlation Coefficient to discover a molecular network mechanism. We report that osteoporosis is distinguished from the phenotype and genotype analysis. A cluster of genes involved in osteoporosis is identified using Pearson correlation coefficient analysis. Most of the genes are reported in the bone related literature, confirming the feasibility of phenotype-genotype association analysis, which could be used in the analysis of almost all diseases. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1, collagen type I α 1 chain (COL1A1, 5′-nucleotidase ecto (NT5E, HtrA serine peptidase 1 (HTRA1 and angiopoietin 1 (ANGPT1 and their signalling pathways are shown to be involved in osteoporosis in CD patients. Our discoveries provide a molecular link for osteoporosis in CD patients, and may open new potential avenues for osteoporosis intervention and treatment.

  12. The effect of social support on the quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis

    David Castro Costa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the predictive value of social support on health related quality of life (HRQoL in multiple sclerosis (MS patients. METHODS: The sample is composed by 150 MS consecutive patients. We used the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey to assess social support and the Health Status Questionnaire to assess HRQoL. For inferential analysis, we used the Multiple Linear Regression with stepwise selection of variables. RESULTS: The age, basic education, psychological support and disability explains 41.6% of the variance in physical function, 29.4% in physical performance and 30.6% in emotional performance. Age and psychological support explains 23.1% of the variance in physical function and 29.4% in vitality. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that social support is a predictor with a significant effect on HRQoL in MS.

  13. The association between supportive relatives and lower occurrence of anxiety and depression in heart patients

    Hansen, Camilla; Zinckernagel, Line; Schneekloth, Nanna

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 30-40% of heart patients develop anxiety and/or depression, which might influence recovery and long-term survival. Research has suggested that support from relatives may decrease anxiety and depression among heart patients; however, the results are inconsistent and often...... based on small study populations. AIM: The paper aimed to investigate the association between having supportive relatives and the occurrence of anxiety and depression in heart patients. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study among Danish patients diagnosed with ischemic heart disease, atrial...... fibrillation, heart failure, or heart valve disease. Presence of supportive relatives was measured as the degree to which the patients felt that they had relatives they could count on, while symptoms of anxiety and depression were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Multiple logistic...

  14. The role of social support in anxiety and depression among Parkinson's disease patients.

    Ghorbani Saeedian, Radka; Nagyova, Iveta; Krokavcova, Martina; Skorvanek, Matej; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Gdovinova, Zuzana; Groothoff, Johan W; van Dijk, Jitse P

    2014-01-01

    To explore how social support is associated with anxiety and depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients controlling for gender, disease duration and disease severity. The sample consisted of 124 patients (52.4% male; mean age 68.1 ± 8.4 years; mean disease duration 6.3 ± 5.5 years). Anxiety and depression were measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, social support with the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and disease severity with the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale. Data were analyzed using linear regression. Gender, disease duration, disease severity and social support explained 31% of the total variance in anxiety in younger PD patients but did not significantly contribute to the explanation of depression. In the older group, this model explained 41% of the variance in depression but did not significantly contribute to the explanation of anxiety. PD patients experience the positive influence of social support differently according to age. In the younger group, disease duration plays the primary role regarding anxiety. In the older group, poor social support especially from friends is associated with more depression after controlling for the relevant variables. Implications of Rehabilitation PD is a disease of older age with a neurodegenerative character and treatment should focus on increasing quality of life. Anxiety and depression are common co-morbidities in PD patients. The support network should also be screened regularly and involved in enhancing the quality of life.

  15. "LIPOPROTEIN (a LEVELS AND CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN IRANIAN PATIENTS. IS THERE A LINK?"

    H. Rezvan

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein(a, an LDL variant, has been claimed to have a role in atherogenesis and therefore coronary artery disease (CAD. However, its production and atherogenecity seems to vary among ethnic groups. In order to study the possible correlation between levels of Lp(a and CAD in Iranian patients who suffered myocardial infarction (MI, a case-control study was carried out on 120 MI patients and 120 matched healthy subjects. Levels of Lp(a were significantly higher in the MI patients than the control group (P < 0.0001, which demonstrates a possible correlation between levels of Lp(a and CAD. Estimation of Lp (a may be helpful in evaluating the risk of CAD, particularly in those patients with borderline levels of triglycerides and cholesterol.

  16. Examining the Link between Patient Satisfaction and Adherence to HIV Care: A Structural Equation Model

    Dang, Bich N.; Westbrook, Robert A.; Black, William C.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Giordano, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. Objective To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM), a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey (“Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV?) and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, (“Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?”). A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA patient satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2) on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported “excellent” adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all pPatient satisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes. PMID:23382948

  17. Supportive Communication to Facilitate Chinese Patients' Adaptation to a Permanent Colostomy: A Qualitative Case Study Approach.

    Tao, Hui; Songwathana, Praneed; Isaramalai, Sang-Arun; Wang, Qingxi

    2016-01-01

    This study, which is a part of action research, aims to explore how supportive communication can impact individuals' adaptation to a permanent colostomy in a Chinese cultural context. Two Chinese rectal cancer patients with complexity and difficulty in living with a permanent colostomy were selected using a qualitative case study approach. The researcher (H.T.) interacted with the participants along their journey from the preoperative period until the third postoperative month after discharge via face-to-face or telephone interviews. Content analysis was applied. Supportive communication was characterized by "communication as a supportive tool," which consisted of 4 elements: respect, description, empathy, and empowerment. The nursing strategies included (1) developing a collaborative relationship with patients and families; (2) understanding patients' concerns and problems; (3) discussing potential solutions; (4) encouraging patients to take action; (5) bringing out emotional expression; (6) normalizing negative emotions; and (7) protecting hope. The findings of this study informed that supportive communication is a valuable tool for nurses to provide informational and emotional support to Chinese patients in order to enhance their adaptation to living with a permanent colostomy. Developing an operational manual to enhance supportive communication for patients with colostomy is suggested.

  18. Supporting cancer patients with work-related problems through an oncological occupational physician: a feasibility study.

    Zaman, A C G N M; Bruinvels, D J; de Boer, A G E M; Frings-Dresen, M H W

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of an oncological occupational physician (OOP) who is trained in oncological work-related problems, and in providing work-related support to cancer patients within the curative setting. We assessed facilitators and barriers that affect the activities of an OOP, and the satisfaction of the OOPs and patients with this new form of health care. Interviews were held with (1) OOPs (N = 13) to assess facilitators, barriers and their satisfaction with their ability to give supportive care and (2) cancer patients (N = 8) to assess their satisfaction concerning consulting an OOP. The main facilitators were positive feedback from health care providers and patients about the received care and support that the OOP had given, and the additional knowledge of the OOPs about cancer and work-related problems. Major barriers for being active as an OOP were lack of financial support for the OOP and the unfamiliarity of patients and health care providers with the specialised occupational physician. Both OOPs and the specialised knowledge and additional training of the OOPs facilitated providing support to cancer patients and survivors with work-related problems. Familiarity with the specialised occupational physician and financial support should be improved. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effects of interactive patient smartphone support app on drug adherence and lifestyle changes in myocardial infarction patients: A randomized study.

    Johnston, Nina; Bodegard, Johan; Jerström, Susanna; Åkesson, Johanna; Brorsson, Hilja; Alfredsson, Joakim; Albertsson, Per A; Karlsson, Jan-Erik; Varenhorst, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Patients with myocardial infarction (MI) seldom reach recommended targets for secondary prevention. This study evaluated a smartphone application ("app") aimed at improving treatment adherence and cardiovascular lifestyle in MI patients. Multicenter, randomized trial. A total of 174 ticagrelor-treated MI patients were randomized to either an interactive patient support tool (active group) or a simplified tool (control group) in addition to usual post-MI care. Primary end point was a composite nonadherence score measuring patient-registered ticagrelor adherence, defined as a combination of adherence failure events (2 missed doses registered in 7-day cycles) and treatment gaps (4 consecutive missed doses). Secondary end points included change in cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life (European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions), and patient device satisfaction (System Usability Scale). Patient mean age was 58 years, 81% were men, and 21% were current smokers. At 6 months, greater patient-registered drug adherence was achieved in the active vs the control group (nonadherence score: 16.6 vs 22.8 [P = .025]). Numerically, the active group was associated with higher degree of smoking cessation, increased physical activity, and change in quality of life; however, this did not reach statistical significance. Patient satisfaction was significantly higher in the active vs the control group (system usability score: 87.3 vs 78.1 [P = .001]). In MI patients, use of an interactive patient support tool improved patient self-reported drug adherence and may be associated with a trend toward improved cardiovascular lifestyle changes and quality of life. Use of a disease-specific interactive patient support tool may be an appreciated, simple, and promising complement to standard secondary prevention. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dietary counselling and nutritional support in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    Vlooswijk, C.P.; Rooij, Van P.H.E.; Kruize, J.C.; Schuring, H.A.; Al-Mamgani, A.; Roos, De N.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives:The need for dietary counselling and nutritional support in oropharyngeal cancer patients is generally accepted. However, evidence for the effectiveness is sparse. The aim of this study was to describe dietary counselling, nutritional support, body weight and toxicity during

  1. Predicting Resilience via Social Support and Illness Perceptions Among Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    Reihane Hajmohammadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives Chronic renal disease is a threatening condition for the health, economic, and social status of the affected person and his/her family. Patients undergoing hemodialysis encounter mental and health problems; the current study aimed at predicting resilience via social support and illness perceptions among patients undergoing hemodialysis. Methods The current descriptive-correlational study had a statistical population including 308 patients undergoing hemodialysis in Kerman, Iran, in 2017. Based on the Krejcie-Morgan table, the minimum required sample size was 169. The sample was selected using a convenience sampling method. Data collection tools were the Connor-Davidson resilience scale, the medical outcome study (MOS social support survey developed by Sherbourne and Stewart, and the brief illness perception questionnaire developed by Broadbent et al. Data were analyzed using a Pearson correlation coefficient and a stepwise regression analysis via SPSS version 19. Results Results indicated that resilience was significantly and positively related to social support (r = 0.318, P < 0.05 and illness perceptions (r = 0.165, P < 0.05. Among the subscales of social support, emotional support, tangible support, and social interaction could predict resilience, and among the subscales of illness perceptions, only cognitive representation could predict resilience. Conclusions The obtained results demonstrated that resilience was significantly and positively related to social support and illness perceptions. Additionally, the subscales of social support and illness perceptions could predict resilience among the patients undergoing hemodialysis.

  2. Do Hospitals Support Second Victims? Collective Insights From Patient Safety Leaders in Maryland.

    Edrees, Hanan H; Morlock, Laura; Wu, Albert W

    2017-09-01

    Second victims-defined as health care providers who are emotionally traumatized after a patient adverse event-may not receive needed emotional support. Although most health care organizations have an employee assistance program (EAP), second victims may be reluctant to access this service because of worries about confidentiality. A study was conducted to describe the extent to which organizational support for second victims is perceived as desirable by patient safety officers in acute care hospitals in Maryland and to identify existing support programs. Semistructured interviews (using existing and newly developed questions) were conducted with 43 patient safety representatives from 38 of the 46 acute care hospitals in Maryland (83% response rate). All but one of the responding hospitals offered EAP services to their employees, but there were gaps in the services provided related to timeliness, EAP staff's ability to relate to clinical providers, and physical accessibility. There were no valid measures in place to assess the effectiveness of EAP services. Participants identified a need for peer support, both for the second victim and potentially for individuals who provide that support. Six (16%) of the 38 hospitals had second victim support programs, which varied in structure, accessibility, and outcomes, while an additional 5 hospitals (13%) were developing such a program. Patient safety officers thought their organizations should reevaluate the support currently provided by their EAPs, and consider additional peer support mechanisms. Future research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Linking social cognition with social interaction: Non-verbal expressivity, social competence and "mentalising" in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    Lehmkämper Caroline

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research has shown that patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD can be distinguished from controls on the basis of their non-verbal expression. For example, patients with SSD use facial expressions less than normals to invite and sustain social interaction. Here, we sought to examine whether non-verbal expressivity in patients corresponds with their impoverished social competence and neurocognition. Method Fifty patients with SSD were videotaped during interviews. Non-verbal expressivity was evaluated using the Ethological Coding System for Interviews (ECSI. Social competence was measured using the Social Behaviour Scale and psychopathology was rated using the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale. Neurocognitive variables included measures of IQ, executive functioning, and two mentalising tasks, which tapped into the ability to appreciate mental states of story characters. Results Non-verbal expressivity was reduced in patients relative to controls. Lack of "prosocial" nonverbal signals was associated with poor social competence and, partially, with impaired understanding of others' minds, but not with non-social cognition or medication. Conclusion This is the first study to link deficits in non-verbal expressivity to levels of social skills and awareness of others' thoughts and intentions in patients with SSD.

  4. Imbalanced functional link between reward circuits and the cognitive control system in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Xie, Chunming; Ma, Lisha; Jiang, Nan; Huang, Ruyan; Li, Li; Gong, Liang; He, Cancan; Xiao, Chaoyong; Liu, Wen; Xu, Shu; Zhang, Zhijun

    2017-08-01

    Altered reward processing and cognitive deficits are often observed in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); however, whether the imbalance in activity between reward circuits and the cognitive control (CC) system is associated with compulsive behavior remains unknown. Sixty-eight OCD patients and 33 cognitively normal (CN) healthy subjects participated in this resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Alterations in the functional connectivity between reward circuits and the CC system were quantitatively assessed and compared between the groups. A Granger causality analysis was used to determine the causal informational influence between and within reward circuits and the CC system across all subjects. OCD patients showed a dichotomous pattern of enhanced functional coupling in their reward circuits and a weakened functional coupling in their CC system when compared to CN subjects. Neural correlates of compulsive behavior were primarily located in the reward circuits and CC system in OCD patients. Importantly, the CC system exerted a reduced interregional causal influence over the reward system in OCD patients relative to its effect in CN subjects. The limitations of this study are that it was a cross-sectional study and the potential effects of environmental and genetic factors were not explored. OCD patients showed an imbalance in the functional link between reward circuits and the CC system at rest. This bias toward a loss of control may define a pathological state in which subjects are more vulnerable to engaging in compulsive behaviors.

  5. Linking Nurses' Clinical Leadership to Patient Care Quality: The Role of Transformational Leadership and Workplace Empowerment.

    Boamah, Sheila

    2018-03-01

    Background While improving patient safety requires strong nursing leadership, there has been little empirical research that has examined the mechanisms by which leadership influences patient safety outcomes. Aim To test a model examining relationships among transformational leadership, structural empowerment, staff nurse clinical leadership, and nurse-assessed adverse patient outcomes. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a randomly selected sample of 378 registered nurses working in direct patient care in acute care hospitals across Ontario, Canada. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized model. Results The model had an acceptable fit, and all paths were significant. Transformational leadership was significantly associated with decreased adverse patient outcomes through structural empowerment and staff nurse clinical leadership. Discussion This study highlights the importance of transformational leadership in creating empowering practice environments that foster high-quality care. The findings indicate that a more complete understanding of what drives desired patient outcomes warrants the need to focus on how to empower nurses and foster clinical leadership practices at the point of care. Conclusion In planning safety strategies, managers must demonstrate transformational leadership behaviors in order to modify the work environment to create better defenses for averting adverse events.

  6. Physical and psychosocial support requirements of 1,500 patients starting radiotherapy

    Kirchheiner, K.; Czajka, A.; Luetgendorf-Cacig, C.; Schmid, M.P.; Komarek, E.; Poetter, R. [Medical Univ. of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Ponocny-Seliger, E. [Sigmund Freud Private Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Psychology; Doerr, W. [Medical Univ. of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology

    2013-05-15

    Background. The need for psychosocial support in cancer patients is estimated in the literature at 14-50%. At the Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, approximately 3,000 patients are seen annually. Due to limited staff resources, highly distressed patients need to be selected for focused support. A multidisciplinary screening questionnaire covering physical, social and psychological problems and needs was successfully implemented in clinical routine. We present the results of a representative sample of 1,500 heterogeneous cancer patients before beginning radiotherapy. Patients and methods. The prevalence rates of physical, social and psychological problems and needs were evaluated. Independent risk factors for critical psychological distress were analyzed in a multivariate logistic regression model, in order to identify vulnerable subgroups for focused psychosocial support. Results. Critical psychological distress was found in 22% of the overall cohort, of whom only 26% reported a need for psychological information. Clinically relevant pain was suffered by 31%. Patients' most frequent complaints were weakness, sleeping difficulties and exhaustion. Consequently, 40% were impaired in activities and 35% reported a requirement for support in daily life. A need for further information was expressed by 37% of patients. Significant risk factors for critical psychological distress included pain, functional status, support requirements and patient-reported symptoms. Differences in tumor type, metastases and sociodemographic variables had no impact on critical psychological distress. Conclusion. Approximately one third of all patients beginning radiotherapy have physical, social and psychological problems and should receive focused psychosocial support. Multivariate analysis reveals that patients with impaired ''physical integrity'' are at a significantly higher risk of experiencing critical psychological distress. (orig.)

  7. Physical and psychosocial support requirements of 1,500 patients starting radiotherapy

    Kirchheiner, K.; Czajka, A.; Luetgendorf-Cacig, C.; Schmid, M.P.; Komarek, E.; Poetter, R.; Ponocny-Seliger, E.; Doerr, W.; Medical Univ. of Vienna

    2013-01-01

    Background. The need for psychosocial support in cancer patients is estimated in the literature at 14-50%. At the Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, approximately 3,000 patients are seen annually. Due to limited staff resources, highly distressed patients need to be selected for focused support. A multidisciplinary screening questionnaire covering physical, social and psychological problems and needs was successfully implemented in clinical routine. We present the results of a representative sample of 1,500 heterogeneous cancer patients before beginning radiotherapy. Patients and methods. The prevalence rates of physical, social and psychological problems and needs were evaluated. Independent risk factors for critical psychological distress were analyzed in a multivariate logistic regression model, in order to identify vulnerable subgroups for focused psychosocial support. Results. Critical psychological distress was found in 22% of the overall cohort, of whom only 26% reported a need for psychological information. Clinically relevant pain was suffered by 31%. Patients' most frequent complaints were weakness, sleeping difficulties and exhaustion. Consequently, 40% were impaired in activities and 35% reported a requirement for support in daily life. A need for further information was expressed by 37% of patients. Significant risk factors for critical psychological distress included pain, functional status, support requirements and patient-reported symptoms. Differences in tumor type, metastases and sociodemographic variables had no impact on critical psychological distress. Conclusion. Approximately one third of all patients beginning radiotherapy have physical, social and psychological problems and should receive focused psychosocial support. Multivariate analysis reveals that patients with impaired ''physical integrity'' are at a significantly higher risk of experiencing critical psychological distress. (orig.)

  8. Support needs of patients with COPD: a systematic literature search and narrative review

    Gardener AC

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A Carole Gardener,1 Gail Ewing,2 Isla Kuhn,3 Morag Farquhar4 1Primary Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; 2Centre for Family Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; 3University of Cambridge Medical School Library, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; 4School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK Introduction: Understanding the breadth of patients’ support needs is important for the delivery of person-centered care, particularly in progressive long-term conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Existing reviews identify important aspects of managing life with COPD with which patients may need support (support needs; however, none of these comprehensively outlines the full range of support needs that patients can experience. We therefore sought to systematically determine the full range of support needs for patients with COPD to inform development of an evidence-based tool to enable person-centered care.Methods: We conducted a systematic search and narrative review of the literature. Medline (Ovid, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL were systematically searched for papers which included data addressing key aspects of support need, as identified by patients with COPD. Relevant data were extracted, and a narrative analysis was conducted.Results: Thirty-one papers were included in the review, and the following 13 domains (broad areas of support need were identified: 1 understanding COPD, 2 managing symptoms and medication, 3 healthy lifestyle, 4 managing feelings and worries, 5 living positively with COPD, 6 thinking about the future, 7 anxiety and depression, 8 practical support, 9 finance work and housing, 10 families and close relationships, 11 social and recreational life, 12 independence, and 13 navigating services. These 13 domains of support need were mapped to three of the four overarching categories of need

  9. The moral agency of institutions: effectively using expert nurses to support patient autonomy.

    Charles, Sonya

    2017-08-01

    Patient autonomy-with an emphasis on informed consent and the right to refuse treatment-is a cornerstone of modern bioethics. Within discussions about patient autonomy, feminist bioethicists have argued for a relational approach to autonomy. Under a relational framework, we must look beyond the individual moment of choice to include the role relationships and specific contexts can play in supporting or undermining autonomy. Given the day-to-day interactions they have with patients, nurses play a significant role in helping patients understand the nature of their illnesses and make truly informed decisions. However, the skills of expert nurses also support patient autonomy in more subtle ways. Specifically, nurses develop skills of attunement that help them to find subtle ways to support patient autonomy. However, in order to effectively do this, nurses need institutions that support their professional autonomy. In this paper, I look at the ways nurses have been inhibited in their professional autonomy both as a profession and as individual practitioners. I argue that turning our attention to institutions and the role they play in supporting or undermining nurses' autonomy can help promote nurses' professional autonomy and thereby enhance patient autonomy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Development of patient-based questionnaire about aesthetic and functional differences between overdentures implant-supported and overdentures tooth-supported. Study of 43 patients with a follow up of 1 year

    GARGARI, M.; PRETE, V.; PUJIA, M.; CERUSO, F. M.

    2013-01-01

    Development of patient-based questionnaire about aesthetic and functional differences between overdentures implant-supported and overdentures tooth-supported. Study of 43 patients with a follow up of 1 year.

  11. The effect of computer-mediated social support in online communities on patient empowerment and doctor-patient communication.

    Oh, Hyun Jung; Lee, Byoungkwan

    2012-01-01

    In the context of diabetes, this study tested a mechanism through which Korean diabetes patients' exchange of computer-mediated social support (CMSS) in diabetes online communities influences their sense of empowerment and intention to actively communicate with the doctor. Analysis of data from 464 Korean diabetes patients indicates significant relationships among diabetes patients' online community activities, perceived CMSS, sense of empowerment, and their intention to actively communicate with the doctor. Diabetes patients who have engaged more in online community activities perceived greater social support from other members of the community. Perceived CMSS significantly predicted their intention to actively communicate with the doctor through sense of empowerment. Sense of empowerment was a valid underlying mechanism that explains how patients' perceived CMSS influences their intention to actively communicate with the doctor. The implications for health communication research and practice are discussed.

  12. Facial emotion linked cooperation in patients with paranoid schizophrenia: a test on the Interpersonal Communication Model.

    Tse, Wai S; Yan Lu; Bond, Alyson J; Chan, Raymond Ck; Tam, Danny W H

    2011-09-01

    Patients with schizophrenia consistently show deficits in facial affect perception and social behaviours. It is illusive to suggest that these deficits in facial affect perception cause poor social behaviours. The present research aims to study how facial affects influence ingratiation, cooperation and punishment behaviours of the patients. Forty outpatients with paranoid schizophrenia, 26 matched depressed patients and 46 healthy volunteers were recruited. After measurement of clinical symptoms and depression, their facial emotion recognition, neurocognitive functioning and the facial affects dependent cooperative behaviour were measured using a modified version of Mixed-Motive Game. The depressed control group showed demographic characteristics, depression levels and neurocognitive functioning similar to the schizophrenic group. Patients with schizophrenia committed significantly more errors in neutral face identification than the other two groups. They were significantly more punitive on the Mixed-Motive Game in the neutral face condition. Neutral face misidentification was a unique emotion-processing deficit in the schizophrenic group. Their increase in punitive behaviours in the neutral face condition might confuse their family members and trigger more expressed emotion from them, thus increasing the risk of relapse. Family members might display more happy faces to promote positive relationships with patients.

  13. Social support as a predictor of perceived health status in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Krokavcova, Martina; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Nagyova, Iveta; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Gavelova, Miriam; Middel, Berrie; Gdovinova, Zuzana; Groothoff, Johan W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to investigate whether different levels of perceived social support are associated with different levels of perceived health status in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Methods: Two hundred and seven MS patients (38.4 +/- 10.6 years, 66.2% female) completed

  14. The role of social support in anxiety and depression among Parkinson's disease patients

    Saeedian, Radka Ghorbani; Nagyova, Iveta; Krokavcova, Martina; Skorvanek, Matej; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Gdovinova, Zuzana; Groothoff, Johan W.; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To explore how social support is associated with anxiety and depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients controlling for gender, disease duration and disease severity. Methods: The sample consisted of 124 patients (52.4% male; mean age 68.1 +/- 8.4 years; mean disease duration 6.3 +/-

  15. Beyond stroke : Description and evaluation of an effective intervention to support family caregivers of stroke patients

    Schure, Lidwien M.; van den Heuvel, Elisabeth T. P.; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; de Witte, Luc P.; Meyboom-de Jong, Betty

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a group support program and a home visiting program for family caregivers of stroke patients. It also examined the best fit between intervention variant and family caregiver and patient characteristics. van den

  16. Development of a Decision Support System to Predict Physicians' Rehabilitation Protocols for Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Hawamdeh, Ziad M.; Alshraideh, Mohammad A.; Al-Ajlouni, Jihad M.; Salah, Imad K.; Holm, Margo B.; Otom, Ali H.

    2012-01-01

    To design a medical decision support system (MDSS) that would accurately predict the rehabilitation protocols prescribed by the physicians for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) using only their demographic and clinical characteristics. The demographic and clinical variables for 170 patients receiving one of three treatment protocols for knee…

  17. WikiBuild: A New Application to Support Patient and Health Care Professional Involvement in the Development of Patient Support Tools

    2011-01-01

    Active patient and public involvement as partners in their own health care and in the development of health services is key to achieving a health care system that is responsive to patients’ needs and values. It promotes better use of the health care system, and improves health outcomes, quality of life and patient satisfaction. By involving patients and health care professionals as partners in the creation and updating of patient health support tools, wikis—highly accessible, interactive vehicles of communication—have the potential to empower users to implement these support tools in daily life. Acknowledging the potential of wikis, and recognizing that they capitalize on the free and open access to information, scientists, opinion leaders and patient advocates have suggested that wikis could help decision-making constituencies improve the delivery of health care. They might also decrease its cost and improve access to knowledge within developing countries. However, little is known about the efficacy of wikis in helping to attain these goals. There is also a need to know more about the intention of patients and health care workers to use wikis, in what circumstances and what factors will influence their use of wikis. In this issue of the Journal of Medical Internet Research, Gupta et al describe how they developed and tested a new wiki-inspired application to improve asthma care. The researchers involved patients with asthma, primary care physicians, pulmonologists and certified asthma educators in the construction of an asthma action plan. Their paper—entitled “WikiBuild: a new online collaboration process for multistakeholder tool development and consensus building”—is the first description of a wiki-inspired technology built to involve patients and health care professionals in the development of a patient support tool. This innovative study has made important contributions toward how wikis could be generalized to involve multiple stakeholders in

  18. The Glasgow 'Deep End' Links Worker Study Protocol: a quasi-experimental evaluation of a social prescribing intervention for patients with complex needs in areas of high socioeconomic deprivation.

    Mercer, Stewart W; Fitzpatrick, Bridie; Grant, Lesley; Chng, Nai Rui; O'Donnell, Catherine A; Mackenzie, Mhairi; McConnachie, Alex; Bakhshi, Andisheh; Wyke, Sally

    2017-01-01

    'Social prescribing' can be used to link patients with complex needs to local (non-medical) community resources. The 'Deep End' Links Worker Programme is being tested in general practices serving deprived populations in Glasgow, Scotland. To assess the implementation and impact of the intervention at patient and practice levels. Study design : Quasi-experimental outcome evaluation with embedded theory-driven process evaluation in 15 practices randomized to receive the intervention or not. Complex intervention : Comprising a practice development fund, a practice-based community links practitioner (CLP), and management support. It aims to link patients to local community organizations and enhance practices' social prescribing capacity. Study population : For intervention practices, staff and adult patients involved in referral to a CLP, and a sample of community organization staff. For comparison practices, all staff and a random sample of adult patients. Sample size : 286 intervention and 484 comparator patients. Outcomes : Primary patient outcome is health-related quality of life (EQ-5D-5L). Secondary patient outcomes include capacity, depression/anxiety, self-esteem, and healthcare utilization. Practice outcome measures include team climate, job satisfaction, morale, and burnout. Outcomes measured at baseline and 9 months. Processes : Barriers and facilitators to implementation of the programme and possible mechanisms through which outcomes are achieved. Analysis plan : For outcome, intention-to-treat analysis with differences between groups tested using mixed-effects regression models. For process, case-study approach with thematic analysis. This evaluation will provide new evidence about the implementation and impact of social prescribing by general practices serving patients with complex needs living in areas of high deprivation.

  19. Examining the link between patient satisfaction and adherence to HIV care: a structural equation model.

    Dang, Bich N; Westbrook, Robert A; Black, William C; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Giordano, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM), a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey ("Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV?) and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, ("Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?"). A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2) on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported "excellent" adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all psatisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes.

  20. Eye lens dosimetry in interventional cardiology: Results of staff dose measurements and link to patient dose levels

    Antic, V.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Rehani, M.; Aleksandric, S.; Arandjic, D.; Ostojic, M.

    2013-01-01

    Workers involved in interventional cardiology procedures receive high eye lens dose if protection is not used. Currently, there is no suitable method for routine use for the measurement of eye dose. Since most angiography machines are equipped with suitable patient dosemeters, deriving factors linking staff eye doses to the patient doses can be helpful. In this study the patient kerma-area product, cumulative dose at an interventional reference point and eye dose in terms of Hp(3) of the cardiologists, nurses and radiographers for interventional cardiology procedures have been measured. Correlations between the patient dose and the staff eye dose were obtained. The mean eye dose was 121 mSv for the first operator, 33 mSv for the second operator/nurse and 12 mSv for radiographer. Normalised eye lens doses per unit kerma-area product were 0.94 mSv Gy -1 cm -2 for the first operator, 0.33 mSv Gy -1 cm -2 for the second operator/nurse and 0.16 mSv Gy -1 cm -2 for radiographers. Statistical analysis indicated that there is a weak but significant (p < 0.01) correlation between the eye dose and the kerma-area product for all three staff categories. These values are based on a local practice and may provide useful reference for other studies for validation and for wider utilisation in assessing the eye dose using patient dose values. (authors)

  1. Nutritional support of the elderly cancer patient: the role of the nurse.

    Hopkinson, Jane B

    2015-04-01

    Cancer in the geriatric population is a growing problem. Malnutrition is common in cancer. A number of factors increase the risk for malnutrition in older people with cancer, including chronic comorbid conditions and normal physiological changes of aging. Nurses have an important role in the nutritional support of older cancer patients. To contribute to the improvement of nutritional support of these patients, nurses need appropriate training to be able to identify risk for malnutrition and offer a range of interventions tailored to individual need. Factors to consider in tailoring interventions include disease status, cancer site, cancer treatment, comorbidity, physiological age, method of facilitating dietary change, and family support. This article identifies ways in which nurses can contribute to the nutritional support of older cancer patients and thus help mitigate the effects of malnutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impaired Telomere Maintenance and Decreased Canonical WNT Signaling but Normal Ribosome Biogenesis in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from X-Linked Dyskeratosis Congenita Patients.

    Bai-Wei Gu

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis congenita (DC is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by the presence of short telomeres at presentation. Mutations in ten different genes, whose products are involved in the telomere maintenance pathway, have been shown to cause DC. The X-linked form is the most common form of the disease and is caused by mutations in the gene DKC1, encoding the protein dyskerin. Dyskerin is required for the assembly and stability of telomerase and is also involved in ribosomal RNA (rRNA processing where it converts specific uridines to pseudouridine. DC is thought to result from failure to maintain tissues, like blood, that are renewed by stem cell activity, but research into pathogenic mechanisms has been hampered by the difficulty of obtaining stem cells from patients. We reasoned that induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells from X-linked DC patients may provide information about the mechanisms involved. Here we describe the production of iPS cells from DC patients with DKC1 mutations Q31E, A353V and ΔL37. In addition we constructed "corrected" lines with a copy of the wild type dyskerin cDNA expressed from the AAVS1 safe harbor locus. We show that in iPS cells with DKC1 mutations telomere maintenance is compromised with short telomere lengths and decreased telomerase activity. The degree to which telomere lengths are affected by expression of telomerase during reprograming, or with ectopic expression of wild type dyskerin, is variable. The recurrent mutation A353V shows the most severe effect on telomere maintenance. A353V cells but not Q31E or ΔL37 cells, are refractory to correction by expression of wild type DKC1 cDNA. Because dyskerin is involved in both telomere maintenance and ribosome biogenesis it has been postulated that defective ribosome biogenesis and translation may contribute to the disease phenotype. Evidence from mouse and zebra fish models has supported the involvement of ribosome biogenesis but primary cells

  3. Impaired Telomere Maintenance and Decreased Canonical WNT Signaling but Normal Ribosome Biogenesis in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from X-Linked Dyskeratosis Congenita Patients.

    Gu, Bai-Wei; Apicella, Marisa; Mills, Jason; Fan, Jian-Meng; Reeves, Dara A; French, Deborah; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Bessler, Monica; Mason, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by the presence of short telomeres at presentation. Mutations in ten different genes, whose products are involved in the telomere maintenance pathway, have been shown to cause DC. The X-linked form is the most common form of the disease and is caused by mutations in the gene DKC1, encoding the protein dyskerin. Dyskerin is required for the assembly and stability of telomerase and is also involved in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing where it converts specific uridines to pseudouridine. DC is thought to result from failure to maintain tissues, like blood, that are renewed by stem cell activity, but research into pathogenic mechanisms has been hampered by the difficulty of obtaining stem cells from patients. We reasoned that induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from X-linked DC patients may provide information about the mechanisms involved. Here we describe the production of iPS cells from DC patients with DKC1 mutations Q31E, A353V and ΔL37. In addition we constructed "corrected" lines with a copy of the wild type dyskerin cDNA expressed from the AAVS1 safe harbor locus. We show that in iPS cells with DKC1 mutations telomere maintenance is compromised with short telomere lengths and decreased telomerase activity. The degree to which telomere lengths are affected by expression of telomerase during reprograming, or with ectopic expression of wild type dyskerin, is variable. The recurrent mutation A353V shows the most severe effect on telomere maintenance. A353V cells but not Q31E or ΔL37 cells, are refractory to correction by expression of wild type DKC1 cDNA. Because dyskerin is involved in both telomere maintenance and ribosome biogenesis it has been postulated that defective ribosome biogenesis and translation may contribute to the disease phenotype. Evidence from mouse and zebra fish models has supported the involvement of ribosome biogenesis but primary cells from human

  4. Basic vital cardiac support. Training to relatives of patients with acute miocardial infarction

    Brandy Viera Valdés; Paula Aguila Solis; Francisco Valladares Carvajal; Marcos D. Iraola Ferrer; Pablo. A. Rodríguez

    2006-01-01

    Background: Title: Basic vital cardiac support. Training to relatives of patients with acute miocardial infarction. The cardiorespiratory reanimation is a proved procedure that can save a human life in case of a cardiorespiratory stop. For three years it is imparted in the University Hospital of Cienfuegos, a training for this procedure, to the family of patients with sharp myocardic infarction. Objective: To evaluate the knowledge acquired by the relatives of the patients during the training...

  5. Neuro-Oncology Branch patient emotional support services | Center for Cancer Research

    Emotional Support Services The diagnosis of a brain tumor elicits many different and sometimes difficult emotions, not only for the patient, but also for their family members. Patients may encounter changes in cognitive functioning and language, a diminished ability to focus or make decisions, or short-term memory loss, all of which can greatly affect their personal and professional lives. We are dedicated to helping patients and their families deal with the physical and emotional facets of this disease.

  6. Zygoma Implant-Supported Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Patient After Bilateral Maxillectomy.

    Celakil, Tamer; Ayvalioglu, Demet Cagil; Sancakli, Erkan; Atalay, Belir; Doganay, Ozge; Kayhan, Kivanc Bektas

    2015-10-01

    Maxillectomy defects may vary from localized to extensive soft and hard tissue loss. In addition to physical and psychologic damages, functional and aesthetic aspects must be restored. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a patient with a zygoma implant-supported obturator prosthesis caused by a subtotal bilateral maxillectomy due to a squamous oral cell carcinoma. Prosthetic rehabilitation of this patient was performed after zygoma implant surgery. A maxillary obturator prosthesis supported by 2 osseointegrated zygoma implants was fabricated. Despite limited mouth opening and anatomic deficiencies, the patient's aesthetic and functional demands were fulfilled.

  7. Study: Long nursing shifts linked to burnout, job dissatisfaction, negative patient assessments.

    2013-02-01

    While nurses often choose to work 12-hour shifts, there is new evidence that too many of these longer shifts can lead to burnout and job dissatisfaction. Further, a new study suggests that patients are less satisfied with their care when nurses are working longer shifts, and patient outcomes may suffer as well. Experts recommend education around this issue for both staff nurses and nurse managers, and they urge administrators to devise sensible scheduling solutions. A three-year study, involving 23,000 registered nurses from four states, showed that nurses working shifts of 10 hours or longer were up to two and a half times more likely to experience burnout and dissatisfaction with their jobs than nurses working shorter shifts. Also, the study showed that seven out of 10 patient outcomes were adversely impacted by the longest nursing shifts. The Cleveland Clinic's 'parent shift' gives nurses the option of working shifts of six hours or less in exchange for less pay and no benefits. Administrators use these nurses to help their units manage busy hours or patient surges.

  8. Missing link in community psychiatry: When a patient with schizophrenia was expelled from her home

    I-Ming Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Treatment and disposition of homeless patients with schizophrenia represent a great challenge in clinical practice. We report a case of this special population, and discuss the development of homelessness, the difficulty in disposition, their utilization of health services, and possible applications of mandatory community treatment in this group of patients. A 51-year-old homeless female was brought to an emergency department for left femur fracture caused by an assault. She was diagnosed with schizophrenia about 20 years ago but received little help from mental health services over the decades. During hospitalization, her psychotic symptoms were only partially responsive to treatment. Her family refused to handle caretaking duties. The social welfare system was mobilized for long-term disposition. Homeless patients with schizophrenia are characterized by family disruption, poor adherence to health care, and multiple emergency visits and hospitalization. We hope this article can provide information about the current mental health policy to medical personnel. It is possible that earlier intervention and better outcome can be achieved by utilizing mandatory community treatment in the future, as well as preventing patients with schizophrenia from losing shelters.

  9. Association between suicidal ideation and behavior, and depression, anxiety, and perceived social support in cancer patients.

    Balcı Şengül, Melike Ceyhan; Kaya, Vildan; Şen, Cenk Ahmet; Kaya, Kemal

    2014-02-27

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between suicidal behavior and associated factors such as depression, anxiety, and perceived social support level in cancer patients. The study group included 102 patients who were under treatment in the oncology department and the control group included 100 individuals with similar sociodemographic features. A sociodemographic information form, Beck depression inventory, Beck anxiety inventory, suicidal behavior inventory, suicidal ideation inventory, and multidimensional inventory of perceived social support were used. The mean Beck depression inventory and Beck anxiety inventory scores in the study group were significantly higher compared to the control group. Thirteen patients in the study group attempted suicide, whereas 3 individuals attempted suicide in the control group. Similarly, the mean suicide behavior and ideation scores in the study group were significantly higher compared to the control group. The mean total multidimensional inventories of perceived social support score, as well as the mean family and friend sub-inventory scores in the control group were significantly higher compared to the study group. This study revealed that depression and anxiety occur frequently in cancer patients. Suicide attempts and ideation are higher in cancer patients compared to the control group. Social support perceived from family and friends is lower in cancer patients. Suicide attempts are correlated with depression, anxiety, low level of perceived social support, and advanced disease stage.

  10. Withholding and withdrawing of life support from patients with severe head injury.

    O'Callahan, J G; Fink, C; Pitts, L H; Luce, J M

    1995-09-01

    To characterize the withholding or withdrawing of life support from patients with severe head injury. San Francisco General Hospital, a city and county hospital with a Level I trauma center. A standardized questionnaire was used to collect data on demographics and functional outcome of severely head-injured (Glasgow Coma Score of family members. Forty-seven patients who were admitted to a medical-surgical intensive care unit over a 1-yr period. Twenty-four patients had life support withheld or withdrawn, and 23 patients did not. Physician and family separately assessed patient's probable functional outcome, degree of communication between them, reasons important in recommending or deciding on discontinuation of life support, and the result of action taken. Six months later, the families reviewed the process of their decision, how well physician(s) had communicated, and what might have improved communication. Of 24 patients with life support discontinued, 22 died; two were discharged from the hospital. Twenty-three of the 24 patients had a poor prognosis on admission. Of the 23 patients who were continued on life support for the duration of their hospitalization, ten had a poor (p Family's assessment of prognosis agreed with physician's assessment in 22 of the 24 patients from whom life support was discontinued (p families' assessments. Physicians' considerations in recommending limitation of care and families' considerations in making decisions were the same, primarily an inevitably poor prognosis. Neither physician nor families cited cost or availability of care as a deciding factor. Two families disagreed with the recommendation to limit care after initial agreement because the patients' prognosis improved from "likely death" to "vegetative." Care was therefore continued, and both patients remained vegetative 6 months after admission to the hospital and discharge to chronic care facilities. Life support is commonly withheld or withdrawn from patients with severe

  11. Gender-linked impact of epicardial adipose tissue volume in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery or non-coronary valve surgery

    Maimaituxun, Gulinu; Shimabukuro, Michio; Salim, Hotimah Masdan; Tabata, Minoru; Yuji, Daisuke; Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Akasaka, Takeshi; Matsuura, Tomomi; Yagi, Shusuke; Fukuda, Daiju; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Soeki, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Takaki; Tanaka, Masashi; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditional and non-traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) are different between men and women. Gender-linked impact of epicardial adipose tissue volume (EATV) in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) remains unknown. Methods Gender-linked impact of EATV, abdominal fat distribution and other traditional ASCVD risk factors were compared in 172 patients (men: 115; women: 57) who underwent CABG or non-coronary valvular surgery ...

  12. The Kynurenine Pathway: a Proposed Mechanism Linking Diabetes and Periodontal Disease in Diabetic Patients

    Rishabh Kapila; KS Nagesh; Asha R. Iyengar; Subash BV. Adiga

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characte-rized by dysregulation of carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism. Diabetes could result, in part, in activation of tryptophan metabolism. Diabetic patients are more susceptible to gingivitis and periodontitis than healthy subjects. The salivary kynurenine derivatives are also implicated in the onset and development of periodontal dis-ease in humans.The hypothesis: We propose that the tryptophan metabolites via kynurenine path...

  13. Patients' online access to their electronic health records and linked online services: a systematic review in primary care.

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon; Sheikh, Aziz; Majeed, Azeem; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Quinn, Tom; Cavill, Mary; Franco, Christina; Chauhan, Umesh; Blakey, Hannah; Kataria, Neha; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Ellis, Beverley

    2015-03-01

    Online access to medical records by patients can potentially enhance provision of patient-centred care and improve satisfaction. However, online access and services may also prove to be an additional burden for the healthcare provider. To assess the impact of providing patients with access to their general practice electronic health records (EHR) and other EHR-linked online services on the provision, quality, and safety of health care. A systematic review was conducted that focused on all studies about online record access and transactional services in primary care. Data sources included MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EPOC, DARE, King's Fund, Nuffield Health, PsycINFO, OpenGrey (1999-2012). The literature was independently screened against detailed inclusion and exclusion criteria; independent dual data extraction was conducted, the risk of bias (RoB) assessed, and a narrative synthesis of the evidence conducted. A total of 176 studies were identified, 17 of which were randomised controlled trials, cohort, or cluster studies. Patients reported improved satisfaction with online access and services compared with standard provision, improved self-care, and better communication and engagement with clinicians. Safety improvements were patient-led through identifying medication errors and facilitating more use of preventive services. Provision of online record access and services resulted in a moderate increase of e-mail, no change on telephone contact, but there were variable effects on face-to-face contact. However, other tasks were necessary to sustain these services, which impacted on clinician time. There were no reports of harm or breaches in privacy. While the RoB scores suggest many of the studies were of low quality, patients using online services reported increased convenience and satisfaction. These services positively impacted on patient safety, although there were variations of record access and use by specific ethnic and socioeconomic groups

  14. Comparison of electronic health record system functionalities to support the patient recruitment process in clinical trials.

    Schreiweis, Björn; Trinczek, Benjamin; Köpcke, Felix; Leusch, Thomas; Majeed, Raphael W; Wenk, Joachim; Bergh, Björn; Ohmann, Christian; Röhrig, Rainer; Dugas, Martin; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-11-01

    Reusing data from electronic health records for clinical and translational research and especially for patient recruitment has been tackled in a broader manner since about a decade. Most projects found in the literature however focus on standalone systems and proprietary implementations at one particular institution often for only one singular trial and no generic evaluation of EHR systems for their applicability to support the patient recruitment process does yet exist. Thus we sought to assess whether the current generation of EHR systems in Germany provides modules/tools, which can readily be applied for IT-supported patient recruitment scenarios. We first analysed the EHR portfolio implemented at German University Hospitals and then selected 5 sites with five different EHR implementations covering all major commercial systems applied in German University Hospitals. Further, major functionalities required for patient recruitment support have been defined and the five sample EHRs and their standard tools have been compared to the major functionalities. In our analysis of the site's hospital information system environments (with four commercial EHR systems and one self-developed system) we found that - even though no dedicated module for patient recruitment has been provided - most EHR products comprise generic tools such as workflow engines, querying capabilities, report generators and direct SQL-based database access which can be applied as query modules, screening lists and notification components for patient recruitment support. A major limitation of all current EHR products however is that they provide no dedicated data structures and functionalities for implementing and maintaining a local trial registry. At the five sites with standard EHR tools the typical functionalities of the patient recruitment process could be mostly implemented. However, no EHR component is yet directly dedicated to support research requirements such as patient recruitment. We

  15. The impact of a patient support program for multiple sclerosis on patient satisfaction and subjective health status.

    Kohlmann, Thomas; Wang, Cheng; Lipinski, Jens; Hadker, Nandini; Caffrey, Elizabeth; Epstein, Michael; Sadasivan, Ravi; Gondek, Kathleen

    2013-06-01

    Leading multiple sclerosis (MS) therapies have patient support programs (PSPs) aimed at improving patients' lives. There is limited knowledge about what drives patient satisfaction with PSPs and little evidence about its impact on patient-reported health status or health-related quality of life. The aims of this study were to evaluate patient needs and the PSP's role in meeting those needs; understand the drivers of PSP satisfaction and loyalty; and assess whether a MS PSP provides quantifiable, incremental benefit to patients, as measured by patient-reported health status, health state utility, and/or health-related quality of life. An Internet survey was conducted among 1,123 adult German MS patients currently enrolled in Bayer's German BETAPLUS PSP. Health status, health state utility, and health-related quality of life were measured using the EQ-5D Visual Analog Scale, the EQ-5D Index, and Short Form-12 Health Survey, respectively. MS patient needs vary by disease severity, duration of disease, and gender. Patients with greater self-reported needs and lower health status, health state utility, and health-related quality of life value and use the PSP more than other patients. Drivers of PSP satisfaction include use of patient hotline, nurse telephone calls, and mail education. Patients estimate that their health status would be 15 points lower if the PSP ceased to exist (translating to 0.15 on the time trade-off utility scale). This impact is significant, as it is nearly two times the minimally important difference. MS patients place inherent value on PSPs. From a patient's viewpoint, PSPs provide real incremental benefit in patient-reported health status at all stages of MS.

  16. A two-state comparative implementation of peer-support intervention to link veterans to health-related services after incarceration: a study protocol.

    Simmons, Molly M; Fincke, Benjamin G; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Kim, Bo; Byrne, Tom; Smelson, David; Casey, Kevin; Ellison, Marsha L; Visher, Christy; Blue-Howells, Jessica; McInnes, D Keith

    2017-09-12

    Approximately 600,000 persons are released from prison annually in the United States. Relatively few receive sufficient re-entry services and are at risk for unemployment, homelessness, poverty, substance abuse relapse and recidivism. Persons leaving prison who have a mental illness and/or a substance use disorder are particularly challenged. This project aims to create a peer mentor program to extend the reach and effectiveness of reentry services provided by the Department of Veterans' Affairs (VA). We will implement a peer support for reentry veterans sequentially in two states. Our outcome measures are 1) fidelity of the intervention, 2) linkage to VA health care and, 3) continued engagement in health care. The aims for this project are as follows: (1) Conduct contextual analysis to identify VA and community reentry resources, and describe how reentry veterans use them. (2) Implement peer-support, in one state, to link reentry veterans to Veterans' Health Administration (VHA) primary care, mental health, and SUD services. (3) Port the peer-support intervention to another, geographically, and contextually different state. This intervention involves a 2-state sequential implementation study (Massachusetts, followed by Pennsylvania) using a Facilitation Implementation strategy. We will conduct formative and summative analyses, including assessment of fidelity, and a matched comparison group to evaluate the intervention's outcomes of veteran linkage and engagement in VHA health care (using health care utilization measures). The study proceeds in 3 phases. We anticipate that a peer support program will be effective at improving the reentry process for veterans, particularly in linking them to health, mental health, and SUD services and helping them to stay engaged in those services. It will fill a gap by providing veterans with access to a trusted individual, who understands their experience as a veteran and who has experienced justice involvement. The outputs from

  17. Combined Population Dynamics and Entropy Modelling Supports Patient Stratification in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Brehme, Marc; Koschmieder, Steffen; Montazeri, Maryam; Copland, Mhairi; Oehler, Vivian G.; Radich, Jerald P.; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Schuppert, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Modelling the parameters of multistep carcinogenesis is key for a better understanding of cancer progression, biomarker identification and the design of individualized therapies. Using chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) as a paradigm for hierarchical disease evolution we show that combined population dynamic modelling and CML patient biopsy genomic analysis enables patient stratification at unprecedented resolution. Linking CD34+ similarity as a disease progression marker to patient-derived gene expression entropy separated established CML progression stages and uncovered additional heterogeneity within disease stages. Importantly, our patient data informed model enables quantitative approximation of individual patients’ disease history within chronic phase (CP) and significantly separates “early” from “late” CP. Our findings provide a novel rationale for personalized and genome-informed disease progression risk assessment that is independent and complementary to conventional measures of CML disease burden and prognosis.

  18. Study Protocol: Nutritional Support in a Cross-sector Model for the Rehabilitation of Geriatric Patients

    Beck, Anne Marie; Rask, Kø; Leedo, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hospital stays are generally getting shorter which leaves limited time to improve a poor nutritional status for geriatric patients. Therefore, it seems necessary to integrate nutritional support also in the period after discharge. Furthermore, improving cross-sector cooperation...... support to geriatric patients. This may ultimately lead to reduced health care costs, and improvement in mobility, independence and quality of life for geriatric patients at nutritional risk. Trial registration: Clinical Trials.gov NCT01776762....... in the transition of geriatric patients between hospital and home-care institutions is essential to ensure follow-up and completion of hospital (nutritional) treatment and rehabilitation of patients. In spite of many issues, i.e. the multi-morbidity, the reduced level of functioning and the excessive use...

  19. Exploring the breast cancer patient journey: do breast cancer survivors need menopause management support?

    Tanna, Nuttan; Buijs, Helene; Pitkin, Joan

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer survivors can be expected to suffer from menopause symptoms with estrogen deprivation due to cancer treatments, in addition to natural menopause-related estrogen loss. To gain an understanding of what support breast cancer patients have when they suffer from menopausal symptoms, and utilize findings to further inform National Health Service (NHS) care provision for breast cancer survivors. Qualitative study with focus group sessions targeting Caucasian and Asian women with breast cancer. Patient stories, with women describing their breast cancer journey and speaking about support received for any menopausal symptoms. Thematic data analysis of transcription. Breast cancer patients were not sure if they had menopausal symptoms or whether this was due to their breast cancer condition or treatment. Patients had an attitude of acceptance of menopausal symptoms and reported trying to cope with these by themselves. This research identifies a need for more information that is culturally sensitive on managing menopause symptoms, both as side-effects of breast cancer treatments as well as for affect on quality of life during the survivorship phase. Our work also gives insight into cultural remedies used for hot flushes by Asian patients, which they consider as 'cooling' foods. Breast cancer patients want to know whether side-effects of cancer treatment persist long term and how these can be managed. There is a need for improved patient support within any new NHS service models that are developed along breast cancer patient pathways, and inclusion of personalized advice for menopause symptoms.

  20. Telemedicine support to patients with chronic diseases for better long-term control at home

    Drago Rudel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Authors in many scientific publications suggest that the telemonitoring of health parameters is a useful tool for supporting patients with long-term conditions staying at home and their self-management of the disease. Those patients are likely to benefit from timely and adequate response to deteriorated conditions detected by the telemedicine system. Almost all of the studies state that telemedicine provided as telemonitoring can be an effective add-on tool in the hands of patients and medical experts for the self-management of patients with, for example, heart failure or diabetes. In this paper the principles of patient telemonitoring are presented as applied within a telemedicine service provided by the Centre for Telehealth (CEZAR at the General Hospital Slovenj Gradec (Slovenia. The centre supports patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and/or with chronic congestive heart failure. The service was set-up in 2014 as part of a European project called UNITED4HEALTH. Since then over 550 patients from the Carinthia and Saleška regions (Slovenia have been receiving telemedicine support for more than two years. The clinical outcomes of the telemedicine service published elsewhere prove that the selected telemedicine service model is adequate and the implemented technological solution is acceptable for all service users: the patients and the clinicians.

  1. Palateless custom bar supported overdenture: a treatment modality to treat patient with severe gag reflex.

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Gupta, Nidhi

    2012-01-01

    To suggest a custom bar supported overdenture treatment modality for prosthodontic management of patients with severe gag reflex. Some patients have a severe gag reflex and cannot tolerate conventional maxillary complete dentures with maximum palatal coverage and extensions of all borders. The condition further gets complicated in patients suffering from respiratory problems along with severe gag reflex. Severe gagging acts as a barrier to treat such patients with accepted clinical procedures and prevent patients from wearing the prosthesis. By saving some of the remaining natural teeth and fabricating, a horse shoe shape palateless simple tooth or bar supported overdenture can be successfully used for treating such patients. The remaining maxillary right and left canines were prepared with the tapered round end diamond bur to receive copings of custom bar after intentional root canal treatment of same teeth. Impression was made with light body and putty of the polyvinyl siloxane elastomer with double step putty wash technique. Impression was poured with die stone. Wax pattern of copings with bar was fabricated with inlay wax which was invested and casted. After retrieving the bar, it was finished and its fit was evaluated. The coping-bar assembly was finally cemented with the glass ionomer cement. Palateless overdenture was fabricated by conventional technique used for the fabrication of complete denture. Palateless custom bar supported overdenture procedure can be successfully used for the management of patients with severe gag reflex with improved denture retention, stability, chewing efficiency and comfort of the patient.

  2. Impact of family support on psychiatric disorders and seizure control in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Jayalakshmi, Sita; Padmaja, Gaddamanugu; Vooturi, Sudhindra; Bogaraju, Anand; Surath, Mohandas

    2014-08-01

    Psychiatric disorders (PDs) are frequently observed in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). In this study, we aimed to assess factors associated with PDs in patients with JME. Retrospective analysis of data of 90 consecutive patients with JME was performed. Assessment of DSM-IV Axis I clinical disorders was done using Structured Clinical Interview for Axis I. Diagnosis of PDs is made when the score exceeds the threshold provided by the DSM-IV. We also applied the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale which is part of the multiaxial evaluation of the DSM-IV (Axis-V). Using seizure frequency score at presentation, we classified subjects into controlled and uncontrolled groups. In the current cohort, 29 (32.2%) patients were diagnosed with PDs. Fewer patients with PDs had family support (48.3% vs. 83.6%; p=0.001). Lifetime prevalence of PDs was higher among patients with current PDs (96.6% vs. 18.0%; pseizure control (7.8% vs. 73.1%; pseizure control. Patients with lack of family support had poor seizure control (0% vs. 36.9%; pseizure control and higher incidence of PDs in patients with JME. Lack of family support increases neither the odds of PDs nor seizure control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Proposal of a conceptual method of supportive care for co-active patients].

    Abidli, Yamine; Piette, Danielle; Casini, Annalisa

    2015-01-01

    There is a broad consensus on the importance for health professionals to support co-active patients. However, in practice, very few "patient care partnership" approaches have been developed. We hypothesized that the lack of investment in supporting patient care partnerships is due to the lack of interest in the skills needed by caregivers to provide such support. This paper intends to address thisgap. The patient care partnership method is studied, adapted and developed from existing models. It complements, harmonizes and integrates various schools of thought arising from the need to place the patient at the center of care and life in general. The patient care partnership method includes 7 stages during which the professional accompanies the patient through the process of care. The methodological approach for training professionals is designed to ensure that professionals experience the change as well as its difficulties of the change they expect from the patient in the care relationship. This method now needs to be validated by the experience of other professionals in order define the limits of application and to allow further development.

  4. Integrating emotional and psychological support into the end-stage renal disease pathway: a protocol for mixed methods research to identify patients' lower-level support needs and how these can most effectively be addressed.

    Taylor, Francesca; Taylor, Celia; Baharani, Jyoti; Nicholas, Johann; Combes, Gill

    2016-08-02

    As a result of difficulties related to their illness, diagnosis and treatment, patients with end-stage renal disease experience significant emotional and psychological problems, which untreated can have considerable negative impact on their health and wellbeing. Despite evidence that patients desire improved support, management of their psychosocial problems, particularly at the lower-level, remains sub-optimal. There is limited understanding of the specific support that patients need and want, from whom, and when, and also a lack of data on what helps and hinders renal staff in identifying and responding to their patients' support needs, and how barriers to doing so might be overcome. Through this research we therefore seek to determine what, when, and how, support for patients with lower-level emotional and psychological problems should be integrated into the end-stage renal disease pathway. The research will involve two linked, multicentre studies, designed to identify and consider the perspectives of patients at five different stages of the end-stage renal disease pathway (Study 1), and renal staff working with them (Study 2). A convergent, parallel mixed methods design will be employed for both studies, with quantitative and qualitative data collected separately. For each study, the data sets will be analysed separately and the results then compared or combined using interpretive analysis. A further stage of synthesis will employ data-driven thematic analysis to identify: triangulation and frequency of themes across pathway stages; patterns and plausible explanations of effects. There is an important need for this research given the high frequency of lower-level distress experienced by end-stage renal disease patients and lack of progress to date in integrating support for their lower-level psychosocial needs into the care pathway. Use of a mixed methods design across the two studies will generate a holistic patient and healthcare professional perspective that

  5. PERCEPTION OF PATIENTS ON ART ABOUT THE SERVICES AVAILED AT LINK ART CENTERS IN SELECTED STATES OF INDIA

    Ruchi Sogarwal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study was attempted to assess the perception of patients on ART about the services availed at Link ART Centers (LAC in selected states of India. Methods: A total of 354 PLHAs were selected from 20 systematic randomly selected LACs from Gujarat, Maharashtra, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh. Results: Study reveals that majority (97% of the patients seeking services from LACs made regular visits to the center. It was found that 57 percent of the patients had spent less than 100 rupees during the last visit. More than 95 percent of the clients reported waiting time less than 30 minutes for availing counseling and collection of drugs at LACs. The mean±SD score of patient’s level of satisfaction with the services availed at LACs is 4.7±0.5. Conclusions: Study concludes that while majority of the patients were satisfied with the services at LACs, there is need of strengthening the existing ‘package’ of services in these centers and expand the network across the country.

  6. PERCEPTION OF PATIENTS ON ART ABOUT THE SERVICES AVAILED AT LINK ART CENTERS IN SELECTED STATES OF INDIA

    Ruchi Sogarwal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study was attempted to assess the perception of patients on ART about the services availed at Link ART Centers (LAC in selected states of India. Methods: A total of 354 PLHAs were selected from 20 systematic randomly selected LACs from Gujarat, Maharashtra, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh. Results: Study reveals that majority (97% of the patients seeking services from LACs made regular visits to the center. It was found that 57 percent of the patients had spent less than 100 rupees during the last visit. More than 95 percent of the clients reported waiting time less than 30 minutes for availing counseling and collection of drugs at LACs. The mean±SD score of patient’s level of satisfaction with the services availed at LACs is 4.7±0.5. Conclusions: Study concludes that while majority of the patients were satisfied with the services at LACs, there is need of strengthening the existing ‘package’ of services in these centers and expand the network across the country.

  7. New mutations of DAX-1 genes in two Japanese patients with X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    Yanase, Toshihiko; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Oba, Koichi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    Congenital adrenal hypoplasia, an X-linked disorder, is characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency and frequent association with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The X-chromosome gene DAX-1 has been most recently identified and shown to be responsible for this disorder. We analyzed the DAX-1 genes of two unrelated Japanese patients with congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism by using PCR amplification of genomic DNA and its complete exonic sequencing. In a family containing several affected individuals, the proband male patient had a stop codon (TGA) in place of tryptophan (TGG) at amino acid position 171. As expected, his mother was a heterozygous carrier for the mutation, whereas his father and unaffected brother did not carry this mutation. In another male patient with noncontributory family history, sequencing revealed a 1-bp (T) deletion at amino acid position 280, leading to a frame shift and, subsequently a premature stop codon at amino acid position 371. The presence of this mutation in the patients` genome was further confirmed by digestion of genomic PCR product with MspI created by this mutation. Family studies using MspI digestion of genomic PCR products revealed that neither parent of this individual carried the mutation. These results clearly indicate that congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism result from not only inherited but also de novo mutation in the DAX-1 gene. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Application of spiral nasointestinal tube in enteral nutrition support for patients with extensive burn

    Lai-Ping Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effect of spiral nasointestinal tube on enteral nutrition support in patients with extensive burn. Methods: A total of 60 patients with extensive burn who were admitted in our hospital from January, 2014 to June, 2015 were included in the study and divided into the observation group and the control group with 30 cases in each group according to different catheter indwelling methods. The patients in the observation group were given spiral nasointestinal tube for enteral nutrition support, while the patients in the control group were given routine gastric tube for enteral nutrition support. The nutrition status and the occurrence rate of complications before catheter indwelling, 3, 6, and 10 d after catheter indwelling in the two groups were recorded. Results: The levels of ALB, HB, PA, and Scr 6, 10 d after catheter indwelling in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05. The occurrence rate of complications during the treatment period in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: The spiral nasointestinal tube can provide the patients with extensive burn a better effective enteral nutrition support and improve the nutrition support, with a lower occurrence rate of complications, which is beneficial for the patients’ rehabilitation.

  9. Nutrition support team management of enterally fed patients in a community hospital is cost-beneficial.

    Hassell, J T; Games, A D; Shaffer, B; Harkins, L E

    1994-09-01

    To determine whether nutrition support team (NST) management of enterally fed patients is cost-beneficial and to compare primary outcomes of care between team and nonteam management. A quasi-experimental study was conducted over a 7-month period. A 400-bed community hospital. A convenience sample of 136 subjects who had received enteral nutrition support for at least 24 hours. Forty-two patients died; only their mortality data were used. Ninety-six patients completed the study. Outcomes, including cost, for enterally fed patients in two treatment groups--those managed by the nutrition support team and those managed by nonteam staff--were compared. Severity of illness level was determined for patients managed by the nutrition support team and those managed by nonteam staff. For each group, the following measures were adjusted to reflect a significant difference in average severity of illness and then compared: length of hospital stay, readmission rates, and mortality rates. Complication rates between the groups were also compared. The cost benefit was determined based on savings from the reduction in adjusted length of hospital stay. Parametric and nonparametric statistics were used to evaluate outcomes between the two groups. Differences were statistically significant for both severity of illness, which was at a higher level in the nutrition support team group (P group (P team-managed group, there was a 23% reduction in adjusted mortality rate, an 11.6% reduction in the adjusted length of hospital stay, and a 43% reduction in adjusted readmission rate. Cost-benefit analysis revealed that for every $1 invested in nutrition support team management, a benefit of $4.20 was realized. Financial and humanitarian benefits are associated with nutrition support team management of enterally fed hospitalized patients.

  10. Home noninvasive ventilatory support for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : patient selection and perspectives

    Storre, Jan Hendrik; Callegari, Jens; Magnet, Friederike Sophie; Schwarz, Sarah Bettina; Duiverman, Marieke Leontine; Wijkstra, Peter Jan; Windisch, Wolfram

    2018-01-01

    Long-term or home mechanical noninvasive ventilation (Home-NIV) has become a well-established form of therapy over the last few decades for chronic hypercapnic COPD patients in European countries. However, meta-analyses and clinical guidelines do not recommend Home-NIV for COPD patients on a routine

  11. Mediastinal neoplasms in patients with Graves disease: a possible link between sustained hyperthyroidism and thymic neoplasia?

    Boyd Jonathan D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anterior mediastinal masses are a rare but well documented finding in Graves disease. The vast majority of these lesions represents benign thymic hypertrophy and regress after treatment of the hyperthyroidism. A small percentage of these cases however represent neoplastic/malignant diseases which require further treatment. Cases 12 year old boy with one year history of refractory Graves disease was found to have an anterior mediastinal mass and underwent curative thyroidectomy for sustained hyperthyroidism. Cervical lymphadenopathy was detected during the procedure and biopsy was obtained. A 23 year old woman who presented with a one month history of hyperthyroid symptoms, was diagnosed with Graves disease and also was found to have an anterior mediastinal mass on imaging. Biopsy of the anterior mediastinal mass was obtained and subsequently the patient underwent robotic thymectomy. Histologic examination and immunophenotyping of the cervical lymph node in a 12 year old boy revealed neoplastic proliferation of T lymphoblasts diagnostic of T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma. Examination of the anterior mediastinal mass biopsy in the 23 year old woman revealed type B1 thymoma which was confirmed after examination of the subsequent robotic thymectomy specimen. Conclusion This is the first reported case of T cell lymphoblastic lymphoma and the third reported case of thymoma associated with sustained hyperthyroidism due to Graves disease. These cases indicate that an anterior mediastinal mass in a patient with active Graves disease may be due to a neoplastic cause, which may require definitive treatment. Caution should be exercised when dismissing a mediastinal mass as benign thymic hyperplasia in patients with active Graves disease.

  12. Economic Evaluation of Implant-Supported Overdentures in Edentulous Patients: A Systematic Review.

    Zhang, Qi; Jin, Xin; Yu, Mengliu; Ou, Guoming; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Liang, Xing; Sasaki, Keiichi

    Edentulous patients benefit significantly from implant-supported overdenture prostheses. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of implant-supported overdentures (IODs) for edentulous patients. The search was limited to studies written in English and included an electronic and manual search through MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to November 2015), Embase (Ovid, 1966 to November 2015), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (to November 2015), and PubMed (to November 2015). Two investigators extracted the data and assessed the studies independently. No meta-analysis was conducted due to the high heterogeneity within the literature. Of the initial 583 selected articles, 10 studies involving 802 participants were included. Of these, 6 studies had a high risk of bias and the rest had an unclear risk of bias. Implant-supported prostheses were more cost-effective when compared to conventional dentures and fixed implant-supported prostheses. Overdentures supported by two implants and magnet attachment were reported as cost-effective. Implant-supported overdentures are a cost-effective treatment for edentulous patients. More clinical studies with appropriate scientific vigor are required to further assess the cost-effectiveness of implant-supported overdentures.

  13. Evaluation of the quality of patient information to support informed shared decision-making.

    Godolphin, W; Towle, A; McKendry, R

    2001-12-01

    (a) To find out how much patient information material on display in family physicians' offices refers to management choices, and hence may be useful to support informed and shared decision-making (ISDM) by patients and (b) to evaluate the quality of print information materials exchanged during the consultation, i.e. brought in by patients or given out by family physicians. All print information available for patients and exchanged between physicians and patients was collected in a single complete day of the office practices of 21 family physicians. A published and validated instrument (DISCERN) was used to assess quality. Community office practices in the greater Vancouver area, British Columbia, Canada. The physicians were purposefully recruited by their association with the medical school Department of Family Practice, their interest in providing patients with print information and their representation of a range of practice types and location. The source of the pamphlets and these categories: available in the physicians' offices; exchanged between physician and patient; and produced with the explicit or apparent intent to support evidence-based patient choice. The quality of the print information to support ISDM, as measured by DISCERN and the ease of use and reliability of the DISCERN tool. Fewer than 50% of pamphlets available in these offices fulfilled our minimum criteria for ISDM (mentioned more than one management option). Offices varied widely in the proportion of pamphlets on display that supported ISDM and how particular the physician was in selecting materials. The DISCERN tool is quick, valid and reliable for the evaluation of patient information. The quality of patient information materials used in the consultation and available in these offices was below midpoint on the DISCERN score. Major deficiencies were with respect to the mention of choices, risks, effect of no treatment or uncertainty and reliability (source, evidence-base). Good quality

  14. Effects of Natural Sounds on Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation Support.

    Saadatmand, Vahid; Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Tadrisi, Sayed Davood; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jordan, Sue

    2015-08-01

    Nonpharmacologic pain management in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support in critical care units is under investigated. Natural sounds may help reduce the potentially harmful effects of anxiety and pain in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of pleasant, natural sounds on self-reported pain in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support, using a pragmatic parallel-arm, randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a general adult intensive care unit of a high-turnover teaching hospital, in Tehran, Iran. Between October 2011 and June 2012, we recruited 60 patients receiving mechanical ventilation support to the intervention (n = 30) and control arms (n = 30) of a pragmatic parallel-group, randomized controlled trial. Participants in both arms wore headphones for 90 minutes. Those in the intervention arm heard pleasant, natural sounds, whereas those in the control arm heard nothing. Outcome measures included the self-reported visual analog scale for pain at baseline; 30, 60, and 90 minutes into the intervention; and 30 minutes post-intervention. All patients approached agreed to participate. The trial arms were similar at baseline. Pain scores in the intervention arm fell and were significantly lower than in the control arm at each time point (p natural sounds via headphones is a simple, safe, nonpharmacologic nursing intervention that may be used to allay pain for up to 120 minutes in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Internalized Stigma and Perceived Family Support in Acute Psychiatric In-Patient Units.

    Korkmaz, Gülçin; Küçük, Leyla

    2016-02-01

    This descriptive study aims to identify the relationship between internalized stigma and perceived family support in patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric unit. The sample is composed of 224 patients treated in an acute inpatient psychiatric ward in İstanbul, Turkey. The data were collected using information obtained from the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale and Social Support from Family Scale. The mean age of the patients was 37±11.56years, and the mean duration of treatment was 6.27±5.81years. Most patients had been hospitalized three or more times. Of the total number of patients, 66.1% had been taken to the hospital by family members. We noted a statistically significant negative correlation between the total scores obtained from the perceived Social Support from Family Scale and the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale. The patients were observed to stigmatize themselves more when the perceived social support from their family had decreased. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Corneal collagen cross-linking for progressive keratoconus in patients aged 9 to 14

    Fernando Plazzi Palis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO Objetivo: Determinar a segurança e eficácia do cross-linking corneano (CXL em pacientes de 9 a 14 anos de idade com ceratocone progressivo. Métodos: Dezesseis olhos de onze pacientes (8 homens e 3 mulheres com ceratocone progressivo foram submetidos ao CXL, de acordo com o protocolo padrão de Dresden. A média do tempo de seguimento foi de 26 meses (variando de 12 a 60 meses. Os exames pré e pós-operatórios incluíram: acuidade visual sem correção (AVSC, melhor acuidade visual com correção (AVCC, topografia corneana, tonometria, refração, paquimetria corneana, e contagem de células endoteliais. Resultados: Na última visita de acompanhamento ambulatorial, a AVCC melhorou pelo menos uma linha na tabela de Snellen em 6 olhos (37,5% e permaneceu estável em 9 olhos (56,25%. Dois olhos (12,5% de pacientes que coçam os olhos com frequência, exigiram retratamento devido à progressão do ceratocone, 15 e 28 meses após o primeiro CXL. A refração e contagem de células endoteliais mantiveram-se estáveis. Os resultados topográficos mostraram melhora estatisticamente significativa nos valores do K máximo até dois anos após o CXL. No entanto, houve perda de significância ao longo do tempo. Nenhuma complicação peroperatória foi observada. Dois olhos (12,5% apresentaram haze grau I, que regrediu após um mês de terapia com esteróide tópico. Conclusão: Neste estudo com pacientes selecionados, de 9 a 14 anos de idade, o CXL mostrou ser uma opção segura e eficaz para o tratamento do ceratocone progressivo. No entanto, o efeito pode não ser duradouro, podendo ser necessário um novo tratamento. Maior amostragem e maior seguimento são necessários para verificar esta tendência.

  17. Impaired Muscle Oxygenation and Elevated Exercise Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients: Links With Vascular Stiffness.

    Dipla, Konstantina; Triantafyllou, Areti; Koletsos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Stavros; Sachpekidis, Vasileios; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Gkaliagkousi, Eugenia; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Douma, Stella

    2017-08-01

    This study examined in vivo (1) skeletal muscle oxygenation and microvascular function, at rest and during handgrip exercise, and (2) their association with macrovascular function and exercise blood pressure (BP), in newly diagnosed, never-treated patients with hypertension and normotensive individuals. Ninety-one individuals (51 hypertensives and 40 normotensives) underwent office and 24-hour ambulatory BP, arterial stiffness, and central aortic BP assessment, followed by a 5-minute arterial occlusion and a 3-minute submaximal handgrip exercise. Changes in muscle oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and tissue oxygen saturation were continuously monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy and beat-by-beat BP by Finapres. Hypertensives had higher ( P age and body mass index (BMI) adjusted). When exercising at the same submaximal intensity, hypertensives required a significantly greater ( P hypertension exhibit prominent reductions in in vivo indices of skeletal muscle oxidative capacity, suggestive of mitochondrial dysfunction, and blunted muscle microvascular reactivity. These dysfunctions were associated with higher aortic systolic BP and arterial stiffness. Dysregulations in muscle oxygen delivery/utilization and microvascular stiffness, in hypertensive patients, partially contribute to their exaggerated BP during exercise. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Faulty Suppression of Irrelevant Material in Patients with Thought Disorder Linked to Attenuated Frontotemporal Activation

    S. M. Arcuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Formal thought disorder is a feature schizophrenia that manifests as disorganized, incoherent speech, and is associated with a poor clinical outcome. The neurocognitive basis of this symptom is unclear but it is thought to involve an impairment in semantic processing classically described as a loosening of meaningful associations. Using a paradigm derived from the n400 event-related, potential, we examined the extent to which regional activation during semantic processing is altered in schizophrenic patients with formal thought disorder. Ten healthy control and 18 schizophrenic participants (9 with and 9 without formal thought disorder performed a semantic decision sentence task during an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. We employed analysis of variance to estimate the main effects of semantic congruency and groups on activation and specific effects of formal thought disorder were addressed using post-hoc comparisons. We found that the frontotemporal network, normally engaged by a semantic decision task, was underactivated in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with FTD. This network is implicated in the inhibition of automatically primed stimuli and impairment of its function interferes with language processing and contributes to the production of incoherent speech.

  19. Geriatric Patient Safety Indicators Based on Linked Administrative Health Data to Assess Anticoagulant-Related Thromboembolic and Hemorrhagic Adverse Events in Older Inpatients: A Study Proposal.

    Le Pogam, Marie-Annick; Quantin, Catherine; Reich, Oliver; Tuppin, Philippe; Fagot-Campagna, Anne; Paccaud, Fred; Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle; Burnand, Bernard

    2017-05-11

    Frail older people with multiple interacting conditions, polypharmacy, and complex care needs are particularly exposed to health care-related adverse events. Among these, anticoagulant-related thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events are particularly frequent and serious in older inpatients. The growing use of anticoagulants in this population and their substantial risk of toxicity and inefficacy have therefore become an important patient safety and public health concern worldwide. Anticoagulant-related adverse events and the quality of anticoagulation management should thus be routinely assessed to improve patient safety in vulnerable older inpatients. This project aims to develop and validate a set of outcome and process indicators based on linked administrative health data (ie, insurance claims data linked to hospital discharge data) assessing older inpatient safety related to anticoagulation in both Switzerland and France, and enabling comparisons across time and among hospitals, health territories, and countries. Geriatric patient safety indicators (GPSIs) will assess anticoagulant-related adverse events. Geriatric quality indicators (GQIs) will evaluate the management of anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of arterial or venous thromboembolism in older inpatients. GPSIs will measure cumulative incidences of thromboembolic and bleeding adverse events based on hospital discharge data linked to insurance claims data. Using linked administrative health data will improve GPSI risk adjustment on patients' conditions that are present at admission and will capture in-hospital and postdischarge adverse events. GQIs will estimate the proportion of index hospital stays resulting in recommended anticoagulation at discharge and up to various time frames based on the same electronic health data. The GPSI and GQI development and validation process will comprise 6 stages: (1) selection and specification of candidate indicators, (2) definition of administrative data

  20. Do improved patient recall and the provision of memory support enhance treatment adherence?

    Dong, Lu; Lee, Jason Y; Harvey, Allison G

    2017-03-01

    Patient adherence to psychosocial treatment is an important but understudied topic. The aim of this study was to examine whether better patient recall of treatment contents and therapist use of memory support (MS) were associated with better treatment adherence. Data were drawn from a pilot randomized controlled trial. Participants were 48 individuals (mean age = 44.27 years, 29 females) with Major Depressive Disorder randomized to receive either Cognitive Therapy (CT) with an adjunctive Memory Support Intervention (CT + Memory Support) or CT-as-usual. Therapist and patient ratings of treatment adherence were collected during each treatment session. Patient recall was assessed at mid-treatment. Therapist use of MS was manually coded for a random selection of sessions. Patient recall was significantly associated with better therapist and patient ratings of adherence. Therapist use of Application, a specific MS strategy, predicted higher therapist ratings of adherence. Attention Recruitment, another specific MS strategy, appeared to attenuate the positive impact of session number on patient ratings of adherence. Treatment groups, MS summary scores and other specific MS strategies were not significantly associated with adherence. The measure for treatment adherence is in the process of being formally validated. Results were based on small sample. These results support the importance of patient recall in treatment adherence. Although collectively the effects of MS on treatment adherence were not significant, the results support the use of certain specific MS strategy (i.e., application) as a potential pathway to improve treatment adherence. Larger-scale studies are needed to further examine these constructs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Loneliness, depression, and social support of patients with cancer and their caregivers.

    Şahin, Zümrüt Akgün; Tan, Mehtap

    2012-04-01

    Loneliness is a significant psychosocial concern for patients with cancer, and depression may be an antecedent to loneliness. To date, no studies have directly addressed the relationship of loneliness, depression, and social support among Turkish patients with cancer and their caregivers. The emotional responses that result from a cancer diagnosis vary and may include anxiety, anger, frustration, or depression. Because of the unexpected demands and emotions thrust on them, the caregivers of patients with cancer may be just as likely to experience loneliness or depression following a cancer diagnosis. As a result, this study sought to examine that relationship among a sample of 60 patients with cancer and 60 caregivers.

  2. Modeling posttraumatic growth among cancer patients: The roles of social support, appraisals, and adaptive coping.

    Cao, Weidan; Qi, Xiaona; Cai, Deborah A; Han, Xuanye

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to build a model to explain the relationships between social support, uncontrollability appraisal, adaptive coping, and posttraumatic growth (PTG) among cancer patients in China. The participants who were cancer patients in a cancer hospital in China filled out a survey. The final sample size was 201. Structural equation modeling was used to build a model explaining PTG. Structural equation modeling results indicated that higher levels of social support predicted higher levels of adaptive coping, higher levels of uncontrollability appraisal predicted lower levels of adaptive coping, and higher levels of adaptive coping predicted higher levels of PTG. Moreover, adaptive coping was a mediator between social support and growth, as well as a mediator between uncontrollability and growth. The direct effects of social support and uncontrollability on PTG were insignificant. The model demonstrated the relationships between social support, uncontrollability appraisal, adaptive coping, and PTG. It could be concluded that uncontrollability appraisal was a required but not sufficient condition for PTG. Neither social support nor uncontrollability appraisal had direct influence on PTG. However, social support and uncontrollability might indirectly influence PTG, through adaptive coping. It implies that both internal factors (eg, cognitive appraisal and coping) and external factors (eg, social support) are required in order for growth to happen. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Ways of coping with stress and perceived social support in gynecologic cancer patients.

    Yilmaz, Sema Dereli; Bal, Meltem Demirgöz; Beji, Nezihe Kzlkaya; Arvas, Macit

    2015-01-01

    Stress is commonly encountered among cancer patients and may be a challenge affecting immune system resistance. Social support may contribute positively to the health of cancer patients, playing a role in coping with stress. The aim of this study was to determine whether ways of coping are related to social support given to women with gynecologic cancer. The study was performed as a cross-sectional design in a university hospital in Istanbul, Turkey, with 221 women with gynecologic cancer; the data were collected via 3 questionnaires, the first with sociodemographic and clinical features, the second with multidimensional scale of perceived social support, and the third with the scale of ways of coping with stress. Women with gynecologic cancer who were employed and declared their incomes as balanced and reported more years of education were more likely to perceive higher social support and to use the ineffective coping ways with stress at a lower rate (P perceived social support from family, friends, significant other, and total increases (P support from family members is the mainstay of coping with stress by women with gynecologic cancer. Nurses are indispensable in increasing social support required by women with gynecologic cancer. Well-trained clinical nurses via in-service programs should be experienced and aware of women diagnosed with gynecologic cancer in need of social support during hospital visits and provide necessary guidance.

  4. X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED): clinical and diagnostic insights from an international patient registry.

    Fete, Mary; Hermann, Julie; Behrens, Jeffrey; Huttner, Kenneth M

    2014-10-01

    The web-based Ectodermal Dysplasia International Registry (EDIR) is a comprehensive patient-reported survey contributing to an understanding of ectodermal dysplasia (ED). XLHED is the most common of the genetic ED syndromes and was the primary diagnosis reported by 223/835 respondents (141 males and 82 females). Overall, 96% of XLHED registrants reported as least one other affected family member and 21% reported a family history of infant or childhood deaths, consistent with the published mortality data in this disorder. In general, XLHED is diagnosed by the triad of decreased sweating, reduced hair, and hypodontia (present in 89%, 74%, and 74% of XLHED respondents). Additionally, the registry dataset confirmed a spectrum of life-long XLHED clinical complications including recurrent sinus infections (49% males, 52% females), nasal congestion often foul smelling and interfering with feeding (73% males, 27% females), eczema (66% males, 40% females), wheezing (66% males, 45% females), and a hoarse, raspy voice (67% males, 23% females). The Registry results also highlighted features consistently differentiating XLHED from the non-hypohidrotic ED syndromes including the frequency of infant/childhood deaths, the presence of limb/digit abnormalities, feeding issues related to nasal discharge, dentures, and a diagnosis of asthma. These results represent the largest collection of data on a broad-spectrum of health-related issues affecting ED patients. This project provides information for expanding knowledge of the natural history of XLHED, and as such may facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of its varied and lifelong medical challenges. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Galectin-3: A Link between Myocardial and Arterial Stiffening in Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure?

    Lala, Radu Ioan; Darabantiu, Dan; Pilat, Luminita; Puschita, Maria

    2016-02-01

    Heart failure is accompanied by abnormalities in ventricular-vascular interaction due to increased myocardial and arterial stiffness. Galectin-3 is a recently discovered biomarker that plays an important role in myocardial and vascular fibrosis and heart failure progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether galectin-3 is correlated with arterial stiffening markers and impaired ventricular-arterial coupling in decompensated heart failure patients. A total of 79 inpatients with acute decompensated heart failure were evaluated. Serum galectin-3 was determined at baseline, and during admission, transthoracic echocardiography and measurements of vascular indices by Doppler ultrasonography were performed. Elevated pulse wave velocity and low arterial carotid distensibility are associated with heart failure in patients with preserved ejection fraction (p = 0.04, p = 0.009). Pulse wave velocity, carotid distensibility and Young's modulus did not correlate with serum galectin-3 levels. Conversely, raised galectin-3 levels correlated with an increased ventricular-arterial coupling ratio (Ea/Elv) p = 0.047, OR = 1.9, 95% CI (1.0‑3.6). Increased galectin-3 levels were associated with lower rates of left ventricular pressure rise in early systole (dp/dt) (p=0.018) and raised pulmonary artery pressure (p = 0.046). High galectin-3 levels (p = 0.038, HR = 3.07) and arterial pulmonary pressure (p = 0.007, HR = 1.06) were found to be independent risk factors for all-cause mortality and readmissions. This study showed no significant correlation between serum galectin-3 levels and arterial stiffening markers. Instead, high galectin-3 levels predicted impaired ventricular-arterial coupling. Galectin-3 may be predictive of raised pulmonary artery pressures. Elevated galectin-3 levels correlate with severe systolic dysfunction and together with pulmonary hypertension are independent markers of outcome.

  6. Gender Differences in Perceived Social Support and Stressful Life Events in Depressed Patients.

    Soman, S; Bhat, S M; Latha, K S; Praharaj, S K

    2016-03-01

    To study the gender differences in perceived social support and life events in patients with depression. A total of 118 patients aged 18 to 60 years, with depressive disorder according to the DSM-IV-TR, were evaluated using the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and Presumptive Stressful Life Events Scale. The perceived social support score was significantly higher in males than females (p friends than females (p life events as well as specific type of life events in males that became apparent after controlling for education (p life event in both males and females. Work-related problems were more commonly reported by males, whereas family and marital conflict were more frequently reported by females. Perceived social support and stressful life events were higher in males with depression than females.

  7. Initiation of nutritional support is delayed in critically ill obese patients: a multicenter cohort study.

    Borel, Anne-Laure; Schwebel, Carole; Planquette, Benjamin; Vésin, Aurélien; Garrouste-Orgeas, Maité; Adrie, Christophe; Clec'h, Christophe; Azoulay, Elie; Souweine, Bertrand; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Jamali, Samir; Darmon, Michael; Timsit, Jean-François

    2014-09-01

    A high catabolic rate characterizes the acute phase of critical illness. Guidelines recommend an early nutritional support, regardless of the previous nutritional status. We aimed to assess whether the nutritional status of patients, which was defined by the body mass index (BMI) at admission in an intensive care unit (ICU), affected the time of nutritional support initiation. We conducted a cohort study that reported a retrospective analysis of a multicenter ICU database (OUTCOMEREA) by using data prospectively entered from January 1997 to October 2012. Patients who needed orotracheal intubation within the first 72 h and >3 d were included. Data from 3257 ICU stays were analyzed. The delay before feeding was different according to BMI groups (P = 0.035). The delay was longer in obese patients [BMI (in kg/m²) ≥30; n = 663] than in other patients with either low weight (BMI nutritional status and a delay in nutrition initiation was independent of potential confounding factors such as age, sex, and diabetes or other chronic diseases. In comparison with normal weight, the adjusted RR (95% CI) associated with a delayed nutrition initiation was 0.92 (0.86, 0.98) for patients with low weight, 1.00 (0.94, 1.05) for overweight patients, and 1.06 (1.00, 1.12) for obese patients (P = 0.004). The initiation of nutritional support was delayed in obese ICU patients. Randomized controlled trials that address consequences of early compared with delayed beginnings of nutritional support in critically ill obese patients are needed. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Patient compliance and supportive periodontal therapy: Study among young adults of Namakkal district

    Subramanium Gokulanathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study is to assess the patient compliance to supportive and maintenance periodontal therapy and to determine the reason for noncompliance among young adult patients of Namakkal district, India. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 400 patients who underwent periodontal therapy and subsequently recalled for supportive and maintenance periodontal treatment in the Department of Periodontics, Vivekanandha Dental College for Women, Namakkal. Patients age group 25-35 years and of both gender were equally selected and grouped by occupation and socioeconomic status. According to their compliance with appointments, they are categorized as complete compliance, partially compliance and insufficient or noncompliance. Noncompliance and partially compliance patients were contacted and asked to rate their experience and reason for noncompliance. Results: In this study, 80% of patients showed complete compliance and were regular for supportive periodontal therapy appointments. Women were more regular in maintaining recall appointments than men. Salaried employers showed 84.3% complete compliance, while self-employed personals showed 77% complete compliance and 75% of nonworking personals were regular to the appointment schedule. Noncompliance person has quoted lack of time and forgetting the appointment date as a major reason for missed appointments. Conclusions: This study recommends the need for improvement in communication skills of practitioners and weekend appointment for patient undergoing periodontal maintenance therapy.

  9. Nursing Support of Home Hospice Caregivers on the Day of Patient Death.

    Clayton, Margaret F; Hulett, Jennifer; Kaur, Kirandeep; Reblin, Maija; Wilson, Andrew; Ellington, Lee

    2017-07-01

    To describe nurse-caregiver communication on the day of patient death.
. A descriptive secondary analysis of 44 audio-recorded home hospice nursing visits on day of death.
. Nine hospices in Utah, Oregon, and Massachusetts.
. 42 caregiver-patient dyads, 27 hospice nurses.
. Transcripts of audio recordings were coded for supportive nursing communication and relative time spent in physical, psychosocial, and spiritual discussion.
. Tangible, emotional, informational, esteem, and networking supportive communication; nurses' self-reported communication effectiveness; caregiver religious affiliation.
. Nurses reported that their communication skills were less effective when discussing difficult topics as compared to their overall communication effectiveness. Eleven patients died before the nursing visit, 3 died during the visit, and 30 died post-visit. Nurses primarily engaged in discussions facilitating caregiver emotional, tangible, and informational support. More informational support was observed when patient death occurred during the nursing visit. Time spent in general conversation showed that physical care conversations predominated (80% of the average overall amount of conversation time), compared to lifestyle/psychosocial discussions (14%) and spiritual discussions (6%). Spiritual discussions were observed in only 7 of 44 hospice visits. Spiritual discussions, although short and infrequent, were significantly longer, on average, for caregivers without a religious affiliation.
. Nurses support caregivers on the day of patient death using multiple supportive communication strategies. Spiritual discussions are minimal.
. Communication skills programs can potentially increase self-reported communication effectiveness. Emerging acute spiritual concerns, particularly for caregivers without a previous religious affiliation, should be anticipated. Spiritual support is included in the hospice model of holistic care.

  10. Electromyographic evaluation of implant-supported prostheses in hemimandibulectomy-reconstructed patients.

    Dellavia, Claudia; Romeo, Eugenio; Ghisolfi, Marco; Chiapasco, Matteo; Sforza, Chiarella; Ferrario, Virgilio F

    2007-06-01

    To assess the clinical conditions, patient's satisfaction and functional outcomes in oral neoplasia patients with hemimandibulectomy, bone reconstruction and implant-supported prosthesis. Twelve patients after mandibular resection (with and without condyle), reconstruction and successful fixed implant-supported prosthesis rehabilitation were examined. Patients underwent clinical evaluation and filled in a questionnaire about their satisfaction toward oral functions. Surface electromyography (EMG) of the masticatory muscles was performed during a 15-s unilateral gum chewing test. EMG potentials were standardized as percentage of a maximum clench on cotton rolls and compared with reference data obtained from 20 healthy subjects. Excellent clinical and radiological parameters were found. Patients stated a decreased post-rehabilitation satisfaction toward mastication and phonetics, but an increased attention to oral care. Only patients with condylar resection reported augmented esthetic scores. In both the resected and the remaining sides, chewing frequency was higher in the patients than in the reference group (Wilcoxon's rank-sum test, Pchewing were more variable in the reconstructed patients than in control subjects; the difference was significant only in the non-operated side (P<0.01). Post-rehabilitation median scores of the questionnaire indicated a positive judgment of the treatment. EMG analysis showed that functional recovery in hemimandibulectomy patients was satisfactory, although some alterations were observed in the non-operated side of mastication.

  11. A comparison of weather variables linked to infectious disease patterns using laboratory addresses and patient residence addresses.

    Djennad, Abdelmajid; Lo Iacono, Giovanni; Sarran, Christophe; Fleming, Lora E; Kessel, Anthony; Haines, Andy; Nichols, Gordon L

    2018-04-27

    To understand the impact of weather on infectious diseases, information on weather parameters at patient locations is needed, but this is not always accessible due to confidentiality or data availability. Weather parameters at nearby locations are often used as a proxy, but the accuracy of this practice is not known. Daily Campylobacter and Cryptosporidium cases across England and Wales were linked to local temperature and rainfall at the residence postcodes of the patients and at the corresponding postcodes of the laboratory where the patient's specimen was tested. The paired values of daily rainfall and temperature for the laboratory versus residence postcodes were interpolated from weather station data, and the results were analysed for agreement using linear regression. We also assessed potential dependency of the findings on the relative geographic distance between the patient's residence and the laboratory. There was significant and strong agreement between the daily values of rainfall and temperature at diagnostic laboratories with the values at the patient residence postcodes for samples containing the pathogens Campylobacter or Cryptosporidium. For rainfall, the R-squared was 0.96 for the former and 0.97 for the latter, and for maximum daily temperature, the R-squared was 0.99 for both. The overall mean distance between the patient residence and the laboratory was 11.9 km; however, the distribution of these distances exhibited a heavy tail, with some rare situations where the distance between the patient residence and the laboratory was larger than 500 km. These large distances impact the distributions of the weather variable discrepancies (i.e. the differences between weather parameters estimated at patient residence postcodes and those at laboratory postcodes), with discrepancies up to ±10 °C for the minimum and maximum temperature and 20 mm for rainfall. Nevertheless, the distributions of discrepancies (estimated separately for minimum and maximum

  12. Optimal support systems for patients with stomas – an opinion piece

    Burch J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Jennie BurchSt Marks Hospital, Surgery, London, UKAbstract: Coping with a stoma is physically and emotionally difficult. This adaptation process can be hindered by various factors, including complications associated with the stoma, such as appliance leakage, and comorbidities, such as arthritis. There are many ways of learning to live successfully with a stoma, which may be influenced by family, health care professionals, and spiritual support. There is some evidence that a good social support network can result in a positive coping mechanism for people with a newly formed stoma. Difficulty in accepting the stoma has been shown to slow down the adaptation process. This article explores the basic issues related to stomas and the general preoperative and postoperative support that is supplied by health care professionals. There was no optimal support system protocol discovered in the review of the literature. However, some of the published data related to stoma care were extrapolated to enable the reader to understand the important role that support systems can play in the acceptance of the stoma. Health care professionals provide support in a variety of ways, including the provision of telephone advice, clinics, and “open days”, to assist the patient to come to terms with their newly formed stoma. Care includes training on the practical aspects of the stoma, supporting empowerment and self-efficacy of people with a stoma (ostomates, and providing assistance when problems arise. Other support systems that are available are support groups, which may be local or national. It can be seen that the adaptation process takes many months or longer, but by utilizing various means of support, people with a stoma can have a good quality of life. The optimal support systems for patients with a stoma are discussed in relation to the literature and the personal experience of the author.Keywords: colostomy, ileostomy, urostomy

  13. Relationship between social support and the nutritional status of patients receiving radiation therapy for cancer

    Pulliam, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to ascertain if there is a relationship between social support and the nutritional status of patients receiving radiation therapy for cancer. The data collection instruments used included the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire (NSSQ), the Personal Characteristics Form, the abbreviated Health History, the Flow Sheet for Nutritional Data, and the Interview Schedule. For the analysis of data descriptive statistics were utilized to provide a profile of subjects, and correlational statistics were used to ascertain if there were relationships among the indicators of nutritional status and the social support variables. A convenience sample was comprised of 50 cancer patients deemed curable by radiation therapy. Findings included significant decreases in anthropometric measurements and biochemical tests during therapy. Serial assessments of nutritional status, therefore, are recommended for all cancer patients during therapy in order to plan and implement strategies for meeting the self-care requisites for food and water. No statistically significant relationships were found between the social support variables as measured by the NSSQ and the indicators of nutritional status. This suggests that nurses can assist patients by fostering support from actual and potential nutritional confidants

  14. Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient: update. Consensus SEMICYUC-SENPE: neurocritical patient.

    Acosta Escribano, J; Herrero Meseguer, I; Conejero García-Quijada, R

    2011-11-01

    Neurocritical patients require specialized nutritional support due to their intense catabolism and prolonged fasting. The preferred route of nutrient administration is the gastrointestinal route, especially the gastric route. Alternatives are the transpyloric route or mixed enteral-parenteral nutrition if an effective nutritional volume of more than 60% cannot be obtained. Total calorie intake ranges from 20-30 kcal/kg/day, depending on the period of the clinical course, with protein intake higher than 20% of total calories (hyperproteic diet). Nutritional support should be initiated early. The incidence of gastrointestinal complications is generally higher to other critically-ill patients, the most frequent complication being an increase in gastric residual volume. As in other critically-ill patients, glycemia should be closely monitored and maintained below 150 mg/dL.

  15. Percutaneous cardiopulmonary support for catheter ablation of unstable ventricular arrhythmias in high-risk patients.

    Carbucicchio, Corrado; Della Bella, Paolo; Fassini, Gaetano; Trevisi, Nicola; Riva, Stefania; Giraldi, Francesco; Baratto, Francesca; Marenzi, Giancarlo; Sisillo, Erminio; Bartorelli, Antonio; Alamanni, Francesco

    2009-11-01

    In patients with severe cardiomyopathy, recurrent episodes of nontolerated ventricular tachycardia (VT) or electrical storm (ES) frequently cause acute heart failure and cardiac death; the suppression of the arrhythmia is therefore lifesaving, but feasibility of catheter ablation (CA) is precluded by the adverse hemodynamic conditions together with the characteristics of the arrhythmia that interdicts efficacious mapping. The use of the percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (CPS) for circulatory assistance may allow patient's stabilization and enhance efficacy and safety of CA in this emergency setting. 19 patients (19 males; mean age 61 +/- 6 years; chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy, eleven patients; primary dilated cardiomyopathy, six patients; arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/ cardiomyopathy, two patients) with recurrent nontolerated VT episodes undergoing CPS-assisted CA were retrospectively evaluated. Twelve patients had acute hemodynamic failure refractory to inotropic agents and ventilatory assistance, seven patients had undergone a failing nonconventional CA procedure. 14 patients presented with ES, and in twelve the procedure was undertaken under emergency conditions within 24 h from admission. Patients were ventilated under general anesthesia and assisted by a multidisciplinary team. The CPS system consisted in a Medtronic Bio-Medicus centrifugal pump and in a Maxima Plus oxygenator, a 15-F arterial cannula, and a 17-F venous cannula. Flows between 2 and 3 l/min were activated after induction of 56/62 forms of nontolerated VT, achieving hemodynamic stabilization in all patients. CA was mainly guided by conventional activation mapping and was effective in abolishing 45/56 supported VTs; in 10/19 patients all clinical VTs were suppressed by CA. Mean procedural time was 4 h and 20 min. Complete stabilization was achieved in 13 patients (68%) without VT recurrence during a 7-day in-hospital monitoring. A significant clinical improvement was observed in

  16. Patient contributions during primary care consultations for hypertension after self-reporting via a mobile phone self-management support system.

    Bengtsson, Ulrika; Kjellgren, Karin; Hallberg, Inger; Lundin, Mona; Mäkitalo, Åsa

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports on how the clinical consultation in primary care is performed under the new premises of patients' daily self-reporting and self-generation of data. The aim was to explore and describe the structure, topic initiation and patients' contributions in follow-up consultations after eight weeks of self-reporting through a mobile phone-based hypertension self-management support system. A qualitative, explorative study design was used, examining 20 audio- (n = 10) and video-recorded (n = 10) follow-up consultations in primary care hypertension management, through interaction analysis. Clinical trials registry: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01510301. Four primary health care centers in Sweden. Patients with hypertension (n = 20) and their health care professional (n = 7). The consultations comprised three phases: opening, examination and closing. The most common topic was blood pressure (BP) put in relation to self-reported variables, for example, physical activity and stress. Topic initiation was distributed symmetrically between parties and BP talk was lifestyle-centered. The patients' contributed to the interpretation of BP values by connecting them to specific occasions, providing insights to the link between BP measurements and everyday life activities. Patients' contribution through interpretations of BP values to specific situations in their own lives brought on consultations where the patient as a person in context became salient. Further, the patients' and health care professionals' equal contribution during the consultations showed actively involved patients. The mobile phone-based self-management support system can thus be used to support patient involvement in consultations with a person-centered approach in primary care hypertension management Key points   The clinical consultation is important to provide opportunities for patients to gain understanding of factors affecting high blood pressure, and for health care professionals to

  17. Testing of a Model with Latino Patients That Explains the Links Among Patient-Perceived Provider Cultural Sensitivity, Language Preference, and Patient Treatment Adherence.

    Nielsen, Jessica D Jones; Wall, Whitney; Tucker, Carolyn M

    2016-03-01

    Disparities in treatment adherence based on race and ethnicity are well documented but poorly understood. Specifically, the causes of treatment nonadherence among Latino patients living in the USA are complex and include cultural and language barriers. The purpose of this study was to examine whether patients' perceptions in patient-provider interactions (i.e., trust in provider, patient satisfaction, and patient sense of interpersonal control in patient-provider interactions) mediate any found association between patient-perceived provider cultural sensitivity (PCS) and treatment adherence among English-preferred Latino (EPL) and Spanish-preferred Latino (SPL) patients. Data from 194 EPL patients and 361 SPL patients were obtained using questionnaires. A series of language-specific structural equation models were conducted to test the relationship between patient-perceived PCS and patient treatment adherence and the examined mediators of this relationship among the Latino patients. No significant direct effects of patient-perceived PCS on general treatment adherence were found. However, as hypothesized, several significant indirect effects emerged. Preferred language appeared to have moderating effects on the relationships between patient-perceived PCS and general treatment adherence. These results suggest that interventions to promote treatment adherence among Latino patients should likely include provider training to foster patient-defined PCS, trust in provider, and patient satisfaction with care. Furthermore, this training needs to be customized to be suitable for providing care to Latino patients who prefer speaking Spanish and Latino patients who prefer speaking English.

  18. Shared psychological characteristics that are linked to aggression between patients with Internet addiction and those with alcohol dependence.

    Hwang, Jae Yeon; Choi, Jung-Seok; Gwak, Ah Reum; Jung, Dawn; Choi, Sam-Wook; Lee, Jaewon; Lee, Jun-Young; Jung, Hee Yeon; Kim, Dai Jin

    2014-02-21

    Internet addiction (IA) is considered as one of behavioral addictions. Although common neurobiological mechanisms have been suggested to underlie behavioral addiction and substance dependence, few studies have directly compared IA with substance dependence, such as alcohol dependence (AD). We compared patients with IA, AD, and healthy controls (HC) in terms of the Five Factor Model of personality and with regard to impulsiveness, anger expression, and mood to explore psychological factors that are linked to aggression. All patients were treatment-seeking and had moderate-to-severe symptoms. The IA and AD groups showed a lower level of agreeableness and higher levels of neuroticism, impulsivity, and anger expression compared with the HC group, which are characteristics related to aggression. The addiction groups showed lower levels of extraversion, openness to experience, and conscientiousness and were more depressive and anxious than the HCs, and the severity of IA and AD symptoms was positively correlated with these types of psychopathology. IA and AD are similar in terms of personality, temperament, and emotion, and they share common characteristics that may lead to aggression. Our findings suggest that strategies to reduce aggression in patients with IA are necessary and that IA and AD are closely related and should be dealt with as having a close nosological relationship.

  19. Detection of Francisella tularensis-Specific Antibodies in Patients with Tularemia by a Novel Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Fujita, Osamu; Uda, Akihiko; Morikawa, Shigeru; Yamada, Akio

    2013-01-01

    A novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was developed and evaluated for detection of antibodies against Francisella tularensis in humans. The assay is based on the ability of serum antibodies to inhibit the binding of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide antigens. The assay was evaluated using serum samples of tularemia patients, inactivated F. tularensis-immunized rabbits, and F. tularensis-infected mice. Antibodies against F. tularensis were successfully detected in serum samples of tularemia patients as well as the immunized and infected animals. The cELISA method was compared to indirect ELISA (iELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination test (MA) using serum samples of 19 tularemia patients and 50 healthy individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of cELISA were 93.9 and 96.1%, respectively, in comparison to the iELISA. MA was less sensitive than cELISA with a sensitivity and specificity of only 81.8 and 98.0%, respectively. A high degree of correlation (R2 = 0.8226) was observed between cELISA and iELISA results. The novel cELISA developed in this study appears to be highly sensitive and specific for serodiagnosis of human tularemia. The potential of the MAb-based cELISA to be used in both human and animal samples emphasizes its usefulness for serological survey of tularemia among multiple animal species. PMID:23114700

  20. In and out of control: brain mechanisms linking fluency of action selection to self-agency in patients with schizophrenia.

    Voss, Martin; Chambon, Valérian; Wenke, Dorit; Kühn, Simone; Haggard, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Sense of agency refers to the feeling of control over one's actions, and their consequences. It involves both predictive processes linked to action control, and retrospective 'sense-making' causal inferences. Schizophrenia has been associated with impaired predictive processing, but the underlying mechanisms that impair patients' sense of agency remain unclear. We introduce a new 'prospective' aspect of agency and show that subliminally priming an action not only influences response times, but also influences reported sense of agency over subsequent action outcomes. This effect of priming was associated with altered connectivity between frontal areas and the angular gyrus. The effects on response times and on frontal action selection mechanisms were similar in patients with schizophrenia and in healthy volunteers. However, patients showed no effects of priming on sense of agency, no priming-related activation of angular gyrus, and no priming-related changes in fronto-parietal connectivity. We suggest angular gyrus activation reflects the experiences of agency, or non-agency, in part by processing action selection signals generated in the frontal lobes. The altered action awareness that characterizes schizophrenia may be due to impaired communication between these areas. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Social reintegration of TBI patients: a solution to provide long-term support.

    Bulinski, Leszek

    2010-01-01

    This article evaluates the effectiveness of a workable long-term program to provide social support for TBI patients, based on the "Academy of Life" concept. Disability after TBI causes numerous disruptions of normal life, which affect the patient, the family, and society. The patient needs the particular kind of support the program was designed to provide. The study involved 200 married couples with a TBI spouse previously enrolled in the "Academy of Life." The methods included documentation analysis, clinical interviews, the Family Bonds Scale, the Social Isolation Scale, and the Social Functions subscale from a battery used to evaluate QOL after TBI. The subjects were examined before and after completing the program. In the first examination all types of family bonds were found to be severely weakened; there was deep social isolation, loneliness, sadness, a feeling of being surrounded by hostility, and no purposeful social activity. The most common form of support from significant others was pity and unwanted interference, accompanied by lack of understanding and social ostracism. In the second examination there was selective improvement of all parameters, significantly greater in patients without PTSD symptoms. The best effects were achieved in the reduction of social dysfunctions, the growth of purposeful social activity, and improvement in the type of support received, and a reduction of selected parameters of social isolation. The program here described is selectively effective for the social reintegration of TBI-patients, especially those without PTSD symptoms.

  2. Banding together: an investigation of post-surgery support groups for laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding patients

    Melissa Opolski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Though advocated as useful for patients, there is little in the literature regarding the use and effectiveness of bariatric support groups. This study investigated characteristics and experiences of bariatric patients who did and did not attend offered groups. Seventy-eight postoperative laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding patients from a private bariatric clinic completed mailed self-report questionnaires. Almost 60% reported having attended the clinic groups, with most wanting to meet other patients and obtain information rather than access psychological assistance. Participants reported generally positive experiences of attending. Nonattendance was often attributed to practical barriers. Satisfaction with support from others was not related to past or predicted future attendance, but higher psychological distress was related to and predictive of greater intention to attend future groups. Likely future attenders also held more positive beliefs about the groups than those who were unlikely to attend. Further research is required into potential positive and negative consequences of attendance, and characteristics of those who are likely to benefit or be harmed by attending. Interventions addressing stereotypes about support groups may help patients make informed decisions about whether to attend a bariatric support group.

  3. Translational Research in Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition Support for Patients with Severe Head Injury

    Fa-liang LIN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To explore the key points of the translational research in enteral and pareenteral nutrition support for patients with severe head injury (SHI, and to analyze the influence of different nutritional support routes on the prognosis of SHI patients. Methods: Totally 141 patients with severe craniocerebral injury were selected as study subjects, 47 cases for each group, and were given early enteral nutrition (EEN, delayed enteral nutrition (DEN, and parenteral nutrition (PN, respectively. The effect of different nutritional support routes on SHI patients was observed. Results: After 14 d of treatment, Glasgow coma scale (GCS scores of 3 groups were higher than treatment before (P<0.01, and with statistical differences among groups (P<0.05, or P<0.01. The levels of serum albumin, total serum protein and hemoglobin were higher in EEN group than the other groups (P<0.01. The level of serum albumin was lower in PN group than in DEN group (P<0.05. There were statistical differences in the incidence of complications among three groups (χ2=9.2487, P=0.0098. Conclusion: EEN support is more conductive to the improvement of the nutrition status, reduction of the incidence of complications, and promotion of the prognosis of SHI patients than DEN and PN.

  4. Linking care of patients with obesity to outpatient weight control clinics following acute hospitalizations

    Harris CM

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ché M Harris,1 Lawrence J Cheskin,2 Trina L Gipson-Jones,3 Jennifer A Hartfield,4 Flora Kisuule1 1Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 2Department of Health, Behavior and Society, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3School of Nursing, Hampton University, Hampton, VA, USA; 4Center for Research on Men’s Health, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Despite obesity impacting over one-third of US adults, guideline recommendations have not been effectively utilized by health care providers in hospital settings. Initiation of weight loss plans for obese patients during hospitalizations followed by linkage of care to weight control centers may improve compliance with the guidelines. Provider recognition and awareness that obesity is a chronic condition that warrants inpatient counsel and management with appropriate arrangement of postdischarge follow-up care will be critical to guideline implementation. Keywords: guideline compliance, health systems, intervention, linkage 

  5. Hope and social support in elderly patients with cancer and their partners: an actor-partner interdependence model.

    Goldzweig, Gil; Baider, Lea; Andritsch, Elisabeth; Rottenberg, Yakir

    2016-12-01

    Assess relationships between oldest-old (minimum 86 years) patients' perceived social support to their own and their spousal caregivers' hope through application of the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM). 58 dyads of patients and their spousal caregivers completed standardized self-report measures of depression, distress, hope and social support. Patients presented high distress levels. Among patients and spouses, perceived social support was positively correlated to their own level of hope (β = 0.44, p hope (β = -0.25, p hope among dyads of oldest-old patients and their spousal caregivers. Patients and caregiver seem to utilize social support to enhance hope.

  6. Osseointegrated Supported Prosthesis and Interdisciplinary Approach for Prosthodontic Rehabilitation of a Young Patient with Ectodermal Dysplasia

    Karthik M. Sadashiva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is a triad of hypodontia or anodontia, hypotrichosis, and hypohydrosis, associated with other problems that result from the defective development of structures of ectodermal origin (Freire-Maia, Pinheiro (1988. Early and extensive dental treatment is needed keeping in mind the effect on the craniofacial growth. Due to rapid growth of the jaws, the patients are rehabilitated using removable prostheses (Tarjan et al. (2005. Hence for a young patient in this case report, the placement of endosseous osseointegrated implants was delayed till adulthood. Finally a definitive fixed tooth-supported and osseointegrated implant supported fixed partial denture therapy was used to rehabilitate the patient satisfactorily after she had completed her growth (Sweeney et al. (2005. A review of the current literature relevant to several aspects of syndromic hypodontia, patient selection, and implant planning is discussed.

  7. A Decision Support Tool for Appropriate Glucose-Lowering Therapy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Ampudia-Blasco, F Javier; Benhamou, Pierre Yves; Charpentier, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Optimal glucose-lowering therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus requires a patient-specific approach. Although a good framework, current guidelines are insufficiently detailed to address the different phenotypes and individual needs of patients seen in daily practice. We developed...... a patient-specific decision support tool based on a systematic analysis of expert opinion. Materials and Methods: Based on the American Diabetes Association (ADA)/European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 2012 position statement, a panel of 12 European experts rated the appropriateness (RAND....... The panel recommendations were embedded in an online decision support tool (DiaScope(®); Novo Nordisk Health Care AG, Zürich, Switzerland). Results: Treatment appropriateness was associated with (combinations of) the patient variables mentioned above. As second-line agents, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors...

  8. Exercise physiology, testing, and training in patients supported by a left ventricular assist device.

    Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo Y; Plaisance, Eric P; Arena, Ross; Shah, Keyur

    2015-08-01

    The left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is an accepted treatment alternative for the management of end-stage heart failure. As we move toward implantation of LVADs in less severe cases of HF, scrutiny of functional capacity and quality of life becomes more important. Patients demonstrate improvements in exercise capacity after LVAD implantation, but the effect is less than predicted. Exercise training produces multiple beneficial effects in heart failure patients, which would be expected to improve quality of life. In this review, we describe factors that are thought to participate in the persistent exercise impairment in LVAD-supported patients, summarize current knowledge about the effect of exercise training in LVAD-supported patients, and suggest areas for future research. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Disease specific stress of tumor patients at the beginning of radiotherapy. Effect on psychosocial support requirement

    Sehlen, S.; Hollenhorst, H.; Schymura, B.; Firsching, M.; Duehmke, E.; Herschbach, P.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy brings a tumor patient into a special life situation in which different variables play a role of often unknown importance. The goal of this study was to investigate disease specific stress of tumor patients at the beginning of radiotherapy with established psychodiagnostic questionnaires and to evaluate the effect on psychosocial support requirement in order to reduce stress and to improve quality of life and compliance during radiotherapeutical treatment. Patients and Methods: 732 patients were screened, of whom 446 (60.9%) fulfilled the criteria for inclusion (refusals 21.0%, low Karnofsky performance status 6.6%, management problems 3.4%, language barriers 3.0%, cognitive restrictions 2.6%, death 2.5%). Disease specific aspects of stress in the questionnaire (Fragebogen zur Belastung von Krebspatienten, FBK), life situation (LS) and self-defined care requirements (BB) were self-rated by patients with different tumor types before radiotherapy. Medical and sociodemographic data were also documented. We investigated 446 patients (262 male, 184 female; median age 60.0 years) with different diagnoses. Results: Stress was observed mainly due to reduction of efficiency, anxiety and pain on the subscales. Women had a significant higher stress on subscales of pain (p=0.016) and anxiety (p=0.009), patients younger than 45 years in the subscale information (p=0.002) and patients older than 45 and younger than 60 years in the subscale anxiety (p=0.002) and the total score (p=0.003). Patients with mamma carcinoma had the highest stress. The maximum percentages of patients under high stress were found for the subscales of efficiency (43%) and anxiety (40%). The support requirement was characterized by the need of more medical information and dialogue with the doctor. We saw a significant correlation of high stress and high care requirement. Conclusions: Psychosocial support should be founded on psychosocial stress diagnostic and self-defined care

  10. Design and implementation of a web-based patient portal linked to an electronic health record designed to improve medication safety: the Patient Gateway medications module

    Jeffrey Schnipper

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we describe the background, design, and preliminary results of a medications module within Patient Gateway (PG, a patient portal linked to an electronic health record (EHR. The medications module is designed to improve the accuracy of medication lists within the EHR, reduce adverse drug events and improve patient_provider communication regarding medications and allergies in several primary care practices within a large integrated healthcare delivery network. This module allows patients to view and modify the list of medications and allergies from the EHR, report nonadherence, side effects and other medication-related problems and easily communicate this information to providers, who can verify the information and update the EHR as needed. Usage and satisfaction data indicate that patients found the module easy to use, felt that it led to their providers having more accurate information about them and enabled them to feel more prepared for their forthcoming visits. Further analyses will determine the effects of this module on important medication-related outcomes and identify further enhancements needed to improve on this approach.

  11. Association between suicidal ideation and behavior, and depression, anxiety, and perceived social support in cancer patients

    Şengül, Melike Ceyhan Balcı; Kaya, Vildan; Şen, Cenk Ahmet; Kaya, Kemal

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between suicidal behavior and associated factors such as depression, anxiety, and perceived social support level in cancer patients. Material/Methods The study group included 102 patients who were under treatment in the oncology department and the control group included 100 individuals with similar sociodemographic features. A sociodemographic information form, Beck depression inventory, Beck anxiety inventory, suicidal behavi...

  12. Advanced Clinical Decision Support for Transport of the Critically Ill Patient

    2013-12-01

    in the sections to follow. Accomplishments according to proposed tasks: Our "team" has included all CHRCO based physician and nurse investigators...ahead of print). Winsor, G., et al., Inadequate hemodynamic management in patients undergoing interfacility transfer for suspected aortic dissection...Fields, and C.d. Forca-Tarefa, Clinical practice parameters for hemodynamic support of pediatric and neonatal patients in septic shock. J Pediatr, 2002

  13. Social support, self-care, and quality of life in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy in Thailand

    Hanucharurnkul, S.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the study was two-fold: (1) to examine the relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life in adult cancer patients receiving radiotherapy while the selected basic conditioning factors of age, marital and socio-economic status, living arrangement, stage and site of cancer were statistically controlled; and (2) to test a theoretical model which postulated that (a) quality of life was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors, social support and self-care, and (b) self-care was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors and social support. A convenience sample of 112 adult cervical and head/neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy was obtained from radiotherapy outpatient clinic in three hospitals located in Bangkok, Thailand. Results of the study indicated positive relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life. Socio-economic status, site of cancer, and self-care were significant predictors for reported quality of life. Social support appeared to be a significant predictor of quality of life indirectly through self-care. Socio-economic status and social support were also significant predictors of self-care, whereas, stage and site of cancer seemed to predict self-care indirectly through social support

  14. CHARACTERISTICS OF NEUROPEPTIDE-CYTOKINE IMMUNITY LINKS IN PATIENTS WITH COMBINED CARDIOVASCULAR PATHOLOGY, PROCEEDING WITH ANXIETY/DEPRESSION DISORDER

    A. V. Gertsev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, pathogenetic events underlying coronary heart disease and hypertensive syndrome should be regarded as complex reactions of neuroimmune interactions characterized by activation of proinflammatory cytokines, opiate receptors and endogenous opioid peptides. These changes are mediated by high activity of basic regulatory systems that increase myocardial resistance to acute and chronic ischemic damage. However, there is lack of data concerning severity of these changes in the course of complicated coronary heart disease and hypertension, which occur in the background of anxiety-depressive disorders.The aim of present study was to assess regulatory disturbances at the level of neuropeptide-cytokine pool in the patients with polymorbid cardiovascular disease accomplished by anxiety and depressive conditions. Clinical examination of 85 patients (males aged 35 to 45 years, with complicated cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease combined with essential hypertension stage II associated with anxiety and depressive disorders. To address these issues, we have formed a group of patients with anxiety and depressive disorders (group 1, n = 40, patients with coronary artery disease and stage II hypertension; group 2 (n = 20 included patients with coronary artery disease; group 3 (n = 25 included patients with hypertension stage II; group 4 (n = 30 represented controls (healthy person. In order to study dysfunction of regulatory neuropeptides at the level of cytokine-mediated immunity in these groups, we have studied diagnostic markers of the suprasegmentary autonomous nervous condition, and cytokine pool of immune system. Immune testing was used to determine β-endorphin, cytokines of pro-inflammatory (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10 spectra in blood serum of patients.In the course of clinical and laboratory examination, the authors found that the patients with polymorbid cardiovascular pathology exhibit regulatory

  15. Breast cancer patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy: Distress, depressive symptoms and unmet needs of psychosocial support

    Luutonen, Sinikka; Vahlberg, Tero; Eloranta, Sini; Hyvaeri, Heidi; Salminen, Eeva

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: The diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer can cause considerable psychological consequences, which may remain unrecognized and untreated. In this study, the prevalence of depressive symptoms and distress, and unmet needs for psychosocial support were assessed among breast cancer patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy. Material and methods: Out of 389 consecutive patients, 276 responded and comprised the final study group. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory. Distress was measured with the Distress Thermometer. Hospital records of the patients were examined for additional information. Results: Nearly one third of patients (32.1%) displayed depressive symptoms, and more than a quarter of patients (28.4%) experienced distress. Younger age (p = 0.001) and negative hormone receptor status (p = 0.008) were independent factors associated with distress. One quarter of the patients expressed an unmet need for psychosocial support, which was independently associated with depressive symptoms and/or distress (p = 0.001) and younger age (p = 0.006). Conclusions: During radiotherapy for breast cancer, the staff should have awareness of the higher risk of depression and distress in their patients and should consider screening tools to recognise distress and depressive symptoms. Special attention should be paid to younger patients.

  16. Supporting the Sexual Intimacy Needs of Patients in a Longer Stay Inpatient Forensic Setting.

    Quinn, Chris; Happell, Brenda

    2016-10-01

    To explore perceptions of nurses and patients regarding sexual intimacy in a long-term mental health unit. Qualitative exploratory design including in-depth semi-structured individual interviews with 12 registered nurses and 10 long-term patients of a forensic mental health hospital. The theme of supporting sexual intimacy was identified and described in this paper and included the following subthemes for nurses: It depends on the setting, need for guidelines and consent, and for patients-it depends on the setting; and need for support. The findings suggest that current guidelines regarding sexual intimacy in acute inpatient settings may not be appropriate in long-term facilities, with a need for guidelines to specifically address this setting. Furthermore, support for sexual intimacy needs of patients was identified as a strong need for patients and they believed not currently met. Nurses have an important role to play as part of their holistic approach to care and barriers to providing this aspect of care must be overcome to ensure patients' rights are respected. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Role of resilience and social support in alleviating depression in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis

    Liu YM

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Yueh-Min Liu,1 Hong-Jer Chang,2 Ru-Hwa Wang,3 Li-King Yang,4 Kuo-Cheng Lu,4 Yi-Chou Hou4 1Department of Nursing, Ching Kuo Institute of Management and Health, Taiwan; 2Graduate Institute of Long-Term Care, National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Taipei City, Taiwan; 3Department of Nursing, Fu-Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan; 4Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Cardinal Tien Hospital, School of Medicine, Fu-Jen Catholic University, New Taipei, Taiwan Background: Patients who undergo hemodialysis encounter challenges including role changes, physical degeneration, and difficulty in performing activities of daily living (ADLs and self-care. These challenges deteriorate their physiological and psychosocial conditions, resulting in depression. High resilience (RES and social support can alleviate stress and depression. This study evaluated the importance of RES and social support in managing depression in elderly patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (HD. Patients and methods: In this descriptive, correlational study, 194 older patients undergoing HD were enrolled from the HD centers of three hospitals in northern Taiwan. The Barthel ADL Index, RES scale, Inventory of Socially Supportive Behavior, and Beck Depression Inventory-II were used. Hierarchical regression analysis was applied to evaluate the interaction of RES and social support with illness severity, demographics, and ADLs. Results: Of the total participants, 45.9% experienced depressive symptoms. Demographic analysis showed that men and those with high educational level and income and financial independence had less depression (p<0.01. Patients with a higher Barthel Index (n=103, RES scale (n=33, and social support (n=113 showed less depressive symptoms (p<0.01. We found a significant negative correlation between depressive symptoms and social support (r=-0.506, p<0.01 and RES (r=-0.743, p<0.01. Hierarchical regression analysis showed

  18. Association of Social Support and Family Environment with Cognitive Function in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    Wang, Qin; Yang, Zhi-Kai; Sun, Xiu-Mei; Du, Yun; Song, Yi-Fan; Ren, Ye-Ping; Dong, Jie

    ♦ BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment (CI) is a common phenomenon and predictive of high mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. This study aimed to analyze the association of social support and family environment with cognitive function in PD patients. ♦ METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of PD patients from Peking University First Hospital and the Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University. Global cognitive function was measured using the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination (3MS), executive function was measured by the A and B trail-making tests, and other cognitive functions were measured by the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status. Social support was measured with the Social Support Scale developed by Xiaoshuiyuan and family environment was measured with the Chinese Version of the Family Environment Scale (FES-CV). ♦ RESULTS: The prevalence of CI and executive dysfunction among the 173 patients in the study was, respectively, 16.8% and 26.3%. Logistic regression found that higher global social support (odds ratio [OR] = 1.09, 1.01 - 1.17, p = 0.027) and subjective social support predicted higher prevalence of CI (OR = 1.13, 1.02 - 1.25, p = 0.022), adjusting for covariates. Analyses of the FES-CV dimensions found that greater independence was significantly associated with better immediate memory and delayed memory. Moreover, higher scores on achievement orientation were significantly associated with poorer language skills. ♦ CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that social support is negatively associated with the cognitive function of PD patients and that some dimensions of the family environment are significantly associated with several domains of cognitive function. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  19. Peer counselors' role in supporting patients' adherence to ART in Ethiopia and Uganda.

    Gusdal, Annelie K; Obua, Celestino; Andualem, Tenaw; Wahlstrom, Rolf; Chalker, John; Fochsen, Grethe

    2011-06-01

    Our aim was to explore peer counselors' work and their role in supporting patients' adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in resource-limited settings in Ethiopia and Uganda. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 79 patients, 17 peer counselors, and 22 providers in ART facilities in urban and rural areas of Ethiopia and Uganda. Two main categories with related subcategories emerged from the analysis. The first main category, peer counselors as facilitators of adherence, describes how peer counselors played an important role by acting as role models, raising awareness, and being visible in the community. They were also recognized for being close to the patients while acting as a bridge to the health system. They provided patients with an opportunity to individually talk to someone who was also living with HIV, who had a positive and life-affirming attitude about their situation, and were willing to share personal stories of hope when educating and counseling their patients. The second main category, benefits and challenges of peer counseling, deals with how peer counselors found reward in helping others while at the same time acknowledging their limitations and need of support and remuneration. Their role and function were not clearly defined within the health system and they received negligible financial and organizational support. While peer counseling is acknowledged as an essential vehicle for treatment success in ART support in sub-Saharan Africa, a formal recognition and regulation of their role should be defined. The issue of strategies for disclosure to support adherence, while avoiding or reducing stigma, also requires specific attention. We argue that the development and implementation of support to peer counselors are crucial in existing and future ART programs, but more research is needed to further explore factors that are important to sustain and strengthen the work of peer counselors.

  20. Study of the Psychological Profile in Diabetic Patient and its Relationship with their Social Support

    Akbar Atadokht

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder that has negative effect on physical function, psychological condition, interpersonal, family and social relationship and in general, on psychological well being. The aim of this study was to investigate of psychological profile in diabetic patients and it's relatioship with social support.   Methods: In this descriptive-correlational study, 120 diabetic patients have been selected among of those that systematically refered to Diabetes Clinic of Emam Khomeini Hospital in order to follow their therapeutic process in Ardabil . Data gathering was accomplished by two tests: SCL-90-R and Social Support Scale. Finally data were analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient and T-test on SPSS-17 software and p-value less than 0.05 considered as significant.   Results: Results showed that 70% of diabetic patients had problems in somatic complaint and obsession, 62.5% in sensitivity, 72.5% in depression, 62.5% in anxiety, 55% in hostility, 67.5% in paranoid thoughts, 27.5% in phobia and 37.5% in psychosis. Correlations between social support with somatic complaint, obsession, sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility and paranoid thoughts were negatively significant. Family support associated significantly with all of the psychological variables but friend Support had no significant correlation with them.   Conclusion: The range of psychological problems experienced by diabetic patients is more extensive and these problems have significant relationship with social support. Thus, attention to different dimensions of psychological health is necessary and social support-based interventions can be more effective.

  1. Self-reported differences in empowerment between lurkers and posters in online patient support groups.

    van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; Seydel, Erwin R; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2008-06-30

    Patients who visit online support groups benefit in various ways. Results of our earlier study indicated that participation in online support groups had a profound effect on the participants' feelings of "being empowered." However, most studies of online patient support groups have focused on the members of these groups who actively contribute by sending postings (posters). Thus far, little is known about the impact for "lurkers" (ie, those who do not actively participate by sending postings). In the present study, we explored if lurkers in online patient support groups profit to the same extent as posters do. We searched the Internet with the search engine Google to identify all Dutch online support groups for patients with breast cancer, fibromyalgia, and arthritis. Invitations to complete an online survey were sent out by the owners of 19 groups. In the online questionnaire, we asked questions about demographic and health characteristics, use of and satisfaction with the online support group, empowering processes, and empowering outcomes. The online questionnaire was completed by 528 individuals, of which 109 (21%) identified themselves as lurkers. Lurkers (mean age 47 years) were slightly older than active participants (mean age 43 years, P = .002), had a shorter disease history (time since diagnosis 3.7 years vs 5.4 years, P = .001), and reported lower mental well-being (SF 12 subscore 37.7 vs 40.5, P = .004). No significant differences were found in other demographic variables. Posters indicated visiting the online support groups significantly more often for social reasons, such as curiosity about how other members were doing, to enjoy themselves, as a part of their daily routine (all P posters did not differ in their information-related reasons for visiting the online support group. Lurkers were significantly less satisfied with the online support group compared to posters (P posters. However, lurkers did not differ significantly from posters with regard to

  2. Patients with acephalic spermatozoa syndrome linked to SUN5 mutations have a favorable pregnancy outcome from ICSI.

    Fang, Jianzheng; Zhang, Jingjing; Zhu, Fuxi; Yang, Xiaoyu; Cui, Yugui; Liu, Jiayin

    2018-01-10

    Are Sad1 and UNC84 domain containing 5 (SUN5) mutations associated with the outcomes of ICSI in patients with acephalic spermatozoa syndrome (ASS)? Despite highly abnormal sperm morphology, ASS patients with SUN5 mutations have a favorable pregnancy outcome following ICSI. ASS is a rare cause of infertility characterized by the production of a majority of headless spermatozoa, along with a small proportion of intact spermatozoa with an abnormal head-tail junction. Previous studies have demonstrated that SUN5 mutations may cause ASS. Several studies showed that ICSI could help patients with ASS father children. This retrospective cohort study included 11 infertile ASS males with SUN5 mutations. Five of them underwent five ICSI cycles. Their ICSI results were compared to men with ASS without SUN5 mutations (n = 3) and to men with multiple morphological abnormalities of the sperm flagella (MMAF) (n = 9). All ICSI treatments were completed between Jan 2011 and May 2017. Sanger DNA sequencing was used to detect mutations in SUN5. Clinical and biological data were collected from patients at the fertility center. Sanger sequencing validated 11 patients with SUN5 mutations. Three novel mutations in SUN5 (c.829C>T [p.Q277*]; c.1067G>A [p.R356H]; c.211+1 insGT [p.S71Cfs11*]) were identified in three patients. The rates of fertilization, good-quality embryos and pregnancy for five patients with SUN5 mutations following ICSI were 81.5%, 81.8% and 100%, respectively. The rates of fertilization and good-quality embryos in patients with MMAF were significantly lower compared with ASS patients (65.6 versus 82.4%, P = 0.039 and 53.6 versus 85.2%, P = 0.031, respectively). There were no differences in ICSI results between ASS patients with and without SUN5 mutations. Only a small number patients with SUN5 mutations was available because of its rare incidence. Patients with ASS can be effectively treated with ICSI. SUN5 mutations may be one of the genetic causes of ASS. This study

  3. FACTORS AFFECTING QUALITY OF LIFE AND LEVEL OF SOCIAL SUPPORT IN CANCER PATIENTS

    Ayse Berivan Bakan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: When people face health problems, their life satisfaction levels and social relations could be ruined. When it comes to an eerie, deadly and chronic disease like cancer, the individual is much more likely to be affected by it. Objective: This descriptive study aims to identify quality of life and level of social support and the affecting factors in cancer patients. Methods: The sample included 170 patients who applied to Internal Diseases, Radiation Oncology, Thorax diseases clinics and Chemotherapy polyclinic in a university hospital in Turkey between March and August, 2005, who met the research criteria, and who volunteered to participate in the study. The sample represented 20 % of the target population. Data were collected through SF-36 Quality of Life Scale and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Results: The patients’ Global Quality of Life mean score was found 38.67 ± 13.64, and mean score for the Perceived Social Support was found 59.19 ± 17.5. Global Quality of Life score was higher in those who underwent an operation and who received ambulatory health care. Although Global Quality of Life was not influenced by the gender variable, male patients’ level of well-being was found to be higher. Perceived Social Support total score was found to be higher in those who knew about their disease. Family support was found to be higher in those who were married and who lived in town; it was found to be low in those who had low socio-economic level and who received inpatient treatment. Friend support was found to be high in those who knew about their disease. Conclusion: There was a linear relationship between Perceived Social Support and Quality of Life. It is recommended that more studies with wider groups of participants would shed more light to the issue of identifying quality of life, social support level and the relationships between them in cancer patients.

  4. Quality of life and social support in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Rosiak, Katarzyna; Zagożdżon, Paweł

    2017-10-29

    Quality of life and needforsocial support in persons diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) are to a large extent determined by the degree of their disability. The aim of the study was to analyze an association between specific forms of MS, subjectively perceived quality of life and social support. The study included subjects with established diagnosis of MS, treated at rehabilitation centers, hospitals and in a home setting, as well as the members of patient organizations. After being informed about objectives of the study, type of included tasks and way to complete them, each participant was handed out a set of questionnaires: Berlin Social Support Scales (Łuszczyńska, Kowalska, Schwarzer, Schulz), Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQOLBREF), as well as a survey developed specifically for the purposes of this project. The results were subjected to statistical analysis with STATA 12 package. The study included a total of 110 persons (67 women and 43 men). Quality of life overall, as well in physical, psychological, social relationships and environmental health domains, turned out to be particularly important in patients with primary-progressive MS. Irrespective of MS type, social support overall did not play a significant role on univariate analysis. However, subgroup analysis according to sex demonstrated that men with MS received social support four times less often than women. Quality of life in individuals with primary-progressive MS is significantly lower than in patients presenting with other types of this disease. Men with MS are more likely to present with worse scores for social support overall. They are less likely both to acknowledge the need for support and to realize the availability of support they actually need.

  5. The relationship between type D personality and perceived social support in myocardial infarction patients

    Reza Bagherian Sararoudi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type D personality is based on two global and stable personality traits, including negative affectivity (NA and social inhibition (SI. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between type D personality and perceived social support in post myocardial infarction (MI patients. Methods: One hundred seventy six consecutive patients following MI admitted to the cardiac care unit (CCU of nine hospitals in Isfahan, Iran from April to September 2006 were selected based on the inclusive and exclusive criteria. The patients completed the Persian version of type D personality scale and the Persian version of multidimensional scale of perceived social support (MSPSS. Also, demographic and medical questionnaire was completed for each patient. Chi-squared test, t-test and MANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results: The findings indicated that 35.8% patients (35.8 % were classified as type D. The results of MANOVA showed that type D patients were significantly different from non-type D patients (F = 8.72, p = 0.0001 on MSPSS scores and on all dimensions including family subscale (F = 11.52, p = 0.001, friends subscale (F= 16.16, p = 0.0001 and significant others subscale (F = 5.04, p = 0.026. Conclusions: Type D personality substantially affects the way MI patients perceive availability of social support from different sources including family, friends, and significant others. One implication of this finding may be to develop tailor-made interventions for MI patients with type D.

  6. Supporting cancer patients in illness management: usability evaluation of a mobile app.

    Mirkovic, Jelena; Kaufman, David R; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2014-08-13

    Mobile phones and tablets currently represent a significant presence in people's everyday lives. They enable access to different information and services independent of current place and time. Such widespread connectivity offers significant potential in different app areas including health care. Our goal was to evaluate the usability of the Connect Mobile app. The mobile app enables mobile access to the Connect system, an online system that supports cancer patients in managing health-related issues. Along with symptom management, the system promotes better patient-provider communication, collaboration, and shared decision making. The Connect Mobile app enables access to the Connect system over both mobile phones and tablets. The study consisted of usability tests of a high fidelity prototype with 7 cancer patients where the objectives were to identify existing design and functionality issues and to provide patients with a real look-and-feel of the mobile system. In addition, we conducted semistructured interviews to obtain participants' feedback about app usefulness, identify the need for new system features and design requirements, and measure the acceptance of the mobile app and its features within everyday health management. The study revealed a total of 27 design issues (13 for mobile apps and 14 for tablet apps), which were mapped to source events (ie, errors, requests for help, participants' concurrent feedback, and moderator observation). We also applied usability heuristics to identify violations of usability principles. The majority of violations were related to enabling ease of input, screen readability, and glanceability (15 issues), as well as supporting an appropriate match between systems and the real world (7 issues) and consistent mapping of system functions and interactions (4 issues). Feedback from participants also showed the cancer patients' requirements for support systems and how these needs are influenced by different context-related factors

  7. Stakeholder engagement in diabetes self-management: patient preference for peer support and other insights.

    Kwan, Bethany M; Jortberg, Bonnie; Warman, Meredith K; Kane, Ilima; Wearner, Robyn; Koren, Romona; Carrigan, Thomas; Martinez, Vincent; Nease, Donald E

    2017-06-01

    Self-management support (SMS) for patients with diabetes can improve adherence to treatment, mitigate disease-related distress, and improve health outcomes. Translating this evidence into real-world practice is needed, as it is not clear which SMS models are acceptable to patients, and feasible and sustainable for primary care practices. To use the Boot Camp Translation (BCT) method to engage patient, practice, community resource and research stakeholders in translation of evidence about SMS and diabetes distress into mutually acceptable care models and to inform patient-centred outcomes research (PCOR). Twenty-seven diabetes care stakeholders, including patients and providers from a local network of federally qualified health centres participated. Stakeholders met in-person and by conference call over the course of 8 months. Subject matter experts provided education on the diabetes SMS evidence. Facilitators engaged the group in discussions about barriers to self-management and opportunities for improving delivery of SMS. BCT participants identified lack of social support, personal resources, trust, knowledge and confidence as barriers to diabetes self-management. Intervention opportunities emphasized peer support, use of multidisciplinary care teams and centralized systems for sharing information about community and practice resources. BCT informed new services and a PCOR study proposal. Patients and family engaged in diabetes care research value peer support, group visits, and multidisciplinary care teams as key features of SMS models. SMS should be tailored to an individual patient's health literacy. BCT can be used to engage multiple stakeholders in translation of evidence into practice and to inform PCOR. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Antibody Banding Patterns of the Enzyme-Linked Immunoelectrotransfer Blot and Brain Imaging Findings in Patients With Neurocysticercosis.

    Arroyo, Gianfranco; Rodriguez, Silvia; Lescano, Andres G; Alroy, Karen A; Bustos, Javier A; Santivañez, Saul; Gonzales, Isidro; Saavedra, Herbert; Pretell, E Javier; Gonzalez, Armando E; Gilman, Robert H; Tsang, Victor C W; Garcia, Hector H

    2018-01-06

    The enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) assay is the reference serological test for neurocysticercosis (NCC). A positive result on EITB does not always correlate with the presence of active infections in the central nervous system (CNS), and patients with a single viable brain cyst may be EITB negative. Nonetheless, EITB antibody banding patterns appears to be related with the expression of 3 protein families of Taenia solium, and in turn with the characteristics of NCC in the CNS (type, stage, and burden of viable cysts). We evaluated EITB antibody banding patterns and brain imaging findings of 548 NCC cases. Similar banding patterns were grouped into homogeneous classes using latent class analysis. The association between classes and brain imaging findings was assessed. Four classes were identified. Class 1 (patients negative or only positive to the GP50 band, related to the protein family of the same name) was associated with nonviable or single viable parenchymal cysticerci; class 2 (patients positive to bands GP42-39 and GP24, related to the T24-42 protein family, with or without anti-GP50 antibodies) was associated with intraparenchymal viable and nonviable infections; classes 3 and 4 (positive to GP50, GP42-39, and GP24 but also responding to low molecular weight bands GP21, GP18, GP14, and GP13, related to the 8 kDa protein family) were associated with extraparenchymal and intraparenchymal multiple viable cysticerci. EITB antibody banding patterns correlate with brain imaging findings and complement imaging information for the diagnosis of NCC and for staging NCC patients. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. There's an App for That!: New Directions Using Social Media in Patient Education and Support.

    Wellde, Paula T; Miller, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    Social media has opened the door of information to patients and fundamentally changed communication in ways never imagined 30 years ago. Apps and Web sites from professional organizations as well as private individuals and commercial businesses abound. Opportunities for both research and unique forms of social and emotional support are part of the trend. While there are obvious advantages to having so much information available, social media has disadvantages as well. Today's clinicians need to understand how to access and evaluate social media for patient education and provide guidance for patients seeking health information from the cloud.

  10. Heart Transplant and Mechanical Circulatory Support in Patients With Advanced Heart Failure.

    Sánchez-Enrique, Cristina; Jorde, Ulrich P; González-Costello, José

    2017-05-01

    Patients with advanced heart failure have a poor prognosis and heart transplant is still the best treatment option. However, the scarcity of donors, long waiting times, and an increasing number of unstable patients have favored the development of mechanical circulatory support. This review summarizes the indications for heart transplant, candidate evaluation, current immunosuppression strategies, the evaluation and treatment of rejection, infectious prophylaxis, and short and long-term outcomes. Regarding mechanical circulatory support, we distinguish between short- and long-term support and the distinct strategies that can be used: bridge to decision, recovery, candidacy, transplant, and destination therapy. We then discuss indications, risk assessment, management of complications, especially with long-term support, and outcomes. Finally, we discuss future challenges and how the widespread use of long-term support for patients with advanced heart failure will only be viable if their complications and costs are reduced. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of emotional support on serum cortisol in breast cancer patients

    Sampoornam Webster

    2016-01-01

    Methods: The study was designed to compare the effectiveness of emotional support focused nurse directed intervention in terms of verbal, written and telephone basis on serum cortisol among breast cancer patients in Cancer Centre at Erode. Participants were randomly allocated by using Sequentially Numbered Opaque Sealed Envelope (SNOSE method. 2 ml of blood samples were collected from 30 breast cancer patients who were selected randomly by adopting random number table, 10 in each experimental arm during evening at 18 hour; radioimmunoassay method was used to measure the level of serum cortisol before and after intervention. The intervention was given twice in a week for the duration of 30-45 minutes, in which early 20-30 minutes spares to express thoughts and feelings of the participants and subsequent 10-15 minutes for rendering informational support and later follow up session for the period of 1 month. Results: Emotional support was effective in reducing serum cortisol level among breast cancer patients. There was no statistically significant difference between arms on serum cortisol levels. Conclusions: Marginal differences were noted between posttest mean scores of serum cortisol among verbal, written and telephone arms. Further emotional support can be rendered according to the preference of the breast cancer patients.

  12. Treatment Outcome and Patient Satisfaction with Two Adjacent Implant-Supported Restorations in the Esthetic Zone

    Tymstra, Nynke; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Stellingsma, Kees; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Vissink, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic parameters as well as the esthetic outcome of two adjacent implant-supported restorations and the surrounding peri-implant mucosa in the maxillary esthetic zone. Ten patients were treated with two adjacent implants in the

  13. An online self-care education program to support patients after total laryngectomy : feasibility and satisfaction

    Cnossen, Ingrid C; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Eerenstein, Simone E J; Jansen, Femke; Witte, Birgit I; Lacko, Martin; Hardillo, José A; Honings, Jimmie; Halmos, Gyorgy B; Goedhart-Schwandt, Noortje L Q; de Bree, Remco; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of an online self-care education program supporting early rehabilitation of patients after total laryngectomy (TLPs) and factors associated with satisfaction. METHODS: Health care professionals (HCPs) were invited to participate

  14. An online self-care education program to support patients after total laryngectomy: feasibility and satisfaction

    Cnossen, Ingrid C; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F.; Eerenstein, Simone E J; Jansen, Femke; Witte, Birgit I.; Lacko, Martin; Hardillo, José A U; Honings, Jimmie; Halmos, Gyorgy B; Goedhart-Schwandt, Noortje L Q; de Bree, Remco; Leemans, C René; Leeuw, Irma M Verdonck de

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of an online self-care education program supporting early rehabilitation of patients after total laryngectomy (TLPs) and factors associated with satisfaction. METHODS: Health care professionals (HCPs) were invited to participate

  15. Early home-supported discharge for patients with stroke in Portugal

    Santana, Silvina; Rente, José; Neves, Conceição

    2017-01-01

    Measure at six months after stroke. Results: We randomised 190 patients of whom 34 were lost to follow-up. There were no significant differences (p > 0.5) in the average scores of Functional Independence Measure between the early home-supported discharge (69 ±22; mean ±SD) and the control groups (71 ±17...

  16. Survival benefit of cardiopulmonary bypass support in bilateral lung transplantation for emphysema patients

    Hepkema, BG; Loef, BG; van der Bij, W; Verschuuren, EAM; Lems, SPM; Ebels, T

    2002-01-01

    Background. This study is designed to examine a possible association of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) support and outcome of lung transplantation in a well-balanced group of emphysema patients. Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis of 62 consecutive primary bilateral lung transplantations

  17. Oral nutritional support of older (65 years+) medical and surgical patients after discharge from hospital

    Beck, Anne Marie; Holst, Mette; Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the effectiveness of oral nutritional support compared to placebo or usual care in improving clinical outcome in older (65 years+) medical and surgical patients after discharge from hospital. Outcome goals were: re-admissions, survival, nutritional and functional status, quality of life...

  18. A quality-of-data aware mobile decision support system for patients with chronic illnesses

    Larburu Rubio, Nekane; van Schooten, B.W.; Shalom, Erez; Fung, L.S.N.; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Jones, Valerie M.; Riano, David; Lenz, Richard; Miksch, Silvia; Peleg, Mor; Reichert, M.U.; ten Teije, Annette

    2015-01-01

    We present a mobile decision support system (mDSS) which runs on a patient Body Area Network consisting of a smartphone and a set of biosensors. Quality-of-Data (QoD) awareness in decision making is achieved by means of a component known as the Quality-of-Data Broker, which also runs on the

  19. Social Support, a Mediator in Collaborative Depression Care for Cancer Patients

    Oh, Hyunsung; Ell, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed whether perceived social support (PSS) is a factor in improving physical and functional well-being observed among cancer patients receiving collaborative depression care. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted of data collected in a randomized clinical trial testing the effectiveness of collaborative depression…

  20. Development of a tailored work-related support intervention for gastrointestinal cancer patients

    Zaman, Anne-Claire G. N. M.; Tytgat, Kristien M. A. J.; Van Hezel, Sanne; Klinkenbijl, Jean H. G.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2017-01-01

    Aim is the development of a work-related support intervention, tailored to the severity of work-related problems of patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal (GI) cancer treated with curative intent. Two methods were used: (1) Work-related problems were identified from the literature and submitted to

  1. The design of patient decision support interventions: addressing the theory-practice gap

    Elwyn, G.; Stiel, M.; Durand, M.A.; Boivin, J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although an increasing number of decision support interventions for patients (including decision aids) are produced, few make explicit use of theory. We argue the importance of using theory to guide design. The aim of this work was to address this theory-practice gap and to examine how a

  2. An online self-care education program to support patients after total laryngectomy : feasibility and satisfaction

    Cnossen, Ingrid C; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Eerenstein, Simone E J; Jansen, Femke; Witte, Birgit I; Lacko, Martin; Hardillo, José A; Honings, Jimmie; Halmos, Gyorgy B; Goedhart-Schwandt, Noortje L Q; de Bree, Remco; Leemans, C René; Leeuw, Irma M Verdonck-de

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of an online self-care education program supporting early rehabilitation of patients after total laryngectomy (TLPs) and factors associated with satisfaction. Health care professionals (HCPs) were invited to participate and to recruit

  3. Effect of intensive nutritional counseling and support on clinical outcomes of hemodialysis patients.

    Molfino, Alessio; Chiappini, Maria Grazia; Laviano, Alessandro; Ammann, Thomas; Bollea, Maria Rosa; Alegiani, Filippo; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo; Muscaritoli, Maurizio

    2012-10-01

    Protein-energy wasting is frequently found in patients on hemodialysis (HD). Anorexia and hypophagia contribute to malnutrition and increased morbidity and mortality, but the clinical impact of correcting hypophagia remains uncertain. We evaluated whether the correction of hypophagia influences morbidity and mortality in anorexic patients on HD. Thirty-four patients on HD were enrolled in a 2-y follow-up program including regular nutritional assessments. Patients not meeting the nutritional requirements during the follow-up received nutritional counseling, consisting of advice, individually tailored diets, and, for a failed dietary intervention, artificial nutrition. Biochemical, anthropometric, and body composition parameters, morbidity, and mortality were recorded in all patients at 12 and 24 mo. At baseline, 14 patients (41%) were anorexic, and 20 patients (59%) were non-anorexic. Anorexic patients were hypophagic and presented with a decreased fat-free mass. After 12 and 24 mo, cholesterol, albumin, lymphocyte count, and body mass index did not differ between the groups, whereas fat-free mass (percentage) in supplemented anorexic patients significantly improved in no longer differing from non-anorexic patients (65.8 ± 4.4 versus 65.4 ± 8.9, respectively, P = NS; 65.8 ± 4.4 versus 66.7 ± 10.78, respectively, P = NS). Morbidity and mortality were not different between the two groups. In patients on HD, nutritional counseling and nutritional support positively affect the nutritional status in hypophagic patients and make the risk of morbidity and mortality in anorexic patients comparable to those of non-anorexic patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Nutritional support and parenteral nutrition in the oncological patient: an expert group consensus report].

    Camblor-Álvarez, Miguel; Ocón-Bretón, María Julia; Luengo-Pérez, Luis Miguel; Viruzuela, Juan Antonio; Sendrós-Maroño, María José; Cervera-Peris, Mercedes; Grande, Enrique; Álvarez-Hernández, Julia; Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula

    2018-01-10

    Malnutrition is a frequent medical problem of cancer patients that negatively impacts their quality of life. To analyze and respond to different issues related to the nutritional management of cancer patients in the clinical setting. A multidisciplinary group of experts in Medical Oncology, Pharmacy, and Nutrition developed a list of topics related to the nutritional status of cancer patients, which were grouped into three blocks: Nutritional support; Parenteral nutrition (PN); and Home PN (HPN) in cancer patients. A literature search, which included articles published in Spanish, English, and French until February 2017, was carried out. The document was organized as a questionnaire with those questions that, according to the panel's criteria, could generate greater controversy or doubt. Of the 18 questions addressed, 9 focused on nutritional support: 5 were related to PN and 4 about HPN. Among the different recommendations, the panel emphasized that in the cancer patient, PN is indicated mainly when it is not possible to use the digestive tract and/or oral feeding and/or enteral nutrition is not sufficient or possible. Additionally, the objective of the HPN is to improve or maintain the nutritional status of a patient at home. This document seeks to lay down a set of recommendations and to identify key issues that may be useful for the nutritional management of cancer Patients.

  5. Health of women: associations among life events, social support, and personality for selected patient groups.

    Norlander, T; Dahlin, A; Archer, T

    2000-02-01

    This study examined the effects of life events, social support, personality traits, and siblings' birth-order on the health of women. 199 middle-class participants were included. 95 women, randomly assigned from four different patient groups, were compared with a control group of 96 randomly selected women without any special health problems. They completed a questionnaire which included questions regarding family background, health, different life events, social support, and signs of disease and a projective test, the Sivik Psychosomatism Test. Analysis indicated that report of negative life events was associated with more physical symptoms than positive life events and that the patient groups reported more negative life events and less social support than the control group.

  6. Providing nutritional support to patients with thoracic cancer: findings of a dedicated rehabilitation service.

    Percival, Cheryl; Hussain, Asmah; Zadora-Chrzastowska, Sonja; White, Gillian; Maddocks, Matthew; Wilcock, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    National guidelines recommend screening patients with thoracic cancer to identify those requiring nutritional support. To help quantify this area of need, the associated workload and explore its impact, we report findings from a dedicated rehabilitation service. Patients were screened soon after diagnosis to determine the prevalence of malnutrition, and various aspects compared between malnourished and not malnourished groups. A nutritional care plan was instigated and all contacts recorded, together with follow-up body weight. Of 243 patients seen, 35% were malnourished which was associated with a palliative treatment intent (P group received oral nutritional supplements, but also experienced problems tolerating them. Over one month, neither the pattern nor magnitude of the change in weight differed between malnourished and not malnourished groups. Overall, weight was stable, increased or decreased in 52 (27%), 80 (42%) and 59 (31%) respectively, with no difference in overall survival (P = 0.16). Our data provides a pragmatic insight into the implications of following national guidance on nutritional screening and support in this patient group. Nutritional support failed to prevent weight loss in some patients, and did not appear to impact on survival; new assessments and treatments for cachexia are required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Patient-specific reconstruction plates are the missing link in computer-assisted mandibular reconstruction: A showcase for technical description.

    Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Smolka, Wenko; Giessler, Goetz A; Wilde, Frank; Probst, Florian A

    2015-06-01

    Preoperative planning of mandibular reconstruction has moved from mechanical simulation by dental model casts or stereolithographic models into an almost completely virtual environment. CAD/CAM applications allow a high level of accuracy by providing a custom template-assisted contouring approach for bone flaps. However, the clinical accuracy of CAD reconstruction is limited by the use of prebent reconstruction plates, an analogue step in an otherwise digital workstream. In this paper the integration of computerized, numerically-controlled (CNC) milled, patient-specific mandibular plates (PSMP) within the virtual workflow of computer-assisted mandibular free fibula flap reconstruction is illustrated in a clinical case. Intraoperatively, the bone segments as well as the plate arms showed a very good fit. Postoperative CT imaging demonstrated close approximation of the PSMP and fibular segments, and good alignment of native mandible and fibular segments and intersegmentally. Over a follow-up period of 12 months, there was an uneventful course of healing with good bony consolidation. The virtual design and automated fabrication of patient-specific mandibular reconstruction plates provide the missing link in the virtual workflow of computer-assisted mandibular free fibula flap reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of integrin-linked kinase for functional capacity of endothelial progenitor cells in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    Werner, Christian; Boehm, Michael; Friedrich, Erik B.

    2008-01-01

    Number and function of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are down-regulated in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a signal and adaptor protein that regulates survival of mature endothelial cells and vascular development. Here we show that EPC dysfunction in patients with CAD is paralleled by down-regulation of ILK while restoration of ILK expression rescues the migratory defect of CAD-EPCs. Human EPCs transduced with dominant-negative ILK (DN-ILK) display significantly reduced expression of CD34 + /VEGFR-2 + , DiI-Ac-LDL uptake, and Ulex europaeus lectin binding. Mechanistically, DN-ILK-transfected EPCs are characterized by decreased proliferation, while proliferation is increased in wild-type ILK-transfected EPCs. These effects are paralleled by changes in cyclin D1 expression, colony forming units, and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Functionally, ILK is necessary and sufficient for SDF-1-triggered migration and adhesion in EPCs. These data extend current knowledge about the role of ILK in EPC biology and implicate ILK as a therapeutic target in CAD.

  9. Successful treatment with infliximab for inflammatory colitis in a patient with X-linked anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency.

    Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Obara, Megumi; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Kawai, Tomoki; Tahara, Yoshihiro; Sameshima, Naoki; Marutsuka, Kousuke; Nakase, Hiroshi; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Heike, Toshio; Nunoi, Hiroyuki

    2012-02-01

    X-linked anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency (X-EDA-ID) is caused by hypomorphic mutations in the gene encoding nuclear factor-κB essential modulator protein (NEMO). Patients are susceptibile to diverse pathogens due to insufficient cytokine and frequently show severe chronic colitis. An 11-year-old boy with X-EDA-ID was hospitalized with autoimmune symptoms and severe chronic colitis which had been refractory to immunosuppressive drugs. Since tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α is responsible for the pathogenesis of NEMO colitis according to intestinal NEMO and additional TNFR1 knockout mice studies, and high levels of TNFα-producing mononuclear cells were detected in the patient due to the unexpected gene reversion mosaicism of NEMO, an anti-TNFα monoclonal antibody was administered to ameliorate his abdominal symptoms. Repeated administrations improved his colonoscopic findings as well as his dry skin along with a reduction of TNFα-expressing T cells. These findings suggest TNF blockade therapy is of value for refractory NEMO colitis with gene reversion.

  10. Interventions for supporting informal caregivers of patients in the terminal phase of a disease.

    Candy, Bridget; Jones, Louise; Drake, Robyn; Leurent, Baptiste; King, Michael

    2011-06-15

    Patients in the terminal phase of a disease may have complex needs. It is often family and friends who play a central role in providing support, despite health professional input and regardless of whether the patient is at home or elsewhere. Such informal caring may involve considerable physical, psychological, and economic stresses. A range of supportive programmes for caregivers is being developed including psychological support and practical assistance. To assess the effects of supportive interventions that aim to improve the psychological and physical health of informal caregivers of patients in the terminal phase of their illness. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 2 2010); MEDLINE (1950 to May 2010); EMBASE (1980 to May 2010); PsycINFO (1872 to May 2010); CINAHL (1937 to May 2010); National Health Service Research Register (2000 to November 2008) and Dissertation Abstracts (1716 to May 2010). We searched the reference lists of relevant studies; contacted experts; and handsearched journals. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions to support adults who were caring for a friend or relative with a disease in the terminal phase. Interventions could include practical and emotional support and/or the facilitation of coping skills. Interventions could support caregivers indirectly via patient care. Two authors independently screened citations against the selection criteria. Data were extracted by one author and checked by another. This included extraction of any adverse effects. Risk of bias assessment was undertaken by two authors. We contacted trial authors to obtain missing information. Trial data were combined, where appropriate, on the review's primary outcomes. We included eleven RCTs involving 1836 caregiver participants. Nine interventions were delivered directly to the caregiver. Seven of these provided support in the caring role, another involved a family life review, and one

  11. PCI in Patients Supported With CF-LVADs: Indications, Safety, and Outcomes.

    Anyanwu, Emeka C; Ota, Takeyoshi; Sayer, Gabriel; Nathan, Sandeep; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; Shah, Atman; Uriel, Nir

    2016-06-01

    Patients with heart failure supported with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) may require coronary intervention during their support. This case series seeks to explore the indications, safety, and outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in this population. Electronic medical records of patients with LVADs undergoing PCI at a large academic medical center were reviewed. Demographics, reason for PCI, procedural success, complications, and outcomes were collected. From 2010-2014, a total of 6 patients underwent PCI post LVAD implantation. Three patients had PCI in the early postimplantation period (1-3 days post LVAD implantation) while the other three received it later in the LVAD support period. Three indications for PCI were found in the reviewed cases: right ventricular failure (right coronary artery stenting), bridge to left ventricular recovery, and ventricular tachycardia (VT) storm. All patients were maintained on triple blood thinning therapy (aspirin, clopidogrel, and warfarin). There were no acute complications during the interventions; however, 2 patients died in the early intervention period and 2 died much later. The 2 deaths in the early intervention period were related to fatal gastrointestinal bleeding while on dual-antiplatelet therapy and warfarin, and intractable VT that PCI did not correct. The 2 deaths in the late postintervention period occurred due to unknown causes nearly 1 and 2 years post intervention, respectively. PCI was performed in patients with continuous-flow LVAD with several possible indications and without acute complications. The utility of PCI in this patient population, however, is likely limited by the risk of bleeding related to combined antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapies as well as lack of immediate apparent benefit. Further studies are necessary to better characterize this risk as well as quantify any potential long-term benefits.

  12. Strategies for self-management support by patients with stroke: integrative review

    Huana Carolina Cândido Morais

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze strategies for self-management support by patients with stroke in the light of the methodology of the five A's (ask, advice, assess, assist and arrange. METHODS Integrative review conducted at the following databases CINAHL, SCOPUS, PubMed, Cochrane and LILACS. RESULTS A total of 43 studies published between 2000 and 2013 comprised the study sample. All proposed actions in the five A's methodology and others were included. We highlight the Assist and Arrange, in which we added actions, especially with regard to the use of technological resources and joint monitoring between patients, families and professionals. No study included all five A's, which suggests that the actions of supported self-management are developed in a fragmented way. CONCLUSION The use of five A's strategy provides guidelines for better management of patients with stroke with lower cost and higher effectiveness.

  13. MAXILLOFACIAL TRAUMA MANAGEMENT IN POLYTRAUMATIZED PATIENTS – THE USE OF ADVANCED TRAUMA LIFE SUPPORT (ATLS PRINCIPLES.

    Elitsa G. Deliverska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Management of the multiply injured patient requires a co-ordinated multi-disciplinary approach in order to optimise patients’ outcome. A working knowledge of the sort of problems these patients encounter is therefore vital to ensure that life-threatening injuries are recognised and treated in a timely pattern and that more minor associated injuries are not omitted. This article outlines the management of polytraumatized patients using the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS principles and highlights the areas of specific involvement of the engaged medical team. Advanced Trauma Life Support is generally regarded as the gold standard and is founded on a number of well known principles, but strict adherence to protocols may have its drawbacks when facial trauma co-exists. These can arise in the presence of either major or minor facial injuries, and oral and maxillofacial surgeons need to be aware of the potential problems.

  14. An IHE-conform telecooperation platform supporting the treatment of dementia patients

    Saleh K.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring medical support of patients of advanced age in rural areas is a major challenge. Moreover, the number of registered doctors—medical specialists in particular—will decrease in such areas over the next years. These unmet medical needs in combination with communication deficiencies among different types of health-care professionals pose threats to the quality of patient treatment. This work presents a novel solution combining telemedicine, telecooperation, and IHE profiles to tackle these challenges. We present a telecooperation platform that supports longitudinal electronic patient records and allows for intersectoral cooperation based on shared electronic medication charts and other documents. Furthermore, the conceived platform allows for an integration into the planned German telematics infrastructure.

  15. Satisfaction with support versus size of network: differential effects of social support on psychological distress in parents of pediatric cancer patients.

    Harper, Felicity W K; Peterson, Amy M; Albrecht, Terrance L; Taub, Jeffrey W; Phipps, Sean; Penner, Louis A

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the direct and buffering effects of social support on longer-term global psychological distress among parents coping with pediatric cancer. In both sets of analyses, we examined whether these effects depended on the dimension of social support provided (i.e., satisfaction with support versus size of support network). Participants were 102 parents of pediatric cancer patients. At study entry, parents reported their trait anxiety, depression, and two dimensions of their social support network (satisfaction with support and size of support network). Parents subsequently reported their psychological distress in 3- and 9-month follow-up assessments. Parents' satisfaction with support had a direct effect on longer-term psychological distress; satisfaction was negatively associated with distress at both follow-ups. In contrast, size of support network buffered (moderated) the impact of trait anxiety and depression on later distress. Parents with smaller support networks and higher levels of trait anxiety and depression at baseline had higher levels of psychological distress at both follow-ups; for parents with larger support networks, there was no relationship. Social support can attenuate psychological distress in parents coping with pediatric cancer; however, the nature of the effect depends on the dimension of support. Whereas interventions that focus on increasing satisfaction with social support may benefit all parents, at-risk parents will likely benefit from interventions that ensure they have an adequate number of support resources. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Identifying How Patient Portals May Be Effectively Used Among Mental Health Populations to Support Digital Inclusion: A Study Protocol.

    Strudwick, Gillian; Booth, Richard; Strauss, John

    2018-01-01

    Patient portals are secure online websites that allow patients access to their medical information from a particular healthcare organization. Currently, it is unknown how this technology can best be used to support patients with mental illness, and what types of indicators of portal adoption are meaningful to these patients. This study addresses this gap in our knowledge by obtaining the perspectives on this topic from patients, family members and Peer Support Workers.

  17. Conveying hope in consultations with patients with life-threatening diseases: the balance between supporting and challenging the patient.

    Werner, Anne; Steihaug, Sissel

    2017-06-01

    There is limited knowledge about the communication of hope and denial in consultations with patients with life-threatening diseases on a practical level. In this study, we explored a real-life medical consultation between a doctor and a patient with incurable cancer, focusing on conveying hope. We found one consultation especially suited for illustrating how a physician can convey and reinforce hope without attaching it to curative treatment. The consultation was analysed using a method for discourse analysis, where we took as a point of departure that discourse means language in use. The doctor communicated in a recognising manner, expressing respect for the patient as a subject and an authority of his own experiences. The doctor and patient succeeded in creating a good working alliance characterised by warmth and trust. Within this context, there was room for the doctor to challenge the patient's views and communicate disagreement. The doctor succeeds in conveying and maintaining hope. Within a good working alliance with the patient the doctor can convey hope by balancing between supporting and challenging him. Exploring and grasping the patient's real concerns is essential for being able to relieve and comfort him and convey hope.

  18. Intervention to improve social and family support for caregivers of dependent patients: ICIAS study protocol.

    Rosell-Murphy, Magdalena; Bonet-Simó, Josep M; Baena, Esther; Prieto, Gemma; Bellerino, Eva; Solé, Francesc; Rubio, Montserrat; Krier, Ilona; Torres, Pascuala; Mimoso, Sonia

    2014-03-25

    Despite the existence of formal professional support services, informal support (mainly family members) continues to be the main source of eldercare, especially for those who are dependent or disabled. Professionals on the primary health care are the ideal choice to educate, provide psychological support, and help to mobilize social resources available to the informal caregiver.Controversy remains concerning the efficiency of multiple interventions, taking a holistic approach to both the patient and caregiver, and optimum utilization of the available community resources. .For this reason our goal is to assess whether an intervention designed to improve the social support for caregivers effectively decreases caregivers burden and improves their quality of life. CONTROLled, multicentre, community intervention trial, with patients and their caregivers randomized to the intervention or control group according to their assigned Primary Health Care Team (PHCT). Primary Health Care network (9 PHCTs). Primary informal caregivers of patients receiving home health care from participating PHCTs. Required sample size is 282 caregivers (141 from PHCTs randomized to the intervention group and 141 from PHCTs randomized to the control group. a) PHCT professionals: standardized training to implement caregivers intervention. b) Caregivers: 1 individualized counselling session, 1 family session, and 4 educational group sessions conducted by participating PHCT professionals; in addition to usual home health care visits, periodic telephone follow-up contact and unlimited telephone support. Caregivers and dependent patients: usual home health care, consisting of bimonthly scheduled visits, follow-up as needed, and additional attention upon request.Data analysisDependent variables: Caregiver burden (short-form Zarit test), caregivers' social support (Medical Outcomes Study), and caregivers' reported quality of life (SF-12)INDEPENDENT VARIABLES: a) Caregiver: sociodemographic data

  19. Social support for patients undergoing liver transplantation in a Public University Hospital.

    Garcia, Clerison Stelvio; Lima, Agnaldo Soares; La-Rotta, Ehideé Isabel Gómez; Boin, Ilka de Fátima Santana Ferreira

    2018-02-17

    Several diseases may lead to the need for liver transplantation due to progressive organ damage until the onset of cirrhosis, resulting in changes in interpersonal relationships. Social Support for transplant candidates is an important variable, providing them with psychological and social well-being. This study aims to assess social support in chronic hepatic patients, waiting for liver transplantation. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 119 patients, for convenience sampling, from the liver transplant waiting list at a Brazilian University Hospital Outpatients. The information was collected through semistructured questionnaires, in four stages: 1) socioeconomic and demographic information 2) clinical aspects 3) feelings 4) Social Support Network Inventory (SSNI), to Brazilian Portuguese. The statistical analysis was conducted using ANOVA and multivariate linear regression analysis to evaluate the relationship between the scales of social support and the collected co-variables. Average age was 50.2 ± 11.6, and 87 (73.1%) were men. Patients with alcohol and virus liver disease etiology had the same frequency of 28%. The MELD, without extrapoints, was 16.7 ± 4.9. Global social support family score was 3.72 ± 0.39, and Cronbach's alpha = 0.79. The multivariate analysis presented the following associations, age = [- 0.010 (95% CI = - 0.010 - -0.010); P = 0.001], etiology of hepatic disease = [- 0.212 (95% CI = - 0.37 - -0.05); P = 0.009], happiness = [- 0.214(95% CI = - 0.33 - -0.09) P = 0.001) and aggressiveness = [0.172 (95% CI = 0.040-0.030); P = 0.010). The social support was greater when the patients were younger (18 to 30 years). Patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, regardless of whether or not they were associated with virus, had less social support. As for feelings, the absence of happiness and the presence of aggressiveness showed a negative effect on social support.

  20. Evaluation of the quality of patient information to support informed shared decision‐making

    Godolphin, William; Towle, Angela; McKendry, Rachael

    2008-01-01

    Objectives (a) To find out how much patient information material on display in family physicians’ offices refers to management choices, and hence may be useful to support informed and shared decision‐making (ISDM) by patients and (b) to evaluate the quality of print information materials exchanged during the consultation, i.e. brought in by patients or given out by family physicians. Design All print information available for patients and exchanged between physicians and patients was collected in a single complete day of the office practices of 21 family physicians. A published and validated instrument (DISCERN) was used to assess quality. Setting and participants Community office practices in the greater Vancouver area, British Columbia, Canada. The physicians were purposefully recruited by their association with the medical school Department of Family Practice, their interest in providing patients with print information and their representation of a range of practice types and location. Main variables studied The source of the pamphlets and these categories: available in the physicians’ offices; exchanged between physician and patient; and produced with the explicit or apparent intent to support evidence‐based patient choice. Main outcome measures The quality of the print information to support ISDM, as measured by DISCERN and the ease of use and reliability of the DISCERN tool. Results and conclusions Fewer than 50% of pamphlets available in these offices fulfilled our minimum criteria for ISDM (mentioned more than one management option). Offices varied widely in the proportion of pamphlets on display that supported ISDM and how particular the physician was in selecting materials. The DISCERN tool is quick, valid and reliable for the evaluation of patient information. The quality of patient information materials used in the consultation and available in these offices was below midpoint on the DISCERN score. Major deficiencies were with

  1. Postabsorptive hyperglucagonemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus analyzed with a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Matsuo, Toshihiro; Miyagawa, Jun-Ichiro; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Miuchi, Masayuki; Ikawa, Takashi; Akagami, Takafumi; Tokuda, Masaru; Katsuno, Tomoyuki; Kushida, Akira; Inagaki, Takashi; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the performance of a novel sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for measuring glucagon (1-29) with monoclonal antibodies against both the C- and N-terminal regions of glucagon (1-29), and to analyze the differences in plasma levels and responses of glucagon (1-29) to oral glucose loading in normal glucose tolerance (NGT) subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The cross-reactivity against proglucagon fragments using the ELISA kit and two types of conventional radioimmunoassay (RIA) kits was evaluated. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was carried out with NGT subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the glucagon (1-29) concentration was measured using three types of kit. The ELISA kit clearly had the lowest cross-reactivity against miniglucagon (19-29) and glicentin (1-61). The oral glucose tolerance test was carried out with 30 NGT and 17 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The glucagon (1-29) levels measured by the ELISA kit after glucose loading were significantly higher at all time-points in the type 2 diabetes mellitus group than in the NGT group. However, the glucagon (1-29) levels measured by one RIA kit were significantly higher in the NGT group, and those measured with the other RIA kit were approximately the same among the groups. The novel sandwich ELISA accurately determines plasma glucagon (1-29) concentrations with much less cross-reactivity against other proglucagon fragments than conventional RIA kits.

  2. Emotions at work: what is the link to patient and staff safety? Implications for nurse managers in the NHS.

    Smith, Pam; Pearson, Pauline H; Ross, Fiona

    2009-03-01

    This paper sets the discussion of emotions at work within the modern NHS and the current prioritisation of creating a safety culture within the service. The paper focuses on the work of students, frontline nurses and their managers drawing on recent studies of patient safety in the curriculum, and governance and incentives in the care of patients with complex long term conditions. The primary research featured in the paper combined a case study design with focus groups, interviews and observation. In the patient safety research the importance of physical and emotional safety emerged as a key finding both for users and professionals. In the governance and incentives research, risk emerged as a key concern for managers, frontline workers and users. The recognition of emotions and the importance of emotional labour at an individual and organizational level managed by emotionally intelligent leaders played an important role in promoting worker and patient safety and reducing workplace risk. Nurse managers need to be aware of the emotional complexities of their organizations in order to set up systems to support the emotional wellbeing of professionals and users which in turn ensures safety and reduces risk.

  3. Health Professionals' Expanding eHealth Competences for Supporting Patients' Self-Management.

    Kujala, Sari; Rajalahti, Elina; Heponiemi, Tarja; Hilama, Pirjo

    2018-01-01

    An increasing number of new eHealth services that support patients' self-management has changed health professionals' work and has created a need for a new eHealth competence. In this study, we evaluated the health professionals' eHealth competences and training needs in a public health organization in Finland. The target organization's goal was to increase the number of eHealth services provided to patients, and health professionals and their competences were seen as critical for the adoption of services. Data was collected through an online survey of 701 health professionals working in the target organization. Professionals perceived their basic computer skills as good and they were mostly willing to use eHealth services in patient work. However, health professionals need guidance, especially in their patient work in the new eHealth-enabled environment. They were less confident about their competence to motivate and advise patients to use eHealth services and how to communicate with patients using eHealth solutions. The results also imply that eHealth competence is not merely about an individual's skills but that organizations need to develop new working processes, work practices and distribution of work. We suggest that the training and support