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Sample records for linearized drift kinetic

  1. Kinetic theory of drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, G.

    1988-01-01

    The linear stability of the electrostatic drift waves in slab geometry has been studied analytically and numerically. The effects of magnetic field with shear, of the finite Larmor radius, of an electron streaming, of a temperature gradient and of collisions have been retained. The analytical solution has been obtained using the matched asymptotic expansion technique, and an expression for the critical streaming parameter has been derived. Finally, assuming that the transport in the Reversed Field Pinches is dominated by this instability, a scaling law for the temperature in such machine is derived

  2. Energy of linear quasineutral electrostatic drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Correa-Restrepo, D.

    1993-01-01

    Certain kinds of nonlinear instabilities are related to the existence of negative-energy perturbations. In this paper, an exact energy expression for linear quasineutral electrostatic perturbations is derived within the framework of dissipationless multifluid theory that is valid for any geometry. Taking the mass formally as a tensor with, in general, different masses parallel and perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field allows one to treat in a convenient way different approximations such as the full dynamics and restriction to parallel dynamics or the completely adiabatic case. Application to slab configurations yields the result that the adiabatic approximation does not allow negative energy for perturbations which are perfectly localized at a mode resonant surface, whereas inclusion of the parallel dynamics does. This is in agreement with a recent numerical study of drift-wave turbulence within the framework of collisional two-fluid theory by B. Scott [Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 3289 (1990); Phys. Fluids B 4, 2468 (1992)]. A dissipationless theory can be formulated in terms of a Lagrangian, from which the energy is immediately obtained. We start with the nonlinear theory. The theory is formulated via a Lagrangian which is written in terms of displacement vectors ξ ν (x,t) such that all constraints are taken into account. The nonlinear energy is obtained from the Lagrangian by standard methods. The procedure used is the same as that developed in a forthcoming paper by Pfirsch and Sudan [Phys. Fluids B (to be published)] for ideal nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics theory. From the exact Lagrangian one obtains the Lagrangian of the linearized theory by simple expansion to second order in ξ ν . This Lagrangian then yields the energy of the linearized theory

  3. A multi water bag model of drift kinetic electron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, P.; Dreydemy Ghiro, F.; Berionni, V.; Gurcan, O.D.; Coulette, D.; Besse, N.

    2014-01-01

    A Multi Water Bag model is proposed for describing drift kinetic plasmas in a magnetized cylindrical geometry, relevant for various experimental devices, solar wind modeling... The Multi Water Bag (MWB) model is adapted to the description of a plasma with kinetic electrons as well as an arbitrary number of kinetic ions. This allows to describe the kinetic dynamics of the electrons, making possible the study of electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes, in addition to the effects of non adiabatic electrons on the ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes, that are of prime importance in the magnetized plasmas micro-turbulence [X. Garbet, Y. Idomura, L. Villard, T.H. Watanabe, Nucl. Fusion 50, 043002 (2010); J.A. Krommes, Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech. 44, 175 (2012)]. The MWB model is shown to link kinetic and fluid descriptions, depending on the number of bags considered. Linear stability of the ETG modes is presented and compared to the existing results regarding cylindrical ITG modes [P. Morel, E. Gravier, N. Besse, R. Klein, A. Ghizzo, P. Bertrand, W. Garbet, Ph. Ghendrih, V. Grandgirard, Y. Sarazin, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112109 (2007)]. (authors)

  4. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.C.; Frank, J.A.; Liska, D.J.; Potter, R.C.; Schamaun, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder

  5. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liska, Donald J.; Schamaun, Roger G.; Clark, Donald C.; Potter, R. Christopher; Frank, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  6. Variable-energy drift-tube linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.; Potter, James M.; Stovall, James E.

    1984-01-01

    A linear accelerator system includes a plurality of post-coupled drift-tubes wherein each post coupler is bistably positionable to either of two positions which result in different field distributions. With binary control over a plurality of post couplers, a significant accumlative effect in the resulting field distribution is achieved yielding a variable-energy drift-tube linear accelerator.

  7. Suppression of Phase Mixing in Drift-Kinetic Plasma Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. T.; Dellar, P. J.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Highcock, E. G.

    2017-12-01

    The solar wind and interstellar medium are examples of strongly magnetised, weakly collisional, astrophysical plasmas. Their turbulent fluctuations are strongly anisotropic, with small amplitudes, and frequencies much lower than the Larmor frequency. This regime is described by gyrokinetic theory, a reduced five-dimensional kinetic system describing averages over Larmor orbits. A turbulent plasma may transfer free energy, a measure of fluctuation amplitudes, from injection at large scales, typically by an instability, to dissipation at small physical scales like a turbulent fluid. Alternatively, a turbulent plasma may form fine scale structures in velocity space via phase-mixing, the mechanism that leads to Landau damping in linear plasma theory. Macroscopic plasma properties like heat and momentum transport are affected by both mechanisms. While each is understood in isolation, their interaction is not. We study this interaction using a Hankel-Hermite velocity space representation of gyrokinetic theory. The Hankel transform interacts neatly with the Bessel functions that arise from averaging over Larmor orbits, so the perpendicular velocity space is decoupled for linearized problems. The Hermite transform expresses phase mixing as nearest-neighbor coupling between parallel velocity space scales represented by Hermite mode numbers. We use this representation to study transfer mechanisms in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence, the long wavelength limit of gyrokinetic theory. We show that phase space is divided into two regions, with one transfer mechanism dominating in each. Most energy is contained in the region where the fluid-like nonlinear cascade dominates. Moreover, in that region the nonlinear cascade interferes with phase mixing by exciting an "anti phase mixing" transfer of free energy from small to large velocity space scales. This cancels out the usual phase mixing, and renders the overall behavior fluid-like. These results profoundly change our understanding

  8. Non-linear coupling of drift modes in a quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.A.; Sandeman, J.C.; Tessema, G.Y.

    1990-01-01

    We report continuing experimental studies of non-linear interactions of drift waves, with direct evidence of a growth saturation mechanism by transfer of energy to lower frequency modes. Wave launching experiments show that the decay rate of drift waves can be strongly amplitude dependent. (author) 9 refs., 5 figs

  9. Linear and nonlinear kinetic-stability studies in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.; Chance, M.S.; Chen, L.; Krommes, J.A.; Lee, W.W.; Rewoldt, G.

    1982-09-01

    This paper presents results of theoretical investigations on important linear kinetic properties of low frequency instabilities in toroidal systems and on nonlinear processes which could significantly influence their impact on anomalous transport. Analytical and numerical methods and also particle simulations have been employed to carry out these studies. In particular, the following subjects are considered: (1) linear stability analysis of kinetic instabilities for realistic tokamak equilibria and the application of such calculations to the PDX and PLT tokamak experiments including the influence of a hot beam-ion component; (2) determination of nonlinearly saturated, statistically steady states of three interacting drift modes; and (3) gyrokinetic particle simulation of drift instabilities

  10. Linearized gyro-kinetic equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catto, P.J.; Tsang, K.T.

    1976-01-01

    An ordering of the linearized Fokker-Planck equation is performed in which gyroradius corrections are retained to lowest order and the radial dependence appropriate for sheared magnetic fields is treated without resorting to a WKB technique. This description is shown to be necessary to obtain the proper radial dependence when the product of the poloidal wavenumber and the gyroradius is large (k rho much greater than 1). A like particle collision operator valid for arbitrary k rho also has been derived. In addition, neoclassical, drift, finite β (plasma pressure/magnetic pressure), and unperturbed toroidal electric field modifications are treated

  11. Verification of continuum drift kinetic equation solvers in NIMROD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, E. D.; Ji, J.-Y. [Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322-4415 (United States); Kruger, S. E. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Belli, E. A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Lyons, B. C. [Program in Plasma Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Verification of continuum solutions to the electron and ion drift kinetic equations (DKEs) in NIMROD [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comp. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] is demonstrated through comparison with several neoclassical transport codes, most notably NEO [E. A. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 015015 (2012)]. The DKE solutions use NIMROD's spatial representation, 2D finite-elements in the poloidal plane and a 1D Fourier expansion in toroidal angle. For 2D velocity space, a novel 1D expansion in finite elements is applied for the pitch angle dependence and a collocation grid is used for the normalized speed coordinate. The full, linearized Coulomb collision operator is kept and shown to be important for obtaining quantitative results. Bootstrap currents, parallel ion flows, and radial particle and heat fluxes show quantitative agreement between NIMROD and NEO for a variety of tokamak equilibria. In addition, velocity space distribution function contours for ions and electrons show nearly identical detailed structure and agree quantitatively. A Θ-centered, implicit time discretization and a block-preconditioned, iterative linear algebra solver provide efficient electron and ion DKE solutions that ultimately will be used to obtain closures for NIMROD's evolving fluid model.

  12. Warm ion effects on kinetic drift cyclotron loss cone instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Shichong; Shen Jiewu; Cai Shidong

    1988-01-01

    The effects of adding warm plasmas on the kinetic DCLC mode in high β loss cone plasmas are investigated in detail. It is found that when the fluid DCLC mode is stabilized by a small amount of warm plasma, the kinetic excitation still remains due to two different mechanisms, namely, (1) magnetic drift resonance dissipation excites the negative energy wave; (2) a new type of positive energy wave can become unstable as the resonance condition is met. Comparing with fluid approximation theory, more warm plasmas are needed to suppress the kinetic DCLC instabilities

  13. Drift-free kinetic equations for turbulent dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, A.; Swailes, D. C.; Skartlien, R.

    2012-11-01

    The dispersion of passive scalars and inertial particles in a turbulent flow can be described in terms of probability density functions (PDFs) defining the statistical distribution of relevant scalar or particle variables. The construction of transport equations governing the evolution of such PDFs has been the subject of numerous studies, and various authors have presented formulations for this type of equation, usually referred to as a kinetic equation. In the literature it is often stated, and widely assumed, that these PDF kinetic equation formulations are equivalent. In this paper it is shown that this is not the case, and the significance of differences among the various forms is considered. In particular, consideration is given to which form of equation is most appropriate for modeling dispersion in inhomogeneous turbulence and most consistent with the underlying particle equation of motion. In this regard the PDF equations for inertial particles are considered in the limit of zero particle Stokes number and assessed against the fully mixed (zero-drift) condition for fluid points. A long-standing question regarding the validity of kinetic equations in the fluid-point limit is answered; it is demonstrated formally that one version of the kinetic equation (derived using the Furutsu-Novikov method) provides a model that satisfies this zero-drift condition exactly in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems. In contrast, other forms of the kinetic equation do not satisfy this limit or apply only in a limited regime.

  14. Energy of linear quasi-neutral electrostatic drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Correa-Restrepo, D.

    1992-01-01

    An exact energy expression for linear quasi-neutral electrostatic perturbations is derived within the framework of dissipationless multi-fluid theory, valid for any geometry. Taking the mass as a tensor with, in general, different masses parallel and perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field allows one to treat the full dynamics and also to restrict consideration to parallel dynamics or to the completely adiabatic case. Application to slab configurations yields the result that in plane geometry the adiabatic approximation does not allow negative-energy perturbations, whereas inclusion of the parallel dynamics does. This is in agreement with a numerical study of drift-wave turbulence within the framework of collisional two-fluid theory by B. Scott. Unlike Scott, we consider a dissipationless theory. Whereas the nonlinear energy is just kinetic plus potential plus thermal energy, the energy of perturbations depends on constraints. In a multi-fluid quasi-neutral electrostatic theory, from which we start, such constraints are mass conservation and entropy conservation. The latter is violated if heat conduction, heat sources (e.g. Joule heating) and heat sinks play a role. Hence, the energy expressions obtained are, valid only when situations where this is not the case or where these phenomena do not influence the entropy constraint. The latter is the case if the heat conduction is infinitely large such that the equilibrium temperature profiles T ν (x) of the various particle species ν are independent of x and δT ν =0. A vanishing temperature perturbation results in an entropy-conserving theory if one takes the adiabatic coefficients γ ν =1. This is possible, however, only for the perturbations; the equilibrium energy would diverge. When we consider this case, we do it in the way that the γs are put equal to 1 only after having obtained the perturbed energy for general γs. (author) 7 refs

  15. Linear local stability of electrostatic drift modes in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, O.; Nakajima, N.; Sugama, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the stability of the drift wave in helical systems. For this purpose, we solve the linear local gyrokinetic-Poisson equation, in the electrostatic regime. As a model of helical plasmas, Large helical Device (LHD) is considered. The equation we apply is rather exact in the framework of linear gyrokinetic theory, where only the approximation is the ballooning representation. In this paper, we consider only collisionless cases. All the frequency regime can be naturally reated without any assumptions, and in such cases, ion temperature gradient modes (ITG), trapped electron modes (TEM), and electron temperature gradient modes (ETG) are expected to become unstable linearly independently. (orig.)

  16. A nondissipative simulation method for the drift kinetic equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tomo-Hiko; Sugama, Hideo; Sato, Tetsuya

    2001-07-01

    With the aim to study the ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence, a nondissipative kinetic simulation scheme is developed and comprehensively benchmarked. The new simulation method preserving the time-reversibility of basic kinetic equations can successfully reproduce the analytical solutions of asymmetric three-mode ITG equations which are extended to provide a more general reference for benchmarking than the previous work [T.-H. Watanabe, H. Sugama, and T. Sato: Phys. Plasmas 7 (2000) 984]. It is also applied to a dissipative three-mode system, and shows a good agreement with the analytical solution. The nondissipative simulation result of the ITG turbulence accurately satisfies the entropy balance equation. Usefulness of the nondissipative method for the drift kinetic simulations is confirmed in comparisons with other dissipative schemes. (author)

  17. A novel self-biased linear silicon drift detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsi, F.; Gramegna, G.; Marzocca, C.

    1999-01-01

    A novel linear silicon drift detector (SDD) is proposed in which the proper potential profile is established by the voltage drop along a unique p + cathode implanted across the surfaces. This p + implant, arranged in a zigzag shape, acts at the same time as voltage divider and field cathode and allows one to increase the sensitive area, improving also the uniformity of the thermal distribution and thus minimizing the fluctuation of the electron mobility on the sensitive zone of the SDD. The perturbations of the drift field due to the asymmetry of the strips constituting the zigzag cathode have been evaluated by solving analytically Poisson's equation for a simplified model of the structure. Three-dimensional numerical simulations have been carried out to prove the negligible amount of the perturbation and the effectiveness of the proposed structure. Based on this principle, a prototype has been manufactured at Canberra Semiconductor Company. Dynamic measurements of the time-of-flight of an injected charge prove that the linearity of the prototype and the drift uniformity in the anode direction are very high

  18. Drift-kinetic Alfven modes in high performance tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaun, A.; Fasoli, A.F.; Testa, D.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L.

    2001-01-01

    The stability of fast-particle driven Alfven eigenmodes is modeled in high performance tokamaks, successively with a conventional shear, an optimized shear and a tight aspect ratio plasma. A large bulk pressure yields global kinetic Alfven eigenmodes that are stabilized by mode conversion in the presence of a divertor. This suggests how conventional reactor scenarii could withstand significant pressure gradients from the fusion products. A large safety factor in the core q 0 >2.5 in deeply shear reversed configurations and a relatively large bulk ion Larmor radius in a low magnetic field can trigger global drift-kinetic Alfven eigenmodes that are unstable in high performance JET, NSTX and ITER plasmas. (author)

  19. Linear theory of drift-tearing and interchange modes in a screw pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhaver, C.

    1978-04-01

    A drift dispersion relation, as applied to a resistive incompressible plasma in a screw pinch, is derived. This dispersion relation incorporates both drift-tearing and drift-interchange modes and is valid throughout the collisional regime by including kinetic theory factors. The dispersion relation reduces to the drift-tearing dispersion relation in the zero pressure gradient limit, and to the classical resistive dispersion relation in the zero drift limit. The electron temperature gradient instability is still present. Now, however, the introduction of the interchange-drift instability increases the growth rate further above the tearing-drift case. (orig.) [de

  20. Benchmark test of drift-kinetic and gyrokinetic codes through neoclassical transport simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satake, S.; Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Idomura, Yasuhiro

    2009-09-01

    Two simulation codes that solve the drift-kinetic or gyrokinetic equation in toroidal plasmas are benchmarked by comparing the simulation results of neoclassical transport. The two codes are the drift-kinetic δf Monte Carlo code (FORTEC-3D) and the gyrokinetic full- f Vlasov code (GT5D), both of which solve radially-global, five-dimensional kinetic equation with including the linear Fokker-Planck collision operator. In a tokamak configuration, neoclassical radial heat flux and the force balance relation, which relates the parallel mean flow with radial electric field and temperature gradient, are compared between these two codes, and their results are also compared with the local neoclassical transport theory. It is found that the simulation results of the two codes coincide very well in a wide rage of plasma collisionality parameter ν * = 0.01 - 10 and also agree with the theoretical estimations. The time evolution of radial electric field and particle flux, and the radial profile of the geodesic acoustic mode frequency also coincide very well. These facts guarantee the capability of GT5D to simulate plasma turbulence transport with including proper neoclassical effects of collisional diffusion and equilibrium radial electric field. (author)

  1. Simulation of ITG instabilities with fully kinetic ions and drift-kinetic electrons in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Youjun; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott

    2017-10-01

    A turbulence simulation model with fully kinetic ions and drift-kinetic electrons is being developed in the toroidal electromagnetic turbulence code GEM. This is motivated by the observation that gyrokinetic ions are not well justified in simulating turbulence in tokamak edges with steep density profile, where ρi / L is not small enough to be used a small parameter needed by the gyrokinetic ordering (here ρi is the gyro-radius of ions and L is the scale length of density profile). In this case, the fully kinetic ion model may be useful. Our model uses an implicit scheme to suppress high-frequency compressional Alfven waves and waves associated with the gyro-motion of ions. The ion orbits are advanced by using the well-known Boris scheme, which reproduces correct drift-motion even with large time-step comparable to the ion gyro-period. The field equation in this model is Ampere's law with the magnetic field eliminated by using an implicit scheme of Faraday's law. The current contributed by ions are computed by using an implicit δf method. A flux tube approximation is adopted, which makes the field equation much easier to solve. Numerical results of electromagnetic ITG obtained from this model will be presented and compared with the gyrokinetic results. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award No. DE-SC0008801.

  2. A conservative scheme of drift kinetic electrons for gyrokinetic simulation of kinetic-MHD processes in toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, J.; Liu, D.; Lin, Z.

    2017-10-01

    A conservative scheme of drift kinetic electrons for gyrokinetic simulations of kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic processes in toroidal plasmas has been formulated and verified. Both vector potential and electron perturbed distribution function are decomposed into adiabatic part with analytic solution and non-adiabatic part solved numerically. The adiabatic parallel electric field is solved directly from the electron adiabatic response, resulting in a high degree of accuracy. The consistency between electrostatic potential and parallel vector potential is enforced by using the electron continuity equation. Since particles are only used to calculate the non-adiabatic response, which is used to calculate the non-adiabatic vector potential through Ohm's law, the conservative scheme minimizes the electron particle noise and mitigates the cancellation problem. Linear dispersion relations of the kinetic Alfvén wave and the collisionless tearing mode in cylindrical geometry have been verified in gyrokinetic toroidal code simulations, which show that the perpendicular grid size can be larger than the electron collisionless skin depth when the mode wavelength is longer than the electron skin depth.

  3. Hypocoercivity for linear kinetic equations conserving mass

    KAUST Repository

    Dolbeault, Jean; Mouhot, Clé ment; Schmeiser, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We develop a new method for proving hypocoercivity for a large class of linear kinetic equations with only one conservation law. Local mass conservation is assumed at the level of the collision kernel, while transport involves a confining potential, so that the solution relaxes towards a unique equilibrium state. Our goal is to evaluate in an appropriately weighted $ L^2$ norm the exponential rate of convergence to the equilibrium. The method covers various models, ranging from diffusive kinetic equations like Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equations, to scattering models or models with time relaxation collision kernels corresponding to polytropic Gibbs equilibria, including the case of the linear Boltzmann model. In this last case and in the case of Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equations, any linear or superlinear growth of the potential is allowed. - See more at: http://www.ams.org/journals/tran/2015-367-06/S0002-9947-2015-06012-7/#sthash.ChjyK6rc.dpuf

  4. Hypocoercivity for linear kinetic equations conserving mass

    KAUST Repository

    Dolbeault, Jean

    2015-02-03

    We develop a new method for proving hypocoercivity for a large class of linear kinetic equations with only one conservation law. Local mass conservation is assumed at the level of the collision kernel, while transport involves a confining potential, so that the solution relaxes towards a unique equilibrium state. Our goal is to evaluate in an appropriately weighted $ L^2$ norm the exponential rate of convergence to the equilibrium. The method covers various models, ranging from diffusive kinetic equations like Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equations, to scattering models or models with time relaxation collision kernels corresponding to polytropic Gibbs equilibria, including the case of the linear Boltzmann model. In this last case and in the case of Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equations, any linear or superlinear growth of the potential is allowed. - See more at: http://www.ams.org/journals/tran/2015-367-06/S0002-9947-2015-06012-7/#sthash.ChjyK6rc.dpuf

  5. Benchmark of the local drift-kinetic models for neoclassical transport simulation in helical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B.; Satake, S.; Kanno, R.; Sugama, H.; Matsuoka, S.

    2017-02-01

    The benchmarks of the neoclassical transport codes based on the several local drift-kinetic models are reported here. Here, the drift-kinetic models are zero orbit width (ZOW), zero magnetic drift, DKES-like, and global, as classified in Matsuoka et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 072511 (2015)]. The magnetic geometries of Helically Symmetric Experiment, Large Helical Device (LHD), and Wendelstein 7-X are employed in the benchmarks. It is found that the assumption of E ×B incompressibility causes discrepancy of neoclassical radial flux and parallel flow among the models when E ×B is sufficiently large compared to the magnetic drift velocities. For example, Mp≤0.4 where Mp is the poloidal Mach number. On the other hand, when E ×B and the magnetic drift velocities are comparable, the tangential magnetic drift, which is included in both the global and ZOW models, fills the role of suppressing unphysical peaking of neoclassical radial-fluxes found in the other local models at Er≃0 . In low collisionality plasmas, in particular, the tangential drift effect works well to suppress such unphysical behavior of the radial transport caused in the simulations. It is demonstrated that the ZOW model has the advantage of mitigating the unphysical behavior in the several magnetic geometries, and that it also implements the evaluation of bootstrap current in LHD with the low computation cost compared to the global model.

  6. Revisited global drift fluid model for linear devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The problem of energy conserving global drift fluid simulations is revisited. It is found that for the case of cylindrical plasmas in a homogenous magnetic field, a straightforward reformulation is possible avoiding simplifications leading to energetic inconsistencies. The particular new feature is the rigorous treatment of the polarisation drift by a generalization of the vorticity equation. The resulting set of model equations contains previous formulations as limiting cases and is suitable for efficient numerical techniques. Examples of applications on studies of plasma blobs and its impact on plasma target interaction are presented. The numerical studies focus on the appearance of plasma blobs and intermittent transport and its consequences on the release of sputtered target materials in the plasma. Intermittent expulsion of particles in radial direction can be observed and it is found that although the neutrals released from the target show strong fluctuations in their propagation into the plasma column, the overall effect on time averaged profiles is negligible for the conditions considered. In addition, the numerical simulations are utilised to perform an a-posteriori assessment of the magnitude of energetic inconsistencies in previously used simplified models. It is found that certain popular approximations, in particular by the use of simplified vorticity equations, do not significantly affect energetics. However, popular model simplifications with respect to parallel advection are found to provide significant deterioration of the model consistency.

  7. Non-Linear MDT Drift Gases like Ar/CO2

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksa, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Detailed measurements and simulations have been performed, investigating the properties of Ar/CO2 mixtures as a MDT drift gas. This note presents these measurements and compares them to other drift gases that have been simulated using GARFIELD, HEED and MAGBOLTZ.This note also describes systematic errors to be considered in the operation of precision drift chambers using such gases. In particular we analyze effects of background rate variations, gas-density changes, variations of the gas composition, autocalibration, magnetic field differences and non-concentricity of the wire. Their impact on the reconstructed muon momentum resolution was simulated with DICE/ATRECON.The different properties of linear and non-linear drift gases and their relative advantages and disadvantages are discussed in detail.

  8. BRIEF COMMUNICATION: On the drift kinetic equation driven by plasma flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaing, K. C.

    2010-07-01

    A drift kinetic equation that is driven by plasma flows has previously been derived by Shaing and Spong 1990 (Phys. Fluids B 2 1190). The terms that are driven by particle speed that is parallel to the magnetic field B have been neglected. Here, such terms are discussed to examine their importance to the equation and to show that these terms do not contribute to the calculations of plasma viscosity in large aspect ratio toroidal plasmas, e.g. tokamaks and stellarators.

  9. Comparison of electrostatic and electromagnetic synchronization of drift waves and suppression of drift wave turbulence in a linear device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, C; Grulke, O; Klinger, T, E-mail: christian.brandt@lpmi.uhp-nancy.f [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Experiments in a cylindrical magnetized plasma on the control of drift waves by means of two different spatiotemporal open-loop control systems-an electrostatic and an electromagnetic exciter-are reported. The drift wave dynamics is controlled by a mode-selective signal created with azimuthal arrangements of eight electrodes and eight saddle coils, respectively. Nonlinear interaction between the control signals and drift waves is observed, leading to synchronization of coherent drift waves and suppression of broadband drift wave turbulence. The cross-phase between density and potential fluctuations reduces from {approx}{pi}/2 in turbulence to {approx}0 in controlled turbulence. Hence, the cross-field transport is reduced to the level of coherent drift waves. For both control systems the coupling to the drift wave can be ascribed to the drive of parallel currents, on the one hand via direct electric contact and, on the other hand, via electromagnetic induction.

  10. The hybridized front end electronics of the Central Drift Chamber in the Stanford Linear Collider Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.C.; Kirsten, F.A.; Nakamura, M.

    1987-10-01

    In order to accommodate the high packaging density requirements for the front end electronics of the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) in the SLAC Linear Collider Detector (SLD), the CDC front end electronics has been hybridized. The hybrid package contains eight channels of amplifiers together with all the associated circuits for calibration, event recognition and power economy switching functions. A total of 1280 such hybrids are used in the CDC

  11. 2-D response mapping of multi-linear silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Hartmann, R.; Mezza, D.; Strueder, L.; Tassan Garofolo, F.

    2010-01-01

    Multi-linear silicon drift detectors (MLSDDs) are good candidates to fulfill simultaneous requirements for 2-D position-sensing and spectroscopy applications. The optimization of their design and performance as 2-D imagers requires a detailed study of timing properties of the charge cloud in the MLSDD architecture. In particular it is important to experimentally determine the dependence of the measured amplitude and time-of-arrival on the photon position of interaction so as to derive the 2D detector response. In this paper we will present a detailed experimental characterization aimed at measuring the detector amplitude response and its timing response. The dependence of charge cloud drift time on precise position of interaction has been measured as a function of detector biasing conditions.

  12. Numerical study of drift-kinetic evolution of collisional plasmas in tori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beasley, C.O. Jr.; Meier, H.K.; van Rij, W.I.; McCune, J.E.

    1976-03-01

    Preliminary numerical results for the dynamics of toroidally confined plasmas in the drift-kinetic, Fokker--Planck description are discussed. These solutions were obtained by using the techniques inherent to the collisional plasma model (CPM) described in detail elsewhere. An initial value problem is solved in the local approximation in which collisions and particle dynamics compete in a given magnetic field to set up a quasi-equilibrium. Both the plasma (guiding center) distribution function and many macroscopic quantities of interest are monitored. Good agreement with corresponding but more approximate theories is obtained over a wide range of collisionality, particularly with regard to the neoclassical particle flux. Encouraging confirmation of earlier results for the distribution function is achieved when due account is taken of the differing collisionality of particles with differing energies. These initial results indicate the potential importance of certain non-local effects as well as inclusion of self-consistency between fields and plasma currents and densities

  13. Linear kinetic theory and particle transport in stochastic mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomraning, G.C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We consider the formulation of linear transport and kinetic theory describing energy and particle flow in a random mixture of two or more immiscible materials. Following an introduction, we summarize early and fundamental work in this area, and we conclude with a brief discussion of recent results.

  14. Nonlocal linear theory of the gradient drift instability in the equatorial electrojet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronchi, C.; Similon, P.L.; Sudan, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    The linear global eigenmodes of the gradient drift instability in the daytime equatorial electrojet are investigated. A main feature of the analysis is the inclusion of ion-neutral and electron-neutral collision frequencies dependent on altitude. It is found that the basic characteristics and localization of the unstable modes are determined mainly by the profiles of the Pedersen and Hall mobilities, which are derived from the Cowling conductivity model and experimental data. The equilibrium density profile is parabolic, which is fairly representative of the actual measurements. The unstable modes are sensitive not to the details of this profile, but only to the average value of the gradient. The results are obtained from a direct numerical integration of nonlocal linearized equations. They are further analyzed through an eikonal analysis, which provides both an interpretation of the transient modes observed by Fu et al. (1986) and some additional physics insight into the linear evolution of the global unstable modes. Finally, it is shown that the previously reported short-wavelength stabilization effect due to velocity shear may be overshadowed by the presence of regions in which the transient modes can develop into absolute instabilities. copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  15. Lifetime estimation of zirconia ceramics by linear ageing kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fei; Inokoshi, Masanao; Vanmeensel, Kim; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Naert, Ignace; Vleugels, Jef

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, the ageing kinetics of zirconia ceramics were mainly derived from the sigmoidal evolution of the surface phase transformation as a function of time, as quantified by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD). However, the transformation propagation into the material should be better to monitor the ageing kinetics. In this work, μ-Raman spectroscopy was used to quantitatively measure the transformation profiles in depth as a function of ageing time at 160 °C, 140 °C, 134 °C and 110 °C. A linear relationship between the transformed depth and the ageing time was observed for all investigated yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (3Y-TZP). Furthermore, the μ-Raman investigation of residual stresses in the subsurface of aged 3Y-TZPs showed that the highest tensile stress was located just ahead of the transformation front, indicating the key responsibility of stress accumulation for transformation front propagating into the material. Moreover, the linear kinetics of the transformation propagation were more accurate to calculate the apparent activation energy of the ageing process and allowed a more straightforward estimation of the lifetime of 3Y-TZP at body temperature, as compared to the conventional ageing kinetic parameters obtained from the surface transformation analysis by XRD

  16. Non-linear punctual kinetics applied to PWR reactors simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cysne, F.S.

    1978-11-01

    In order to study some kinds of nuclear reactor accidents, a simulation is made using the punctual kinetics model for the reactor core. The following integration methods are used: Hansen's method in which a linearization is made and CSMP using a variable interval fourth-order Runge Kutta method. The results were good and were compared with those obtained by the code Dinamica I which uses a finite difference integration method of backward kind. (Author) [pt

  17. Estimating kinetic mechanisms with prior knowledge I: Linear parameter constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Autoosa; Navarro, Marco A; Milescu, Mirela; Milescu, Lorin S

    2018-02-05

    To understand how ion channels and other proteins function at the molecular and cellular levels, one must decrypt their kinetic mechanisms. Sophisticated algorithms have been developed that can be used to extract kinetic parameters from a variety of experimental data types. However, formulating models that not only explain new data, but are also consistent with existing knowledge, remains a challenge. Here, we present a two-part study describing a mathematical and computational formalism that can be used to enforce prior knowledge into the model using constraints. In this first part, we focus on constraints that enforce explicit linear relationships involving rate constants or other model parameters. We develop a simple, linear algebra-based transformation that can be applied to enforce many types of model properties and assumptions, such as microscopic reversibility, allosteric gating, and equality and inequality parameter relationships. This transformation converts the set of linearly interdependent model parameters into a reduced set of independent parameters, which can be passed to an automated search engine for model optimization. In the companion article, we introduce a complementary method that can be used to enforce arbitrary parameter relationships and any constraints that quantify the behavior of the model under certain conditions. The procedures described in this study can, in principle, be coupled to any of the existing methods for solving molecular kinetics for ion channels or other proteins. These concepts can be used not only to enforce existing knowledge but also to formulate and test new hypotheses. © 2018 Salari et al.

  18. A concept of a wide aperture klystron with RF absorbing drift tubes for linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolbilov, G.V.; Azorskij, N.I.; Fateev, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is devoted to a problem of optimal design of the electrodynamic structure of the X-band klystron for a linear collider. It is shown that optimal design should provide large aperture and a high power gain, about 80 dB. The most severe problem arising here is that of parasitic self-excitation of the klystron, which becomes more complicated at increasing aperture and power gain. Our investigations have shown that traditional methods for suppressing the self-excitation become ineffective at desired technical parameters of the klystron. A novel concept of a wide aperture klystron with distributed suppression of parasitic oscillations is presented. Results of experimental study of the wide-aperture relativistic klystron for VLEPP are presented. Investigations have been performed using the driving beam of the JINR LIA-3000 induction accelerator (E=1 MeV, I=250 A, τ=250 ns). To suppress self-excitation parasitic modes we have used technique of RF absorbing drift tubes. As a result, we have obtained design output parameters of the klystron and achieved level of 100 MW output power

  19. Validation study of a drift-wave turbulence model for CSDX linear plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, P.; Holland, C.; Thakur, S. C.; Tynan, G. R.

    2017-09-01

    A validation study of self-regulating drift-wave turbulence/zonal flow dynamics in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment linear plasma device using Langmuir probe synthetic diagnostics is presented in this paper. We use a set of nonlocal 3D equations, which evolve density, vorticity, and electron temperature fluctuations, and include proper sheath boundary conditions. Nonlinear simulations of these equations are carried out using BOUndary Turbulence (BOUT++) framework. To identify the dominant parametric dependencies of the model, a linear growth rate sensitivity analysis is performed using input parameter uncertainties, which are taken from the experimental measurements. For the direct comparison of nonlinear simulation results to experiment, we use synthetic Langmuir probe diagnostics to generate a set of synthetic ion saturation current and floating potential fluctuations. In addition, comparisons of azimuthal velocities determined via time-delay estimation, and nonlinear energy transfer are shown. We observe a significant improvement of model-experiment agreement relative to the previous 2D simulations. An essential component of this improved agreement is found to be the effect of electron temperature fluctuations on floating potential measurements, which introduces clear amplitude and phase shifts relative to the plasma potential fluctuations in synthetically measured quantities, where the simulations capture the experimental measurements in the core of plasma. However, the simulations overpredict the fluctuation levels at larger radii. Moreover, systematic simulation scans show that the self-generated E × B zonal flows profile is very sensitive to the steepening of density equilibrium profile. This suggests that evolving both fluctuations and equilibrium profiles, along with the inclusion of modest axial variation of radial profiles in the model are needed for further improvement of simulation results against the experimental measurements.

  20. Kinetic approach to plasma end loss from linear devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, H.

    1976-01-01

    A first step in the direction of a kinetic approach to end loss has been presented. This approach brings to light some fundamental processes not uncovered by the magnetohydrodynamic or guiding center approach. Attention was focused on the basically transient phenomenon in a way that describes the quite different behavior of collision dominated and collisionless ions, but ignores the magnetic nozzle effects near the ends of the system. The treatment illuminates some of the roles played by the parameter l/sub ii//L, and suggests the direction for more detailed investigations. End loss from linear systems is a very many faceted problem. Kinetic effects, magnetic effects, heat flow, etc. are all intermixed, and it will require a strong long term experimental and theoretical program to unravel all of its mysteries

  1. Reduction effect of neutral density on the excitation of turbulent drift waves in a linear magnetized plasma with flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitou, Y.; Yonesu, A.; Shinohara, S.; Ignatenko, M. V.; Kasuya, N.; Kawaguchi, M.; Terasaka, K.; Nishijima, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Kawai, Y.; Yagi, M.; Itoh, S.-I.; Azumi, M.; Itoh, K.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of reducing the neutral density to reach strong drift wave turbulence is clarified from the results of the extended magnetohydrodynamics and Monte Carlo simulations in a linear magnetized plasma. An upper bound of the neutral density relating to the ion-neutral collision frequency for the excitation of drift wave instability is shown, and the necessary flow velocity to excite this instability is also estimated from the neutral distributions. Measurements of the Mach number and the electron density distributions using Mach probe in the large mirror device (LMD) of Kyushu University [S. Shinohara et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 37, 1015 (1995)] are reported as well. The obtained results show a controllability of the neutral density and provide the basis for neutral density reduction and a possibility to excite strong drift wave turbulence in the LMD

  2. Linear kinetic enlightenment of a slab of nonuniform plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revenchuk, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    A phenomenon of linear kinetic regeneration of a harmonic electric-field perturbation beyond the nonuniform opacity barrier due to electrons trapped by a potential well is investigated. Such electrons are reflected by the well walls without loss of phase memory about the external perturbation, which is rehabilitated on the other side of the barrier. The incidence of the electromagnetic wave polarized in the plane of incidence on a plasma slab. Analytic expressions for the regenerated electric field and regeneration coefficient are obtained in the ballistic approximation. The dependence of the regeneration coefficient on shape of the electrostatic potential confining the wave barrier is discussed

  3. Electron transport parameters in CO$_2$: scanning drift tube measurements and kinetic computations

    OpenAIRE

    Vass, M.; Korolov, I.; Loffhagen, D.; Pinhao, N.; Donko, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents transport coefficients of electrons (bulk drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and effective ionization frequency) in CO2 measured under time-of-flight conditions over a wide range of the reduced electric field, 15Td

  4. Linear kinetic theory and particle transport in stochastic mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1994-03-01

    The primary goal in this research is to develop a comprehensive theory of linear transport/kinetic theory in a stochastic mixture of solids and immiscible fluids. The statistics considered correspond to N-state discrete random variables for the interaction coefficients and sources, with N denoting the number of components of the mixture. The mixing statistics studied are Markovian as well as more general statistics, such as renewal processes. A further goal of this work is to demonstrate the applicability of the formalism to real world engineering problems. This three year program was initiated June 15, 1993 and has been underway nine months. Many significant results have been obtained, both in the formalism development and in representative applications. These results are summarized by listing the archival publications resulting from this grant, including the abstracts taken directly from the papers

  5. Numerical Calculation of Transport Based on the Drift-Kinetic Equation for Plasmas in General Toroidal Magnetic Geometry: Numerical Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, J. M.; Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2009-01-01

    In this report we continue with the description of a newly developed numerical method to solve the drift kinetic equation for ions and electrons in toroidal plasmas. Several numerical aspects, already outlined in a previous report [Informes Tecnicos Ciemat 1165, mayo 2009], will be treated now in more detail. Aside from discussing the method in the context of other existing codes, various aspects will be now explained from the viewpoint of numerical methods: the way to solve convection equations, the adopted boundary conditions, the real-space meshing procedures along with a new software developed to build them, and some additional questions related with the parallelization and the numerical integration. (Author) 16 refs

  6. Numerical aspects of drift kinetic turbulence: Ill-posedness, regularization and a priori estimates of sub-grid-scale terms

    KAUST Repository

    Samtaney, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    We present a numerical method based on an Eulerian approach to solve the Vlasov-Poisson system for 4D drift kinetic turbulence. Our numerical approach uses a conservative formulation with high-order (fourth and higher) evaluation of the numerical fluxes coupled with a fourth-order accurate Poisson solver. The fluxes are computed using a low-dissipation high-order upwind differencing method or a tuned high-resolution finite difference method with no numerical dissipation. Numerical results are presented for the case of imposed ion temperature and density gradients. Different forms of controlled regularization to achieve a well-posed system are used to obtain convergent resolved simulations. The regularization of the equations is achieved by means of a simple collisional model, by inclusion of an ad-hoc hyperviscosity or artificial viscosity term or by implicit dissipation in upwind schemes. Comparisons between the various methods and regularizations are presented. We apply a filtering formalism to the Vlasov equation and derive sub-grid-scale (SGS) terms analogous to the Reynolds stress terms in hydrodynamic turbulence. We present a priori quantifications of these SGS terms in resolved simulations of drift-kinetic turbulence by applying a sharp filter. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. Numerical aspects of drift kinetic turbulence: ill-posedness, regularization and a priori estimates of sub-grid-scale terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samtaney, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    We present a numerical method based on an Eulerian approach to solve the Vlasov-Poisson system for 4D drift kinetic turbulence. Our numerical approach uses a conservative formulation with high-order (fourth and higher) evaluation of the numerical fluxes coupled with a fourth-order accurate Poisson solver. The fluxes are computed using a low-dissipation high-order upwind differencing method or a tuned high-resolution finite difference method with no numerical dissipation. Numerical results are presented for the case of imposed ion temperature and density gradients. Different forms of controlled regularization to achieve a well-posed system are used to obtain convergent resolved simulations. The regularization of the equations is achieved by means of a simple collisional model, by inclusion of an ad-hoc hyperviscosity or artificial viscosity term or by implicit dissipation in upwind schemes. Comparisons between the various methods and regularizations are presented. We apply a filtering formalism to the Vlasov equation and derive sub-grid-scale (SGS) terms analogous to the Reynolds stress terms in hydrodynamic turbulence. We present a priori quantifications of these SGS terms in resolved simulations of drift-kinetic turbulence by applying a sharp filter.

  8. Second-order kinetic model for the sorption of cadmium onto tree fern: a comparison of linear and non-linear methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2006-01-01

    A comparison was made of the linear least-squares method and a trial-and-error non-linear method of the widely used pseudo-second-order kinetic model for the sorption of cadmium onto ground-up tree fern. Four pseudo-second-order kinetic linear equations are discussed. Kinetic parameters obtained from the four kinetic linear equations using the linear method differed but they were the same when using the non-linear method. A type 1 pseudo-second-order linear kinetic model has the highest coefficient of determination. Results show that the non-linear method may be a better way to obtain the desired parameters.

  9. Doubling the spectrum of time-domain induced polarization: removal of non-linear self-potential drift, harmonic noise and spikes, tapered gating, and uncertainty estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Per-Ivar; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Larsen, Jakob Juul

    , a logarithmic gate width distribution for optimizing IP data quality and an estimate of gating uncertainty. Additional steps include modelling and cancelling of non-linear background drift and harmonic noise and a technique for efficiently identifying and removing spikes. The cancelling of non-linear background...... drift is based on a Cole-Cole model which effectively handles current induced electrode polarization drift. The model-based cancelling of harmonic noise reconstructs the harmonic noise as a sum of harmonic signals with a common fundamental frequency. After segmentation of the signal and determining....... The processing steps is successfully applied on full field profile data sets. With the model-based cancelling of harmonic noise, the first usable IP gate is moved one decade closer to time zero. Furthermore, with a Cole-Cole background drift model the shape of the response at late times is accurately retrieved...

  10. A bandwidth independent linear method for detection of carrier envelope phase drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goerbe, M.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Most of the femtosecond-scale physical phenomena can be experimentally investigated by using carrier-envelope phase (CEP) stabilized laser pulses only. The usual method of CEP stabilization requires laser pulses with a bandwidth of one octave broad at least. If the spectrum of the fundamental pulse itself is not sufficiently broad, then its bandwidth has to be broadened by use of any nonlinear method. Spectrally and spatially resolved interferometry (SSRI) has been proven to be a powerful technique for dispersion measurement of various materials and optical elements. It typically consists of a two-beam interferometer equipped with an imaging spectrograph. The interference pattern is imaged onto the input slit of the spectrograph, so that spatially (along the slit) and spectrally resolved interference fringes are formed on the 2D detector (CCD camera) inserted at the output plane of the spectrograph. In this paper we show that the visibility of the spectrally and spatially resolved interference fringes depends strongly on the CEP drift of subsequent pulses from a pulse train. When the pulses are CEP stabilized then the visibility has a definite extremum. To introduce the operation principle, let's assume a black box in the sample are of the interferometer illuminated by train of CEP-stabilized laser pulses. This imaginary black box would change only the CEP of the subsequent pulses by Δ ψ but leaves their dispersion relative to the reference pulse, i.e. the pulse propagating in the other arm of the interferometer, unchanged. The spatial position of the interference fringes depends on Δ ψ . If the subsequent fringes are formed by pulses with different CEP, the spatial position of each interference fringe changes. The detector, i.e. the CCD chip of the imaging spectrograph is slow, so that it actually captures many subsequent interference patterns, on top of each other. As a result, the visibility of the resulted and captured

  11. Nonlinear simulation of magnetic reconnection with a drift kinetic electron model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwingmann, W.; Ottaviani, M.

    2004-01-01

    The process of reconnection allows for a change of magnetic topology inside a plasma. It is an important process for eruptive phenomena in astrophysical plasma, and the sawtooth relaxation in laboratory plasma close to thermonuclear conditions. The sawtooth relaxation is associated with the collisionless electron tearing instability, caused by the electron inertia. A thorough treatment therefore requires a kinetic model for the electron dynamics. In this contribution, we report on the numerical simulation of the electron tearing instability by solving the Vlasov equation directly. The results confirm results of an early paper on the same subject, and extends them to smaller values of the collision skin depth d e = 0.25. Our results suggest a faster than exponential growth in the early nonlinear phase of the instability. We observe as well an asymmetry of the resulting fields. It seems, however, that the field structure becomes closer to the fluid case for small values of d e

  12. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonjae, E-mail: wol023@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I., E-mail: skrash@mae.ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Angus, J. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  13. DKE: a fast numerical solver for the 3-D relativistic bounce-averaged electron drift kinetic equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, J.; Peysson, Y

    2004-12-01

    A new original code for solving the 3-D relativistic and bounce-averaged electron drift kinetic equation is presented. It designed for the current drive problem in tokamak with an arbitrary magnetic equilibrium. This tool allows self-consistent calculations of the bootstrap current in presence of other external current sources. RF current drive for arbitrary type of waves may be used. Several moments of the electron distribution function are determined, like the exact and effective fractions of trapped electrons, the plasma current, absorbed RF power, runaway and magnetic ripple loss rates and non-thermal Bremsstrahlung. Advanced numerical techniques have been used to make it the first fully implicit (reverse time) 3-D solver, particularly well designed for implementation in a chain of code for realistic current drive calculations in high {beta}{sub p} plasmas. All the details of the physics background and the numerical scheme are presented, as well a some examples to illustrate main code capabilities. Several important numerical points are addressed concerning code stability and potential numerical and physical limitations. (authors)

  14. DKE: a fast numerical solver for the 3-D relativistic bounce-averaged electron drift kinetic equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.

    2004-12-01

    A new original code for solving the 3-D relativistic and bounce-averaged electron drift kinetic equation is presented. It designed for the current drive problem in tokamak with an arbitrary magnetic equilibrium. This tool allows self-consistent calculations of the bootstrap current in presence of other external current sources. RF current drive for arbitrary type of waves may be used. Several moments of the electron distribution function are determined, like the exact and effective fractions of trapped electrons, the plasma current, absorbed RF power, runaway and magnetic ripple loss rates and non-thermal Bremsstrahlung. Advanced numerical techniques have been used to make it the first fully implicit (reverse time) 3-D solver, particularly well designed for implementation in a chain of code for realistic current drive calculations in high β p plasmas. All the details of the physics background and the numerical scheme are presented, as well a some examples to illustrate main code capabilities. Several important numerical points are addressed concerning code stability and potential numerical and physical limitations. (authors)

  15. Anomalous electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters: Comparison between quasi-linear kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, T.; Martorelli, R.; Chabert, P.; Bourdon, A.

    2018-06-01

    Kinetic drift instabilities have been implicated as a possible mechanism leading to anomalous electron cross-field transport in E × B discharges, such as Hall-effect thrusters. Such instabilities, which are driven by the large disparity in electron and ion drift velocities, present a significant challenge to modelling efforts without resorting to time-consuming particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Here, we test aspects of quasi-linear kinetic theory with 2D PIC simulations with the aim of developing a self-consistent treatment of these instabilities. The specific quantities of interest are the instability growth rate (which determines the spatial and temporal evolution of the instability amplitude), and the instability-enhanced electron-ion friction force (which leads to "anomalous" electron transport). By using the self-consistently obtained electron distribution functions from the PIC simulations (which are in general non-Maxwellian), we find that the predictions of the quasi-linear kinetic theory are in good agreement with the simulation results. By contrast, the use of Maxwellian distributions leads to a growth rate and electron-ion friction force that is around 2-4 times higher, and consequently significantly overestimates the electron transport. A possible method for self-consistently modelling the distribution functions without requiring PIC simulations is discussed.

  16. Effects of drift gas on collision cross sections of a protein standard in linear drift tube and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurneczko, Ewa; Kalapothakis, Jason; Campuzano, Iain D G; Morris, Michael; Barran, Perdita E

    2012-10-16

    There has been a significant increase in the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to investigate conformations of proteins and protein complexes following electrospray ionization. Investigations which employ traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TW IM-MS) instrumentation rely on the use of calibrants to convert the arrival times of ions to collision cross sections (CCS) providing "hard numbers" of use to structural biology. It is common to use nitrogen as the buffer gas in TW IM-MS instruments and to calibrate by extrapolating from CCS measured in helium via drift tube (DT) IM-MS. In this work, both DT and TW IM-MS instruments are used to investigate the effects of different drift gases (helium, neon, nitrogen, and argon) on the transport of multiply charged ions of the protein myoglobin, frequently used as a standard in TW IM-MS studies. Irrespective of the drift gas used, recorded mass spectra are found to be highly similar. In contrast, the recorded arrival time distributions and the derived CCS differ greatly. At low charge states (7 ≤ z ≤ 11) where the protein is compact, the CCS scale with the polarizability of the gas; this is also the case for higher charge states (12 ≤ z ≤ 22) where the protein is more unfolded for the heavy gases (neon, argon, and nitrogen) but not the case for helium. This is here interpreted as a different conformational landscape being sampled by the lighter gas and potentially attributable to increased field heating by helium. Under nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI) conditions, where myoglobin is sprayed from an aqueous solution buffered to pH 6.8 with 20 mM ammonium acetate, in the DT IM-MS instrument, each buffer gas can yield a different arrival time distribution (ATD) for any given charge state.

  17. Estimation of power dissipation of a 4H-SiC Schottky barrier diode with a linearly graded doping profile in the drift region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Talwar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to establish the importance of a linearly graded profile in the drift region of a 4H-SiC Schottky barrier diode (SBD. The power dissipation of the device is found to be considerably lower at any given current density as compared to its value obtained for a uniformly doped drift region. The corresponding values of breakdown voltages obtained are similar to those obtained with uniformly doped wafers of 4H-SiC.

  18. Kinetic description of linear theta-pinch equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Davidson, R.C.

    1975-01-01

    Equilibrium properties of linear theta-pinch plasmas are studied within the framework of the steady-state (o/x=0) Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The analysis is carried out for an infinitely long plasma column aligned parallel to an externally applied axial magnetic field Bsub(z)sup(ext)esub(z). Equilibrium properties are calculated for the class of rigid-rotor Vlasov equilibria, in which the th component distribution function (Hsub(perpendicular), Psub(theta), upsilonsub(z) depends on perpendicular energy H and canonical angular momentum Psub(theta), exclusively through the linear combination Hsub(perpendicular)-ωsub(j)Psub(theta), where ω;=const.=angular velocity of mean rotation. General equilibrium relations that pertain to the entire class of rigid-rotor Vlasov equilibria are discussed; and specific examples of sharp- and diffuse-boundary equilibrium configurations are considered. Rigid-rotor density and magnetic field profiles are compared with experimentally observed profiles. A general prescription is given for determining the functional dependence of the equilibrium distribution function on Hsub(perpendicular)-ωsub(j)Psub(theta) in circumstances, where the density profile or magnetic field profile is specified. (author)

  19. The energy-momentum tensor for the linearized Maxwell-Vlasov and kinetic guiding center theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Morrison, P.J.; Texas Univ., Austin

    1990-02-01

    A modified Hamilton-Jacobi formalism is introduced as a tool to obtain the energy-momentum and angular-momentum tensors for any kind of nonlinear or linearized Maxwell-collisionless kinetic theories. The emphasis is on linearized theories, for which these tensors are derived for the first time. The kinetic theories treated - which need not be the same for all particle species in a plasma - are the Vlasov and kinetic guiding center theories. The Hamiltonian for the guiding center motion is taken in the form resulting from Dirac's constraint theory for non-standard Lagrangian systems. As an example of the Maxwell-kinetic guiding center theory, the second-order energy for a perturbed homogeneous magnetized plasma is calculated with initially vanishing field perturbations. The expression obtained is compared with the corresponding one of Maxwell-Vlasov theory. (orig.)

  20. The energy-momentum tensor for the linearized Maxwell-Vlasov and kinetic guiding center theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Morrison, P.J.

    1990-02-01

    A modified Hamilton-Jacobi formalism is introduced as a tool to obtain the energy-momentum and angular-momentum tensors for any king of nonlinear or linearized Maxwell-collisionless kinetic theories. The emphasis is on linearized theories, for which these tensors are derived for the first time. The kinetic theories treated --- which need not be the same for all particle species in a plasma --- are the Vlasov and kinetic guiding center theories. The Hamiltonian for the guiding center motion is taken in the form resulting from Dirac's constraint theory for non-standard Lagrangian systems. As an example of the Maxwell-kinetic guiding center theory, the second-order energy for a perturbed homogeneous magnetized plasma is calculated with initially vanishing field perturbations. The expression obtained is compared with the corresponding one of Maxwell-Vlasov theory. 11 refs

  1. Suppressing Thermal Energy Drift In The LLNL Flash X-Ray Accelerator Using Linear Disk Resistor Stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitzer, B R; Houck, T L; Luchterhand, O C

    2011-07-19

    This paper addresses thermal drift in sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors and their replacement with linear disk resistors from HVR Advanced Power Components. Sodium thiosulfate resistors in the FXR induction linear accelerator application have a temperature coefficient of {approx}1.8%/C. The FXR Marx banks send an 8kJ pulse through eight 524 cm{sup 3} liquid resistors at a repetition rate of up to 1 every 45 seconds. Every pulse increases the temperature of the solution by {approx}0.4 C which produces a 0.7% change in resistance. The typical cooling rate is {approx}0.4 C per minute which results in {approx}0.1% energy drop per pulse during continuous pulsed operations. A radiographic accelerator is extraordinarily sensitive to energy variations. Changes in beam energy produce movement in beam transport, changes in spot size, and large dose variations. If self-heating were the only problem, we could predict the increase in input voltage required to compensate for the energy loss. However, there are other variables that influence the temperature of the resistors such as focus magnet heating, changes in room temperature, changes in cooling water, where the cell is located, etc. Additionally not all of the resistors have equivalent cooling rates and as many as 32 resistors are driven from a single power source. The FXR accelerator group elected to replace the sodium thiosulfate resistors with HVR Linear Disk Resistors in a stack type configuration. With data limited for these resistors when used in oil and at low resistance values, a full characterization needed to be performed. High currents (up to 15kA), high voltages (up to 400kV), and Fast Rise times (<10ns) made a resistor choice difficult. Other solid resistors have been tried and had problems at the connection points and with the fact that the resistivity changed as they absorbed oil. The selected HVR resistors have the advantage of being manufactured with the oil impregnated in to them so this characteristic

  2. Suppressing Thermal Energy Drift In The LLNL Flash X-Ray Accelerator Using Linear Disk Resistor Stacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitzer, B.R.; Houck, T.L.; Luchterhand, O.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses thermal drift in sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors and their replacement with linear disk resistors from HVR Advanced Power Components. Sodium thiosulfate resistors in the FXR induction linear accelerator application have a temperature coefficient of ∼1.8%/C. The FXR Marx banks send an 8kJ pulse through eight 524 cm 3 liquid resistors at a repetition rate of up to 1 every 45 seconds. Every pulse increases the temperature of the solution by ∼0.4 C which produces a 0.7% change in resistance. The typical cooling rate is ∼0.4 C per minute which results in ∼0.1% energy drop per pulse during continuous pulsed operations. A radiographic accelerator is extraordinarily sensitive to energy variations. Changes in beam energy produce movement in beam transport, changes in spot size, and large dose variations. If self-heating were the only problem, we could predict the increase in input voltage required to compensate for the energy loss. However, there are other variables that influence the temperature of the resistors such as focus magnet heating, changes in room temperature, changes in cooling water, where the cell is located, etc. Additionally not all of the resistors have equivalent cooling rates and as many as 32 resistors are driven from a single power source. The FXR accelerator group elected to replace the sodium thiosulfate resistors with HVR Linear Disk Resistors in a stack type configuration. With data limited for these resistors when used in oil and at low resistance values, a full characterization needed to be performed. High currents (up to 15kA), high voltages (up to 400kV), and Fast Rise times (<10ns) made a resistor choice difficult. Other solid resistors have been tried and had problems at the connection points and with the fact that the resistivity changed as they absorbed oil. The selected HVR resistors have the advantage of being manufactured with the oil impregnated in to them so this characteristic is minimized while still

  3. Detection of kinetic change points in piece-wise linear single molecule motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Flynn R.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Duderstadt, Karl E.

    2018-03-01

    Single-molecule approaches present a powerful way to obtain detailed kinetic information at the molecular level. However, the identification of small rate changes is often hindered by the considerable noise present in such single-molecule kinetic data. We present a general method to detect such kinetic change points in trajectories of motion of processive single molecules having Gaussian noise, with a minimum number of parameters and without the need of an assumed kinetic model beyond piece-wise linearity of motion. Kinetic change points are detected using a likelihood ratio test in which the probability of no change is compared to the probability of a change occurring, given the experimental noise. A predetermined confidence interval minimizes the occurrence of false detections. Applying the method recursively to all sub-regions of a single molecule trajectory ensures that all kinetic change points are located. The algorithm presented allows rigorous and quantitative determination of kinetic change points in noisy single molecule observations without the need for filtering or binning, which reduce temporal resolution and obscure dynamics. The statistical framework for the approach and implementation details are discussed. The detection power of the algorithm is assessed using simulations with both single kinetic changes and multiple kinetic changes that typically arise in observations of single-molecule DNA-replication reactions. Implementations of the algorithm are provided in ImageJ plugin format written in Java and in the Julia language for numeric computing, with accompanying Jupyter Notebooks to allow reproduction of the analysis presented here.

  4. Treating experimental data of inverse kinetic method by unitary linear regression analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yusen; Chen Xiaoliang

    2009-01-01

    The theory of treating experimental data of inverse kinetic method by unitary linear regression analysis was described. Not only the reactivity, but also the effective neutron source intensity could be calculated by this method. Computer code was compiled base on the inverse kinetic method and unitary linear regression analysis. The data of zero power facility BFS-1 in Russia were processed and the results were compared. The results show that the reactivity and the effective neutron source intensity can be obtained correctly by treating experimental data of inverse kinetic method using unitary linear regression analysis and the precision of reactivity measurement is improved. The central element efficiency can be calculated by using the reactivity. The result also shows that the effect to reactivity measurement caused by external neutron source should be considered when the reactor power is low and the intensity of external neutron source is strong. (authors)

  5. Quasi-linear landau kinetic equations for magnetized plasmas: compact propagator formalism, rotation matrices and interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misguich, J.H.

    2004-04-01

    As a first step toward a nonlinear renormalized description of turbulence phenomena in magnetized plasmas, the lowest order quasi-linear description is presented here from a unified point of view for collisionless as well as for collisional plasmas in a constant magnetic field. The quasi-linear approximation is applied to a general kinetic equation obtained previously from the Klimontovich exact equation, by means of a generalised Dupree-Weinstock method. The so-obtained quasi-linear description of electromagnetic turbulence in a magnetoplasma is applied to three separate physical cases: -) weak electrostatic turbulence, -) purely magnetic field fluctuations (the classical quasi-linear results are obtained for cosmic ray diffusion in the 'slab model' of magnetostatic turbulence in the solar wind), and -) collisional kinetic equations of magnetized plasmas. This mathematical technique has allowed us to derive basic kinetic equations for turbulent plasmas and collisional plasmas, respectively in the quasi-linear and Landau approximation. In presence of a magnetic field we have shown that the systematic use of rotation matrices describing the helical particle motion allows for a much more compact derivation than usually performed. Moreover, from the formal analogy between turbulent and collisional plasmas, the results derived here in detail for the turbulent plasmas, can be immediately translated to obtain explicit results for the Landau kinetic equation

  6. Quasi-linear landau kinetic equations for magnetized plasmas: compact propagator formalism, rotation matrices and interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misguich, J.H

    2004-04-01

    As a first step toward a nonlinear renormalized description of turbulence phenomena in magnetized plasmas, the lowest order quasi-linear description is presented here from a unified point of view for collisionless as well as for collisional plasmas in a constant magnetic field. The quasi-linear approximation is applied to a general kinetic equation obtained previously from the Klimontovich exact equation, by means of a generalised Dupree-Weinstock method. The so-obtained quasi-linear description of electromagnetic turbulence in a magnetoplasma is applied to three separate physical cases: -) weak electrostatic turbulence, -) purely magnetic field fluctuations (the classical quasi-linear results are obtained for cosmic ray diffusion in the 'slab model' of magnetostatic turbulence in the solar wind), and -) collisional kinetic equations of magnetized plasmas. This mathematical technique has allowed us to derive basic kinetic equations for turbulent plasmas and collisional plasmas, respectively in the quasi-linear and Landau approximation. In presence of a magnetic field we have shown that the systematic use of rotation matrices describing the helical particle motion allows for a much more compact derivation than usually performed. Moreover, from the formal analogy between turbulent and collisional plasmas, the results derived here in detail for the turbulent plasmas, can be immediately translated to obtain explicit results for the Landau kinetic equation.

  7. Association of footprint measurements with plantar kinetics: a linear regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fascione, Jeanna M; Crews, Ryan T; Wrobel, James S

    2014-03-01

    The use of foot measurements to classify morphology and interpret foot function remains one of the focal concepts of lower-extremity biomechanics. However, only 27% to 55% of midfoot variance in foot pressures has been determined in the most comprehensive models. We investigated whether dynamic walking footprint measurements are associated with inter-individual foot loading variability. Thirty individuals (15 men and 15 women; mean ± SD age, 27.17 ± 2.21 years) walked at a self-selected speed over an electronic pedography platform using the midgait technique. Kinetic variables (contact time, peak pressure, pressure-time integral, and force-time integral) were collected for six masked regions. Footprints were digitized for area and linear boundaries using digital photo planimetry software. Six footprint measurements were determined: contact area, footprint index, arch index, truncated arch index, Chippaux-Smirak index, and Staheli index. Linear regression analysis with a Bonferroni adjustment was performed to determine the association between the footprint measurements and each of the kinetic variables. The findings demonstrate that a relationship exists between increased midfoot contact and increased kinetic values in respective locations. Many of these variables produced large effect sizes while describing 38% to 71% of the common variance of select plantar kinetic variables in the medial midfoot region. In addition, larger footprints were associated with larger kinetic values at the medial heel region and both masked forefoot regions. Dynamic footprint measurements are associated with dynamic plantar loading kinetics, with emphasis on the midfoot region.

  8. Rheokinetics and effect of shear rate on the kinetics of linear polyurethane formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarchian, AH; Picchioni, F; Janssen, LPBM

    In this article, the rheokinetics of polyurethane formation and the influence of shear rate on its kinetics have been studied. Two different linear polyurethane systems with 0% and 100% hard segments are examined in a cone and plate rheometer. The isothermal increase of viscosity during polyurethane

  9. On the asymptotic preserving property of the unified gas kinetic scheme for the diffusion limit of linear kinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieussens, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) of K. Xu et al. (2010) [37], originally developed for multiscale gas dynamics problems, is applied in this paper to a linear kinetic model of radiative transfer theory. While such problems exhibit purely diffusive behavior in the optically thick (or small Knudsen) regime, we prove that UGKS is still asymptotic preserving (AP) in this regime, but for the free transport regime as well. Moreover, this scheme is modified to include a time implicit discretization of the limit diffusion equation, and to correctly capture the solution in case of boundary layers. Contrary to many AP schemes, this method is based on a standard finite volume approach, it does neither use any decomposition of the solution, nor staggered grids. Several numerical tests demonstrate the properties of the scheme

  10. Using linear time-invariant system theory to estimate kinetic parameters directly from projection measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, G.L.; Gullberg, G.T.

    1995-01-01

    It is common practice to estimate kinetic parameters from dynamically acquired tomographic data by first reconstructing a dynamic sequence of three-dimensional reconstructions and then fitting the parameters to time activity curves generated from the time-varying reconstructed images. However, in SPECT, the pharmaceutical distribution can change during the acquisition of a complete tomographic data set, which can bias the estimated kinetic parameters. It is hypothesized that more accurate estimates of the kinetic parameters can be obtained by fitting to the projection measurements instead of the reconstructed time sequence. Estimation from projections requires the knowledge of their relationship between the tissue regions of interest or voxels with particular kinetic parameters and the project measurements, which results in a complicated nonlinear estimation problem with a series of exponential factors with multiplicative coefficients. A technique is presented in this paper where the exponential decay parameters are estimated separately using linear time-invariant system theory. Once the exponential factors are known, the coefficients of the exponentials can be estimated using linear estimation techniques. Computer simulations demonstrate that estimation of the kinetic parameters directly from the projections is more accurate than the estimation from the reconstructed images

  11. Consistent guiding center drift theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmel, H.K.

    1982-04-01

    Various guiding-center drift theories are presented that are optimized in respect of consistency. They satisfy exact energy conservation theorems (in time-independent fields), Liouville's theorems, and appropriate power balance equations. A theoretical framework is given that allows direct and exact derivation of associated drift-kinetic equations from the respective guiding-center drift-orbit theories. These drift-kinetic equations are listed. Northrop's non-optimized theory is discussed for reference, and internal consistency relations of G.C. drift theories are presented. (orig.)

  12. Rectangular drift tube characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, D.S.; Musienko, Yu.V.

    1985-01-01

    Results on the study of the characteristics of a 50 x 100 mm aluminium drift tube are presented. The tube was filled with argon-methane and argon-isobutane mixtures. With 16 per cent methane concentration the largest deviation from a linear relation between the drift time and the drift path over 50 mm is less than 2 mm. The tube filled with argon-isobutane mixture is capable of operating in a limited streamer mode

  13. Electromagnetic response in kinetic energy driven cuprate superconductors: Linear response approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzyzosiak, Mateusz; Huang, Zheyu; Feng, Shiping; Gonczarek, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    Within the framework of the kinetic energy driven superconductivity, the electromagnetic response in cuprate superconductors is studied in the linear response approach. The kernel of the response function is evaluated and employed to calculate the local magnetic field profile, the magnetic field penetration depth, and the superfluid density, based on the specular reflection model for a purely transverse vector potential. It is shown that the low temperature magnetic field profile follows an exponential decay at the surface, while the magnetic field penetration depth depends linearly on temperature, except for the strong deviation from the linear characteristics at extremely low temperatures. The superfluid density is found to decrease linearly with decreasing doping concentration in the underdoped regime. The problem of gauge invariance is addressed and an approximation for the dressed current vertex, which does not violate local charge conservation is proposed and discussed.

  14. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  15. Generalized multivariate Fokker-Planck equations derived from kinetic transport theory and linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    We study many particle systems in the context of mean field forces, concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients, generalized equilibrium distributions, and quantum statistics. Using kinetic transport theory and linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics we derive for these systems a generalized multivariate Fokker-Planck equation. It is shown that this Fokker-Planck equation describes relaxation processes, has stationary maximum entropy distributions, can have multiple stationary solutions and stationary solutions that differ from Boltzmann distributions

  16. Cross-beam energy transfer: On the accuracy of linear stationary models in the linear kinetic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debayle, A.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Ruyer, C.; Casanova, M.; Loiseau, P.

    2018-05-01

    We present an extensive numerical study by means of particle-in-cell simulations of the energy transfer that occurs during the crossing of two laser beams. In the linear regime, when ions are not trapped in the potential well induced by the laser interference pattern, a very good agreement is obtained with a simple linear stationary model, provided the laser intensity is sufficiently smooth. These comparisons include different plasma compositions to cover the strong and weak Landau damping regimes as well as the multispecies case. The correct evaluation of the linear Landau damping at the phase velocity imposed by the laser interference pattern is essential to estimate the energy transfer rate between the laser beams, once the stationary regime is reached. The transient evolution obtained in kinetic simulations is also analysed by means of a full analytical formula that includes 3D beam energy exchange coupled with the ion acoustic wave response. Specific attention is paid to the energy transfer when the laser presents small-scale inhomogeneities. In particular, the energy transfer is reduced when the laser inhomogeneities are comparable with the Landau damping characteristic length of the ion acoustic wave.

  17. A kinetic approach to some quasi-linear laws of macroeconomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gligor, M.; Ignat, M.

    2002-11-01

    Some previous works have presented the data on wealth and income distributions in developed countries and have found that the great majority of population is described by an exponential distribution, which results in idea that the kinetic approach could be adequate to describe this empirical evidence. The aim of our paper is to extend this framework by developing a systematic kinetic approach of the socio-economic systems and to explain how linear laws, modelling correlations between macroeconomic variables, may arise in this context. Firstly we construct the Boltzmann kinetic equation for an idealised system composed by many individuals (workers, officers, business men, etc.), each of them getting a certain income and spending money for their needs. To each individual a certain time variable amount of money is associated this meaning him/her phase space coordinate. In this way the exponential distribution of money in a closed economy is explicitly found. The extension of this result, including states near the equilibrium, give us the possibility to take into account the regular increase of the total amount of money, according to the modern economic theories. The Kubo-Green-Onsager linear response theory leads us to a set of linear equations between some macroeconomic variables. Finally, the validity of such laws is discussed in relation with the time reversal symmetry and is tested empirically using some macroeconomic time series.

  18. Time dependent drift Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1982-04-01

    The motion of individual charged particles in a given magnetic and an electric fields is discussed. An idea of a guiding center distribution function f is introduced. The guiding center distribution function is connected to the asymptotic Hamiltonian through the drift kinetic equation. The general non-stochastic magnetic field can be written in a contravariant and a covariant forms. The drift Hamiltonian is proposed, and the canonical gyroradius is presented. The proposed drift Hamiltonian agrees with Alfven's drift velocity to lowest non-vanishing order in the gyroradius. The relation between the exact, time dependent equations of motion and the guiding center equation is clarified by a Lagrangian analysis. The deduced Lagrangian represents the drift motion. (Kato, T.)

  19. Modeling non-linear kinetics of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate in the crystalloid-perfused rat heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mariotti, E.; Orton, M. R.; Eerbeek, O.; Ashruf, J. F.; Zuurbier, C. J.; Southworth, R.; Eykyn, T. R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (13)C MR measurements have the potential to display non-linear kinetics. We have developed an approach to describe possible non-first-order kinetics of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate employing a system of differential equations that agrees with the principle of conservation of mass

  20. Determination Of Enzyme Kinetic Parameters on Sago Starch Hydrolysis By Linearized Graphical Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, L.W.; Teo, C.L.; Suzana Wahidin; Mohamad Suffian Mohamad Annuar

    2014-01-01

    Amyloglucosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.3) from Aspergillus niger was used to hydrolyze the sago (Metro xylon sagu) starch into reducing sugars. The experiment was conducted at constant temperature, 55 degree Celsius; pH, 4.5 and enzyme amount, 0.2 U/ ml, respectively. In this investigation, the substrate concentration was varied ranging from 1.0 - 7.0 g/ L. The obtained data were then fixed into linearized plots namely Lineweaver-Burk and Langmuir models to calculate enzyme kinetic parameters, K m and V max . Both of the K m and V max (mM, mol/min) values from each plot were: Lineweaver-Burk (26.53, 3.31) and Langmuir (13.52, 2.35). Among the linearized models, K m and V max values acquired from Langmuir plot was chosen. (author)

  1. Nonequilibrium transition and pattern formation in a linear reaction-diffusion system with self-regulated kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shibashis; Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2018-02-01

    We consider a reaction-diffusion system with linear, stochastic activator-inhibitor kinetics where the time evolution of concentration of a species at any spatial location depends on the relative average concentration of its neighbors. This self-regulating nature of kinetics brings in spatial correlation between the activator and the inhibitor. An interplay of this correlation in kinetics and disparity of diffusivities of the two species leads to symmetry breaking non-equilibrium transition resulting in stationary pattern formation. The role of initial noise strength and the linear reaction terms has been analyzed for pattern selection.

  2. Validity of the Taylor hypothesis for linear kinetic waves in the weakly collisional solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howes, G. G.; Klein, K. G.; TenBarge, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of single-point spacecraft measurements of solar wind turbulence is complicated by the fact that the measurements are made in a frame of reference in relative motion with respect to the turbulent plasma. The Taylor hypothesis—that temporal fluctuations measured by a stationary probe in a rapidly flowing fluid are dominated by the advection of spatial structures in the fluid rest frame—is often assumed to simplify the analysis. But measurements of turbulence in upcoming missions, such as Solar Probe Plus, threaten to violate the Taylor hypothesis, either due to slow flow of the plasma with respect to the spacecraft or to the dispersive nature of the plasma fluctuations at small scales. Assuming that the frequency of the turbulent fluctuations is characterized by the frequency of the linear waves supported by the plasma, we evaluate the validity of the Taylor hypothesis for the linear kinetic wave modes in the weakly collisional solar wind. The analysis predicts that a dissipation range of solar wind turbulence supported by whistler waves is likely to violate the Taylor hypothesis, while one supported by kinetic Alfvén waves is not.

  3. KINETIC-J: A computational kernel for solving the linearized Vlasov equation applied to calculations of the kinetic, configuration space plasma current for time harmonic wave electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David L.; Berry, Lee A.; Simpson, Adam B.; Younkin, Timothy R.

    2018-04-01

    We present the KINETIC-J code, a computational kernel for evaluating the linearized Vlasov equation with application to calculating the kinetic plasma response (current) to an applied time harmonic wave electric field. This code addresses the need for a configuration space evaluation of the plasma current to enable kinetic full-wave solvers for waves in hot plasmas to move beyond the limitations of the traditional Fourier spectral methods. We benchmark the kernel via comparison with the standard k →-space forms of the hot plasma conductivity tensor.

  4. Numerical Calculation of Transport Based on the Drift Kinetic Equation for plasmas in General Toroidal Magnetic Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, J. M.; Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2009-01-01

    This report is the first of a series dedicated to the numerical calculation of the evolution of fusion plasmas in general toroidal geometry, including TJ-II plasmas. A kinetic treatment has been chosen: the evolution equation of the distribution function of one or several plasma species is solved in guiding center coordinates. The distribution function is written as a Maxwellian one modulated by polynomial series in the kinetic coordinates with no other approximations than those of the guiding center itself and the computation capabilities. The code allows also for the inclusion of the three-dimensional electrostatic potential in a self-consistent manner, but the initial objective has been set to solving only the neoclassical transport. A high order conservative method (Spectral Difference Method) has been chosen in order to discretized the equation for its numerical solution. In this first report, in addition to justifying the work, the evolution equation and its approximations are described, as well as the baseline of the numerical procedures. (Author) 28 refs

  5. Linear and nonlinear thermodynamics of a kinetic heat engine with fast transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerino, Luca; Puglisi, Andrea; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a kinetic heat engine model composed of particles enclosed in a box where one side acts as a thermostat and the opposite side is a piston exerting a given pressure. Pressure and temperature are varied in a cyclical protocol of period τ : their relative excursions, δ and ɛ , respectively, constitute the thermodynamic forces dragging the system out of equilibrium. The analysis of the entropy production of the system allows us to define the conjugated fluxes, which are proportional to the extracted work and the consumed heat. In the limit of small δ and ɛ the fluxes are linear in the forces through a τ -dependent Onsager matrix whose off-diagonal elements satisfy a reciprocal relation. The dynamics of the piston can be approximated, through a coarse-graining procedure, by a Klein-Kramers equation which—in the linear regime—yields analytic expressions for the Onsager coefficients and the entropy production. A study of the efficiency at maximum power shows that the Curzon-Ahlborn formula is always an upper limit which is approached at increasing values of the thermodynamic forces, i.e., outside of the linear regime. In all our analysis the adiabatic limit τ →∞ and the the small-force limit δ ,ɛ →0 are not directly related.

  6. Direct integral linear least square regression method for kinetic evaluation of hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuke, Noriyuki

    1991-01-01

    In hepatobiliary scintigraphy, kinetic model analysis, which provides kinetic parameters like hepatic extraction or excretion rate, have been done for quantitative evaluation of liver function. In this analysis, unknown model parameters are usually determined using nonlinear least square regression method (NLS method) where iterative calculation and initial estimate for unknown parameters are required. As a simple alternative to NLS method, direct integral linear least square regression method (DILS method), which can determine model parameters by a simple calculation without initial estimate, is proposed, and tested the applicability to analysis of hepatobiliary scintigraphy. In order to see whether DILS method could determine model parameters as good as NLS method, or to determine appropriate weight for DILS method, simulated theoretical data based on prefixed parameters were fitted to 1 compartment model using both DILS method with various weightings and NLS method. The parameter values obtained were then compared with prefixed values which were used for data generation. The effect of various weights on the error of parameter estimate was examined, and inverse of time was found to be the best weight to make the error minimum. When using this weight, DILS method could give parameter values close to those obtained by NLS method and both parameter values were very close to prefixed values. With appropriate weighting, the DILS method could provide reliable parameter estimate which is relatively insensitive to the data noise. In conclusion, the DILS method could be used as a simple alternative to NLS method, providing reliable parameter estimate. (author)

  7. Kinetic Effects on the Stability Properties of Field-reversed Configurations: I. Linear Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elena V. Belova; Ronald C. Davidson; Hantao Ji; Masaaki Yamada

    2003-01-28

    New computational results are presented which advance the understanding of the stability properties of the Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). We present results of hybrid and two-fluid (Hall-MHD) simulations of prolate FRCs. The n = 1 tilt instability mechanism and growth rate reduction mechanisms are investigated in detail including resonant particle effects, finite Larmor radius and Hall stabilization, and profile effects. It is shown that the Hall effect determines the mode rotation and the change in the linear mode structure in the kinetic regime; however, the reduction in the growth rate is mostly due to finite Larmor radius effects. Resonant wave-particle interactions are studied as a function of (a) elongation, (b) the kinetic parameter S*, which is proportional to the ratio of the separatrix radius to the thermal ion Larmor radius, and (c) the separatrix shape. It is demonstrated that, contrary to the usually assumed stochasticity of the ion orbits in the FRC, a large fraction of the orbits are regular in long configurations when S* is small. A stochasticity condition is found, and a scaling with the S* parameter is presented. Resonant particle effects are shown to maintain the instability in the large gyroradius regime regardless of the separatrix shape.

  8. A new multi-domain method based on an analytical control surface for linear and second-order mean drift wave loads on floating bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui; Chen, Xiaobo

    2017-10-01

    A novel multi-domain method based on an analytical control surface is proposed by combining the use of free-surface Green function and Rankine source function. A cylindrical control surface is introduced to subdivide the fluid domain into external and internal domains. Unlike the traditional domain decomposition strategy or multi-block method, the control surface here is not panelized, on which the velocity potential and normal velocity components are analytically expressed as a series of base functions composed of Laguerre function in vertical coordinate and Fourier series in the circumference. Free-surface Green function is applied in the external domain, and the boundary integral equation is constructed on the control surface in the sense of Galerkin collocation via integrating test functions orthogonal to base functions over the control surface. The external solution gives rise to the so-called Dirichlet-to-Neumann [DN2] and Neumann-to-Dirichlet [ND2] relations on the control surface. Irregular frequencies, which are only dependent on the radius of the control surface, are present in the external solution, and they are removed by extending the boundary integral equation to the interior free surface (circular disc) on which the null normal derivative of potential is imposed, and the dipole distribution is expressed as Fourier-Bessel expansion on the disc. In the internal domain, where the Rankine source function is adopted, new boundary integral equations are formulated. The point collocation is imposed over the body surface and free surface, while the collocation of the Galerkin type is applied on the control surface. The present method is valid in the computation of both linear and second-order mean drift wave loads. Furthermore, the second-order mean drift force based on the middle-field formulation can be calculated analytically by using the coefficients of the Fourier-Laguerre expansion.

  9. Drift mode calculations for the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rewoldt, G.; Ku, L.-P.; Tang, W.M.; Sugama, H.; Nakajima, N.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Murakami, S.; Yamada, H.; Cooper, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    A fully kinetic assessment of the stability properties of toroidal drift modes has been obtained for a case for the Large Helical Device (LHD) [A.Iiyoshi, et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1998, Nucl.Fusion 39, 1245 (1999)]. This calculation retains the important effects in the linearized gyrokinetic equation, using the lowest-order ''ballooning representation'' for high toroidal mode number instabilities in the electrostatic limit. Results for toroidal drift waves destabilized by trapped particle dynamics and ion temperature gradients are presented, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics equilibria reconstructed from experimental measurements. The effects of helically-trapped particles and helical curvature are investigated

  10. Nonlinear evolution of the lower-hybrid drift instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackbill, J.U.; Forslund, D.W.; Quest, K.B.; Winske, D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of simulations of the lower-hybrid drift instability in a neutral sheet configuration are described. The simulations use an implicit formulation to relax the usual time step limitations and thus extend previous explicit calculations to weaker gradients, larger mass ratios, and long times compared with the linear growth time. The numerical results give the scaling of the saturation level, heating rates, resistivity, and cross-field diffusion and a demonstration by comparison with a fluid electron model that dissipation in the lower-hybrid drift instability is caused by electron kinetic effects

  11. ANCON, Space-Independent Reactor Kinetics with Linear or Nonlinear Thermal Feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil, John C.; Dugan, E.T.

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: ANCON solves the point-reactor kinetic equations including thermal feedback. Lump-type heat balance equations are used to represent the thermodynamics, and the heat capacity of each lump can vary with temperature. Thermal feedback can be either a linear or a non-linear function of lump temperature, and the impressed reactivity can be either a polynomial or sinusoidal function. 2 - Method of solution: In ANCON the system of coupled first-order differential equations is solved by a method based on continuous analytic continuation (references 2 and 3). The basic procedure consists of expanding all the dependent variables except reactivity in Taylor series, with a truncation error criterion, over successive intervals on the time axis. Variations of the basic procedure are used to increase the efficiency of the method in special situations. Automatic switching from the basic procedure to one of its variations (and vice-versa) may occur during the course of a transient. The method yields an analytic criterion for the magnitude of the time-step at any point in the transient. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program is currently restricted to a maximum of six delayed neutron groups and a maximum of 56 lumps. Larger problems can be accommodated on a 65 K computer by increasing the dimensions of a few subscripted variables. Also, the code is currently restricted to a constant external transport delays, only the open-loop response of a reactor can be computed with ANCON

  12. Stochastic lumping analysis for linear kinetics and its application to the fluctuation relations between hierarchical kinetic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, De-Ming; Chang, Cheng-Hung [Institute of Physics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-14

    Conventional studies of biomolecular behaviors rely largely on the construction of kinetic schemes. Since the selection of these networks is not unique, a concern is raised whether and under which conditions hierarchical schemes can reveal the same experimentally measured fluctuating behaviors and unique fluctuation related physical properties. To clarify these questions, we introduce stochasticity into the traditional lumping analysis, generalize it from rate equations to chemical master equations and stochastic differential equations, and extract the fluctuation relations between kinetically and thermodynamically equivalent networks under intrinsic and extrinsic noises. The results provide a theoretical basis for the legitimate use of low-dimensional models in the studies of macromolecular fluctuations and, more generally, for exploring stochastic features in different levels of contracted networks in chemical and biological kinetic systems.

  13. Stochastic lumping analysis for linear kinetics and its application to the fluctuation relations between hierarchical kinetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, De-Ming; Chang, Cheng-Hung

    2015-05-14

    Conventional studies of biomolecular behaviors rely largely on the construction of kinetic schemes. Since the selection of these networks is not unique, a concern is raised whether and under which conditions hierarchical schemes can reveal the same experimentally measured fluctuating behaviors and unique fluctuation related physical properties. To clarify these questions, we introduce stochasticity into the traditional lumping analysis, generalize it from rate equations to chemical master equations and stochastic differential equations, and extract the fluctuation relations between kinetically and thermodynamically equivalent networks under intrinsic and extrinsic noises. The results provide a theoretical basis for the legitimate use of low-dimensional models in the studies of macromolecular fluctuations and, more generally, for exploring stochastic features in different levels of contracted networks in chemical and biological kinetic systems.

  14. A kinetic formulation of piezoresistance in N-type silicon: Application to non-linear effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnieras, A. R.; Tellier, C. R.

    1999-07-01

    This paper is devoted to the theoretical study of the influence of the temperature and of the doping on the piezoresistance of N-type silicon. In the first step the fractional change in the resistivity caused by stresses is calculated in the framework of a multivalley model using a kinetic transport formulation based on the Boltzmann transport equation. In the second step shifts in the minima of the conduction band and the resulting shift of the Fermi level are expressed in terms of deformation potentials and of stresses. General expressions for the fundamental linear, π_{11} and π_{12}, and non-linear, π_{111}, π_{112}, π_{122} and π_{123}, piezoresistance coefficients are then derived. Plots of the non-linear piezoresistance coefficients against the reduced shift of the Fermi level or against temperature allow us to characterize the influence of doping and temperature. Finally some attempts are made to estimate the non-linearity for heavily doped semiconductor gauges. Cette publication est consacrée à l'étude théorique de l'influence de la température et du dopage sur la piezorésistivité du silicium type N. Dans une première étape nous adoptons le modèle de vallées et nous utilisons une formulation cinétique du transport électronique faisant appel à l'équation de transport de Boltzmann pour calculer la variation de la résistivité du semiconducteur sous contrainte. Dans la deuxième étape nous exprimons les déplacements des minima de la bande de conduction et du niveau de Fermi en termes de potentiels de déformation et de contraintes. Nous proposons ensuite des expressions générales pour les coefficients piezorésistifs fondamentaux linéaires, π_{11} et π_{12}, et non-linéaires, π_{111}, π_{112}, π_{122} et π_{123}. Des représentations graphiques des variations des coefficients non-linéaires permettent de caractériser l'influence du dopage et de la température. Enfin nous fournissons une première pré-estimation des effets

  15. VEGA: A low-power front-end ASIC for large area multi-linear X-ray silicon drift detectors: Design and experimental characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahangarianabhari, Mahdi; Macera, Daniele [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Electronics Engineering, Information Science and Bioengineering, P.za L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics, INFN sez. Milano (Italy); Bertuccio, Giuseppe, E-mail: Giuseppe.Bertuccio@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Electronics Engineering, Information Science and Bioengineering, P.za L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics, INFN sez. Milano (Italy); Malcovati, Piero; Grassi, Marco [University of Pavia, Department of Electrical Engineering, and National Institute of Nuclear Physics, INFN sez. Pavia, Pavia (Italy)

    2015-01-11

    We present the design and the first experimental characterization of VEGA, an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) designed to read out large area monolithic linear Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD’s). VEGA consists of an analog and a digital/mixed-signal section to accomplish all the functionalities and specifications required for high resolution X-ray spectroscopy in the energy range between 500 eV and 50 keV. The analog section includes a charge sensitive preamplifier, a shaper with 3-bit digitally selectable shaping times from 1.6 µs to 6.6 µs and a peak stretcher/sample-and-hold stage. The digital/mixed-signal section includes an amplitude discriminator with coarse and fine threshold level setting, a peak discriminator and a logic circuit to fulfill pile-up rejection, signal sampling, trigger generation, channel reset and the preamplifier and discriminators disabling functionalities. A Serial Peripherical Interface (SPI) is integrated in VEGA for loading and storing all configuration parameters in an internal register within few microseconds. The VEGA ASIC has been designed and manufactured in 0.35 µm CMOS mixed-signal technology in single and 32 channel versions with dimensions of 200 µm×500 µm per channel. A minimum intrinsic Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) of 12 electrons r.m.s. at 3.6 µs peaking time and room temperature is measured and the linearity error is between −0.9% and +0.6% in the whole input energy range. The total power consumption is 481 µW and 420 µW per channel for the single and 32 channels version, respectively. A comparison with other ASICs for X-ray SDD’s shows that VEGA has a suitable low noise and offers high functionality as ADC-ready signal processing but at a power consumption that is a factor of four lower than other similar existing ASICs.

  16. Design and optimization of a Holweck pump via linear kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naris, Steryios; Koutandou, Eirini; Valougeorgis, Dimitris

    2012-05-01

    The Holweck pump is widely used in the vacuum pumping industry. It can be a self standing apparatus or it can be part of a more advanced pumping system. It is composed by an inner rotating cylinder (rotor) and an outer stationary cylinder (stator). One of them, has spiral guided grooves resulting to a gas motion from the high towards the low vacuum port. Vacuum pumps may be simulated by the DSMC method but due to the involved high computational cost in many cases manufactures commonly resort to empirical formulas and experimental data. Recently a computationally efficient simulation of the Holweck pump via linear kinetic theory has been proposed by Sharipov et al [1]. Neglecting curvature and end effects the gas flow configuration through the helicoidal channels is decomposed into four basic flows. They correspond to pressure and boundary driven flows through a grooved channel and through a long channel with a T shape cross section. Although the formulation and the methodology are explained in detail, results are very limited and more important they are presented in a normalized way which does not provide the needed information about the pump performance in terms of the involved geometrical and flow parameters. In the present work the four basic flows are solved numerically based on the linearized BGK model equation subjected to diffuse boundary conditions. The results obtained are combined in order to create a database of the flow characteristics for a large spectrum of the rarefaction parameter and various geometrical configurations. Based on this database the performance characteristics which are critical in the design of the Holweck pump are computed and the design parameters such as the angle of the pump and the rotational speed, are optimized. This modeling may be extended to other vacuum pumps.

  17. Design and optimization of a Holweck pump via linear kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naris, Steryios; Koutandou, Eirini; Valougeorgis, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    The Holweck pump is widely used in the vacuum pumping industry. It can be a self standing apparatus or it can be part of a more advanced pumping system. It is composed by an inner rotating cylinder (rotor) and an outer stationary cylinder (stator). One of them, has spiral guided grooves resulting to a gas motion from the high towards the low vacuum port. Vacuum pumps may be simulated by the DSMC method but due to the involved high computational cost in many cases manufactures commonly resort to empirical formulas and experimental data. Recently a computationally efficient simulation of the Holweck pump via linear kinetic theory has been proposed by Sharipov et al [1]. Neglecting curvature and end effects the gas flow configuration through the helicoidal channels is decomposed into four basic flows. They correspond to pressure and boundary driven flows through a grooved channel and through a long channel with a T shape cross section. Although the formulation and the methodology are explained in detail, results are very limited and more important they are presented in a normalized way which does not provide the needed information about the pump performance in terms of the involved geometrical and flow parameters. In the present work the four basic flows are solved numerically based on the linearized BGK model equation subjected to diffuse boundary conditions. The results obtained are combined in order to create a database of the flow characteristics for a large spectrum of the rarefaction parameter and various geometrical configurations. Based on this database the performance characteristics which are critical in the design of the Holweck pump are computed and the design parameters such as the angle of the pump and the rotational speed, are optimized. This modeling may be extended to other vacuum pumps.

  18. Integral equation based stability analysis of short wavelength drift modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, A.; Elia, M.

    2003-01-01

    Linear stability of electron skin-size drift modes in collisionless tokamak discharges has been investigated in terms of electromagnetic, kinetic integral equations in which neither ions nor electrons are assumed to be adiabatic. A slab-like ion temperature gradient mode persists in such a short wavelength regime. However, toroidicity has a strong stabilizing influence on this mode. In the electron branch, the toroidicity induced skin-size drift mode previously predicted in terms of local kinetic analysis has been recovered. The mode is driven by positive magnetic shear and strongly stabilized for negative shear. The corresponding mixing length anomalous thermal diffusivity exhibits favourable isotope dependence. (author)

  19. Kinetics of nickel silicide growth in silicon nanowires: From linear to square root growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaish, Y. E.; Beregovsky, M.; Katsman, A.; Cohen, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    The common practice for nickel silicide formation in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) relies on axial growth of silicide along the wire that is initiated from nickel reservoirs at the source and drain contacts. In the present work the silicide intrusions were studied for various parameters including wire diameter (25-50 nm), annealing time (15-120 s), annealing temperature (300-440 deg. C), and the quality of the initial Ni/Si interface. The silicide formation was investigated by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy. The main part of the intrusion formed at 420 deg. C consists of monosilicide NiSi, as was confirmed by energy dispersive spectroscopy STEM, selected area diffraction TEM, and electrical resistance measurements of fully silicided SiNWs. The kinetics of nickel silicide axial growth in the SiNWs was analyzed in the framework of a diffusion model through constrictions. The model calculates the time dependence of the intrusion length, L, and predicts crossover from linear to square root time dependency for different wire parameters, as confirmed by the experimental data.

  20. Stokes drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bremer, T. S.; Breivik, Ø.

    2017-12-01

    During its periodic motion, a particle floating at the free surface of a water wave experiences a net drift velocity in the direction of wave propagation, known as the Stokes drift (Stokes 1847 Trans. Camb. Philos. Soc. 8, 441-455). More generally, the Stokes drift velocity is the difference between the average Lagrangian flow velocity of a fluid parcel and the average Eulerian flow velocity of the fluid. This paper reviews progress in fundamental and applied research on the induced mean flow associated with surface gravity waves since the first description of the Stokes drift, now 170 years ago. After briefly reviewing the fundamental physical processes, most of which have been established for decades, the review addresses progress in laboratory and field observations of the Stokes drift. Despite more than a century of experimental studies, laboratory studies of the mean circulation set up by waves in a laboratory flume remain somewhat contentious. In the field, rapid advances are expected due to increasingly small and cheap sensors and transmitters, making widespread use of small surface-following drifters possible. We also discuss remote sensing of the Stokes drift from high-frequency radar. Finally, the paper discusses the three main areas of application of the Stokes drift: in the coastal zone, in Eulerian models of the upper ocean layer and in the modelling of tracer transport, such as oil and plastic pollution. Future climate models will probably involve full coupling of ocean and atmosphere systems, in which the wave model provides consistent forcing on the ocean surface boundary layer. Together with the advent of new space-borne instruments that can measure surface Stokes drift, such models hold the promise of quantifying the impact of wave effects on the global atmosphere-ocean system and hopefully contribute to improved climate projections. This article is part of the theme issue 'Nonlinear water waves'.

  1. Estimating the kinetic parameters of activated sludge storage using weighted non-linear least-squares and accelerating genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Ni, Bing-Jie; Yu, Han-Qing

    2009-06-01

    In this study, weighted non-linear least-squares analysis and accelerating genetic algorithm are integrated to estimate the kinetic parameters of substrate consumption and storage product formation of activated sludge. A storage product formation equation is developed and used to construct the objective function for the determination of its production kinetics. The weighted least-squares analysis is employed to calculate the differences in the storage product concentration between the model predictions and the experimental data as the sum of squared weighted errors. The kinetic parameters for the substrate consumption and the storage product formation are estimated to be the maximum heterotrophic growth rate of 0.121/h, the yield coefficient of 0.44 mg CODX/mg CODS (COD, chemical oxygen demand) and the substrate half saturation constant of 16.9 mg/L, respectively, by minimizing the objective function using a real-coding-based accelerating genetic algorithm. Also, the fraction of substrate electrons diverted to the storage product formation is estimated to be 0.43 mg CODSTO/mg CODS. The validity of our approach is confirmed by the results of independent tests and the kinetic parameter values reported in literature, suggesting that this approach could be useful to evaluate the product formation kinetics of mixed cultures like activated sludge. More importantly, as this integrated approach could estimate the kinetic parameters rapidly and accurately, it could be applied to other biological processes.

  2. Reducing Pesticide Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides information about pesticide spray drift, including problems associated with drift, managing risks from drift and the voluntary Drift Reduction Technology program that seeks to reduce spray drift through improved spray equipment design.

  3. Nonlinear drift tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenyj, L.M.; Kuznetsova, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear study of magnetic perturbation development under single-mode conditions in collision-free plasma in configurations with the magnetic field shear is investigated. Results are obtained with regard of transverse component of electrical field and its effect on ion dynamics within wide range of ion Larmor radius value and values of magnetic field shear. Increments of nonlinear drift tearing mode are obtained and it is shown that excitation drastic conditions of even linearly stable modes are possible. Mechanism of instability nonlinear stabilization is considered and the value of magnetic island at the saturation threshold is estimeted. Energy of nonlinear drift tearing mode is discussed

  4. Drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yosuke

    1977-01-01

    Drift chamber is becoming an important detector in high energy physics as a precision and fast position detector because of its high spatial resolution and count-rate. The basic principle is that it utilizes the drift at constant speed of electrons ionized along the tracks of charged particles towards the anode wire in the nearly uniform electric field. The method of measuring drift time includes the analog and digital ones. This report describes about the construction of and the application of electric field to the drift chamber, mathematical analysis on the electric field and equipotential curve, derivation of spatial resolution and the factor for its determination, and selection of gas to be used. The performance test of the chamber was carried out using a small test chamber, the collimated β source of Sr-90, and 500 MeV/C electron beam from the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron in the Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. Most chambers to date adopted one dimensional read-out, but it is very advantageous if the two dimensional read-out is feasible with one chamber when the resolution in that direction is low. The typical methods of delay line and charge division for two dimensional read-out are described. The development of digital read-out system is underway, which can process the signal of a large scale drift chamber at high speed. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  5. Kinetics of oriented crystallization of polymers in the linear stress-orientation range in the series expansion approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jarecki

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An analytical formula is derived for the oriented crystallization coefficient governing kinetics of oriented crystallization under uniaxial amorphous orientation in the entire temperature range. A series expansion approach is applied to the free energy of crystallization in the Hoffman-Lauritzen kinetic model of crystallization at accounting for the entropy of orientation of the amorphous chains. The series expansion coefficients are calculated for systems of Gaussian chains in linear stress-orientation range. Oriented crystallization rate functions are determined basing on the ‘proportional expansion’ approach proposed by Ziabicki in the steady-state limit. Crystallization kinetics controlled by separate predetermined and sporadic primary nucleation is considered, as well as the kinetics involving both nucleation mechanisms potentially present in oriented systems. The involvement of sporadic nucleation in the transformation kinetics is predicted to increase with increasing amorphous orientation. Example computations illustrate the dependence of the calculated functions on temperature and amorphous orientation, as well as qualitative agreement of the calculations with experimental results.

  6. Numerical Calculation of Transport Based on the Drift-Kinetic Equation for Plasmas in General Toroidal Magnetic Geometry: Numerical Methods; Calculo Numerico de Transporte mediante la Ecuacion Cinetica de Deriva para Plasmas en Geometria Magnetica Toroidal: Metodos Numericos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J. M.; Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2009-10-12

    In this report we continue with the description of a newly developed numerical method to solve the drift kinetic equation for ions and electrons in toroidal plasmas. Several numerical aspects, already outlined in a previous report [Informes Tecnicos Ciemat 1165, mayo 2009], will be treated now in more detail. Aside from discussing the method in the context of other existing codes, various aspects will be now explained from the viewpoint of numerical methods: the way to solve convection equations, the adopted boundary conditions, the real-space meshing procedures along with a new software developed to build them, and some additional questions related with the parallelization and the numerical integration. (Author) 16 refs.

  7. Collisional drift fluids and drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Correa-Restrepo, D.

    1995-05-01

    The usual theoretical description of drift-wave turbulence (considered to be one possible cause of anomalous transport in a plasma), e.g. the Hasegawa-Wakatani theory, makes use of various approximations, the effect of which is extremely difficult to assess. This concerns in particular the conservation laws for energy and momentum. The latter is important as concerns charge separation and resulting electric fields which are possibly related to the L-H transition. Energy conservation is crucial for the stability behaviour; it will be discussed via an example. New collisional multispecies drift-fluid equations were derived by a new method which yields in a transparent way conservation of energy and total angular momentum, and the law for energy dissipation. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic field variations are considered. The method is based primarily on a Lagrangian for dissipationless fluids in drift approximation with isotropic pressures. The dissipative terms are introduced by adding corresponding terms to the ideal equations of motion and of the pressures. The equations of motion, of course, no longer result from a Lagrangian via Hamilton's principle. Their relation to the ideal equations imply, however, also a relation to the ideal Lagrangian of which one can take advantage. Instead of introducing heat conduction one can also assume isothermal behaviour, e.g. T ν (x)=const. Assumptions of this kind are often made in the literature. The new method of introducing dissipation is not restricted to the present kind of theories; it can equally well be applied to theories such as multi-fluid theories without using the drift approximation of the present paper. Linear instability is investigated via energy considerations and the implications of taking ohmic resistivity into account are discussed. (orig./WL)

  8. Sorption of malachite green from aqueous solution by potato peel: Kinetics and equilibrium modeling using non-linear analysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Khamsa Guechi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Potato peel (PP was used as a biosorbent to remove malachite green (MG from aqueous solution under various operating conditions. The effect of the experimental parameters such as initial dye concentration, biosorbent dose, initial pH, stirring speed, temperature, ionic strength and biosorbent particle size was investigated through a number of batch sorption experiments. The sorption kinetic uptake for MG by PP at various initial dye concentrations was analyzed by non-linear method using pseudo-first, pseudo-second and pseudo-nth order models. It was found that the pseudo-nth order kinetic model was the best applicable model to describe the sorption kinetic data and the order n of sorption reaction was calculated in the range from 0.71 to 2.71. Three sorption isotherms namely the Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich–Peterson isotherms in their non-linear forms were applied to the biosorption equilibrium data. Both the Langmuir and Redlich–Peterson models were found to fit the sorption isotherm data well, but the Redlich–Peterson model was better. Thermodynamic parameters show that the sorption process of MG is endothermic and more effective process at high temperatures. The results revealed that PP is very effective for the biosorption of MG from aqueous solutions.

  9. Analytical solution of point kinetics equations for linear reactivity variation during the start-up of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, Daniel A.P. [CEFET QUIMICA de Nilopolis/RJ, 21941-914 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: agoncalves@con.ufrj.br; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Goncalves, Alessandro C. [COPPE/UFRJ - Programa de Engenharia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2009-09-15

    The analytical solution of point kinetics equations with a group of delayed neutrons is useful in predicting the variation of neutron density during the start-up of a nuclear reactor. In the practical case of an increase of nuclear reactor power resulting from the linear insertion of reactivity, the exact analytical solution cannot be obtained. Approximate solutions have been obtained in previous articles, based on considerations that need to be verifiable in practice. In the present article, an alternative analytic solution is presented for point kinetics equations in which the only approximation consists of disregarding the term of the second derivative for neutron density in relation to time. The results proved satisfactory when applied to practical situations in the start-up of a nuclear reactor through the control rods withdraw.

  10. Analytical solution of point kinetics equations for linear reactivity variation during the start-up of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, Daniel A.P.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Goncalves, Alessandro C.

    2009-01-01

    The analytical solution of point kinetics equations with a group of delayed neutrons is useful in predicting the variation of neutron density during the start-up of a nuclear reactor. In the practical case of an increase of nuclear reactor power resulting from the linear insertion of reactivity, the exact analytical solution cannot be obtained. Approximate solutions have been obtained in previous articles, based on considerations that need to be verifiable in practice. In the present article, an alternative analytic solution is presented for point kinetics equations in which the only approximation consists of disregarding the term of the second derivative for neutron density in relation to time. The results proved satisfactory when applied to practical situations in the start-up of a nuclear reactor through the control rods withdraw.

  11. Noise-Induced Modulation of the Relaxation Kinetics around a Non-Equilibrium Steady State of Non-Linear Chemical Reaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; González-Segredo, Nélido

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confi...

  12. Separation-induced boundary layer transition: Modeling with a non-linear eddy-viscosity model coupled with the laminar kinetic energy equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlahostergios, Z.; Yakinthos, K.; Goulas, A.

    2009-01-01

    We present an effort to model the separation-induced transition on a flat plate with a semi-circular leading edge, using a cubic non-linear eddy-viscosity model combined with the laminar kinetic energy. A non-linear model, compared to a linear one, has the advantage to resolve the anisotropic behavior of the Reynolds-stresses in the near-wall region and it provides a more accurate expression for the generation of turbulence in the transport equation of the turbulence kinetic energy. Although in its original formulation the model is not able to accurately predict the separation-induced transition, the inclusion of the laminar kinetic energy increases its accuracy. The adoption of the laminar kinetic energy by the non-linear model is presented in detail, together with some additional modifications required for the adaption of the laminar kinetic energy into the basic concepts of the non-linear eddy-viscosity model. The computational results using the proposed combined model are shown together with the ones obtained using an isotropic linear eddy-viscosity model, which adopts also the laminar kinetic energy concept and in comparison with the existing experimental data.

  13. Relation between nonlinear or 'not-linear' characteristics in nuclear kinetics and noise analysis of neutron flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, H.

    1975-01-01

    The 'not-linear' or '2nd-class-nonlinear' characteristics in nuclear reactor kinetics with the feedback effect in the high-power operation and induce the increase in the amplitude of the neutron flux noise, specially in the very low frequency region. The fundamental behaviour of 'not-linear' characteristics and its effect for the reactor noise was investigated. Application of the reactor noise analysis technique to power reactors has not been successful because of unknown large disagreement between the result of the conventional theoretical analysis and the experimental facts. When the cause of this discrepancy is clear, reactor noise analysis techniques can be effectively applied to instrumentation, control, monitoring and diagnosis of power reactors. (author)

  14. Electron-temperature-gradient-driven drift waves and anomalous electron energy transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.K.; Murtaza, G.; Weiland, J.

    1990-01-01

    By means of a kinetic description for ions and Braginskii's fluid model for electrons, three coupled nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of low-frequency short-wavelength electrostatic waves in the presence of equilibrium density temperature and magnetic-field gradients in a two-component magnetized plasma are derived. In the linear limit a dispersion relation that admits new instabilities of drift waves is presented. An estimate of the anomalous electron energy transport due to non-thermal drift waves is obtained by making use of the saturated wave potential, which is deduced from the mixing-length hypothesis. Stationary solutions of the nonlinear equations governing the interaction of linearly unstable drift waves are also presented. The relevance of this investigation to wave phenomena in space and laboratory plasmas is pointed out. (author)

  15. Linearized method: A new approach for kinetic analysis of central dopamine D2 receptor specific binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Hiroshi; Hatazawa, Jun; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Ido, Tatsuo; Itoh, Masatoshi; Iwata, Ren; Nakamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Toshihiro; Hatano, Kentaro

    1995-01-01

    The authors proposed a new method (Linearized method) to analyze neuroleptic ligand-receptor specific binding in a human brain using positron emission tomography (PET). They derived the linear equation to solve four rate constants, k 3 , k 4 , k 5 , k 6 from PET data. This method does not demand radioactivity curve in plasma as an input function to brain, and can do fast calculations in order to determine rate constants. They also tested Nonlinearized method including nonlinear equations which is conventional analysis using plasma radioactivity corrected for ligand metabolites as an input function. The authors applied these methods to evaluate dopamine D 2 receptor specific binding of [ 11 C] YM-09151-2. The value of B max /K d = k 3 k 4 obtained by Linearized method was 5.72 ± 3.1 which was consistent with the value of 5.78 ± 3.4 obtained by Nonlinearized method

  16. Thermodynamics versus Kinetics Dichotomy in the Linear Self-Assembly of Mixed Nanoblocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, L; Keten, S

    2014-06-05

    We report classical and replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations that establish the mechanisms underpinning the growth kinetics of a binary mix of nanorings that form striped nanotubes via self-assembly. A step-growth coalescence model captures the growth process of the nanotubes, which suggests that high aspect ratio nanostructures can grow by obeying the universal laws of self-similar coarsening, contrary to systems that grow through nucleation and elongation. Notably, striped patterns do not depend on specific growth mechanisms, but are governed by tempering conditions that control the likelihood of depropagation and fragmentation.

  17. Linear kinetic theory and particle transport in stochastic mixtures. Third year and final report, June 15, 1993--December 14, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1997-05-01

    The goal in this research was to continue the development of a comprehensive theory of linear transport/kinetic theory in a stochastic mixture of solids and immiscible fluids. Such a theory should predict the ensemble average and higher moments, such as the variance, of the particle or energy density described by the underlying transport/kinetic equation. The statistics studied correspond to N-state discrete random variables for the interaction coefficients and sources, with N denoting the number of components in the mixture. The mixing statistics considered were Markovian as well as more general statistics. In the absence of time dependence and scattering, the theory is well developed and described exactly by the master (Liouville) equation for Markovian mixing, and by renewal equations for non-Markovian mixing. The intent of this research was to generalize these treatments to include both time dependence and scattering. A further goal of this research was to develop approximate, but simpler, models from any comprehensive theory. In particular, a specific goal was to formulate a renormalized transport/kinetic theory of the usual nonstochastic form, but with effective interaction coefficients and sources to account for the stochastic nature of the problem. In the three and one-half year period of research summarized in this final report, they have made substantial progress in the development of a comprehensive theory of kinetic processes in stochastic mixtures. This progress is summarized in 16 archival journal articles, 7 published proceedings papers, and 2 comprehensive review articles. In addition, 17 oral presentations were made describing these research results

  18. Modeling the kinetics of essential oil hydrodistillation from juniper berries (Juniperus communis L. using non-linear regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Dragana B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents kinetics modeling of essential oil hydrodistillation from juniper berries (Juniperus communis L. by using a non-linear regression methodology. The proposed model has the polynomial-logarithmic form. The initial equation of the proposed non-linear model is q = q∞•(a•(logt2 + b•logt + c and by substituting a1=q∞•a, b1 = q∞•b and c1 = q∞•c, the final equation is obtained as q = a1•(logt2 + b1•logt + c1. In this equation q is the quantity of the obtained oil at time t, while a1, b1 and c1 are parameters to be determined for each sample. From the final equation it can be seen that the key parameter q∞, which presents the maximal oil quantity obtained after infinite time, is already included in parameters a1, b1 and c1. In this way, experimental determination of this parameter is avoided. Using the proposed model with parameters obtained by regression, the values of oil hydrodistillation in time are calculated for each sample and compared to the experimental values. In addition, two kinetic models previously proposed in literature were applied to the same experimental results. The developed model provided better agreements with the experimental values than the two, generally accepted kinetic models of this process. The average values of error measures (RSS, RSE, AIC and MRPD obtained for our model (0.005; 0.017; –84.33; 1.65 were generally lower than the corresponding values of the other two models (0.025; 0.041; –53.20; 3.89 and (0.0035; 0.015; –86.83; 1.59. Also, parameter estimation for the proposed model was significantly simpler (maximum 2 iterations per sample using the non-linear regression than that for the existing models (maximum 9 iterations per sample. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. TR-35026

  19. Linear-quadratic dose kinetics or dose-dependent repair/misrepair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Nelson, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Models for the response of cells exposed to low (LET) linear energy transfer radiation can be grouped into three general types on the basis of assumptions about the nature of the interaction which results in the shoulder of the survival curve. The three forms of interaction are 1) sublethal damage becoming lethal, 2) potentially lethal damage becoming irreparable, and 3) potentially lethal damage ''saturating'' a repair system. The effects that these three forms of interaction would have on the results of specific types of experiments are investigated. Comparisons with experimental results indicate that only the second type is significant in determining the response of typical cultured mammalian cells. (author)

  20. Covariant kinetic dispersion theory of linear transverse waves parallel propagating in magnetized plasmas with thermal anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazar, M.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2006-01-01

    The properties of transverse waves parallel propagating in magnetized plasmas with arbitrary composition and thermally anisotropic, are investigated on the basis of relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The transverse dispersion relations for plasmas with arbitrary distribution functions are derived. These dispersion relations describe the linear response of the system to the initial perturbations and thus define all existing linear (transverse) plasma modes in the system. By analytic continuation the dispersion relations in the whole complex frequency plane are constructed. Further analysis is restricted to the important case of anisotropic bi-Maxwellian equilibrium plasma distribution functions. Explicit forms of the relativistically correct transverse dispersion relations are derived that hold for any values of the plasma temperatures and the temperature anisotropy. In the limit of nonrelativistic plasma temperatures the dispersion relations are expressed in terms of plasma dispersion function, however, the dependence on frequency and wave numbers is markedly different from the standard noncovariant nonrelativistic analysis. Only in the strictly unphysical formal limit of an infinitely large speed of light, c→∞, does the nonrelativistic dispersion relations reduce to the standard noncovariant dispersion relations

  1. Drift wave dispersion relation for arbitrarily collisional plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angus, Justin R.; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.

    2012-01-01

    The standard local linear analysis of drift waves in a plasma slab is generalized to be valid for arbitrarily collisional electrons by considering the electrons to be governed by the drift-kinetic equation with a BGK-like (Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook) collision operator. The obtained dispersion relation reduces to that found from collisionless kinetic theory when the collision frequency is zero. Electron temperature fluctuations must be retained in the standard fluid analysis in order to obtain good quantitative agreement with our general solution in the highly collisional limit. Any discrepancies between the fluid solution and our general solution in this limit are attributed to the limitations of the BGK collision operator. The maximum growth rates in both the collisional and collisionless limits are comparable and are both on the order of the fundamental drift wave frequency. The main role of the destabilizing mechanism is found to be in determining the parallel wave number at which the maximum growth rate will occur. The parallel wave number corresponding to the maximum growth rate is set by the wave-particle resonance condition in the collisionless limit and transitions to being set by the real frequency being on the order of the rate for electrons to diffuse a parallel wavelength in the collisional limit.

  2. Drift wave dispersion relation for arbitrarily collisional plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angus, Justin R.; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The standard local linear analysis of drift waves in a plasma slab is generalized to be valid for arbitrarily collisional electrons by considering the electrons to be governed by the drift-kinetic equation with a BGK-like (Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook) collision operator. The obtained dispersion relation reduces to that found from collisionless kinetic theory when the collision frequency is zero. Electron temperature fluctuations must be retained in the standard fluid analysis in order to obtain good quantitative agreement with our general solution in the highly collisional limit. Any discrepancies between the fluid solution and our general solution in this limit are attributed to the limitations of the BGK collision operator. The maximum growth rates in both the collisional and collisionless limits are comparable and are both on the order of the fundamental drift wave frequency. The main role of the destabilizing mechanism is found to be in determining the parallel wave number at which the maximum growth rate will occur. The parallel wave number corresponding to the maximum growth rate is set by the wave-particle resonance condition in the collisionless limit and transitions to being set by the real frequency being on the order of the rate for electrons to diffuse a parallel wavelength in the collisional limit.

  3. Low-frequency linear waves and instabilities in uniform and stratified plasmas: the role of kinetic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Ferrière

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the basic approximations underlying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD theory, with special emphasis on the closure approximations, i.e. the approximations used in any fluid approach to close the hierarchy of moment equations. We then present the main closure models that have been constructed for collisionless plasmas in the large-scale regime, and we describe our own mixed MHD-kinetic model, which is designed to study low-frequency linear waves and instabilities in collisionless plasmas. We write down the full dispersion relation in a new, general form, which gathers all the specific features of our MHD-kinetic model into four polytropic indices, and which can be applied to standard adiabatic MHD and to double-adiabatic MHD through a simple change in the expressions of the polytropic indices. We study the mode solutions and the stability properties of the full dispersion relation in each of these three theories, first in the case of a uniform plasma, and then in the case of a stratified plasma. In both cases, we show how the results are affected by the collisionless nature of the plasma.

  4. Linear kinetic stability of a field-reversed configuration with two ion components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudenmeier, J.L.; Barnes, D.C.; Lewis, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    It has been suggested that a small fraction of non-axis encircling high energy ions may be sufficient to stabilize the tilt mode in a large s FRC. Experimental alteration of the ion distribution function in this manner might be achieved by rf heating the tail of the distribution function or by neutral beam injection. A linear Vlasov-fluid eigenfunction-eigenfrequency approach was used to investigate possible stabilization of the tilt mode by a high energy component. The ion distribution function is modeled as the sum of two Maxwellians with separate temperatures and no ion flow velocity. The cold component has a thermal s = 7, where s is the approximate number of ion gyroradii contained between the field null and the separatrix. The temperature ratio of the hot component to the cold component (T H /T T ) was varied from 2 to 100. Global hot particle fractions (n H ) up to ∼ .5 were used in the computations

  5. The Non-Linear Child: Ontogeny, Isoniazid Concentration, and NAT2 Genotype Modulate Enzyme Reaction Kinetics and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Zoe; Hiruy, Hiwot; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Mbowane, Chris; Adamson, John; Ngotho, Lihle; Karim, Farina; Jeena, Prakash; Bishai, William; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2016-09-01

    N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) catalyzes the acetylation of isoniazid to N-acetylisoniazid. NAT2 polymorphism explains 88% of isoniazid clearance variability in adults. We examined the effects of clinical and genetic factors on Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetic constants of maximum velocity (V max ) and affinity (K m ) in children 0-10years old. We measured the rates of isoniazid elimination and N-acetylisoniazid production in the blood of 30 children. Since maturation effects could be non-linear, we utilized a pharmacometric approach and the artificial intelligence method, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), to identify factors predicting NAT2 V max and K m by examining clinical, genetic, and laboratory factors in toto. Isoniazid concentration predicted both V max and K m and superseded the contribution of NAT2 genotype. Age non-linearly modified the NAT2 genotype contribution until maturation at ≥5.3years. Thus, enzyme efficiency was constrained by substrate concentration, genes, and age. Since MARS output is in the form of basis functions and equations, it allows multiscale systems modeling from the level of cellular chemical reactions to whole body physiological parameters, by automatic selection of significant predictors by the algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Forschungsgesellschaft für Arbeitsphysiologie und Arbeitschutz e.V. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Non-Linear Child: Ontogeny, Isoniazid Concentration, and NAT2 Genotype Modulate Enzyme Reaction Kinetics and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Rogers

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 catalyzes the acetylation of isoniazid to N-acetylisoniazid. NAT2 polymorphism explains 88% of isoniazid clearance variability in adults. We examined the effects of clinical and genetic factors on Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetic constants of maximum velocity (Vmax and affinity (Km in children 0–10 years old. We measured the rates of isoniazid elimination and N-acetylisoniazid production in the blood of 30 children. Since maturation effects could be non-linear, we utilized a pharmacometric approach and the artificial intelligence method, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS, to identify factors predicting NAT2 Vmax and Km by examining clinical, genetic, and laboratory factors in toto. Isoniazid concentration predicted both Vmax and Km and superseded the contribution of NAT2 genotype. Age non-linearly modified the NAT2 genotype contribution until maturation at ≥5.3 years. Thus, enzyme efficiency was constrained by substrate concentration, genes, and age. Since MARS output is in the form of basis functions and equations, it allows multiscale systems modeling from the level of cellular chemical reactions to whole body physiological parameters, by automatic selection of significant predictors by the algorithm.

  7. Self-consistent kinetic simulations of lower hybrid drift instability resulting in electron current driven by fusion products in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J W S; Chapman, S C; Dendy, R O; Brady, C S

    2011-01-01

    We present particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of minority energetic protons in deuterium plasmas, which demonstrate a collective instability responsible for emission near the lower hybrid frequency and its harmonics. The simulations capture the lower hybrid drift instability in a parameter regime motivated by tokamak fusion plasma conditions, and show further that the excited electromagnetic fields collectively and collisionlessly couple free energy from the protons to directed electron motion. This results in an asymmetric tail antiparallel to the magnetic field. We focus on obliquely propagating modes excited by energetic ions, whose ring-beam distribution is motivated by population inversions related to ion cyclotron emission, in a background plasma with a temperature similar to that of the core of a large tokamak plasma. A fully self-consistent electromagnetic relativistic PIC code representing all vector field quantities and particle velocities in three dimensions as functions of a single spatial dimension is used to model this situation, by evolving the initial antiparallel travelling ring-beam distribution of 3 MeV protons in a background 10 keV Maxwellian deuterium plasma with realistic ion-electron mass ratio. These simulations provide a proof-of-principle for a key plasma physics process that may be exploited in future alpha channelling scenarios for magnetically confined burning plasmas.

  8. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewandowski, J.L.V.

    2003-01-01

    A multi-grid part-in-cell algorithm for a shearless slab drift wave model with kinetic electrons is presented. The algorithm, which is based on an exact separation of adiabatic and nonadiabatic electron responses, is used to investigate the presence of strange attractors in drift wave turbulence. Although the simulation model has a large number of degrees of freedom, it is found that the strange attractor is low-dimensional and that it is strongly affected by dissipative (collisional) effects

  9. Numerical Calculation of Transport Based on the Drift-Kinetic Equation for Plasmas in General Toroidal Magnetic Geometry: Convergence and Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, J. M.; Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2009-01-01

    This report is the third of a series [Informes Tecnicos Ciemat 1165 y 1172] devoted to the development of a new numerical code to solve the guiding center equation for electrons and ions in toroidal plasmas. Two calculation meshes corresponding to axisymmetric tokamaks are now prepared and the kinetic equation is expanded so the standard terms of neoclassical theory --fi rst order terms in the Larmor radius expansion-- can be identified, restricting the calculations correspondingly. Using model density and temperature profiles for the plasma, several convergence test are performed depending on the calculation meshes and the expansions of the distribution function; then the results are compared with the theory [Hinton and Hazeltine, Rev. Mod. Phys. (1976)]. (Author) 18 refs

  10. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez Laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  11. Drift Chambers detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs

  12. Optimization of drift gases for accuracy in pressurized drift tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchner, J J; Dinner, A R; Fidkowski, K J; Wyatt, J H

    2001-01-01

    Modern detectors such as ATLAS use pressurized drift tubes to minimize diffusion and achieve high coordinate accuracy. However, the coordinate accuracy depends on the exact knowledge of converting measured times into coordinates. Linear space-time relationships are best for reconstruction, but difficult to achieve in the $E \\propto \\frac{1}{r}$ field. Previous mixtures, which contained methane or other organic quenchers, are disfavored because of ageing problems. From our studies of nitrogen and carbon dioxide, two mixtures with only small deviations from linearity were determined and measured. Scaling laws for different pressures and magnetic fields are also given.

  13. Optimization of drift gases for accuracy in pressurized drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.J.; Becker, U.J.; Dinner, R.B.; Fidkowski, K.J.; Wyatt, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    Modern detectors such as ATLAS use pressurized drift tubes to minimize diffusion and achieve high coordinate accuracy. However, the coordinate accuracy depends on the exact knowledge of converting measured times into coordinates. Linear space-time relationships are best for reconstruction, but difficult to achieve in the E∝1/r field. Previous mixtures, which contained methane or other organic quenchers, are disfavored because of ageing problems. From our studies of nitrogen and carbon dioxide, two mixtures with only small deviations from linearity were determined and measured. Scaling laws for different pressures and magnetic fields are also given

  14. Nonlinear damping of drift waves by strong flow curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidikman, K.L.; Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.; Diamond, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    A single-equation model has been used to study the effect of a fixed poloidal flow (V 0 ) on turbulent drift waves. The electron dynamics come from a laminar kinetic equation in the dissipative trapped-electron regime. In the past, the authors have assumed that the mode frequency is close to the drift-wave frequency. Trapped-electron density fluctuations are then related to potential fluctuations by an open-quotes iδclose quotes term. Flow shear (V 0 ') and curvature (V 0 double-prime) both have a stabilizing effect on linear modes for this open-quotes iδclose quotes model. However, in the nonlinear regime, single-helicity effects inhibit the flow damping. Neither V 0 ' nor V 0 double-prime produces a nonlinear damping effect. The above assumption on the frequency can be relaxed by including the electron time-response in the linear part of the evolution. In this time-dependent model, instability drive due to trapped electrons is reduced when mode frequency is greater than drift-wave frequency. Since V 0 double-prime produces such a frequency shift, its linear effect is enhanced. There is also nonlinear damping, since single-helicity effects do not eliminate the shift. Renormalized theory for this model predicts nonlinear stability for sufficiently large curvature. Single-helicity calculations have already shown nonlinear damping, and this strong V 0 double-prime regime is being explored. In the theory, the Gaussian shape of the nonlinear diffusivity is expanded to obtain a quadratic potential. The implications of this assumption will be tested by solving the full renormalized equation using a shooting method

  15. Nonlinear propagation of short wavelength drift-Alfven waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Pecseli, H. L.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    Making use of a kinetic ion and a hydrodynamic electron description together with the Maxwell equation, the authors derive a set of nonlinear equations which governs the dynamics of short wavelength ion drift-Alfven waves. It is shown that the nonlinear drift-Alfven waves can propagate as two-dim...

  16. Drift vortices in continuous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernousenko, V.M.; Chernenko, I.V.; Chernyshenko, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    The work is devoted to investigation into the problems of large-scale cortex drift and generation in continuous media based on the solution of notably non-linear differential equations. Using the capability of the modern computer technique it is possible to consider a series of cases with regard to medium viscosity and its inhomogeneity and with regard to three-dimensional vortex nature. Based on the solutions obtained the large-scale steady-state vortex generation processes are considered. The results can be used when studying non-linear phenomena in plasma and processes of substance and energy transfer in non-equilibrium media. 16 refs.; 5 figs

  17. Ponderomotive modification of drift tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urquijo, G.; Singh, R.; Sen, A.

    1997-01-01

    The linear characteristics of drift tearing modes are investigated in the presence of a significant background of radio-frequency (RF) waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. The ponderomotive force, arising from the radial gradients in the RF field energy, is found to significantly modify the inner layer solutions of the drift tearing modes. It can have a stabilizing influence, even at moderate RF powers, provided the field energy has a decreasing radial profile at the mode rational surface. (author)

  18. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  19. Dike/Drift Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffiney, E.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1)

  20. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the...

  1. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.S. Gaffney

    2003-10-08

    This report documents the model of events associated with a potential intrusion of magma from a volcanic dike into a drift or drifts in the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. The following topics are included in this report: (1) A discussion of dike propagation, which provides the basis for describing the path that a representative dike, or swarm of dikes, would follow during an event. (2) A discussion of magma flow, which evaluates the interaction at the junction of the propagating dike with the drift and the movement of magmatic products into and down drifts and, potentially, through a drift to the surface by way of access drift or a secondary dike opened up along the drift. (3) A discussion of gas flow and conductive cooling of a magma-filled drift, describing how an adjacent drift that has not been intersected by a dike could be affected by post-intrusion phenomena. Note that a gas flow analysis is also addressed in ''Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Form and Waste Packages'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161810]), and those results are consistent with the results presented in this report.

  2. Dike/Drift Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.S. Gaffney

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the model of events associated with a potential intrusion of magma from a volcanic dike into a drift or drifts in the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. The following topics are included in this report: (1) A discussion of dike propagation, which provides the basis for describing the path that a representative dike, or swarm of dikes, would follow during an event. (2) A discussion of magma flow, which evaluates the interaction at the junction of the propagating dike with the drift and the movement of magmatic products into and down drifts and, potentially, through a drift to the surface by way of access drift or a secondary dike opened up along the drift. (3) A discussion of gas flow and conductive cooling of a magma-filled drift, describing how an adjacent drift that has not been intersected by a dike could be affected by post-intrusion phenomena. Note that a gas flow analysis is also addressed in ''Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Form and Waste Packages'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161810]), and those results are consistent with the results presented in this report

  3. Noise-induced modulation of the relaxation kinetics around a non-equilibrium steady state of non-linear chemical reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Ramaswamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confinement increases the lifetimes of all species that are involved in any non-linear reaction as a reactant. Burst monotonically increases or decreases lifetimes. Competition between burst-induced and confinement-induced modulation may hence lead to a non-monotonic modulation. We quantify lifetime as the integral of the time autocorrelation function (ACF of concentration fluctuations around a non-equilibrium steady state of the reaction network. Furthermore, we look at the first and second derivatives of the ACF, each of which is affected in opposite ways by burst and confinement. This allows discriminating between these two noise sources. We analytically derive the ACF from the linear Fokker-Planck approximation of the chemical master equation in order to establish a baseline for the burst-induced modulation at low confinement. Effects of higher confinement are then studied using a partial-propensity stochastic simulation algorithm. The results presented here may help understand the mechanisms that deviate stochastic kinetics from its deterministic counterpart. In addition, they may be instrumental when using fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM or fluorescence-correlation spectroscopy (FCS to measure confinement and burst in systems with known reaction rates, or, alternatively, to correct for the effects of confinement and burst when experimentally measuring reaction rates.

  4. Noise-induced modulation of the relaxation kinetics around a non-equilibrium steady state of non-linear chemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; González-Segredo, Nélido

    2011-01-28

    Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confinement increases the lifetimes of all species that are involved in any non-linear reaction as a reactant. Burst monotonically increases or decreases lifetimes. Competition between burst-induced and confinement-induced modulation may hence lead to a non-monotonic modulation. We quantify lifetime as the integral of the time autocorrelation function (ACF) of concentration fluctuations around a non-equilibrium steady state of the reaction network. Furthermore, we look at the first and second derivatives of the ACF, each of which is affected in opposite ways by burst and confinement. This allows discriminating between these two noise sources. We analytically derive the ACF from the linear Fokker-Planck approximation of the chemical master equation in order to establish a baseline for the burst-induced modulation at low confinement. Effects of higher confinement are then studied using a partial-propensity stochastic simulation algorithm. The results presented here may help understand the mechanisms that deviate stochastic kinetics from its deterministic counterpart. In addition, they may be instrumental when using fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) or fluorescence-correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure confinement and burst in systems with known reaction rates, or, alternatively, to correct for the effects of confinement and burst when experimentally measuring reaction rates.

  5. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwayne C. Kicker

    2001-09-28

    A statistical description of the probable block sizes formed by fractures around the emplacement drifts has been developed for each of the lithologic units of the repository host horizon. A range of drift orientations with the drift azimuth varied in 15{sup o} increments has been considered in the static analysis. For the quasi-static seismic analysis, and the time-dependent and thermal effects analysis, two drift orientations have been considered: a drift azimuth of 105{sup o} and the current emplacement drift azimuth of 75{sup o}. The change in drift profile resulting from progressive deterioration of the emplacement drifts has been assessed both with and without backfill. Drift profiles have been determined for four different time increments, including static (i.e., upon excavation), 200 years, 2,000 years, and 10,000 years. The effect of seismic events on rock fall has been analyzed. Block size distributions and drift profiles have been determined for three seismic levels, including a 1,000-year event, a 5,000-year event, and a 10,000-year event. Data developed in this modeling and analysis activity have been entered into the TDMS (DTN: MO0109RDDAAMRR.003). The following conclusions have resulted from this drift degradation analysis: (1) The available fracture data are suitable for supporting a detailed key block analysis of the repository host horizon rock mass. The available data from the north-south Main Drift and the east-west Cross Drift provide a sufficient representative fracture sample of the repository emplacement drift horizon. However, the Tptpln fracture data are only available from a relatively small section of the Cross Drift, resulting in a smaller fracture sample size compared to the other lithologic units. This results in a lower degree of confidence that the key block data based on the Tptpln data set is actually representative of the overall Tptpln key block population. (2) The seismic effect on the rock fall size distribution for all events

  6. The results of a non-linear mathematical model for the kinetics of 10B after BPA-F infusion in BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryynaenen, P.; Savolainen, S.; Hiismaeki, P.; Kangasmaeki, A.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to create a model for the kinetics of 10 B in glioma patients after p-boronophenylalanine fructose complex (BPA-F) infusion in order to predict the 10 B concentration in blood during the neutron irradiations in BNCT. The more specific aim was to create a flexible model that would work with variable infusion duration and variable amounts of infused BRA, by forehand carrying out only 1 to 2 kinetic studies per different trials. Previously used bi-exponential fitting and open compartmental model are capable, but, however, heavy kinetic studies are needed before they are reliable enough. A model probe with a memory effect based on phenomenological findings was created. The model development was based on the data from 10 glioblastoma multiforme patients from the Brookhaven National Laboratory BNCT trials. These patients received i.v. 290 mg BPA/kg body weight as a fructose complex during two hours. Blood samples were collected during and after the infusion. The accuracy of the model was verified with distinctive fitting of 10 new glioma patient data from the Finnish BNCT-trials. The 10 B- concentration in whole blood samples was determined by ICP-AES method. In the study it is concluded that the constructed non-linear model is flexible and capable in describing the kinetics of 10 B concentration in blood after a single infusion of BPA-F. (author)

  7. Silicon Drift Detectors development for position sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Hartmann, R.; Strueder, L.

    2007-01-01

    Novel Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) with multi-linear architecture specifically intended for 2D position sensing and imaging applications are presented and their achievable spatial, energy and time resolution are discussed. The capability of providing a fast timing of the interaction with nanosecond time resolution is a new available feature that allows operating the drift detector in continuous readout mode for coincidence imaging applications either with an external trigger or in self-timing. The application of SDDs with multi-linear architecture to Compton electrons' tracking within a single silicon layer and the achieved experimental results will be discussed

  8. An electrodeless drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Duerdoth, I.; Rowe, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    We describe a chamber in which the drift field is controlled by the deposition of electrostatic charge on an insulating surface. The chamber operates with good efficiency and precision for observed drift distances of up to 45 cm, promises to be extremely robust and adaptable and offers a very cheap way of making particle detectors. (orig.)

  9. Modeling concept drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchani, Hanen; Martinez, Ana Maria; Masegosa, Andrés R.

    2015-01-01

    An often used approach for detecting and adapting to concept drift when doing classification is to treat the data as i.i.d. and use changes in classification accuracy as an indication of concept drift. In this paper, we take a different perspective and propose a framework, based on probabilistic ...... data set from a Spanish bank....

  10. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-01-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package corrosion or radionuclide transport

  11. Simulation of herbicide degradation in different soils by use of Pedo-transfer functions (PTF) and non-linear kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Götz, N; Richter, O

    1999-03-01

    The degradation behaviour of bentazone in 14 different soils was examined at constant temperature and moisture conditions. Two soils were examined at different temperatures. On the basis of these data the influence of soil properties and temperature on degradation was assessed and modelled. Pedo-transfer functions (PTF) in combination with a linear and a non-linear model were found suitable to describe the bentazone degradation in the laboratory as related to soil properties. The linear PTF can be combined with a rate related to the temperature to account for both soil property and temperature influence at the same time.

  12. Comparison of safflower oil extraction kinetics under two characteristic moisture conditions: statistical analysis of non-linear model parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baümler

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study the kinetics of oil extraction from partially dehulled safflower seeds under two moisture conditions (7 and 9% dry basis was investigated. The extraction assays were performed using a stirred batch system, thermostated at 50 ºC, using n-hexane as solvent. The data obtained were fitted to a modified diffusion model in order to represent the extraction kinetics. The model took into account a washing and a diffusive step. Fitting parameters were compared statistically for both moisture conditions. The oil yield increased with the extraction time in both cases, although the oil was released at different rates. A comparison of the parameters showed that both the portion extracted in the washing phase and the effective diffusion coefficient were moisture-dependent. The effective diffusivities were 2.81 10-12 and 8.06 10-13 m²s-1 for moisture contents of 7% and 9%, respectively.

  13. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.H. Nieder-Westermann

    2005-01-01

    The outputs from the drift degradation analysis support scientific analyses, models, and design calculations, including the following: (1) Abstraction of Drift Seepage; (2) Seismic Consequence Abstraction; (3) Structural Stability of a Drip Shield Under Quasi-Static Pressure; and (4) Drip Shield Structural Response to Rock Fall. This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The drift degradation analysis includes the development and validation of rockfall models that approximate phenomenon associated with various components of rock mass behavior anticipated within the repository horizon. Two drift degradation rockfall models have been developed: the rockfall model for nonlithophysal rock and the rockfall model for lithophysal rock. These models reflect the two distinct types of tuffaceous rock at Yucca Mountain. The output of this modeling and analysis activity documents the expected drift deterioration for drifts constructed in accordance with the repository layout configuration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172801])

  14. Solitary drift waves in the presence of magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiss, J.D.; Horton, W.

    1982-07-01

    The two-component fluid equations describing electron drift and ion acoustic waves in a nonuniform magnetized plasma are shown to possess nonlinear two-dimensional solitary wave solutions. In the presence of magnetic shear, radiative shear damping is exponentially small in L/sub s//L/sub n/ for solitary drift waves, in contrast to linear waves

  15. Effect of magnetic shear on dissipative drift instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzdar, P.N.; Chen, L.; Kaw, P.K.; Oberman, C.

    1978-03-01

    In this letter we report the results of a linear radial eigenmode analysis of dissipative drift waves in a plasma with magnetic shear and spatially varying density gradient. The results of the analysis are shown to be consistent with a recent experiment on the study of dissipative drift instabilities in a toroidal stellarator

  16. Comment on the drift mirror instability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 5 (2008), 054502/1-054502/2 ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : drift mirror instability * linear theory Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.427, year: 2008

  17. Learning drifting concepts with neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biehl, Michael; Schwarze, Holm

    1993-01-01

    The learning of time-dependent concepts with a neural network is studied analytically and numerically. The linearly separable target rule is represented by an N-vector, whose time dependence is modelled by a random or deterministic drift process. A single-layer network is trained online using

  18. Kinetic equations for the collisional plasma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rij, W.I. Van; Meier, H.K.; Beasley, C.O. Jr.; McCune, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Using the Collisional Plasma Model (CPM) representation, expressions are derived for the Vlasov operator, both in its general form and in the drift-kinetic approximation following the recursive derivation by Hazeltine. The expressions for the operators give easily calculated couplings between neighbouring components of the CPM representation. Expressions for various macroscopic observables in the drift-kinetics approximation are also given. (author)

  19. Drift Scale THM Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, J.

    2004-01-01

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because a sufficient amount of water must be available within a

  20. Protein fiber linear dichroism for structure determination and kinetics in a low-volume, low-wavelength couette flow cell

    OpenAIRE

    Dafforn, Tim; Rajendra, Jacindra; Halsall, David J.; Serpell, Louise C.; Rodger, Alison

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution structure determination of soluble globular proteins relies heavily on x-ray crystallography techniques. Such an approach is often ineffective for investigations into the structure of fibrous proteins as these proteins generally do not crystallize. Thus investigations into fibrous protein structure have relied on less direct methods such as x-ray fiber diffraction and circular dichroism. Ultraviolet linear dichroism has the potential to provide additional information on the st...

  1. Protein fiber linear dichroism for structure determination and kinetics in a low-volume, low-wavelength couette flow cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafforn, Timothy R; Rajendra, Jacindra; Halsall, David J; Serpell, Louise C; Rodger, Alison

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution structure determination of soluble globular proteins relies heavily on x-ray crystallography techniques. Such an approach is often ineffective for investigations into the structure of fibrous proteins as these proteins generally do not crystallize. Thus investigations into fibrous protein structure have relied on less direct methods such as x-ray fiber diffraction and circular dichroism. Ultraviolet linear dichroism has the potential to provide additional information on the structure of such biomolecular systems. However, existing systems are not optimized for the requirements of fibrous proteins. We have designed and built a low-volume (200 microL), low-wavelength (down to 180 nm), low-pathlength (100 microm), high-alignment flow-alignment system (couette) to perform ultraviolet linear dichroism studies on the fibers formed by a range of biomolecules. The apparatus has been tested using a number of proteins for which longer wavelength linear dichroism spectra had already been measured. The new couette cell has also been used to obtain data on two medically important protein fibers, the all-beta-sheet amyloid fibers of the Alzheimer's derived protein Abeta and the long-chain assemblies of alpha1-antitrypsin polymers.

  2. Noncontact measurement of electrostatic fields: Verification of modeled potentials within ion mobility spectrometer drift tube designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    The heart of an ion mobility spectrometer is the drift region where ion separation occurs. While the electrostatic potentials within a drift tube design can be modeled, no method for independently validating the electrostatic field has previously been reported. Two basic drift tube designs were modeled using SIMION 7.0 to reveal the expected electrostatic fields: (1) A traditional alternating set of electrodes and insulators and (2) a truly linear drift tube. One version of the alternating electrode/insulator drift tube and two versions of linear drift tubes were then fabricated. The stacked alternating electrodes/insulators were connected through a resistor network to generate the electrostatic gradient in the drift tube. The two linear drift tube designs consisted of two types of resistive drift tubes with one tube consisting of a resistive coating within an insulating tube and the other tube composed of resistive ferrites. The electrostatic fields within each type of drift tube were then evaluated by a noncontact method using a Kelvin-Zisman type electrostatic voltmeter and probe (results for alternative measurement methods provided in supplementary material). The experimental results were then compared with the electrostatic fields predicted by SIMION. Both the modeling and experimental measurements reveal that the electrostatic fields within a stacked ion mobility spectrometer drift tube are only pseudo-linear, while the electrostatic fields within a resistive drift tube approach perfect linearity

  3. Accurate computer simulation of a drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killian, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    A general purpose program for drift chamber studies is described. First the capacitance matrix is calculated using a Green's function technique. The matrix is used in a linear-least-squares fit to choose optimal operating voltages. Next the electric field is computed, and given knowledge of gas parameters and magnetic field environment, a family of electron trajectories is determined. These are finally used to make drift distance vs time curves which may be used directly by a track reconstruction program. Results are compared with data obtained from the cylindrical chamber in the Axial Field Magnet experiment at the CERN ISR

  4. Accurate computer simulation of a drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Killian, T J

    1980-01-01

    The author describes a general purpose program for drift chamber studies. First the capacitance matrix is calculated using a Green's function technique. The matrix is used in a linear-least-squares fit to choose optimal operating voltages. Next the electric field is computed, and given knowledge of gas parameters and magnetic field environment, a family of electron trajectories is determined. These are finally used to make drift distance vs time curves which may be used directly by a track reconstruction program. The results are compared with data obtained from the cylindrical chamber in the Axial Field Magnet experiment at the CERN ISR. (1 refs).

  5. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kicker

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal stress. (3) The DRKBA

  6. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal

  7. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs

  8. Radial semiconductor drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    The conditions under which the energy resolution of a radial semiconductor drift chamber based detector system becomes dominated by the step noise from the detector dark current have been investigated. To minimise the drift chamber dark current attention should be paid to carrier generation at Si/SiO 2 interfaces. This consideration conflicts with the desire to reduce the signal risetime: a higher drift field for shorter signal pulses requires a larger area of SiO 2 . Calculations for the single shaping and pseudo Gaussian passive filters indicate that for the same degree of signal risetime sensitivity in a system dominated by the step noise from the detector dark current, the pseudo Gaussian filter gives only a 3% improvement in signal/noise and 12% improvement in rate capability compared with the single shaper performance. (orig.)

  9. Combining vibrational linear-by-part dynamics and kinetic-based decoupling of the dynamics for multiple elastoplastic smooth impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barjau, Ana, E-mail: ana.barjau@upc.edu; Batlle, Joaquim A., E-mail: agullo.batlle@upc.edu; Font-Llagunes, Josep M., E-mail: josep.m.font@upc.edu [Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering Research Centre (Spain)

    2015-11-15

    This article proposes a linear-by-part approach for elastoplastic 3D multiple-point smooth impacts in multibody systems with perfect constraints. The model is an extension of a previous version, restricted to the perfectly elastic case, able to account for the high sensitivity to initial conditions and for redundancy without assuming any particular collision sequence (Barjau et al., Multibody Syst. Dyn. 31:497–517, 2014). Energy losses associated with compression and expansion in percussive analysis is a matter as complex as the physical phenomena involved, at the nanoscale level, for different materials. Simplified models can be developed for specific purposes, which can retain the most relevant trends of internal damping and at the same time be suitable for a particular analytical approach of impact mechanics. In the context of this article, energy dissipation due to material deformation is introduced through a linear-by-part elastoplastic model consisting on two elementary sets of springs and dry-friction dampers. The first set accounts for inelastic behavior (energy loss without permanent indentation), whereas the second one introduces plasticity (that is, permanent indentation). In inelastic and plastic collisions, instantaneous unilateral constraints may appear, thus reducing the number of degrees of freedom (DOF) of the system. The calculation of the corresponding normal contact force at the constrained points is then necessary in order to detect whether the constraint holds or disappears (either because a new compression or an expansion phase starts, or because contact is lost). Different simulated application examples are presented and thoroughly discussed.

  10. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the continuous-time Itô semi-martingale model in such a way that the fundamental arbitrage-free property is preserved......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  11. Determination of tartrazine in beverage samples by stopped-flow analysis and three-way multivariate calibration of non-linear kinetic-spectrophotometric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenone, Agustina V; Culzoni, María J; Marsili, Nilda R; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2013-06-01

    The performance of MCR-ALS was studied in the modeling of non-linear kinetic-spectrophotometric data acquired by a stopped-flow system for the quantitation of tartrazine in the presence of brilliant blue and sunset yellow FCF as possible interferents. In the present work, MCR-ALS and U-PCA/RBL were firstly applied to remove the contribution of unexpected components not included in the calibration set. Secondly, a polynomial function was used to model the non-linear data obtained by the implementation of the algorithms. MCR-ALS was the only strategy that allowed the determination of tartrazine in test samples accurately. Therefore, it was applied for the analysis of tartrazine in beverage samples with minimum sample preparation and short analysis time. The proposed method was validated by comparison with a chromatographic procedure published in the literature. Mean recovery values between 98% and 100% and relative errors of prediction values between 4% and 9% were indicative of the good performance of the method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tapping with intentional drift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardy, A.N.; Daffertshofer, A.; Beek, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    When tapping a desired frequency, subjects tend to drift away from this target frequency. This compromises the estimate of the correlation between inter-tap intervals (ITIs) as predicted by the two-level model of Wing and Kristofferson which consists of an internal timer ('clock') and motor delays.

  13. The KLOE drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, A.

    2002-01-01

    The design and construction of the large drift chamber of the KLOE experiment is presented. The track reconstruction is described, together with the calibration method and the monitoring systems. The stability of operation and the performance are studied with samples of e + e - , K S K L and K + K - events

  14. High resolution drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 μm resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs

  15. Argus drift chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, M; Nagovizin, V; Hasemann, H; Michel, E; Schmidt-Parzefall, W; Wurth, R; Kim, P

    1983-11-15

    The ARGUS detector came into operation at the DORIS-II e/sup +/s/sup -/ storage ring at the end of 1982. Its two meter long drift chamber contains 5940 sense and 24588 field wires organized in uniform 18x18.8 mm/sup 2/ drift cells filling the whole volume. These cells form 36 layers, 18 of which provide stereo views. Each sense wire is equipped with a single hit TDC and ADC for coordinate and dE/dx measurements. The chamber is operated with propane to improve momentum and dE/dx resolution. The drift chamber design and initial performance are presented. With a very crude space-time relation approximation and without all the necessary corrections applied a spatial resolution of about 200 ..mu..m was obtained for half of the drift cell volume. Further corrections should improve this result. An intrinsic dE/dx resolution of 4.2% and an actual resolution of 5% were obtained for cosmic muons and also for Bhabha scattered electrons. An actual dE/dx resolution of 5.6% was obtained for pions from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation data with almost no track selection. A relativistic rise of 30% was observed in good agreement with theory. The long-term stability is still to be investigated.

  16. Inland drift sand landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanta, J.; Siepel, H.

    2010-01-01

    Man has had a complex relationship with inland drift sands through the ages. For some centuries these landscapes were seen as a threat to society, especially agriculture and housing. At present we conserve these landscapes as important Natura 2000 priority habitats. In this book you may find these

  17. Guiding center drift equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1979-03-01

    The quations for particle guiding center drift orbits are given in a new magnetic coordinate system. This form of the equations not only separates the fast motion along the lines from the slow motion across, but also requires less information about the magnetic field than many other formulations of the problem

  18. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  19. Nonlinear radial propagation of drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, M.

    1985-01-01

    We study the linear and the nonlinear radial propagation of drift wave energy in an inhomogeneous plasma. The drift mode excited in such a plasma is dispersive in nature. The drift wave energy spreads out symmetrically along the direction of inhomogeneity with a finite group velocity. To study the effect of the nonlinear coupling on the propagation of energy in a collision free plasma, we solve the Hasegawa-Mima equation as a mixed initial boundary-value problem. The solutions of the linearized equation are used to check the reliability of our numerical calculations. Additional checks are also performed on the invariants of the system. Our results reveal that a pulse gets distorted as it propagates through the medium. The peak of the pulse propagates with a finite velocity that depends on the amplitude of the initial pulse. The polarity of propagation depends on the initial parameters of the pulse. We have also studied drift wave propagation in a resistive plasma. The Hasegawa-Wakatani equations are used to investigate this problem

  20. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M and O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M and O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report

  1. Electromagnetic nonlinear gyrokinetics with polarization drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duthoit, F.-X.; Hahm, T. S.; Wang, Lu

    2014-01-01

    A set of new nonlinear electromagnetic gyrokinetic Vlasov equation with polarization drift and gyrokinetic Maxwell equations is systematically derived by using the Lie-transform perturbation method in toroidal geometry. For the first time, we recover the drift-kinetic expression for parallel acceleration [R. M. Kulsrud, in Basic Plasma Physics, edited by A. A. Galeev and R. N. Sudan (North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1983)] from the nonlinear gyrokinetic equations, thereby bridging a gap between the two formulations. This formalism should be useful in addressing nonlinear ion Compton scattering of intermediate-mode-number toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes for which the polarization current nonlinearity [T. S. Hahm and L. Chen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 266 (1995)] and the usual finite Larmor radius effects should compete

  2. Style drift in private equity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cumming, D.; Fleming, G.; Schwienbacher, A.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the concept of style drift to private equity investment. We present theory and evidence pertaining to style drifts in terms of a fund manager's stated focus on particular stages of entrepreneurial development. We develop a model that derives conditions under which style drifts are less

  3. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive)

  4. New developments on silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashevsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    In the frame of the project to develop large-area linear drift detectors few prototypes have been designed and produced. the function of these prototypes is to allow the evaluation of the solutions chosen for the geometry of the on-board electrodes and the production process. On these prototypes it is studied the static characteristics and measured time of-flight and charge collection injecting charges with an IR laser source. It is report the results from one of the prototypes

  5. Drift-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Banoo

    1998-01-01

    equation in the discrete momentum space. This is shown to be similar to the conventional drift-diffusion equation except that it is a more rigorous solution to the Boltzmann equation because the current and carrier densities are resolved into M×1 vectors, where M is the number of modes in the discrete momentum space. The mobility and diffusion coefficient become M×M matrices which connect the M momentum space modes. This approach is demonstrated by simulating electron transport in bulk silicon.

  6. Negative Drift in Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian

    2011-01-01

    An important step in gaining a better understanding of the stochastic dynamics of evolving populations, is the development of appropriate analytical tools. We present a new drift theorem for populations that allows properties of their long-term behaviour, e.g. the runtime of evolutionary algorithms......, to be derived from simple conditions on the one-step behaviour of their variation operators and selection mechanisms....

  7. Phenomena accompanying gradient-B drift injection of energetic ions into Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    The application of vertically asymmetric toroidal-field ripple, in order to permit the gradient B-drift injection and subsequent capture of energetic ions, results in a new radial diffusion of banana orbits. The nearly mono-kinetic velocity distribution of gradient B-drifting ions in the outer plasma region represents a large source of free energy; and the nonambipolar inward drift of these ions modifies the radial electric field

  8. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Ferreira, Ix-B.; Garcia-Herrera, J.; Villasenor, L.

    2006-01-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas

  9. Nonlinear excitation of geodesic acoustic modes by drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, N.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.; Guzdar, P. N.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, two mode-coupling analyses for the nonlinear excitation of the geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in tokamak plasmas by drift waves are presented. The first approach is a coherent parametric process, which leads to a three-wave resonant interaction. This investigation allows for the drift waves and the GAMs to have comparable scales. The second approach uses the wave-kinetic equations for the drift waves, which then couples to the GAMs. This requires that the GAM scale length be large compared to the wave packet associated with the drift waves. The resonance conditions for these two cases lead to specific predictions of the radial wave number of the excited GAMs

  10. Drift chambers in BM@N Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorišin Ján

    2017-01-01

    In first step, the radius vs drift time calibration curve is estimated and applied to calculate DCH hit closest approach coordinates. These coordinates are used to construct hits in each DCH under the assumption of track linearity. Hits in both the DCHs are subsequently aligned and fitted to produce global linear track candidates. Eventually the hit and track reconstruction is optimized by the autocalibration method. The coordinate resolutions are estimated from Gaussian fits of the DCH hit residual spectra for different DCH planes. Furthermore, the deuteron beam momentum value is reconstructed in order to check reliability of the employed track reconstruction algorithm.

  11. Drifting black aurorae?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoute-Vanneck, H.; Scourfield, M.W.J.; Nielsen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Characteristics of eastward drifting forms, previously described in the literature as black aurorae, have been identified in low-light level TV camera data. The TV field of view was within the field of view of STARE and that of an all-sky camera. On the basis of these observations the authors propose that these auroral forms are a manifestation of folds or waves on the borders of auroral bands propagating along the dark regions between neighboring auroral bands. Conditions under which the folds or waves occur are compatible with their formation by the Kelvin-Helmholtz electrostatic instability

  12. ABSTRACTION OF DRIFT SEEPAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Michael L.

    2001-01-01

    Drift seepage refers to flow of liquid water into repository emplacement drifts, where it can potentially contribute to degradation of the engineered systems and release and transport of radionuclides within the drifts. Because of these important effects, seepage into emplacement drifts is listed as a ''principal factor for the postclosure safety case'' in the screening criteria for grading of data in Attachment 1 of AP-3.15Q, Rev. 2, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''. Abstraction refers to distillation of the essential components of a process model into a form suitable for use in total-system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this analysis/model is to put the information generated by the seepage process modeling in a form appropriate for use in the TSPA for the Site Recommendation. This report also supports the Unsaturated-Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report. The scope of the work is discussed below. This analysis/model is governed by the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS MandO 2000a). Details of this activity are in Addendum A of the technical work plan. The original Work Direction and Planning Document is included as Attachment 7 of Addendum A. Note that the Work Direction and Planning Document contains tasks identified for both Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO). Only the PAO tasks are documented here. The planning for the NEPO activities is now in Addendum D of the same technical work plan and the work is documented in a separate report (CRWMS MandO 2000b). The Project has been reorganized since the document was written. The responsible organizations in the new structure are the Performance Assessment Department and the Unsaturated Zone Department, respectively. The work plan for the seepage abstraction calls for determining an appropriate abstraction methodology, determining uncertainties in seepage, and providing

  13. Benchmark studies of the gyro-Landau-fluid code and gyro-kinetic codes on kinetic ballooning modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, T. F. [Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Xu, X. Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Ma, C. H. [Fusion Simulation Center, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Bass, E. M.; Candy, J. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Holland, C. [University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0429 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A Gyro-Landau-Fluid (GLF) 3 + 1 model has been recently implemented in BOUT++ framework, which contains full Finite-Larmor-Radius effects, Landau damping, and toroidal resonance [Ma et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 055903 (2015)]. A linear global beta scan has been conducted using the JET-like circular equilibria (cbm18 series), showing that the unstable modes are kinetic ballooning modes (KBMs). In this work, we use the GYRO code, which is a gyrokinetic continuum code widely used for simulation of the plasma microturbulence, to benchmark with GLF 3 + 1 code on KBMs. To verify our code on the KBM case, we first perform the beta scan based on “Cyclone base case parameter set.” We find that the growth rate is almost the same for two codes, and the KBM mode is further destabilized as beta increases. For JET-like global circular equilibria, as the modes localize in peak pressure gradient region, a linear local beta scan using the same set of equilibria has been performed at this position for comparison. With the drift kinetic electron module in the GYRO code by including small electron-electron collision to damp electron modes, GYRO generated mode structures and parity suggest that they are kinetic ballooning modes, and the growth rate is comparable to the GLF results. However, a radial scan of the pedestal for a particular set of cbm18 equilibria, using GYRO code, shows different trends for the low-n and high-n modes. The low-n modes show that the linear growth rate peaks at peak pressure gradient position as GLF results. However, for high-n modes, the growth rate of the most unstable mode shifts outward to the bottom of pedestal and the real frequency of what was originally the KBMs in ion diamagnetic drift direction steadily approaches and crosses over to the electron diamagnetic drift direction.

  14. Drift velocity monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented.

  15. The CLEO III drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, D; Briere, R A; Chen, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Csorna, S; Dickson, M; Dombrowski, S V; Ecklund, K M; Lyon, A; Marka, S; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Sadoff, A; Thies, P; Thorndike, E H; Urner, D

    2002-01-01

    The CLEO group at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring has constructed and commissioned a new central drift chamber. With 9796 cells arranged in 47 layers ranging in radius from 13.2 to 79 cm, the new drift chamber has a smaller outer radius and fewer wires than the drift chamber it replaces, but allows the CLEO tracking system to have improved momentum resolution. Reduced scattering material in the chamber gas and in the inner skin separating the drift chamber from the silicon vertex detector provides a reduction of the multiple scattering component of the momentum resolution and an extension of the usable measurement length into the silicon. Momentum resolution is further improved through quality control in wire positioning and symmetry of the electric fields in the drift cells which have provided a reduction in the spatial resolution to 88 mu m (averaged over the full drift range).

  16. Electronics for proportional drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremont, G.; Friend, B.; Mess, K.H.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Tarle, J.C.; Verweij, H.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration); Geske, K.; Riege, H.; Schuett, J.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration); Semenov, Y.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration)

    1980-01-01

    An electronic system for the read-out of a large number of proportional drift tubes (16,000) has been designed. This system measures deposited charge and drift-time of the charge of a particle traversing a proportional drift tube. A second event can be accepted during the read-out of the system. Up to 40 typical events can be collected and buffered before a data transfer to a computer is necessary. (orig.)

  17. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houseworth, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  18. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  19. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-01-01

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling

  20. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-02-17

    alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC submodel uses a drift-scale process model relying on the same conceptual model and many of the same input data (i.e., physical, hydrologic, thermodynamic, and kinetic) as the THC seepage model. The DST THC submodel is the primary means for validating the THC seepage model. The DST THC submodel compares predicted water and gas compositions, and mineral alteration patterns, with observed data from the DST. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal-loading conditions, and predict the evolution of mineral alteration and fluid chemistry around potential waste emplacement drifts. The DST THC submodel is used solely for the validation of the THC seepage model and is not used for calibration to measured data.

  1. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-01-01

    -scale process model relying on the same conceptual model and many of the same input data (i.e., physical, hydrologic, thermodynamic, and kinetic) as the THC seepage model. The DST THC submodel is the primary means for validating the THC seepage model. The DST THC submodel compares predicted water and gas compositions, and mineral alteration patterns, with observed data from the DST. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal-loading conditions, and predict the evolution of mineral alteration and fluid chemistry around potential waste emplacement drifts. The DST THC submodel is used solely for the validation of the THC seepage model and is not used for calibration to measured data

  2. Effects of magnetic drift tangential to magnetic surfaces on neoclassical transport in non-axisymmetric plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Seikichi; Satake, Shinsuke; Kanno, Ryutaro; Sugama, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    In evaluating neoclassical transport by radially local simulations, the magnetic drift tangential to a flux surface is usually ignored in order to keep the phase-space volume conservation. In this paper, effect of the tangential magnetic drift on the local neoclassical transport is investigated. To retain the effect of the tangential magnetic drift in the local treatment of neoclassical transport, a new local formulation for the drift kinetic simulation is developed. The compressibility of the phase-space volume caused by the tangential magnetic drift is regarded as a source term for the drift kinetic equation, which is solved by using a two-weight δf Monte Carlo method for non-Hamiltonian system [G. Hu and J. A. Krommes, Phys. Plasmas 1, 863 (1994)]. It is demonstrated that the effect of the drift is negligible for the neoclassical transport in tokamaks. In non-axisymmetric systems, however, the tangential magnetic drift substantially changes the dependence of the neoclassical transport on the radial electric field E r . The peaked behavior of the neoclassical radial fluxes around E r  =   0 observed in conventional local neoclassical transport simulations is removed by taking the tangential magnetic drift into account

  3. Effects of magnetic drift tangential to magnetic surfaces on neoclassical transport in non-axisymmetric plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, Seikichi, E-mail: matsuoka@rist.or.jp [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, 6F Kimec-Center Build., 1-5-2 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Satake, Shinsuke; Kanno, Ryutaro [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Sugama, Hideo [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    In evaluating neoclassical transport by radially local simulations, the magnetic drift tangential to a flux surface is usually ignored in order to keep the phase-space volume conservation. In this paper, effect of the tangential magnetic drift on the local neoclassical transport is investigated. To retain the effect of the tangential magnetic drift in the local treatment of neoclassical transport, a new local formulation for the drift kinetic simulation is developed. The compressibility of the phase-space volume caused by the tangential magnetic drift is regarded as a source term for the drift kinetic equation, which is solved by using a two-weight δf Monte Carlo method for non-Hamiltonian system [G. Hu and J. A. Krommes, Phys. Plasmas 1, 863 (1994)]. It is demonstrated that the effect of the drift is negligible for the neoclassical transport in tokamaks. In non-axisymmetric systems, however, the tangential magnetic drift substantially changes the dependence of the neoclassical transport on the radial electric field E{sub r}. The peaked behavior of the neoclassical radial fluxes around E{sub r }={sub  }0 observed in conventional local neoclassical transport simulations is removed by taking the tangential magnetic drift into account.

  4. Numerical Calculation of Transport Based on the Drift Kinetic Equation for plasmas in General Toroidal Magnetic Geometry; Calculo Numerico del Transporte mediante la Ecuacion Cinetica de Deriva para Plasmas en Geometria Magnetica Toroidal: Preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J. M.; Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2009-12-11

    This report is the first of a series dedicated to the numerical calculation of the evolution of fusion plasmas in general toroidal geometry, including TJ-II plasmas. A kinetic treatment has been chosen: the evolution equation of the distribution function of one or several plasma species is solved in guiding center coordinates. The distribution function is written as a Maxwellian one modulated by polynomial series in the kinetic coordinates with no other approximations than those of the guiding center itself and the computation capabilities. The code allows also for the inclusion of the three-dimensional electrostatic potential in a self-consistent manner, but the initial objective has been set to solving only the neoclassical transport. A high order conservative method (Spectral Difference Method) has been chosen in order to discretized the equation for its numerical solution. In this first report, in addition to justifying the work, the evolution equation and its approximations are described, as well as the baseline of the numerical procedures. (Author) 28 refs.

  5. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements

  6. CTF Void Drift Validation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salko, Robert K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gosdin, Chris [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Avramova, Maria N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gergar, Marcus [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    This milestone report is a summary of work performed in support of expansion of the validation and verification (V&V) matrix for the thermal-hydraulic subchannel code, CTF. The focus of this study is on validating the void drift modeling capabilities of CTF and verifying the supporting models that impact the void drift phenomenon. CTF uses a simple turbulent-diffusion approximation to model lateral cross-flow due to turbulent mixing and void drift. The void drift component of the model is based on the Lahey and Moody model. The models are a function of two-phase mass, momentum, and energy distribution in the system; therefore, it is necessary to correctly model the ow distribution in rod bundle geometry as a first step to correctly calculating the void distribution due to void drift.

  7. On the kinetic theory of QPEMIC instabilities in weakly ionized plasmas placed in non-parallel fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milic, B.S.; Gajic, D.Z.

    1994-01-01

    Quasi-perpendicular electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (QPEMIC) modes and instabilities are studied, on the ground of linear theory of perturbations and kinetic equations with BGK collision integrals, in weakly ionized, low-β and moderately non-isothermal plasmas placed in non-parallel electric and magnetic fields. The magnetization is assumed to be sufficiently high to cut off the perpendicular steady-state current. Special attention is given to evaluation of magnitudes of the threshold drifts required for the onset of instabilities. It is found that these drifts are smaller than those for the corresponding quasi-perpendicular electrostatic ion-cyclotron (QPESIC) instabilities studied previously for the same type of plasmas. Both QPEMIC and QPESIC threshold drifts exhibit the same behavioural pattern if the order of harmonic, magnetization, non-isothermality or the angle between the fields are varied. An increase of the angle between the fields lowers the threshold drifts, which means that the presence of u perpendicular to (or E perpendicular to ) facilitates the excitation of both QPEMIC and QPESIC instabilities. The QPEMIC threshold drifts are found to depend on the overall gas pressure, and to decrease as the pressure is lowered, which is a feature not found in the QPESIC case. The discrepancies between the QPEMIC and QPESIC threshold drifts increase if the pressure decreases, or if magnetization, degree of ionization or ion charge number increase. (orig.)

  8. Numerical Calculation of Transport Based on the Drift-Kinetic Equation for Plasmas in General Toroidal Magnetic Geometry: Convergence and Testing; Calculo Numerico del Transporte mediante la Ecuacion Cinetica de Deriva para Plasmas en Geometria Magnetica Toroidal: Convergencia y Comprobaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J. M.; Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2009-12-11

    This report is the third of a series [Informes Tecnicos Ciemat 1165 y 1172] devoted to the development of a new numerical code to solve the guiding center equation for electrons and ions in toroidal plasmas. Two calculation meshes corresponding to axisymmetric tokamaks are now prepared and the kinetic equation is expanded so the standard terms of neoclassical theory --fi rst order terms in the Larmor radius expansion-- can be identified, restricting the calculations correspondingly. Using model density and temperature profiles for the plasma, several convergence test are performed depending on the calculation meshes and the expansions of the distribution function; then the results are compared with the theory [Hinton and Hazeltine, Rev. Mod. Phys. (1976)]. (Author) 18 refs.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of non-linear free radical polymerization using a percolation kinetic gelation model (I): free radical homo polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiass, M.; Dabir, B.; Nikazar, M.; Rey, A.D.; Mirzadeh, H.

    2001-01-01

    A kinetic gelation model that incorporates the kinetics of free radical homo polymerization is implemented to determine the effects of kinetics on polymerization statistics and microstructures. The simulation is performed on a simple cubic lattice that has 100 sites in each direction. A new algorithm for random selecting of the next step in a self-avoiding random walk and very efficient mechanisms of mobility of components are introduced to improve the generality of the predictions by removing commonly accruing deficiencies due to early trapping of radicals. A first order kinetics is considered for decomposition of initiator that enables us to consider the effect of temperature on polymerization reaction. Better understanding of microstructural evolution during polymerization and providing a framework to produce a realistic system of highly packed random chains within polymer network are among the benefits of model

  10. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flauger, Raphael [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); McAllister, Liam [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Silverstein, Eva [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Westphal, Alexander, E-mail: flauger@physics.ucsd.edu, E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu, E-mail: evas@stanford.edu, E-mail: alexander.westphal@desy.de [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-10-01

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  11. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flauger, Raphael; Westphal, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  12. Thirty-five years of drift-tube linac experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, H.B.

    1984-10-01

    The history of the drift-tube linear accelerator (linac) for the first 35 years of its existence is briefly reviewed. Both US and foreign experience is included. Particular attention is given to technological improvements, operational reliability, capital investment, and number of personnel committed to drift-tube linac (DTL) development. Preliminary data indicate that second- and third-generation (post-1960) DTLs have, in the US alone, operated for a combined total period of more than 75 machine-years and that very high reliability (>90%) has been achieved. Existing US drift-tube linacs represent a capital investment of at least $250 million (1983). Additional statistical evidence, derived from the proceedings of the last 11 linear accelerator conferences, supports the view that the DTL has achieved a mature technological base. The report concludes with a discussion of important recent advances in technology and their applications to the fourth generation of DTLs, many of which are now becoming operational

  13. Influence of tungsten fiber’s slow drift on the measurement of G with angular acceleration method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Jie; Wu, Wei-Huang; Zhan, Wen-Ze [School of Mechanical Engineering and Electronic Information, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xue, Chao [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Physics and Astronomy, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Shao, Cheng-Gang, E-mail: cgshao@mail.hust.edu.cn; Wu, Jun-Fei [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Milyukov, Vadim [Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    In the measurement of the gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method, the equilibrium position of torsion pendulum with tungsten fiber undergoes a linear slow drift, which results in a quadratic slow drift on the angular velocity of the torsion balance turntable under feedback control unit. The accurate amplitude determination of the useful angular acceleration signal with known frequency is biased by the linear slow drift and the coupling effect of the drifting equilibrium position and the room fixed gravitational background signal. We calculate the influences of the linear slow drift and the complex coupling effect on the value of G, respectively. The result shows that the bias of the linear slow drift on G is 7 ppm, and the influence of the coupling effect is less than 1 ppm.

  14. Drift chamber data readout system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiladze, S.G.; Lokhonyai, L.

    1980-01-01

    An electronic system for processing drift chamber signals is described. The system consists of 4-channel fast amplifier-discriminators of low threshold, 16-channel time-expanders transforming 0.5 μs time intervals to 10 μs and a 9-bit time-to-digital converter (TDC) recording up to 16 expanded time intervals. If the average track multiplicity is small, TDC is capable to process signals from 4 time-expanders (i.e., 64 drift gaps). In order to record multiple tracks per drift gap discriminator outputs can be connected to a number of time-expander channels. The fast clear input enables the system to be cleared within 0.5 μs. Efficient readout from TDC is facilated by reading only those channels which contain non-zero data (9 bits - drift time; 6 bits - wire number)

  15. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1977-01-01

    Being redied for installation, those at the right are for tank 1, those on the left for tank 2. Contrary to Linac 1, which had drift-tubes supported on stems, here the tubes are suspended, for better mechanical stability.

  16. On nonlinear periodic drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauschke, U.; Schlueter, H.

    1990-09-01

    Nonlinear periodic drift waves are investigated on the basis of a simple perturbation scheme for both the amplitude and inverse frequency. The coefficients for the generation of the forced harmonics are derived, a nonlinear dispersion relation is suggested and a criterion for the onset of the modulational instability is obtained. The results are compared with the ones obtained with the help of a standard KBM-treatment. Moreover cnoidal drift waves are suggested and compared to an experimental observation. (orig.)

  17. The OPAL vertex drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.R.; Elcombe, P.A.; Hill, J.C.; Roach, C.M.; Armitage, J.C.; Carnegie, R.K.; Estabrooks, P.; Hemingway, R.; Karlen, D.; McPherson, A.; Pinfold, J.; Roney, J.M.; Routenburg, P.; Waterhouse, J.; Hargrove, C.K.; Klem, D.; Oakham, F.G.; Carter, A.A.; Jones, R.W.L.; Lasota, M.M.B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Pritchard, T.W.; Wyatt, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    A high precision vertex drift chamber has been installed in the OPAL experiment at LEP. The design of the chamber and the associated readout electronics is described. The performance of the system has been studied using cosmic ray muons and the results of these studies are presented. A space resolution of 50 μm in the drift direction is obtained using the OPAL central detector gas mixture at 4 bar. (orig.)

  18. Advanced numerical studies of the neutralized drift compression of intense ion beam pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B. Sefkow

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal bunch compression of intense ion beams for warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion applications occurs by imposing an axial velocity tilt onto an ion beam across the acceleration gap of a linear induction accelerator, and subsequently allowing the beam to drift through plasma in order to neutralize its space-charge and current as the pulse compresses. The detailed physics and implications of acceleration gap effects and focusing aberration on optimum longitudinal compression are quantitatively reviewed using particle-in-cell simulations, showing their dependence on many system parameters. Finite-size gap effects are shown to result in compression reduction, due to an increase in the effective longitudinal temperature imparted to the beam, and a decrease in intended fractional tilt. Sensitivity of the focal plane quality to initial longitudinal beam temperature is explored, where slower particles are shown to experience increased levels of focusing aberration compared to faster particles. A plateau effect in axial compression is shown to occur for larger initial pulse lengths, where the increases in focusing aberration over the longer drift lengths involved dominate the increases in relative compression, indicating a trade-off between current compression and pulse duration. The dependence on intended fractional tilt is also discussed and agrees well with theory. A balance between longer initial pulse lengths and larger tilts is suggested, since both increase the current compression, but have opposite effects on the final pulse length, drift length, and amount of longitudinal focusing aberration. Quantitative examples are outlined that explore the sensitive dependence of compression on the initial kinetic energy and thermal distribution of the beam particles. Simultaneous transverse and longitudinal current density compression can be achieved in the laboratory using a strong final-focus solenoid, and simulations addressing the effects

  19. Generalized drift-flux correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, K.; Young, M.Y.; Hochreiter, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    A one-dimensional drift-flux model with five conservation equations is frequently employed in major computer codes, such as TRAC-PD2, and in simulator codes. In this method, the relative velocity between liquid and vapor phases, or slip ratio, is given by correlations, rather than by direct solution of the phasic momentum equations, as in the case of the two-fluid model used in TRAC-PF1. The correlations for churn-turbulent bubbly flow and slug flow regimes were given in terms of drift velocities by Zuber and Findlay. For the annular flow regime, the drift velocity correlations were developed by Ishii et al., using interphasic force balances. Another approach is to define the drift velocity so that flooding and liquid hold-up conditions are properly simulated, as reported here. The generalized correlation is used to reanalyze the MB-2 test data for two-phase flow in a large-diameter pipe. The results are applied to the generalized drift flux velocity, whose relationship to the other correlations is discussed. Finally, the generalized drift flux correlation is implemented in TRAC-PD2. Flow reversal from countercurrent to cocurrent flow is computed in small-diameter U-shaped tubes and is compared with the flooding curve

  20. Linear mass reflectron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamyrin, B.A.; Shmikk, D.V.

    1979-01-01

    A description and operating principle of a linear mass reflectron with V-form trajectory of ion motion -a new non-magnetic time-of-flight mass spectrometer with high resolution are presented. The ion-optical system of the device consists of an ion source with ionization by electron shock, of accelerating gaps, reflector gaps, a drift space and ion detector. Ions move in the linear mass refraction along the trajectories parallel to the axis of the analyzer chamber. The results of investigations into the experimental device are given. With an ion drift length of 0.6 m the device resolution is 1200 with respect to the peak width at half-height. Small-sized mass spectrometric transducers with high resolution and sensitivity may be designed on the base of the linear mass reflectron principle

  1. Position reconstruction in drift chambers operated with Xe, $CO_{2}$ (15\\%)

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, C; Appelshäuser, H; Bielcikova, J; Blume, C; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bucher, D; Busch, O; Catanescu, V; Ciobanu, M; Daues, H W; Emschermann, D; Fateev, O V; Foka, P; Garabatos, C; Gunji, T; Herrmann, N; Inuzuka, M; Ivanov, M; Kislov, E; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Ludolphs, W; Mahmoud, T; Petracek, V; Petrovici, M; Radomski, S; Rusanov, I; Sandoval, A; Santo, R; Schicker, R; Schwarz, K; Simon, R S; Smykov, L P; Soltveit, H K; Stachel, J; Stelzer, H; Tsiledakis, G; Vulpescu, B; Wessels, J P; Windelband, B; Yurevich, V; Zanevsky, Yu; Zaudtke, O

    2005-01-01

    We present measurements of position and angular resolution of drift chambers operated with a Xe, CO2 (15%) mixture. The results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and important systematic effects - in particular the dispersive nature of the absorption of transition radiation and non-linearities - are discussed. The measurements were carried out with prototype drift chambers of the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector, but our findings can be generalized to other drift chambers with similar geometry, where the electron drift is perpendicular to the wire planes.

  2. Kinetic analysis of synthetic analogues of linear-epitope peptides of glycoprotein D of herpes simplex virus type 1 by surface plasmon resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lasonder, E; Schellekens, GA; Koedijk, DGAM; Damhof, RA; WellingWester, S; Feijlbrief, M; Scheffer, AJ; Welling, GW

    1996-01-01

    The interaction between mAb A16 and glycoprorein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus type 1 was analyzed by studying the kinetics of binding with a surface-plasmon-resonance biosensor. mAb A16 belongs to group VII antibodies, which recognize residues 11-19 of gD. In a previous study, three critical

  3. Cyclopropanation reactions catalysed by dendrimers possessing one metalloporphyrin active site at the core: linear and sigmoidal kinetic behaviour for different dendrimer generations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinš, P.; de Cózar, A.; Rivilla, I.; Nováková, Kateřina; Zangi, R.; Cvačka, Josef; Arrastia, I.; Arrieta, A.; Drašar, P.; Miranda, J. I.; Cossío, F. P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 8 (2016), s. 1120-1131 ISSN 0040-4020 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/10/1951 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cyclopropanation * catalysis * kinetic analysis * dendrimers * molecular dynamics * DOSY Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.651, year: 2016

  4. The Drifting Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  5. Designing Neutralized Drift Compression for Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses in a Background Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Startsev, E.A.; Barnard, J.J.; Friedman, A.; Lee, E.P.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Welch, D.R.; Sefkow, A.B.

    2009-01-01

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective method for particle beam focusing and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear radial and longitudinal velocity drift is applied to a beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the drift-compression section. The beam intensity can increase more than a factor of 100 in both the radial and longitudinal directions, resulting in more than 10,000 times increase in the beam number density during this process. The self-electric and self-magnetic fields can prevent tight ballistic focusing and have to be neutralized by supplying neutralizing electrons. This paper presents a survey of the present theoretical understanding of the drift compression process and plasma neutralization of intense particle beams. The optimal configuration of focusing and neutralizing elements is discussed in this paper.

  6. Coherent Structure Phenomena in Drift Wave-Zonal Flow Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolyakov, A. I.; Diamond, P. H.; Malkov, M.

    2000-01-01

    Zonal flows are azimuthally symmetric plasma potential perturbations spontaneously generated from small-scale drift-wave fluctuations via the action of Reynolds stresses. We show that, after initial linear growth, zonal flows can undergo further nonlinear evolution leading to the formation of long-lived coherent structures which consist of self-bound wave packets supporting stationary shear layers. Such coherent zonal flow structures constitute dynamical paradigms for intermittency in drift-wave turbulence that manifests itself by the intermittent distribution of regions with a reduced level of anomalous transport. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  7. THE 15 LAYER SILICON DRIFT DETECTOR TRACKER IN EXPERIMENT 896

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, S.U.

    1998-01-01

    Large linear silicon drift detectors have been developed and are in production for use in several experiments. Recently 15 detectors were used as a tracking device in BNL-AGS heavy ion experiment (E896). The detectors were successfully operated in a 6.2 T magnetic field. The behavior of the detectors, such as drift uniformity, resolution, and charge collection efficiency are presented. The effect of the environment on the detector performance is discussed. Some results from the experimental run are presented. The detectors performed well in an experimental environment. This is the first tracking application of these detectors

  8. Drift chamber and pulse height readout systems using analog multiplexing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisneros, E.L; Kang, H.K.; Hall, J.N.; Larsen, R.S.

    1976-11-01

    Drift chamber and pulse-height readout systems are being developed for use in a new large scale detector at the SPEAR colliding beam facility. The systems are based upon 32 channels of sample-and-hold together with an analog multiplexer in a single-width CAMAC module. The modules within each crate are scanned by an autonomous controller containing a single ADC and memory plus arithmetic capability for offset, gain and linearity corrections. The drift chamber module has a facility for extracting hit wire information for use in trigger decision circuitry

  9. Characteristic parameters of drift chambers calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez-Laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present here the methods we used to analyse the characteristic parameters of drift chambers. The algorithms to calculate the electric potential in any point for any drift chamber geometry are presented. We include the description of the programs used to calculate the electric field, the drift paths, the drift velocity and the drift time. The results and the errors are discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  10. The Geodiversity in Drift Sand Landscapes of The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk; Riksen, Michel

    2015-04-01

    metres high. They are common near villages. They originated through sand blown from fallow agricultural fields and local overgrazing. They vary in age from prehistoric to modern time and are now mostly planted with forests. Third are the linear drift sand areas with one to three metre high ridges that align old roads and originated through dust whirled up by horses and carriages over many centuries. They also occurs within drift sands of the first system. In the re-stabilization of reactivated drift sands, differences in geodiversity on a still more detailed scale are important (Ancker, Jungerius et al. 2013). Even a small change in slope can cause primary dunes to develop and stop wind erosion. Gradually the geodiversity aspects are recognized as relevant for the management of active and fossil drift sands, and also is becoming a management issue in itself. An important future research issue is the completion of the Drift Sand Atlas, a project that describes the geodiversity aspects of all drift sand areas of The Netherlands. This project has been retarded by lack of means. Knowledge of the geodiversity also is important for correct sampling of C14 and luminescence data. Other future research includes the processes that caused the formation of 'randwallen' (rim walls), rates of water and wind erosion and soil formation and links between flora, fauna and Natura 2000 species. References

  11. Non-Linear Response to Periodic Forcing of Methane-Air Global and Detailed Kinetics in Continuous Stirred Tank Reactors Close to Extinction Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Saverio Marra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focus on the behavior of a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR subject to perturbations of finite amplitude and frequency. Two main objectives are pursued: to determine the extinction line in the equivalence ratio (φ - residence time (τ plane, fixed the thermodynamic state conditions; and to characterize the response of the chemical system to periodic forcing of the residence time. Transient simulations of combustion of methane with air, using both global single-step and detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms, have been conducted and the corresponding asymptotic solutions analyzed. Results indicate very different dynamical behaviors, posing the issue of a proper choice of the kinetic scheme for the numerical study of combustion oscillations.

  12. SHORT COMMUNICATION CATALYTIC KINETIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of ...

  13. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Jolley

    2000-11-09

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses.

  14. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, D.

    2000-01-01

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses

  15. The merits of cell kinetic parameters for the assessment of intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity to photon and high linear energy transfer neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, Therina; Slabbert, Jacobus; Serafin, Antonio; Boehm, Lothar

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Differences in tumor response and intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity make the selection of patients for specific radiation modalities very difficult. The reasons for these differences are still unclear, but are thought to be due to genomic and cellular characteristics. Because radiosensitivities vary between cell cycle stages and because S phase cells are very radioresistant, cell cycle kinetic parameters could be a candidate for predicting intrinsic radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: A panel of 15 tumor cell lines was analyzed for S phase content and potential doubling times (T pot ), and the influence of these parameters on the intrinsic radiosensitivity to 60 Coγ- and p(66)/Be neutron irradiation was assessed. Results: S phase content and T pot show a statistically significant correlation with the mean inactivation dose for photons. The correlation between cell kinetic parameters and the mean inactivation dose for neutrons showed the same trend as photon sensitivity but this was not found to be statistically significant. Conclusions: S phase content and T pot were identified as suitable criteria for predicting photon sensitivity. It is suggested that cell kinetic parameters could play a role in identifying neutron sensitive tumors if both tumor and normal cells are analyzed

  16. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    With the advent of the 800 MeV PS Booster in 1972, the original injector of the PS, a 50 MeV Alvarez-type proton linac, had reached its limits, in terms of intensity and stability. In 1973 one therefore decided to build a new linac (Linac 2), also with a drift-tube Alvarez structure and an energy of 50 MeV. It had a new Cockcroft-Walton preinjector with 750 keV, instead of the previous one with 500 keV. Linac 2 was put into service in 1980. The old Linac 1 was then used for the study of, and later operation with, various types of ions. This picture shows Linac 2 drift-tubes, suspended on stems coming from the top, in contrast to Linac 1, where the drift-tubes stood on stems coming from the bottom.

  17. On the Theory of Compensation in Lithium drifted Semiconductor Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauber, A

    1969-04-15

    The lithium ion drift method produces detectors with a highly but not perfectly compensated intrinsic region. The amount of fixed space charge left in the depleted layer and its dependence on drift and clean-up parameters is of great practical interest. The imperfect compensation is mainly due to the presence in the depletion layer of thermally generated electron-hole pairs swept apart by the voltage applied to the detector during drift. A theoretical model is developed which takes into account the influence on the fixed space charge of mobile carrier generation and recombination. When recombination of free electrons and holes is negligible the theory predicts the formation of linear space charge gradients. When recombination is strong a constant space charge throughout a large part of the compensated layer may result. The theoretical calculations are compared with experimental findings. The influence of space charge on detector performance is discussed.

  18. Test beam results of Silicon Drift Detector prototypes for the ALICE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouais, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Busso, L.; Cerello, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gregorio, A.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Idzik, M.; Kolojvari, A.; Mazza, G.; Montano, L. M.; Nilsen, B.S.; Petta, C.; Randazzo, N.; Rashevsky, A.; Reito, S.; Rivetti, A.; Tosello, F.; Trzaska, W.H.; Vacchi, A

    1999-08-01

    We report preliminary beam test results of linear Silicon Drift Detector prototypes for the ALICE experiment. Linearity, resolution, charge transport and collection, and efficiency have been studied using a minimum ionizing particle beam for a very large area detector prototype read out with the OLA preamplifier/shaper and for another detector read out using a new transimpedance amplifier with a non linear response.

  19. Predicting public sector accountability : From agency drift to forum drift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillemans, Thomas|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229913881; Busuioc, Madalina

    2015-01-01

    Principal-agent theory has been the dominant theory at the heart of public sector accountability research. The notion of the potentially drifting agent-such as independent public agencies, opaque transnational institutions, or recalcitrant street-level bureaucrats-has been the guiding paradigm in

  20. Collisional drift fluid equations and implications for drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, Dieter; Correa-Restrepo, Dario

    1996-01-01

    The usual theoretical description of drift-wave turbulence (considered to be one possible cause of anomalous transport in a plasma), e.g. the Hasegawa-Wakatani theory, makes use of various approximations, the effects of which are extremely difficult to assess. This concerns in particular the conservation laws for energy and momentum. The latter law is important in relation to charge separation and the resulting electric fields, which are possibly related to the L-H transition. Energy conservation is crucial to the stability behaviour, it will be discussed by means of an example. New collisional multi-species drift-fluid equations were derived by a new method which yields, in a transparent way, conservation of energy and total angular momentum and the law for energy dissipation. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic field variations are considered. The only restriction involved is the validity of the drift approximation; in particular, there are no assumptions restricting the geometry of the system. The method is based primarily on a Lagrangian for dissipationless fluids in the drift approximation with isotropic pressures. The dissipative terms are introduced by adding corresponding terms to the ideal equations of motion and of the pressures. The equations of motion, of course, no longer result from a Lagrangian via Hamilton's principle. However, their relation to the ideal equations also implies a relation to the ideal Lagrangian, which can be used to advantage. Instead of introducing heat conduction one can also assume isothermal behaviour, e.g. T v (x) = constant. Assumptions of this kind are often made in the literature. The new method of introducing dissipation is not restricted to the present kind of theory; it can equally well be applied to theories such as multi-fluid theories without using the drift approximation of the present paper. (author)

  1. Atomic physics effects on dissipative toroidal drift wave stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, M.A.; Hahm, T.S.

    1992-02-01

    The effects of atomic physics processes such as ionization, charge exchange, and radiation on the linear stability of dissipative drift waves are investigated in toroidal geometry both numerically and analytically. For typical TFTR and TEXT edge parameters, overall linear stability is determined by the competition between the destabilizing influence of ionization and the stabilizing effect due to the electron temperature gradient. An analytical expression for the linear marginal stability condition, η e crit , is derived. The instability is most likely to occur at the extreme edge of tokamaks with a significant ionization source and a steep electron density gradient

  2. Solar Drift-Pair Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, A.; Volvach, Ya.; Konovalenko, A.; Koval, A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper a new sight on the study of solar bursts historically called drift pairs (DPs) is presented. Having a simple morphology on dynamic spectra of radio records (two short components separated in time, and often they are very similar) and discovered at the dawn of radio astronomy, their features remain unexplained totally up to now. Generally, the DPs are observed during the solar storms of type III bursts, but not every storm of type III bursts is linked with DPs. Detected by ground-based instruments at decameter and meter wavelengths, the DP bursts are limited in frequency bandwidth. They can drift from high frequencies to low ones and vice versa. Their frequency drift rate may be both lower and higher than typical rates of type III bursts at the same frequency range. The development of low-frequency radio telescopes and data processing provide additional possibilities in the research. In this context the fresh analysis of DPs, made from recent observations in the summer campaign of 2015, are just considered. Their study was implemented by updated tools of the UTR-2 radio telescope at 9-33 MHz. During 10-12 July of 2015, DPs forming the longest patterns on dynamic spectra are about 7% of the total number of recorded DPs. Their marvelous resemblance in frequency drift rates with the solar S-bursts is discussed.

  3. Job satisfaction and preference drift.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen van den Brink, H.; Groot, W.J.N.

    1999-01-01

    Most empirical studies do not find that higher wages lead to more job satisfaction. In this paper we argue that the insignificant effect of wages on job satisfaction is due to preference drift. We adapt the standard ordered response model to allow for preference shifts. The empirical results support

  4. Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) - II Quarterly Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    LBNL has received American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding to construct a new accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to significantly increase the energy on target, which will allow both the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) and Warm Dense Matter (WDM) research communities to explore scientific conditions that have not been available in any other device. For NDCX-II, a new induction linear accelerator (linac) will be constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). NDCX-II will produce nano-second long ion beam bunches to hit thin foil targets. The final kinetic energy of the ions arriving at the target varies according to the ion mass. For atomic mass unit of 6 or 7 (Lithium ions), useful kinetic energies range from 1.5 to 5 or more MeV. The expected beam charge in the 1 ns (or shorter) pulse is about 20 nanoCoulombs. The pulse repetition rate will be about once or twice per minute (of course, target considerations will often reduce this rate). Our approach to building the NDCX-II ion accelerator is to make use of the available induction modules and 200 kV pulsers from the retired ATA electron linac at LLNL. Reusing this hardware will maximize the ion energy on target at a minimum cost. Some modification of the cells (e.g., reduce the bore diameter and replace with higher field pulsed solenoids) are needed in order to meet the requirements of this project. The NDCX-II project will include the following tasks: (1) Physics design to determine the required ion current density at the ion source, the injector beam optics, the layout of accelerator cells along the beam line, the voltage waveforms for beam acceleration and compression, the solenoid focusing, the neutralized drift compression and the final focus on target; (2) Engineering design and fabrication of the accelerator components, pulsed power system, diagnostic system, and control and data acquisition system; (3) Conventional facilities; and (4) Installation and integration

  5. Kinetic instabilities in the solar wind driven by temperature anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2017-12-01

    The present paper comprises a review of kinetic instabilities that may be operative in the solar wind, and how they influence the dynamics thereof. The review is limited to collective plasma instabilities driven by the temperature anisotropies. To limit the scope even further, the discussion is restricted to the temperature anisotropy-driven instabilities within the model of bi-Maxwellian plasma velocity distribution function. The effects of multiple particle species or the influence of field-aligned drift will not be included. The field-aligned drift or beam is particularly prominent for the solar wind electrons, and thus ignoring its effect leaves out a vast portion of important physics. Nevertheless, for the sake of limiting the scope, this effect will not be discussed. The exposition is within the context of linear and quasilinear Vlasov kinetic theories. The discussion does not cover either computer simulations or data analyses of observations, in any systematic manner, although references will be made to published works pertaining to these methods. The scientific rationale for the present analysis is that the anisotropic temperatures associated with charged particles are pervasively detected in the solar wind, and it is one of the key contemporary scientific research topics to correctly characterize how such anisotropies are generated, maintained, and regulated in the solar wind. The present article aims to provide an up-to-date theoretical development on this research topic, largely based on the author's own work.

  6. Curvature-induced electrostatic drift modes in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venema, M.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis deals with a number of problems in the theory of linear stability of a hot, fully ionized plasma immersed in a strong magnetic field. The most widely used system to magnetically confine a plasma is the tokamak. This is a toroidal, current carrying device with a strong, externally imposed, magnetic field. The author discusses the linear theory of unstable, low-frequency waves in the gradient region, restricted to electrostatic waves. In that case the resulting radial fluxes of particles and energy are due to electric cross-field drifts. In the presence of magnetic fluctuations and small-scale reconnection phenomena, radial transport could also be predominantly along field lines. At present, it is not clear which of the two mechanisms is the dominant feature of the observed anomalous transport. First, the author introduces the theory of drift waves in toroidal geometry. Next, the electrostratic drift modes in toroidal geometry (weakly collisional regime), the equations for low-frequency waves in the strongly collisional regime and the electrostatic drift modes (strongly collisional regime) are discussed. (Auth.)

  7. Using different drift gases to change separation factors (alpha) in ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbury; Hill

    2000-02-01

    The use of different drift gases to alter separation factors (alpha) in ion mobility spectrometry has been demonstrated. The mobility of a series of low molecular weight compounds and three small peptides was determined in four different drift gases. The drift gases chosen were helium, argon, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. These drift gases provide a range of polarizabilities and molecular weights. In all instances, the compounds showed the greatest mobility in helium and the lowest mobility in carbon dioxide; however the percentage change of mobility for each compound was different, effectively changing the alpha value. The alpha value changes were primarily due to differences in drift gas polarizability but were also influenced by the mass of the drift gas. In addition, gas-phase ion radii were calculated in each of the different drift gases. These radii were then plotted against drift gas polarizability producing linear plots with r2 values greater than 0.99. The intercept of these plots provides the gas-phase radius of an ion in a nonpolarizing environment, whereas the slope is indicative of the magnitude of the ion's mobility change related to polarizability. It therefore, should be possible to separate any two compounds that have different slopes with the appropriate drift gas.

  8. Precise muon drift tube detectors for high background rate conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engl, Albert

    2011-08-04

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS-experiment at the Large Hadron Collider consists of drift tube chambers, which provide the precise measurement of trajectories of traversing muons. In order to determine the momentum of the muons with high precision, the measurement of the position of the muon in a single tube has to be more accurate than {sigma}{<=}100 {mu}m. The large cross section of proton-proton-collisions and the high luminosity of the accelerator cause relevant background of neutrons and {gamma}s in the muon spectrometer. During the next decade a luminosity upgrade to 5.10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned, which will increase the background counting rates considerably. In this context this work deals with the further development of the existing drift chamber technology to provide the required accuracy of the position measurement under high background conditions. Two approaches of improving the drift tube chambers are described: - In regions of moderate background rates a faster and more linear drift gas can provide precise position measurement without changing the existing hardware. - At very high background rates drift tube chambers consisting of tubes with a diameter of 15 mm are a valuable candidate to substitute the CSC muon chambers. The single tube resolution of the gas mixture Ar:CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} in the ratio of 96:3:1 Vol %, which is more linear and faster as the currently used drift gas Ar:CO{sub 2} in the ratio of 97:3 Vol %, was determined at the Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility at Garching and at high {gamma}-background counting rates at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. The alternative gas mixture shows similar resolution without background. At high background counting rates it shows better resolution as the standard gas. To analyse the data the various parts of the setup have to be aligned precisely to each other. The change to an alternative gas mixture allows the use of the existing hardware. The second approach are drift tubes

  9. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I; Martinez laso, L

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  10. ATLAS Muon Drift Tube Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Y [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organisation, Tsukuba (Japan); Ball, B; Chapman, J W; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Gregory, J [University of Michigan, Department of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Beretta, M [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Boterenbrood, H; Jansweijer, P P M [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brandenburg, G W; Fries, T; Costa, J Guimaraes da; Harder, S; Huth, J [Harvard University, Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ceradini, F [INFN Roma Tre and Universita Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma (Italy); Hazen, E [Boston University, Physics Department, Boston, MA (United States); Kirsch, L E [Brandeis University, Department of Physics, Waltham, MA (United States); Koenig, A C [Radboud University Nijmegen/Nikhef, Dept. of Exp. High Energy Physics, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lanza, A [INFN Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Mikenberg, G [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics, Rehovot (Israel)], E-mail: brandenburg@physics.harvard.edu (and others)

    2008-09-15

    This paper describes the electronics used for the ATLAS monitored drift tube (MDT) chambers. These chambers are the main component of the precision tracking system in the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The MDT detector system consists of 1,150 chambers containing a total of 354,000 drift tubes. It is capable of measuring the sagitta of muon tracks to an accuracy of 60 {mu}m, which corresponds to a momentum accuracy of about 10% at p{sub T}= 1 TeV. The design and performance of the MDT readout electronics as well as the electronics for controlling, monitoring and powering the detector will be discussed. These electronics have been extensively tested under simulated running conditions and have undergone radiation testing certifying them for more than 10 years of LHC operation. They are now installed on the ATLAS detector and are operating during cosmic ray commissioning runs.

  11. ATLAS Muon Drift Tube Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, Y; Beretta, M; Boterenbrood, H; Brandenburg, G W; Ceradini, F; Chapman, J W; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Fries, T; Gregory, J; Guimarães da Costa, J; Harder, S; Hazen, E; Huth, J; Jansweijer, P P M; Kirsch, L E; König, A C; Lanza, A; Mikenberg, G; Oliver, J; Posch, C; Richter, R; Riegler, W; Spiriti, E; Taylor, F E; Vermeulen, J; Wadsworth, B; Wijnen, T A M

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the electronics used for the ATLAS monitored drift tube (MDT) chambers. These chambers are the main component of the precision tracking system in the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The MDT detector system consists of 1,150 chambers containing a total of 354,000 drift tubes. It is capable of measuring the sagitta of muon tracks to an accuracy of 60 microns, which corresponds to a momentum accuracy of about 10% at pT = 1 TeV. The design and performance of the MDT readout electronics as well as the electronics for controlling, monitoring and powering the detector will be discussed. These electronics have been extensively tested under simulated running conditions and have undergone radiation testing certifying them for more than 10 years of LHC operation. They are now installed on the ATLAS detector and are operating during cosmic ray commissioning runs.

  12. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, H.

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  13. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, H., E-mail: hendrik.jansen@desy.de

    2016-09-21

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  14. An Experimental Study of the Accuracy of Compensation in Lithium Drifted Germanium Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauber, A; Malmsten, B

    1969-10-15

    The nature and magnitude of the space charge existing in the compensated layer of lithium drifted germanium detectors has been studied as a function of drifted depth and of the electric field applied during drift. Experimental values were obtained from the dependence of detector capacitance on applied bias. In most cases there was a linear space charge gradient in the compensated layer. When small electric fields were applied to deep compensated layers, the space charge became constant throughout a large part of the compensated layer. There is some evidence for a strong decrease of mobile carrier recombination lifetime with increasing drifted depth, possibly down to a few microseconds for drifted depths of the order of 7 mm. The experimental results of the investigation are to a large extent in good agreement with theory.

  15. Investigation of drift gas selectivity in high resolution ion mobility spectrometry with mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Laura M; Hill, Herbert H; Beegle, Luther W; Kanik, Isik

    2002-04-01

    Recent studies in electrospray ionization (ESI)/ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) have focussed on employing different drift gases to alter separation efficiency for some molecules. This study investigates four structurally similar classes of molecules (cocaine and metabolites, amphetamines, benzodiazepines, and small peptides) to determine the effect of structure on relative mobility changes in four drift gases (helium, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide). Collision cross sections were plotted against drift gas polarizability and a linear relationship was found for the nineteen compounds evaluated in the study. Based on the reduced mobility database, all nineteen compounds could be separated in one of the four drift gases, however, the drift gas that provided optimal separation was specific for the two compounds.

  16. MPS II drift chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed

  17. Exact representation of the asymptotic drift speed and diffusion matrix for a class of velocity-jump processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines a class of linear hyperbolic systems which generalizes the Goldstein-Kac model to an arbitrary finite number of speeds vi with transition rates μij. Under the basic assumptions that the transition matrix is symmetric and irreducible, and the differences vi -vj generate all the space, the system exhibits a large-time behavior described by a parabolic advection-diffusion equation. The main contribution is to determine explicit formulas for the asymptotic drift speed and diffusion matrix in term of the kinetic parameters vi and μij, establishing a complete connection between microscopic and macroscopic coefficients. It is shown that the drift speed is the arithmetic mean of the velocities vi. The diffusion matrix has a more complicate representation, based on the graph with vertices the velocities vi and arcs weighted by the transition rates μij. The approach is based on an exhaustive analysis of the dispersion relation and on the application of a variant of the Kirchoff's matrix tree Theorem from graph theory.

  18. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated

  19. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, P.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this Model Report (REV02) is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes on UZ flow and transport. This Model Report has been developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2002 [160819]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this Model Report in Section 1.12, Work Package AUZM08, ''Coupled Effects on Flow and Seepage''. The plan for validation of the models documented in this Model Report is given in Attachment I, Model Validation Plans, Section I-3-4, of the TWP. Except for variations in acceptance criteria (Section 4.2), there were no deviations from this TWP. This report was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models''. This Model Report documents the THC Seepage Model and the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model. The THC Seepage Model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC model is a drift-scale process model relying on the same conceptual model and much of the same input data (i.e., physical, hydrological, thermodynamic, and kinetic) as the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model is the primary method for validating the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model compares predicted water and gas compositions, as well as mineral alteration patterns, with observed data from the DST. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal-loading conditions, and predict the evolution of mineral alteration and fluid chemistry around potential waste emplacement drifts. The DST THC Model is used solely for the validation of the THC

  20. Characteristics of Electron Drift in an Ar-Hg Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golyatina, R. I.; Maiorov, S. A.

    2018-04-01

    The characteristics of electron drift in a mixture of argon with mercury vapor at reduced electric fields of E/ N = 1-100 Td are calculated and analyzed with allowance for inelastic collisions. It is shown that even a minor additive of mercury to argon at a level of a fraction of percent substantially affects the discharge parameters, in particular, the characteristics of inelastic processes. The influence of the concentration of mercury vapor in argon on the kinetic characteristics, such as the diffusion and mobility coefficients and ionization frequency, is investigated.

  1. Theory of modulational interaction of trapped ion convective cells and drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, V.D.; Diamond, P.H.; Lebedev, V.; Soloviev, G.; Shevchenko, V.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical and computational studies of the modulational interaction between trapped ion convective cells and short wavelength drift wave turbulence are discussed. These studies are motivated by the fact that cells and drift waves are expected to coexist in tokamaks so that: (a) cells strain and modulate drift waves, and (b) drift waves open-quote ride on close-quote a background of cells. The results of the authors' investigation indicate that: (1) (nonlinear) parametric growth rates of trapped ion convective cells can exceed linear predictions (for drift wave levels at the mixing length limit); (2) a set of coupled envelope equations, akin to the Zakharov equations from Langmuir turbulence, can be derived and used to predict the formation of a dipole pair of convective cells trapped by the drift wave envelope. This dipole pair is strongly anisotropic, due to the structure of the drift wave Reynolds stress which drives the cell flow. Numerical solutions of the envelope equations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, and indicate the persistence of the structure in time; (3) strong modulation and trapping of drift waves with k perpendicular ρ > 1 occurs. Extensions to magnetically sheared systems and the broader implications of this work as a paradigm for the dynamics of persistent structures in shearing flows are discussed

  2. Modeling and optimizing of the random atomic spin gyroscope drift based on the atomic spin gyroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Wei; Lv, Lin, E-mail: lvlinlch1990@163.com; Liu, Baiqi [School of Instrument Science and Opto-Electronics Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-11-15

    In order to improve the atom spin gyroscope's operational accuracy and compensate the random error caused by the nonlinear and weak-stability characteristic of the random atomic spin gyroscope (ASG) drift, the hybrid random drift error model based on autoregressive (AR) and genetic programming (GP) + genetic algorithm (GA) technique is established. The time series of random ASG drift is taken as the study object. The time series of random ASG drift is acquired by analyzing and preprocessing the measured data of ASG. The linear section model is established based on AR technique. After that, the nonlinear section model is built based on GP technique and GA is used to optimize the coefficients of the mathematic expression acquired by GP in order to obtain a more accurate model. The simulation result indicates that this hybrid model can effectively reflect the characteristics of the ASG's random drift. The square error of the ASG's random drift is reduced by 92.40%. Comparing with the AR technique and the GP + GA technique, the random drift is reduced by 9.34% and 5.06%, respectively. The hybrid modeling method can effectively compensate the ASG's random drift and improve the stability of the system.

  3. Spatial mode structures of electrostatic drift waves in a collisional cylindrical helicon plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, C.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.

    2004-01-01

    In a cylindrical helicon plasma, mode structures of coherent drift waves are studied in the poloidal plane, the plane perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The mode structures rotate with a constant angular velocity in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift and show significant...... radial bending. The experimental observations are compared with numerical solutions of a linear nonlocal cylindrical model for drift waves [ Ellis , Plasma Phys. 22, 113 (1980) ]. In the numerical model, a transition to bended mode structures is found if the plasma collisionality is increased....... This finding proves that the experimentally observed bended mode structures are the result of high electron collisionality. (C) 2004 American Institute of Physics....

  4. Atomic physics effects on tokamak edge drift-tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of ionization and charge exchange on the linear stability of drift-tearing modes are analytically investigated. In particular, the linear instability threshold Δ Th , produced by ion sound wave coupling [Phys. Rev. Lett. 40, 1500 (1978)] is modified. In the strongly collisional regime, the ionization breaks up the near cancellation of the perturbed electric field and the pressure gradient along the magnetic field, and increases the threshold. In the semicollisional regime, both ionization and charge exchange act as drag on the ion parallel velocity [Phys. Fluids B 4, 2567 (1992)], and consequently decrease the threshold by reducing the effectiveness of ion sound wave propagation

  5. Micro Loudspeaker Behaviour versus 6½" Driver, Micro Loudspeaker Parameter Drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bo Rohde

    2010-01-01

    This study tested micro loudspeaker behavior from the perspective of loudspeaker parameter drift. The main difference between traditional transducers and micro loudspeakers, apart from their size, is their suspension construction. The suspension generally is a loudspeaker's most unstable parameter......, and the study investigated temperature drift and signal dependency. There is investigated three different micro loudspeakers and compared their behavior to that of a typical bass mid-range loudspeaker unit. There is measured all linear loudspeaker parameters at different temperatures....

  6. Linear theory of equatorial spread F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, M.K.; Kennel, C.F.

    1975-01-01

    A fluid dispersion relation for the drift and interchange (Rayleigh-Taylor) modes in a collisional plasma forms the basis for a linear theory of equatorial spread F. The collisional drift mode growth rate will exceed the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor mode at short perpendicular wavelengths and density gradient scale lengths, and the drift mode can grow on top side as well as on bottom side density gradients. However, below the F peak, where spread F predominates, it is concluded that both the drift and the Rayleigh-Taylor modes contribute to the total spread F spectrum, the Rayleigh-Taylor mode dominating at long and the drift mode at short perpendicular wavelengths above the ion Larmor radius

  7. Radio frequency focused interdigital linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Donald A.; Starling, W. Joel

    2006-08-29

    An interdigital (Wideroe) linear accelerator employing drift tubes, and associated support stems that couple to both the longitudinal and support stem electromagnetic fields of the linac, creating rf quadrupole fields along the axis of the linac to provide transverse focusing for the particle beam. Each drift tube comprises two separate electrodes operating at different electrical potentials as determined by cavity rf fields. Each electrode supports two fingers, pointing towards the opposite end of the drift tube, forming a four-finger geometry that produces an rf quadrupole field distribution along its axis. The fundamental periodicity of the structure is equal to one half of the particle wavelength .beta..lamda., where .beta. is the particle velocity in units of the velocity of light and .lamda. is the free space wavelength of the rf. Particles are accelerated in the gaps between drift tubes. The particle beam is focused in regions inside the drift tubes.

  8. Measurement of the positron-drift time relation of a high-pressure drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruefert, W.

    1989-04-01

    As a test of its performance, the measurement of the drift time versus drift distance relation of a high pressure drift chamber using cosmic rays is described. Two multiwire proportional chambers, mounted above and below the detector, are used to define the track of the cosmic particle in the drift chamber. The drift chamber is read out by FADCs (Flash Analog to Digital Converter), and the drift time is determined from the FADC signals by the DOS- (Difference Of Samples) method. The measured drift time versus drift distance relation showed good agreement with the relation, which is expected from the spatial dependence of the electric field and the dependence of the drift velocity on this field. (orig.) [de

  9. Pulse shape simulation for drift chambers with long drift paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed Monte Carlo program for the simulation of drift chamber pulse shapes is described. It has been applied to the case of a jet chamber with drift paths up to 24 cm. Results on pulse shapes and corresponding spatial and double hit resolution are discussed and compared to recent measurements of the OPAL central detector jet chamber full size prototype and to measurements of a small 20-wire prototype, which was designed to study the pulse shapes generated by tracks in a magnetic field. Simulated pulse shapes and spatial resolutions agree well with the experimental data. Clustering, saturation and wire crosstalk are shown to be necessary ingredients in the simulation. A deterioration in resolution due to the influence of crosstalk signals is correctly reproduced, as well as the cancellation of this effect by a hardwired first and second neighbour crosstalk compensation. The simulation correctly describes the asymmetry in spatial resolution observed for tracks with positive or negative inclination against the wire plane when a magnetic field is present. The effect of saturation on double hit resolution is found to be small. The magnetic field is predicted to improve the double hit resolution. (orig.)

  10. Pulse shape simulation for drift chambers with long drift paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, H J

    1987-09-15

    A detailed Monte Carlo program for the simulation of drift chamber pulse shapes is described. It has been applied to the case of a jet chamber with drift paths up to 24 cm. Results on pulse shapes and corresponding spatial and double hit resolution are discussed and compared to recent measurements of the OPAL central detector jet chamber full size prototype and to measurements of a small 20-wire prototype, which was designed to study the pulse shapes generated by tracks in a magnetic field. Simulated pulse shapes and spatial resolutions agree well with the experimental data. Clustering, saturation and wire crosstalk are shown to be necessary ingredients in the simulation. A deterioration in resolution due to the influence of crosstalk signals is correctly reproduced, as well as the cancellation of this effect by a hardwired first and second neighbour crosstalk compensation. The simulation correctly describes the asymmetry in spatial resolution observed for tracks with positive or negative inclination against the wire plane when a magnetic field is present. The effect of saturation on double hit resolution is found to be small. The magnetic field is predicted to improve the double hit resolution.

  11. Kinetic global analysis of Alfven eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.

    2002-01-01

    Systematic study on low to medium n (toroidal mode number) Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in tokamaks and helical systems is presented. Linear stability of AE in the presence of energetic ions was studied using the kinetic full-wave code TASK/WM.We have reproduced the destabilizing effect of toroidal co-rotation on TAE for JT-60U parameters. We have found the existence of reversed-shear-induced Alfven eigenmode (RSAE) which localizes near the q minimum in a reversed magnetic shear configuration. Two kinds of mode structures are identified for energetic particle mode (EPM) below the TAE frequency gap. The coupling to lower-frequency modes such as drift waves and MHD modes as well as the effect of trapped particles are also taken into account. For a helical plasma, the existence of GAE in the central region and TAE in the off-axis region was confirmed. (author)

  12. Drift waves in a stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Sedlak, J.E.; Similon, P.L.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Ross, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    We investigate the eigenmode structure of drift waves in a straight stellarator using the ballooning mode formalism. The electrons are assumed to be adiabatic and the ions constitute a cold, magnetized fluid. The effective potential has an overall parabolic envelope but is modulated strongly by helical ripples along B. We have found two classes of solutions: those that are strongly localized in local helical wells, and those that are weakly localized and have broad spatial extent. The weakly localized modes decay spatially due to the existence of Mathieu resonances between the periods of the eigenfunction and the effective potential

  13. Experimental work on drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, J.; Duran, I.; Gonzalez, E.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Olmos, P.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental work made on drift chambers is described in two chapters. In the firt chapter we present the description of the experimental installation used, as well as some details on the data adquisition systems and the characteristics on three ways used for calibration proposes (cosmic muons, β radiation and test beam using SPS at CERN facilities). The second chapter describes the defferent prototypes studied. The experimental set up and the analysis are given. Some results are discussed. The magnetic field effect is also studied. (Author)

  14. Drift-time measurement electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, M.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of the construction was to improve the time resolution without using the facility of time stretching, to have a fast read-out possibility, and to be still cheaper in price in comparison to other systems. A possibility was thus foreseen for using the firm Fairchild. These integrated circuits (IC) have, for example, a propagation delay of 0.75 ns for a gate. One can expect therefore less time jitter and less time difference between the different inputs. Furthermore this IC offers a greater flexibility and therefore the number of ICs decreases and distances become smaller. Working with clock frequencies up to 166.6 MHz is easily possible without running into timing problems. On the other hand, to make full use of the advantages of this IC, it was necessary to build the print as a multilayer. The only risk could be in the use of a completely new product. A further aim was to build for this system a second type of drift-time module with a short time range for measuring drift time and pulse length in rotated multiwire proportional chambers. A brief outline of the specifications of the different modules is given in table 1. (Auth.)

  15. Thermal drift reduction with multiple bias current for MOSFET dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvajal, M A; Martinez-Olmos, A; Morales, D P; Lopez-Villanueva, J A; Palma, A J [Departamento de Electronica y TecnologIa de Computadores, ETSIIT, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Lallena, A M, E-mail: carvajal@ugr.es [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2011-06-21

    New thermal compensation methods suitable for p-channel MOSFET (pMOS) dosimeters with the usual dose readout procedure based on a constant drain current are presented. Measuring the source-drain voltage shifts for two or three different drain currents and knowing the value of the zero-temperature coefficient drain current, I{sub ZTC}, the thermal drift of source-drain or threshold voltages can be significantly reduced. Analytical expressions for the thermal compensation have been theoretically deduced on the basis of a linear dependence on temperature of the parameters involved. The proposed thermal modelling has been experimentally proven. These methods have been applied to a group of ten commercial pMOS transistors (3N163). The thermal coefficients of the source-drain voltage and the threshold voltage were reduced from -3.0 mV deg. C{sup -1}, in the worst case, down to -70 {mu}V deg. C{sup -1}. This means a thermal drift of -2.4 mGy deg. C{sup -1} for the dosimeter. When analysing the thermal drifts of all the studied transistors, in the temperature range from 19 to 36 deg. C, uncertainty was obtained in the threshold voltage due to a thermal drift of {+-}9mGy (2 SD), a commonly acceptable value in most radiotherapy treatments. The procedures described herein provide thermal drift reduction comparable to that of other technological or numerical strategies, but can be used in a very simple and low-cost dosimetry sensor.

  16. The large cylindrical drift chamber of TASSO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, H.; Fischer, H.M.; Hartmann, H.; Loehr, B.; Wollstadt, M.; Fohrmann, R.; Schmueser, P.; Cassel, D.G.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.

    1980-03-01

    We have built and operated a large cylindrical drift chamber for the TASSO experiment at the DESY storage ring, PETRA. The chamber has a length of 3.5 m, a diameter of 2.5 m, and a total of 2340 drift cells. The cells are arranged in 15 concentric layers such that tracks can be reconstructed in three dimensions. A spatial resolution of 220 μm has been achieved for tracks of normal incidence on the drift cells. (orig.)

  17. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  18. Electron injection in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Castoldi, A.; Vacchi, A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports the first successful results of a simple MOS structure to inject electrons at a given position in Silicon Drift Detectors. The structure allows on-line calibration of the drift velocity of electrons within the detector. The calibration is a practical method to trace the temperature dependence of the electron mobility. Several of these injection structures can be implemented in silicon drift detectors without additional steps in the fabrication process. 5 refs., 11 figs

  19. Cooling tower drift: comprehensive case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laulainen, N.S.; Ulanski, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive experiment to study drift from mechanical drift cooling towers was conducted during June 1978 at the PG and E Pittsburg Power Plant. The data from this study will be used for validation of drift deposition models. Preliminary results show the effects of tower geometry and orientation with respect to the wind and to single- or two-tower operation. The effect of decreasing relative humidity during a test run can also be seen

  20. Second coordinate readout in drift chambers by charge division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeka, V.; Rehak, P.

    1977-10-01

    The drift time measurement and the charge division can be performed simultaneously on the same electrode (resistive anode) without affecting the accuracy of either measurement. It is shown that for the shortest measurement time there is an optimum value for the anode wire resistance. The signal requirement for a position uncertainty sigma less than or equal to 0.5% of the anode wire length is only 2.7 x 10 6 electron charges. The drift chamber can be operated in the linear mode and with negligible space charge effects, so that it can also be used for ΔE/ΔX measurements. A simple preamplifier optimized for both the time and charge measurements using a monolithic transistor array is described

  1. The drift flux correlation in RELAP-UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.A.

    1977-11-01

    A numerical technique for modelling the effects of drift flux in vertical channels is described, which has been included in the RELAP-UK code for the analysis of loss of coolant accidents. It is based on the assumption that the difference between the average velocities of the steam and water phases is a result of the linear superposition of the profile slip and the local slip. The profile slip may be obtained from a choice of profile slip correlations, which includes the flow-dependent Bryce correlation, modified at low void fractions to be consistent with the analysis of Zuber and Findlay. Comparisons are given between the drift flux correlation and certain sets of published experimental data. (author)

  2. Neoclassical and anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas with drift-ordered turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    1996-01-01

    Neoclassical and anomalous transport fluxes are determined for axisymmetric toroidal plasmas with weak electromagnetic drift wave fluctuations. The neoclassical and anomalous fluxes are defined based on the ensemble-averaged kinetic equation with the statistically averaged nonlinear wave-particle interactions. The anomalous forces derived from that quasilinear term induce the anomalous particle and heat fluxes. For the microscale fluctuations k perpendicular ρ i ∼ 1 the parallel neoclassical fluxes remain invariant. For mesoscale fluctuations the mixing length fluctuation level with broken symmetry from (weak) shear flows the neoclassical banana-plateau fluxes are affected by the fluctuations through the parallel anomalous forces and the modified parallel viscosities. The entropy production rate due to the anomalous transport processes is formulated and used to identify conjugate pairs of the anomalous fluxes and forces, which are connected by the matrix with the Onsager symmetry. The proof of the Onsager symmetry is carried out by splitting the response function up into the even and odd parts under the (t, B) → (-t,-B) transformation and using the self-adjointness of the linearized Landau collision operator and the quasilinear formalism. An explicit calculation of the symmetric transport coefficients is possible when the Krook collision model replaces the Landau collision operator. The importance of low aspect ratio tokamaks and helical systems for experimental investigations of the Onsager symmetries is emphasized

  3. Non linear microtearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Mourgues, F.; Samain, A.

    1987-01-01

    Among the various instabilities which could explain the anomalous electron heat transport observed in tokamaks during additional heating, a microtearing turbulence is a reasonable candidate since it affects directly the magnetic topology. This turbulence may be described in a proper frame rotating around the majors axis by a static potential vector. In strong non linear regimes, the flow of electrons along the stochastic field lines induces a current. The point is to know whether this current can sustain the turbulence. The mechanisms of this self-consistency, involving the combined effects of the thermal diamagnetism and of the electric drift are presented here

  4. Gyrokinetic neoclassical study of the bootstrap current in the tokamak edge pedestal with fully non-linear Coulomb collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hager, Robert, E-mail: rhager@pppl.gov; Chang, C. S., E-mail: cschang@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    As a follow-up on the drift-kinetic study of the non-local bootstrap current in the steep edge pedestal of tokamak plasma by Koh et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 072505 (2012)], a gyrokinetic neoclassical study is performed with gyrokinetic ions and drift-kinetic electrons. Besides the gyrokinetic improvement of ion physics from the drift-kinetic treatment, a fully non-linear Fokker-Planck collision operator—that conserves mass, momentum, and energy—is used instead of Koh et al.'s linearized collision operator in consideration of the possibility that the ion distribution function is non-Maxwellian in the steep pedestal. An inaccuracy in Koh et al.'s result is found in the steep edge pedestal that originated from a small error in the collisional momentum conservation. The present study concludes that (1) the bootstrap current in the steep edge pedestal is generally smaller than what has been predicted from the small banana-width (local) approximation [e.g., Sauter et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2834 (1999) and Belli et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 095010 (2008)], (2) the plasma flow evaluated from the local approximation can significantly deviate from the non-local results, and (3) the bootstrap current in the edge pedestal, where the passing particle region is small, can be dominantly carried by the trapped particles in a broad trapped boundary layer. A new analytic formula based on numerous gyrokinetic simulations using various magnetic equilibria and plasma profiles with self-consistent Grad-Shafranov solutions is constructed.

  5. Construction update and drift velocity calibration for the CLAS drift chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestayer, M.D.; Barbosa, F.J.; Bonneau, P.; Burtin, E.; Christo, S.; Doolittle, G.; Dytman, S.A.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Hyde-Wright, C.E.; Klein, A.; Kossov, M.V.; Kuhn, S.E.; Magahiz, R.; Miskimen, R.A.; Murphy, L.Y.; O'Meara, J.E.; Pyron, T.D.; Qin, L.; Raue, B.A.; Schumacher, R.A.; Tuzel, W.; Weinstein, L.B.; Yegneswaran, A.

    1995-01-01

    We briefly describe the drift chamber system for the CLAS detector at CEBAF, concentrating on the method which will be used to calibrate the drift velocity function. We identify key features of the function which should apply to any small-cell drift chamber geometry in which the cathode and anode surfaces are wires. Using these ideas, we describe a simple method to compensate for variations in the drift velocity function due to environmental changes. (orig.)

  6. Construction update and drift velocity calibration for the CLAS drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestayer, M.D. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Barbosa, F.J. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bonneau, P. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Burtin, E. [University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Christo, S. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Doolittle, G. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dytman, S.A. [University of Pittsburg, Pittsburg, PA (United States); Gilfoyle, G.P. [University of Richmond, Richmond, VA (United States); Hyde-Wright, C.E. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Klein, A. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Kossov, M.V. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States); Kuhn, S.E. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Magahiz, R. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Miskimen, R.A. [University of Massachussetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Murphy, L.Y. [CE Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); O`Meara, J.E. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Pyron, T.D. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Qin, L. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Raue, B.A. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Schumacher, R.A. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tuzel, W. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Weinstein, L.B. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Yegneswaran, A. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    1995-12-11

    We briefly describe the drift chamber system for the CLAS detector at CEBAF, concentrating on the method which will be used to calibrate the drift velocity function. We identify key features of the function which should apply to any small-cell drift chamber geometry in which the cathode and anode surfaces are wires. Using these ideas, we describe a simple method to compensate for variations in the drift velocity function due to environmental changes. (orig.).

  7. Electron drift time in silicon drift detectors: A technique for high precision measurement of electron drift mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Rehak, P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a precise absolute measurement of the drift velocity and mobility of electrons in high resistivity silicon at room temperature. The electron velocity is obtained from the differential measurement of the drift time of an electron cloud in a silicon drift detector. The main features of the transport scheme of this class of detectors are: the high uniformity of the electron motion, the transport of the signal electrons entirely contained in the high-purity bulk, the low noise timing due to the very small anode capacitance (typical value 100 fF), and the possibility to measure different drift distances, up to the wafer diameter, in the same semiconductor sample. These features make the silicon drift detector an optimal device for high precision measurements of carrier drift properties. The electron drift velocity and mobility in a 10 kΩ cm NTD n-type silicon wafer have been measured as a function of the electric field in the range of possible operation of a typical drift detector (167--633 V/cm). The electron ohmic mobility is found to be 1394 cm 2 /V s. The measurement precision is better than 1%. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  8. Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.; Tsang, C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M andO 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M andO 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to

  9. Autoresonant control of drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shagalov, A.G.; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker

    2017-01-01

    The control of nonlinear drift waves in a magnetized plasmas column has been investigated. The studies are based on the Hasegawa–Mima model, which is solved on a disk domain with radial inhomogeneity of the plasma density. The system is forced by a rotating potential with varying frequency defined...... on the boundary. To excite and control the waves we apply the autoresonant effect, taking place when the amplitude of the forcing exceeds a threshold value and the waves are phase-locked with the forcing. We demonstrate that the autoresonant approach is applicable for excitation of a range of steady nonlinear...... waves of the lowest azimuthal mode numbers and for controlling their amplitudes and phases. We also demonstrate the excitation of zonal flows (m = 0 modes), which are controlled via the forced modes....

  10. Single wire drift chamber design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krider, J.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the design and prototype tests of single wire drift chambers to be used in Fermilab test beam lines. The goal is to build simple, reliable detectors which require a minimum of electronics. Spatial resolution should match the 300 μm rms resolution of the 1 mm proportional chambers that they will replace. The detectors will be used in beams with particle rates up to 20 KHz. Single track efficiency should be at least 99%. The first application will be in the MT beamline, which has been designed for calibration of CDF detectors. A set of four x-y modules will be used to track and measure the momentum of beam particles

  11. Drift effects in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koclas, J.; Roy, R.; Marleau, G.

    1993-01-01

    The diffusion equation is an approximation to the transport equation which relies on the validity of Fick's law. Since this law is not explicitly integrated in the transport equation it can only be derived approximately using homogenization theories. However, such homogenization theories state that when the cell is not symmetric Fick's law breaks down due to the presence of an additional term to the neutron current, called the drift term. In fact, this term can be interpreted as a transport correction to Fick's law which tends to increase the neutron current in a direction opposite to that specified by the flux gradient. In this paper, we investigate how the presence of asymmetric liquid zone controllers will modify the flux distribution inside a CANDU core. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  12. Modelling of the space-to-drift-time relationship of the ATLAS monitored drift-tube chambers in the presence of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubbert, J.; Horvat, S.; Khartchenko, D.; Kortner, O.; Kotov, S.; Kroha, H.; Manz, A.; Nikolaev, K.; Rauscher, F.; Richter, R.; Staude, A.; Valderanis, Ch.

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer uses tracking chambers consisting of up to 5m long drift tubes filled with Ar:CO 2 (93:7) at 3bar. The chambers are run in a average toroidal magnetic field of 0.4T created by 8 air core coils. They provide a track-point accuracy of 40μm if the space-to-drift-time relationship r(t) is known with 20μm accuracy. The magnetic field B influences the electron drift inside the tubes: the maximum drift time t max =700ns increases by ∼70ns/T 2 B 2 . B varies by up to +/-0.4T along the tubes of the chambers mounted near the magnet coils which translates into a variation of t max of up to 45ns. The dependence of r(t) on B must be taken into account. Test-beam measurements show that the electron drift in case of B 0 can be modelled with the required accuracy by a Langevin equation with a friction term which is slightly non-linear in the drift velocity

  13. On the inward drift of runaway electrons during the plateau phase of runaway current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Di, E-mail: hudi-2@pku.edu.cn [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Qin, Hong [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); School of Nuclear Science and Technology and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2016-03-15

    The well observed inward drift of current carrying runaway electrons during runaway plateau phase after disruption is studied by considering the phase space dynamic of runaways in a large aspect ratio toroidal system. We consider the case where the toroidal field is unperturbed and the toroidal symmetry of the system is preserved. The balance between the change in canonical angular momentum and the input of mechanical angular momentum in such a system requires runaways to drift horizontally in configuration space for any given change in momentum space. The dynamic of this drift can be obtained by integrating the modified Euler-Lagrange equation over one bounce time. It is then found that runaway electrons will always drift inward as long as they are decelerating. This drift motion is essentially non-linear, since the current is carried by runaways themselves, and any runaway drift relative to the magnetic axis will cause further displacement of the axis itself. A simplified analytical model is constructed to describe such inward drift both in the ideal wall case and no wall case, and the runaway current center displacement as a function of parallel momentum variation is obtained. The time scale of such displacement is estimated by considering effective radiation drag, which shows reasonable agreement with the observed displacement time scale. This indicates that the phase space dynamic studied here plays a major role in the horizontal displacement of runaway electrons during plateau phase.

  14. A kinetic-MHD model for low frequency phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    A hybrid kinetic-MHD model for describing low-frequency phenomena in high beta anisotropic plasmas that consist of two components: a low energy core component and an energetic component with low density. The kinetic-MHD model treats the low energy core component by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description, the energetic component by kinetic approach such as the gyrokinetic equation, and the coupling between the dynamics of these two components through plasma pressure in the momentum equation. The kinetic-MHD model optimizes both the physics contents and the theoretical efforts in studying low frequency MHD waves and transport phenomena in general magnetic field geometries, and can be easily modified to include the core plasma kinetic effects if necessary. It is applicable to any magnetized collisionless plasma system where the parallel electric field effects are negligibly small. In the linearized limit two coupled eigenmode equations for describing the coupling between the transverse Alfven type and the compressional Alfven type waves are derived. The eigenmode equations are identical to those derived from the full gyrokinetic equation in the low frequency limit and were previously analyzed both analytically nd numerically to obtain the eigenmode structure of the drift mirror instability which explains successfully the multi-satellite observation of antisymmetric field-aligned structure of the compressional magnetic field of Pc 5 waves in the magnetospheric ring current plasma. Finally, a quadratic form is derived to demonstrate the stability of the low-frequency transverse and compressional Alfven type instabilities in terms of the pressure anisotropy parameter τ and the magnetic field curvature-pressure gradient parameter. A procedure for determining the stability of a marginally stable MHD wave due to wave-particle resonances is also presented

  15. Energy drift in reversible time integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLachlan, R I; Perlmutter, M

    2004-01-01

    Energy drift is commonly observed in reversible integrations of systems of molecular dynamics. We show that this drift can be modelled as a diffusion and that the typical energy error after time T is O(√T). (letter to the editor)

  16. TBV 361 RESOLUTION ANALYSIS: EMPLACEMENT DRIFT ORIENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.; Kicker, D.C.; Sellers, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this To Be Verified/To Be Determined (TBX) resolution analysis is to release ''To Be Verified'' (TBV)-361 related to the emplacement drift orientation. The system design criterion in ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1998a, p.9) specifies that the emplacement drift orientation relative to the dominant joint orientations should be at least 30 degrees. The specific objectives for this analysis include the following: (1) Collect and evaluate key block data developed for the repository host horizon rock mass. (2) Assess the dominant joint orientations based on available fracture data. (3) Document the maximum block size as a function of drift orientation. (4) Assess the applicability of the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion in the ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1998a, p.9). (5) Consider the effects of seepage on drift orientation. (6) Verify that the viability assessment (VA) drift orientation complies with the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion, or provide justifications and make recommendations for modifying the VA emplacement drift layout. In addition to providing direct support to the System Description Document (SDD), the release of TBV-361 will provide support to the Repository Subsurface Design Department. The results from this activity may also provide data and information needs to support the MGR Requirements Department, the MGR Safety Assurance Department, and the Performance Assessment Organization

  17. Silicon drift detectors, present and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, J.; Bellwied, R.; Beuttenmuller, R.; Caines, H.; Chen, W.; Dyke, H.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Humanic, T.; Kotov, I.; Kuczewski, P.; Leonhardt, W.; Li, Z.; Lynn, D.; Minor, R.; Munhoz, M.; Ott, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Schambach, J.; Soja, R.; Sugarbaker, E.; Willson, R. M.

    2001-04-01

    Silicon drift detectors provide unambiguous two-dimensional position information for charged particle detection with a single detector layer. A large area silicon drift detector was developed for the inner tracking detector of the STAR experiment at RHIC. In this paper, we discuss the lessons learned and the future prospects of this technology.

  18. FIELD INVESTIGATION OF THE DRIFT SHADOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.W. Su; T.J. Kneafsey

    2006-01-01

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an underground void that, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rock mass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturated rock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirming the existence of the drift shadow have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of drift shadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristics could provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in the subsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the field program that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadow--and the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sand mine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch, California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it an excellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. The mine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine formation, an approximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales, coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the mine required the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other, driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. This configuration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rock mass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around the underlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performed are described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radial pattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situ water content using a gravimetric technique, as well as analyzed for chemistry. With the active hydrologic test, water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel drifts and the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottom drift

  19. Kinetic Typography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Djonov, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images.......After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images....

  20. Role of drifts in diffusive shock acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    The role played by shock-associated drifts during the diffusive acceleration of charged particles at collisionless MHD shocks is evaluated. In the rest frame of the shock, the total energy gained by a particle is shown to result from two coupled acceleration mechanisms, the usual first-order Fermi mechanism and the drift mechanism. When averaged over a distribution of particles, the ratio of the drift-associated energy gain to the total energy is found to be independent of the total energy at a given theta1 (the angle between the shock normal and the unperturbed upstream magnetic field) in agreement with theoretical predictions. No evidence is found for drift-associated deceleration, suggesting that drifts always augment acceleration. 35 references

  1. Drift reversal capability in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Itoh, K.; Okamura, S.

    2002-10-01

    The maximum-J (J is the second adiabatic invariant) capability, i.e., the drift reversal capability, is examined in quasi-axisymmetric (QAS) stellarators and quasi-poloidally symmetric (QPS) stellarators as a possible mechanism for turbulent transport suppression. Due to the existence of non-axisymmetry of the magnetic field strength in QAS configurations, a local maximum of J is created to cause the drift reversal. The increase of magnetic shear in finite beta equilibria also has favorable effect in realizing the drift reversal. The radial variation of the uniform magnetic field component plays a crucial role for the drift reversal in a QPS configuration. Thus, the drift reversal capability and its external controllability are demonstrated for QAS and QPS stellarators, by which the impact of magnetic configuration on turbulent transport can be studied in experiments. (author)

  2. Drift reversal capability in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Itoh, K.; Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Nakajima, N.; Itoh, S.-I.; Neilson, G.H.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Rewoldt, G.

    2003-01-01

    The maximum-J (J is the second adiabatic invariant) capability, i.e., the drift reversal capability, is examined in quasi-axisymmetric (QAS) stellarators and quasi-poloidally symmetric (QPS) stellarators as a possible mechanism for turbulent transport suppression. Due to the existence of non-axisymmetry of the magnetic field strength in QAS configurations, a local maximum of J is created to cause the drift reversal. The increase of magnetic shear in finite beta equilibria also has favorable effect in realizing the drift reversal. The radial variation of the uniform magnetic field component plays a crucial role for the drift reversal in a QPS configuration. Thus, the drift reversal capability and its external controllability are demonstrated for QAS and QPS stellarators, by which the impact of magnetic configuration on turbulent transport can be studied in experiments. (author)

  3. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Sun

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). The scope of the work includes determination of input parameter values and loads, selection of appropriate process and methods for the calculation, application of selected methods, such as empirical or analytical, to the calculation, development and execution of numerical models, and evaluation of results. Results from this calculation are limited to use for design of the emplacement drifts and the final ground support system installed in these drifts. The design of non-emplacement openings and their ground support systems is covered in the ''Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA'' (BSC 2004c)

  4. Dissipative drift instability in dusty plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilakshi Das

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation has been done on the very low-frequency electrostatic drift waves in a collisional dusty plasma. The dust density gradient is taken perpendicular to the magnetic field B0⃗, which causes the drift wave. In this case, low-frequency drift instabilities can be driven by E1⃗×B0⃗ and diamagnetic drifts, where E1⃗ is the perturbed electric field. Dust charge fluctuation is also taken into consideration for our study. The dust- neutral and ion-neutral collision terms have been included in equations of motion. It is seen that the low-frequency drift instability gets damped in such a system. Both dust charging and collision of plasma particles with the neutrals may be responsible for the damping of the wave. Both analytical and numerical techniques have been used while developing the theory.

  5. Nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion with multiple hidden states for remaining useful life prediction of rechargeable batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Fangfang; Tsui, Kwok-Leung

    2017-09-01

    Brownian motion with adaptive drift has attracted much attention in prognostics because its first hitting time is highly relevant to remaining useful life prediction and it follows the inverse Gaussian distribution. Besides linear degradation modeling, nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion has been developed to model nonlinear degradation. Moreover, the first hitting time distribution of the nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion has been approximated by time-space transformation. In the previous studies, the drift coefficient is the only hidden state used in state space modeling of the nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion. Besides the drift coefficient, parameters of a nonlinear function used in the nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion should be treated as additional hidden states of state space modeling to make the nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion more flexible. In this paper, a prognostic method based on nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion with multiple hidden states is proposed and then it is applied to predict remaining useful life of rechargeable batteries. 26 sets of rechargeable battery degradation samples are analyzed to validate the effectiveness of the proposed prognostic method. Moreover, some comparisons with a standard particle filter based prognostic method, a spherical cubature particle filter based prognostic method and two classic Bayesian prognostic methods are conducted to highlight the superiority of the proposed prognostic method. Results show that the proposed prognostic method has lower average prediction errors than the particle filter based prognostic methods and the classic Bayesian prognostic methods for battery remaining useful life prediction.

  6. Drift velocity and pressure monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore, the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented. Another important parameter to be monitored is the pressure inside the muon drift tube chambers. The differential pressure must not exceed a certain value and the absolute pressure has to be kept slightly above ambient pressure to prevent air from entering into the muon drift tube chambers in case of a leak. Latest drift velocity monitoring results are discussed.

  7. Drift velocity and pressure monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore, the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented. Another important parameter to be monitored is the pressure inside the muon drift tube chambers because the drift velocity depends on it. Furthermore the differential pressure must not exceed a certain value and the absolute pressure has to be kept slightly above ambient pressure to prevent air from entering into the muon drift tube chambers in case of a leak. Latest pressure monitoring results are discussed.

  8. Force illusions and drifts observed during muscle vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschechtko, Sasha; Cuadra, Cristian; Latash, Mark L

    2018-01-01

    We explored predictions of a scheme that views position and force perception as a result of measuring proprioceptive signals within a reference frame set by ongoing efferent process. In particular, this hypothesis predicts force illusions caused by muscle vibration and mediated via changes in both afferent and efferent components of kinesthesia. Healthy subjects performed accurate steady force production tasks by pressing with the four fingers of one hand (the task hand) on individual force sensors with and without visual feedback. At various times during the trials, subjects matched the perceived force using the other hand. High-frequency vibration was applied to one or both of the forearms (over the hand and finger extensors). Without visual feedback, subjects showed a drop in the task hand force, which was significantly smaller under the vibration of that forearm. Force production by the matching hand was consistently higher than that of the task hand. Vibrating one of the forearms affected the matching hand in a manner consistent with the perception of higher magnitude of force produced by the vibrated hand. The findings were consistent between the dominant and nondominant hands. The effects of vibration on both force drift and force mismatching suggest that vibration led to shifts in both signals from proprioceptors and the efferent component of perception, the referent coordinate and/or coactivation command. The observations fit the hypothesis on combined perception of kinematic-kinetic variables with little specificity of different groups of peripheral receptors that all contribute to perception of forces and coordinates. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We show that vibration of hand/finger extensors produces consistent errors in finger force perception. Without visual feedback, finger force drifted to lower values without a drift in the matching force produced by the other hand; hand extensor vibration led to smaller finger force drift. The findings fit the scheme with

  9. Field investigation of the drift shadow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Grace W.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Cook, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an underground void that, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rockmass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturated rock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirming its existence have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of drift shadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristics could provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in the subsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the field program that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadow and the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sandmine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch, California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it an excellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. The mine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine Formation, an approximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales, coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the mine required the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other, driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. This configuration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rockmass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around the underlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performed are described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radial pattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situ water content and chemical constituents. With the active hydrologic test, water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel drifts and the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottom drift. Tensiometers, electrical resistance probes, neutron probes, and ground

  10. Low frequency fluid drift turbulence in magnetised plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.

    2001-03-01

    We start with the first principles of fluid dynamics and classical electrodynamics and then find the regime in which we can reduce to quasineutral dynamics, which also implicitly underlies MHD. Then, we find the limits under which we can specialise to the MHD model as a subset, first of two fluid dynamics, then of the fluid drift dynamics that results when the motions are not vigorous enough to compress the magnetic field. In Chapters 4 and 5 we find the basic character of small disturbances in this system. Chapters 6 through 9 treat various aspects of fluid drift turbulence, also called drift wave turbulence, moving from a simple consideration of the underlying nonlinear dynamics, to some methods by which one can diagnose computations to find out what is going on, and then to the nonlinear instability which is the hallmark of this physics, and then to the interactions with large scale sheared flows. Chapter 10 introduces interchange turbulence, which is the plasma analog of the buoyant convection well known from fluid dynamics. Chapters 11 through 13 treat electromagnetic drift wave turbulence in closed magnetic field geometry, starting with a simplified model treating only the electron pressure and then introducing the electron and ion temperatures. Chapter 14 treats the basic characteristics of the transport that results from fluid drift turbulence, as this is quite different from the kinetic diffusion, such as heat conduction, that is more familiar. Appendices A and B treat the details of the numerical methods and models of magnetic field geometry necessary to treat all but the simplest cases. For this subject is dominated by nonlinear physics and therefore numerical computation. Computations therefore form an integral part of its study right from the beginning. Citations to the literature are not intended to be comprehensive but to serve as starting points for further reading, a section for which is included in every chapter. Much of this work is very new, and

  11. Drift-modeling and monitoring comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Hanna, S.R.

    1977-01-01

    Congress is looking into the conglomeration of nuclear reactors into energy centers of limited area. Drift from cooling towers can corrode and damage structures in the immediate vicinity of the towers, cause a public nuisance if located near parking lots or high-density traffic areas, and endanger local vegetation. The estimation of salt deposition has relied primarily on predictions from a variety of models, with very few direct measurements. One of the major efforts in our program is to evaluate the assumptions, limitations, and applicabilities of various analytical models for drift deposition prediction. Several drift deposition models are compared using a set of standard input conditions. The predicted maximum drift deposition differs by two orders of magnitude, and the downwind locations of the maximum differ by one order of magnitude. The discrepancies are attributed mainly to different assumptions in the models regarding the initial effective height of the droplets. Current programs in which drift characteristics at the tower mouth and drift deposition downwind of the tower are being measured are summarized. At the present time, drift deposition measurements, sufficiently comprehensive for model verifications, are unavailable. Hopefully, the Chalk Point Program will satisfy this need

  12. Seepage into drifts with mechanical degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2002-01-01

    Seepage into drifts in unsaturated tuff is an important issue for the long-term performance of the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Drifts in which waste packages will potentially be emplaced are subject to degradation in the form of rockfall from the drift ceiling induced by stress relief, seismic, or thermal effects. The objective of this study is to calculate seepage rates for various drift-degradation scenarios and for different values of percolation flux for the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and the Topopah Spring lower lithophysal (Tptpll) units. Seepage calculations are conducted by (1) defining a heterogeneous permeability model on the drift scale that is consistent with field data, (2) selecting calibrated parameters associated with the Tptpmn and Tptpll units, and (3) simulating seepage on detailed degraded-drift profiles, which were obtained from a separate rock mechanics engineering analysis. The simulation results indicate (1) that the seepage threshold (i.e., the percolation flux at which seepage first occurs) is not significantly changed by drift degradation, and (2) the degradation-induced increase in seepage above the threshold is influenced more by the shape of the cavity created by rockfall than the rockfall volume

  13. Nonlinear Gyrokinetic Theory With Polarization Drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Hahm, T.S.

    2010-01-01

    A set of the electrostatic toroidal gyrokinetic Vlasov equation and the Poisson equation, which explicitly includes the polarization drift, is derived systematically by using Lie-transform method. The polarization drift is introduced in the gyrocenter equations of motion, and the corresponding polarization density is derived. Contrary to the wide-spread expectation, the inclusion of the polarization drift in the gyrocenter equations of motion does not affect the expression for the polarization density significantly. This is due to modification of the gyrocenter phase-space volume caused by the electrostatic potential [T. S. Hahm, Phys. Plasmas 3, 4658 (1996)].

  14. Pixelated CdZnTe drift detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2005-01-01

    A technique, the so-called Drift Strip Method (DSM), for improving the CdZnTe detector energy response to hard X-rays and gamma-rays was applied as a pixel geometry. First tests have confirmed that this detector type provides excellent energy resolution and imaging performance. We specifically...... report on the performance of 3 mm thick prototype CZT drift pixel detectors fabricated using material from eV-products. We discuss issues associated with detector module performance. Characterization results obtained from several prototype drift pixel detectors are presented. Results of position...

  15. Computer controlled drifting of Si(Li) detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landis, D.A.; Wong, Y.K.; Walton, J.T.; Goulding, F.S.

    1989-01-01

    A relatively inexpensive computer-controlled system for performing the drift process used in fabricating Si(Li) detectors is described. The system employs a small computer to monitor the leakage current, applied voltage and temperature on eight individual drift stations. The associated computer program initializes the drift process, monitors the drift progress and then terminates the drift when an operator set drift time has elapsed. The improved control of the drift with this system has been well demonstrated over the past three years in the fabrication of a variety of Si(Li) detectors. A few representative system responses to detector behavior during the drift process are described

  16. Linear algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Shilov, Georgi E

    1977-01-01

    Covers determinants, linear spaces, systems of linear equations, linear functions of a vector argument, coordinate transformations, the canonical form of the matrix of a linear operator, bilinear and quadratic forms, Euclidean spaces, unitary spaces, quadratic forms in Euclidean and unitary spaces, finite-dimensional space. Problems with hints and answers.

  17. Phase-mixing by the guiding centre drifts of charged particles in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1988-02-01

    Thermal dispersion of the guiding center drifts in a plasma leads to phase-mixing and kinetic damping of macroscopic plasma perturbations. A simple illustration is given by the drifts of a dilute plasma in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. This results in a substantial kinetic damping on a time scale only being slightly longer than that of the Larmor period of gyration. Similar results are likely to be obtained in more complicated situations such as those of a dense, non-dissipative, high-beta plasma, at least as far as orders of magnitude are concerned. Thus the present phase mixing effect is expected to have a substantial general influence on the dynamics and stability of macroscopic plasma perturbations in high-beta systems with strong magnetic field inhomogeneities. (author)

  18. Unintended Positional Drift and Its Potential Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    many users unintentionally move forward while walking in place. We refer to this phenomenon accidental movement as Unintended Positional Drift. The poster presents evidence of the phenomenon's existence and subsequently discusses different design solutions which potentially could circumvent the problem....

  19. CROSS DRIFT ALCOVE/NICHE UTILITIES ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Goodin

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide the design basis and general arrangement requirements of the non-potable water, waste water, compressed air and ventilation (post excavation) utilities required in support of the Cross Drift alcoves and niches

  20. Travelling fronts in stochastic Stokes’ drifts

    KAUST Repository

    Blanchet, Adrien; Dolbeault, Jean; Kowalczyk, Michał

    2008-01-01

    By analytical methods we study the large time properties of the solution of a simple one-dimensional model of stochastic Stokes' drift. Semi-explicit formulae allow us to characterize the behaviour of the solutions and compute global quantities

  1. Self-shielding flex-circuit drift tube, drift tube assembly and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David Alexander

    2016-04-26

    The present disclosure is directed to an ion mobility drift tube fabricated using flex-circuit technology in which every other drift electrode is on a different layer of the flex-circuit and each drift electrode partially overlaps the adjacent electrodes on the other layer. This results in a self-shielding effect where the drift electrodes themselves shield the interior of the drift tube from unwanted electro-magnetic noise. In addition, this drift tube can be manufactured with an integral flex-heater for temperature control. This design will significantly improve the noise immunity, size, weight, and power requirements of hand-held ion mobility systems such as those used for explosive detection.

  2. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Tsang

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  3. Unstable universal drift eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chen, L.

    1980-01-01

    The eigenmode equation describing ballooning collisionless drift instabilities is analyzed both analytically and numerically. A new branch of eigenmodes, which corresponds to quasi-bound states due to toroidal coupling effects such as ion delB drifts, is shown to be destabilized by electron Landau damping for typical tokamak parameters. This branch cannot be understood by the strong coupling approximation. However, the slab-like (Pearlstein--Berk-type) branch is found to remain stable and experience enhanced shear damping

  4. Effects of Fault Displacement on Emplacement Drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, F.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate potential effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts, including drip shields and waste packages emplaced in emplacement drifts. The output from this analysis not only provides data for the evaluation of long-term drift stability but also supports the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) process model report (PMR) and Disruptive Events Report currently under development. The primary scope of this analysis includes (1) examining fault displacement effects in terms of induced stresses and displacements in the rock mass surrounding an emplacement drift and (2 ) predicting fault displacement effects on the drip shield and waste package. The magnitude of the fault displacement analyzed in this analysis bounds the mean fault displacement corresponding to an annual frequency of exceedance of 10 -5 adopted for the preclosure period of the repository and also supports the postclosure performance assessment. This analysis is performed following the development plan prepared for analyzing effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts (CRWMS M and O 2000). The analysis will begin with the identification and preparation of requirements, criteria, and inputs. A literature survey on accommodating fault displacements encountered in underground structures such as buried oil and gas pipelines will be conducted. For a given fault displacement, the least favorable scenario in term of the spatial relation of a fault to an emplacement drift is chosen, and the analysis is then performed analytically. Based on the analysis results, conclusions are made regarding the effects and consequences of fault displacement on emplacement drifts. Specifically, the analysis will discuss loads which can be induced by fault displacement on emplacement drifts, drip shield and/or waste packages during the time period of postclosure

  5. Drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, M.; Melchior, H.

    1968-01-01

    A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated.......A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated....

  6. Lower hybrid drift instability in modified Harris current sheet with negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Feng; Chen, Y-H; Shi Guifen; Hu, Z-Q; Yu, M Y

    2008-01-01

    The lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) in a Harris current sheet with negative ions is investigated using the kinetic theory. Numerical results show that the negative ions have considerable effect on the LHDI. With increase of the negative-ion concentration, the growth rate of the LHDI increases and its real frequency decreases for any wave length. The Harris current sheet can thus be significantly modified

  7. Competitive Association and Charge Transfer in the Reactions of NO + with some Ketones: a Select Ion Flow Drift Tube Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fairley, D. A.; Milligan, D. B.; Freeman, C. G.; McEwan, M. J.; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 193, č. 1 (1999), s. 35-43 ISSN 1387-3806 Grant - others:Marsden Fund(NZ) - Institutional research plan: CEZ:A54/98:Z4-040-9-ii Keywords : ion-molecule reaction kinetics * selected ion flow drift tube * ternary association Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.086, year: 1999

  8. Calibration of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers and Measurement of the Drift Velocity with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; 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Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; 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Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration procedure for the drift tubes of the CMS barrel muon system and reports the main results obtained with data collected during a high statistics cosmic ray data-taking period. The main goal of the calibration is to determine, for each drift cell, the minimum time delay for signals relative to the trigger, accounting for the drift velocity within the cell. The accuracy of the calibration procedure is influenced by the random arrival time of cosmic muons. A more refined analysis of the drift velocity was performed during the offline reconstruction phase, which takes into account this feature of cosmic ray events.

  9. Some Aspects of Extended Kinetic Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the pathway model of Mathai introduced in 2005 [Linear Algebra and Its Applications, 396, 317–328] we extend the standard kinetic equations. Connection of the extended kinetic equation with fractional calculus operator is established. The solution of the general form of the fractional kinetic equation is obtained through Laplace transform. The results for the standard kinetic equation are obtained as the limiting case.

  10. Test beam results of silicon drift detector prototypes for the ALICE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Nouais, D; Busso, L; Cerello, P G; Giubellino, P; Gregorio, A; Hernández-Montoya, R; Idzik, M; Kolojvari, A A; Mazza, G; Montaño-Zetina, L M; Nilsson, B S; Petta, C; Randazzo, N; Rashevsky, A; Reito, S; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F; Trzaska, W H; Vacchi, A

    1999-01-01

    We report preliminary beam test results of linear silicon drift detector prototypes for the ALICE experiment. Linearity, resolution, charge transport and collection, and efficiency have been studied using a minimum ionizing particle beam for a very large area detector prototype read out with the OLA preamplifier/shaper and for another detector read out using a new transimpedance amplifier with a nonlinear response. (14 refs).

  11. Temporal impulse and step responses of the human eye obtained psychophysically by means of a drift-correcting perturbation technique

    OpenAIRE

    Roufs, J.A.J.; Blommaert, F.J.J.

    1981-01-01

    Internal impulse and step responses are derived from the thresholds of short probe flashes by means of a drift-correcting perturbation technique. The approach is based on only two postulated systems properties: quasi-linearity and peak detection. A special feature of the technique is its strong reduction of the concealing effect of sensitivity drift within and between sessions. Results were found to be repeatable, even after about one year. For a 1° foveal disk at 1200 td stationary level, im...

  12. Simulations of drift waves in 3D magnetic configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jost, G.

    2000-06-01

    Drift waves are commonly held responsible for anomalous transport in tokamak configurations and in particular for the anomalously high heat loss. The next generation of stellarators on the other hand are hoped to be characterized by a much smaller neo-classical transport and by particle confinement close to that of tokamaks. There is nevertheless a strong interest in the stellarator community to study the properties of drift waves in 3D magnetic configurations. To serve this interest we have developed the first global gyrokinetic code, EUTERPE, aimed at the investigation of linear drift wave stability in general toroidal geometry. The physical model assumes electrostatic waves and adiabatic electrons. EUTERPE is a particle-in-cell (PIC) code in which the gyrokinetic Poisson equation is discretized with the finite element method defined in the PEST -1 system of magnetic coordinates. The magnetic geometry is provided by the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium code VMEC. The complete 3D model has been successfully validated in toroidal axisymmetric and straight helical geometries and has permitted the first simulation of unstable global ITG driven modes in non-axisymmetric toroidal configurations. As a first application, two configurations have been studied, the Quasi-Axially symmetric Stellarator with three fields periods (QAS3) currently one system under consideration at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and the Helically Symmetric experiment (HSX) which has recently started operation at the University of Wisconsin. QAS3 is characterized by a tokamak-Iike field in the outer part of the torus. In this structure the drift waves are mainly affected by the magnetic shear and barely by the shape of the plasma. Also, the results are very close to those obtained for a tokamak. On the other hand, results for the HSX configuration, which is characterized by a dominant helical magnetic field, show a clear 3D effect, namely a strong toroidal variation of the drift wave

  13. Physical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifschitz, E.M.; Pitajewski, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    The textbook covers the subject under the following headings: kinetic gas theory, diffusion approximation, collisionless plasma, collisions within the plasma, plasma in the magnetic field, theory of instabilities, dielectrics, quantum fluids, metals, diagram technique for nonequilibrium systems, superconductors, and kinetics of phase transformations

  14. Heparin kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swart, C.A.M. de.

    1983-01-01

    The author has studied the kinetics of heparin and heparin fractions after intravenous administration in humans and in this thesis the results of this study are reported. Basic knowledge about the physico-chemical properties of heparin and its interactions with proteins resulting in anticoagulant and lipolytic effects are discussed in a review (chapter II), which also comprises some clinical aspects of heparin therapy. In chapter III the kinetics of the anticoagulant effect are described after intravenous administration of five commercial heparin preparations. A mathematical model is presented that fits best to these kinetics. The kinetics of the anticoagulant and lipolytic effects after intravenous injection of various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions and their relationship with the disappearance of the radiolabel are described in chapter IV. Chapter V gives a description of the kinetics of two radiolabels after injection of in vitro formed complexes consisting of purified, 125 I-radiolabelled antithrombin III and various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions. (Auth.)

  15. Analysis of zonal flow bifurcations in 3D drift wave turbulence simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammel, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The main issue of experimental magnetic fusion devices lies with their inherently high turbulent transport, preventing long-term plasma confinement. A deeper understanding of the underlying transport processes is therefore desirable, especially in the high-gradient tokamak edge which marks the location of the drift wave regime as well as the outer boundary of the still badly understood high confinement mode. One of the most promising plasma features possibly connected to a complete bifurcation theory for the transition to this H-mode is found in large-scale phenomena capable of regulating radial transport through vortex shearing - i.e. zonal flows, linearly stable large-scale poloidal vector E x vector B-modes based on radial flux surface averages of the potential gradient generated through turbulent self-organization. Despite their relevance, few detailed turbulence studies of drift wave-based zonal flows have been undertaken, and none of them have explicitly targeted bifurcations - or, within a resistive sheared-slab environment, observed zonal flows at all. In this work, both analytical means and the two-fluid code NLET are used to analyze a reduced set of Hasegawa-Wakatani equations, describing a sheared collisional drift wave system without curvature. The characteristics of the drift waves themselves, as well as those of the drift wave-based zonal flows and their retroaction on the drift wave turbulence are examined. The single dimensionless parameter ρ s proposed in previous analytical models is examined numerically and shown to divide the drift wave scale into two transport regimes, the behavioral characteristics of which agree perfectly with theoretical expectations. This transport transition correlates with a transition from pure drift wave turbulence at low ρ s into the high-ρ s zonal flow regime. The associated threshold has been more clearly identified by tracing it back to a tipping of the ratio between a newly proposed frequency gradient length at

  16. A temperature and mass dependence of the linear Boltzmann collision operator from group theory point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saveliev, V.

    1996-01-01

    The Lie group of the transformations affecting the parameters of the linear Boltzmann collision operator such as temperature of background gas and ratio of masses of colliding particles and molecules is discovered. The group also describes the conservation laws for collisions and main symmetries of the collision operator. New algebraic properties of the collision operator are derived. Transformations acting on the variables and parameters and leaving the linear Boltzmann kinetic equation invariant are found. For the constant collision frequency the integral representation of solutions for nonuniform case in terms of the distribution function of particles drifting in a gas with zero temperature is deduced. The new exact relaxation solutions are obtained too. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. Strong drifts effects on neoclassical transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessarotto, M.; Gregoratto, D.; White, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that strong drifts play an important role in plasma equilibrium, stability and confinement A significant example concerns, in particular for tokamak plasmas, the case of strong toroidal differential rotation produced by E x B drift which is currently regarded as potentially important for its influence in equilibrium, stability and transport. In fact, theoretically, it has been found that shear flow can substantially affect the stability of microinstabilities as well modify substantially transport. Recent experimental observations of enhanced confinement and transport regimes in Tokamaks, show, however, evidence of the existence of strong drifts in the plasma core. These are produced not only by the radial electric field [which gives rise to the E x B drift], but also by density [N s ], temperature [T s ] and mass flow [V = ωRe var-phi , with e var-phi the toroidal unit vector, R the distance for the symmetry axis of the torus and ω being the toroidal angular rotation velocity] profiles which are suitably steep. This implies that, in a significant part of the plasma core, the relevant scale lengths of the gradients [of N s , T s , ω], i.e., respectively L N , L T and L ω can be as large as the radial scale length characterizing the banana orbits, L b . Interestingly enough, the transport estimates obtained appear close or even lower than the predictions based on the simplest neoclassical model. However, as is well known, the latter applies, in a strict sense only in the case of weak drifts and also ignoring even the contribution of shear flow related to strong E x B drift. Thus a fundamental problem appears the extension of neoclassical transport theory to include the effect of strong drifts in Tokamak confinement systems. The goal of this investigation is to develop a general formulation of neoclassical transport embodying such important feature

  18. Role of the current density profile on drift wave stability in internal transport barrier reversed magnetic shear experiments at JET and Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourment, C; Hoang, G T; Eriksson, L-G; Garbet, X; Litaudon, X; Tresset, G [EURATOM-CEA Association, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2003-03-01

    The role of the current density profile on drift wave stability is investigated using a linear electrostatic gyro-kinetic code. The growth rates are shown to have a linear dependence on the normalized temperature gradients above a certain threshold. A parametric study of the threshold shows a dramatic stabilizing effect of negative magnetic shear, especially for large scale instabilities. A set of handy formulae fitting the threshold as a function of the magnetic shear and the safety factor is proposed. Analysis of reversed magnetic shear discharges with internal transport barrier (ITB) in JET shows that ion ITBs can be triggered by the negative magnetic shear in the core of the plasma. Subsequently, the increase of the ExB shearing rate allows for the expansion of the ITB, despite the increase of the linear growth rates due to the temperature gradient peaking. In the case of the electron ITB obtained in the Tore Supra LHEP mode, the central increase of the confinement is associated with the stabilization of large scale trapped electron modes by the negative magnetic shear effect, whereas the steep electron temperature gradient destabilizes the small scale electron temperature gradient modes, which prevent the electron heat transport to reach neoclassical levels.

  19. Self-sustained collisional drift-wave turbulence in a sheared magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.D.

    1990-01-01

    Although collisional drift waves in a sheared slab configuration are linearly damped, it is found that the corresponding turbulence is self-sustaining if initialized at nonlinear amplitude. The influence of the free-energy source represented by the temperature and density gradients on the turbulent system involving bidirectional spectral energy transfer is responsible for this change of regime. Several important features of tokamak edge fluctuations are reproduced by these single-rational-surface nonlinear dynamics. As a result, drift-wave turbulence must still be considered as an underlying dynamic of anomalous transport in tokamak edges

  20. Circuit and Measurement Technique for Radiation Induced Drift in Precision Capacitance Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sudheer; Shankar, Krishnamurthy Ganapathy

    2013-04-01

    In the design of radiation tolerant precision ADCs targeted for space market, a matched capacitor array is crucial. The drift of capacitance ratios due to radiation should be small enough not to cause linearity errors. Conventional methods for measuring capacitor matching may not achieve the desired level of accuracy due to radiation induced gain errors in the measurement circuits. In this work, we present a circuit and method for measuring capacitance ratio drift to a very high accuracy (<; 1 ppm) unaffected by radiation levels up to 150 krad.

  1. Single nozzle spray drift measurements of drift reducing nozzles at two forward speeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stallinga, H.; Zande, van de J.C.; Michielsen, J.G.P.; Velde, van P.

    2016-01-01

    In 2011‒2012 single nozzle field experiments were carried out to determine the effect of different flat fan spray nozzles of the spray drift reduction classes 50, 75, 90 and 95% on spray drift at two different forward speeds (7.2 km h-1 and 14.4 km h-1). Experiments were performed with a single

  2. Optical drift effects in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzyński, Mikołaj; Kopiński, Jarosław

    2018-03-01

    We consider the question of determining the optical drift effects in general relativity, i.e. the rate of change of the apparent position, redshift, Jacobi matrix, angular distance and luminosity distance of a distant object as registered by an observer in an arbitrary spacetime. We present a fully relativistic and covariant approach, in which the problem is reduced to a hierarchy of ODE's solved along the line of sight. The 4-velocities and 4-accelerations of the observer and the emitter and the geometry of the spacetime along the line of sight constitute the input data. We build on the standard relativistic geometric optics formalism and extend it to include the time derivatives of the observables. In the process we obtain two general, non-perturbative relations: the first one between the gravitational lensing, represented by the Jacobi matrix, and the apparent position drift, also called the cosmic parallax, and the second one between the apparent position drift and the redshift drift. The applications of the results include the theoretical study of the drift effects of cosmological origin (so-called real-time cosmology) in numerical or exact Universe models.

  3. Drift chamber performance in the field of a superconducting magnet: measurement of the drift angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, G.H.; Sherman, S.; McDonald, K.T.; Smith, A.J.S.; Thaler, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented of the first measurements in a study of drift chamber performance in magnetic fields up to 6 tesla. The angle of the electron drift was measured as a function of electric and magnetic field intensity. It appears that even at the high fields of superconducting magnets (3 to 6 tesla) the drift angle induced by the Lorentz force can be corrected for with tilted electric drift fields and/or the use of Xenon gas. At 3 tesla a drift field tilted at 45 0 with a magnitude of 3.5 kV/cm should restore normal operating conditions. At 4 tesla, a 45 0 tilt field would have a magnitude 5 kV/cm

  4. Spray particle drift mitigation using field corn (Zea mays L.) as a drift barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Bruno C; Butts, Thomas R; Rodrigues, Andre O; Golus, Jeffrey A; Schroeder, Kasey; Kruger, Greg R

    2018-04-24

    Herbicide particle drift reduces application efficacy and can cause severe impacts on nearby vegetation depending on the herbicide mode-of-action, exposure level, and tolerance to the herbicide. A particle drift mitigation effort placing windbreaks or barriers on the field boundaries to reduce off-target movement of spray particles has been utilized in the past. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of field corn (Zea mays L.) at different heights as a particle drift barrier. Applications with a non-air inclusion flat fan nozzle (ER11004) resulted in greater particle drift when compared to an air inclusion nozzle (TTI11004). Eight rows of corn were used as barriers (0.91, 1.22, and 1.98 m height) which reduced the particle drift for both nozzles, especially at shorter downwind distances. Applications with the ER11004 nozzle without corn barriers had 1% of the applied rate (D 99 ) predicted to deposit at 14.8 m downwind, whereas this distance was reduced (up to 7-fold) when applications were performed with corn barriers. The combination of corn drift barriers and nozzle selection (TTI11004) provided satisfactory particle drift reduction when the D 99 estimates were compared to applications with the ER11004 nozzle without corn barriers (up to 10-fold difference). The corn drift barriers were effective in reducing particle drift from applications with the ER11004 and the TTI11004 nozzles (Fine and Ultra Coarse spray classifications, respectively). The corn drift barrier had appropriate porosity and width as the airborne spray was captured within its canopy instead of deflecting up and over it. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Approximate Stokes Drift Profiles in Deep Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Øyvind; Janssen, Peter A. E. M.; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond

    2014-09-01

    A deep-water approximation to the Stokes drift velocity profile is explored as an alternative to the monochromatic profile. The alternative profile investigated relies on the same two quantities required for the monochromatic profile, viz the Stokes transport and the surface Stokes drift velocity. Comparisons with parametric spectra and profiles under wave spectra from the ERA-Interim reanalysis and buoy observations reveal much better agreement than the monochromatic profile even for complex sea states. That the profile gives a closer match and a more correct shear has implications for ocean circulation models since the Coriolis-Stokes force depends on the magnitude and direction of the Stokes drift profile and Langmuir turbulence parameterizations depend sensitively on the shear of the profile. The alternative profile comes at no added numerical cost compared to the monochromatic profile.

  6. P-type silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.T.; Krieger, B.; Krofcheck, D.; O'Donnell, R.; Odyniec, G.; Partlan, M.D.; Wang, N.W.

    1995-06-01

    Preliminary results on 16 CM 2 , position-sensitive silicon drift detectors, fabricated for the first time on p-type silicon substrates, are presented. The detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested recently at LBL and show interesting properties which make them attractive for use in future physics experiments. A pulse count rate of approximately 8 x l0 6 s -1 is demonstrated by the p-type silicon drift detectors. This count rate estimate is derived by measuring simultaneous tracks produced by a laser and photolithographic mask collimator that generates double tracks separated by 50 μm to 1200 μm. A new method of using ion-implanted polysilicon to produce precise valued bias resistors on the silicon drift detectors is also discussed

  7. Correcting sample drift using Fourier harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena-González, G; Guerrero-Lebrero, M P; Guerrero, E; Reyes, D F; Braza, V; Yañez, A; Nuñez-Moraleda, B; González, D; Galindo, P L

    2018-07-01

    During image acquisition of crystalline materials by high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, the sample drift could lead to distortions and shears that hinder their quantitative analysis and characterization. In order to measure and correct this effect, several authors have proposed different methodologies making use of series of images. In this work, we introduce a methodology to determine the drift angle via Fourier analysis by using a single image based on the measurements between the angles of the second Fourier harmonics in different quadrants. Two different approaches, that are independent of the angle of acquisition of the image, are evaluated. In addition, our results demonstrate that the determination of the drift angle is more accurate by using the measurements of non-consecutive quadrants when the angle of acquisition is an odd multiple of 45°. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Relativistic electron drift in overdense plasma produced by a superintense femtosecond laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastunkov, V.S.; Krainov, V.P.

    2004-01-01

    The general peculiarities of electron motion in the skin layer at the irradiation of overdense plasma by a superintense linearly polarized laser pulse of femtosecond duration are considered. The quiver electron energy is assumed to be a relativistic quantity. Relativistic electron drift along the propagation of laser radiation produced by a magnetic part of a laser field remains after the end of the laser pulse, unlike the relativistic drift of a free electron in underdense plasma. As a result, the penetration depth is much larger than the classical skin depth. The conclusion has been made that the drift velocity is a nonrelativistic quantity even at the peak laser intensity of 10 21 W/cm 2 . The time at which an electron penetrates into field-free matter from the skin layer is much less than the pulse duration

  9. An experimental investigation of the propagation of a compact toroid along curved drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, N.; Inoo, Y.; Nomura, M.; Nagata, M.; Uyama, T.; Ogawa, H.; Kimura, H.; Uehara, U.; Shibata, T.; Kashiwa, Y.; Suzuki, S.; Kasai, S.

    2004-01-01

    Compact toroid (CT) injection is a viable technology for fuelling large tokamak reactors in the future. Experimental demonstration of CT injection has thus far been conducted using horizontal injection in the midplane of tokamak devices. However, recent analyses indicate adverse effects of the toroidal magnetic field on CT injection. In order to avoid these adverse effects, the CT would need to be injectable in any direction. We have therefore devised a curved drift tube to change the direction of CT propagation and have experimentally demonstrated its efficacy. It has been observed that a CT can be transported smoothly through curved drift tubes with 45 deg. and 90 deg. bends without any appreciable change in the CT parameters. The magnetic field, electron density and speed of CTs transported through both 45 deg. and 90 deg. bends are similar to those observed in a linear drift tube. (author)

  10. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  11. Mean Lagrangian drift in continental shelf waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivdal, M.; Weber, J. E. H.

    2012-04-01

    The time- and depth-averaged mean drift induced by barotropic continental shelf waves (CSW's) is studied theoretically for idealized shelf topography by calculating the mean volume fluxes to second order in wave amplitude. The waves suffer weak spatial damping due to bottom friction, which leads to radiation stress forcing of the mean fluxes. In terms of the total wave energy density E¯ over the shelf region, the radiation stress tensor component S¯11 for CSW's is found to be different from that of shallow water surface waves in a non-rotating ocean. For CSW's, the ratio ¯S11/¯E depends strongly on the wave number. The mean Lagrangian flow forced by the radiation stress can be subdivided into a Stokes drift and a mean Eulerian drift current. The magnitude of the latter depends on the ratio between the radiation stress and the bottom stress acting on the mean flow. When the effect of bottom friction acts equally strong on the waves and the mean current, calculations for short CSW's show that the Stokes drift and the friction-dependent wave-induced mean Eulerian current varies approximately in anti-phase over the shelf, and that the latter is numerically the largest. For long CSW's they are approximately in phase. In both cases the mean Lagrangian current, which is responsible for the net particle drift, has its largest numerical value at the coast on the shallow part of the shelf. Enhancing the effect of bottom friction on the Eulerian mean flow, results in a general current speed reduction, as well as a change in spatial structure for long waves. Applying realistic physical parameters for the continental shelf west of Norway, calculations yield along-shelf mean drift velocities for short CSW's that may be important for the transport of biological material, neutral tracers, and underwater plumes of dissolved oil from deep water drilling accidents.

  12. Evaluation and statistical judgement of neural responses to sinusoidal stimulation in cases with superimposed drift and noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastreboff, P W

    1979-06-01

    Time histograms of neural responses evoked by sinuosidal stimulation often contain a slow drifting and an irregular noise which disturb Fourier analysis of these responses. Section 2 of this paper evaluates the extent to which a linear drift influences the Fourier analysis, and develops a combined Fourier and linear regression analysis for detecting and correcting for such a linear drift. Usefulness of this correcting method is demonstrated for the time histograms of actual eye movements and Purkinje cell discharges evoked by sinusoidal rotation of rabbits in the horizontal plane. In Sect. 3, the analysis of variance is adopted for estimating the probability of the random occurrence of the response curve extracted by Fourier analysis from noise. This method proved to be useful for avoiding false judgements as to whether the response curve was meaningful, particularly when the response was small relative to the contaminating noise.

  13. Kinetic stability of internal kink mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, F.; Fogaccia, G.

    1993-01-01

    With reference to studies of the attainment of ignited operations on devices like ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the stability of the internal kink mode is re-investigated by taking into account the contribution of perpendicular compressibility, obtained by solving the drift kinetic equation. The resulting stability condition yields threshold values typically larger than the conventional Bussac criterion. For the case of ultra-flat safety factor profiles, the mode can be stable also in the absence of line-bending

  14. Drift estimation from a simple field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, F. M.; Figueiredo, A.

    2008-01-01

    Given the outcome of a Wiener process, what can be said about the drift and diffusion coefficients? If the process is stationary, these coefficients are related to the mean and variance of the position displacements distribution. However, if either drift or diffusion are time-dependent, very little can be said unless some assumption about that dependency is made. In Bayesian statistics, this should be translated into some specific prior probability. We use Bayes rule to estimate these coefficients from a single trajectory. This defines a simple, and analytically tractable, field theory.

  15. Ultra-low mass drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assiro, R.; Cappelli, L.; Cascella, M.; De Lorenzis, L.; Grancagnolo, F.; Ignatov, F.; L'Erario, A.; Maffezzoli, A.; Miccoli, A.; Onorato, G.; Perillo, M.; Piacentino, G.; Rella, S.; Rossetti, F.; Spedicato, M.; Tassielli, G.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel low mass drift chamber concept, developed in order to fulfill the stringent requirements imposed by the experiments for extremely rare processes, which require high resolutions (order of 100–200 keV/c) for particle momenta in a range (50–100 MeV/c) totally dominated by the multiple scattering contribution. We describe a geometry optimization procedure and a new wiring strategy with a feed-through-less wire anchoring system developed and tested on a drift chamber prototype under completion at INFN-Lecce

  16. Ultra-low mass drift chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiro, R.; Cappelli, L.; Cascella, M.; De Lorenzis, L.; Grancagnolo, F.; Ignatov, F.; L'Erario, A.; Maffezzoli, A.; Miccoli, A.; Onorato, G.; Perillo, M.; Piacentino, G.; Rella, S.; Rossetti, F.; Spedicato, M.; Tassielli, G.; Zavarise, G.

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel low mass drift chamber concept, developed in order to fulfill the stringent requirements imposed by the experiments for extremely rare processes, which require high resolutions (order of 100-200 keV/c) for particle momenta in a range (50-100 MeV/c) totally dominated by the multiple scattering contribution. We describe a geometry optimization procedure and a new wiring strategy with a feed-through-less wire anchoring system developed and tested on a drift chamber prototype under completion at INFN-Lecce .

  17. Properties of low-pressure drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breskin, A.; Trautner, N.

    1976-01-01

    Drift chambers operated with methylal vapour or ethylene at pressures in the range of 10-110 torr are described. A systematic study of position resolution, pulse height and rise time shows that especially for ethylene they are strongly influenced by electron diffusion. Intrinsic position resolution was found to be at least as good as found at atmospheric pressure. A relative pulse height resolution of 10% was obtained with 5.5 MeV alpha-particles. A simple mathematical model which can describe the processes in the drift chamber is presented. (Auth.)

  18. Nonlinear dynamics of resistive electrostatic drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, H.L.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in an externally imposed strong homogeneous magnetic field is investigated numerically in three spatial dimensions. The analysis is based on a set of coupled, nonlinear equations, which are solved for an initial condition which is pertur......The evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in an externally imposed strong homogeneous magnetic field is investigated numerically in three spatial dimensions. The analysis is based on a set of coupled, nonlinear equations, which are solved for an initial condition which...... polarity, i.e. a pair of electrostatic convective cells....

  19. Controls on the global distribution of contourite drifts: Insights from an eddy-resolving ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thran, Amanda C.; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Spence, Paul; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2018-05-01

    Contourite drifts are anomalously high sediment accumulations that form due to reworking by bottom currents. Due to the lack of a comprehensive contourite database, the link between vigorous bottom water activity and drift occurrence has yet to be demonstrated on a global scale. Using an eddy-resolving ocean model and a new georeferenced database of 267 contourites, we show that the global distribution of modern contourite drifts strongly depends on the configuration of the world's most powerful bottom currents, many of which are associated with global meridional overturning circulation. Bathymetric obstacles frequently modify flow direction and intensity, imposing additional finer-scale control on drift occurrence. Mean bottom current speed over contourite-covered areas is only slightly higher (2.2 cm/s) than the rest of the global ocean (1.1 cm/s), falling below proposed thresholds deemed necessary to re-suspend and redistribute sediments (10-15 cm/s). However, currents fluctuate more frequently and intensely over areas with drifts, highlighting the role of intermittent, high-energy bottom current events in sediment erosion, transport, and subsequent drift accumulation. We identify eddies as a major driver of these bottom current fluctuations, and we find that simulated bottom eddy kinetic energy is over three times higher in contourite-covered areas in comparison to the rest of the ocean. Our work supports previous hypotheses which suggest that contourite deposition predominantly occurs due to repeated acute events as opposed to continuous reworking under average-intensity background flow conditions. This suggests that the contourite record should be interpreted in terms of a bottom current's susceptibility to experiencing periodic, high-speed current events. Our results also highlight the potential role of upper ocean dynamics in contourite sedimentation through its direct influence on deep eddy circulation.

  20. Small-scale lacustrine drifts in Lake Champlain, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Patricia L.; Manley, T.O.; Hayo, Kathryn; Cronin, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    High resolution CHIRP (Compressed High Intensity Radar Pulse) seismic profiles reveal the presence of two lacustrine sediment drifts located in Lake Champlain's Juniper Deep. Both drifts are positive features composed of highly laminated sediments. Drift B sits on a basement high while Drift A is built on a trough-filling acoustically-transparent sediment unit inferred to be a mass-transport event. These drifts are oriented approximately north–south and are parallel to a steep ridge along the eastern shore of the basin. Drift A, located at the bottom of a structural trough, is classified as a confined, elongate drift that transitions northward to become a system of upslope asymmetric mudwaves. Drift B is perched atop a structural high to the west of Drift A and is classified as a detached elongate drift. Bottom current depositional control was investigated using Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) located across Drift A. Sediment cores were taken at the crest and at the edges of the Drift A and were dated. Drift source, deposition, and evolution show that these drifts are formed by a water column shear with the highest deposition occurring along its crest and western flank and began developing circa 8700–8800 year BP.

  1. Linear gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwono.

    1978-01-01

    A linear gate providing a variable gate duration from 0,40μsec to 4μsec was developed. The electronic circuity consists of a linear circuit and an enable circuit. The input signal can be either unipolar or bipolar. If the input signal is bipolar, the negative portion will be filtered. The operation of the linear gate is controlled by the application of a positive enable pulse. (author)

  2. Plasma heating by kinetic Alfven wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis, A.S. de.

    1982-01-01

    The heating of a nonuniform plasma (electron-ion) due to the resonant excitation of the shear Alfven wave in the low β regime is studied using initially the ideal MHD model and posteriorly using the kinetic model. The Vlasov equation for ions and the drift kinetic equation for electrons have been used. Through the ideal MHD model, it is concluded that the energy absorption is due to the continuous spectrum (phase mixing) which the shear Alfven wave has in a nonuniform plasma. An explicit expression for the energy absorption is derived. Through the kinetic model it is concluded that the energy absorption is due to a resonant mode convertion of the incident wave into the kinetic Alfven wave which propagates away from the resonant region. Its electron Landau damping has been observed. There has been a concordance with the MHD calculations. (Author) [pt

  3. Linear Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vretenar, M

    2014-01-01

    The main features of radio-frequency linear accelerators are introduced, reviewing the different types of accelerating structures and presenting the main characteristics aspects of linac beam dynamics

  4. Almost two-dimensional treatment of drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, J.M.; Similon, P.L.; Sudan, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    The approximation of two-dimensionality is studied and extended for electrostatic drift wave turbulence in a three-dimensional, magnetized plasma. It is argued on the basis of the direct interaction approximation that in the absence of parallel viscosity, purely 2-D solutions exist for which only modes with k parallel =0 are excited, but that the 2-D spectrum is unstable to perturbations at nonzero k parallel . A 1-D equation for the parallel profile g k perpendicular (k parallel ) of the saturated spectrum at steady state is derived and solved, allowing for parallel viscosity; the spectrum has finite width in k parallel , and hence finite parallel correlation length, as a result of nonlinear coupling. The enhanced energy dissipation rate, a 3-D effect, may be incorporated in the 2-D approximation by a suitable renormalization of the linear dissipation term. An algorithm is presented that reduces the 3-D problem to coupled 1- and 2-D problems. Numerical results from a 2-D spectral direct simulation, thus modified, are compared with the results from the corresponding 3-D (unmodified) simulation for a specific model of drift wave excitation. Damping at high k parallel is included. It is verified that the 1-D solution for g k perpendicular (k parallel ) accurately describes the shape and width of the 3-D spectrum, and that the modified 2-D simulation gives a good estimate of the 3-D energy saturation level and distribution E(k perpendicular )

  5. Geomorphology and drift potential of major aeolian sand deposits in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereher, Mohamed E.

    2018-03-01

    Aeolian sand deposits cover a significant area of the Egyptian deserts. They are mostly found in the Western Desert and Northern Sinai. In order to understand the distribution, pattern and forms of sand dunes in these dune fields it is crucial to analyze the wind regimes throughout the sandy deserts of the country. Therefore, a set of wind data acquired from twelve meteorological stations were processed in order to determine the drift potential (DP), the resultant drift potential (RDP) and the resultant drift direction (RDD) of sand in each dune field. The study showed that the significant aeolian sand deposits occur in low-energy wind environments with the dominance of linear and transverse dunes. Regions of high-energy wind environments occur in the south of the country and exhibit evidence of deflation rather than accumulation with the occurrence of migratory crescentic dunes. Analysis of the sand drift potentials and their directions help us to interpret the formation of major sand seas in Egypt. The pattern of sand drift potential/direction suggests that the sands in these seas might be inherited from exogenous sources.

  6. Drift forces on vacancies and interstitials in alloys with radiation-induced segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfer, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation-induced segregation in alloys leads to compositional gradients around point defect sinks such as voids and dislocations. These compositional gradients in turn affect the drift forces on both interstitials and vacancies and thereby modify the bias. Linear irreversible thermodynamics is employed to derive the total drift force on interstitials and vacancies in substitutional binary alloys. The obtained results are evaluated for binary Fe-Ni alloys. It is shown that radiation-induced segregation produces new drift forces which can be of the same order of magnitude as the stress-induced drift force produced by edge dislocations in an alloy with uniform composition. Hence, segregation results in a significant modification of the bias for void nucleation and swelling. The additional drift forces on interstitials and vacancies are due to the compositional dependence of the formation and migration energies; due to the dependence of the point defect's strain energy on the local elastic properties; due to a coherency strain field caused by lattice parameter variations; and finally due to the Kirkendall force produced by the difference in tracer mobilities. Estimates of these forces given for Fe-Ni alloys indicate that the Kirkendall force is small compared to the other segregation-induced forces on interstitials. In contrast, the Kirkendall force seems to be the dominant one for vacancies. (orig.)

  7. Relation of zonal plasma drift and wind in the equatorial F region as derived from CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Park

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we estimate zonal plasma drift in the equatorial ionospheric F region without counting on ion drift meters. From June 2001 to June 2004 zonal plasma drift velocity is estimated from electron, neutral, and magnetic field observations of Challenging Mini-satellite Payload (CHAMP in the 09:00–20:00 LT sector. The estimated velocities are validated against ion drift measurements by the Republic of China Satellite-1/Ionospheric Plasma and Electrodynamics Instrument (ROCSAT-1/IPEI during the same period. The correlation between the CHAMP (altitude ~ 400 km estimates and ROCSAT-1 (altitude ~ 600 km observations is reasonably high (R ≈ 0.8. The slope of the linear regression is close to unity. However, the maximum westward drift and the westward-to-eastward reversal occur earlier for CHAMP estimates than for ROCSAT-1 measurements. In the equatorial F region both zonal wind and plasma drift have the same direction. Both generate vertical currents but with opposite signs. The wind effect (F region wind dynamo is generally larger in magnitude than the plasma drift effect (Pedersen current generated by vertical E field, thus determining the direction of the F region vertical current.

  8. Linearization Method and Linear Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hidema

    We focus on the relationship between the linearization method and linear complexity and show that the linearization method is another effective technique for calculating linear complexity. We analyze its effectiveness by comparing with the logic circuit method. We compare the relevant conditions and necessary computational cost with those of the Berlekamp-Massey algorithm and the Games-Chan algorithm. The significant property of a linearization method is that it needs no output sequence from a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) because it calculates linear complexity using the algebraic expression of its algorithm. When a PRNG has n [bit] stages (registers or internal states), the necessary computational cost is smaller than O(2n). On the other hand, the Berlekamp-Massey algorithm needs O(N2) where N(≅2n) denotes period. Since existing methods calculate using the output sequence, an initial value of PRNG influences a resultant value of linear complexity. Therefore, a linear complexity is generally given as an estimate value. On the other hand, a linearization method calculates from an algorithm of PRNG, it can determine the lower bound of linear complexity.

  9. A new variable transformation technique for the nonlinear drift vortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orito, Kohtaro

    1996-02-01

    The dipole vortex solution of the Hasegawa-Mima equation describing the nonlinear drift wave is a stable solitary wave which is called the modon. The profile of the modon depends on the nonlinearity of the ExB drift. In order to investigate the nonlinear drift wave more accurately, the effect of the polarization drift needs to be considered. In case of containing the effect of the polarization drift the profile of the electrostatic potential is distorted in the direction perpendicular to the ExB drift. (author)

  10. Partial drift volume due to a self-propelled swimmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Nicholas G.; Khair, Aditya S.

    2018-01-01

    We assess the ability of a self-propelled swimmer to displace a volume of fluid that is large compared to its own volume via the mechanism of partial drift. The swimmer performs rectilinear locomotion in an incompressible, unbounded Newtonian fluid. The partial drift volume D is the volume of fluid enclosed between the initial and final profiles of an initially flat circular disk of marked fluid elements; the disk is initially aligned perpendicular to the direction of locomotion and subsequently distorted due to the passage of the swimmer, which travels a finite distance. To focus on the possibility of large-scale drift, we model the swimmer simply as a force dipole aligned with the swimming direction. At zero Reynolds number (Re =0 ), we demonstrate that D grows without limit as the radius of the marked fluid disk h is made large, indicating that a swimmer at Re =0 can generate a partial drift volume much larger than its own volume. Next, we consider a steady swimmer at small Re , which is modeled as the force-dipole solution to Oseen's equation. Here, we find that D no longer diverges with h , which is due to inertial screening of viscous forces, and is effectively proportional to the magnitude of the force dipole exerted by the swimmer. The validity of this result is extended to Re ≥O (1 ) —the realm of intermediate-Re swimmers such as copepods—by taking advantage of the fact that, in this case, the flow is also described by Oseen's equations at distances much larger than the characteristic linear dimension of the swimmer. Next, we utilize an integral momentum balance to demonstrate that our analysis for a steady inertial swimmer also holds, in a time-averaged sense, for an unsteady swimmer that does not experience a net acceleration over a stroke cycle. Finally, we use experimental data to estimate D for a few real swimmers. Interestingly, we find that D depends heavily on the kinematics of swimming, and, in certain cases, D can be significantly greater

  11. Theory of semicollisional kinetic Alfven modes in sheared magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.; Chen, L.

    1985-02-01

    The spectra of the semicollisional kinetic Alfven modes in a sheared slab geometry are investigated, including the effects of finite ion Larmor radius and diamagnetic drift frequencies. The eigenfrequencies of the damped modes are derived analytically via asymptotic analyses. In particular, as one reduces the resistivity, we find that, due to finite ion Larmor radius effects, the damped mode frequencies asymptotically approach finite real values corresponding to the end points of the kinetic Alfven continuum

  12. Performance of the front-end signal processing electronics for the drift chambers of the Stanford Large Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, A.; Haller, G.M.; Usher, T.; Shypit, R.

    1990-10-01

    This paper reports on the performance of the front-end analog and digital signal processing electronics for the drift chambers of the Stanford Large Detector (SLD) detector at the Stanford Linear Collider. The electronics mounted on printed circuit boards include up to 64 channels of transimpedance amplification, analog sampling, A/D conversion, and associated control circuitry. Measurements of the time resolution, gain, noise, linearity, crosstalk, and stability of the readout electronics are described and presented. The expected contribution of the electronics to the relevant drift chamber measurement resolutions (i.e., timing and charge division) is given

  13. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  14. Resistive drift wave turbulence and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatani, M.

    1986-01-01

    Our efforts for studying the properties of resistive drift wave turbulence by using model mode-coupling equations are shown. It may be related to the edge turbulence and the associated anomalous transport in tokamaks or in stellarator/heliotron. (author)

  15. Effects of Drifting Macroalgae in Eelgrass Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canal Vergés, Paula; Valdemarsen, Thomas Bruun; Kristensen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    and physical damage on eelgrass can occur when macroalgae are drifting as bedload. The ballistic effect of moving macroalgae on surface sediment was tested in the field as well as in a series of annular flume experiments, where simultaneous measurements of macroalgae transport and turbidity were measured...

  16. EU law revisions and legislative drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghetto, Enrico; Mäder, Lars Kai

    2014-01-01

    in force in their original form for several years while others are revised soon after their enactment. What factors account for this variation? We empirically analyze the proposition that in the presence of ‘legislative drift,’ i.e. the intertemporal variation of decision-makers’ preferences, major...

  17. Study and analysis of drift chamber parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Laso, L.

    1988-01-01

    The present work deals mainly with drift chambers. In the first chapter a summary of drift chamber properties is presented. The information has been collected from the extensive bibliography available in this field. A very simple calculation procedure of drift chamber parameters has been developed and is presented in detail in the second chapter. Some prototypes have been made following two geometries (multidrift chamber and Z-chambers). Several installations have been used for test and calibration of these prototypes. A complete description of these installations is given in the third chapter. Cosmic rays, beta particles from a Ru106 radiactive source and a test beam in the WA (West Area) of SPS at CERN have been used for experimental purposes. The analysis and the results are described for the different setups. The experimental measurements have been used to produce a complete cell parametrization (position as function of drift time) and to obtain spatial resolution values (in the range of 200-250 um). Experimental results are in good agreement with numerical calculations. (Author)

  18. Drift wave in pair-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ion plasma are discussed. It is shown that the temperature and/or mass difference of both species could produce drift wave in a pair-ion plasma. The results are discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiment.

  19. Learning in the context of distribution drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-09

    Figure 3 shows a heatmap of the pairwise drift in the joint distribution on the Landsat-8 French land usage satellite data. This data represents 10 meter...listed under the List of Publications. 1. White, C., Using Big Data for Smarter Decision Making. 2011, BI Research: Ashland, Or. 2. Cook , S., et al

  20. Sealed drift tube cosmic ray veto counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, R.; Tatar, E.; Bacon, J.D.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Green, J.A.; Hogan, G.E.; Ito, T.M.; Makela, M.; Morris, C.L.; Mortenson, R.; Pasukanics, F.E.; Ramsey, J.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S.J.; Sondheim, W.E.; Teasdale, W.; Saltus, M.; Back, H.O.; Cottrell, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a simple drift tube counter that has been used as a cosmic ray veto for the UCNA experiment, a first-ever measurement of the neutron beta-asymmetry using ultra-cold neutrons. These detectors provide an inexpensive alternative to more conventional scintillation detectors for large area cosmic ray anticoincidence detectors.

  1. Fine structure in fast drift storm bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, D.; Ellis, G.R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observations with high time resolution of fast drift storm (FDS) solar bursts are described. A new variety of FDS bursts characterised by intensity maxima regularly placed in the frequency domain is reported. Possible interpretations of this are mentioned and the implications of the short duration of FDS bursts are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Linear algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2017-01-01

    This self-contained, clearly written textbook on linear algebra is easily accessible for students. It begins with the simple linear equation and generalizes several notions from this equation for the system of linear equations and introduces the main ideas using matrices. It then offers a detailed chapter on determinants and introduces the main ideas with detailed proofs. The third chapter introduces the Euclidean spaces using very simple geometric ideas and discusses various major inequalities and identities. These ideas offer a solid basis for understanding general Hilbert spaces in functional analysis. The following two chapters address general vector spaces, including some rigorous proofs to all the main results, and linear transformation: areas that are ignored or are poorly explained in many textbooks. Chapter 6 introduces the idea of matrices using linear transformation, which is easier to understand than the usual theory of matrices approach. The final two chapters are more advanced, introducing t...

  3. Studies of drift waves in a toroidal heliac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, X.H.; Blackwell, B.D.; Hamberger, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Low frequency, coherent density fluctuations have been studied for three typical magnetic configurations in the helical axis stellarator SHEILA using Langmuir probe techniques. The parametric dependence, the threshold magnetic field, the frequency spectrum and the spatial structure of the fluctuations are measured experimentally. Mode analyses are made in a magnetic coordinate system. Both the mode numbers thus obtained and the smallness of the directly measured values of the wavenumber along the magnetic field lines indicate a close correspondence between the helicity of the fluctuations and the field lines. These experimental results are consistent with a collisional drift wave model, derived from a linearized two-fluid theory, related to the heliac geometry. Density reduction associated with the fluctuations is clearly observed and is consistent with rough estimates of the cross-filed particle flux due to the fluctuations. 17 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab

  4. Drift wave instability and turbulence in advanced stellarator configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendl, A.

    2001-08-01

    In the following chapter, an overview and references on the physics and geometry of helical advanced stellarators is given. On the basis of this configuration, the influence of magnetic field geometry is then discussed in a basic model of drift-Alfven wave turbulence which contains the necessary physics that applies to the plasma edge. By means of linear models, core physics in the form of ITG and dissipative trapped electron modes is further included in our survey. These models are, of course, by far not comprehensive in order to cover the complex physics of plasma turbulence in three-dimensional fusion devices, where a large range of parameter and mode regimes is present. Optimization criteria for a possible systematic minimization of turbulent transport in Helias configurations therefore still have to be regarded as tentative. The results presented here should, however, encourage for more detailed future computations. (orig.)

  5. Kinetics and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous degradation of Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84 by potassium peroxydisulfate (K2S2O8 has been studied in laboratory scale experiments. The effect of the initial concentrations of potassium peroxydisulfate and RY84, pH and temperature on RY84 degradation were also examined. Experimental data were analyzed using first and second-order kinetics. The degradation kinetics of RY84 of the potassium peroxydisulfate process followed the second-order reaction kinetics. These rate constants have an extreme values similar to of 9.493 mM−1min−1 at a peroxydisulfate dose of 4 mmol/L. Thermodynamic parameters such as activation (Ea and Gibbs free energy (ΔG° were also evaluated. The negative value of ΔGo and Ea shows the spontaneous reaction natural conditions and exothermic nature.

  6. Granulocyte kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.; Saverymuttu, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    By using density gradient materials enriched with autologous plasma, the authors have been able to isolate granulocutes from other cellular elements and label them with In-111 without separation from a plasma environment. The kinetic behavior of these cells suggests that phenomena attributed to granulocyte activation are greatly reduced by this labeling. Here, they review their study of granulocyte kinetics in health and disease in hope of quantifying sites of margination and identifying principal sites of destruction. The three principle headings of the paper are distribution, life-span, and destruction

  7. Oxidative desulfurization: kinetic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, S; Uppaluri, R; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-30

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H(2)O(2) over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel.

  8. Oxidative desulfurization: Kinetic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, S.; Uppaluri, R.; Purkait, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H 2 O 2 over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel

  9. Linear algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Stoll, R R

    1968-01-01

    Linear Algebra is intended to be used as a text for a one-semester course in linear algebra at the undergraduate level. The treatment of the subject will be both useful to students of mathematics and those interested primarily in applications of the theory. The major prerequisite for mastering the material is the readiness of the student to reason abstractly. Specifically, this calls for an understanding of the fact that axioms are assumptions and that theorems are logical consequences of one or more axioms. Familiarity with calculus and linear differential equations is required for understand

  10. Drift mechanism for energetic charged particles at shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.M.; Axford, W.I.; Terasawa, T.

    1983-01-01

    The energy changes of energetic charged particles at a plane shock due to the so-called drift mechanism are analyzed by using the ''adiabatic treatment.'' The analysis shows that for a fast MHD shock, particles lose energy owing to acceleration (curvature) drift in the magnetic field at the shock with the drift velocity being antiparallel to the electric field, and they gain energy owing to gradient drift parallel to the electric field. It is shown that particles with pitch angles aligned along the magnetic field which pass through the shock tend to lose energy owing to acceleration drift, whereas particles with pitch angles nonaligned to the magnetic field gain energy owing to gradient drift. Particles that are reflected by the shock always gain energy. Slow-mode shocks may be similarly analyzed, but in this case curvature drifts give rise to particle energy gains, and gradient drifts result in particle energy losses

  11. Barber's Point, Oahu, Hawaii Drift Card Study 2002-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drift cards were be released from Barber's Point, Oahu, approximately once a month during the two year span to get an idea of the distribution of card drift under...

  12. Electromagnetic drift modes in an inhomogeneous electron gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Pecseli, H. L.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    A pair of nonlinear equations is derived which describes the dynamics of the electromagnetic drift oscillations in a nonuniform magnetized electron gas. It is shown that the nonlinear electromagnetic drift modes can propagate in the form of dipole vortices...

  13. A drift chamber constructed of aluminized mylar tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baringer, P.; Jung, C.; Ogren, H.O.; Rust, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A thin reliable drift chamber has been constructed to be used near the interaction point of the PEP storage ring in the HRS detector. It is composed of individual drift tubes with aluminized mylar walls. (orig.)

  14. A drift chamber constructed of aluminized mylar tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baringer, P.; Jung, C.; Ogren, H. O.; Rust, D. R.

    1987-03-01

    A thin reliable drift chamber has been constructed to be used near the interaction point of the PEP storage ring in the HRS detector. It is composed of individual drift tubes with aluminized mylar walls.

  15. PIGMI linear-accelerator technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, T.J.; Crandall, K.R.; Hamm, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A new linear-accelerator technology has been developed that makes pi-meson (pion) generation possible for cancer therapy in the setting of a major hospital center. This technology uses several new major inventions in particle accelerator science-such as a new accelerator system called the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and permanent-magnet drift-tube focusing-to substantially reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a meson factory for this use. This paper describes this technology, discusses other possible uses for these new developments, and finally discusses possible costs for such installations

  16. Gyrokinetic linearized Landau collision operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    , which is important in multiple ion-species plasmas. Second, the equilibrium operator describes drag and diffusion of the magnetic field aligned component of the vorticity associated with the E×B drift. Therefore, a correct description of collisional effects in turbulent plasmas requires the equilibrium......The full gyrokinetic electrostatic linearized Landau collision operator is calculated including the equilibrium operator, which represents the effect of collisions between gyrokinetic Maxwellian particles. First, the equilibrium operator describes energy exchange between different plasma species...... operator, even for like-particle collisions....

  17. Linear programming

    CERN Document Server

    Solow, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This text covers the basic theory and computation for a first course in linear programming, including substantial material on mathematical proof techniques and sophisticated computation methods. Includes Appendix on using Excel. 1984 edition.

  18. Linear algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Liesen, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    This self-contained textbook takes a matrix-oriented approach to linear algebra and presents a complete theory, including all details and proofs, culminating in the Jordan canonical form and its proof. Throughout the development, the applicability of the results is highlighted. Additionally, the book presents special topics from applied linear algebra including matrix functions, the singular value decomposition, the Kronecker product and linear matrix equations. The matrix-oriented approach to linear algebra leads to a better intuition and a deeper understanding of the abstract concepts, and therefore simplifies their use in real world applications. Some of these applications are presented in detailed examples. In several ‘MATLAB-Minutes’ students can comprehend the concepts and results using computational experiments. Necessary basics for the use of MATLAB are presented in a short introduction. Students can also actively work with the material and practice their mathematical skills in more than 300 exerc...

  19. Linear algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Berberian, Sterling K

    2014-01-01

    Introductory treatment covers basic theory of vector spaces and linear maps - dimension, determinants, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors - plus more advanced topics such as the study of canonical forms for matrices. 1992 edition.

  20. Linear Models

    CERN Document Server

    Searle, Shayle R

    2012-01-01

    This 1971 classic on linear models is once again available--as a Wiley Classics Library Edition. It features material that can be understood by any statistician who understands matrix algebra and basic statistical methods.

  1. Nonlinear correlations in phase-space resolved fluctuations at drift wave frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiff, F [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Uzun, I [Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Diallo, A [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasams EPF, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-12-15

    In an effort to better understand plasma transport, we measure fluctuations associated with drift instabilities resolved in the ion phase-space. Primary attention is given to fluctuations near the electron drift frequency where there are two general components to the observed fluctuations. From two (spatial) point measurements of the ion distribution function with a variable separation along the magnetic field, a number of statistical measures of the fluctuations are calculated including cross-correlation and cross-bicoherence. Both fluid ({omega}/k >> v{sub ti}) and kinetic ({omega}/k {approx} v{sub ti}) components are observed in the fluctuations. The nonlinear interactions are found to depend strongly on the ion particle velocity.

  2. Ocean modelling aspects for drift applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephane, L.; Pierre, D.

    2010-12-01

    Nowadays, many authorities in charge of rescue-at-sea operations lean on operational oceanography products to outline research perimeters. Moreover, current fields estimated with sophisticated ocean forecasting systems can be used as input data for oil spill/ adrift object fate models. This emphasises the necessity of an accurate sea state forecast, with a mastered level of reliability. This work focuses on several problems inherent to drift modeling, dealing in the first place with the efficiency of the oceanic current field representation. As we want to discriminate the relevance of a particular physical process or modeling option, the idea is to generate series of current fields of different characteristics and then qualify them in term of drift prediction efficiency. Benchmarked drift scenarios were set up from real surface drifters data, collected in the Mediterranean sea and off the coasts of Angola. The time and space scales that we are interested in are about 72 hr forecasts (typical timescale communicated in case of crisis), for distance errors that we hope about a few dozen of km around the forecast (acceptable for reconnaissance by aircrafts) For the ocean prediction, we used some regional oceanic configurations based on the NEMO 2.3 code, nested into Mercator 1/12° operational system. Drift forecasts were computed offline with Mothy (Météo France oil spill modeling system) and Ariane (B. Blanke, 1997), a Lagrangian diagnostic tool. We were particularly interested in the importance of the horizontal resolution, vertical mixing schemes, and any processes that may impact the surface layer. The aim of the study is to ultimately point at the most suitable set of parameters for drift forecast use inside operational oceanic systems. We are also motivated in assessing the relevancy of ensemble forecasts regarding determinist predictions. Several tests showed that mis-described observed trajectories can finally be modelled statistically by using uncertainties

  3. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.H.Tang

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. REV 01 ICN 01 of this analysis is developed in accordance with AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models, Revision 2, ICN 4, and prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M and O 2001a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M and O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M and O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document, which is included in the Requirements and Criteria for Implementing a Repository Design that can be Operated Over a Range of Thermal Modes (BSC 2001), input information, and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and granular natural material. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period. (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment. (4

  4. Parametric decay of lower hybrid wave into drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanuki, Heiji.

    1976-12-01

    A dispersion relation describing the parametric decay of a lower hybrid wave into an electrostatic drift wave and a drift Alfven wave is derived for an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma. Particularly the stimulated scattering of a drift Alfven wave in such a plasma was investigated in detail. The resonance backscattering instability is found to yield the minimum threshold. (auth.)

  5. Image compression for the silicon drift detectors in the ALICE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werbrouck, A.; Tosello, F.; Rivetti, A.; Mazza, G.; De Remigis, P.; Cavagnino, D.; Alberici, G.

    2001-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the zero suppression and data compression for the Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD) in the ALICE experiment. The algorithm operates on 10-bit linear data streams from the SDDs by applying a 10 bit to 8-bit non-linear compression followed by a data reduction based on a two-threshold discrimination and a two-dimensional analysis along both the drift time and the anodes. The proposed scheme allows for a better understanding of the neighborhoods of the SDD signal clusters, thus improving their reconstructability, and also provides a statistical monitoring of the background characteristics for each SDD anode. The entire algorithm is purely combinatorial and thus can be executed in pipeline, without additional clock cycles, during the SDD readout. The hardware coding together with the methods for the expansion to the original 10-bit values in the offline analysis and for the background monitoring are presented

  6. Linear Water Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, N.; Maz'ya, V.; Vainberg, B.

    2002-08-01

    This book gives a self-contained and up-to-date account of mathematical results in the linear theory of water waves. The study of waves has many applications, including the prediction of behavior of floating bodies (ships, submarines, tension-leg platforms etc.), the calculation of wave-making resistance in naval architecture, and the description of wave patterns over bottom topography in geophysical hydrodynamics. The first section deals with time-harmonic waves. Three linear boundary value problems serve as the approximate mathematical models for these types of water waves. The next section uses a plethora of mathematical techniques in the investigation of these three problems. The techniques used in the book include integral equations based on Green's functions, various inequalities between the kinetic and potential energy and integral identities which are indispensable for proving the uniqueness theorems. The so-called inverse procedure is applied to constructing examples of non-uniqueness, usually referred to as 'trapped nodes.'

  7. A Comprehensive Enzyme Kinetic Exercise for Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Janice S.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a comprehensive treatment of experimental enzyme kinetics strongly coupled to electronic data acquisition and use of spreadsheets to organize data and perform linear and nonlinear least-squares analyses, all in a manner that promotes development of important reasoning skills. Kinetic parameters are obtained for the stable…

  8. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lācis, U.; Brosse, N.; Ingremeau, F.; Mazzino, A.; Lundell, F.; Kellay, H.; Bagheri, S.

    2014-10-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs and fins to aid locomotion. Many of these appendages are not actively controlled, instead they have to interact passively with the surrounding fluid to generate motion. Here, we use theory, experiments and numerical simulations to show that an object with a protrusion in a separated flow drifts sideways by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in a fluid flow is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming flow direction. It is plausible that organisms with appendages in a separated flow use this newly discovered mechanism for locomotion; examples include the drift of plumed seeds without wind and the passive reorientation of motile animals.

  9. Hole drift mobility in poly(hexylphenylsilane)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunimi, Y.; Seki, S.; Tagawa, S.

    2000-01-01

    Poly(n-alkylphenylsilane)s in which n-alkyl were changed from methyl to octyl were polymerized. Hole transport properties of poly(alkyllphenylsilane)s were systematically studied by the DC time-of-flight (TOF) technique. While the hole drift mobility of poly(methylphenylsilane) increased monotonously in entire field, those of poly(hexylphenylsilane) and poly(octylphenylsilane) decreased with increase in the field strength. Temperature dependence of hole drift mobility in those polymers was small. On the basis of Baessler's disorder formalism the mobility was analyzed quantitatively to disserve complex contributions of charge transport. The analyzed results indicated that with increase in the length of n-alkyl side-groups, the energetic disorder of hopping sites became smaller and the disorder of distance between hopping sites became larger. These results were supported by the results obtained by UV absorption measurement and positron annihilation life-time spectroscopy measurement. (author)

  10. Clean industrial room for drift tube assembling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glonti, G.L.; Gongadze, A.L.; Evtukhovich, P.G.

    2001-01-01

    Description of a clean industrial room for assembly of drift tubes for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment is presented. High quality specifications on the detectors to be produced demanded creation of a workplace with stable temperature and humidity, as well as minimum quantity of dust in the room. Checking of parameters of intra-room air during long period of continuous work has confirmed correctness of the designed characteristics of the climatic system installed in the clean room. The room large volume (∼ 190 m 3 ), the powerful and flexible climatic system, and simplicity of service allow assembling of detectors with length up to 5 m. Subsequent checking of functionality of the assembled detectors has shown high quality of assembling (the amount of rejected tubes does not exceed 2%). It demonstrates conformity to the assembling quality requirements for mass production of drift chambers for the muon spectrometer. (author)

  11. Clean Industrial Room for Drift Tube Assembling

    CERN Document Server

    Glonti, GL; Evtoukhovitch, P G; Kroa, G; Manz, A; Potrap, I N; Rihter, P; Stoletov, G D; Tskhadadze, E G; Chepurnov, V F; Chirkov, A V; Shelkov, G A

    2001-01-01

    Description of a clean industrial room for assembly of drift tubes for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment is presented. High quality specifications on the detectors to be produced demanded creation of a workplace with stable temperature and humidity, as well as minimum quantity of dust in the room. Checking of parameters of intra-room air during long period of continuous work has been confirmed correctness of the designed characteristics of the climatic system installed in the clean room. The room large volum (\\sim 190 m^3), the powerful and flexible climatic system, and simplicity of service allow assembling of detectors with length up to 5 m. Subsequent checking of functionality of the assembled detectors has shown high quality of assembling (the amount of rejected tubes does not exceed 2 %). It demonstrates conformity to the assembling quality requirements for mass production of drift chambers for the muon spectrometer.

  12. Bottle appeal drifts across the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbesmeyer, Curtis; Ingraham, W. James, Jr.; McKinnon, Richard; Okubo, Akira; Wang, Dong-Ping; Strickland, Richard; Willing, Peter

    Pacific drift currents were used by a group of oceanographers to estimate the path of a drift bottle that was found on a beach of Barkley Sound in Vancouver Island by Richard Strickland on June 10, 1990. The Chinese rice wine bottle, which remained unopened until December 18, 1991, contained six leaflets, one appealing for the release of China's well-known dissident, Wei Jingsheng. The bottle was one of thousands set adrift as part of a propaganda effort from the islands of Quemoy and Matsu off mainland China shortly after Wei was sentenced in 1979 to 15 years in prison (see Figure 1 for locations). Wei was in poor health and still in prison when the bottle made its way across the Pacific Ocean.

  13. The drift-flux correlation package MDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeld, A.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the SONNENBURG drift-flux correlation, developed at GRS/Garching (Germany), a comprehensive drift-flux correlation package (MDS) has been established. Its aim is to support thermal-hydraulic mixture-fluid models, models being used for the simulation of the steady state and transient behaviour of characteristic thermal-hydraulic parameters of single- or two-phase fluids flowing along coolant channels of different types (being, e.g., parts of NPP-s, steam generators etc.). The characteristic properties of this package with respect to the behaviour at co- and counter-current flow, its inverse solutions needed for steady state simulations, its behaviour when approaching the lower or upper boundary of a two-phase region, its verification and behaviour with respect to other correlations will be discussed. An adequate driver code, MDSDRI, has been established too, allowing to test the package very thoroughly out of the complex thermal-hydraulic codes. (author)

  14. Ionospheric drift measurements: Skymap points selection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kouba, Daniel; Boška, Josef; Galkin, I. A.; Santolík, Ondřej; Šauli, Petra

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 1 (2008), RS1S90/1-RS1S90/11 ISSN 0048-6604 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/06/1619; GA ČR GA205/06/1267; GA AV ČR IAA300420504 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) OC 296; MIERS(XE) COST 296 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : digisonde drift measurement * plasma drift * radio sounding * ionosphere * Doppler shift * skymap processing Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.092, year: 2008 http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2008/2007RS003633.shtml

  15. Pulsar magnetic alignment. The drifting subpulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    According to Ruderman and Sutherland (Ap.J.;196:51 (1975)) the subpulse drift observed in certain pulsars is a consequence of the circulation around the magnetic axis of electron-positron discharges occurring within an acceleration region near the polar cap. The predicted period of circulation P 3 is of the correct order of magnitude, but the sense of circulation and therefore the direction of subpulse drift is not consistent with indirect evidence, from observed integrated pulse widths, on the variation with pulsar age of the angle between the spin and magnetic axes. It is shown that this problem is resolved by a model of the acceleration electric field based on space charge limited ion flow. (author)

  16. The drift-flux correlation package MDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeld, A. [Bernaysstr. 16A, Munich, F.R. (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Based on the SONNENBURG drift-flux correlation, developed at GRS/Garching (Germany), a comprehensive drift-flux correlation package (MDS) has been established. Its aim is to support thermal-hydraulic mixture-fluid models, models being used for the simulation of the steady state and transient behaviour of characteristic thermal-hydraulic parameters of single- or two-phase fluids flowing along coolant channels of different types (being, e.g., parts of NPP-s, steam generators etc.). The characteristic properties of this package with respect to the behaviour at co- and counter-current flow, its inverse solutions needed for steady state simulations, its behaviour when approaching the lower or upper boundary of a two-phase region, its verification and behaviour with respect to other correlations will be discussed. An adequate driver code, MDSDRI, has been established too, allowing to test the package very thoroughly out of the complex thermal-hydraulic codes. (author)

  17. Nonlinear drift tearing mode. Strong mode of excitation and stabilization mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeev, A.A.; Zelenyj, L.M.; Kuznetsova, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    A nonlinear theory of magnetic disturbance development in collisionless configurations with magnetic field shear is considered. The instability evolution is investigated with account for the dynamics of ions and potential electric fields which determine the mode stabilization. It has been found that the drift tearing mode possesses metastable properties: in a nonlinear mode even the growth of linearly stable disturbances of the finite amplitude is possible

  18. Cylindrical geometry for proportional and drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoulet, B.

    1975-06-01

    For experiments performed around storage rings such as e + e - rings or the ISR pp rings, cylindrical wire chambers are very attractive. They surround the beam pipe completely without any dead region in the azimuth, and fit well with the geometry of events where particles are more or less spherically produced. Unfortunately, cylindrical proportional or drift chambers are difficult to make. Problems are discussed and two approaches to fabricating the cathodes are discussed. (WHK)

  19. Spin-drift transport in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M Idrish [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh)

    2008-02-07

    We present a study on spin transport in semiconductors under applied electric fields. Our experiments detect photoinjected electron spins and their relaxation during drift transport in intrinsic and moderately n-doped GaAs, based on the extraordinary Hall (eH) effect. For relatively low electric field (E), the optically spin-induced eH effect in n-doped GaAs is found to be enhanced with increasing doping density and not to depend much on E, indicating that a substantial amount of optical spin polarization is preserved during the drift transport in these extrinsic semiconductors. However, when the spin-oriented electrons are injected with a high E, a very significant decrease is observed in the eH voltage (V{sub eH}) due to an increase in the spin precession frequency of the hot electrons. Spin relaxation by the D'yakonov-Perel' mechanism is calculated, and is suggested to be the reason for such a rapid spin relaxation for hot electrons under a high E. However, in an intrinsic GaAs (i-GaAs), a much weaker V{sub eH} is observed and, as the electron spins scattered by holes due to the Coulomb interaction in i-GaAs, the spin relaxation by the Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanism is considered. Skew scattering and side jump as possible mechanisms of the optically spin-induced transverse Hall currents are discussed. Based on a spin drift-diffusion model, drift and diffusion contributions to the V{sub eH} are examined. The results are also discussed in comparison with theoretical investigations.

  20. Unstable universal drift eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chen, L.

    1979-08-01

    The eigenmode equation describing ballooning collisionless drift instabilities is analyzed both analytically and numerically. A new branch of eigenmodes, which corresponds to quasi-bound states due to the finite toroidicity, is shown to be destabilized by electron Landau damping for typical Tokamak parameters. This branch cannot be understood by the strong coupling approximation. However, the slab-like (Pearlstein-Berk type) branch is found to remain stable and experience enhanced shear damping due to finite toroidicity

  1. Snow Drift Management: Summit Station Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    management Snow surveys Transport analysis Winds -- Speed 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...that about 25% of the estimated snow that the wind transports to Summit each winter is deposited and forms drifts, mostly in close proxim- ity to...the structures. This analysis demonstrates that weather data ( wind speed and direction) and a transport analysis can aid in estimating the vol- ume of

  2. The Absence of Stokes Drift in Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Chafin, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    Stokes drift has been as central to the history of wave theory as it has been distressingly absent from experiment. Neither wave tanks nor experiments in open bodies detect this without nearly canceling "eulerian flows." Acoustic waves have an analogous problem that is particularly problematic in the vorticity production at the edges of beams. Here we demonstrate that the explanation for this arises from subtle end-of-packet and wavetrain gradient effects such as microbreaking events and wave...

  3. Continued Drift, but without the Acrimony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian L.

    2013-01-01

    If the measure of Barack Obama's success in mending US–European relations is whether the tone has improved, his presidency has been a great success. If the measure of success, however, is halting the drifting apart of policy preferences, the picture looks a lot less rosy. This article argues....... The Obama administration realises that, and by this more limited measure, it has succeeded brilliantly....

  4. Cathode readout with stripped resistive drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Novikov, E.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Shafranov, M.D.; Zhiltsov, V.E.

    1995-01-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with a carbon layer with a resistivity of 0.5, 30 and 70 kΩ/□. Both the anode wire and the cathode strip signals were detected to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented. (orig.)

  5. Cathode readout with stripped resistive drift tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, V. N.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Novikov, E. A.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Shafranov, M. D.; Zhiltsov, V. E.

    1995-12-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with a carbon layer with a resistivity of 0.5, 30 and 70 kΩ/□. Both the anode wire and the cathode strip signals were detected to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented.

  6. Drift bifurcation detection for dissipative solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liehr, A W; Boedeker, H U; Roettger, M C; Frank, T D; Friedrich, R; Purwins, H-G

    2003-01-01

    We report on the experimental detection of a drift bifurcation for dissipative solitons, which we observe in the form of current filaments in a planar semiconductor-gas-discharge system. By introducing a new stochastic data analysis technique we find that due to a change of system parameters the dissipative solitons undergo a transition from purely noise-driven objects with Brownian motion to particles with a dynamically stabilized finite velocity

  7. Transient chaotic transport in dissipative drift motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyarzabal, R.S. [Pós-Graduação em Ciências/Física, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Szezech, J.D. [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Batista, A.M., E-mail: antoniomarcosbatista@gmail.com [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Souza, S.L.T. de [Departamento de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de São João del Rei, 36420-000, Ouro Branco, MG (Brazil); Caldas, I.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05315-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Viana, R.L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sanjuán, M.A.F. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipán s/n, 28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-22

    Highlights: • We consider a situation for which a chaotic transient is present in the dynamics of the two-wave model with damping. • The damping in plasma models can be a way for study a realistic behavior of confinement due the collisional effect. • The escape time as a function of the damping obey a power-law scaling. • We have made a qualitative transport analysis with a simple model that can be useful for more complete models. • We have shown that the pattern of the basin of attraction depends on the damping parameter. - Abstract: We investigate chaotic particle transport in magnetised plasmas with two electrostatic drift waves. Considering dissipation in the drift motion, we verify that the removed KAM surfaces originate periodic attractors with their corresponding basins of attraction. We show that the properties of the basins depend on the dissipation and the space-averaged escape time decays exponentially when the dissipation increases. We find positive finite time Lyapunov exponents in dissipative drift motion, consequently the trajectories exhibit transient chaotic transport. These features indicate how the transient plasma transport depends on the dissipation.

  8. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M and O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used

  9. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  10. Internal Clock Drift Estimation in Computer Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Marouani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most computers have several high-resolution timing sources, from the programmable interrupt timer to the cycle counter. Yet, even at a precision of one cycle in ten millions, clocks may drift significantly in a single second at a clock frequency of several GHz. When tracing the low-level system events in computer clusters, such as packet sending or reception, each computer system records its own events using an internal clock. In order to properly understand the global system behavior and performance, as reported by the events recorded on each computer, it is important to estimate precisely the clock differences and drift between the different computers in the system. This article studies the clock precision and stability of several computer systems, with different architectures. It also studies the typical network delay characteristics, since time synchronization algorithms rely on the exchange of network packets and are dependent on the symmetry of the delays. A very precise clock, based on the atomic time provided by the GPS satellite network, was used as a reference to measure clock drifts and network delays. The results obtained are of immediate use to all applications which depend on computer clocks or network time synchronization accuracy.

  11. Ultrasonic Linear Motor with Two Independent Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneishi, Takeshi; Tomikawa, Yoshiro

    2004-09-01

    We propose a new structure of an ultrasonic linear motor in order to solve the problems of high-power ultrasonic linear motors that drive the XY-stage for electron beam equipment and to expand the application fields of the motor. We pay special attention to the following three points: (1) the vibration in two directions of the ultrasonic linear motor should not influence mutually each other, (2) the vibration in two directions should be divided into the stage traveling direction and the pressing direction of the ultrasonic linear motor, and (3) the rigidity of the stage traveling direction of the ultrasonic linear motor should be increased. As a result, the supporting method of ultrasonic linear motors is simplified. The efficiency of the motor is improved and temperature rise is reduced. The stage position drift is also improved.

  12. Simplified Drift Analysis for Proving Lower Bounds in Evolutionary Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveto, Pietro S.; Witt, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Drift analysis is a powerful tool used to bound the optimization time of evolutionary algorithms (EAs). Various previous works apply a drift theorem going back to Hajek in order to show exponential lower bounds on the optimization time of EAs. However, this drift theorem is tedious to read...... and to apply since it requires two bounds on the moment-generating (exponential) function of the drift. A recent work identifies a specialization of this drift theorem that is much easier to apply. Nevertheless, it is not as simple and not as general as possible. The present paper picks up Hajek’s line...

  13. Linear regression

    CERN Document Server

    Olive, David J

    2017-01-01

    This text covers both multiple linear regression and some experimental design models. The text uses the response plot to visualize the model and to detect outliers, does not assume that the error distribution has a known parametric distribution, develops prediction intervals that work when the error distribution is unknown, suggests bootstrap hypothesis tests that may be useful for inference after variable selection, and develops prediction regions and large sample theory for the multivariate linear regression model that has m response variables. A relationship between multivariate prediction regions and confidence regions provides a simple way to bootstrap confidence regions. These confidence regions often provide a practical method for testing hypotheses. There is also a chapter on generalized linear models and generalized additive models. There are many R functions to produce response and residual plots, to simulate prediction intervals and hypothesis tests, to detect outliers, and to choose response trans...

  14. Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, J.

    2001-01-01

    After several years of study e''+ e''- linear colliders in the TeV range have emerged as the major and optimal high-energy physics projects for the post-LHC era. These notes summarize the present status form the main accelerator and detector features to their physics potential. The LHC era. These notes summarize the present status, from the main accelerator and detector features to their physics potential. The LHC is expected to provide first discoveries in the new energy domain, whereas an e''+ e''- linear collider in the 500 GeV-1 TeV will be able to complement it to an unprecedented level of precision in any possible areas: Higgs, signals beyond the SM and electroweak measurements. It is evident that the Linear Collider program will constitute a major step in the understanding of the nature of the new physics beyond the Standard Model. (Author) 22 refs

  15. Linear algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Edwards, Harold M

    1995-01-01

    In his new undergraduate textbook, Harold M Edwards proposes a radically new and thoroughly algorithmic approach to linear algebra Originally inspired by the constructive philosophy of mathematics championed in the 19th century by Leopold Kronecker, the approach is well suited to students in the computer-dominated late 20th century Each proof is an algorithm described in English that can be translated into the computer language the class is using and put to work solving problems and generating new examples, making the study of linear algebra a truly interactive experience Designed for a one-semester course, this text adopts an algorithmic approach to linear algebra giving the student many examples to work through and copious exercises to test their skills and extend their knowledge of the subject Students at all levels will find much interactive instruction in this text while teachers will find stimulating examples and methods of approach to the subject

  16. Linear theory of the tearing instability in axisymmetric toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A.; Singh, R.

    1988-08-01

    We derive a very general kinetic equation describing the linear evolution of low m/l modes in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas with arbitrary cross sections. Included are: Ion sound, inertia, diamagnetic drifts, finite poloidal beta, and finite ion Larmor radius effects. Assuming the magnetic surfaces to form a set of nested tori with circular cross sections of shifted centers, and introducing adequate simplifications justified by our knowledge of experimental tokamak plasmas, we then obtain explicitely the sets of equations describing the coupling of the quasimodes 0/1, 1/1, 2/1, and, for m≥2, m/1, (m+1)/1. By keeping finite aspect ratio effects into account when calculating the jump of the derivative of the eigenfunction, it is shown that the theory can explain the rapid evolution, within one sawtooth period, of the growth rate of the sawteeth precursors from resistive values to magnetohydrodynamic ones. The characteristics thus theoretically required from current profiles in sawtoothing discharges have clearly been observed. Other aspects of the full theory could be relevant to the phenomenon of major disruptions. (orig.)

  17. Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, N.D.; Sassani, D.

    2000-01-01

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) describes an abstraction, for the performance assessment total system model, of the near-field host rock water chemistry and gas-phase composition. It also provides an abstracted process model analysis of potentially important differences in the thermal hydrologic (TH) variables used to describe the performance of a geologic repository obtained from models that include fully coupled reactive transport with thermal hydrology and those that include thermal hydrology alone. Specifically, the motivation of the process-level model comparison between fully coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) and thermal-hydrologic-only (TH-only) is to provide the necessary justification as to why the in-drift thermodynamic environment and the near-field host rock percolation flux, the essential TH variables used to describe the performance of a geologic repository, can be obtained using a TH-only model and applied directly into a TSPA abstraction without recourse to a fully coupled reactive transport model. Abstraction as used in the context of this AMR refers to an extraction of essential data or information from the process-level model. The abstraction analysis reproduces and bounds the results of the underlying detailed process-level model. The primary purpose of this AMR is to abstract the results of the fully-coupled, THC model (CRWMS M andO 2000a) for effects on water and gas-phase composition adjacent to the drift wall (in the near-field host rock). It is assumed that drift wall fracture water and gas compositions may enter the emplacement drift before, during, and after the heating period. The heating period includes both the preclosure, in which the repository drifts are ventilated, and the postclosure periods, with backfill and drip shield emplacement at the time of repository closure. Although the preclosure period (50 years) is included in the process models, the postclosure performance assessment starts at the end of this initial period

  18. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Sun

    2000-01-01

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k 0 =0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the

  19. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariner, P.

    2001-01-01

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M and O 1999a), an analysis of the effects of salts and precipitates on the repository chemical environment is to be developed and documented in an Analyses/Model Report (AMR). The purpose of this analysis is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and the Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). The purpose of this ICN is to qualify and document qualification of the AMR's technical products. The scope of this document is to develop a model of the processes that govern salt precipitation and dissolution and resulting water composition in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS). This model is developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical modeling work performed by PAO and is to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. However, the concepts may also apply to some near and far field geochemical processes and can have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone and saturated zone transport modeling efforts. The intended use of the model developed in this report is to estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the pH, chloride concentration, and ionic strength of water on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the post-closure period. These estimates are based on evaporative processes that are subject to a broad range of potential environmental conditions and are independent of the presence or absence of backfill. An additional intended use is to estimate the environmental conditions required for complete vaporization of water. The presence and composition of liquid water

  20. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Mariner

    2001-01-10

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), an analysis of the effects of salts and precipitates on the repository chemical environment is to be developed and documented in an Analyses/Model Report (AMR). The purpose of this analysis is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and the Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). The purpose of this ICN is to qualify and document qualification of the AMR's technical products. The scope of this document is to develop a model of the processes that govern salt precipitation and dissolution and resulting water composition in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS). This model is developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical modeling work performed by PAO and is to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. However, the concepts may also apply to some near and far field geochemical processes and can have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone and saturated zone transport modeling efforts. The intended use of the model developed in this report is to estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the pH, chloride concentration, and ionic strength of water on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the post-closure period. These estimates are based on evaporative processes that are subject to a broad range of potential environmental conditions and are independent of the presence or absence of backfill. An additional intended use is to estimate the environmental conditions required for complete vaporization of water. The presence and composition of liquid water

  1. Physisorption kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    1986-01-01

    This monograph deals with the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of molecules physisorbed on solid surfaces. Although frequent and detailed reference is made to experiment, it is mainly concerned with the theory of the subject. In this, we have attempted to present a unified picture based on the master equation approach. Physisorption kinetics is by no means a closed and mature subject; rather, in writing this monograph we intended to survey a field very much in flux, to assess its achievements so far, and to give a reasonable basis from which further developments can take off. For this reason we have included many papers in the bibliography that are not referred to in the text but are of relevance to physisorption. To keep this monograph to a reasonable size, and also to allow for some unity in the presentation of the material, we had to omit a number of topics related to physisorption kinetics. We have not covered to any extent the equilibrium properties of physisorbed layers such as structures, phase tr...

  2. A novel silicon drift detector with two dimensional drift time measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hijzen, E.A.; Schooneveld, E.M.; Van Eijk, C.W.E.; Hollander, R.W.; Sarro, P.M.; Van den Bogaard, A.

    1994-01-01

    Until now silicon drift detectors with two dimensional position resolution made use of drift time measurement in one dimension only. The resolution in the other dimension was obtained by dividing the collecting anode into small pixels. In this paper we present a new type of drift detector that uses drift time measurements for both dimensions. The design consists of concentric quadrilateral closed strips with a small collecting anode in the centre. At first electrons will travel perpendicular to the strips until they reach a diagonal. Then they will proceed along this diagonal until they are collected at the centre. Position resolution in two dimensions can be obtained when both the time the electrons need to reach the diagonal and the time they need to reach the centre are measured. The latter is obtained from the collecting anode, the former from a diagonal strip present at the back side of the detector. Compared to common 2D drift detectors this detector offers the advantage of a small amount of readout electronics. It also has the advantage of having just one small collecting anode with a very low capacitance, resulting in low noise and therefore in a good energy resolution. ((orig.))

  3. Temporal impulse and step responses of the human eye obtained psychophysically by means of a drift-correcting perturbation technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roufs, J.A.J.; Blommaert, F.J.J.

    1981-01-01

    Internal impulse and step responses are derived from the thresholds of short probe flashes by means of a drift-correcting perturbation technique. The approach is based on only two postulated systems properties: quasi-linearity and peak detection. A special feature of the technique is its strong

  4. Mechanistic Drifting Forecast Model for A Small Semi-Submersible Drifter Under Tide-Wind-Wave Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Na; Huang, Hui-ming; Wang, Yi-gang; Chen, Da-ke; Zhang, lin

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the drifting motion of a small semi-submersible drifter is of vital importance regarding monitoring surface currents and the floating pollutants in coastal regions. This work addresses this issue by establishing a mechanistic drifting forecast model based on kinetic analysis. Taking tide-wind-wave into consideration, the forecast model is validated against in situ drifting experiment in the Radial Sand Ridges. Model results show good performance with respect to the measured drifting features, characterized by migrating back and forth twice a day with daily downwind displacements. Trajectory models are used to evaluate the influence of the individual hydrodynamic forcing. The tidal current is the fundamental dynamic condition in the Radial Sand Ridges and has the greatest impact on the drifting distance. However, it loses its leading position in the field of the daily displacement of the used drifter. The simulations reveal that different hydrodynamic forces dominate the daily displacement of the used drifter at different wind scales. The wave-induced mass transport has the greatest influence on the daily displacement at Beaufort wind scale 5-6; while wind drag contributes mostly at wind scale 2-4.

  5. Intrafractional baseline drift during free breathing breast cancer radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Christer Andre; Acosta Roa, Ana María; Lund, Jo-Åsmund; Frengen, Jomar

    2017-06-01

    Intrafraction motion in breast cancer radiation therapy (BCRT) has not yet been thoroughly described in the literature. It has been observed that baseline drift occurs as part of the intrafraction motion. This study aims to measure baseline drift and its incidence in free-breathing BCRT patients using an in-house developed laser system for tracking the position of the sternum. Baseline drift was monitored in 20 right-sided breast cancer patients receiving free breathing 3D-conformal RT by using an in-house developed laser system which measures one-dimensional distance in the AP direction. A total of 357 patient respiratory traces from treatment sessions were logged and analysed. Baseline drift was compared to patient positioning error measured from in-field portal imaging. The mean overall baseline drift at end of treatment sessions was -1.3 mm for the patient population. Relatively small baseline drift was observed during the first fraction; however it was clearly detected already at the second fraction. Over 90% of the baseline drift occurs during the first 3 min of each treatment session. The baseline drift rate for the population was -0.5 ± 0.2 mm/min in the posterior direction the first minute after localization. Only 4% of the treatment sessions had a 5 mm or larger baseline drift at 5 min, all towards the posterior direction. Mean baseline drift in the posterior direction in free breathing BCRT was observed in 18 of 20 patients over all treatment sessions. This study shows that there is a substantial baseline drift in free breathing BCRT patients. No clear baseline drift was observed during the first treatment session; however, baseline drift was markedly present at the rest of the sessions. Intrafraction motion due to baseline drift should be accounted for in margin calculations.

  6. Generation of zonal magnetic fields by drift waves in a current carrying nonuniform magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Nitin; Shukla, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that zonal magnetic fields (ZMFs) can be nonlinearly excited by incoherent drift waves (DWs) in a current carrying nonuniform magnetoplasma. The dynamics of incoherent DWs in the presence of ZMFs is governed by a wave-kinetic equation. The governing equation for ZMFs in the presence of nonlinear advection force of the DWs is obtained from the parallel component of the electron momentum equation and the Faraday law. Standard techniques are used to derive a nonlinear dispersion relation, which depicts instability via which ZMFs are excited in plasmas. ZMFs may inhibit the turbulent cross-field particle and energy transport in a nonuniform magnetoplasma.

  7. Drift wave stabilized by an additional streaming ion or plasma population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, M. F.; Vranjes, J.

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that the universally unstable kinetic drift wave in an electron-ion plasma can very effectively be suppressed by adding an extra flowing ion (or plasma) population. The effect of the flow of the added ions is essential, their response is of the type (vp h-vf 0) exp[-(vph-vf 0) 2] , where vf 0 is the flow speed and vp h is the phase speed parallel to the magnetic field vector. The damping is strong and it is mainly due to this ion exponential term, and this remains so for vf 0

  8. Calibration model maintenance in melamine resin production: Integrating drift detection, smart sample selection and model adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad-Langerodi, Ramin; Lughofer, Edwin; Cernuda, Carlos; Reischer, Thomas; Kantner, Wolfgang; Pawliczek, Marcin; Brandstetter, Markus

    2018-07-12

    The physico-chemical properties of Melamine Formaldehyde (MF) based thermosets are largely influenced by the degree of polymerization (DP) in the underlying resin. On-line supervision of the turbidity point by means of vibrational spectroscopy has recently emerged as a promising technique to monitor the DP of MF resins. However, spectroscopic determination of the DP relies on chemometric models, which are usually sensitive to drifts caused by instrumental and/or sample-associated changes occurring over time. In order to detect the time point when drifts start causing prediction bias, we here explore a universal drift detector based on a faded version of the Page-Hinkley (PH) statistic, which we test in three data streams from an industrial MF resin production process. We employ committee disagreement (CD), computed as the variance of model predictions from an ensemble of partial least squares (PLS) models, as a measure for sample-wise prediction uncertainty and use the PH statistic to detect changes in this quantity. We further explore supervised and unsupervised strategies for (semi-)automatic model adaptation upon detection of a drift. For the former, manual reference measurements are requested whenever statistical thresholds on Hotelling's T 2 and/or Q-Residuals are violated. Models are subsequently re-calibrated using weighted partial least squares in order to increase the influence of newer samples, which increases the flexibility when adapting to new (drifted) states. Unsupervised model adaptation is carried out exploiting the dual antecedent-consequent structure of a recently developed fuzzy systems variant of PLS termed FLEXFIS-PLS. In particular, antecedent parts are updated while maintaining the internal structure of the local linear predictors (i.e. the consequents). We found improved drift detection capability of the CD compared to Hotelling's T 2 and Q-Residuals when used in combination with the proposed PH test. Furthermore, we found that active

  9. Drift wave transport and origin of the disruption phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasselberg, G.; Rogister, A.

    1983-02-01

    Nonlinear ion Landau damping of drift waves yields a splitting of the spectrum into a long and a short wavelength branch. The latter contributes most (> 90%) of the transport and permits to explain the observed relaxation of Tokamak plasma profiles to a weakly unstable state, in the occurence with regard to the dissipative trapped electron mode. The fluxes indeed increase much more rapidly than the linear growth rates. This result and surprising coincidences between the linear theory and empirical laws concerning the high density limit lead us to propose that the slow rise of the sawtooth pulsations of the core occurs whilst the transport in the surrounding layer is insufficient to evacuate the power deposited. The sudden relaxation takes place once the released heat pulses are capable - much as in collisionless shock waves - of exciting the trapped electron mode to a sufficient level to ensure adequate transport. The model explains many experimental features associated with these sawteeth as well as with the related plasma disruptions: contraction of the current channel, high density limit (both the scaling and the order of magnitude are predicted), etc. ... (orig.)

  10. Stationary drift-Rossby vortices in shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horihata, Satoshi; Irie, Haruyuki; Sato, Masatomo

    1990-01-01

    Starting from Hasegawa-Mima equation with the generalized vorticity q which describes both electrostatic drift waves in plasmas and Rossby waves in the atmosphere of rotating planets, the stationary solutions of this equation in the (x, y) plane were considered assuming that the equilibrium density no depends on x and the electron temperature T 0 is constant. The arbitrary function F(φ) yielded from integration of transformed Hasegawa-Mima equation was taken either linear or nonlinear in φ, where φ is the stream function. When F is linear, vortex solutions were obtained by dividing the entire plane into internal and external regions by a closed boundary curve. Imposing the boundary conditions at the boundary curve, the constants in the solutions φ ex and φ in were determined. 4 examples are figured. When F is nonlinear, isolated (localized) vortex was considered. Deriving the equation to determine F, the equation for ψ, the internal vortical motion beyond the boundary was given. 2 examples are shown. (M.T.)

  11. Cascaded Kalman and particle filters for photogrammetry based gyroscope drift and robot attitude estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaghzadeh N, Nargess; Poshtan, Javad; Wagner, Achim; Nordheimer, Eugen; Badreddin, Essameddin

    2014-03-01

    Based on a cascaded Kalman-Particle Filtering, gyroscope drift and robot attitude estimation method is proposed in this paper. Due to noisy and erroneous measurements of MEMS gyroscope, it is combined with Photogrammetry based vision navigation scenario. Quaternions kinematics and robot angular velocity dynamics with augmented drift dynamics of gyroscope are employed as system state space model. Nonlinear attitude kinematics, drift and robot angular movement dynamics each in 3 dimensions result in a nonlinear high dimensional system. To reduce the complexity, we propose a decomposition of system to cascaded subsystems and then design separate cascaded observers. This design leads to an easier tuning and more precise debugging from the perspective of programming and such a setting is well suited for a cooperative modular system with noticeably reduced computation time. Kalman Filtering (KF) is employed for the linear and Gaussian subsystem consisting of angular velocity and drift dynamics together with gyroscope measurement. The estimated angular velocity is utilized as input of the second Particle Filtering (PF) based observer in two scenarios of stochastic and deterministic inputs. Simulation results are provided to show the efficiency of the proposed method. Moreover, the experimental results based on data from a 3D MEMS IMU and a 3D camera system are used to demonstrate the efficiency of the method. © 2013 ISA Published by ISA All rights reserved.

  12. An analytic study of the perpendicularly propagating electromagnetic drift instabilities in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yansong; Kulsrud, Russell; Ji, Hantao

    2008-01-01

    A local linear theory is proposed for a perpendicularly propagating drift instability driven by relative drifts between electrons and ions. The theory takes into account local cross-field current, pressure gradients, and modest collisions as in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment [M. Yamada et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 1936 (1997)]. The unstable waves have very small group velocities in the direction of the pressure gradient, but have a large phase velocity near the relative drift velocity between electrons and ions in the direction of the cross-field current. By taking into account the electron-ion collisions and applying the theory in the Harris sheet, we establish that this instability could be excited near the center of the Harris sheet and have enough e-foldings to grow to large amplitude before it propagates out of the unstable region. Comparing with the other magnetic reconnection related instabilities (lower-hybrid-drift instability, modified two-stream instability, etc.) studied previously, we believe the instability we found is a favorable candidate to produce anomalous resistivity because of its unique wave characteristics, such as electromagnetic component, large phase velocity, and small group velocity in the cross-current-layer direction.

  13. The launching and propagation of drift waves in a steady-state plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandeman, J.; Elliott, J.A.; Sutcliffe, M.; Rusbridge, M.G.

    1992-01-01

    The UMIST linear quadrupole GOLUX is a steady-state device in which hydrogen plasma is continuously injected axially, at one end, from an external duoplasmatron source. The electron temperature in the drift wave region is about 1 eV, and the density about 10 15 m -3 . Self-excited intrinsic drift modes are observed in the shared flux region of GOLUX, forming a broad band between 30 and 50 kHz. Drift waves may also be launched into the system, by passing an AC current through the plasma between the two flag antennae. These coherent launched waves present a powerful means of studying drift wave phenomena. We obtain information about the launched wave by detecting both density and potential fluctuations, using a small cylindrical Langmuir probe and lock-in amplifier techniques. Scanning the probe in the longitudinal (z) direction yields the spatial variation of amplitude and phase with respect to the launching signal; the ratio of the wave potential, extrapolated back to the probe, to the launching current gives the launching impedance, a measure of the effectiveness of the launching process. (author) 5 refs., 6 figs

  14. Drift waves and counter rotating vortices in pair-ion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, Q., E-mail: qamar_haque@hotmail.co [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2010-07-19

    Linear dispersion relation has been found for drift and acoustic waves in pair-ion-electron plasmas. The stationary solution in the form of counter rotating vortices has been obtained in the presence of equilibrium potential profile. It is noticed that the speed of nonlinear structures is reduced with the increase of electrons concentration in pair-ion plasmas. Linear instability condition has also been found in the presence of shear flow. It is pointed out that the present results can be useful for future pair-ion plasma experiments.

  15. Field experiment on spray drift: deposition and airborne drift during application to a winter wheat crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, André; Linnemann, Volker; van de Zande, Jan C; Vereecken, Harry

    2008-11-01

    A field experiment was performed to evaluate various techniques for measuring spray deposition and airborne drift during spray application to a winter wheat crop. The application of a spraying agent containing the fluorescent dye Brilliant Sulfo Flavine by a conventional boom sprayer was done according to good agricultural practice. Deposition was measured by horizontal collectors in various arrangements in and outside the treated area. Airborne spray drift was measured both with a passive and an active air collecting system. Spray deposits on top of the treated canopy ranged between 68 and 71% of the applied dose and showed only small differences for various arrangements of the collectors. Furthermore, only small variations were measured within the various groups of collectors used for these arrangements. Generally, the highest spray deposition outside the treated area was measured close to the sprayed plot and was accompanied by a high variability of values, while a rapid decline of deposits was detected in more remote areas. Estimations of spray deposits with the IMAG Drift Calculator were in accordance with experimental findings only for areas located at a distance of 0.5-4.5 m from the last nozzle, while there was an overestimation of a factor of 4 at a distance of 2.0-3.0 m, thus revealing a high level of uncertainty of the estimation of deposition for short distances. Airborne spray drift measured by passive and active air collecting systems was approximately at the same level, when taking into consideration the collector efficiency of the woven nylon wire used as sampling material for the passive collecting system. The maximum value of total airborne spray drift for both spray applications (0.79% of the applied dose) was determined by the active collecting system. However, the comparatively high variability of measurements at various heights above the soil by active and passive collecting systems revealed need for further studies to elucidate the spatial

  16. Linear and nonlinear stability analysis, associated to experimental fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, E.S. do; Moura Neto, C. de; Rosa, M.A.P.

    1980-07-01

    Phenomena associated to the physics of fast neutrons were analysed by linear and nonlinear Kinetics with arbitrary feedback. The theoretical foundations of linear kinetics and transfer functions aiming at the analysis of fast reactors stability, are established. These stability conditions were analitically proposed and investigated by digital and analogic programs. (E.G.) [pt

  17. Tantalum high-temperature oxidation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'ev, Yu.M.; Sarkisyan, A.A.; Merzhanov, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetics of heat release and scale growth during tantalum oxidation within 650-1300 deg C temperature range in oxygen-containing media is investigated. Kinetic equations and temperature and pressure dependences of constants are ound Applicability of the kinetic Lorie mechanism for the description of the tantalum oxidation kinetics applicably to rapid-passing processes is shown. It is stated that the process rate (reaction ability) is determined by adsorption desorption factors on the external surface of the ''protective'' oxide for the ''linear'' oxidation stage [ru

  18. Development of an equipment diagnostic system that evaluates sensor drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanada, Masaki; Arita, Setsuo; Tada, Nobuo; Yokota, Katsuo

    2011-01-01

    The importance of condition monitoring technology for equipment has increased with the introduction of condition-based maintenance in nuclear power plants. We are developing a diagnostic system using process signals for plant equipment, such as pumps and motors. It is important to enable the diagnostic system to distinguish sensor drift and equipment failure. We have developed a sensor drift diagnostic method that combines some highly correlative sensor signals by using the MT (Mahalanobis-Taguchi) method. Furthermore, we have developed an equipment failure diagnostic method that measures the Mahalanobis distance from the normal state of equipment by the MT method. These methods can respectively detect sensor drift and equipment failure, but there are the following problems. In the sensor drift diagnosis, there is a possibility of misjudging the sensor drift when the equipment failure occurs and the process signal changes because the behavior of the process signal is the same as that of the sensor drift. Oppositely, in the equipment failure diagnosis, there is a possibility of misjudging the equipment failure when the sensor drift occurs because the sensor drift influences the change of process signal. To solve these problems, we propose a diagnostic method combining the sensor drift diagnosis and the equipment failure diagnosis by the MT method. Firstly, the sensor drift values are estimated by the sensor drift diagnosis, and the sensor drift is removed from the process signal. It is necessary to judge the validity of the estimated sensor drift values before removing the sensor drift from the process signal. We developed a method for judging the validity of the estimated sensor drift values by using the drift distribution based on the sensor calibration data. And then, the equipment failure is diagnosed by using the process signals after removal of the sensor drifts. To verify the developed diagnostic system, several sets of simulation data based on abnormal cases

  19. Linear programming

    CERN Document Server

    Karloff, Howard

    1991-01-01

    To this reviewer’s knowledge, this is the first book accessible to the upper division undergraduate or beginning graduate student that surveys linear programming from the Simplex Method…via the Ellipsoid algorithm to Karmarkar’s algorithm. Moreover, its point of view is algorithmic and thus it provides both a history and a case history of work in complexity theory. The presentation is admirable; Karloff's style is informal (even humorous at times) without sacrificing anything necessary for understanding. Diagrams (including horizontal brackets that group terms) aid in providing clarity. The end-of-chapter notes are helpful...Recommended highly for acquisition, since it is not only a textbook, but can also be used for independent reading and study. —Choice Reviews The reader will be well served by reading the monograph from cover to cover. The author succeeds in providing a concise, readable, understandable introduction to modern linear programming. —Mathematics of Computing This is a textbook intend...

  20. Stochastic kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombino, A.; Mosiello, R.; Norelli, F.; Jorio, V.M.; Pacilio, N.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear system kinetics is formulated according to a stochastic approach. The detailed probability balance equations are written for the probability of finding the mixed population of neutrons and detected neutrons, i.e. detectrons, at a given level for a given instant of time. Equations are integrated in search of a probability profile: a series of cases is analyzed through a progressive criterium. It tends to take into account an increasing number of physical processes within the chosen model. The most important contribution is that solutions interpret analytically experimental conditions of equilibrium (moise analysis) and non equilibrium (pulsed neutron measurements, source drop technique, start up procedures)

  1. Suspended sediment drift and dispersion at Hibernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedford, T.; Drozdowski, A.; Hannah, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    Surface water waves and near-bottom currents around the Hibernia oil production platform on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland were examined to determine how the different seasons affect changes in wave magnitude and directions of water currents. Wave observations revealed a strong correlation with seasons, with the larger waves occurring in fall and early winter. There was no obvious seasonality in the size or direction of currents. The benthic boundary layer transport (BBLT) model was used to predict the drift and dispersion pathways of suspended drilling muds discharged from the Hibernia platform. The 2-year study from March 1998 to May 2000 involved 5-day BBLT model simulations covering the complete period of current meter deployment. The study focused on the sensitivity of the drift and dispersion to variability in the physical environment and uncertainty in the bottom stress calculation and particle settling velocity. The BBLT model incorporates a stress dependent particle settling velocity that includes the main features of the flocculations of drill mud fines under marine conditions. The study provides a better understanding of how drill mud concentration levels can change with variations in waves, currents, and bottom stress. It was determined that drift is generally oriented along the northwest/southeast axis, with a typical magnitude of 0.8 cm/sec for the fast settling velocity and 3.1 cm/sec for the slow settling velocity. It was concluded that near-surface or mid-depth discharges of drilling mud in the summer may not reach the sea floor. 17 refs., 13 tabs., 36 figs

  2. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  3. Indoor spray measurement of spray drift potential using a spray drift test bench : effect of drift-reducing nozzle types, spray boom height, nozzle spacing and forward speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno Ruiz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    In a series of indoor experiments spray drift potential was assessed when spraying over a spray drift testbench with two different driving speeds, 2m/s and 4m/s, two different spray boom heights, 30 cm and 50 cm, and two different nozzle spacing, 25 cm and 50 cm, for six different nozzle types. The

  4. Reactivity-induced time-dependencies of EBR-II linear and non-linear feedbacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1988-01-01

    Time-dependent linear feedback reactivities are calculated for stereotypical subassemblies in the EBR-II reactor. These quantities are calculated from nodal reactivities obtained from a kinetic code analysis of an experiment in which the change in power resulted from the dropping of a control rod. Shown with these linear reactivities are the reactivity associated with the control-rod shaft contraction and also time-dependent non-linear (mainly bowing) component deduced from the inverse kinetics of the experimentally measured fission power and the calculated linear reactivities. (author)

  5. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewandowski, Jerome L.V.

    2003-01-01

    There are growing experimental, numerical and theoretical evidences that the anomalous transport observed in tokamaks and stellarators is caused by slow, drift-type modes (such as trapped electron modes and ion-temperature gradient-driven modes). Although typical collision frequencies in hot, magnetized fusion plasmas can be quite low in absolute values, collisional effects are nevertheless important since they act as dissipative sinks. As it is well known, dissipative systems with many (strictly speaking more than two) degrees of freedom are often chaotic and may evolve towards a so-called attractor

  6. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.

    1989-03-01

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 μm spatial resolution and 2 gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO 2 mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  7. Autocalibration of high precision drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacci, C.; Bini, C.; Ciapetti, G.; De Zorzi, G.; Gauzzi, P.; Lacava, F.; Nisati, A.; Pontecorvo, L.; Rosati, S.; Veneziano, S.; Cambiaghi, M.; Casellotti, G.; Conta, C.; Fraternali, M.; Lanza, A.; Livan, M.; Polesello, G.; Rimoldi, A.; Vercesi, V.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results on MDT (monitored drift tubes) autocalibration studies obtained from the analysis of the data collected in Summer 1995 on the H8B Muon Test Beam. In particular we studied the possibility of autocalibration of the MDT using four or three layers of tubes, and we compared the calibration obtained using a precise external tracker with the output of the autocalibration procedure. Results show the feasibility of autocalibration with four and three tubes and the good accuracy of the autocalibration procedure. (orig.)

  8. Unstable drift eigenmode in slab geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsotsonis, S.; Hirose, A.

    1986-01-01

    The unstable Pearlstein-Berk mode of drift waves in plane, sheared slab geometry has later been shown to be stable when electron Landau resonance is rigorously treated. Based on the variational method previously developed the authors have found that in addition to the absolutely stable Pearlstein-Berk mode, there exists an absolutely unstable eigenfunction characterized by ω ≤ ω/sub chemical bonde/, and weak ''radial'' dependence. Also, the growth rate, only weakly depends on the magnetic shear and ion/electron temperature ratio

  9. Analysis of digisonde drift measurements quality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kouba, Daniel; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    90-91, December (2012), s. 212-221 ISSN 1364-6826. [IAGA/ICMA/CAWSES-II TG4 Workshop on Vertical Coupling in the Atmosphere-Ionosphere System /4./. Prague, 14.02.2011-18.02.2011] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB300420904; GA AV ČR IAA300420704 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Ionosphere * Plasma drifts * Skymap * Digisonde Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.417, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682612001290

  10. MAGSAT anomaly map and continental drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemouel, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anomaly maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length anomalies. The anomalies were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic anomalies are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the anomalies found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African anomalies. It is also shown that anomalies are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.

  11. Crowdsourcing and annotating NER for Twitter #drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromreide, Hege; Hovy, Dirk; Søgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We present two new NER datasets for Twitter; a manually annotated set of 1,467 tweets (kappa=0.942) and a set of 2,975 expert-corrected, crowdsourced NER annotated tweets from the dataset described in Finin et al. (2010). In our experiments with these datasets, we observe two important points: (a......) language drift on Twitter is significant, and while off-the-shelf systems have been reported to perform well on in-sample data, they often perform poorly on new samples of tweets, (b) state-of-the-art performance across various datasets can beobtained from crowdsourced annotations, making it more feasible...

  12. Cathode Readout with Stripped Resistive Drift Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Novikov, E.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Shafranov, M.D.; Zhil'tsov, V.E.

    1994-01-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with carbon layer of resistivity 0.5, 30 and 70 k Ohm/sq. The gas mixture used was Ar/CH 4 . Both the anode wire and cathode signals were detected in order to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  13. Hydrogen high pressure proportional drift detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arefiev, A.; Balaev, A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and operation performances of a proportional drift detector PDD are described. High sensitivity of the applied PAD makes it possible to detect the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the energy range of recoil protons as low as 1 keV. The PDD is filled with hydrogen up to the pressure at 40 bars. High purity of the gas is maintained by a continuously operating purification system. The detector has been operating for several years in a neutron beam at the North Area of the CERN SPS

  14. Evaluation of prototype silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, J.; Hall, G.; Roe, S.; Lucas, A.

    1988-01-01

    Operating characteristics of several prototypes of silicon drift detectors are investigated. Detectors are made of unpolished silicon produced by the zone melting method and characterized by n-type conductivity and specific resistance of 3.6-4.6 kOhmxcm. The detectors comprise 40 parallel bands of 200 μm width and 1 cm length separated by 50 μm intervals. Data characterizing the potential distribution near anodes under the operating bias voltage, dependences of capacities and leakage as well as the detector space resolution

  15. Post-earnings announcement drift in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, William; Giannopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents evidence regarding the post-earnings announcement drift (PEAD) anomaly for the Greek market in the years 2000–2006 (covering earnings announcements in the years 2001–2007). The impact of the introduction of International Financial Reporting Standards on the size and prevalence of the PEAD anomaly is examined. Unlike recent evidence for the US market we find PEAD to be\\ud alive and well, and of growing importance in our Greek sample. It may be the adoption of international ...

  16. Construction of the Cleo III drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csorna, S.; Marka, S.; Dickson, M.; Dombrowski, S. von; Peterson, D.; Thies, P.; Glenn, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Kravchenko, I.

    1998-01-01

    The CLEO III group is constructing a new chamber to be installed as part of the staged luminosity upgrade program at the Cornell electron storage ring and compatible with the interaction region optics. Although having less radial extent than the current CLEO II tracking system, CLEO III will have equivalent momentum resolution because of material reduction in the drift chamber inner skin and gas. The thin inner skin requires special attention to the end-plate motion due to wire creep. During stringing, use of a robot will fully automate the wire handling on the upper end. (author)

  17. Drift Tube Linac Conditioning of Tank1

    CERN Document Server

    Shafqat, N; Toor, W A

    2014-01-01

    Tank1 of the Drift Tube Linac (DTL) of the Linac4 has been conditioned at the Linac4 tunnel. The tank was tuned for resonance at 352.2 MHz, and stable operation has been achieved with 725 µs long RF pulses at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. The maximum RF level that has been reached is 810 kW with a pulse width of 600 µs. Since this was the first RF structure exclusively conditioned in the Linac4 tunnel with the operation and control software of Linac4, some related issues and limitations had to be taken into account.

  18. Limiting currents of an unneutralized magnetized electron beam in a cylindrical drift tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.R.; Sloan, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the steady state injection of a uniform unneutralized, magnetized, relativistic electron beam into a cylindrical drift tube are presented. The space-charge-limited current and the asymptotic kinetic energy of electrons on axis is determined both numerically and analytically as a function of the input kinetic energy (γ 0 -1) mc 2 and of the ratio of beam-to-wall radii. A previously cited ''interpolation formula'' is obtained in the pencil beam limit, but more accurate limiting current expressions are developed for other cases (such as the fat beam limit) where the interpolation formula is as much as 20% in error. The corresponding axial electron energy is also found to be significantly smaller than the previously cited value of (γ/sup 1/3/ 0 -1) mc 2 except in the strong pencil beam limit

  19. Tolrestat kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.R.; Kraml, M.; Cayen, M.N.; Dubuc, J.; Ryder, S.; Dvornik, D.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of tolrestat, a potent inhibitor of aldose reductase, were examined. Serum concentrations of tolrestat and of total 14 C were measured after dosing normal subjects and subjects with diabetes with 14 C-labeled tolrestat. In normal subjects, tolrestat was rapidly absorbed and disappearance from serum was biphasic. Distribution and elimination t 1/2s were approximately 2 and 10 to 12 hr, respectively, after single and multiple doses. Unchanged tolrestat accounted for the major portion of 14 C in serum. Radioactivity was rapidly and completely excreted in urine and feces in an approximate ratio of 2:1. Findings were much the same in subjects with diabetes. In normal subjects, the kinetics of oral tolrestat were independent of dose in the 10 to 800 mg range. Repetitive dosing did not result in unexpected cumulation. Tolrestat was more than 99% bound to serum protein; it did not compete with warfarin for binding sites but was displaced to some extent by high concentrations of tolbutamide or salicylate

  20. Field experiment on spray drift: Deposition and airborne drift during application to a winter wheat crop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, A.; Linnemann, V.; Zande, van de J.C.; Vereecken, H.

    2008-01-01

    A field experiment was performed to evaluate various techniques for measuring spray deposition and airborne drift during spray application to a winter wheat crop. The application of a spraying agent containing the fluorescent dye Brilliant Sulfo Flavine by a conventional boom sprayer was done

  1. The kinetic theory and stability of a stochastic plasma with respect to low frequency perturbations and magnetospheric convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurricane, O.A.

    1994-09-01

    In this dissertation, a new linear Vlasov kinetic theory is developed for calculating the plasma response to perturbing electromagnetic fields in cases where the particle dynamics are stochastic; for modes with frequencies less than the typical particle bounce frequency. A variational form is arrived at which allows one to properly perform a stability analysis for a stochastic plasma. In the case of stochastic dynamics, the authors demonstrate that the plasma responds to the flux tube volume average of the perturbing potentials as opposed to the usual case of adiabatic dynamics where plasma responds to the bounce average of the perturbed potentials. They show that for the stochastic plasma, the kinetic variational form maps into the Bernstein energy principle if the perturbation frequency is large compared to all drift frequencies, the perpendicular wavelength is large compared to the Larmor radius, and vanishing of the potentials associated with the parallel electric field are all assumed. By explicit minimization of the energy principle, it is established that the stochastic plasma is always less stable than an adiabatic plasma. Lastly, the effect of strictly enforcing the quasi-neutrality (QN) condition upon a gyro-kinetic type stability analysis is explored. From simple mathematical considerations, it is shown that when the QN condition is imposed convective type modes that are equipotentials along magnetic field lines are created that alter the stability properties of the plasma. The pertinent modifications to the Bernstein energy principle are given

  2. Precision alignment of permanent-magnet drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.J.; Dauelsberg, L.B.; Spalek, G.

    1986-01-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) technique of drift-tube alignment has been resurrected at Los Alamos for the precision alignment of 1-cm-bore drift tubes that carry high-gradient rare-earth-cobalt quadrupole. Because the quadrupole cannot be switched off, this technique is not applicable to a drift-tube assembly, but tests indicate that individual magnetic centers can be detected with a precision of +- 0.003 mm. Methods of transferring this information to machined alignment flats on the sides of the drift-tube body are discussed. With measurements of drift tubes designed for a 100-mA. 425-MHz drift-tube linac, we have detected offsets between the geometric and magnetic axes of up to +- 0.05 mm following final assembly and welding. This degree of offset is serious if not accommodated, because it represents the entire alignment tolerance for the 40-cell tank. The measurement equipment and technique are described

  3. Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, D.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository non-emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for non-emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). This calculation will provide input for the development of LA documents. The scope of this calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts including access mains, ramps, exhaust mains, turnouts, intersections between access mains and turnouts, and intersections between exhaust mains and emplacement drifts, portals, TBM launch chambers, observation drift and test alcove in the performance confirmation (PC) facilities, etc. The calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts subjected to a combined loading of in-situ stress, seismic stress, and/or thermal stress. Other effects such as hydrological and chemical effects are not considered in this analysis

  4. Laced permanent magnet quadrupole drift tube magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.; Behrsing, G.U.; Halbach, K.; Marks, J.S.; Morrison, M.E.; Nelson, D.H.

    1988-10-01

    A laced permanent magnet quadrupole drift tube magnet has been constructed for a proof-of-principle test. The magnet is a conventional tape-wound quadrupole electromagnet, using iron pole- pieces, with the addition of permanent magnet material (neodymium iron) between the poles to reduce the effects of saturation. The iron is preloaded with magnetic flux generated by the permanent magnet material, resulting in an asymmetrical saturation curve. Since the polarity of the quadrupole magnets in a drift tube linac is not reversed we can take advantage of this asymmetrical saturation to provide greater focusing strength. The magnet configuration has been optimized and the vanadium permendur poles needed in a conventional quadrupole have been replaced with iron poles. The use of permanent magnet material has allowed us to increase the focusing strength of the magnet by about 20% over that of a conventional tape-wound quadrupole. Comparisons will be made between this magnet and the conventional tape-wound quadrupole. 3 refs., 5 figs

  5. Metabolic drift in the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanisevic, Julijana; Stauch, Kelly L; Petrascheck, Michael; Benton, H Paul; Epstein, Adrian A; Fang, Mingliang; Gorantla, Santhi; Tran, Minerva; Hoang, Linh; Kurczy, Michael E; Boska, Michael D; Gendelman, Howard E; Fox, Howard S; Siuzdak, Gary

    2016-05-01

    Brain function is highly dependent upon controlled energy metabolism whose loss heralds cognitive impairments. This is particularly notable in the aged individuals and in age-related neurodegenerative diseases. However, how metabolic homeostasis is disrupted in the aging brain is still poorly understood. Here we performed global, metabolomic and proteomic analyses across different anatomical regions of mouse brain at different stages of its adult lifespan. Interestingly, while severe proteomic imbalance was absent, global-untargeted metabolomics revealed an energymetabolic drift or significant imbalance in core metabolite levels in aged mouse brains. Metabolic imbalance was characterized by compromised cellular energy status (NAD decline, increased AMP/ATP, purine/pyrimidine accumulation) and significantly altered oxidative phosphorylation and nucleotide biosynthesis and degradation. The central energy metabolic drift suggests a failure of the cellular machinery to restore metabostasis (metabolite homeostasis) in the aged brain and therefore an inability to respond properly to external stimuli, likely driving the alterations in signaling activity and thus in neuronal function and communication.

  6. EMPLACEMENT DRIFT ISOLATION DOOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.T. Raczka

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to review and refine key design concepts related to the control system presently under consideration for remotely operating the emplacement drift isolation doors at the potential subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis will discuss the key design concepts of the control system that may be utilized for remotely monitoring, opening, and closing the emplacement drift isolation doors. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Discuss the purpose and function of the isolation doors (Presented in Section 7.1). (2) Review the construction of the isolation door and other physical characteristics of the doors that the control system will interface with (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Discuss monitoring and controlling the operation of the isolation doors with a digital control system (either a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) system or a Distributed Control System (DCS)) (Presented in Section 7.3). (4) Discuss how all isolation doors can be monitored and controlled from a subsurface central control center (Presented in Section 7.4). This analysis will focus on the development of input/output (I/O) counts including the types of I/O, redundancy and fault tolerance considerations, and processor requirements for the isolation door control system. Attention will be placed on operability, maintainability, and reliability issues for the system operating in the subsurface environment with exposure to high temperatures and radiation

  7. PWCs and drift chambers at ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, H.; Teramoto, Y.; Wheeler, C.D.

    1978-01-01

    Rate effects in proportional chambers and drift chambers are addressed first. The widely used high-gas-gain chambers would have impaired performance at ISABELLE data rates. Improvement can be expected with lower gas gain, and this possibility is investigated with respect to position and time resolution. Results on chamber lifetime are summarized; space-charge effects, gain saturation, and radiation hardness of electronics are considered. The resolution of drift chambers is discussed in some detail; time resolution, double pulse resolution, and momentum resolution and multiple scattering are included. The expected high multiplicity of tracks from a single event, the high event rates, and the requirement for low gas gain necessitate revision of the methods for measuring the second coordinate. Known methods of two-dimensional point localization are summarized according to spatial accuracy, electronics requirements, and multihit capability. Delay lines, charge division, and cathode strips are considered. Particle identification by means of measurement of the relativistic rise of energy loss by conventional and unconventional means was investigated. 32 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  8. Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING): A Model for Estimating Microbial Communities in Repository Drifts at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley; T.F. Ehrhorn; J. Horn

    2002-03-19

    Geochemical and microbiological modeling was performed to evaluate the potential quantities and impact of microorganisms on the geochemistry of the area adjacent to and within nuclear waste packages in the proposed repository drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The microbial growth results from the introduction of water, ground support, and waste package materials into the deep unsaturated rock. The simulations, which spanned one million years, were accomplished using a newly developed computer code, Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING). MING uses environmental thresholds for limiting microbial growth to temperatures below 120 C and above relative humidities of 90 percent in repository drifts. Once these thresholds are met, MING expands upon a mass balance and thermodynamic approach proposed by McKinley and others (1997), by using kinetic rates to supply constituents from design materials and constituent fluxes including solubilized rock components into the drift, to perform two separate mass-balance calculations as a function of time. The first (nutrient limit) assesses the available nutrients (C, N, P and S) and calculates how many microorganisms can be produced based on a microorganism stoichiometry of C{sub 160}(H{sub 280}O{sub 80})N{sub 30}P{sub 2}S. The second (energy limit) calculates the energy available from optimally combined redox couples for the temperature, and pH at that time. This optimization maximizes those reactions that produce > 15kJ/mol (limit on useable energy) using an iterative linear optimization technique. The final available energy value is converted to microbial mass at a rate of 1 kg of biomass (dry weight) for every 64 MJ of energy. These two values (nutrient limit and energy limit) are then compared and the smaller value represents the number of microorganisms that can be produced over a specified time. MING can also be adapted to investigate other problems of interest as the model can be used in saturated

  9. Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING): A Model for Estimating Microbial Communities in Repository Drifts at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, D.M.; Ehrhorn, T.F.; Horn, J.

    2002-01-01

    Geochemical and microbiological modeling was performed to evaluate the potential quantities and impact of microorganisms on the geochemistry of the area adjacent to and within nuclear waste packages in the proposed repository drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The microbial growth results from the introduction of water, ground support, and waste package materials into the deep unsaturated rock. The simulations, which spanned one million years, were accomplished using a newly developed computer code, Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING). MING uses environmental thresholds for limiting microbial growth to temperatures below 120 C and above relative humidities of 90 percent in repository drifts. Once these thresholds are met, MING expands upon a mass balance and thermodynamic approach proposed by McKinley and others (1997), by using kinetic rates to supply constituents from design materials and constituent fluxes including solubilized rock components into the drift, to perform two separate mass-balance calculations as a function of time. The first (nutrient limit) assesses the available nutrients (C, N, P and S) and calculates how many microorganisms can be produced based on a microorganism stoichiometry of C 160 (H 280 O 80 )N 30 P 2 S. The second (energy limit) calculates the energy available from optimally combined redox couples for the temperature, and pH at that time. This optimization maximizes those reactions that produce > 15kJ/mol (limit on useable energy) using an iterative linear optimization technique. The final available energy value is converted to microbial mass at a rate of 1 kg of biomass (dry weight) for every 64 MJ of energy. These two values (nutrient limit and energy limit) are then compared and the smaller value represents the number of microorganisms that can be produced over a specified time. MING can also be adapted to investigate other problems of interest as the model can be used in saturated and unsaturated

  10. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Mariner

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the development and validation of the in-drift precipitates/salts (IDPS) model. The IDPS model is a geochemical model designed to predict the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Application of the model in support of TSPA-LA is documented in ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156]) is the technical work plan (TWP) for this report. It called for a revision of the previous version of the report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167734]) to achieve greater transparency, readability, data traceability, and report integration. The intended use of the IDPS model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period. Specifically, the intended use is as follows: (1) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the presence and composition of water occurring within the repository during the postclosure period (i.e., effects on pH, ionic strength, deliquescence relative humidity, total concentrations of dissolved components in the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO 3 -SO 4 -Br-CO 3 -SiO 2 -CO 2 -O 2 -H 2 O, and concentrations of the following aqueous species that potentially affect acid neutralizing capacity: HCO 3 - , CO 3 2- , OH - , H + , HSO 4 - , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , CaHCO 3 + , MgHCO 3 + , HSiO 3 - , and MgOH + ); (2) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, mineral

  11. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Mariner

    2004-11-09

    This report documents the development and validation of the in-drift precipitates/salts (IDPS) model. The IDPS model is a geochemical model designed to predict the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Application of the model in support of TSPA-LA is documented in ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156]) is the technical work plan (TWP) for this report. It called for a revision of the previous version of the report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167734]) to achieve greater transparency, readability, data traceability, and report integration. The intended use of the IDPS model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period. Specifically, the intended use is as follows: (1) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the presence and composition of water occurring within the repository during the postclosure period (i.e., effects on pH, ionic strength, deliquescence relative humidity, total concentrations of dissolved components in the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, and concentrations of the following aqueous species that potentially affect acid neutralizing capacity: HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}, H{sup +}, HSO{sub 4}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, CaHCO{sub 3}{sup +}, MgHCO{sub 3

  12. Nonlinear drift waves in a dusty plasma with sheared flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vranjes, J. [K.U. Leuven (Belgium). Center for Plasma Astrophysics; Shukla, R.K. [Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik IV

    2002-01-01

    Nonlinear properties of dust-modified drift waves and dust-drift waves in a dusty magnetoplasma with equilibrium sheared flows are examined. For this purpose, the relevant nonlinear equations for drift waves are analyzed for various profiles of the perpendicular and parallel plasma flows, and a variety of nonlinear solutions (viz. single and double vortex chains accompanied with zonal flows, tripolar and global vortices), which are driven by nommiform shear flows and nommiform dust density, is presented.

  13. Nonlinear drift waves in a dusty plasma with sheared flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vranjes, J.; Shukla, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    Nonlinear properties of dust-modified drift waves and dust-drift waves in a dusty magnetoplasma with equilibrium sheared flows are examined. For this purpose, the relevant nonlinear equations for drift waves are analyzed for various profiles of the perpendicular and parallel plasma flows, and a variety of nonlinear solutions (viz. single and double vortex chains accompanied with zonal flows, tripolar and global vortices), which are driven by nommiform shear flows and nommiform dust density, is presented

  14. Test of a high resolution drift chamber prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comminchau, V.; Deutschmann, M.; Draheim, K.J.; Fritze, P.; Hangarter, K.; Hawelka, P.; Herten, U.; Tonutti, M.; Anderhub, H.; Fehlmann, J.; Hofer, H.; Klein, M.; Paradiso, J.A.; Schreiber, J.; Viertel, G.

    1984-06-01

    The performance of a drift chamber prototype for a colliding beam vertex detector in a test beam at DESY is described. At one (two) atmosphere gas pressure a spatial resolution of 40 μm (30 μm) per wire for one cm drift length was achieved with a 100 MHz Flash-ADC system. An excellent double track resolution of better than 300 μm over the full drift length of 5 cm can be estimated. (orig.)

  15. The Study of Westward Drift in the Main Geomagnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bayanjargal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have obtained a solution for the velocity of westward drift from the induction equation in which an approach for main geomagnetic field was built. Distribution functions B(r, t entered into the induction equation have been built by the observatories' data in North America and the Europe from 1991 to 2006. The longitudinal −0.123 degree/year and latitudinal 0.068 degree/year drifts were defined in North America. And the longitudinal −0.257 degree/year drift was defined in Europe from 1991 to 2006. These drifts are similar to results of other studies.

  16. Impurity and neutral effects on the dissipative drift wave in tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.Z.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1991-05-01

    Possible destabilizing mechanisms for the liner electrostatic dissipative drift waves (in tokamak edge plasmas) are investigated in slab geometry. The effects of processes such as ionization, charge exchange, radiation, and rippling are examined. In particular, the impurity condensation associated with radiation cooling is evaluated appropriately for the drift wave ordering, which is found to be an important driving mechanism in contrast to the results of earlier studies. It also shown that the role of ionization is quite complicated, and depends strongly on the manner in which the equilibrium is achieved. The linear eigenmode equation is studied both analytically and numerically. For the range of parameters relevant to TEXT tokamak, both the charge exchange of the rippling effect are found to be unimportant for instability. 25 refs., 6 figs

  17. Adiabatic-drift-loss modification of the electromagnetic loss-cone instability for anisotropic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhl, B.; Treumann, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Observation of the adiabatic behaviour of energetic particle pitch-angle distributions in the magnetosphere (Lyons, 1977, and others) in the past indicated the development of pronounced minima or drift-loss cones on the pitch-angle distributions centred at α approx.= 90 0 in connection with storm-time changes in magnetospheric convection and magnetic field. Using a model of a drift-modified loss-cone distribution (MLCD) of the butterfly type, the linear stability of electromagnetic whistler or ion-cyclotron waves propagating parallel to the magnetic field has been investigated. The instability is shown to be quenched at high frequencies ω 0 are identified as generating electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the marginally stable frequency ωsub(m). It is concluded that the absence of electromagnetic VLF and ELF noise during times when MLCD develops is the result of the shift of the unstable spectrum to low frequencies. (orig.)

  18. The drift velocity of electrons in carbon dioxide at temperatures between 193 and 573 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elford, M.T.; Haddad, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    The drift velocity of electrons in carbon dioxide has been measured at gas temperatures ranging from 193 to 573 K and at E/N values up to 20 Td at 193 K, 50 Td at 293 K and 40 Td at 573 K. The measured drift velocities were found to decrease linearly with increasing gas number density at a given value of E/N for gas temperatures less than 293 K. This dependence has been attributed to multiple scattering and the data have been extrapolated to zero number density to correct for this effect. Comparisons are made with previous measurements where available. The present data for the variation of μN(thermal) with temperature agree to within the experimental error with the data of Pact et al. (1962)

  19. Is the temperature gradient or the derivative of the density gradient responsible for drift solitons?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salat, A.

    1990-01-01

    In conventional drift wave theory the density gradient κ n =d lnn/dχ determines the linear phase velocity, and the (electron) temperature gradient κ T =d lnT/dχ gives rise to a nonlinear term which leads to the existence of soliton-type solutions and solitary waves. LAKHIN, MIKHAILOVSKI and ONISHCHENKO, Phys. Lett. A 119, 348 (1987) and Plasma Phys. and Contr. Fus. 30, 457 (1988), recently claimed that it is not κ T but essentially the derivative of the density gradient, dκ n /dχ, that is relevant. This claim is refuted by means of an expansion scheme in ε=eΦ/T≤1, where Φ is the drift wave potential. (orig.)

  20. Reduction of Linear Programming to Linear Approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Vaserstein, Leonid N.

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that every Chebyshev linear approximation problem can be reduced to a linear program. In this paper we show that conversely every linear program can be reduced to a Chebyshev linear approximation problem.