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Sample records for linearized constant temperature

  1. Application of accelerated evaluation method of alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation on bipolar linear regulator LM317

    Deng Wei; Wu Xue; Wang Xin; Zhang Jinxin; Zhang Xiaofu; Zheng Qiwen; Ma Wuying; Lu Wu; Guo Qi; He Chengfa

    2014-01-01

    With different irradiation methods including high dose rate irradiation, low dose rate irradiation, alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation, and US military standard constant high temperature and constant dose rate irradiation, the ionizing radiation responses of bipolar linear regulator LM317 from three different companies were investigated under the operating and zero biases. The results show that compared with constant high temperature and constant dose rate irradiation method, the alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation method can not only very rapidly and accurately evaluate the dose rate effect of three bipolar linear regulators, but also well simulate the damage of low dose rate irradiation. Experiment results make the alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation method successfully apply to bipolar linear regulator. (authors)

  2. On The Stress Free Deformation Of Linear FGM Interface Under Constant Temperature

    Ganczarski Artur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the stress free thermo-elastic problem of the FGM thick plate. Existence of such a purely thermal deformation is proved in two ways. First proof is based on application of the Iljushin thermo-elastic potential to displacement type system of equations. This reduces 3D problem to the plane stress state problem. Next it is shown that the unique solution fulfils conditions of simultaneous constant temperature and linear gradation of thermal expansion coefficient. Second proof is based directly on stress type system of equations which straightforwardly reduces to compatibility equations for purely thermal deformation. This occurs if only stress field is homogeneous in domain and at boundary. Finally an example of application to an engineering problem is presented.

  3. Constant-roll (quasi-)linear inflation

    Karam, A.; Marzola, L.; Pappas, T.; Racioppi, A.; Tamvakis, K.

    2018-05-01

    In constant-roll inflation, the scalar field that drives the accelerated expansion of the Universe is rolling down its potential at a constant rate. Within this framework, we highlight the relations between the Hubble slow-roll parameters and the potential ones, studying in detail the case of a single-field Coleman-Weinberg model characterised by a non-minimal coupling of the inflaton to gravity. With respect to the exact constant-roll predictions, we find that assuming an approximate slow-roll behaviour yields a difference of Δ r = 0.001 in the tensor-to-scalar ratio prediction. Such a discrepancy is in principle testable by future satellite missions. As for the scalar spectral index ns, we find that the existing 2-σ bound constrains the value of the non-minimal coupling to ξphi ~ 0.29–0.31 in the model under consideration.

  4. Constant force linear permanent magnet actuators

    Paulides, J.J.H.; Encica, L.; Meessen, K.J.; Lomonova, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    In applications, such as vibration isolation, gravity compensation, pick-and-place machines, etc., there is a need for (long-stroke) passive constant force actuators combined with tubular permanent magnet actuators to minimize the power consumption, hence, passively counteract the gravitational

  5. Hawking temperature of constant curvature black holes

    Cai Ronggen; Myung, Yun Soo

    2011-01-01

    The constant curvature (CC) black holes are higher dimensional generalizations of Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes. It is known that these black holes have the unusual topology of M D-1 xS 1 , where D is the spacetime dimension and M D-1 stands for a conformal Minkowski spacetime in D-1 dimensions. The unusual topology and time-dependence for the exterior of these black holes cause some difficulties to derive their thermodynamic quantities. In this work, by using a globally embedding approach, we obtain the Hawking temperature of the CC black holes. We find that the Hawking temperature takes the same form when using both the static and global coordinates. Also, it is identical to the Gibbons-Hawking temperature of the boundary de Sitter spaces of these CC black holes.

  6. Constant-Temperature Calorimetry for In-Core Power Measurement

    Radcliff, Thomas D.; Miller, Don W.; Kauffman, Andrew C.

    2000-01-01

    Reactor thermal limits are based on fuel energy deposition and cladding temperature. This paper presents a two-wire in-core instrument that directly measures fuel energy deposition. The instrument is based on the addition of heat through resistive dissipation of input electrical energy to a small mass of reactor fuel or fuel analogue. A feedback loop controls the input electrical energy needed to maintain the fuel mass at a nearly constant temperature regardless of the nuclear energy deposited in the mass. Energy addition to the fuel and fuel temperature feedback to the controller are provided by a resistive heating element embedded in the fuel mass. As long as the external heat transfer environment remains constant, the input electrical energy is inversely related to the actual nuclear energy deposition. To demonstrate this instrument, we first scaled the sensor and controller parameters and then used the results to guide fabrication of prototype instruments. In-reactor testing was performed to measure the instrument sensitivity, linearity, bandwidth, and long-term drift characteristics of the prototypes. The instrument is shown to be capable of high-sensitivity, linear measurement of fuel energy deposition with sufficient bandwidth for safety-related measurements. It is also clear that a means to compensate the sensor for changes in the external heat transfer environment is required. Means of actively measuring heat losses and performing this compensation are discussed

  7. Temperature dependence of grain boundary free energy and elastic constants

    Foiles, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    This work explores the suggestion that the temperature dependence of the grain boundary free energy can be estimated from the temperature dependence of the elastic constants. The temperature-dependent elastic constants and free energy of a symmetric Σ79 tilt boundary are computed for an embedded atom method model of Ni. The grain boundary free energy scales with the product of the shear modulus times the lattice constant for temperatures up to about 0.75 the melting temperature.

  8. Constant displacement rate testing at elevated temperatures

    Pepe, J.J.; Gonyea, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    A short time test has been developed which is capable of determining the long time notch sensitivity tendencies of CrMoV rotor forging materials. This test is based on Constant Displacement Rate (CDR) testing of a specific notch bar specimen at 1200 0 F at 2 mils/in/hour displacement rate. These data were correlated to conventional smooth and notch bar rupture behavior for a series of CrMoV materials with varying long time ductility tendencies. The purpose of this paper is to describe the details of this new test procedure and some of the relevant mechanics of material information generated during its development

  9. and Biomphalaria pfeifferi (Krauss) at constant temperatures

    1988-03-16

    Mar 16, 1988 ... lifespan and net reproduction rate of H. dury; were higher than those of B. pfeifferi over the whole range of temperatures ... not itself act as an intermediate host of economically impor- tant parasite .... age-specific birth rate.

  10. Behaviour of coupling constants at high temperature in supersymmetric theories

    Swee Ping Chia.

    1986-04-01

    An analysis is presented of the temperature dependence of the coupling constants using the improved one-loop approximation in the Wess-Zumino model and the supersymmetric O(N) model. It is found that all the coupling constants, both bosonic (Φ 4 type) and Yukawa, approach constant nonzero values as T→∞. The asymptotic values of the bosonic couplings are slightly smaller than the corresponding zero-temperature values, and those of the Yukawa couplings are the same as the zero-temperature values. (author)

  11. Bioclimatic thresholds, thermal constants and survival of mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis (hemiptera: pseudococcidae) in response to constant temperatures on hibiscus.

    Sreedevi, Gudapati; Prasad, Yenumula Gerard; Prabhakar, Mathyam; Rao, Gubbala Ramachandra; Vennila, Sengottaiyan; Venkateswarlu, Bandi

    2013-01-01

    Temperature-driven development and survival rates of the mealybug, Phenacoccussolenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) were examined at nine constant temperatures (15, 20, 25, 27, 30, 32, 35 and 40°C) on hibiscus (Hibiscusrosa -sinensis L.). Crawlers successfully completed development to adult stage between 15 and 35°C, although their survival was affected at low temperatures. Two linear and four nonlinear models were fitted to describe developmental rates of P. solenopsis as a function of temperature, and for estimating thermal constants and bioclimatic thresholds (lower, optimum and upper temperature thresholds for development: Tmin, Topt and Tmax, respectively). Estimated thresholds between the two linear models were statistically similar. Ikemoto and Takai's linear model permitted testing the equivalence of lower developmental thresholds for life stages of P. solenopsis reared on two hosts, hibiscus and cotton. Thermal constants required for completion of cumulative development of female and male nymphs and for the whole generation were significantly lower on hibiscus (222.2, 237.0, 308.6 degree-days, respectively) compared to cotton. Three nonlinear models performed better in describing the developmental rate for immature instars and cumulative life stages of female and male and for generation based on goodness-of-fit criteria. The simplified β type distribution function estimated Topt values closer to the observed maximum rates. Thermodynamic SSI model indicated no significant differences in the intrinsic optimum temperature estimates for different geographical populations of P. solenopsis. The estimated bioclimatic thresholds and the observed survival rates of P. solenopsis indicate the species to be high-temperature adaptive, and explained the field abundance of P. solenopsis on its host plants.

  12. Bioclimatic Thresholds, Thermal Constants and Survival of Mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in Response to Constant Temperatures on Hibiscus

    Sreedevi, Gudapati; Prasad, Yenumula Gerard; Prabhakar, Mathyam; Rao, Gubbala Ramachandra; Vennila, Sengottaiyan; Venkateswarlu, Bandi

    2013-01-01

    Temperature-driven development and survival rates of the mealybug, Phenacoccussolenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) were examined at nine constant temperatures (15, 20, 25, 27, 30, 32, 35 and 40°C) on hibiscus ( Hibiscus rosa -sinensis L.). Crawlers successfully completed development to adult stage between 15 and 35°C, although their survival was affected at low temperatures. Two linear and four nonlinear models were fitted to describe developmental rates of P . solenopsis as a function of temperature, and for estimating thermal constants and bioclimatic thresholds (lower, optimum and upper temperature thresholds for development: Tmin, Topt and Tmax, respectively). Estimated thresholds between the two linear models were statistically similar. Ikemoto and Takai’s linear model permitted testing the equivalence of lower developmental thresholds for life stages of P . solenopsis reared on two hosts, hibiscus and cotton. Thermal constants required for completion of cumulative development of female and male nymphs and for the whole generation were significantly lower on hibiscus (222.2, 237.0, 308.6 degree-days, respectively) compared to cotton. Three nonlinear models performed better in describing the developmental rate for immature instars and cumulative life stages of female and male and for generation based on goodness-of-fit criteria. The simplified β type distribution function estimated Topt values closer to the observed maximum rates. Thermodynamic SSI model indicated no significant differences in the intrinsic optimum temperature estimates for different geographical populations of P . solenopsis . The estimated bioclimatic thresholds and the observed survival rates of P . solenopsis indicate the species to be high-temperature adaptive, and explained the field abundance of P . solenopsis on its host plants. PMID:24086597

  13. Temperature variation of higher-order elastic constants of MgO

    series of strains using Taylor's series expansion. The coefficients of quadratic, cu- ... as thermal expansion, specific heat at higher temperature, temperature variation of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation, .... such studies have an impression that linear variation of elastic constant is true. The experimental study shows that ...

  14. A first-principles approach to finite temperature elastic constants

    Wang, Y; Wang, J J; Zhang, H; Manga, V R; Shang, S L; Chen, L-Q; Liu, Z-K [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-06-09

    A first-principles approach to calculating the elastic stiffness coefficients at finite temperatures was proposed. It is based on the assumption that the temperature dependence of elastic stiffness coefficients mainly results from volume change as a function of temperature; it combines the first-principles calculations of elastic constants at 0 K and the first-principles phonon theory of thermal expansion. Its applications to elastic constants of Al, Cu, Ni, Mo, Ta, NiAl, and Ni{sub 3}Al from 0 K up to their respective melting points show excellent agreement between the predicted values and existing experimental measurements.

  15. A first-principles approach to finite temperature elastic constants

    Wang, Y; Wang, J J; Zhang, H; Manga, V R; Shang, S L; Chen, L-Q; Liu, Z-K

    2010-01-01

    A first-principles approach to calculating the elastic stiffness coefficients at finite temperatures was proposed. It is based on the assumption that the temperature dependence of elastic stiffness coefficients mainly results from volume change as a function of temperature; it combines the first-principles calculations of elastic constants at 0 K and the first-principles phonon theory of thermal expansion. Its applications to elastic constants of Al, Cu, Ni, Mo, Ta, NiAl, and Ni 3 Al from 0 K up to their respective melting points show excellent agreement between the predicted values and existing experimental measurements.

  16. Dynamic analysis of the CTAR (constant temperature adsorption refrigeration) cycle

    Hassan, H.Z.; Mohamad, A.A.; Al-Ansary, H.A.; Alyousef, Y.M.

    2014-01-01

    The basic SAR (solar-driven adsorption refrigeration) machine is an intermittent cold production system. Recently, the CO-SAR (continuous operation solar-powered adsorption refrigeration) system is developed. The CO-SAR machine is based on the theoretical CTAR (constant temperature adsorption refrigeration) cycle in which the adsorption process takes place at a constant temperature that equals the ambient temperature. Practically, there should be a temperature gradient between the adsorption bed and the surrounding atmosphere to provide a driving potential for heat transfer. In the present study, the dynamic analysis of the CTAR cycle is developed. This analysis provides a comparison between the theoretical and the dynamic operation of the CTAR cycle. The developed dynamic model is based on the D-A adsorption equilibrium equation and the energy and mass balances in the adsorption reactor. Results obtained from the present work demonstrate that, the idealization of the constant temperature adsorption process in the theoretical CTAR cycle is not far from the real situation and can be approached. Furthermore, enhancing the heat transfer between the adsorption bed and the ambient during the bed pre-cooling process helps accelerating the heat rejection process from the adsorption reactor and therefore approaching the isothermal process. - Highlights: • The dynamic analysis of the CTAR (constant temperature adsorption refrigeration) cycle is developed. • The CTAR theoretical and dynamic cycles are compared. • The dynamic cycle approaches the ideal one by enhancing the bed precooling

  17. A linear temperature-to-frequency converter

    Løvborg, Leif

    1965-01-01

    , and that the maximum value of the temperature-frequency coefficient beta in this point is-1/3 alpha, where a is the temperature coefficient of the thermistor at the corresponding temperature. Curves showing the range in which the converter is expected to be linear to within plusmn0.1 degC are given. A laboratory......-built converter having beta = 1.0% degC-1 at 25degC is found to be linear to within plusmn0. 1 degC from 10 to 40degC....

  18. Influx of CO2 from Soil Incubated Organic Residues at Constant Temperature

    Shoukat Ali Abro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature induced CO2 from genotypic residue substances is still less understood. Two types of organic residues (wheat- maize were incubated at a constant temperature (25°C to determine the rate and cumulative influx of CO2 in laboratory experiment for 40 days. Further, the effect of surface and incorporated crop residues with and without phosphorus addition was also studied. Results revealed that mixing of crop residues increased CO2-C evolution significantly & emission rare was 37% higher than that of control. At constant temperature, soil mixed residues, had higher emission rates CO2-C than the residues superimposed. There was linear correlation of CO2-C influxed for phosphorus levels and residue application ways with entire incubation at constant temperature. The mixing of organic residues to soil enhanced SOC levels and biomass of microbially bound N; however to little degree ammonium (NH4-N and nitrate NO3-N nitrogen were decreased.

  19. A Simple and Convenient Method of Multiple Linear Regression to Calculate Iodine Molecular Constants

    Cooper, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure using a student-friendly least-squares multiple linear-regression technique utilizing a function within Microsoft Excel is described that enables students to calculate molecular constants from the vibronic spectrum of iodine. This method is advantageous pedagogically as it calculates molecular constants for ground and excited…

  20. Classically exact surface diffusion constants at arbitrary temperature

    Voter, A.F.; Cohen, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    An expression is presented for computing the classical diffusion constant of a point defect (e.g., an adatom) in an infinite lattice of binding sites at arbitrary temperature. The transition state theory diffusion constant is simply multiplied by a dynamical correction factor that is computed from short-time classical trajectories initiated at the site boundaries. The time scale limitations of direct molecular dynamics are thus avoided in the low- and middle-temperature regimes. The expression results from taking the time derivative of the particle mean-square displacement in the lattice-discretized coordinate system. Applications are presented for surface diffusion on fcc(100) and fcc(111) Lennard-Jones crystal faces

  1. Description of tritium release from lithium titanate at constant temperature

    Pena, L; Lagos, S; Jimenez, J; Saravia, E [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile)

    1998-03-01

    Lithium Titanate Ceramics have been prepared by the solid-state route, pebbles and pellets were fabricated by extrusion and their microstructure was characterized in our laboratories. The ceramic material was irradiated in the La Reina Reactor, RECH-1. A study of post-irradiation annealing test, was performed measuring Tritium release from the Lithium Titanate at constant temperature. The Bertone`s method modified by R. Verrall is used to determine the parameters of Tritium release from Lithium Titanate. (author)

  2. Tritium release from lithium ceramics at constant temperature

    Verrall, R.A.; Miller, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Analytic methods for post-irradiation annealing tests to measure tritium release from lithium ceramics at constant temperature are examined. Modifications to the Bertone (1) relations for distinguishing diffusion-controlled release from desorption-controlled release are shown. The methods are applied to tests on sintered LiA10 2 ; first-order desorption is shown to control tritium release for these tests

  3. Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of…

  4. High-temperature rate constant measurements for OH+xylenes

    Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid

    2015-06-01

    The overall rate constants for the reactions of hydroxyl (OH) radicals with o-xylene (k 1), m-xylene (k 2), and p-xylene (k 3) were measured behind reflected shock waves over 890-1406K at pressures of 1.3-1.8atm using OH laser absorption near 306.7nm. Measurements were performed under pseudo-first-order conditions. The measured rate constants, inferred using a mechanism-fitting approach, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as:k1=2.93×1013exp(-1350.3/T)cm3mol-1s-1(890-1406K)k2=3.49×1013exp(-1449.3/T)cm3mol-1s-1(906-1391K)k3=3.5×1013exp(-1407.5/T)cm3mol-1s-1(908-1383K)This paper presents, to our knowledge, first high-temperature measurements of the rate constants of the reactions of xylene isomers with OH radicals. Low-temperature rate-constant measurements by Nicovich et al. (1981) were combined with the measurements in this study to obtain the following Arrhenius expressions, which are applicable over a wider temperature range:k1=2.64×1013exp(-1181.5/T)cm3mol-1s-1(508-1406K)k2=3.05×109exp(-400/T)cm3mol-1s-1(508-1391K)k3=3.0×109exp(-440/T)cm3mol-1s-1(526-1383K) © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  5. High temperature elastic constant measurements: application to plutonium; Mesure des constantes elastiques a haute temperature application au plutonium

    Bouchet, J M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-03-01

    We present an apparatus with which we have measured the Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio of several compounds from the resonance frequency of cylinders in the temperature range 0 deg. C-700 deg. C. We especially studied the elastic constants of plutonium and measured for the first time to our knowledge the Young's modulus of Pu{sub {delta}} and Pu{sub {epsilon}}. E{sub {delta}} 360 deg. C = 1.6 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}; E{sub {epsilon}} 490 deg. C = 1.1 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}, {sigma}{sub {epsilon}} = 0.25 {+-} 0.03 Using our results, we have calculated the compressibility, the Debye temperature, the Grueneisen constant and the electronic specific heat of Pu{sub {epsilon}}. (author) [French] Nous decrivons un appareil qui permet de mesurer les constantes elastiques (module de Young et module de Poisson) jusqu'a 700 deg. C a partir des frequences de resonance de barreaux cylindriques. Nous avons plus specialement etudie le plutonium et determine pour la premiere fois a notre connaissance le module de Young des phases {delta} et {epsilon}: E{sub {delta}} 360 deg. C = 1.6 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}; E{sub {epsilon}} 490 deg. C = 1.1 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}, {sigma}{sub {epsilon}} = 0.25 {+-} 0.03 Nos mesures nous ont permis de calculer la compressibilite, la temperature de Debye, la constante de Gruneisen et la chaleur specifique electronique de Pu{sub {epsilon}}. (auteur)

  6. A study on linear and non-linear optical constants of Rhodamine B thin film deposited on FTO glass

    Yahia, I. S.; Jilani, Asim; Abutalib, M. M.; AlFaify, S.; Shkir, M.; Abdel-wahab, M. Sh.; Al-Ghamdi, Attieh A.; El-Naggar, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this research was to fabricate/deposit the good quality thin film of Rhodamine B dye on fluorine doped tin oxide glass substrate by the low cost spin coating technique and study their linear and nonlinear optical parameters. The thickness of the thin film was measured about 300 nm with alpha step system. The transmittance of the fabricated thin film was found to be above 75% corresponding to the fluorine doped tin oxide layer. The structural analysis was performed with X-rays diffraction spectroscopy. Atomic force microscope showed the topographic image of deposited thin film. Linear optical constant like absorption coefficient, band gap, and extinction index was calculated. The dielectric constant was calculated to know the optical response of Rhodamine B dye over fluorine doped tin oxide substrate. The nonlinear optical constant like linear optical susceptibility χ(1), nonlinear optical susceptibility χ(3), nonlinear refractive index (n2) were calculated by spectroscopic method. This method has advantage over the experimental method like Z-Scan for organic dye base semiconductors for future advance optoelectronics applications like dye synthesis solar cell.

  7. A study on linear and non-linear optical constants of Rhodamine B thin film deposited on FTO glass

    Yahia, I.S. [Nano-Science & Semiconductor Labs, Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Jilani, Asim, E-mail: asim.jilane@gmail.com [Centre of Nanotechnology, Physics Department-Faculty of Science-AL Faisaliah Campus, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80200, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Abutalib, M.M. [Centre of Nanotechnology, Physics Department-Faculty of Science-AL Faisaliah Campus, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80200, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); AlFaify, S. [Nano-Science & Semiconductor Labs, Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo (Egypt); Shkir, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Abdel-wahab, M.Sh.; Al-Ghamdi, Attieh A. [Centre of Nanotechnology, Physics Department-Faculty of Science-AL Faisaliah Campus, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80200, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); El-Naggar, A.M. [Exploitation of Renewable Energy Applications in Saudi Arabia, Physics & Astronomy Department, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O.Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this research was to fabricate/deposit the good quality thin film of Rhodamine B dye on fluorine doped tin oxide glass substrate by the low cost spin coating technique and study their linear and nonlinear optical parameters. The thickness of the thin film was measured about 300 nm with alpha step system. The transmittance of the fabricated thin film was found to be above 75% corresponding to the fluorine doped tin oxide layer. The structural analysis was performed with X-rays diffraction spectroscopy. Atomic force microscope showed the topographic image of deposited thin film. Linear optical constant like absorption coefficient, band gap, and extinction index was calculated. The dielectric constant was calculated to know the optical response of Rhodamine B dye over fluorine doped tin oxide substrate. The nonlinear optical constant like linear optical susceptibility χ{sup (1)}, nonlinear optical susceptibility χ{sup (3)}, nonlinear refractive index (n{sub 2}) were calculated by spectroscopic method. This method has advantage over the experimental method like Z-Scan for organic dye base semiconductors for future advance optoelectronics applications like dye synthesis solar cell.

  8. On The Structure of The Inverse of a Linear Constant Multivariable ...

    On The Structure of The Inverse of a Linear Constant Multivariable System. ... It is shown that the use of this representation has certain advantages in the design of multivariable feedback systems. typical examples were considered to indicate the corresponding application. Keywords: Stability Functions, multivariable ...

  9. Lie symmetries of systems of second-order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients.

    Boyko, Vyacheslav M; Popovych, Roman O; Shapoval, Nataliya M

    2013-01-01

    Lie symmetries of systems of second-order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients are exhaustively described over both the complex and real fields. The exact lower and upper bounds for the dimensions of the maximal Lie invariance algebras possessed by such systems are obtained using an effective algebraic approach.

  10. Exact Finite-Difference Schemes for d-Dimensional Linear Stochastic Systems with Constant Coefficients

    Peng Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors attempt to construct the exact finite-difference schemes for linear stochastic differential equations with constant coefficients. The explicit solutions to Itô and Stratonovich linear stochastic differential equations with constant coefficients are adopted with the view of providing exact finite-difference schemes to solve them. In particular, the authors utilize the exact finite-difference schemes of Stratonovich type linear stochastic differential equations to solve the Kubo oscillator that is widely used in physics. Further, the authors prove that the exact finite-difference schemes can preserve the symplectic structure and first integral of the Kubo oscillator. The authors also use numerical examples to prove the validity of the numerical methods proposed in this paper.

  11. Deterministic constant-temperature dynamics for dissipative quantum systems

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    A novel method is introduced in order to treat the dissipative dynamics of quantum systems interacting with a bath of classical degrees of freedom. The method is based upon an extension of the Nose-Hoover chain (constant temperature) dynamics to quantum-classical systems. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic numerical calculations on the relaxation dynamics of the spin-boson model show that the quantum-classical Nose-Hoover chain dynamics represents the thermal noise of the bath in an accurate and simple way. Numerical comparisons, both with the constant-energy calculation and with the quantum-classical Brownian motion treatment of the bath, show that the quantum-classical Nose-Hoover chain dynamics can be used to introduce dissipation in the evolution of a quantum subsystem even with just one degree of freedom for the bath. The algorithm can be computationally advantageous in modelling, within computer simulation, the dynamics of a quantum subsystem interacting with complex molecular environments. (fast track communication)

  12. Experimental determination of monoethanolamine protonation constant and its temperature dependency

    Ma’mun Sholeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide as one of the major contributors to the global warming problem is produced in large quantities by many important industries and its emission seems to rise from year to year. Aminebased absorption is one of the methods to capture CO2 from its sources. As a reactive system, mass transfer and chemical reaction take place simultaneously. In a vapor-liquid equilibrium model for the CO2-amine-water system, some parameters such as mass transfer coefficients and chemical equilibrium constants need to be known. However, some parameters could be determined experimentally and the rests could be regressed from the model. The protonation constant (pKa, as one of the model parameters, could then be measured experimentally. The purpose of this study is to measure the pKa of monoethanolamine (MEA at a range of temperatures from 303 to 330K by a potentiometric titration method. The experimental data obtained were in a good agreement with the literature data. The pKa data from this work together with those from the literature were then correlated in an empirical correlation to be used for future research.

  13. Propargyl Recombination: Estimation of the High Temperature, Low Pressure Rate Constant from Flame Measurements

    Rasmussen, Christian Lund; Skjøth-Rasmussen, Martin Skov; Jensen, Anker

    2005-01-01

    The most important cyclization reaction in hydrocarbon flames is probably recombination of propargyl radicals. This reaction may, depending on reaction conditions, form benzene, phenyl or fulvene, as well as a range of linear products. A number of rate measurements have been reported for C3H3 + C3H......3 at temperatures below 1000 K, while data at high temperature and low pressure only can be obtained from flames. In the present work, an estimate of the rate constant for the reaction at 1400 +/- 50 K and 20 Torr is obtained from analysis of the fuel-rich acetylene flame of Westmoreland, Howard...

  14. Long persistence of rigor mortis at constant low temperature.

    Varetto, Lorenzo; Curto, Ombretta

    2005-01-06

    We studied the persistence of rigor mortis by using physical manipulation. We tested the mobility of the knee on 146 corpses kept under refrigeration at Torino's city mortuary at a constant temperature of +4 degrees C. We found a persistence of complete rigor lasting for 10 days in all the cadavers we kept under observation; and in one case, rigor lasted for 16 days. Between the 11th and the 17th days, a progressively increasing number of corpses showed a change from complete into partial rigor (characterized by partial bending of the articulation). After the 17th day, all the remaining corpses showed partial rigor and in the two cadavers that were kept under observation "à outrance" we found the absolute resolution of rigor mortis occurred on the 28th day. Our results prove that it is possible to find a persistence of rigor mortis that is much longer than the expected when environmental conditions resemble average outdoor winter temperatures in temperate zones. Therefore, this datum must be considered when a corpse is found in those environmental conditions so that when estimating the time of death, we are not misled by the long persistence of rigor mortis.

  15. A critical oscillation constant as a variable of time scales for half-linear dynamic equations

    Řehák, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2 (2010), s. 237-256 ISSN 0139-9918 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100190701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : dynamic equation * time scale * half-linear equation * (non)oscillation criteria * Hille-Nehari criteria * Kneser criteria * critical constant * oscillation constant * Hardy inequality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.316, year: 2010 http://link.springer.com/article/10.2478%2Fs12175-010-0009-7

  16. Linearized stability analysis of thin-shell wormholes with a cosmological constant

    Lobo, Francisco S N; Crawford, Paulo

    2004-01-01

    Spherically symmetric thin-shell wormholes in the presence of a cosmological constant are constructed applying the cut-and-paste technique implemented by Visser. Using the Darmois-Israel formalism the surface stresses, which are concentrated at the wormhole throat, are determined. This construction allows us to apply a dynamical analysis to the throat, considering linearized radial perturbations around static solutions. For a large positive cosmological constant, i.e., for the Schwarzschild-de Sitter solution, the region of stability is significantly increased, relatively to the null cosmological constant case, analysed by Poisson and Visser. With a negative cosmological constant, i.e., the Schwarzschild-anti de Sitter solution, the region of stability is decreased. In particular, considering static solutions with a generic cosmological constant, the weak and dominant energy conditions are violated, while for a 0 ≤ 3M the null and strong energy conditions are satisfied. The surface pressure of the static solution is strictly positive for the Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-anti de Sitter spacetimes, but takes negative values, assuming a surface tension in the Schwarzschild-de Sitter solution, for high values of the cosmological constant and the wormhole throat radius

  17. Voltage-regulating constant-current sources in a linear induction accelerator

    Zhao Juan; Cao Kefeng; Deng Jianjun; Zhu Lijun; Yang Jia; Ye Chao; Huang Bin; Cao Ningxiang; Dong Jinxuan; Zhang Jichang; Yu Zhiguo; Chen Min

    2002-01-01

    Constant-current Sources are one of key units in a linear induction accelerator. The requirements for the sources are to supply stable direct current of high power for the induction coil, be easy to computer-control and highly stable and reliable. Applying the technique of linear current source regulating in series, the primary voltage of the power transformer is regulated through an MJYS-JL-350A type three-phase alterative voltage-regulating module. The output current variation is 300-500 A when the load variation is 0.06-0.1 Ω and the voltage drop of the regulator tube is controlled within 8 V±2V when the variation of mains voltage is in ±10%. Both the current ripple and stability meet the technical requirements. The constant-current sources are controlled through an industrial controller. For each of the constant-current sources has a smallest system comprised of 8051 which is communication-controlled through a RS-485 interface, the sources can be controlled remotely

  18. The low-energy constants of the extended linear sigma model

    Divotgey, Florian; Giacosa, Francesco; Kovacs, Peter; Rischke, Dirk H. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The low-energy dynamics of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is fully determined by the interactions of the (pseudo-) Nambu-Goldstone bosons of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, i.e., for two quark flavors, the pions. Pion dynamics is described by the low-energy effective theory of QCD, chiral perturbation theory (ChPT), which is based on the nonlinear realization of chiral symmetry. An alternative description is provided by the Linear Sigma Model, where chiral symmetry is linearly realized. An extended version of this model, the so-called extended Linear Sigma Model (eLSM) was recently developed which incorporates all J{sup P}=0{sup ±}, 1{sup ±} anti qq mesons up to 2 GeV in mass. A fit of the coupling constants of this model to experimentally measured masses and decay widths has a surprisingly good quality. In this talk, it is demonstrated that the low-energy limit of the eLSM, obtained by integrating out all fields which are heavier than the pions, assumes the same form as ChPT. Moreover, the low-energy constants (LECs) of the eLSM agree with those of ChPT.

  19. Controlled release of 1-methylcyclopropene from its functionalised electrospun fibres under constant and linearly ramped humidity.

    Neoh, Tze Loon; Ariyanto, Hermawan Dwi; Menéndez Galvan, Patricia; Yoshii, Hidefumi

    2017-10-01

    The methodology to electrospin polystyrene (PS) fibres functionalised with the inclusion complex between 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) has been developed successfully. Due to limited availability, α-CD crystals instead of 1-MCP/α-CD complex were suspended in the electrospinning (ES) solutions to investigate the ES process. The ES solutions were characterised in terms of viscosity, conductivity and surface tension. Meanwhile, the fibres were subjected to scanning electron microscopy. The average fibre diameter was proportional to approximately one-sixth power of the capillary number of the ES solution. Viscosity, which was a function of PS concentration and α-CD loading, was the main property that dictated the spin ability of the ES solutions. ES fibres with 1.5-4.4 μm in diameter were produced with 12.5-20.0% (w/w) PS in ES solution and an equal amount of the inclusion complex for PS. In the case of the ES solutions of 20 wt% PS loaded with the inclusion complex from 0 to 100% (w/w) to PS, all the ES solutions were electrospinnable with the average diameter ranging from 3.8 to 4.6 μm. X-ray diffractometry indicated that the α-CD crystals were homogeneously suspended on the fibre mats. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the crystals were suspended on the fibre mats while being coated with a layer of PS. The complex-functionalised fibre was formed from the ES solution of 20% PS and 50% (w/w) inclusion complex with the ES. The release characteristics of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) from the functionalised fibre and the inclusion complex were investigated real time under linearly ramping humidity conditions at constant temperatures with a home-built humidity regulating system coupled with gas chromatography. The irregular release profiles were successfully modelled and the activation energies of release for the functionalised fibre and inclusion complex were about 128 and 69 kJ/mol, respectively..

  20. Exergy analysis of integrated photovoltaic thermal solar water heater under constant flow rate and constant collection temperature modes

    Tiwari, A.; Dubey, Swapnil; Sandhu, G.S.; Sodha, M.S.; Anwar, S.I.

    2009-01-01

    In this communication, an analytical expression for the water temperature of an integrated photovoltaic thermal solar (IPVTS) water heater under constant flow rate hot water withdrawal has been obtained. Analysis is based on basic energy balance for hybrid flat plate collector and storage tank,

  1. High-temperature rate constant measurements for OH+xylenes

    Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Badra, Jihad; Farooq, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    The overall rate constants for the reactions of hydroxyl (OH) radicals with o-xylene (k 1), m-xylene (k 2), and p-xylene (k 3) were measured behind reflected shock waves over 890-1406K at pressures of 1.3-1.8atm using OH laser absorption near 306

  2. Reaction rate constants of HO2 + O3 in the temperature range 233-400 K

    Wang, Xiuyan; Suto, Masako; Lee, L. C.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction rate constants of HO2 + O3 were measured in the temperature range 233-400 K using a discharge flow system with photofragment emission detection. In the range 233-253 K, the constants are approximately a constant value, and then increase with increasing temperature. This result suggests that the reaction may have two different channels. An expression representing the reaction rate constants is presented.

  3. Constant temperatures and the rate of seed germination in maize ...

    The rate of germination of the NEM cultivar was faster than that of the QPM cultivar at all temperatures. The thermal times for median germination were 46 for QPM and 40.7 oCd for the NEM cultivar. The cardinal temperatures (base, Tb, optimum, To and ceiling, Tc) for the NEM cultivar were Tb: 7, To: 30 and Tc: 48.2 oC.

  4. ARRHENIUS MODEL FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE GLASS VISCOSITY WITH A CONSTANT PRE-EXPONENTIAL FACTOR

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2008-01-01

    A simplified form of the Arrhenius equation, ln η = A + B(x)/T, where η is the viscosity, T the temperature, x the composition vector, and A and B the Arrhenius coefficients, was fitted to glass-viscosity data for the processing temperature range (the range at which the viscosity is within 1 to 103 Pa.s) while setting A = constant and treating B(x) as a linear function of mass fractions of major components. Fitting the Arrhenius equation to over 550 viscosity data of commercial glasses and approximately 1000 viscosity data of glasses for nuclear-waste glasses resulted in the A values of -11.35 and -11.48, respectively. The R2 value ranged from 0.92 to 0.99 for commercial glasses and was 0.98 for waste glasses. The Arrhenius models estimate viscosities for melts of commercial glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 within the temperature range of 1100 to 1550 C and viscosity range of 5 to 400 Pa.s and for waste glasses containing 32 to 60 mass% SiO2 within the temperature range of 850 to 1450 C and viscosity range of 0.4 to 250 Pa.s

  5. A Fresh Look at Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as…

  6. Renormalization group analysis of the temperature dependent coupling constant in massless theory

    Yamada, Hirofumi.

    1987-06-01

    A general analysis of finite temperature renormalization group equations for massless theories is presented. It is found that in a direction where momenta and temperature are scaled up with their ratio fixed the coupling constant behaves in the same manner as in zero temperature and that asymptotic freedom at short distances is also maintained at finite temperature. (author)

  7. Determination of Henry’s law constant of light hydrocarbon gases at low temperatures

    Mohebbi, V.; Naderifar, A.; Behbahani, R.M.; Moshfeghian, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Henry’s constants of light hydrocarbon gases are reported at low temperatures. ► Solubility of iso-butane in water at low temperatures (275 K to 293 K) was measured. ► An expression of Krichevsky–Kasarnovsky equation is reported. - Abstract: The solubility of i-butane in water at the low temperatures was measured (274 K to 293 K). Additionally, Henry’s law constants of light hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, propane, i-butane, and n-butane) in water at the low temperatures are reported. A modified equation based on Krichevsky–Kasarnovsky equation is proposed to consider the effect of pressure and temperature on the equation parameters. Results show that Henry’s law constant of the selected components depends on temperature. It is deduced that pressure has a considerable effect on Henry’s law constant for methane, ethane, and propane, whereas this dependency for butanes is negligible.

  8. Constant pressure and temperature discrete-time Langevin molecular dynamics

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Mathematics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Farago, Oded [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Be' er Sheva 84105 (Israel); Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Be' er Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2014-11-21

    We present a new and improved method for simultaneous control of temperature and pressure in molecular dynamics simulations with periodic boundary conditions. The thermostat-barostat equations are built on our previously developed stochastic thermostat, which has been shown to provide correct statistical configurational sampling for any time step that yields stable trajectories. Here, we extend the method and develop a set of discrete-time equations of motion for both particle dynamics and system volume in order to seek pressure control that is insensitive to the choice of the numerical time step. The resulting method is simple, practical, and efficient. The method is demonstrated through direct numerical simulations of two characteristic model systems—a one-dimensional particle chain for which exact statistical results can be obtained and used as benchmarks, and a three-dimensional system of Lennard-Jones interacting particles simulated in both solid and liquid phases. The results, which are compared against the method of Kolb and Dünweg [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 4453 (1999)], show that the new method behaves according to the objective, namely that acquired statistical averages and fluctuations of configurational measures are accurate and robust against the chosen time step applied to the simulation.

  9. Development of the Oriental Latrine Fly, Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera: Calliphoridae), at Five Constant Temperatures.

    Gruner, S V; Slone, D H; Capinera, J L; Turco, M P

    2017-03-01

    Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) is a forensically important fly that is found throughout the tropics and subtropics. We calculated the accumulated development time and transition points for each life stage from eclosion to adult emergence at five constant temperatures: 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 °C. For each transition, the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles were calculated with a logistic linear model. The mean transition times and % survivorship were determined directly from the raw laboratory data. Development times of C. megacephala were compared with that of two other closely related species, Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) and Phormia regina (Meigen). Ambient and larval mass temperatures were collected from field studies conducted from 2001-2004. Field study data indicated that adult fly activity was reduced at lower ambient temperatures, but once a larval mass was established, heat generation occurred. These development times and durations can be used for estimation of a postmortem interval (PMI). © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Temperature dependent lattice constant of InSb above room temperature

    Breivik, Magnus; Nilsen, Tron Arne; Fimland, Bjørn-Ove

    2013-10-01

    Using temperature dependent X-ray diffraction on two InSb single crystalline substrates, the bulk lattice constant of InSb was determined between 32 and 325 °C. A polynomial function was fitted to the data: a(T)=6.4791+3.28×10-5×T+1.02×10-8×T2 Å (T in °C), which gives slightly higher values than previously published (which go up to 62 °C). From the fit, the thermal expansion of InSb was calculated to be α(T)=5.062×10-6+3.15×10-9×T K-1 (T in °C). We found that the thermal expansion coefficient is higher than previously published values above 100 °C (more than 10% higher at 325 °C).

  11. Kinetic Behavior of on Various Cheeses under Constant and Dynamic Temperature

    K. Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed kinetic models to predict the growth of pathogenic Escherichia coli on cheeses during storage at constant and changing temperatures. A five-strain mixture of pathogenic E. coli was inoculated onto natural cheeses (Brie and Camembert and processed cheeses (sliced Mozzarella and sliced Cheddar at 3 to 4 log CFU/g. The inoculated cheeses were stored at 4, 10, 15, 25, and 30°C for 1 to 320 h, with a different storage time being used for each temperature. Total bacteria and E. coli cells were enumerated on tryptic soy agar and MacConkey sorbitol agar, respectively. E. coli growth data were fitted to the Baranyi model to calculate the maximum specific growth rate (μmax; log CFU/g/h, lag phase duration (LPD; h, lower asymptote (log CFU/g, and upper asymptote (log CFU/g. The kinetic parameters were then analyzed as a function of storage temperature, using the square root model, polynomial equation, and linear equation. A dynamic model was also developed for varying temperature. The model performance was evaluated against observed data, and the root mean square error (RMSE was calculated. At 4°C, E. coli cell growth was not observed on any cheese. However, E. coli growth was observed at 10°C to 30°C with a μmax of 0.01 to 1.03 log CFU/g/h, depending on the cheese. The μmax values increased as temperature increased, while LPD values decreased, and μmax and LPD values were different among the four types of cheese. The developed models showed adequate performance (RMSE = 0.176–0.337, indicating that these models should be useful for describing the growth kinetics of E. coli on various cheeses.

  12. Kinetic Behavior of Escherichia coli on Various Cheeses under Constant and Dynamic Temperature.

    Kim, K; Lee, H; Gwak, E; Yoon, Y

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we developed kinetic models to predict the growth of pathogenic Escherichia coli on cheeses during storage at constant and changing temperatures. A five-strain mixture of pathogenic E. coli was inoculated onto natural cheeses (Brie and Camembert) and processed cheeses (sliced Mozzarella and sliced Cheddar) at 3 to 4 log CFU/g. The inoculated cheeses were stored at 4, 10, 15, 25, and 30°C for 1 to 320 h, with a different storage time being used for each temperature. Total bacteria and E. coli cells were enumerated on tryptic soy agar and MacConkey sorbitol agar, respectively. E. coli growth data were fitted to the Baranyi model to calculate the maximum specific growth rate (μ max; log CFU/g/h), lag phase duration (LPD; h), lower asymptote (log CFU/g), and upper asymptote (log CFU/g). The kinetic parameters were then analyzed as a function of storage temperature, using the square root model, polynomial equation, and linear equation. A dynamic model was also developed for varying temperature. The model performance was evaluated against observed data, and the root mean square error (RMSE) was calculated. At 4°C, E. coli cell growth was not observed on any cheese. However, E. coli growth was observed at 10°C to 30°C with a μ max of 0.01 to 1.03 log CFU/g/h, depending on the cheese. The μ max values increased as temperature increased, while LPD values decreased, and μ max and LPD values were different among the four types of cheese. The developed models showed adequate performance (RMSE = 0.176-0.337), indicating that these models should be useful for describing the growth kinetics of E. coli on various cheeses.

  13. A fresh look at linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. Revisiting the impulsive response method using factorization

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of the other more advanced approaches: Laplace transform, linear systems, the general theory of linear equations with variable coefficients and variation of parameters. The approach presented here can be used in a first course on differential equations for science and engineering majors.

  14. A Simple Method to Calculate the Temperature Dependence of the Gibbs Energy and Chemical Equilibrium Constants

    Vargas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy and important quantities such as Henry's law constants, activity coefficients, and chemical equilibrium constants is usually calculated by using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. Although, this is a well-known approach and traditionally covered as part of any physical chemistry course, the required…

  15. The Constitution and Operation of the Constant Temperature Anemometer(CTA:IFA 300)

    Nam, H. Y.; Kim, J. M.; Choi, B. H.; Choi, J. H.; Jeong, J. Y.; Kim, B. H.; Kim, T. J.; Cha, J. E.; Kim, H. R

    2005-09-15

    This study shows the constitution and application method on constant temperature anemometer(CTA-Model : IFA 300 by TSI Co.). Especially, the software instruction(Thermal Pro Ver. 4.55) was re-adjusted for users.

  16. SOFC regulation at constant temperature: Experimental test and data regression study

    Barelli, L.; Bidini, G.; Cinti, G.; Ottaviano, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SOFC operating temperature impacts strongly on its performance and lifetime. • Experimental tests were carried out varying electric load and feeding mixture gas. • Three different anodic inlet gases were tested maintaining constant temperature. • Cathodic air flow rate was used to maintain constant its operating temperature. • Regression law was defined from experimental data to regulate the air flow rate. - Abstract: The operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cell stack (SOFC) is an important parameter to be controlled, which impacts the SOFC performance and its lifetime. Rapid temperature change implies a significant temperature differences between the surface and the mean body leading to a state of thermal shock. Thermal shock and thermal cycling introduce stress in a material due to temperature differences between the surface and the interior, or between different regions of the cell. In this context, in order to determine a control law that permit to maintain constant the fuel cell temperature varying the electrical load and the infeed fuel mixture, an experimental activity were carried out on a planar SOFC short stack to analyse stack temperature. Specifically, three different anodic inlet gas compositions were tested: pure hydrogen, reformed natural gas with steam to carbon ratio equal to 2 and 2.5. By processing the obtained results, a regression law was defined to regulate the air flow rate to be provided to the fuel cell to maintain constant its operating temperature varying its operating conditions.

  17. Determination of time constants of reactor pressure and temperature sensors: the dynamic data system method

    Wu, S.M.; Hsu, M.C.; Chow, M.C.

    1979-01-01

    A new modeling technique is introduced for on-line sensor time constant identification, both for the resistance temperature detector (RTD) and for the pressure sensor using power plant operational data. The sensor's time constant is estimated from a real characteristic root of the fitted autoregressive moving average model. The RTD's time constant values were identified to be 8.4 s, with a standard deviation of 1.2 s. The pressure sensor time constant was identified to be 28.6 ms, with a standard deviation of 3.5 ms

  18. Low-temperature monocrystal elastic constants of Fe-19Cr-10Ni

    Ledbetter, H.M.

    1984-01-01

    By a pulse-echo-overlap ultrasonic method, we determined the monocrystal elastic constants (C 11 , C 12 , C 44 ) of an Fe-19Cr-10Ni alloy between 295 and 4 K. In composition this laboratory alloy approximates a technological austenitic stainless steel: AISI 304. Many previous studies on polycrystalline steels found a low-temperature magnetic phase transition that affects physical properties, including elastic constants. At the transition, anomalies occur in all polycrystal elastic constants: Young's modulus, shear modulus, bulk modulus, and Poisson's ratio. The present study found that the transition, near 50 K, does not affect one monocrystal elastic constant: C 44 , the resistance to shear on a (100) plane in a [100]-type direction. We interpret this new observation from the viewpoint of a Born-type lattice model. Also, we comment about the relationship between the elastic-constant changes and the low-temperature magnetic state

  19. Design of laser diode driver with constant current and temperature control system

    Wang, Ming-cai; Yang, Kai-yong; Wang, Zhi-guo; Fan, Zhen-fang

    2017-10-01

    A laser Diode (LD) driver with constant current and temperature control system is designed according to the LD working characteristics. We deeply researched the protection circuit and temperature control circuit based on thermos-electric cooler(TEC) cooling circuit and PID algorithm. The driver could realize constant current output and achieve stable temperature control of LD. Real-time feedback control method was adopted in the temperature control system to make LD work on its best temperature point. The output power variety and output wavelength shift of LD caused by current and temperature instability were decreased. Furthermore, the driving current and working temperature is adjustable according to specific requirements. The experiment result showed that the developed LD driver meets the characteristics of LD.

  20. Spectroscopic determination of ionization constants of quinoline and 3-aminoquinoline at different temperature

    Indhar, H.A.B.

    2000-01-01

    Quinoline and its derivative are chemically and biologically important heterocylic compounds. Its ionization constant (pK/sub a/ values have been previously determined only at 18 or 20 deg. C. We have enhanced this work at different temperatures from 20-50 deg. C at the interval of 5 deg. C. The dissociation constants (pk/sub a/s), and Gibb's free energies of quinoline and 3-aminoquinoline have been determined by UV-Spectrophotometer (lambda 2) equipped with a temperature control of - + 0.1 deg. C at temperatures ranging from 20-50 deg. C in water. The experimental data have been used for the determination of thermodynamic ionization constants (pk /sub a //sup t/) sub t/, concentration ionization constants (pK/sub a//sup M/) and Gibbs's free energy values of pK/sub a/sup M/. The ionization constant values decrease with increase of temperature. The significance of relative magnitudes of the values is discussed and some useful generalization are obtained. The curves are parabolic. A computer program in GW-BASIC calculates the values of dissociation constants. From the pK/sub a/ values, Gibb's free energies are compared and discussed. (author)

  1. Solution of linear ordinary differential equations by means of the method of variation of arbitrary constants

    Mejlbro, Leif

    1997-01-01

    An alternative formula for the solution of linear differential equations of order n is suggested. When applicable, the suggested method requires fewer and simpler computations than the well-known method using Wronskians.......An alternative formula for the solution of linear differential equations of order n is suggested. When applicable, the suggested method requires fewer and simpler computations than the well-known method using Wronskians....

  2. Global non-linear effect of temperature on economic production.

    Burke, Marshall; Hsiang, Solomon M; Miguel, Edward

    2015-11-12

    Growing evidence demonstrates that climatic conditions can have a profound impact on the functioning of modern human societies, but effects on economic activity appear inconsistent. Fundamental productive elements of modern economies, such as workers and crops, exhibit highly non-linear responses to local temperature even in wealthy countries. In contrast, aggregate macroeconomic productivity of entire wealthy countries is reported not to respond to temperature, while poor countries respond only linearly. Resolving this conflict between micro and macro observations is critical to understanding the role of wealth in coupled human-natural systems and to anticipating the global impact of climate change. Here we unify these seemingly contradictory results by accounting for non-linearity at the macro scale. We show that overall economic productivity is non-linear in temperature for all countries, with productivity peaking at an annual average temperature of 13 °C and declining strongly at higher temperatures. The relationship is globally generalizable, unchanged since 1960, and apparent for agricultural and non-agricultural activity in both rich and poor countries. These results provide the first evidence that economic activity in all regions is coupled to the global climate and establish a new empirical foundation for modelling economic loss in response to climate change, with important implications. If future adaptation mimics past adaptation, unmitigated warming is expected to reshape the global economy by reducing average global incomes roughly 23% by 2100 and widening global income inequality, relative to scenarios without climate change. In contrast to prior estimates, expected global losses are approximately linear in global mean temperature, with median losses many times larger than leading models indicate.

  3. Global non-linear effect of temperature on economic production

    Burke, Marshall; Hsiang, Solomon M.; Miguel, Edward

    2015-11-01

    Growing evidence demonstrates that climatic conditions can have a profound impact on the functioning of modern human societies, but effects on economic activity appear inconsistent. Fundamental productive elements of modern economies, such as workers and crops, exhibit highly non-linear responses to local temperature even in wealthy countries. In contrast, aggregate macroeconomic productivity of entire wealthy countries is reported not to respond to temperature, while poor countries respond only linearly. Resolving this conflict between micro and macro observations is critical to understanding the role of wealth in coupled human-natural systems and to anticipating the global impact of climate change. Here we unify these seemingly contradictory results by accounting for non-linearity at the macro scale. We show that overall economic productivity is non-linear in temperature for all countries, with productivity peaking at an annual average temperature of 13 °C and declining strongly at higher temperatures. The relationship is globally generalizable, unchanged since 1960, and apparent for agricultural and non-agricultural activity in both rich and poor countries. These results provide the first evidence that economic activity in all regions is coupled to the global climate and establish a new empirical foundation for modelling economic loss in response to climate change, with important implications. If future adaptation mimics past adaptation, unmitigated warming is expected to reshape the global economy by reducing average global incomes roughly 23% by 2100 and widening global income inequality, relative to scenarios without climate change. In contrast to prior estimates, expected global losses are approximately linear in global mean temperature, with median losses many times larger than leading models indicate.

  4. Calculation of the Spontaneous Polarization and the Dielectric Constant as a Function of Temperature for

    Hamit Yurtseven

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the spontaneous polarization P is calculated in the ferroelectric phase of KH2PO4 (KDP at atmospheric pressure (TC = 122 K. Also, the dielectric constant ε is calculated at various temperatures in the paraelectric phase of KDP at atmospheric pressure. For this calculation of P and ε, by fitting the observed Raman frequencies of the soft mode, the microscopic parameters of the pure tunnelling model are obtained. In this model, the proton-lattice interaction is not considered and the collective proton mode is identified with the soft-mode response of the system. Our calculations show that the spontaneous polarization decreases continuously in the ferroelectric phase as approaching the transition temperature TC. Also, the dielectric constant decreases with increasing temperature and it diverges in the vicinity of the transition temperature (TC = 122 K for KDP according to the Curie-Weiss law.

  5. Nuclear spin-spin coupling constants of linear carbon chains terminated by coronene molecules: a first principles study

    Oliveira, Joao Paulo Cavalcante; Mota, F. de Brito; Rivelino, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Full text. Carbon nano wires made of long linear atomic chains have attracted considerable interest due to their potential applications in nano electronics. We report a density-functional-theory study of the nuclear spin-spin coupling constants for nano assemblies made of two coronene molecules bridged by carbon linear chains, considering distinct sizes and spin multiplicities. Also, we examine the effects of two terminal conformations (syn and anti) of the terminal anchor pieces on the magnetic properties of the carbon chains via 13 C NMR calculations. Our results reveal that simplified chemical models such as those based on cumulenes or polyynes are not appropriate to describe the linear chains with sp 2 terminations. For these types of atomic chains, the electronic ground state of the even-numbered chains can be singlet or triplet, whereas the ground state of the odd-numbered chains can be doublet or quartet. We discuss how the 13 C NMR chemical shift absorption is affected by increasing the size and changing the parity of the linear carbon chains. We have found that the J coupling constants between the carbon atoms in the linear chains present a well-defined pattern, in good accordance with our electronic structure calculations. For example, in the -C 4 - units we obtain couplings of 43.8, 114.5, 84.6, 114.5, and 43.8 Hz from one end to the other

  6. Calculated thermally induced displacements and stresses for heater experiments at Stripa, Sweden. Linear thermoelastic models using constant material properties

    Chan, T.; Cook, N.G.W.

    1979-12-01

    Thermally induced displacements and stresses have been calculated by finite element analysis to guide the design, operation, and data interpretation of the in situ heating experiments in a granite formation at Stripa, Sweden. There are two full-scale tests with electrical heater canisters comparable in size and power to those envisaged for reprocessed high level waste canisters and a time-scaled test. To provide a simple theoretical basis for data analysis, linear thermoelasticity was assumed. Constant (temperature-independent) thermal and mechanical rock properties were used in the calculations. These properties were determined by conventional laboratory testing on small intact core specimens recovered from the Stripa test site. Two-dimensional axisymmetric models were used for the full-scale experiments, and three-dimensional models for the time-scaled experiment. Highest compressive axial and tangential stresses are expected at the wall of the heater borehole. For the 3.6 kW full-scale heated experiment, maximum compressive tangential stress was predicted to be below the unconfined compressive strength of Stripa granite, while for the 5 kW experiment, the maximum was approximately equal to the compressive strength before the concentric ring of eight 1 kW peripheral heaters was activated, but would exceed that soon afterwards. Three zones of tensile thermomechanical stresses will occur in each full-scale experiment. Maximum vertical displacements range from a fraction of a millimeter over most of the instrumented area of the time-scaled experiment to a few millimeters in the higher-power full-scale experiment. Radial displacements are typically half or less than vertical displacements. The predicted thermomechanical displacements and stresses have been stored in an on-site computer to facilitate instant graphic comparison with field data as the latter are collected

  7. Thermal time constant: optimising the skin temperature predictive modelling in lower limb prostheses using Gaussian processes.

    Mathur, Neha; Glesk, Ivan; Buis, Arjan

    2016-06-01

    Elevated skin temperature at the body/device interface of lower-limb prostheses is one of the major factors that affect tissue health. The heat dissipation in prosthetic sockets is greatly influenced by the thermal conductive properties of the hard socket and liner material employed. However, monitoring of the interface temperature at skin level in lower-limb prosthesis is notoriously complicated. This is due to the flexible nature of the interface liners used which requires consistent positioning of sensors during donning and doffing. Predicting the residual limb temperature by monitoring the temperature between socket and liner rather than skin and liner could be an important step in alleviating complaints on increased temperature and perspiration in prosthetic sockets. To predict the residual limb temperature, a machine learning algorithm - Gaussian processes is employed, which utilizes the thermal time constant values of commonly used socket and liner materials. This Letter highlights the relevance of thermal time constant of prosthetic materials in Gaussian processes technique which would be useful in addressing the challenge of non-invasively monitoring the residual limb skin temperature. With the introduction of thermal time constant, the model can be optimised and generalised for a given prosthetic setup, thereby making the predictions more reliable.

  8. Universal linear-temperature resistivity: possible quantum diffusion transport in strongly correlated superconductors.

    Hu, Tao; Liu, Yinshang; Xiao, Hong; Mu, Gang; Yang, Yi-Feng

    2017-08-25

    The strongly correlated electron fluids in high temperature cuprate superconductors demonstrate an anomalous linear temperature (T) dependent resistivity behavior, which persists to a wide temperature range without exhibiting saturation. As cooling down, those electron fluids lose the resistivity and condense into the superfluid. However, the origin of the linear-T resistivity behavior and its relationship to the strongly correlated superconductivity remain a mystery. Here we report a universal relation [Formula: see text], which bridges the slope of the linear-T-dependent resistivity (dρ/dT) to the London penetration depth λ L at zero temperature among cuprate superconductor Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ and heavy fermion superconductors CeCoIn 5 , where μ 0 is vacuum permeability, k B is the Boltzmann constant and ħ is the reduced Planck constant. We extend this scaling relation to different systems and found that it holds for other cuprate, pnictide and heavy fermion superconductors as well, regardless of the significant differences in the strength of electronic correlations, transport directions, and doping levels. Our analysis suggests that the scaling relation in strongly correlated superconductors could be described as a hydrodynamic diffusive transport, with the diffusion coefficient (D) approaching the quantum limit D ~ ħ/m*, where m* is the quasi-particle effective mass.

  9. Rate Constant and Temperature Dependence for the Reaction of Hydroxyl Radicals with 2-Flouropropane (FC-281ea) and Comparison with an Estimated Rate Constant

    DeMore, W.; Wilson, E., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Relative rate experiments were used to measure the rate constant and temperature dependence of the reaction of OH radicals with 2-fluoropropane (HFC-281ea), using ethane, propane, ethyl chloride as reference standards.

  10. Reversible conformational transition gives rise to 'zig-zag' temperature dependence of the rate constant of irreversible thermoinactivation of enzymes.

    Levitsky VYu; Melik-Nubarov, N S; Siksnis, V A; Grinberg VYa; Burova, T V; Levashov, A V; Mozhaev, V V

    1994-01-15

    We have obtained unusual 'zig-zag' temperature dependencies of the rate constant of irreversible thermoinactivation (k(in)) of enzymes (alpha-chymotrypsin, covalently modified alpha-chymotrypsin, and ribonuclease) in a plot of log k(in) versus reciprocal temperature (Arrhenius plot). These dependencies are characterized by the presence of both ascending and descending linear portions which have positive and negative values of the effective activation energy (Ea), respectively. A kinetic scheme has been suggested that fits best for a description of these zig-zag dependencies. A key element of this scheme is the temperature-dependent reversible conformational transition of enzyme from the 'low-temperature' native state to a 'high-temperature' denatured form; the latter form is significantly more stable against irreversible thermoinactivation than the native enzyme. A possible explanation for a difference in thermal stabilities is that low-temperature and high-temperature forms are inactivated according to different mechanisms. Existence of the suggested conformational transition was proved by the methods of fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The values of delta H and delta S for this transition, determined from calorimetric experiments, are highly positive; this fact underlies a conclusion that this heat-induced transition is caused by an unfolding of the protein molecule. Surprisingly, in the unfolded high-temperature conformation, alpha-chymotrypsin has a pronounced proteolytic activity, although this activity is much smaller than that of the native enzyme.

  11. Constant and alternating temperature effects on germination and early growth of scorzonera

    Dias, A.S.; Dias, L.S.; Pereira, I.P.

    2013-01-01

    Scorzonera is a threatened species in Portugal. Given the role of temperature in germination and seedling recruitment, the performance of total germination, lag of germination, duration of germination, shape of germination, root and hypocotyl length, and relative root growth of scorzonera was investigated under constant and alternating temperatures between 10 and 25ºC. Because of scorzonera’s rarity and threatened status, seeds of cultivated scorzonera were used, providing the framework for h...

  12. A low-temperature (4-300K) constant volume gas thermometer

    Combarieu, A. de

    1976-01-01

    A constant volume gas thermometer was built to calibrate the various secondary thermometers used at low temperature. This gas thermometer is placed in a cryostat where any stable temperature between 4 and 300K may be obtained. The principle is outlined, then the gas thermometer and its auxiliary equipment are briefly described; the corrections to be applied to the results are given and a table shows the values obtained [fr

  13. Linear free energy relationships between aqueous phase hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants and free energy of activation.

    Minakata, Daisuke; Crittenden, John

    2011-04-15

    The hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) is a strong oxidant that reacts with electron-rich sites on organic compounds and initiates complex radical chain reactions in aqueous phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Computer based kinetic modeling requires a reaction pathway generator and predictions of associated reaction rate constants. Previously, we reported a reaction pathway generator that can enumerate the most important elementary reactions for aliphatic compounds. For the reaction rate constant predictor, we develop linear free energy relationships (LFERs) between aqueous phase literature-reported HO(•) reaction rate constants and theoretically calculated free energies of activation for H-atom abstraction from a C-H bond and HO(•) addition to alkenes. The theoretical method uses ab initio quantum mechanical calculations, Gaussian 1-3, for gas phase reactions and a solvation method, COSMO-RS theory, to estimate the impact of water. Theoretically calculated free energies of activation are found to be within approximately ±3 kcal/mol of experimental values. Considering errors that arise from quantum mechanical calculations and experiments, this should be within the acceptable errors. The established LFERs are used to predict the HO(•) reaction rate constants within a factor of 5 from the experimental values. This approach may be applied to other reaction mechanisms to establish a library of rate constant predictions for kinetic modeling of AOPs.

  14. Dielectric constant and laser beam propagation in an underdense collisional plasma: effects of electron temperature

    Xia Xiongping; Qin Zhen; Xu Bin; Cai Zebin

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric constant and laser beam propagation in an underdense collisional plasma are investigated, using the wave and dielectric function equations, for their dependence on the electron temperature. Simulation results show that, due to the influence of the ponderomotive force there is a nonlinear variation of electron temperature in an underdense collisional plasma, and this leads to a complicated and interesting nonlinear variation of dielectric constant; this nonlinear variation of dielectric constant directly affects the beam propagation and gives rise to laser beam self-focusing in some spatial-temporal regions; in particular, the beam width and the beam intensity present an oscillatory variation in the self-focusing region. The influence of several parameters on the dielectric function and beam self-focusing is discussed.

  15. Constant-current charging supplies for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linear accelerator modulators

    Fuja, R.; Grelick, A.E.; Meyer, D.

    1997-01-01

    The APS linac beam energy must be stable to within ±1% to match the energy acceptance of the positron accumulator ring. The klystron pulse modulators must therefore provide a pulse-to-pulse repeatability of 0.1% in order for the beam to have the required energy stability. The modulators have had difficulty achieving the necessary repeatability since the pulse forming network (PFN) charging scheme does not include a deQing circuit. Several of the major charging circuit components are also less reliable than desired. In order to increase operating reliability and to improve pulse-to-pulse stability, it is planned to replace the high voltage power supplies in all modulators with constant-current power supplies. A new modulator charging supply that contains two EMI series 303 constant-current power supplies was constructed. Each of these EMI supplies delivers 1.5 A at up to 40 kV. One supply is sufficient for linac operation at up to 45 Hz, and two supplies in parallel enable linac operation at the nominal rf repetition rate of 60 Hz. This paper discusses test results from the new modulator, and also describes the existing modulators and their performance limitations

  16. Does the Addition of Inert Gases at Constant Volume and Temperature Affect Chemical Equilibrium?

    Paiva, Joao C. M.; Goncalves, Jorge; Fonseca, Susana

    2008-01-01

    In this article we examine three approaches, leading to different conclusions, for answering the question "Does the addition of inert gases at constant volume and temperature modify the state of equilibrium?" In the first approach, the answer is yes as a result of a common students' alternative conception; the second approach, valid only for ideal…

  17. Temperature dependence of (+)-catechin pyran ring proton coupling constants as measured by NMR and modeled using GMMX search methodology

    Fred L. Tobiason; Stephen S. Kelley; M. Mark Midland; Richard W. Hemingway

    1997-01-01

    The pyran ring proton coupling constants for (+)-catechin have been experimentally determined in deuterated methanol over a temperature range of 213 K to 313 K. The experimental coupling constants were simulated to 0.04 Hz on the average at a 90 percent confidence limit using a LAOCOON method. The temperature dependence of the coupling constants was reproduced from the...

  18. High-temperature stable absorber coatings for linear concentrating solar thermal power plants; Hochtemperaturstabile Absorberschichten fuer linear konzentrierende solarthermische Kraftwerke

    Hildebrandt, Christina

    2009-03-23

    This work describes the development of new absorber coatings for different applications - para-bolic trough and linear Fresnel collectors - and operating conditions - absorber in vacuum or in air. The demand for higher efficiencies of solar thermal power plants using parabolic trough technology results in higher temperatures in the collectors and on the absorber tubes. As heat losses increase strongly with increasing temperatures, the need for a lower emissivity of the absorber coating at constant absorptivity arises. The linear Fresnel application envisions ab-sorber tubes stable in air at high temperatures of about 450 C, which are to date commercially not available. This work comprises the theoretical background, the modeling and the fabrication of absorber tubes including the technology transfer to a production-size inline sputter coater. In annealing tests and accompanying optical measurements, degradation processes have been observed and specified more precisely by material characterization techniques. The simulations provided the capability of different materials used as potential IR-reflector. The highest selectivity can be achieved by applying silver which consequently has been chosen for the application in absorber coatings of the parabolic trough technology. Thin silver films how-ever need to be stabilized when used at high temperatures. Appropriate barrier layers as well as process and layer parameters were identified. A high selectivity was achieved and stability of the absorber coating for 1200 h at 500 C in vacuum has been demonstrated. For the application in air, silver was also analyzed as a potential IR-reflector. Even though the stability could be increased considerably, it nevertheless proved to be insufficient. The main factors influencing stability in a positive way are the use of higher quality polishing, additional barrier layers and adequate process parameters. This knowledge was applied for developing coatings which are stable in air at

  19. Exact Solutions for Unsteady Free Convection Flow of Casson Fluid over an Oscillating Vertical Plate with Constant Wall Temperature

    Asma Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady free flow of a Casson fluid past an oscillating vertical plate with constant wall temperature has been studied. The Casson fluid model is used to distinguish the non-Newtonian fluid behaviour. The governing partial differential equations corresponding to the momentum and energy equations are transformed into linear ordinary differential equations by using nondimensional variables. Laplace transform method is used to find the exact solutions of these equations. Expressions for shear stress in terms of skin friction and the rate of heat transfer in terms of Nusselt number are also obtained. Numerical results of velocity and temperature profiles with various values of embedded flow parameters are shown graphically and their effects are discussed in detail.

  20. A new analytical method for estimating lumped parameter constants of linear viscoelastic models from strain rate tests

    Mattei, G.; Ahluwalia, A.

    2018-04-01

    We introduce a new function, the apparent elastic modulus strain-rate spectrum, E_{app} ( \\dot{ɛ} ), for the derivation of lumped parameter constants for Generalized Maxwell (GM) linear viscoelastic models from stress-strain data obtained at various compressive strain rates ( \\dot{ɛ}). The E_{app} ( \\dot{ɛ} ) function was derived using the tangent modulus function obtained from the GM model stress-strain response to a constant \\dot{ɛ} input. Material viscoelastic parameters can be rapidly derived by fitting experimental E_{app} data obtained at different strain rates to the E_{app} ( \\dot{ɛ} ) function. This single-curve fitting returns similar viscoelastic constants as the original epsilon dot method based on a multi-curve global fitting procedure with shared parameters. Its low computational cost permits quick and robust identification of viscoelastic constants even when a large number of strain rates or replicates per strain rate are considered. This method is particularly suited for the analysis of bulk compression and nano-indentation data of soft (bio)materials.

  1. The Elastic Constants Measurement of Metal Alloy by Using Ultrasonic Nondestructive Method at Different Temperature

    Eryi Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonic nondestructive method is introduced into the elastic constants measurement of metal material. The extraction principle of Poisson’s ratio, elastic modulus, and shear modulus is deduced from the ultrasonic propagating equations with two kinds of vibration model of the elastic medium named ultrasonic longitudinal wave and transverse wave, respectively. The ultrasonic propagating velocity is measured by using the digital correlation technique between the ultrasonic original signal and the echo signal from the bottom surface, and then the elastic constants of the metal material are calculated. The feasibility of the correlation algorithm is verified by a simulation procedure. Finally, in order to obtain the stability of the elastic properties of different metal materials in a variable engineering application environment, the elastic constants of two kinds of metal materials in different temperature environment are measured by the proposed ultrasonic method.

  2. The time-walk of analog constant fraction discriminators using very fast scintillator detectors with linear and non-linear energy response

    Regis, J.-M., E-mail: regis@ikp.uni-koeln.de [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Rudigier, M.; Jolie, J.; Blazhev, A.; Fransen, C.; Pascovici, G.; Warr, N. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2012-08-21

    The electronic {gamma}-{gamma} fast timing technique allows for direct nuclear lifetime determination down to the few picoseconds region by measuring the time difference between two coincident {gamma}-ray transitions. Using high resolution ultra-fast LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator detectors in combination with the recently developed mirror symmetric centroid difference method, nuclear lifetimes are measured with a time resolving power of around 5 ps. The essence of the method is to calibrate the energy dependent position (centroid) of the prompt response function of the setup which is obtained for simultaneously occurring events. This time-walk of the prompt response function induced by the analog constant fraction discriminator has been determined by systematic measurements using different photomultiplier tubes and timing adjustments of the constant fraction discriminator. We propose a universal calibration function which describes the time-walk or the combined {gamma}-{gamma} time-walk characteristics, respectively, for either a linear or a non-linear amplitude versus energy dependency of the scintillator detector output pulses.

  3. A comparative numerical analysis of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic sound generation by vortex disturbances in homentropic constant shear flows

    Hau, Jan-Niklas; Oberlack, Martin; Chagelishvili, George; Khujadze, George; Tevzadze, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Aerodynamic sound generation in shear flows is investigated in the light of the breakthrough in hydrodynamics stability theory in the 1990s, where generic phenomena of non-normal shear flow systems were understood. By applying the thereby emerged short-time/non-modal approach, the sole linear mechanism of wave generation by vortices in shear flows was captured [G. D. Chagelishvili, A. Tevzadze, G. Bodo, and S. S. Moiseev, “Linear mechanism of wave emergence from vortices in smooth shear flows,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3178-3181 (1997); B. F. Farrell and P. J. Ioannou, “Transient and asymptotic growth of two-dimensional perturbations in viscous compressible shear flow,” Phys. Fluids 12, 3021-3028 (2000); N. A. Bakas, “Mechanism underlying transient growth of planar perturbations in unbounded compressible shear flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 639, 479-507 (2009); and G. Favraud and V. Pagneux, “Superadiabatic evolution of acoustic and vorticity perturbations in Couette flow,” Phys. Rev. E 89, 033012 (2014)]. Its source is the non-normality induced linear mode-coupling, which becomes efficient at moderate Mach numbers that is defined for each perturbation harmonic as the ratio of the shear rate to its characteristic frequency. Based on the results by the non-modal approach, we investigate a two-dimensional homentropic constant shear flow and focus on the dynamical characteristics in the wavenumber plane. This allows to separate from each other the participants of the dynamical processes — vortex and wave modes — and to estimate the efficacy of the process of linear wave-generation. This process is analyzed and visualized on the example of a packet of vortex modes, localized in both, spectral and physical, planes. Further, by employing direct numerical simulations, the wave generation by chaotically distributed vortex modes is analyzed and the involved linear and nonlinear processes are identified. The generated acoustic field is anisotropic in the wavenumber

  4. A Fiber Bragg grating based tilt sensor suitable for constant temperature room

    Tang, Guoyu; Wei, Jue; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Mingyu; Yang, Meichao; Xie, Ruijun; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Constant-temperature rooms have been widely used in industrial production, quality testing, and research laboratories. This paper proposes a high-precision tilt sensor suitable for a constant- temperature room, which has achieved a wide-range power change while the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) reflection peak wavelength shifted very little, thereby demonstrating a novel method for obtaining a high-precision tilt sensor. This paper also studies the effect of the reflection peak on measurement precision. The proposed sensor can distinguish the direction of tilt with an excellent sensitivity of 403 dBm/° and a highest achievable resolution of 2.481 × 10 −5 ° (that is, 0.08% of the measuring range). (paper)

  5. Low-Temperature Experimental and Theoretical Rate Constants for the O(1D) + H2 Reaction.

    Hickson, Kevin M; Suleimanov, Yury V

    2017-03-09

    In the present joint experimental and theoretical study, we report thermal rate constants for the O( 1 D) + H 2 reaction within the 50-300 K temperature range. Experimental kinetics measurements were performed using a continuous supersonic flow reactor coupled with pulsed laser photolysis for O( 1 D) production and pulsed laser-induced fluorescence in the vacuum ultraviolet wavelength range (VUV LIF) for O( 1 D) detection. Theoretical rate constants were obtained using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) approach over the two lowest potential energy surfaces 1 1 A' and 1 1 A″, which possess barrierless and thermally activated energy profiles, respectively. Both the experimental and theoretical rate constants exhibit a weak temperature dependence. The theoretical results show the dominant role of the 1 1 A' ground state and that contribution of the 1 1 A″ excited state to the total thermal rate decreases dramatically at lower temperature. Agreement between the experimental and theoretical results is good, and the discrepancy does not exceed 25%. It is argued that these differences are likely to be due to nonadiabatic couplings between the 1 1 A' and 2 1 A' surfaces.

  6. Calculated temperature dependence of elastic constants and phonon dispersion of hcp and bcc beryllium

    Hahn, Steven; Arapan, Sergiu; Harmon, Bruce; Eriksson, Olle

    2011-03-01

    Conventional first principle methods for calculating lattice dynamics are unable to calculate high temperature thermophysical properties of materials containing modes that are entropically stabilized. In this presentation we use a relatively new approach called self-consistent ab initio lattice dynamics (SCAILD) to study the hcp to bcc transition (1530 K) in beryllium. The SCAILD method goes beyond the harmonic approximation to include phonon-phonon interactions and produces a temperature-dependent phonon dispersion. In the high temperature bcc structure, phonon-phonon interactions dynamically stabilize the N-point phonon. Fits to the calculated phonon dispersion were used to determine the temperature dependence of the elastic constants in the hcp and bcc phases. Work at the Ames Laboratory was supported by the Department of Energy-Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  7. Limit of ratio of consecutive terms for general order-k linear homogeneous recurrences with constant coefficients

    Fiorenza, Alberto; Vincenzi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We prove a result true for all linear homogeneous recurrences with constant coefficients. → As a corollary of our results we immediately get the celebrated Poincare' theorem. → The limit of the ratio of adjacent terms is characterized as the unique leading root of the characteristic polynomial. → The Golden Ratio, Kepler limit of the classical Fibonacci sequence, is the unique leading root. → The Kepler limit may differ from the unique root of maximum modulus and multiplicity. - Abstract: For complex linear homogeneous recursive sequences with constant coefficients we find a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of the limit of the ratio of consecutive terms. The result can be applied even if the characteristic polynomial has not necessarily roots with modulus pairwise distinct, as in the celebrated Poincare's theorem. In case of existence, we characterize the limit as a particular root of the characteristic polynomial, which depends on the initial conditions and that is not necessarily the unique root with maximum modulus and multiplicity. The result extends to a quite general context the way used to find the Golden mean as limit of ratio of consecutive terms of the classical Fibonacci sequence.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations to calculate glass transition temperature and elastic constants of novel polyethers.

    Sarangapani, Radhakrishnan; Reddy, Sreekantha T; Sikder, Arun K

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations studies are carried out on hydroxyl terminated polyethers that are useful in energetic polymeric binder applications. Energetic polymers derived from oxetanes with heterocyclic side chains with different energetic substituents are designed and simulated under the ensembles of constant particle number, pressure, temperature (NPT) and constant particle number, volume, temperature (NVT). Specific volume of different amorphous polymeric models is predicted using NPT-MD simulations as a function of temperature. Plots of specific volume versus temperature exhibited a characteristic change in slope when amorphous systems change from glassy to rubbery state. Several material properties such as Young's, shear, and bulk modulus, Poisson's ratio, etc. are predicted from equilibrated structures and established the structure-property relations among designed polymers. Energetic performance parameters of these polymers are calculated and results reveal that the performance of the designed polymers is comparable to the benchmark energetic polymers like polyNIMMO, polyAMMO and polyBAMO. Overall, it is worthy remark that this molecular simulations study on novel energetic polyethers provides a good guidance on mastering the design principles and allows us to design novel polymers of tailored properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The influence of temperature and P/P0 upon cationic exchange constants

    Blanc, P.; Vieillard, P.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaboreau, S.; Gaucher, E.C.; Giffaut, E.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The knowledge of thermodynamic properties of clay minerals forming clay materials is important in the context of a disposal within clayey formations (Callovo-Oxfordian argillite) or for clayey barriers. Different experiments have been previously performed concerning the long term behavior of clay materials, indicating that strong transformations are influenced by the alkaline solutions issued from the cementitious materials. But the first stages of the transformations affect the hydration and exchange capacity of the mineral, which are closely related to their retention properties. This work aims at assessing the influence of temperature and relative humidity upon the thermodynamic functions related to cationic exchange and hydration reactions. It is carried out within the framework of the Thermochimie project, aiming at defining a consistent thermodynamic database for modeling purposes. This work is an extension of the thermodynamic of hydration study carried out by Vieillard et al. (2010). Using the same, regular, solid solution model developed by the authors, we first consider the influence of temperature on the hydration reaction by expressing the hydration constant LogK hyd (T) according to the enthalpy and entropy of hydration and to the gas constant. Predicted isotherms are then compared with experimental data acquired on the MX80 smectite at 40, 60, 75, 90 and 100 deg. C. We now consider a cationic exchange reaction between cations A+ and B+, with z cations per mole of smectite and y2 and y1 mole of water per mole of smectite for A and B end members, respectively. The exchange constant LogK A/B , for a given temperature and relative humidity, is expressed as a function of the difference between anhydrous end members, and of the difference between anhydrous end-members activities. A comparison with room temperature exchange constants derived from experiments suggests that discrepancies are related to

  10. Explosive He4 burning: I. kinetics of burning at constant temperature and density

    Khokhlov, A.M.; Ergma, E.V.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of He 4 burning at a constant temperature T> 10 9 0 K and a density rho> 10 5 g/cm 3 is considered. The regions of formation of iron group elements and lighter nuclides during He 4 burning are indicated in the rho, T plane. The dependence of the mean atomic number of the nuclides formed on the temperature and the density is determined. For the temperature T ≥4.10 9 0 K a ''neutron flash'' is found, which can lead to a change in the isotopic composition of the r- and s-process elements present. The range of rho and T in which the formation of an excess number of the elements beyond the iron peak is found

  11. Extrapolation of rate constants of reactions producing H2 and O2 in radiolysis of water at high temperatures

    Leblanc, R.; Ghandi, K.; Hackman, B.; Liu, G.

    2014-01-01

    One target of our research is to extrapolate known data on the rate constants of reactions and add corrections to estimate the rate constants at the higher temperatures reached by the SCWR reactors. The focus of this work was to extrapolate known data on the rate constants of reactions that produce Hydrogen or Oxygen with a rate constant below 10 10 mol -1 s -1 at room temperature. The extrapolation is done taking into account the change in the diffusion rate of the interacting species and the cage effect with thermodynamic conditions. The extrapolations are done over a wide temperature range and under isobaric conditions. (author)

  12. Mixed convection of magnetohydrodynamic nanofluids inside microtubes at constant wall temperature

    Moshizi, S.A. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Neyshabur Branch, Islamic Azad University, Neyshabur (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zamani, M. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Gonabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Gonabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, S.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Malvandi, A., E-mail: amirmalvandi@aut.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Neyshabur Branch, Islamic Azad University, Neyshabur (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Laminar fully developed mixed convection of magnetohydrodynamic nanofluids inside microtubes at a constant wall temperature (CWT) under the effects of a variable directional magnetic field is investigated numerically. Nanoparticles are assumed to have slip velocities relative to the base fluid owing to thermophoretic diffusion (temperature gradient driven force) and Brownian diffusion (concentration gradient driven force). The no-slip boundary condition is avoided at the fluid-solid mixture to assess the non-equilibrium region at the fluid-solid interface. A scale analysis is performed to estimate the relative significance of the pertaining parameters that should be included in the governing equations. After the effects of pertinent parameters on the pressure loss and heat transfer enhancement were considered, the figure of merit (FoM) is employed to evaluate and optimize the thermal performance of heat exchange equipment. The results indicate the optimum thermal performance is obtained when the thermophoresis overwhelms the Brownian diffusion, which is for larger nanoparticles. This enhancement boosts when the buoyancy force increases. In addition, increasing the magnetic field strength and slippage at the fluid-solid interface enhances the thermal performance. - Highlights: • Thermally fully developed flow of nanofluid in circular microchannels at constant wall temperature. • Effect of nanoparticle migration on fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics. • Investigating the Figure of merit of thermal performance. • Performance of system grows when the thermophoresis overwhelms the Brownian diffusion.

  13. Developmental Times of Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) at Constant Temperatures and Applications in Forensic Entomology.

    Yang, Yong-Qiang; Li, Xue-Bo; Shao, Ru-Yue; Lyu, Zhou; Li, Hong-Wei; Li, Gen-Ping; Xu, Lyu-Zi; Wan, Li-Hua

    2016-09-01

    The characteristic life stages of infesting blowflies (Calliphoridae) such as Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) are powerful evidence for estimating the death time of a corpse, but an established reference of developmental times for local blowfly species is required. We determined the developmental rates of C. megacephala from southwest China at seven constant temperatures (16-34°C). Isomegalen and isomorphen diagrams were constructed based on the larval length and time for each developmental event (first ecdysis, second ecdysis, wandering, pupariation, and eclosion), at each temperature. A thermal summation model was constructed by estimating the developmental threshold temperature D0 and the thermal summation constant K. The thermal summation model indicated that, for complete development from egg hatching to eclosion, D0 = 9.07 ± 0.54°C and K = 3991.07 ± 187.26 h °C. This reference can increase the accuracy of estimations of postmortem intervals in China by predicting the growth of C. megacephala. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Temperature dependence of the elastic constant of Borassus Flabellifier 'BF' material by acoustic response

    Phadke, Sushil; DShrivastava, B; Dagaonkar, N; Mishra, Ashutosh

    2012-01-01

    The homogeneous continuous materials are widely used for many structural applications. Migrations of atoms or molecules are the mechanism of mechanical and kinetic processes in materials for their synthesis processing as well as for their structural evolutions. The elastic constant of solids provides valuable information on their mechanical and dynamical properties. In particular, they provide information on the stability and stiffness of materials. In the present study author investigated relation between elastic constant and temperature in Borassus Flabellifier 'BF' wood part. Determination of elastic properties of material is based on the longitudinal wave's velocities via ultrasonic methods. The resonant frequencies of the specimens were measured by Ultrasonic Interferometer (for solids) dual frequency using longitudinal cubic piezoelectric crystal of quartz of frequency 123.62 KHz. The temperature variations from room temperature were done by PID control unit, Mittal Enterprises, New Delhi, India. Characterization of the samples was done by scanning electron microscope (SEM) Model JEOL JSM5400 at 5.0kvx750, 10 μm.

  15. Lifespan metabolic potential of the unicellular organisms expressed by Boltzmann constant, absolute temperature and proton mass

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov

    2016-12-01

    The unicellular organisms and phages are the first appeared fundamental living organisms on the Earth. The total metabolic energy (Els, J) of these organisms can be expressed by their lifespan metabolic potential (Als, J/kg) and body mass (M, kg): Els =Als M. In this study we found a different expression - by Boltzmann's constant (k, J/K), nucleon mass (mp+, kg) of protons (and neutrons), body mass (M, kg) of organism or mass (Ms) of biomolecules (proteins, nucleotides, polysaccharides and lipids) building organism, and the absolute temperature (T, K). The found equations are: Els= (M/mp+)kT for phages and Els=(Ms/mp+)kT for the unicellular organisms. From these equations the lifespan metabolic potential can be expressed as: Als=Els/M= (k/mp+)T for phages and Als=Els/M= (k/3.3mp+)T for unicellular organisms. The temperature-normated lifespan metabolic potential (Als/T, J/K.kg) is equals to the ratio between Boltzmann's constant and nucleon mass: Als/T=k/mp+ for phages and Als/T=k/3.3mp+ for unicellular organisms. The numerical value of the k/mp+ ratio is equals to 8.254×103 J/K.kg, and the numerical value of k/3.3mp+ ratio is equal to 2.497×103 J/K.kg. These values of temperature-normated lifespan metabolic potential could be considered fundamental for the unicellular organisms.

  16. Temperature dependence of bulk modulus and second-order elastic constants

    Singh, P.P.; Kumar, Munish

    2004-01-01

    A simple theoretical model is developed to investigate the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus and second order elastic constants. The method is based on the two different approaches viz. (i) the theory of thermal expansivity formulated by Suzuki, based on the Mie-Gruneisen equation of state, (ii) the theory of high-pressure-high-temperature equation of state formulated by Kumar, based on thermodynamic analysis. The results obtained for a number of crystals viz. NaCl, KCl, MgO and (Mg, Fe) 2 SiO 4 are discussed and compared with the experimental data. It is concluded that the Kumar formulation is far better that the Suzuki theory of thermal expansivity

  17. Laminar free convection in a vertical tube with constant wall temperature considering the variation of fluid properties

    Senna, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    A model to analyze Laminar Free convection with variable properties in the entrance of a vertical open tube with constant wall temperature and for one Prandtl number (0.7), is studied. The velocity and temperature profiles are determined by finite difference methods for different rates of wall to ambient temperatures and different values of the velocity in the entrance of the tube. The results will be compared with those obtained in the same problem with constant properties. (Author) [pt

  18. Laser Measurements of the H Atom + Ozone Rate Constant at Atmospheric Temperatures

    Liu, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Peng, J.; Reppert, K. J.; Callahan, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The exothermic H + O3 reaction produces OH(v) Meinel band emissions, used to derive mesospheric H concentrations and chemical heating rates. We have remeasured its rate constant to reduce resulting uncertainties and the measurement extend to lower mesospheric temperatures using modern laser techniques. H atoms are produced by pulsed ultraviolet laser trace photolysis of O3, followed by reaction of O(D) with added H2. A second, delayed, frequency-mixed dye laser measures the reaction decay rate with the remaining ozone by laser induced fluorescence. We monitor either the H atom decay by 2 photon excitation at 205 nm and detection of red fluorescence, or the OH(v=9) product time evolution with excitation of the B-X (0,9) band at 237 nm and emission in blue B-A bands. By cooling the enclosed low pressure flow cell we obtained measurements from 146-305 K. Small kinetic modeling corrections are made for secondary regeneration of H atoms. The results fully confirm the current NASA JPL recommendation for this rate constant, and establish its extrapolation down to the lower temperatures of the mesosphere. This work was supported by the NSF Aeronomy Program and an NSF Physics summer REU student grant.

  19. Subcooled boiling heat transfer and dryout on a constant temperature microheater

    Chen Tailian; Klausner, James F.; Chung, Jacob N.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study of single-bubble subcooled boiling heat transfer (ΔT sub =31.5 K) on a small heater with constant wall temperature has been performed to better understand the boiling heat transfer associated with this unique configuration. The heater of 0.27 mm x 0.27 mm is set at different superheats to generate vapor bubbles on the microheater surface. For each superheat, the heater temperature is maintained constant by an electronic feedback control circuit while its power dissipation is measured at a frequency of 4.5 kHz. The single-bubble boiling is characterized by a transient bubble nucleation-departure period and a slow growth period. For the superheat range of 34-114 K in this study, at wall superheats below 84 K, the heater remains partially wetted following bubble departure and subsequent nucleation, and this period is characterized by a heat flux spike. At wall superheats above 90 K, the heater is blanketed with vapor following bubble departure and the heat flux experiences a dip during this period. At all superheats, the slow growth period is characterized by an almost uniform heat flux, and it has been observed that the heater surface is mostly covered by vapor. The unique heat transfer processes associated with boiling on this microheater are considerably different than those typically observed during boiling on a large heater

  20. Reinvestigation of the Henry's law constant for hydrogen peroxide with temperature and acidity variation.

    Huang, Daoming; Chen, Zhongming

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is not only an important oxidant in itself; it also serves as both sink and temporary reservoir for other important oxidants including HOx (OH and HO2) radicals and O3 in the atmosphere. Its partitioning between gas and aqueous phases in the atmosphere, usually described by its Henry's law constant (K(H)), significantly influences its role in atmospheric processes. Large discrepancies between the K(H) values reported in previous work, however, have created uncertainty for atmospheric modelers. Based on our newly developed online instrumentation, we have re-determined the temperature and acidity dependence of K(H) for hydrogen peroxide at an air pressure of (0.960 +/- 0.013) atm (1 atm = 1.01325 x 10(5) Pa). The results indicated that the temperature dependence of K(H) for hydrogen peroxide fits to the Van't Hoff equation form, expressed as lnK(H) = a/T - b, and a = -deltaH/R, where K(H) is in M/atm (M is mol/L), T is in degrees Kelvin, R is the ideal gas constant, and deltaH is the standard heat of solution. For acidity dependence, results demonstrated that the K(H) value of hydrogen peroxide appeared to have no obvious dependence on decreasing pH level (from pH 7 to pH 1). Combining the dependence of both temperature and acidity, the obtained a and b were 7024 +/- 138 and 11.97 +/- 0.48, respectively, deltaH was (58.40 +/- 1.15) kJ/(K x mol), and the uncertainties represent sigma. Our determined K(H) values for hydrogen peroxide will therefore be of great use in atmospheric models.

  1. Direct measurements of methoxy removal rate constants for collisions with CH4, Ar, N2, Xe, and CF4 in the temperature range 673--973K

    Wantuck, P.J.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Baugchum, S.L.; Winn, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    Removal rate constants for CH 3 O by CH 4 , Ar, N 2 , Xe, and CF 4 were measured over a 400K temperature range using a laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence technique. Rapid methoxy removal rates are observed for the non-reactive collision partners (Ar, N 2 , Xe, and CF 4 ) at elevated temperatures showing that the dissociation and isomerization channels for CH 3 O are indeed important. The total removal rate constant (reaction /plus/ dissociation and/or isomerization) for CH 4 exhibits a linear dependence on temperature and has a removal rate constant, k/sub r/ /equals/ (1.2 +- 0.6) /times/ 10/sup /minus/8/exp[(/minus/101070 +- 350)/T]cm 3 molecule/sup /minus/1/s/sup /minus/1/. Assuming that the removal rate constant due to dissociation and/or isomerization are similar for CH 4 and CF 4 , the reaction rate constant for CH 3 O /plus/ CH 4 is equal to (1.7 +- 1.0) /times/ 10/sup /minus/10/exp[(/minus/7480 +- 1100)/T]cm 3 molecule/sup /minus/1/s/sup /minus/1/. 7 refs., 4 figs

  2. Thermal expansion and temperature variation of elastic constants of Li(H,D) and Na(H,D) systems

    Islam, A.K.M.A.; Hoque, M.T.

    1994-11-01

    An analysis of thermal expansion of Li(H,D) systems up to melting temperature has been performed using the theory of anharmonic lattice. The study has for the first time been extended to Na(H,D) systems where very little or no data are available. The calculated lattice constants of Li(H,D) systems show quite good agreement with experiment. The success of the present calculation with Li(H,D) and room temperature lattice constant data for Na(H,D) given an indication of the reliability of the computed lattice constants and thermal expansion coefficients for Na(H,D) systems. The study also allows us to predict the hitherto unknown lattice constants of Na(H,D) crystal at 0K. The temperature dependence of elastic constants for Li(H,D) systems has also been evaluated. Comparison with measurements shows the reliability of the present calculations. (author). 45 refs, 4 figs

  3. Modeling and monitoring cyclic and linear volatile methylsiloxanes in a wastewater treatment plant using constant water level sequencing batch reactors

    Wang, De-Gao, E-mail: degaowang@dlmu.edu.cn; Du, Juan; Pei, Wei; Liu, Yongjun; Guo, Mingxing

    2015-04-15

    The fate of cyclic and linear volatile methylsiloxanes (VMSs) was evaluated in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) using constant water level sequencing batch reactors from Dalian, China. Influent, effluent, and sewage sludge samples were collected for seven consecutive days. The mean concentrations of cyclic VMSs (cVMSs) in influent and effluent samples are 1.05 μg L{sup −1} and 0.343 μg L{sup −1}; the total removal efficiency of VMSs is > 60%. Linear VMS (lVMS) concentration is under the quantification limitation in aquatic samples but is found in sludge samples with a value of 90 μg kg{sup −1}. High solid-water partition coefficients result in high VMS concentrations in sludge with the mean value of 5030 μg kg{sup −1}. No significant differences of the daily mass flows are found when comparing the concentration during the weekend and during working days. The estimated mass load of total cVMSs is 194 mg d{sup −1} 1000 inhabitants{sup −1} derived for the population. A mass balance model of the WWTP was developed and derived to simulate the fate of cVMSs. The removal by sorption on sludge increases, and the volatilization decreases with increasing hydrophobicity and decreasing volatility for cVMSs. Sensitivity analysis shows that the total suspended solid concentration in the effluent, mixed liquor suspended solid concentration, the sewage sludge flow rate, and the influent flow rate are the most influential parameters on the mass distribution of cVMSs in this WWTP. - Highlights: • A mass balance model for siloxanes was developed in sequencing batch reactor. • Total suspended solid in effluent has the most influence on removal efficiency. • Enhancement of suspended solid removal reduces the release to aquatic environment.

  4. Theoretical study of temperature dependent acoustic attenuation and non-linearity parameters in alkali metal hydride and deuteride

    Singh, Rishi Pal [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Singh, Rajendra Kumar, E-mail: rksingh_17@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2010-11-01

    Temperature dependence of acoustic attenuation and non-linearity parameters in lithium hydride and lithium deuteride have been studied for longitudinal and shear modes along various crystallographic directions of propagation in a wide temperature range. Lattice parameter and repulsive parameters have been used as input data and interactions up to next nearest neighbours have been considered to calculate second and third order elastic constants which in turn have been used for evaluating acoustic attenuation and related parameters. The results have been discussed and compared with available data. It is hoped that the present results will serve to stimulate the determination of the acoustic attenuation of these compounds at different temperatures.

  5. Study of optical non-linear properties of a constant total effective length multiple quantum wells system

    Solaimani, M.; Morteza, Izadifard; Arabshahi, H.; Reza, Sarkardehi Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the effect of the number of the wells, in a multiple quantum wells structure with constant total effective length, on the optical properties of multiple quantum wells like the absorption coefficient and the refractive index by means of compact density matrix approach. GaAs/Al x Ga (1−x) As multiple quantum wells systems was selected as an example. Besides, the effect of varying number of wells on the subband energies, wave functions, number of bound states, and the Fermi energy have been also investigated. Our calculation revealed that the number of wells in a multiple quantum well is a criterion with which we can control the amount of nonlinearity. This study showed that for the third order refractive index change there is two regimes of variations and the critical well number was six. In our calculations, we have used the same wells and barrier thicknesses to construct the multiple quantum wells system. - Highlights: ► OptiOptical Non-Linear. ► Total Effective Length. ► Multiple Quantum Wells System - genetic algorithm ► Schrödinger equation solution. ► Nanostructure.

  6. Simple and accurate solution for convective-radiative fin with temperature dependent thermal conductivity using double optimal linearization

    Bouaziz, M.N.; Aziz, Abdul

    2010-01-01

    A novel concept of double optimal linearization is introduced and used to obtain a simple and accurate solution for the temperature distribution in a straight rectangular convective-radiative fin with temperature dependent thermal conductivity. The solution is built from the classical solution for a pure convection fin of constant thermal conductivity which appears in terms of hyperbolic functions. When compared with the direct numerical solution, the double optimally linearized solution is found to be accurate within 4% for a range of radiation-conduction and thermal conductivity parameters that are likely to be encountered in practice. The present solution is simple and offers superior accuracy compared with the fairly complex approximate solutions based on the homotopy perturbation method, variational iteration method, and the double series regular perturbation method. The fin efficiency expression resembles the classical result for the constant thermal conductivity convecting fin. The present results are easily usable by the practicing engineers in their thermal design and analysis work involving fins.

  7. Correction of MHS Viscosimetric Constants upon Numerical Simulation of Temperature Induced Degradation Kinetic of Chitosan Solutions

    Vincenzo Maria De Benedictis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Mark–Houwink–Sakurada (MHS equation allows for estimation of rheological properties, if the molecular weight is known along with good understanding of the polymer conformation. The intrinsic viscosity of a polymer solution is related to the polymer molecular weight according to the MHS equation, where the value of the constants is related to the specific solvent and its concentration. However, MHS constants do not account for other characteristics of the polymeric solutions, i.e., Deacetilation Degree (DD when the solute is chitosan. In this paper, the degradation of chitosan in different acidic environments by thermal treatment is addressed. In particular, two different solutions are investigated (used as solvent acetic or hydrochloric acid with different concentrations used for the preparation of chitosan solutions. The samples were treated at different temperatures (4, 30, and 80 °C and time points (3, 6 and 24 h. Rheological, Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and Thermal Gravimetric Analyses (TGA were performed in order to assess the degradation rate of the polymer backbones. Measured values of molecular weight have been integrated in the simulation of the batch degradation of chitosan solutions for evaluating MHS coefficients to be compared with their corresponding experimental values. Evaluating the relationship between the different parameters used in the preparation of chitosan solutions (e.g., temperature, time, acid type and concentration, and their contribution to the degradation of chitosan backbone, it is important to have a mathematical frame that could account for phenomena involved in polymer degradation that go beyond the solvent-solute combination. Therefore, the goal of the present work is to propose an integration of MHS coefficients for chitosan solutions that contemplate a deacetylation degree for chitosan systems or a more

  8. A simulation model of Rosa hybrida growth response to constant irradiance and day and night temperatures

    Hopper, D.A.; Hammer, P.A.; Wilson, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper details the development and verification of ROSESIM, a computer simulation model of the growth of ‘Royalty’ roses (Rosa hybrida L.) based on experimentally observed growth responses from pinch until flowering under 15 combinations of constant photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), day temperature (DT), and night temperature (NT). Selected according to a rotatable central composite design, these treatment combinations represent commercial greenhouse conditions during the winter and spring in the midwestern United States; each selected condition was maintained in an environmental growth chamber having 12-hour photoperiods. ROSESIM incorporates regression models of four flower development characteristics (days from pinch to visible bud, first color, sepal reflex, and flowering) that are full quadratic polynomials in PPF, DT, and NT. ROSESIM also incorporates mathematical models of nine plant growth characteristics (stem length and the following fresh and dry weights: stem, leaf, flower, and total) based on data recorded every 10 days and at flowering. At each design point, a cubic regression in time (days from pinch) estimated the plant growth characteristics on intermediate days; then difference equations were developed to predict the resulting daily growth increments as third-degree polynomial functions of days from pinch, PPF, DT, and NT. ROSESIM was verified by plotting against time each simulated plant growth characteristic and the associated experimental observations for the eight factorial design points defining the region of interest. Moreover, one-way analysis of variance procedures were applied to the differences between ROSESIM predictions and the corresponding observed means for all 15 treatment combinations. At 20 days from pinch, significant differences (P < 0.05) were observed for all nine plant growth characteristics. At 30 and 40 days from pinch, only flower fresh and dry weights yielded significant differences; at flowering, none of the 13

  9. A simulation model of Rosa hybrida growth response to constant irradiance and day and night temperatures

    Hopper, D. A. [Colorado State University, Fort Collin, CO. (United States); Hammer, P. A.; Wilson, J. R.

    1994-09-15

    This paper details the development and verification of ROSESIM, a computer simulation model of the growth of ‘Royalty’ roses (Rosa hybrida L.) based on experimentally observed growth responses from pinch until flowering under 15 combinations of constant photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), day temperature (DT), and night temperature (NT). Selected according to a rotatable central composite design, these treatment combinations represent commercial greenhouse conditions during the winter and spring in the midwestern United States; each selected condition was maintained in an environmental growth chamber having 12-hour photoperiods. ROSESIM incorporates regression models of four flower development characteristics (days from pinch to visible bud, first color, sepal reflex, and flowering) that are full quadratic polynomials in PPF, DT, and NT. ROSESIM also incorporates mathematical models of nine plant growth characteristics (stem length and the following fresh and dry weights: stem, leaf, flower, and total) based on data recorded every 10 days and at flowering. At each design point, a cubic regression in time (days from pinch) estimated the plant growth characteristics on intermediate days; then difference equations were developed to predict the resulting daily growth increments as third-degree polynomial functions of days from pinch, PPF, DT, and NT. ROSESIM was verified by plotting against time each simulated plant growth characteristic and the associated experimental observations for the eight factorial design points defining the region of interest. Moreover, one-way analysis of variance procedures were applied to the differences between ROSESIM predictions and the corresponding observed means for all 15 treatment combinations. At 20 days from pinch, significant differences (P < 0.05) were observed for all nine plant growth characteristics. At 30 and 40 days from pinch, only flower fresh and dry weights yielded significant differences; at flowering, none of the 13

  10. Determination of temperature dependence of full matrix material constants of PZT-8 piezoceramics using only one sample.

    Zhang, Yang; Tang, Liguo; Tian, Hua; Wang, Jiyang; Cao, Wenwu; Zhang, Zhongwu

    2017-08-15

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) was used to determine the temperature dependence of full matrix material constants of PZT-8 piezoceramics from room temperature to 100 °C. Property variations from sample to samples can be eliminated by using only one sample, so that data self-consistency can be guaranteed. The RUS measurement system error was estimated to be lower than 2.35%. The obtained full matrix material constants at different temperatures all have excellent self-consistency, which can help accurately predict device performance at high temperatures using finite element simulations.

  11. Linearity between temperature peak and bio-energy CO2 emission rates

    Cherubini, Francesco; Bright, Ryan M.; Stromman, Anders H.; Gasser, Thomas; Ciais, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Many future energy and emission scenarios envisage an increase of bio-energy in the global primary energy mix. In most climate impact assessment models and policies, bio-energy systems are assumed to be carbon neutral, thus ignoring the time lag between CO 2 emissions from biomass combustion and CO 2 uptake by vegetation. Here, we show that the temperature peak caused by CO 2 emissions from bio-energy is proportional to the maximum rate at which emissions occur and is almost insensitive to cumulative emissions. Whereas the carbon-climate response (CCR) to fossil fuel emissions is approximately constant, the CCR to bio-energy emissions depends on time, biomass turnover times, and emission scenarios. The linearity between temperature peak and bio-energy CO 2 emission rates resembles the characteristic of the temperature response to short-lived climate forcers. As for the latter, the timing of CO 2 emissions from bio-energy matters. Under the international agreement to limit global warming to 2 C by 2100, early emissions from bio-energy thus have smaller contributions on the targeted temperature than emissions postponed later into the future, especially when bio-energy is sourced from biomass with medium (50-60 years) or long turnover times (100 years). (authors)

  12. Studies of Redox Equilibria at Elevated Temperatures I. The Estimation of Equilibrium Constants and Standard Potentials for Aqueous Systems up to 374 deg C

    Lewis, Derek

    1969-07-01

    A method is described for the estimation of equilibrium constants for aqueous systems at temperatures up to 374 deg C from entropy and free energy data for 25 deg C and data on the variation of heat capacity with temperature. Partial molal heat capacities of aqueous ions are estimated on the basis of the principle that, with suitably chosen standard states, the partial molal entropies of ions of a particular class at any given temperature are linearly related to the corresponding entropies at some reference temperature. The method suggested is compared with other methods, based on the Van't Hoff isobar and on an extension of the conventional scale of ionic free energy at 25 deg C, and the general dependence of aqueous equilibria on ionic heat capacity is considered.

  13. Effect of linear and non-linear components in the temperature dependences of thermoelectric properties on the energy conversion efficiency

    Yamashita, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    The new thermal rate equations were built up by taking the linear and non-linear components in the temperature dependences of the Seebeck coefficient α, the electrical resistivity ρ and thermal conductivity κ of a thermoelectric (TE) material into the thermal rate equations on the assumption that their temperature dependences are expressed by a quadratic function of temperature T. The energy conversion efficiency η for a single TE element was formulated using the new thermal rate ones proposed here. By applying it to the high-performance half-Heusler compound, the non-linear component in the temperature dependence of α among those of the TE properties has the greatest effect on η, so that η/η 0 was increased by 11% under the condition of T = 510 K and ΔT = 440 K, where η 0 is a well-known conventional energy conversion efficiency. It was thus found that the temperature dependences of TE properties have a significant influence on η. When one evaluates the accurate achievement rate of η exp obtained experimentally for a TE generator, therefore, η exp should be compared with η the estimated from the theoretical expression proposed here, not with η 0 , particularly when there is a strong non-linearity in the temperature dependence of TE properties.

  14. The dissolution rate constant of magnetite in water at different temperatures and pH conditions

    Mohajery, Khatereh; Deydier de Pierrefeu, Laurent; Lister, Derek H.

    2012-09-01

    Under the nominal conditions of power system coolants, the corrosion of components made of carbon steel is limited by the magnetite films that develop on surfaces. In some situations, the magnetite film loses much of its protective ability and corrosion and loss of iron to the system are exacerbated. Common examples of such situations occur when the system is non-isothermal so that temperature gradients cause differences in magnetite solubility around the circuit; the resulting areas of under-saturation in iron give rise to dissolution of normally protective films. Condensing steam in two-phase systems may also promote oxide dissolution. When the turbulence in the system is high, oxide degradation is aggravated and flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) results. The subsequent increased loading of systems with iron leads to fouling of flow passages and heat transfer surfaces and in reactor primary coolants to rising radiation fields, while FAC can have disastrous results in terms of pipe wall thinning and eventual rupture. Magnetite dissolution is clearly a key contributor to these processes. Thus, the conventional mechanistic description of FAC postulates magnetite dissolution in series with mass transfer of iron from the film to the bulk coolant. In the resulting equations, if the dissolution rate constant is considerably less than the mass transfer coefficient for a particular situation, dissolution will control and flow should have no effect. This is clearly untenable for FAC, so it is often assumed that mass transfer controls and the contribution from oxide dissolution is ignored - on occasion when data on dissolution kinetics are available and sometimes when those data show that dissolution should control. In most cases, however, dissolution rate constants for magnetite are not available. At UNB Nuclear we have a research program using a high-temperature loop to measure dissolution rates of magnetite in water under various conditions of flow, temperature and

  15. Preliminary study of rabbit model with corneal neovascularization after thermal burn under the constant temperature

    Yong Jia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To explore the suitable conditions in rapid model of corneal neovascularization(CNVafter thermal burn under different constant temperature in rabbit. METHODS: Total 45 New Zealand white rabbits were divided randomly into five groups(A, B, C, D, E. A groups: 100℃(n=10, B groups: 200℃(n=10, C groups: 300℃(n=10, D groups: 400℃(n=10, and E groups: control group(n=5. All left eyes of rabbits in A,B,C,D groups were induced corneal neovascularization by constant temperature burning device. The growth of CNV was observed by slit lamp microscope and the area of CNV were recorded on 4 th, 7 th, 14th, 30th days postoperatively. SPSS 19.0 statistical package was used for data analysis, and the data was recorded by mean±standard deviation. Comparison by analysis of variance was made by repeated measures in the area of neovascularization at each time point in groups. Statistical tests were considered significantly when P values were less than 0.05. RESULTS: On postoperative 4th, 7th, 14th, 30th days: no neovascularization was found after corneal thermal burn in A group, but only a few nebula left(n=2; the area of CNV were(9.16±1.45mm2,(37.73±5.49mm2,(62.44±7.54mm2,(40.28±7.39mm2 in B group respectively; and(11.45±1.04mm2,(44.51±4.64mm2,(66.13±4.13mm2,(43.04±2.33mm2 in C group respectively; and(13.23±0.86mm2,(47.26±4.59mm2,(67.57±4.56mm2,(45.59±4.44mm2 in D group respectively, and part corneal carbide(n=4was observed as well as corneal perforation(n=6were found on 3d in D group. No neovascularization was found in normal control group. Comparison of the areas of CNV at each time point between groups was statistically different, PPCOCLUSION: In 4 to 7d, the higher the temperature is, the more the neovascularization area of CNV are. It has no significant difference in 14 to 30d. But corneal carbide and corneal perforation are often found in 400℃ group, so its modeling failure rate is high. It is between 200℃ and 300℃ that

  16. Experimental determination of the high-temperature rate constant for the reaction of OH with sec-butanol.

    Pang, Genny A; Hanson, Ronald K; Golden, David M; Bowman, Craig T

    2012-10-04

    The overall rate constant for the reaction of OH with sec-butanol [CH(3)CH(OH)CH(2)CH(3)] was determined from measurements of the near-first-order OH decay in shock-heated mixtures of tert-butylhydroperoxide (as a fast source of OH) with sec-butanol in excess. Three kinetic mechanisms from the literature describing sec-butanol combustion were used to examine the sensitivity of the rate constant determination to secondary kinetics. The overall rate constant determined can be described by the Arrhenius expression 6.97 × 10(-11) exp(-1550/T[K]) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), valid over the temperature range of 888-1178 K. Uncertainty bounds of ±30% were found to adequately account for the uncertainty in secondary kinetics. To our knowledge, the current data represent the first efforts toward an experimentally determined rate constant for the overall reaction of OH with sec-butanol at combustion-relevant temperatures. A rate constant predicted using a structure-activity relationship from the literature was compared to the current data and previous rate constant measurements for the title reaction at atmospheric-relevant temperatures. The structure-activity relationship was found to be unable to correctly predict the measured rate constant at all temperatures where experimental data exist. We found that the three-parameter fit of 4.95 × 10(-20)T(2.66) exp(+1123/T[K]) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) better describes the overall rate constant for the reaction of OH with sec-butanol from 263 to 1178 K.

  17. Diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 at room and elevated temperatures determined by neutron diffraction

    Wang, Zhuqing; Stoica, Alexandru D.; Ma, Dong; Beese, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 have been determined by means of in situ loading at room and elevated temperatures using time-of-flight neutron diffraction. Theoretical models proposed by Voigt, Reuss, and Kroner were used to determine single-crystal elastic constants from measured diffraction elastic constants, with the Kroner model having the best ability to capture experimental data. The magnitude of single-crystal elastic moduli, computed from single-crystal elastic constants, decreases and the single crystal anisotropy increases as temperature increases, indicating the importance of texture in affecting macroscopic stress at elevated temperatures. The experimental data reported here are of great importance in understanding additive manufacturing of metallic components as: diffraction elastic constants are required for computing residual stresses from residual lattice strains measured using neutron diffraction, which can be used to validate thermomechanical models of additive manufacturing, while single-crystal elastic constants can be used in crystal plasticity modeling, for example, to understand mechanical deformation behavior of additively manufactured components.

  18. Diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 at room and elevated temperatures determined by neutron diffraction

    Wang, Zhuqing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Stoica, Alexandru D. [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Ma, Dong, E-mail: dongma@ornl.gov [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Beese, Allison M., E-mail: amb961@psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-09-30

    In this work, diffraction and single-crystal elastic constants of Inconel 625 have been determined by means of in situ loading at room and elevated temperatures using time-of-flight neutron diffraction. Theoretical models proposed by Voigt, Reuss, and Kroner were used to determine single-crystal elastic constants from measured diffraction elastic constants, with the Kroner model having the best ability to capture experimental data. The magnitude of single-crystal elastic moduli, computed from single-crystal elastic constants, decreases and the single crystal anisotropy increases as temperature increases, indicating the importance of texture in affecting macroscopic stress at elevated temperatures. The experimental data reported here are of great importance in understanding additive manufacturing of metallic components as: diffraction elastic constants are required for computing residual stresses from residual lattice strains measured using neutron diffraction, which can be used to validate thermomechanical models of additive manufacturing, while single-crystal elastic constants can be used in crystal plasticity modeling, for example, to understand mechanical deformation behavior of additively manufactured components.

  19. Linear and quadratic in temperature resistivity from holography

    Ge, Xian-Hui [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of High Temperature Superconductors,Shanghai 200444 (China); Shanghai Key Lab for Astrophysics,100 Guilin Road, 200234 Shanghai (China); Tian, Yu [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing, 100049 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of High Temperature Superconductors,Shanghai 200444 (China); Wu, Shang-Yu [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University,Hsinchu 300 (China); Wu, Shao-Feng [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of High Temperature Superconductors,Shanghai 200444 (China); Shanghai Key Lab for Astrophysics,100 Guilin Road, 200234 Shanghai (China)

    2016-11-22

    We present a new black hole solution in the asymptotic Lifshitz spacetime with a hyperscaling violating factor. A novel computational method is introduced to compute the DC thermoelectric conductivities analytically. We find that both the linear-T and quadratic-T contributions to the resistivity can be realized, indicating that a more detailed comparison with experimental phenomenology can be performed in this scenario.

  20. Prediction of minimum temperatures in an alpine region by linear and non-linear post-processing of meteorological models

    R. Barbiero

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Model Output Statistics (MOS refers to a method of post-processing the direct outputs of numerical weather prediction (NWP models in order to reduce the biases introduced by a coarse horizontal resolution. This technique is especially useful in orographically complex regions, where large differences can be found between the NWP elevation model and the true orography. This study carries out a comparison of linear and non-linear MOS methods, aimed at the prediction of minimum temperatures in a fruit-growing region of the Italian Alps, based on the output of two different NWPs (ECMWF T511–L60 and LAMI-3. Temperature, of course, is a particularly important NWP output; among other roles it drives the local frost forecast, which is of great interest to agriculture. The mechanisms of cold air drainage, a distinctive aspect of mountain environments, are often unsatisfactorily captured by global circulation models. The simplest post-processing technique applied in this work was a correction for the mean bias, assessed at individual model grid points. We also implemented a multivariate linear regression on the output at the grid points surrounding the target area, and two non-linear models based on machine learning techniques: Neural Networks and Random Forest. We compare the performance of all these techniques on four different NWP data sets. Downscaling the temperatures clearly improved the temperature forecasts with respect to the raw NWP output, and also with respect to the basic mean bias correction. Multivariate methods generally yielded better results, but the advantage of using non-linear algorithms was small if not negligible. RF, the best performing method, was implemented on ECMWF prognostic output at 06:00 UTC over the 9 grid points surrounding the target area. Mean absolute errors in the prediction of 2 m temperature at 06:00 UTC were approximately 1.2°C, close to the natural variability inside the area itself.

  1. Description of an identification method of thermocouple time constant based on application of recursive numerical filtering to temperature fluctuation

    Bernardin, B.; Le Guillou, G.; Parcy, JP.

    1981-04-01

    Usual spectral methods, based on temperature fluctuation analysis, aiming at thermocouple time constant identification are using an equipment too much sophisticated for on-line application. It is shown that numerical filtering is optimal for this application, the equipment is simpler than for spectral methods and less samples of signals are needed for the same accuracy. The method is described and a parametric study was performed using a temperature noise simulator [fr

  2. A temperature and mass dependence of the linear Boltzmann collision operator from group theory point of view

    Saveliev, V.

    1996-01-01

    The Lie group of the transformations affecting the parameters of the linear Boltzmann collision operator such as temperature of background gas and ratio of masses of colliding particles and molecules is discovered. The group also describes the conservation laws for collisions and main symmetries of the collision operator. New algebraic properties of the collision operator are derived. Transformations acting on the variables and parameters and leaving the linear Boltzmann kinetic equation invariant are found. For the constant collision frequency the integral representation of solutions for nonuniform case in terms of the distribution function of particles drifting in a gas with zero temperature is deduced. The new exact relaxation solutions are obtained too. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  3. Effects of constant and stepwise changes in temperature on the species abundance dynamics of four cladocera species

    Verbitsky V. B.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experiments with natural zooplankton communities were carried out to study the effects of two contrasting temperature regimes: constant temperature (15, 20, and 25 °C and graded changes in temperature. The graded regime consisted of repeated sustained (three weeks controlled stepwise temperature changes of 5 or 10 °C within 15–25 °C on the population dynamics of four dominant species of lake littoral zooplankton, Daphnia longispina (Müller, 1785, Diaphanosoma brachyurum (Lievin, 1848, Simocephalus vetulus (Müller, 1776 and Chydorus sphaericus (Müller, 1785. The results show that controlled stepwise changes (positive or negative in temperature within the ranges of 15–20, 20–25, and 15–25 °C can exert either stimulating or inhibitory effect (direct or delayed on the development of D. longispina and S. vetulus populations. The development of D. brachyurum and Ch. sphaericus, both more steno-thermophile, was only stimulated by a stable elevated temperature (25 °C. These results support the previously formulated hypothesis that, in determining the ecological temperature optimum of a species within a natural community, it is not enough to define its optimum from constant, cyclic or random temperature fluctuations, but also from unidirectional stepwise changes in temperature. These stepwise changes may also induce prolonged or delayed effects.

  4. Soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel and diesel spray combustion in a constant volume combustion chamber

    Zhang, Ji; Jing, Wei; Roberts, William L.; Fang, Tiegang

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of the soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel and diesel combustion in a constant volume chamber using a two-color technique. This technique uses a high-speed camera coupled with two narrowband filters (550. nm

  5. Invar hardening under keeping of low values of temperature coefficient of linear expansion

    Bashnin, Yu.A.; Shiryaeva, A.N.; Omel'chenko, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Complex invar alloying with chromium, zirconium and nitrogen is conducted for increasing hardness and assuring low values of the temperature coefficient of linear expansion. It is shown that alloying with nitride-forming elements-chromium, zirconium and the following high-temperature saturation under high pressure with nitrogen provides the invar hardening at assuring a low temperature coefficient of linear expansion. Saturation with nitrogen under 100 MPa pressure at 1050 deg C during 3 hours permits to prepare an invar containing up to 0.2% N 2 uniformly distributed over the whole cross section of samples with 4 mm diameter. Nitrogen in invar alloys alloyed with chromium and zirconium affects the Curie point similarly to carbon and nickel shifting it towards higher temperatures, it slightly changes the value of the temperature coefficient of linear expansion and provides linear character of thermal expansion dependence on temperature in the +100 deg C - -180 deg C range

  6. An investigation on linear and non-linear optical constants of nano-spherical CuPc thin films for optoelectronic applications

    Yahia, I. S.; Ganesh, V.; Shkir, M.; AlFaify, S.; Zahran, H. Y.; Algarni, H.; Abutalib, M. M.; Al-Ghamdi, Attieh A.; El-Naggar, A. M.; AlBassam, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    In the current work, the authors present the systematic study on linear and nonlinear optical properties of Copper-phathalocyanine thin film deposited by thermal evaporation system for the first time. The thickness of the prepared thin film was measured and found to be ~300 nm. X-ray diffraction and AFM study confirms that the prepared thin film possess good quality. The orientation of the grown thin film is found to be along (100). UV-vis-NIR study shows that the deposited thin film is highly transparent (>80%) in the wavelength range of 700-2500 nm. Further, the recorded optical data was used to determine the various linear and nonlinear optical parameters. The calculated value of refractive index is found to be in the range of 0.4-1.0. The direct and indirect band gap value is found to be 2.9 and 3.25 eV, respectively. The value of linear and nonlinear susceptibilities is found to be in order of 10-12. The higher value of linear and nonlinear parameters makes it suitable for optoelectronic applications.

  7. An investigation on linear and non-linear optical constants of nano-spherical CuPc thin films for optoelectronic applications

    Yahia, I.S. [Nano-Science & Semiconductor Labs, Metallurgical Lab., Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo (Egypt); Advanced Functional Materials & Optoelectronic Laboratory (AFMOL), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Ganesh, V. [Advanced Functional Materials & Optoelectronic Laboratory (AFMOL), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Shkir, M., E-mail: shkirphysics@gmail.com [Advanced Functional Materials & Optoelectronic Laboratory (AFMOL), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); AlFaify, S. [Advanced Functional Materials & Optoelectronic Laboratory (AFMOL), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Zahran, H.Y. [Nano-Science & Semiconductor Labs, Metallurgical Lab., Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo (Egypt); Advanced Functional Materials & Optoelectronic Laboratory (AFMOL), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Algarni, H. [Advanced Functional Materials & Optoelectronic Laboratory (AFMOL), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Abutalib, M.M.; Al-Ghamdi, Attieh A. [Centre of Nanotechnology, Physics Department-Faculty of Science-AL Faisaliah Campus, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); El-Naggar, A.M.; AlBassam, A.M. [Research Chair of Exploitation of Renewable Energy Applications in Saudi Arabia, Physics & Astronomy Dept., College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-09-01

    In the current work, the authors present the systematic study on linear and nonlinear optical properties of Copper-phathalocyanine thin film deposited by thermal evaporation system for the first time. The thickness of the prepared thin film was measured and found to be ~300 nm. X-ray diffraction and AFM study confirms that the prepared thin film possess good quality. The orientation of the grown thin film is found to be along (100). UV–vis-NIR study shows that the deposited thin film is highly transparent (>80%) in the wavelength range of 700–2500 nm. Further, the recorded optical data was used to determine the various linear and nonlinear optical parameters. The calculated value of refractive index is found to be in the range of 0.4–1.0. The direct and indirect band gap value is found to be 2.9 and 3.25 eV, respectively. The value of linear and nonlinear susceptibilities is found to be in order of 10{sup −12}. The higher value of linear and nonlinear parameters makes it suitable for optoelectronic applications.

  8. Temperature coefficient of elastic constants of SiO2 over-layer on LiNbO3 for a temperature stable SAW device

    Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K

    2003-01-01

    The influence of sputtered SiO 2 over-layer on the SAW propagation characteristics of a 128 deg. rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate SAW filter has been studied. Experimentally measured SAW phase velocity and temperature coefficient of delay (TCD), with varying SiO 2 over-layer thickness, show a significant deviation from the theoretically calculated values using the bulk material parameters of SiO 2 . The observed deviation is attributed to the differences in the material parameters (density, elastic and dielectric constants and their temperature coefficient) of the deposited SiO 2 over-layer. The density and the dielectric constant of the deposited SiO 2 layer were determined separately, and the elastic constants and their temperature coefficients were estimated by fitting the experimental velocity and TCD data, respectively. The deviation in the dielectric constant and the density in comparison to the bulk was insignificant, and the estimated values of the elastic constants (C 11 = 0.75x10 11 N m -2 and C 44 0.225x10 11 N m -2 ) were found to be lower, and the respective temperature coefficients (5.0x10 -4 deg C -1 and 2.0x10 -4 deg C -1 ) were high in comparison to the bulk material parameters

  9. Temperature coefficient of elastic constants of SiO{sub 2} over-layer on LiNbO{sub 3} for a temperature stable SAW device

    Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2003-08-07

    The influence of sputtered SiO{sub 2} over-layer on the SAW propagation characteristics of a 128 deg. rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate SAW filter has been studied. Experimentally measured SAW phase velocity and temperature coefficient of delay (TCD), with varying SiO{sub 2} over-layer thickness, show a significant deviation from the theoretically calculated values using the bulk material parameters of SiO{sub 2}. The observed deviation is attributed to the differences in the material parameters (density, elastic and dielectric constants and their temperature coefficient) of the deposited SiO{sub 2} over-layer. The density and the dielectric constant of the deposited SiO{sub 2} layer were determined separately, and the elastic constants and their temperature coefficients were estimated by fitting the experimental velocity and TCD data, respectively. The deviation in the dielectric constant and the density in comparison to the bulk was insignificant, and the estimated values of the elastic constants (C{sub 11} = 0.75x10{sup 11} N m{sup -2} and C{sub 44} 0.225x10{sup 11} N m{sup -2}) were found to be lower, and the respective temperature coefficients (5.0x10{sup -4} deg C{sup -1} and 2.0x10{sup -4} deg C{sup -1}) were high in comparison to the bulk material parameters.

  10. Piezoelectric Non Linear Nanomechanical Temperature and Acceleration Insensitive Clocks (PENNTAC)

    2016-07-01

    relationship between the resonator Q and flicker noise when TED is largely mitigated , we measured a total of 25 resonators (11 full-anchor and 14...during this effort demonstrated the first fully integrated oven control system to mitigate the temperature effect on the reference clock. It showed...Reduction in AlN CMRs by Prolonged RF Excitation ............................................................ 13 2.6 Impact of Damping on Flicker

  11. Effect of morning bright light on body temperature, plasma cortisol and wrist motility measured during 24 hour of constant conditions.

    Foret, J; Aguirre, A; Touitou, Y; Clodoré, M; Benoit, O

    1993-06-11

    Using 24 h constant conditions, time course of body temperature, plasma cortisol and wrist motility was measured in response to a 3 day morning 2 h bright light pulse. This protocol demonstrated that a 2000 lux illumination was sufficient to elicit a shift of about 2 h of temperature minimum and cortisol peak. In reference session, actimetric recordings showed a circadian time course, closely in relation with core temperature. Bright light pulse resulted in a decrease of amplitude and a disappearance of circadian pattern of actimetry.

  12. An Adaptive, Multi-Rate Linear Quadratic Regulator for a Shipboard MVDC Distribution System with Constant Power Loads

    2017-09-01

    investigation into the factors which most strongly influence ROA size would be instructive. The genetic algorithm could be modified to assess ROA size and an...DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM WITH CONSTANT POWER LOADS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS REL95 REK4K 6. AUTHOR(S) Adam J. Mills 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND

  13. Inclusion of fluorophores in cyclodextrins: a closer look at the fluorometric determination of association constants by linear and nonlinear fitting procedures

    Hutterer, Rudi

    2018-01-01

    The author discusses methods for the fluorometric determination of affinity constants by linear and nonlinear fitting methods. This is outlined in particular for the interaction between cyclodextrins and several anesthetic drugs including benzocaine. Special emphasis is given to the limitations of certain fits, and the impact of such studies on enzyme-substrate interactions are demonstrated. Both the experimental part and methods of analysis are well suited for students in an advanced lab.

  14. Performance Testing of a High Temperature Linear Alternator for Stirling Convertors

    Metscher, Jonathan F.; Geng, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has conducted performance testing of a high temperature linear alternator (HTLA) in support of Stirling power convertor development for potential future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). The high temperature linear alternator is a modified version of that used in Sunpower's Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC), and is capable of operation at temperatures up to 200 deg. Increasing the temperature capability of the linear alternator could expand the mission set of future Stirling RPS designs. High temperature Neodymium-Iron-Boron (Nd-Fe-B) magnets were selected for the HTLA application, and were fully characterized and tested prior to use. Higher temperature epoxy for alternator assembly was also selected and tested for thermal stability and strength. A characterization test was performed on the HTLA to measure its performance at various amplitudes, loads, and temperatures. HTLA endurance testing at 200 deg is currently underway.

  15. Elastic constants and Debye temperature of wz-AlN and wz-GaN ...

    DOI: 10.1007/s12043-014-0785-7; ePublication: 5 September 2014. Abstract. First-principles calculations .... For calculating elastic stiffness constants, C11, C12, C13, C33 and C44, we have taken ..... 89, 5815 (2001). [2] G Chris, Van de Walle ...

  16. Room-temperature and temperature-dependent QSRR modelling for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constants of organic chemicals using ensemble learning methods.

    Gupta, S; Basant, N; Mohan, D; Singh, K P

    2016-07-01

    Experimental determinations of the rate constants of the reaction of NO3 with a large number of organic chemicals are tedious, and time and resource intensive; and the development of computational methods has widely been advocated. In this study, we have developed room-temperature (298 K) and temperature-dependent quantitative structure-reactivity relationship (QSRR) models based on the ensemble learning approaches (decision tree forest (DTF) and decision treeboost (DTB)) for predicting the rate constant of the reaction of NO3 radicals with diverse organic chemicals, under OECD guidelines. Predictive powers of the developed models were established in terms of statistical coefficients. In the test phase, the QSRR models yielded a correlation (r(2)) of >0.94 between experimental and predicted rate constants. The applicability domains of the constructed models were determined. An attempt has been made to provide the mechanistic interpretation of the selected features for QSRR development. The proposed QSRR models outperformed the previous reports, and the temperature-dependent models offered a much wider applicability domain. This is the first report presenting a temperature-dependent QSRR model for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constant at different temperatures. The proposed models can be useful tools in predicting the reactivities of chemicals towards NO3 radicals in the atmosphere, hence, their persistence and exposure risk assessment.

  17. Kernel reconstruction methods for Doppler broadening — Temperature interpolation by linear combination of reference cross sections at optimally chosen temperatures

    Ducru, Pablo; Josey, Colin; Dibert, Karia; Sobes, Vladimir; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord

    2017-01-01

    This paper establishes a new family of methods to perform temperature interpolation of nuclear interactions cross sections, reaction rates, or cross sections times the energy. One of these quantities at temperature T is approximated as a linear combination of quantities at reference temperatures (T_j). The problem is formalized in a cross section independent fashion by considering the kernels of the different operators that convert cross section related quantities from a temperature T_0 to a higher temperature T — namely the Doppler broadening operation. Doppler broadening interpolation of nuclear cross sections is thus here performed by reconstructing the kernel of the operation at a given temperature T by means of linear combination of kernels at reference temperatures (T_j). The choice of the L_2 metric yields optimal linear interpolation coefficients in the form of the solutions of a linear algebraic system inversion. The optimization of the choice of reference temperatures (T_j) is then undertaken so as to best reconstruct, in the L∞ sense, the kernels over a given temperature range [T_m_i_n,T_m_a_x]. The performance of these kernel reconstruction methods is then assessed in light of previous temperature interpolation methods by testing them upon isotope "2"3"8U. Temperature-optimized free Doppler kernel reconstruction significantly outperforms all previous interpolation-based methods, achieving 0.1% relative error on temperature interpolation of "2"3"8U total cross section over the temperature range [300 K,3000 K] with only 9 reference temperatures.

  18. Ultrasonic measurement of elastic constants at temperatures from 20 to 11000C

    Moyer, M.W.; Hammond, J.P.

    1976-09-01

    Measurements of the elastic moduli at temperatures from 20 to 1100 0 C of a number of materials of interest in the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor and the High Temperature Gas Reactor were accomplished using acoustic techniques. A two-step process was required to complete the measurements. First, the acoustic velocities were measured accurately on bulk samples at room temperature, then a wire sample was used to make elevated-temperature measurements. A computer was used to calculate the moduli and plot the data. A detailed summary has been made of the sources of error and a calculation of the precision of the measurements is given

  19. Do Insect Populations Die at Constant Rates as They Become Older? Contrasting Demographic Failure Kinetics with Respect to Temperature According to the Weibull Model.

    Petros Damos

    Full Text Available Temperature implies contrasting biological causes of demographic aging in poikilotherms. In this work, we used the reliability theory to describe the consistency of mortality with age in moth populations and to show that differentiation in hazard rates is related to extrinsic environmental causes such as temperature. Moreover, experiments that manipulate extrinsic mortality were used to distinguish temperature-related death rates and the pertinence of the Weibull aging model. The Newton-Raphson optimization method was applied to calculate parameters for small samples of ages at death by estimating the maximum likelihoods surfaces using scored gradient vectors and the Hessian matrix. The study reveals for the first time that the Weibull function is able to describe contrasting biological causes of demographic aging for moth populations maintained at different temperature regimes. We demonstrate that at favourable conditions the insect death rate accelerates as age advances, in contrast to the extreme temperatures in which each individual drifts toward death in a linear fashion and has a constant chance of passing away. Moreover, slope of hazard rates shifts towards a constant initial rate which is a pattern demonstrated by systems which are not wearing out (e.g. non-aging since the failure, or death, is a random event independent of time. This finding may appear surprising, because, traditionally, it was mostly thought as rule that in aging population force of mortality increases exponentially until all individuals have died. Moreover, in relation to other studies, we have not observed any typical decelerating aging patterns at late life (mortality leveling-off, but rather, accelerated hazard rates at optimum temperatures and a stabilized increase at the extremes.In most cases, the increase in aging-related mortality was simulated reasonably well according to the Weibull survivorship model that is applied. Moreover, semi log- probability hazard

  20. Robust Bayesian linear regression with application to an analysis of the CODATA values for the Planck constant

    Wübbeler, Gerd; Bodnar, Olha; Elster, Clemens

    2018-02-01

    Weighted least-squares estimation is commonly applied in metrology to fit models to measurements that are accompanied with quoted uncertainties. The weights are chosen in dependence on the quoted uncertainties. However, when data and model are inconsistent in view of the quoted uncertainties, this procedure does not yield adequate results. When it can be assumed that all uncertainties ought to be rescaled by a common factor, weighted least-squares estimation may still be used, provided that a simple correction of the uncertainty obtained for the estimated model is applied. We show that these uncertainties and credible intervals are robust, as they do not rely on the assumption of a Gaussian distribution of the data. Hence, common software for weighted least-squares estimation may still safely be employed in such a case, followed by a simple modification of the uncertainties obtained by that software. We also provide means of checking the assumptions of such an approach. The Bayesian regression procedure is applied to analyze the CODATA values for the Planck constant published over the past decades in terms of three different models: a constant model, a straight line model and a spline model. Our results indicate that the CODATA values may not have yet stabilized.

  1. Reproduction, longevity and life table parameters of Monosteira unicostata (Hemiptera: Tingidae) at constant temperatures

    Sánchez-Ramos, I.; Pascual, S.; Fernández, C.E.; González-Núñez, M.

    2017-07-01

    Information on the effect of temperature on biological parameters of phytophagous insects is one of the tools in IPM programs, as it allows prediction of risk situations in the field. This work reports the effect of temperature on reproductive parameters and longevity of one of the most important current pests of almond orchards in the Mediterranean basin, the poplar lace bug, Monosteira unicostata (Mulsant & Rey) (Hemiptera: Tingidae). The temperatures tested were 22, 25, 28, 31, 34 and 37ºC, always at 60 ± 10% relative humidity and under a L16:D8 photoperiod. Extreme temperatures had an adverse effect on preoviposition period, total fecundity and daily fecundity while increasing values of oviposition period and adults longevity were registered for decreasing temperatures. Male longevity was higher than female longevity, and mortality pattern differed between sexes for all temperatures but 37ºC. The nonlinear Lactin model described accurately the effect of temperature on the intrinsic rate of natural increase of M. unicostata populations and predicted the optimum temperature for population increase at 34.1ºC, at which the population doubling time is 3.6 days. Produced values of lower and upper thresholds for M. unicostata populations were 14.8 and 38.8ºC, respectively. This characterizes the poplar lace bug as a very important pest in the Mediterranean basin, with an increasing potential risk in a global warming scenario.

  2. Modelling growth of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions.

    Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2010-06-15

    The growth of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger, isolated from yogurt production environment, was investigated on malt extract agar with pH=4.2 and a(w)=0.997, simulating yogurt, at isothermal conditions ranging from -1.3 to 35 degrees C and from 5 to 42.3 degrees C, respectively. The growth rate (mu) and (apparent) lag time (lambda) of the mycelium growth were modelled as a function of temperature using a Cardinal Model with Inflection (CMI). The results showed that the CMI can describe successfully the effect of temperature on fungal growth within the entire biokinetic range for both isolates. The estimated values of the CMI for mu were T(min)=-5.74 degrees C, T(max)=30.97 degrees C, T(opt)=22.08 degrees C and mu(opt)=0.221 mm/h for P. expansum and T(min)=10.13 degrees C, T(max)=43.13 degrees C, T(opt)=31.44 degrees C, and mu(opt)=0.840 mm/h for A. niger. The cardinal values for lambda were very close to the respective values for mu indicating similar temperature dependence of the growth rate and the lag time of the mycelium growth. The developed models were further validated under fluctuating temperature conditions using various dynamic temperature scenarios. The time-temperature conditions studied included single temperature shifts before or after the end of the lag time and continuous periodic temperature fluctuations. The prediction of growth at changing temperature was based on the assumption that after a temperature shift the growth rate is adopted instantaneously to the new temperature, while the lag time was predicted using a cumulative lag approach. The results showed that when the temperature shifts occurred before the end of the lag, they did not cause any significant additional lag and the observed total lag was very close to the cumulative lag predicted by the model. In experiments with temperature shifts after the end of the lag time, accurate predictions were obtained when the temperature profile included temperatures which were inside the

  3. Rate constants and temperature effects for reactions of Cl2sm-bullet- with unsaturated alcohols and hydrocarbons in aqueous and acetonitrile/water solutions

    Padmaja, S.; Neta, P.; Huie, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for reactions of the dichlorine radical anion, Cl 2 sm-bullet- , with unsaturated alcohols and hydrocarbons have been measured at various temperatures. The alcohol reactions were measured in aqueous solutions and the hydrocarbon reactions in 1:1 aqueous acetonitirle (ACN) solutions. The rate constants for two alcohols and one hydrocarbon were also examined as a function of solvent composition. The room temperature rate constants varied between 10 6 and 10 9 M -1 s -1 . The pre-exponential factors, A, were about (1-5) x 10 9 M -1 s -1 for the alcohols in aqueous solutions and about (0.1-1) x 10 9 M -1 s -1 for the hydrocarbons in aqueous ACN solutions. The activation energies, E a , varied considerably, between 4 and 12 kJ mol -1 for the alcohols and between 2 and 8 kJ mol -1 for the hydrocarbons. The rate constants, k 298 , decrease with increasing ionization potential (IP) of the unsaturated compound, in agreement with an electrophilic addition mechanism. The activation energies for the unsaturated alcohols decrease when the IP decreases from 9.7 to 9.1 eV but appear to level off at lower IP. Most alkenes studied had IP a . Upon addition of ACN to the aqueous solution, the values of log k 298 decreased linearly by more than 1 order of magnitude with increasing ACN mole fraction. This decrease appears to result from a combination of changes in the activation energy and in the pre-exponential factor. The reason for these changes may lie in changes in the solvation shell of the Cl 2 sm-bullet- radical, which will affect the A factor, in combination with changes in solvation of Cl - , which will affect the energetics of the reactions as well. 20 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel and diesel spray combustion in a constant volume combustion chamber

    Zhang, Ji

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents measurements of the soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel and diesel combustion in a constant volume chamber using a two-color technique. This technique uses a high-speed camera coupled with two narrowband filters (550. nm and 650. nm, 10. nm FWHM). After calibration, statistical analysis shows that the uncertainty of the two-color temperature is less than 5%, while it is about 50% for the KL factor. This technique is then applied to the spray combustion of biodiesel and diesel fuels under an ambient oxygen concentration of 21% and ambient temperatures of 800, 1000 and 1200. K. The heat release result shows higher energy utilization efficiency for biodiesel compared to diesel under all conditions; meanwhile, diesel shows a higher pressure increase due to its higher heating value. Biodiesel yields a lower temperature inside the flame area, a longer soot lift-off length, and a smaller soot area compared to diesel. Both the KL factor and the total soot with biodiesel are lower than with diesel throughout the entire combustion process, and this difference becomes larger as the ambient temperature decreases. Biodiesel shows approximately 50-100. K lower temperatures than diesel at the quasi-steady stage for 1000 and 1200. K ambient temperature, while diesel shows a lower temperature than biodiesel at 800. K ambient. This result may raise the question of how important the flame temperature is in explaining the higher NO. x emissions often observed during biodiesel combustion. Other factors may also play an important role in controlling NO. x emissions. Both biodiesel and diesel temperature measurements show a monotonic dependence on the ambient temperature. However, the ambient temperature appears to have a more significant effect on the soot formation and oxidation in diesel combustion, while biodiesel combustion soot characteristics shows relative insensitivity to the ambient temperature. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. The dissolution rate constant of magnetite in water at different temperatures and neutral or ammoniated chemistry conditions

    Mohajery, K.; Lister, D.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the dissolution rate constants of magnetite were measured at various water chemistry conditions and different temperatures, corresponding to several feedwater conditions of water-cooled reactors. Sintered magnetite pellets were used as the dissolving material and these were mounted in a jet-impingement apparatus in a recirculating water loop. Exposures were carried out at temperatures of 25, 55 and 140 o C and pHs of neutral and 9.2 in which many FAC (Flow Accelerated Corrosion) studies have been conducted. Average dissolution rate constants were estimated by measuring the volume of lost material with a profilometry technique. The excellent correspondent between the calculated value of dissolution rate constant of 2.20 mm/s for the synthesized magnetite and 2.05 mm/s for the single crystal of magnetite at neutral condition shows that the particle removal from the synthesized pellets is not an obstruction in this technique. Also, good agreement between the values calculated in duplicated runs at neutral condition at room temperature supports the accuracy of the method. (author)

  6. From Cavendish to PLANCK: Constraining Newton's gravitational constant with CMB temperature and polarization anisotropy

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Smoot, George F.; Zahn, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    We present new constraints on cosmic variations of Newton's gravitational constant by making use of the latest CMB data from WMAP, BOOMERANG, CBI and ACBAR experiments and independent constraints coming from big bang nucleosynthesis. We found that current CMB data provide constraints at the ∼10% level, that can be improved to ∼3% by including big bang nucleosynthesis data. We show that future data expected from the Planck satellite could constrain G at the ∼1.5% level while an ultimate, cosmic variance limited, CMB experiment could reach a precision of about 0.4%, competitive with current laboratory measurements.

  7. Independence of the effective dielectric constant of an electrolytic solution on the ionic distribution in the linear Poisson-Nernst-Planck model.

    Alexe-Ionescu, A L; Barbero, G; Lelidis, I

    2014-08-28

    We consider the influence of the spatial dependence of the ions distribution on the effective dielectric constant of an electrolytic solution. We show that in the linear version of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck model, the effective dielectric constant of the solution has to be considered independent of any ionic distribution induced by the external field. This result follows from the fact that, in the linear approximation of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck model, the redistribution of the ions in the solvent due to the external field gives rise to a variation of the dielectric constant that is of the first order in the effective potential, and therefore it has to be neglected in the Poisson's equation that relates the actual electric potential across the electrolytic cell to the bulk density of ions. The analysis is performed in the case where the electrodes are perfectly blocking and the adsorption at the electrodes is negligible, and in the absence of any ion dissociation-recombination effect.

  8. Effect of temperature dependence of the Langmuir constant molecular pair potentials on gas hydrates formation mechanism

    Mokhtari, B.; Enayati, M. [Iranian Offshore Oil Co., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heidaryan, E. [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Masjidosolayman Branch

    2008-07-01

    Theoretical methods show that crystalline hydrates can form from single-phase systems consisting of both vapor water with gaseous hydrate former and liquid water with dissolved hydrate former. Two phase systems consist of both liquid water with gaseous hydrate former and with liquid hydrate former on the surface. This paper presented a Langmuir constant related model for the prediction of equilibrium pressures and cage occupancies of pure component hydrates. Intermolecular potentials were fit to quantum mechanical energies to obtain the Langmuir constants, which differed from the procedure utilized with the vdWP model. The paper described the experimental method and model calculations. This included the Fugacity model and Van der Waals and Platteeuw model. The paper also discussed pair potential of non-spherical molecules, including the multicentre (site-site) potential; Gaussian overlap potential; Lennard-Jones potential; and Kihara generalized pair potential. It was concluded that fraction of occupied cavities is a function of pair potentials between hard core and empty hydrate lattice. These pair potentials could be calculated from some model as Kihara cell potential, Gaussian potential, Lennard-Jones potential and multicentre pair potential. 49 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Non-linear optical measurement of the twist elastic constant in thermotropic and DNA lyotropic chiral nematics.

    Lucchetti, Liana; Fraccia, Tommaso P; Ciciulla, Fabrizio; Bellini, Tommaso

    2017-07-10

    Throughout the whole history of liquid crystals science, the balancing of intrinsic elasticity with coupling to external forces has been the key strategy for most application and investigation. While the coupling of the optical field to the nematic director is at the base of a wealth of thoroughly described optical effects, a significant variety of geometries and materials have not been considered yet. Here we show that by adopting a simple cell geometry and measuring the optically induced birefringence, we can readily extract the twist elastic coefficient K 22 of thermotropic and lyotropic chiral nematics (N*). The value of K 22 we obtain for chiral doped 5CB thermotropic N* well matches those reported in the literature. With this same strategy, we could determine for the first time K 22 of the N* phase of concentrated aqueous solutions of DNA oligomers, bypassing the limitations that so far prevented measuring the elastic constants of this class of liquid crystalline materials. The present study also enlightens the significant nonlinear optical response of DNA liquid crystals.

  10. Evaluation of a Linear Mixing Model to Retrieve Soil and Vegetation Temperatures of Land Targets

    Yang, Jinxin; Jia, Li; Cui, Yaokui; Zhou, Jie; Menenti, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    A simple linear mixing model of heterogeneous soil-vegetation system and retrieval of component temperatures from directional remote sensing measurements by inverting this model is evaluated in this paper using observations by a thermal camera. The thermal camera was used to obtain multi-angular TIR (Thermal Infra-Red) images over vegetable and orchard canopies. A whole thermal camera image was treated as a pixel of a satellite image to evaluate the model with the two-component system, i.e. soil and vegetation. The evaluation included two parts: evaluation of the linear mixing model and evaluation of the inversion of the model to retrieve component temperatures. For evaluation of the linear mixing model, the RMSE is 0.2 K between the observed and modelled brightness temperatures, which indicates that the linear mixing model works well under most conditions. For evaluation of the model inversion, the RMSE between the model retrieved and the observed vegetation temperatures is 1.6K, correspondingly, the RMSE between the observed and retrieved soil temperatures is 2.0K. According to the evaluation of the sensitivity of retrieved component temperatures on fractional cover, the linear mixing model gives more accurate retrieval accuracies for both soil and vegetation temperatures under intermediate fractional cover conditions

  11. Population growth and development of Liposcelis pearmani (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) at constant temperatures and relative humidities.

    Aminatou, B A; Gautam, S G; Opit, G P; Talley, J; Shakya, K

    2011-08-01

    Psocids of genus Liposcelis are now considered serious pests of stored products. We investigated the effects of eight temperatures (22.5, 25.0, 27.5, 30.0, 32.5, 35.0, 37.5, and 40.0°C) and four relative humidities (43, 55, 63, and 75%) on population growth and development of the psocid Liposcelis pearmani Lienhard. L. pearmani did not survive at 37.5 and 40.0°C, at all relative humidities tested; at 43% RH, at all temperatures tested; and at 55% RH, at 32.5 and 35°C. The greatest population growth was recorded at 32.5°C and 75% RH (32-fold growth). L. pearmani males have two to four nymphal instars, and the percentages of males with two, three, and four instars were 17, 63, and 20%, respectively. Female L. pearmani have two to five instars, and the percentages of females with two, three, four, and five instars were 5, 39, 55, and 1%, respectively. We developed temperature-dependent development equations for male and female eggs, individual nymphal, combined nymphal, and combined immature stages. Based on 30-d population growth, L. pearmani cannot survive at temperatures >35.0°C; does not thrive at low relative humidities (55%), at temperatures above 25°C; and has a high optimum relative humidity for population growth (75%). Therefore, we expect it to have a more limited distribution compared with other Liposcelis species. These data provide a better understanding of how temperature and RH may influence L. pearmani population dynamics and can be used in population growth models to help develop effective management strategies for this psocid, and to predict its occurrence.

  12. Analysis of stress intensity factor for a Griffith crack opened under constant pressure in a plate with temperature dependent properties

    Hata, Toshiaki

    1982-01-01

    Recently, the research on the thermal stress of structural materials has become important with the progress of nuclear reactor technology. In the case of large temperature gradient, the change of the physical properties of materials must be taken into account. The thermal stress analysis for the things with cracks taking the temperature dependence of properties into account has scarcely been carried out. In this report, the general method of solution of three-dimensional problems using perturbation method and the extension of thermo-elastic displacement potential method is shown for the case in which Young's modulus changes according to the exponential function of temperature. Moreover, using this method, the effect of the temperature dependence of properties on the stress intensity factor of the cracks subjected to internal pressure in a strip exposed to linear thermal flow was clarified. In the analysis, Young's modulus, the coefficient of linear thermal expansion and thermal conductivity were assumed to be dependent on temperature. The method of solution, the analysis of stress intensity factor considering the change of properties due to temperature, and the numerical calculation for a square plate with a crack are explained. (Kako, I.)

  13. Growth rate and trapping efficacy of nematode-trapping fungi under constant and fluctuating temperatures

    Fernandez, A.S.; Larsen, M.; Wolstrup, J.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of temperature on radial growth and predatory activity of different isolates of nematode-trapping fungi was assessed. Four isolates of Duddingtonia flagrans and one isolate of Arthrobotrys oligospora were inoculated on petri dishes containing either cornmeal agar (CMA) or faecal agar...

  14. Room temperature giant and linear magnetoresistance in topological insulator Bi2Te3 nanosheets.

    Wang, Xiaolin; Du, Yi; Dou, Shixue; Zhang, Chao

    2012-06-29

    Topological insulators, a new class of condensed matter having bulk insulating states and gapless metallic surface states, have demonstrated fascinating quantum effects. However, the potential practical applications of the topological insulators are still under exploration worldwide. We demonstrate that nanosheets of a Bi(2)Te(3) topological insulator several quintuple layers thick display giant and linear magnetoresistance. The giant and linear magnetoresistance achieved is as high as over 600% at room temperature, with a trend towards further increase at higher temperatures, as well as being weakly temperature-dependent and linear with the field, without any sign of saturation at measured fields up to 13 T. Furthermore, we observed a magnetic field induced gap below 10 K. The observation of giant and linear magnetoresistance paves the way for 3D topological insulators to be useful for practical applications in magnetoelectronic sensors such as disk reading heads, mechatronics, and other multifunctional electromagnetic applications.

  15. An optimal policy for deteriorating items with time-proportional deterioration rate and constant and time-dependent linear demand rate

    Singh, Trailokyanath; Mishra, Pandit Jagatananda; Pattanayak, Hadibandhu

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, an economic order quantity (EOQ) inventory model for a deteriorating item is developed with the following characteristics: (i) The demand rate is deterministic and two-staged, i.e., it is constant in first part of the cycle and linear function of time in the second part. (ii) Deterioration rate is time-proportional. (iii) Shortages are not allowed to occur. The optimal cycle time and the optimal order quantity have been derived by minimizing the total average cost. A simple solution procedure is provided to illustrate the proposed model. The article concludes with a numerical example and sensitivity analysis of various parameters as illustrations of the theoretical results.

  16. A novel method for in-situ estimation of time constant for core temperature monitoring thermocouples of operating reactors

    Sylvia, J.I.; Chandar, S. Clement Ravi; Velusamy, K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Core temperature sensor was mathematically modeled. • Ramp signal generated during reactor operating condition is used. • Procedure and methodology has been demonstrated by applying it to FBTR. • Same technique will be implemented for all fast reactors. - Abstract: Core temperature monitoring system is an important component of reactor protection system in the current generation fast reactors. In this system, multiple thermocouples are housed inside a thermowell of fuel subassemblies. Response time of the thermocouple assembly forms an important input for safety analysis of fast reactor and hence frequent calibration/time constant estimation is essential. In fast reactors the central fuel subassembly is provided with bare fast response thermocouples to detect under cooling events in reactor and take proper safety action. On the other hand, thermocouples in thermowell are mainly used for blockage detection in individual fuel subassemblies. The time constant of thermocouples in thermowell can drift due to creep, vibration and thermal fatigue of the thermowell assembly. A novel method for in-situ estimation of time constant is proposed. This method uses the Safety Control Rod Accelerated Mechanism (SCRAM) or lowering of control Rod (LOR) signals of the reactor along with response of the central subassembly thermocouples as reference data. Validation of the procedure has been demonstrated by applying it to FBTR

  17. The non-linear link between electricity consumption and temperature in Europe: A threshold panel approach

    Bessec, Marie [CGEMP, Universite Paris-Dauphine, Place du Marechal de Lattre de Tassigny Paris (France); Fouquau, Julien [LEO, Universite d' Orleans, Faculte de Droit, d' Economie et de Gestion, Rue de Blois, BP 6739, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2008-09-15

    This paper investigates the relationship between electricity demand and temperature in the European Union. We address this issue by means of a panel threshold regression model on 15 European countries over the last two decades. Our results confirm the non-linearity of the link between electricity consumption and temperature found in more limited geographical areas in previous studies. By distinguishing between North and South countries, we also find that this non-linear pattern is more pronounced in the warm countries. Finally, rolling regressions show that the sensitivity of electricity consumption to temperature in summer has increased in the recent period. (author)

  18. Extrapolation of rate constants of reactions producing H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} in radiolysis of water at high temperatures

    Leblanc, R.; Ghandi, K.; Hackman, B.; Liu, G. [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville, NB (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    One target of our research is to extrapolate known data on the rate constants of reactions and add corrections to estimate the rate constants at the higher temperatures reached by the SCWR reactors. The focus of this work was to extrapolate known data on the rate constants of reactions that produce Hydrogen or Oxygen with a rate constant below 10{sup 10} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} at room temperature. The extrapolation is done taking into account the change in the diffusion rate of the interacting species and the cage effect with thermodynamic conditions. The extrapolations are done over a wide temperature range and under isobaric conditions. (author)

  19. Numerical solution of fully developed heat transfer problem with constant wall temperature and application to isosceles triangle and parabolic ducts

    Karabulut, Halit; Ipci, Duygu; Cinar, Can

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A numerical method has been developed for fully developed flows with constant wall temperature. • The governing equations were transformed to boundary fitted coordinates. • The Nusselt number of parabolic duct has been investigated. • Validation of the numerical method has been made by comparing published data. - Abstract: In motor-vehicles the use of more compact radiators have several advantages such as; improving the aerodynamic form of cars, reducing the weight and volume of the cars, reducing the material consumption and environmental pollutions, and enabling faster increase of the engine coolant temperature after starting to run and thereby improving the thermal efficiency. For the design of efficient and compact radiators, the robust determination of the heat transfer coefficient becomes imperative. In this study the external heat transfer coefficient of the radiator has been investigated for hydrodynamically and thermally fully developed flows in channels with constant wall temperature. In such situation the numerical treatment of the problem results in a trivial solution. To find a non-trivial solution the problem is treated either as an eigenvalue problem or as a thermally developing flow problem. In this study a numerical solution procedure has been developed and the heat transfer coefficients of the fully developed flow in triangular and parabolic air channels were investigated. The governing equations were transformed to boundary fitted coordinates and numerically solved. The non-trivial solution was obtained by means of guessing the temperature of any grid point within the solution domain. The correction of the guessed temperature was performed via smoothing the temperature profile on a line passing through the mentioned grid point. Results were compared with literature data and found to be consistent.

  20. Global embedding of D-dimensional black holes with a cosmological constant in Minkowskian spacetimes: Matching between Hawking temperature and Unruh temperature

    Santos, Nuno Loureiro; Dias, Oscar J.C.; Lemos, Jose P.S.

    2004-01-01

    We study the matching between the Hawking temperature of a large class of static D-dimensional black holes and the Unruh temperature of the corresponding higher dimensional Rindler spacetime. In order to accomplish this task we find the global embedding of the D-dimensional black holes into a higher dimensional Minkowskian spacetime, called the global embedding Minkowskian spacetime procedure (GEMS procedure). These global embedding transformations are important on their own, since they provide a powerful tool that simplifies the study of black hole physics by working instead, but equivalently, in an accelerated Rindler frame in a flat background geometry. We discuss neutral and charged Tangherlini black holes with and without cosmological constant, and in the negative cosmological constant case, we consider the three allowed topologies for the horizons (spherical, cylindrical/toroidal, and hyperbolic)

  1. Linear all-fiber temperature sensor based on macro-bent erbium doped fiber

    Hajireza, P; Cham, C L; Kumar, D; Abdul-Rashid, H A; Emami, S D; Harun, S W

    2010-01-01

    A new all fiber temperature sensor is proposed and demonstrated based on a pair of 1 meter erbium-doped fiber (EDF), which are respectively macro-bent and straight. The sensor has a linear normalized loss (dB) response to temperature at 6.5 mm bending radius and 1580 nm input wavelength. The main advantage of this sensor is high temperature resolution (less than 1°C) and sensitivity (0.03 dB/°C) due to combination of temperature dependence of EDF and bending loss. The proposed silica based sensor, has the potential for wide range and high temperature applications in harsh environments

  2. Long-term creep behavior of high-temperature gas turbine materials under constant and variable stress

    Granacher, J.; Preussler, T.

    1987-01-01

    Within the framework of the documented research project, extensive creep rupture tests were carried out with characteristic, high-temperature gas turbine materials for establishment of improved design data. In the range of the main application temperatures and in stress ranges down to application-relevant values the tests extended over a period of about 40,000 hours. In addition, long-term annealing tests were carried out in the most important temperature ranges for the measurement of the density-dependent straim, which almost always manifested itself as a material contraction. Furthermore, hot tensile tests were carried out for the description of the elastoplastic short-term behavior. Several creep curves were derived from the results of the different tests with a differentiated evaluation method. On the basis of these creep curves, creep equations were set up for a series of materials which are valid in the entire examined temperature range and stress range and up to the end of the secondary creep range. Also, equations for the time-temperature-dependent description of the material contraction behavior were derived. With these equations, the high-temperature deformation behavior of the examined materials under constant creep stress can be described simply and application-oriented. (orig.) With 109 figs., 19 tabs., 77 refs [de

  3. Temperature dependence of the rate constant for reactions of hydrated electrons with H, OH and H2O2

    Christensen, H.; Sehested, K.; Løgager, T.

    1994-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate constants, for the reactions of hydrated electrons with H atoms, OH radicals and H2O2 has been determined. The reaction with H atoms, studied in the temperature range 20-250-degrees-C gives k(20-degrees-C) = 2.4 x 10(10) M-1 s-1 and the activation energy E......-1 and E(A) = 15.6 kJ mol-1 (3.7 kcal mol-1) measured from 5-150-degrees-C. Thus, the activation energy for all three fast reactions is close to that expected for diffusion controlled reactions. As phosphates were used as buffer system, the rate constant and activation energy for the reaction......(A) = 14.0 kJ mol-1 (3.3 kcal mol-1). For reaction with OH radicals the corresponding values are, k(20-degrees-C) = 3.1 x 10(10) M-1 s-1 and E(A) = 14.7 kJ mol-1 (3.5 kcal mol-1) determined in the temperature range 5-175-degrees-C. For reaction with H2O2 the values are, k(20-degrees-C) = 1.2 x 10(10) M-1 s...

  4. Temperature dependencies of Henry's law constants and octanol/water partition coefficients for key plant volatile monoterpenoids.

    Copolovici, Lucian O; Niinemets, Ulo

    2005-12-01

    To model the emission dynamics and changes in fractional composition of monoterpenoids from plant leaves, temperature dependencies of equilibrium coefficients must be known. Henry's law constants (H(pc), Pa m3 mol(-1) and octanol/water partition coefficients (K(OW), mol mol(-1)) were determined for 10 important plant monoterpenes at physiological temperature ranges (25-50 degrees C for H(pc) and 20-50 degrees C for K(OW)). A standard EPICS procedure was established to determine H(pc) and a shake flask method was used for the measurements of K(OW). The enthalpy of volatilization (deltaH(vol)) varied from 18.0 to 44.3 kJ mol(-1) among the monoterpenes, corresponding to a range of temperature-dependent increase in H(pc) between 1.3- and 1.8-fold per 10 degrees C rise in temperature. The enthalpy of water-octanol phase change varied from -11.0 to -23.8 kJ mol(-1), corresponding to a decrease of K(OW) between 1.15- and 1.32-fold per 10 degrees C increase in temperature. Correlations among physico-chemical characteristics of a wide range of monoterpenes were analyzed to seek the ways of derivation of H(pc) and K(OW) values from other monoterpene physico-chemical characteristics. H(pc) was strongly correlated with monoterpene saturated vapor pressure (P(v)), and for lipophilic monoterpenes, deltaH(vol) scaled positively with the enthalpy of vaporization that characterizes the temperature dependence of P(v) Thus, P(v) versus temperature relations may be employed to derive the temperature relations of H(pc) for these monoterpenes. These data collectively indicate that monoterpene differences in H(pc) and K(OW) temperature relations can importantly modify monoterpene emissions from and deposition on plant leaves.

  5. The D(+) + H2 reaction: differential and integral cross sections at low energy and rate constants at low temperature.

    González-Lezana, Tomás; Scribano, Yohann; Honvault, Pascal

    2014-08-21

    The D(+) + H2 reaction is investigated by means of a time independent quantum mechanical (TIQM) and statistical quantum mechanical (SQM) methods. Differential cross sections and product rotational distributions obtained with these two theoretical approaches for collision energies between 1 meV and 0.1 eV are compared to analyze the dynamics of the process. The agreement observed between the TIQM differential cross sections and the SQM predictions as the energy increases revealed the role played by the complex-forming mechanism. The importance of a good description of the asymptotic regions is also investigated by calculating rate constants for the title reaction at low temperature.

  6. Effect of temperature on a free energy and equilibrium constants during dry flue gas desulphurisation chemical reactions

    Kuburović Miloš

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available During dry flue gas desulphurisation (FGD dry particles of reagents are inserted (injected in the stream of flue gas, where they bond SO2. As reagents, the most often are used compounds of calcium (CaCO3, CaO or Ca(OH2. Knowledge of free energy and equilibrium constants of chemical reactions during dry FGD is necessary for understanding of influence of flue gas temperature to course of these chemical reactions as well as to SO2 bonding from flue gases.

  7. Definition of the linearity loss of the surface temperature in static tensile tests

    A. Risitano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Static tensile tests on material for mechanical constructions have pointed out the linearity loss of the surface temperature with the application of load. This phenomenon is due to the heat generation caused by the local microplasticizations which carry the material to deviate from its completely thermoelastic behavior,. The identification of the static load which determines the loss of linearity of the temperature under stress, becomes extremely important to define a first dynamic characterization of the material. The temperature variations that can be recorded during the static test are often very limited (a few tenths of degree for every 100 MPa in steels and they require the use of special sensors able to measure very low temperature variations. The experience acquired in such analysis highlighted that, dealing with highly accurate sensors or with particular materials, the identification of the first linearity loss (often by eye in the temperature curves, can be influenced by the sensibility of the investigator himself and can lead to incorrect estimates. The aim of this work is to validate the above mentioned observations on different steels, by applying the autocorrelation function to the data collected during the application of a static load. This, in order to make the results of the thermal analysis free from the sensitivity of the operator and to make the results as objective as possible, for defining the closest time of the linearity loss in the temperature-time function.

  8. Temperature and sowing date affect the linear increase of sunflower harvest index

    Bange, M.P.; Hammer, G.L.; Rickert, K.G.

    1998-01-01

    The linearity of daily linear harvest index (HI) increase can provide a simple means to predict grain growth and yield in field crops. However, the stability of the rate of increase across genotypes and environments is uncertain. Data from three field experiments were collated to investigate the phase of linear HI increase of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) across environments by changing genotypes, sowing time, N level, and solar irradiation level. Linear increase in HI was similar among different genotypes, N levels, and radiation treatments (mean 0.0125 d-1), but significant differences occurred between sowings. The linear increase in HI was not stable at very low temperatures (down to 9 degrees C) during grain filling, due to possible limitations to biomass accumulation and translocation (mean 0.0091 d-1). Using the linear increase in HI to predict grain yield requires predictions of the duration from an thesis to the onset of linear HI increase (lag phase) and the cessation of linear HI increase. These studies showed that the lag phase differed, and the linear HI increase ceased when 91% of the anthesis to physiological maturity period had been completed

  9. Accurate and efficient integration for molecular dynamics simulations at constant temperature and pressure

    Lippert, Ross A.; Predescu, Cristian; Ierardi, Douglas J.; Mackenzie, Kenneth M.; Eastwood, Michael P.; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.

    2013-10-01

    In molecular dynamics simulations, control over temperature and pressure is typically achieved by augmenting the original system with additional dynamical variables to create a thermostat and a barostat, respectively. These variables generally evolve on timescales much longer than those of particle motion, but typical integrator implementations update the additional variables along with the particle positions and momenta at each time step. We present a framework that replaces the traditional integration procedure with separate barostat, thermostat, and Newtonian particle motion updates, allowing thermostat and barostat updates to be applied infrequently. Such infrequent updates provide a particularly substantial performance advantage for simulations parallelized across many computer processors, because thermostat and barostat updates typically require communication among all processors. Infrequent updates can also improve accuracy by alleviating certain sources of error associated with limited-precision arithmetic. In addition, separating the barostat, thermostat, and particle motion update steps reduces certain truncation errors, bringing the time-average pressure closer to its target value. Finally, this framework, which we have implemented on both general-purpose and special-purpose hardware, reduces software complexity and improves software modularity.

  10. Assessment of body mapping sportswear using a manikin operated in constant temperature mode and thermoregulatory model control mode

    Wang, Faming; Del Ferraro, Simona; Molinaro, Vincenzo; Morrissey, Matthew; Rossi, René

    2014-09-01

    Regional sweating patterns and body surface temperature differences exist between genders. Traditional sportswear made from one material and/or one fabric structure has a limited ability to provide athletes sufficient local wear comfort. Body mapping sportswear consists of one piece of multiple knit structure fabric or of different fabric pieces that may provide athletes better wear comfort. In this study, the `modular' body mapping sportswear was designed and subsequently assessed on a `Newton' type sweating manikin that operated in both constant temperature mode and thermophysiological model control mode. The performance of the modular body mapping sportswear kit and commercial products were also compared. The results demonstrated that such a modular body mapping sportswear kit can meet multiple wear/thermal comfort requirements in various environmental conditions. All body mapping clothing (BMC) presented limited global thermophysiological benefits for the wearers. Nevertheless, BMC showed evident improvements in adjusting local body heat exchanges and local thermal sensations.

  11. Spin fluctuations and low temperature features of thermal coefficient of linear expansion of iron monosilicide

    Volkov, A.G.; Kortov, S.V.; Povzner, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    The low temperature measurements of thermal coefficient of linear expansion of strong paramagnet FeSi are carried out. The results obtained are discussed with in the framework of spin-fluctuation theory. It is shown that electronic part of the thermal coefficient of linear expansion is negative in the range of temperatures lower that of the semiconductor-metal phase transition. In metal phase it becomes positive. This specific features of the thermal coefficient is explained by the spin-fluctuation renormalization of d-electronic states density

  12. Live performance of male broilers subjected to constant or increasing air velocities at moderate temperatures with a high dew point.

    Dozier, W A; Lott, B D; Branton, S L

    2005-08-01

    This study examined the effects of varying air velocities vs. a constant air velocity with a cyclic temperature curve of 25-30-25 degrees C and a dew point of 23 degrees C on broilers from 28 to 49 d of age. Four replicate trials were conducted. In each trial, 742 male broilers were randomly allocated to 6 floor pens or 2 air velocity tunnels, with each tunnel consisting of 4 pens. Bird density, feeder, and waterer space were similar across all pens (53 birds/ pen; 0.07 m2/bird). The treatments were control (still air), constant air velocity of 120 m/min, and increasing air velocity (90 m/min from 28 to 35 d, 120 m/min from 36 to 42 d, and 180 m/min from 43 to 49 d). Birds grown in a still air environment gained less weight, consumed less feed, and converted feed less efficiently between 28 and 49 d than birds subjected to moving air (constant or increasing). Growth responses between the air velocity treatments were similar from 28 to 35 and 36 to 42 d of age. Increasing air velocity to 180 m/min improved (P < or = 0.02) the growth rate of broilers from 43 to 49 d of age over birds receiving an air velocity of 120 m/min, but the incidence of mortality was not affected. These results provide evidence that increasing air velocity from 120 to 180 m/min is beneficial to broilers weighing 2.5 kg or greater when exposed to moderate temperatures.

  13. Alexandrium fundyense cyst viability and germling survival in light vs. dark at a constant low temperature

    Vahtera, Emil; Crespo, Bibiana G.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J.; Olli, Kalle; Anderson, Donald M.

    2014-05-01

    Both observations and models suggest that large-scale coastal blooms of Alexandrium fundyense in the Gulf of Maine are seeded by deep-bottom cyst accumulation zones (“seed beds”) where cysts germinate from the sediment surface or the overlying near-bottom nepheloid layers at water depths exceeding 100 m. The germling cells and their vegetative progeny are assumed to be subject to mortality while in complete darkness, as they swim to illuminated surface waters. To test the validity of this assumption we conducted laboratory investigations of cyst viability and the survival of the germling cells and their vegetative progeny during prolonged exposure to darkness at a temperature of 6 °C, simulating the conditions in deep Gulf of Maine waters. We isolated cysts from bottom sediments collected in the Gulf of Maine under low red light and incubated them in 96-well tissue culture-plates in culture medium under a 10:14 h light:dark cycle and under complete darkness. Cyst viability was high, with excystment frequency reaching 90% in the illuminated treatment after 30 days and in the dark treatment after 50 days. Average germination rates were 0.062 and 0.038 d-1 for light and dark treatments, respectively. The dark treatment showed an approximately 2-week time lag in maximum germination rates compared to the light treatment. Survival of germlings was considerably lower in the dark treatment. In the light treatments, 47% of germinated cysts produced germlings that were able to survive for 7 days and produce vegetative progeny, i.e., there were live cells in the well along with an empty cyst at least once during the experiment. In the dark treatments 12% of the cysts produced germlings that were able to survive for the same length of time. When dark treatments are scaled to take into account non-darkness related mortality, approximately 28% of the cysts produced germlings that were able to survive for at least 7 days. Even though cysts are able to germinate in darkness

  14. Experimental determination of the anisotropy function for the Model 200 103Pd 'light seed' and derivation of the anisotropy constant based upon the linear quadratic model

    Yue Ning; Nath, Ravinder

    2002-01-01

    Since the publication of the AAPM Task Group 43 report in 1995, Model 200 103 Pd seed, which has been widely used in prostate seed implants and other brachytherapy procedures, has undergone some changes in its internal geometry resulting from the manufacturer's transition from lower specific activity reactor-produced 103 Pd ('heavy seeds') to higher specific activity accelerator-produced radioactive material ('light seeds'). Based on previously reported theoretical calculations and measurements, the dose rate constants and the radial dose functions of the two types of seeds are nearly the same and have already been reported. In this work, the anisotropy function of the 'light seed' was experimentally measured and an averaging method for the determination of the anisotropy constant from distance-dependent values of anisotropy factors is presented based upon the continuous low dose rate irradiation linear quadratic model for cell killing. The anisotropy function of Model 200 103 Pd 'light seeds' was measured in a Solid Water trade mark sign phantom using 1x1x1 mm micro LiF TLD chips at radial distances of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 cm and at angles from 0 to 90 deg. with respect to the longitudinal axis of the seeds. At a radial distance of 1 cm, the measured anisotropy function of the 103 Pd 'light seed' is considerably lower than that of the 103 Pd 'heavy seed' reported in the TG 43 report. Our measured values at all radial distances are in excellent agreement with the results of a Monte Carlo simulation reported by Weaver, except for points along and near the seed longitudinal axis. The anisotropy constant of the 103 Pd 'light seed' was calculated using the linear quadratic biological model for cell killing in 30 clinical implants. For the model 200 ''light seed,'' it has a value of 0.865. However, our biological model calculations lead us to conclude that if the anisotropy factors of an interstitial brachytherapy seed vary significantly over radial distances anisotropy

  15. All-Digital Time-Domain CMOS Smart Temperature Sensor with On-Chip Linearity Enhancement.

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Chen, Chao-Lieh; Lin, Yi

    2016-01-30

    This paper proposes the first all-digital on-chip linearity enhancement technique for improving the accuracy of the time-domain complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) smart temperature sensor. To facilitate on-chip application and intellectual property reuse, an all-digital time-domain smart temperature sensor was implemented using 90 nm Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Although the inverter-based temperature sensor has a smaller circuit area and lower complexity, two-point calibration must be used to achieve an acceptable inaccuracy. With the help of a calibration circuit, the influence of process variations was reduced greatly for one-point calibration support, reducing the test costs and time. However, the sensor response still exhibited a large curvature, which substantially affected the accuracy of the sensor. Thus, an on-chip linearity-enhanced circuit is proposed to linearize the curve and achieve a new linearity-enhanced output. The sensor was implemented on eight different Xilinx FPGA using 118 slices per sensor in each FPGA to demonstrate the benefits of the linearization. Compared with the unlinearized version, the maximal inaccuracy of the linearized version decreased from 5 °C to 2.5 °C after one-point calibration in a range of -20 °C to 100 °C. The sensor consumed 95 μW using 1 kSa/s. The proposed linearity enhancement technique significantly improves temperature sensing accuracy, avoiding costly curvature compensation while it is fully synthesizable for future Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) system.

  16. Linear thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity and melting temperature of Am-MOX and Np-MOX

    Prieur, D.; Belin, R.C.; Manara, D.; Staicu, D.; Richaud, J.-C.; Vigier, J.-F.; Scheinost, A.C.; Somers, J.; Martin, P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The thermal properties of Np- and Am-MOX solid solutions were investigated. • Np- and Am-MOX solid solutions exhibit the same linear thermal expansion. • The thermal conductivity of Am-MOX is about 10% higher than that of Np-MOX. • The melting temperatures of Np-MOX and Am-MOX are 3020 ± 30 K and 3005 ± 30 K, respectively. - Abstract: The thermal properties of Np- and Am-MOX solid solution materials were investigated. Their linear thermal expansion, determined using high temperature X-ray diffraction from room temperature to 1973 K showed no significant difference between the Np and the Am doped MOX. The thermal conductivity of the Am-MOX is about 10% higher than that of Np-MOX. The melting temperatures of Np-MOX and Am-MOX, measured using a laser heating self crucible arrangement were 3020 ± 30 K and 3005 ± 30 K, respectively

  17. Analysis of Knock Phenomenon Induced in a Constant Volume Chamber by Local Gas Temperature Measurement and Visualization

    Moriyoshi, Yasuo; Kobayashi, Shigemi; Enomoto, Yoshiteru

    Knock phenomenon in SI engines is regarded as an auto-ignition of unburned end-gas, and it has been widely examined by using rapid compression machines (RCM), shock-tubes or test engines. Recent researches point out the importance of the low temperature chemical reaction and the negative temperature coefficient (NTC). To investigate the effects, analyses of instantaneous local gas temperature, flow visualization and gaseous pressure were conducted in this study. As measurements using real engines are too difficult to analyze, the authors aimed to make measurements using a constant volume vessel under knock conditions where propagating flame exists during the induction time of auto-ignition. Adopting the two-wire thermocouple method enabled us to measure the instantaneous local gas temperature until the moment when the flame front passes by. High-speed images inside the unburned region were also recorded simultaneously using an endoscope. As a result, it was found that when knock occurs, the auto-ignition initiation time seems slightly early compared to the results without knock. This causes a higher volume ratio of unburned mixture and existence of many hot spots and stochastically leads to an initiation of knock.

  18. Heat exchange and pressure drop of herring-bone fin surfaces. Experimental cell results at constant wall temperature; Echange de chaleur et perte de charge de surfaces a ailettes en chevrons. Resultats experimentaux en cellule a temperature de paroi constante

    NONE

    1968-07-01

    The increase in the specific power of nuclear reactors of the gas-graphite type has necessitated the use of high performance exchange surfaces for canning the fuel (natural uranium). For this, experiments were carried out on cans fitted with herring-bone fins, at constant wall temperature; a flow of water at 100 deg. C passes inside the can which is cooled externally by a flow of CO{sub 2} at 15 bars pressure. This experimental set-up makes it possible to compare the aero-thermal performances of the different cans with an accuracy of 5 per cent. This report presents the results obtained in the form of a friction coefficient f{sub 0} and mean Margoulis number m{sub 0} as a function of the Reynolds number Re{sub 0}, this latter varying from 3 x 10{sup 5} to 9 x 10{sup 5}. (authors) [French] L'augmentation de la puissance specifique des reacteurs nucleaires de la filiere graphite-gaz a necessite l'utilisation de surfaces d'echange a hautes performances pour gainer le combustible (uranium naturel). Dans cette optique, des gaines munies d'ailettes disposees en chevron ont ete experimentees a temperature de paroi constante: un courant d'eau a 100 deg. C circule a l'interieur de la gaine qui est refroidie exterieurement par un ecoulement de CO{sub 2} sous une pression de 15 bars. Cette methode experimentale permet de situer les performances aerothermiques des gaines les unes par rapport aux autres a 5 pour cent pres. Ce rapport presente les resultats obtenus sous la forme d'un coefficient de frottement f{sub 0} et d'un nombre de Margoulis moyen m{sub 0} en fonction du nombre de Reynolds Re{sub 0}, ce dernier pouvant varier de 3. 10{sup 5} a 9. 10{sup 5}. (auteurs)

  19. Evaluation of a Linear Mixing Model to Retrieve Soil and Vegetation Temperatures of Land Targets

    Yang, J.; Jia, L.; Cui, Y.; Zhou, J.; Menenti, M.

    2014-01-01

    A simple linear mixing model of heterogeneous soil-vegetation system and retrieval of component temperatures from directional remote sensing measurements by inverting this model is evaluated in this paper using observations by a thermal camera. The thermal camera was used to obtain multi-angular TIR

  20. Temperature dependence of mode conversion in warm, unmagnetized plasmas with a linear density profile

    Yu, Dae Jung; Lee, Dong-Hun [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kihong [Division of Energy Systems Research, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    We study theoretically the linear mode conversion between electromagnetic waves and Langmuir waves in warm, stratified, and unmagnetized plasmas, using a numerically precise calculation based on the invariant imbedding method. We verify that the principle of reciprocity for the forward and backward mode conversion coefficients holds precisely regardless of temperature. We also find that the temperature dependence of the mode conversion coefficient is substantially stronger than that previously reported. Depending on the wave frequency and the incident angle, the mode conversion coefficient is found to increase or decrease with the increase of temperature.

  1. Finite difference modelling of the temperature rise in non-linear medical ultrasound fields.

    Divall, S A; Humphrey, V F

    2000-03-01

    Non-linear propagation of ultrasound can lead to increased heat generation in medical diagnostic imaging due to the preferential absorption of harmonics of the original frequency. A numerical model has been developed and tested that is capable of predicting the temperature rise due to a high amplitude ultrasound field. The acoustic field is modelled using a numerical solution to the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation, known as the Bergen Code, which is implemented in cylindrical symmetric form. A finite difference representation of the thermal equations is used to calculate the resulting temperature rises. The model allows for the inclusion of a number of layers of tissue with different acoustic and thermal properties and accounts for the effects of non-linear propagation, direct heating by the transducer, thermal diffusion and perfusion in different tissues. The effect of temperature-dependent skin perfusion and variation in background temperature between the skin and deeper layers of the body are included. The model has been tested against analytic solutions for simple configurations and then used to estimate temperature rises in realistic obstetric situations. A pulsed 3 MHz transducer operating with an average acoustic power of 200 mW leads to a maximum steady state temperature rise inside the foetus of 1.25 degrees C compared with a 0.6 degree C rise for the same transmitted power under linear propagation conditions. The largest temperature rise occurs at the skin surface, with the temperature rise at the foetus limited to less than 2 degrees C for the range of conditions considered.

  2. Design and Application of a High-Temperature Linear Ion Trap Reactor

    Jiang, Li-Xue; Liu, Qing-Yu; Li, Xiao-Na; He, Sheng-Gui

    2018-01-01

    A high-temperature linear ion trap reactor with hexapole design was homemade to study ion-molecule reactions at variable temperatures. The highest temperature for the trapped ions is up to 773 K, which is much higher than those in available reports. The reaction between V2O6 - cluster anions and CO at different temperatures was investigated to evaluate the performance of this reactor. The apparent activation energy was determined to be 0.10 ± 0.02 eV, which is consistent with the barrier of 0.12 eV calculated by density functional theory. This indicates that the current experimental apparatus is prospective to study ion-molecule reactions at variable temperatures, and more kinetic details can be obtained to have a better understanding of chemical reactions that have overall barriers. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Biological parameters of trichogramma chilonis ishii (trichogrammatidae: hymenoptera) feeding on sitotroga cerealella eggs at three constant temperatures

    Sultan, R.; Khan, J.; Haq, E.

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted on the biological parameters of trichogramma chilonis ishii (trichogrammatidae: hymenoptera) feeding on grain moth, sitotroga cereallela eggs at three constant temperatures and five different ages of host eggs at insect pest management programme, national agricultural research centre, (narc) islamabad. The results revealed that maximum rate of parasitism was 95.70 +- 1.94 at 28 +- 1 degree c while minimum was 61.30 +-1.70 at 32 +- 1 degree c. maximum adult emergence and female ratio from parasitized eggs were 96.30% with 59.2+- 5.83 female ratio at 28 +-1 degree c while minimum was 51.10% with female ratio of 58.1 at 32+-1 degree c. The maximum developmental duration (9.6 +- 0.32 days) and adult longevity (4.3 +- 0.38 days) was at 24 +-1 degree degree c while minimum was 7.4 +-0.36 and 2.0 +- 0.56 days at 32 +- 1 degree c. The results indicate that temperature has a significant effect on the biological parameters of trichogramma and with increasing temperature developmental duration decreased. Similarly effect of host eggs age indicates that maximum parasitism and adult emergence were 97.40 +- 0.84% and 98.20 +- 0.94% on 2h old eggs while minimum parasitism was 24.6 +- 4.92% and adult emergence was 21.5 +- 1.33% from 72h old eggs. Adult longevity and female ratio was not significantly different at different ages of host eggs. Thus out of three tested temperatures, 28 +-1 degree c was more suitable for mass rearing of tricho-gramma and feeding 2-12h old eggs for maximum parasitism and adult emergence from parasitized eggs under laboratory condition of 28 +-1 degree c. (author)

  4. Linear parameter-varying modeling and control of the steam temperature in a Canadian SCWR

    Sun, Peiwei, E-mail: sunpeiwei@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Jianmin; Su, Guanghui

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Nonlinearity of Canadian SCWR is analyzed based on step responses and Nyquist plots. • LPV model is derived through Jacobian linearization and curve fitting. • An output feedback H{sub ∞} controller is synthesized for the steam temperature. • The control performance is evaluated by step disturbances and wide range operation. • The controller can stabilize the system and reject the reactor power disturbance. - Abstract: The Canadian direct-cycle Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) is a pressure-tube type SCWR under development in Canada. The dynamics of the steam temperature have a high degree of nonlinearity and are highly sensitive to reactor power disturbances. Traditional gain scheduling control cannot theoretically guarantee stability for all operating regions. The control performance can also be deteriorated when the controllers are switched. In this paper, a linear parameter-varying (LPV) strategy is proposed to solve such problems. Jacobian linearization and curve fitting are applied to derive the LPV model, which is verified using a nonlinear dynamic model and determined to be sufficiently accurate for control studies. An output feedback H{sub ∞} controller is synthesized to stabilize the steam temperature system and reject reactor power disturbances. The LPV steam temperature controller is implemented using a nonlinear dynamic model, and step changes in the setpoints and typical load patterns are carried out in the testing process. It is demonstrated through numerical simulation that the LPV controller not only stabilizes the steam temperature under different disturbances but also efficiently rejects reactor power disturbances and suppresses the steam temperature variation at different power levels. The LPV approach is effective in solving control problems of the steam temperature in the Canadian SCWR.

  5. ZZ POINT-2004, Linearly Interpolable ENDF/B-VI.8 Data for 13 Temperatures

    Cullen, Dermott E.

    2004-01-01

    A - Description or function: The ENDF/B data library, ENDF/B-VI, Release 8 was processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections. The original evaluated data include cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications, these ENDF/B-VI, Release 8 data were processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight temperatures between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin. It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures, 1, 10, 100 eV, 1 and 10 keV. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy with a tolerance of 0.1 %. POINT2004 contains all of the evaluations in the ENDF/B-VI general purpose library, which contains evaluations for 328 materials (isotopes or naturally occurring elemental mixtures of isotopes). No special purpose ENDF/B-VI libraries, such as fission products, thermal scattering, photon interaction data are included. The majority of these evaluations are complete, in the sense that they include all cross sections over the energy range 10 e-5 eV to at least 20 MeV. B - Methods: The PREPRO2002 code system was used to process the ENDF/B data. Listed below are the steps, including the PREPRO2002 codes, which were used to process the data in the order in which the codes were run. 1) Linearly interpolable, tabulated cross sections (LINEAR); 2) Including the resonance contribution (RECENT); 3) Doppler broaden all cross sections to temperature (SIGMA1); 4) Check data, define redundant cross sections by summation (FIXUP)

  6. A linearization time-domain CMOS smart temperature sensor using a curvature compensation oscillator.

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Chen, Hao-Wen

    2013-08-28

    This paper presents an area-efficient time-domain CMOS smart temperature sensor using a curvature compensation oscillator for linearity enhancement with a -40 to 120 °C temperature range operability. The inverter-based smart temperature sensors can substantially reduce the cost and circuit complexity of integrated temperature sensors. However, a large curvature exists on the temperature-to-time transfer curve of the inverter-based delay line and results in poor linearity of the sensor output. For cost reduction and error improvement, a temperature-to-pulse generator composed of a ring oscillator and a time amplifier was used to generate a thermal sensing pulse with a sufficient width proportional to the absolute temperature (PTAT). Then, a simple but effective on-chip curvature compensation oscillator is proposed to simultaneously count and compensate the PTAT pulse with curvature for linearization. With such a simple structure, the proposed sensor possesses an extremely small area of 0.07 mm2 in a TSMC 0.35-mm CMOS 2P4M digital process. By using an oscillator-based scheme design, the proposed sensor achieves a fine resolution of 0.045 °C without significantly increasing the circuit area. With the curvature compensation, the inaccuracy of -1.2 to 0.2 °C is achieved in an operation range of -40 to 120 °C after two-point calibration for 14 packaged chips. The power consumption is measured as 23 mW at a sample rate of 10 samples/s.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of ignition front propagation in a constant volume with temperature inhomogeneities. I. Fundamental analysis and diagnostics

    Chen, Jacqueline H.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Sankaran, Ramanan [Reacting Flow Research Department, Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969 MS 9051, Livermore, CA 94551-0969 (United States); Mason, Scott D. [Lockheed Martin Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Im, Hong G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    The influence of thermal stratification on autoignition at constant volume and high pressure is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS) with detailed hydrogen/air chemistry with a view to providing better understanding and modeling of combustion processes in homogeneous charge compression-ignition engines. Numerical diagnostics are developed to analyze the mode of combustion and the dependence of overall ignition progress on initial mixture conditions. The roles of dissipation of heat and mass are divided conceptually into transport within ignition fronts and passive scalar dissipation, which modifies the statistics of the preignition temperature field. Transport within ignition fronts is analyzed by monitoring the propagation speed of ignition fronts using the displacement speed of a scalar that tracks the location of maximum heat release rate. The prevalence of deflagrative versus spontaneous ignition front propagation is found to depend on the local temperature gradient, and may be identified by the ratio of the instantaneous front speed to the laminar deflagration speed. The significance of passive scalar mixing is examined using a mixing timescale based on enthalpy fluctuations. Finally, the predictions of the multizone modeling strategy are compared with the DNS, and the results are explained using the diagnostics developed. (author)

  8. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  9. Linear analysis using secants for materials with temperature dependent nonlinear elastic modulus and thermal expansion properties

    Pepi, John W.

    2017-08-01

    Thermally induced stress is readily calculated for linear elastic material properties using Hooke's law in which, for situations where expansion is constrained, stress is proportional to the product of the material elastic modulus and its thermal strain. When material behavior is nonlinear, one needs to make use of nonlinear theory. However, we can avoid that complexity in some situations. For situations in which both elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion vary with temperature, solutions can be formulated using secant properties. A theoretical approach is thus presented to calculate stresses for nonlinear, neo-Hookean, materials. This is important for high acuity optical systems undergoing large temperature extremes.

  10. The Systematic Bias of Ingestible Core Temperature Sensors Requires a Correction by Linear Regression

    Andrew P. Hunt

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An accurate measure of core body temperature is critical for monitoring individuals, groups and teams undertaking physical activity in situations of high heat stress or prolonged cold exposure. This study examined the range in systematic bias of ingestible temperature sensors compared to a certified and traceable reference thermometer. A total of 119 ingestible temperature sensors were immersed in a circulated water bath at five water temperatures (TEMP A: 35.12 ± 0.60°C, TEMP B: 37.33 ± 0.56°C, TEMP C: 39.48 ± 0.73°C, TEMP D: 41.58 ± 0.97°C, and TEMP E: 43.47 ± 1.07°C along with a certified traceable reference thermometer. Thirteen sensors (10.9% demonstrated a systematic bias > ±0.1°C, of which 4 (3.3% were > ± 0.5°C. Limits of agreement (95% indicated that systematic bias would likely fall in the range of −0.14 to 0.26°C, highlighting that it is possible for temperatures measured between sensors to differ by more than 0.4°C. The proportion of sensors with systematic bias > ±0.1°C (10.9% confirms that ingestible temperature sensors require correction to ensure their accuracy. An individualized linear correction achieved a mean systematic bias of 0.00°C, and limits of agreement (95% to 0.00–0.00°C, with 100% of sensors achieving ±0.1°C accuracy. Alternatively, a generalized linear function (Corrected Temperature (°C = 1.00375 × Sensor Temperature (°C − 0.205549, produced as the average slope and intercept of a sub-set of 51 sensors and excluding sensors with accuracy outside ±0.5°C, reduced the systematic bias to < ±0.1°C in 98.4% of the remaining sensors (n = 64. In conclusion, these data show that using an uncalibrated ingestible temperature sensor may provide inaccurate data that still appears to be statistically, physiologically, and clinically meaningful. Correction of sensor temperature to a reference thermometer by linear function eliminates this systematic bias (individualized functions or ensures

  11. Non-linear temperature-dependent curvature of a phase change composite bimorph beam

    Blonder, Greg

    2017-06-01

    Bimorph films curl in response to temperature. The degree of curvature typically varies in proportion to the difference in thermal expansion of the individual layers, and linearly with temperature. In many applications, such as controlling a thermostat, this gentle linear behavior is acceptable. In other cases, such as opening or closing a valve or latching a deployable column into place, an abrupt motion at a fixed temperature is preferred. To achieve this non-linear motion, we describe the fabrication and performance of a new bilayer structure we call a ‘phase change composite bimorph (PCBM)’. In a PCBM, one layer in the bimorph is a composite containing small inclusions of phase change materials. When the inclusions melt, their large (generally positive and  >1%) expansion coefficient induces a strong, reversible step function jump in bimorph curvature. The measured jump amplitude and thermal response is consistent with theory, and can be harnessed by a new class of actuators and sensors.

  12. The Systematic Bias of Ingestible Core Temperature Sensors Requires a Correction by Linear Regression.

    Hunt, Andrew P; Bach, Aaron J E; Borg, David N; Costello, Joseph T; Stewart, Ian B

    2017-01-01

    An accurate measure of core body temperature is critical for monitoring individuals, groups and teams undertaking physical activity in situations of high heat stress or prolonged cold exposure. This study examined the range in systematic bias of ingestible temperature sensors compared to a certified and traceable reference thermometer. A total of 119 ingestible temperature sensors were immersed in a circulated water bath at five water temperatures (TEMP A: 35.12 ± 0.60°C, TEMP B: 37.33 ± 0.56°C, TEMP C: 39.48 ± 0.73°C, TEMP D: 41.58 ± 0.97°C, and TEMP E: 43.47 ± 1.07°C) along with a certified traceable reference thermometer. Thirteen sensors (10.9%) demonstrated a systematic bias > ±0.1°C, of which 4 (3.3%) were > ± 0.5°C. Limits of agreement (95%) indicated that systematic bias would likely fall in the range of -0.14 to 0.26°C, highlighting that it is possible for temperatures measured between sensors to differ by more than 0.4°C. The proportion of sensors with systematic bias > ±0.1°C (10.9%) confirms that ingestible temperature sensors require correction to ensure their accuracy. An individualized linear correction achieved a mean systematic bias of 0.00°C, and limits of agreement (95%) to 0.00-0.00°C, with 100% of sensors achieving ±0.1°C accuracy. Alternatively, a generalized linear function (Corrected Temperature (°C) = 1.00375 × Sensor Temperature (°C) - 0.205549), produced as the average slope and intercept of a sub-set of 51 sensors and excluding sensors with accuracy outside ±0.5°C, reduced the systematic bias to Correction of sensor temperature to a reference thermometer by linear function eliminates this systematic bias (individualized functions) or ensures systematic bias is within ±0.1°C in 98% of the sensors (generalized function).

  13. Cross-sectional area of the murine aorta linearly increases with increasing core body temperature.

    Crouch, A Colleen; Manders, Adam B; Cao, Amos A; Scheven, Ulrich M; Greve, Joan M

    2017-11-06

    The cardiovascular (CV) system plays a vital role in thermoregulation. To date, the response of core vasculature to increasing core temperature has not been adequately studied in vivo. Our objective was to non-invasively quantify the arterial response in murine models due to increases in body temperature, with a focus on core vessels of the torso and investigate whether responses were dependent on sex or age. Male and female, adult and aged mice were anaesthetised and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Data were acquired from the circle of Willis (CoW), heart, infrarenal aorta and peripheral arteries at core temperatures of 35, 36, 37 and 38 °C (±0.2 °C). Vessels in the CoW did not change. Ejection fraction decreased and cardiac output (CO) increased with increasing temperature in adult female mice. Cross-sectional area of the aorta increased significantly and linearly with temperature for all groups, but at a diminished rate for aged animals (p temperature are biologically important because they may affect conductive and convective heat transfer. Leveraging non-invasive methodology to quantify sex and age dependent vascular responses due to increasing core temperature could be combined with bioheat modelling in order to improve understanding of thermoregulation.

  14. Large eddy simulation of the low temperature ignition and combustion processes on spray flame with the linear eddy model

    Wei, Haiqiao; Zhao, Wanhui; Zhou, Lei; Chen, Ceyuan; Shu, Gequn

    2018-03-01

    Large eddy simulation coupled with the linear eddy model (LEM) is employed for the simulation of n-heptane spray flames to investigate the low temperature ignition and combustion process in a constant-volume combustion vessel under diesel-engine relevant conditions. Parametric studies are performed to give a comprehensive understanding of the ignition processes. The non-reacting case is firstly carried out to validate the present model by comparing the predicted results with the experimental data from the Engine Combustion Network (ECN). Good agreements are observed in terms of liquid and vapour penetration length, as well as the mixture fraction distributions at different times and different axial locations. For the reacting cases, the flame index was introduced to distinguish between the premixed and non-premixed combustion. A reaction region (RR) parameter is used to investigate the ignition and combustion characteristics, and to distinguish the different combustion stages. Results show that the two-stage combustion process can be identified in spray flames, and different ignition positions in the mixture fraction versus RR space are well described at low and high initial ambient temperatures. At an initial condition of 850 K, the first-stage ignition is initiated at the fuel-lean region, followed by the reactions in fuel-rich regions. Then high-temperature reaction occurs mainly at the places with mixture concentration around stoichiometric mixture fraction. While at an initial temperature of 1000 K, the first-stage ignition occurs at the fuel-rich region first, then it moves towards fuel-richer region. Afterwards, the high-temperature reactions move back to the stoichiometric mixture fraction region. For all of the initial temperatures considered, high-temperature ignition kernels are initiated at the regions richer than stoichiometric mixture fraction. By increasing the initial ambient temperature, the high-temperature ignition kernels move towards richer

  15. Room temperature plasma oxidation: A new process for preparation of ultrathin layers of silicon oxide, and high dielectric constant materials

    Tinoco, J.C.; Estrada, M.; Baez, H.; Cerdeira, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present basic features and oxidation law of the room temperature plasma oxidation (RTPO), as a new process for preparation of less than 2 nm thick layers of SiO 2 , and high-k layers of TiO 2 . We show that oxidation rate follows a potential law dependence on oxidation time. The proportionality constant is function of pressure, plasma power, reagent gas and plasma density, while the exponent depends only on the reactive gas. These parameters are related to the physical phenomena occurring inside the plasma, during oxidation. Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) capacitors fabricated with these layers are characterized by capacitance-voltage, current-voltage and current-voltage-temperature measurements. Less than 2.5 nm SiO 2 layers with surface roughness similar to thermal oxide films, surface state density below 3 x 10 11 cm -2 and current density in the expected range for each corresponding thickness, were obtained by RTPO in a parallel-plate reactor, at 180 mW/cm 2 and pressure range between 9.33 and 66.5 Pa (0.07 and 0.5 Torr) using O 2 and N 2 O as reactive gases. MOS capacitors with TiO 2 layers formed by RTPO of sputtered Ti layers are also characterized. Finally, MOS capacitors with stacked layers of TiO 2 over SiO 2 , both layers obtained by RTPO, were prepared and evaluated to determine the feasibility of the use of TiO 2 as a candidate for next technology nodes

  16. Non-linear effects of initial melt temperatures on microstructures and mechanical properties during quenching process of liquid Cu{sub 46}Zr{sub 54} alloy

    Mo, Yun-Fei [School of Physics and Microelectronics Science, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Liu, Rang-Su, E-mail: liurangsu@sina.com [School of Physics and Microelectronics Science, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Tian, Ze-An; Liang, Yong-Chao [School of Physics and Microelectronics Science, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Zhang, Hai-Tao [School of Physics and Microelectronics Science, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Department of Electronic and Communication Engineering, Changsha University, Changsha 410003 (China); Hou, Zhao-Yang [Department of Applied Physics, Chang’an University, Xi’an 710064 (China); Liu, Hai-Rong [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Ai-long [College of Physics and Electronics, Hunan University of Arts and Science, Changde 415000 (China); Zhou, Li-Li [Department of Information Engineering, Gannan Medical University, Ganzhou 341000 (China); Peng, Ping [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Xie, Zhong [School of Physics and Microelectronics Science, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China)

    2015-05-15

    A MD simulation of liquid Cu{sub 46}Zr{sub 54} alloys has been performed for understanding the effects of initial melt temperatures on the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties during quenching process. By using several microstructural analyzing methods, it is found that the icosahedral and defective icosahedral clusters play a key role in the microstructure transition. All the final solidification structures obtained at different initial melt temperatures are of amorphous structures, and their structural and mechanical properties are non-linearly related to the initial melt temperatures, and fluctuated in a certain range. Especially, there exists a best initial melt temperature, from which the glass configuration possesses the highest packing density, the optimal elastic constants, and the smaller extent of structural softening under deforming.

  17. Graphical assessment of the linear contact steel on composite material at high temperature and pressure

    Rus, Dorin; Florescu, Virgil; Bausic, Florin; Ursache, Robert; Sasu, Anca

    2018-01-01

    In this article we have tried to present a graphical assessment of the dry linear contact for composite materials reinforced with glass fibers as well as of the influence of the sliding speed, load and friction coefficient. Perpendicular loads, the contact temperature and the wear of the metal surface were recorded. The wear volume was calculated using the Archard relationship. Using the Archard relationship, the width of trace can be calculated in 3 locations. Numerous experimental trials were performed in connection to the wear of the metal surface, the contact temperature and the value of the friction coefficient. A connection between the evolution of the wear process and the dependency on the contact temperature and friction coefficient can be observed.

  18. Experimental investigation of linear thermal expansion of pyrolytic graphite at high temperatures

    Senchenko, V. N.; Belikov, R. S.

    2017-11-01

    Using the previously described [1] experimental setup for investigation of the thermophysical properties of refractory materials under high pressure and temperature a few experiments with pyrolytic graphite were carried out. The density of the material was equal to 2.18 g/cm3. Experimental data on the linear thermal expansion in the perpendicular and parallel to the basal plane direction were obtained. Thermal expansion in the perpendicular to the basal plane direction during the heating from room temperature up to the melting point was 16.4 ± 1.6%. The results obtained allow calculating the density of pyrolytic graphite in the wide range of high temperatures up to the melting point.

  19. Studies of the trapped particle and ion temperature gradient instabilities in the Columbia Linear Machine

    Mathey, O.H.

    1989-01-01

    In the first part of the work, the effects of weak Coulomb and neutral collisions on the collisionless curvature driven trapped particle mode are studied in the Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 1729, (1986)]. Low Coulomb collisionality yields a small stabilizing correction to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) collisionless mode, which scales as v, using the Krook model, and ν ec 1/2 using a Lorentz pitch angle operator. In higher collisionality regimes, both models tend to yield similar scalings. In view of relative high neutral collisionality in CLM, both types of collisionality are then combined, modeling neutral collisions with the conserving Krook and Coulomb collisions with a Lorentz model. The dispersion relation is then integrated over velocity space. This combination yields results in very good accord with the available experimental data. The Ion Temperature Gradient Instability is then investigated. It is shown that anisotropy in gradient has a substantial effect on the ion temperature gradient driven mode. A gradient in the parallel temperature is needed for an instability to occur, and a gradient in the perpendicular temperature gradient further enhances the instability indirectly as long as the frequency of the mode is near ion resonance. The physical reason for this important role difference is presented. The Columbia Linear Machine is being redesigned to produce and identify the ion temperature gradient driven η i mode. Using the expected parameters, the author has developed detailed predictions of the mode characteristics in the CLM. Strong multi mode instabilities are expected. As the ion parallel and perpendicular ion temperature gradients are expected to differ significantly, we differentiate between η i parallel and ν i perpendicular and explore the physical differences between them, which leads to a scheme for stabilization of the mode

  20. Effect of linear temperature dependence of thermoelectric properties on energy conversion efficiency

    Yamashita, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    New thermal rate equations were developed by taking the temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity ρ and thermal conductivity κ of the thermoelectric (TE) materials into the thermal rate equations on the assumption that they vary linearly with temperature T. The relative energy conversion efficiency η/η 0 for a single TE element was formulated by approximate analysis, where η and η 0 are the energy conversion efficiencies derived from the new and conventional thermal rate equations, respectively. Applying it to Si-Ge alloys, the temperature dependence of ρ is stronger than that of κ, so the former has a more significant effect on η/η 0 than the latter. However, the degree of contribution from both of them to η/η 0 was a little lower than 1% at the temperature difference ΔT of 600 K. When the temperature dependence of κ was increased to become equal to that of ρ, however, it was found that η/η 0 is increased by about 10% at ΔT = 600 K. It is clarified here that the temperature dependences of ρ and κ are also important factors for an improvement in η

  1. Low temperature diamond growth by linear antenna plasma CVD over large area

    Izak, Tibor; Babchenko, Oleg; Potocky, Stepan; Kromka, Alexander; Varga, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there is a great effort to increase the deposition area and decrease the process temperature for diamond growth which will enlarge its applications including use of temperature sensitive substrates. In this work, we report on the large area (20 x 30 cm 2 ) and low temperature (250 C) polycrystalline diamond growth by pulsed linear antenna microwave plasma system. The influence of substrate temperature varied from 250 to 680 C, as controlled by the table heater and/or by microwave power, is studied. It was found that the growth rate, film morphology and diamond to non-diamond phases (sp 3 /sp 2 carbon bonds) are influenced by the growth temperature, as confirmed by SEM and Raman measurements. The surface chemistry and growth processes were studied in terms of activation energies (E a ) calculated from Arrhenius plots. The activation energies of growth processes were very low (1.7 and 7.8 kcal mol -1 ) indicating an energetically favourable growth process from the CO 2 -CH 4 -H 2 gas mixture. In addition, from activation energies two different growth regimes were observed at low and high temperatures, indicating different growth mechanism. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. ZZ POINT-2007, linearly interpolable ENDF/B-VII.0 data for 14 temperatures

    Cullen, Dermott E.

    2007-01-01

    A - Description or function: The ENDF/B data library, ENDF/B-VII.0 was processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections. The original evaluated data include cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications, these ENDF/B-VII.0 data were processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight temperatures: 0, 300, 600, 900, 1200, 1500, 1800 and 2100 Kelvin. It has also been processed to six astrophysics like temperatures: 0.1, 1, 10, 100 eV, 1 and 10 keV. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy with a tolerance of 0.1 %. POINT 2007 contains all of the evaluations in the ENDF/B-VII general purpose library, which contains 78 new evaluations + 315 old ones: total 393 nuclides. It also includes 16 new elemental evaluations replaced by isotopic evaluations + 19 old ones. No special purpose ENDF/B-VII libraries, such as fission products, thermal scattering, photon interaction data are included. These evaluations include all cross sections over the energy range 10 e-5 eV to at least 20 MeV. The list of nuclides is indicated. B - Methods: The PREPRO 2007 code system was used to process the ENDF/B data. Listed below are the steps, including the PREPRO2007 codes, which were used to process the data in the order in which the codes were run. 1) Linearly interpolable, tabulated cross sections (LINEAR) 2) Including the resonance contribution (RECENT) 3) Doppler broaden all cross sections to temperature (SIGMA1) 4) Check data, define redundant cross sections by summation (FIXUP) 5) Update evaluation dictionary in MF/MT=1/451 (DICTIN) C - Restrictions: Due to recent changes in ENDF-6 Formats and Procedures only the latest version of the ENDF/B Pre-processing codes, namely PREPRO 2007, can be used to accurately process all current ENDF/B-VII evaluations. The use of

  3. The effect of addition of primary positive salts, complex salt, on the ionic strength and rate constant at various temperatures by reaction kinetics

    Kurade, S. S.; Ramteke, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we have investigated the rate of reaction by using ionic strength at different temperatures. The main goal of this experiment is to determine the relation between ionic strength with reaction rate, reaction time and rate constant with temperature. It is observed that the addition of positive salt indicate the increasing ionic strength with increase in run time at various temperatures. Thus the temperature affects the speed of reaction and mechanism by which chemical reaction occurs and time variable plays vital role in the progress of reaction at different temperatures.

  4. Linear and nonlinear dynamics of electron temperature gradient mode in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    Zakir, U.; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar (Pakistan); Haque, Q. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-05-15

    The effect of non-Maxwellian distributed ions on electron temperature gradient mode is investigated. The linear dispersion relation of η{sub e}−mode is obtained which shows that the behavior of this mode changes in the presence of superthermal ions. The growth rate of η{sub e}−mode driven linear instability is found and is observed to modify due to nonthermal ions. However, it is found that this leaves the electron energy transport coefficient unchanged. In the nonlinear regime, a dipolar vortex solution is derived which indicates that the dynamic behavior of the vortices changes with the inclusion of kappa distributed ions. The importance of present study with respect to space and laboratory plasmas is also pointed out.

  5. Solar Wind Proton Temperature Anisotropy: Linear Theory and WIND/SWE Observations

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P.; Kasper, J. C.; Lazarus, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a comparison between WIND/SWE observations (Kasper et al., 2006) of beta parallel to p and T perpendicular to p/T parallel to p (where beta parallel to p is the proton parallel beta and T perpendicular to p and T parallel to p are the perpendicular and parallel proton are the perpendicular and parallel proton temperatures, respectively; here parallel and perpendicular indicate directions with respect to the ambient magnetic field) and predictions of the Vlasov linear theory. In the slow solar wind, the observed proton temperature anisotropy seems to be constrained by oblique instabilities, by the mirror one and the oblique fire hose, contrary to the results of the linear theory which predicts a dominance of the proton cyclotron instability and the parallel fire hose. The fast solar wind core protons exhibit an anticorrelation between beta parallel to c and T perpendicular to c/T parallel to c (where beta parallel to c is the core proton parallel beta and T perpendicular to c and T parallel to c are the perpendicular and parallel core proton temperatures, respectively) similar to that observed in the HELIOS data (Marsch et al., 2004).

  6. Comment on “Recent progress in thermodynamics of radiation——exergy of radiation,effective temperature of photon and entropy constant of photon”

    2009-01-01

    Chen et al.proposed the concepts of effective temperature of photon and entropy constant of photon in a recent paper [Chen Z S,Mo S P,Hu P.Recent progress in thermodynamics of radiation―exergy of radiation,effective temperature of photon and entropy constant of photon.Sci China Ser E-Tech Sci,2008,51(8):1096―1109] by enduing a single photon with macroscale thermodynamic parameters such as exergy and entropy.This paper argues that applying these concepts and their inferences to macro-scale thermodynamic system will lead to the results which conflict with macroscale thermodynamic laws.This means that the concepts of effective temperature of photon and entropy constant of photon are not correct.

  7. Development of Pasteuria penetrans in Meloidogyne javanica females as affected by constantly high vs fluctuating temperature in an in-vivo system.

    Darban, D A; Gowen, S R; Pembroke, B; Mahar, A N

    2005-03-01

    Growth room and glasshouse experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of constant and fluctuating temperatures on the development of Pasteuria penetrans a hyperparasite of root-knot nematodes. Tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) were inoculated with Meloidogyne javanica second-stage juveniles attached with endospores of P. penetrans and were grown in growth room at 26-29 degrees C and in glasshouse at 20-32 degrees C. The tomato plants were sampled from the growth room after 600 degree-days based on 17 degrees C/d, accumulating each day above a base temperature of 10 degrees C and from the glasshouse after 36 calendar days. Temperature affected the development of P. penetrans directly. The rate of development at constant temperature in growth room was faster than that in the glasshouse at fluctuating temperatures.

  8. Skewness of the cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations due to the non-linear gravitational instability

    Munshi, D.; Souradeep, T.; Starobinsky, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The skewness of the temperature fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) produced by initially Gaussian adiabatic perturbations with the flat (Harrison-Zeldovich) spectrum, which arises due to non-linear corrections to a gravitational potential at the matter-dominated stage, is calculated quantitatively. For the standard CDM model, the effect appears to be smaller than expected previously and lies below the cosmic variance limit even for small angles. The sign of the skewness is opposite to that of the skewness of density perturbations. (author)

  9. Discovery of a Significant Acetone•Hydroperoxy Adduct Chaperone Effect and Its Impact on the Determination of Room Temperature Rate Constants for Acetonylperoxy/Hydroperoxy Self-Reactions and Cross Reaction Via Infrared Kinetic Spectroscopy.

    Grieman, F. J.; Hui, A. O.; Okumura, M.; Sander, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    In order to model the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere in regions containing acetone properly, the kinetics of the acetonylperoxy/hydroperoxy self-reactions and cross reaction have been studied over a wide temperature range using Infrared Kinetic Spectroscopy. We report here the determination of different rate constants for the acetonylperoxy chemistry that we obtained at 298 K compared to currently accepted values. A considerable increase in the observed HO2 self-reaction rate constant due to rate enhancement via the chaperone effect from the reaction between HO2 and the (CH3)2CO•HO2 hydrogen-bonded adduct, even at room temperature, was discovered that was previously ignored. Correct determination of the acetonylperoxy and hydroperoxy kinetics must include this dependence of the HO2 self-reaction rate on acetone concentration. Via excimer laser flash photolysis to create the radical reactants, HO2 absorption was monitored in the infrared by diode laser wavelength modulation detection simultaneously with CH3C(O)CH2O2absorption monitored in the ultraviolet at 300 nm as a function of time. Resulting decay curves were fit concurrently first over a short time scale to obtain the rate constants minimizing subsequent product reactions. Modeling/fitting with a complete reaction scheme was then performed to refine the rate constants and test their veracity. Experiments were carried out over a variety of concentrations of acetone and methanol. Although no effect due to methanol concentration was found at room temperature, the rate constant for the hydroperoxy self-reaction was found to increase linearly with acetone concentration which is interpreted as the adduct being formed and resulting in a chaperone mechanism that enhances the self-reaction rate: (CH3)2CO·HO2 + HO2 → H2O2 + O2 + (CH3)2CO Including this effect, the resulting room temperature rate constants for the cross reaction and the acetonylperoxy self-reaction were found to be 2-3 times smaller than

  10. Temperature coefficient of piezoelectric constants in Pb(Mg1/3 Nb2/3O3 - PbTiO3 ceramics

    Manuel Henrique Lente

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the thermal stability of piezoelectric constants of PMN-PT ceramics in the tetragonal and rhombohedral phases were investigated in a wide range of temperatures. The results showed that the tetragonal PMN-PT presented higher thermal stability and, consequently, the temperature coefficients for the piezoelectric constants were approximately zero. This result revealed to be much better than that commonly found for PZT ceramics. Although the rhombohedral PMN-PT presented a slight lower thermal stability, the values found for the coupling factor were significantly higher than the tetragonal composition.

  11. Linear and nonlinear post-processing of numerically forecasted surface temperature

    M. Casaioli

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we test different approaches to the statistical post-processing of gridded numerical surface air temperatures (provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts onto the temperature measured at surface weather stations located in the Italian region of Puglia. We consider simple post-processing techniques, like correction for altitude, linear regression from different input parameters and Kalman filtering, as well as a neural network training procedure, stabilised (i.e. driven into the absolute minimum of the error function over the learning set by means of a Simulated Annealing method. A comparative analysis of the results shows that the performance with neural networks is the best. It is encouraging for systematic use in meteorological forecast-analysis service operations.

  12. Temperature--pressure compensation for a linear accelerator electron beam dosimeter

    Hrejsa, A.F.; Soen, J.; Jankowiak, P.

    1985-01-01

    Routine weekly calibration of a Siemens Mevatron 20 linear accelerator with 3-, 5-, 7-, 10-, 12-, 15-, and 18-MeV electron energies demonstrated fluctuations in dose/monitor unit for the electron beam on the order of 3%--6%. Evaluations and study of the problem demonstrated that the electron chamber, which is open to atmosphere, was undergoing significant temperature changes during the course of a treatment day. The inability of the chamber to compensate for these changes in temperature and pressure led to the addition of a compensating circuit by the manufacturer. The results of the addition of this circuit were evaluated for several extended periods throughout the year, and it was found that the changes in dose/monitor were reduced to approximately +- 0.5%

  13. Estimating spatially distributed monthly evapotranspiration rates by linear transformations of MODIS daytime land surface temperature data

    J. Szilagyi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Under simplifying conditions catchment-scale vapor pressure at the drying land surface can be calculated as a function of its watershed-representative temperature (<Ts> by the wet-surface equation (WSE, similar to the wet-bulb equation in meteorology for calculating the dry-bulb thermometer vapor pressure of the Complementary Relationship of evaporation. The corresponding watershed ET rate, , is obtained from the Bowen ratio with the help of air temperature, humidity and percent possible sunshine data. The resulting (<Ts>, pair together with the wet-environment surface temperature (<Tws> and ET rate (ETw, obtained by the Priestley-Taylor equation, define a linear transformation on a monthly basis by which spatially distributed ET rates can be estimated as a sole function of MODIS daytime land surface temperature, Ts, values within the watershed. The linear transformation preserves the mean which is highly desirable. <Tws>, in the lack of significant open water surfaces within the study watershed (Elkhorn, Nebraska, was obtained as the mean of the smallest MODIS Ts values each month. The resulting period-averaged (2000–2007 catchment-scale ET rate of 624 mm/yr is very close to the water-balance derived ET rate of about 617 mm/yr. The latter is a somewhat uncertain value due to the effects of (a observed groundwater depletion of about 1m over the study period caused by extensive irrigation, and; (b the uncertain rate of net regional groundwater supply toward the watershed. The spatially distributed ET rates correspond well with soil/aquifer properties and the resulting land use type (i.e. rangeland versus center-pivot irrigated crops.

  14. Effective temperatures, angular diameters, distances and linear radii for 160 O and B stars

    Underhill, A.B.; Divan, L.; Prevot-Burnichon, M.L.; Doazan, V.

    1979-01-01

    The significance is explained of the effective temperatures, angular diameters, distances and linear diameters which have been found from published ultraviolet spectrophotometry, visible and near infrared intermediate-band photometry and model-atmosphere fluxes for 160 O and B stars using a method which is fully explained and evaluated in the full paper which is reproduced on Microfiche MN 189/1. An appendix to the full paper presents BCD spectrophotometry for 77 of the program stars. The angular diameters are systematically the same as those measured previously, and the flux effective temperatures of the main-sequence and giant stars reproduce well the relationship established by other authors, for main-sequence and giant O and B stars. The O8 - B9 supergiants have systematically lower temperatures than do main-sequence stars of the same subtype. The Beta Cephei stars and most Be stars have the same effective temperature as normal stars of the same spectral type. The radii of O and B stars increase from main-sequence to supergiant. The late B supergiants are about twice as large as the O9 supergiants. (author)

  15. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W.; Gázquez, José L.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model

  16. Electronic setup for fluorescence emission measurements and long-time constant-temperature maintenance of Single-Walled Carbon Nano-Tubes in water solutions

    De Rosa Matteo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In our previous research we have observed that the fluorescence emission from water solutions of Single-Walled Carbon Nano-Tubes (SWCNT, excited by a laser with a wavelength of 830nm, diminishes with the time. We have already proved that such a fading is a function of the storage time and the storage temperature. In order to study the emission of the SWCNT as a function of these two parameters we have designed and realized a special measurement compartment with a cuvette holder where the SWCNT solutions can be measured and stored at a fixed constant temperature for periods of time as long as several weeks. To maintain the measurement setup under a constant temperature we have designed special experimental setup based on two Peltier cells with electronic temperature control.

  17. Lattice constants of pure methane and carbon dioxide hydrates at low temperatures. Implementing quantum corrections to classical molecular dynamics studies

    Costandy, Joseph; Michalis, Vasileios K.; Economou, Ioannis G., E-mail: i.tsimpanogiannis@qatar.tamu.edu, E-mail: ioannis.economou@qatar.tamu.edu [Chemical Engineering Program, Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N., E-mail: i.tsimpanogiannis@qatar.tamu.edu, E-mail: ioannis.economou@qatar.tamu.edu [Chemical Engineering Program, Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Environmental Research Laboratory, National Center for Scientific Research NCSR “Demokritos,” 15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Attikis (Greece); Stubos, Athanassios K. [Environmental Research Laboratory, National Center for Scientific Research NCSR “Demokritos,” 15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Attikis (Greece)

    2016-03-28

    We introduce a simple correction to the calculation of the lattice constants of fully occupied structure sI methane or carbon dioxide pure hydrates that are obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations using the TIP4PQ/2005 water force field. The obtained corrected lattice constants are subsequently used in order to obtain isobaric thermal expansion coefficients of the pure gas hydrates that exhibit a trend that is significantly closer to the experimental behavior than previously reported classical molecular dynamics studies.

  18. Development of procedures for calculating stiffness and damping properties of elastomers in engineering applications. Part 2: Elastomer characteristics at constant temperature

    Gupta, P. K.; Tessarzik, J. M.; Cziglenyi, L.

    1974-01-01

    Dynamic properties of a commerical polybutadiene compound were determined at a constant temperature of 32 C by a forced-vibration resonant mass type of apparatus. The constant thermal state of the elastomer was ensured by keeping the ambient temperature constant and by limiting the power dissipation in the specimen. Experiments were performed with both compression and shear specimens at several preloads (nominal strain varying from 0 to 5 percent), and the results are reported in terms of a complex stiffness as a function of frequency. Very weak frequency dependence is observed and a simple power law type of correlation is shown to represent the data well. Variations in the complex stiffness as a function of preload are also found to be small for both compression and shear specimens.

  19. Isotope effects and the temperature dependences of the hyperfine coupling constants of muoniated sec-butyl radicals in condensed phases.

    Fleming, Donald G; Bridges, Michael D; Arseneau, Donald J; Chen, Ya Kun; Wang, Yan Alexander

    2011-04-07

    Reported here is the first μSR study of the muon (A(μ)) and proton (A(p)) β-hyperfine coupling constants (Hfcc) of muoniated sec-butyl radicals, formed by muonium (Mu) addition to 1-butene and to cis- and trans-2-butene. The data are compared with in vacuo spin-unrestricted MP2 and hybrid DFT/B3YLP calculations reported in the previous paper (I), which played an important part in the interpretation of the data. The T-dependences of both the (reduced) muon, A(μ)′(T), and proton, A(p)(T), Hfcc are surprisingly well explained by a simple model, in which the calculated Hfcc from paper I at energy minima of 0 and near ±120° are thermally averaged, assuming an energy dependence given by a basic 2-fold torsional potential. Fitted torsional barriers to A(μ)′(T) from this model are similar (~3 kJ/mol) for all muoniated butyl radicals, suggesting that these are dominated by ZPE effects arising from the C−Mu bond, but for A(p)(T) exhibit wide variations depending on environment. For the cis- and trans-2-butyl radicals formed from 2-butene, A(μ)′(T) exhibits clear discontinuities at bulk butene melting points, evidence for molecular interactions enhancing these muon Hfcc in the environment of the solid state, similar to that found in earlier reports for muoniated tert-butyl. In contrast, for Mu−sec-butyl formed from 1-butene, there is no such discontinuity. The muon hfcc for the trans-2-butyl radical are seemingly very well predicted by B3LYP calculations in the solid phase, but for sec-butyl from 1-butene, showing the absence of further interactions, much better agreement is found with the MP2 calculations across the whole temperature range. Examples of large proton Hfcc near 0 K are also reported, due to eclipsed C−H bonds, in like manner to C−Mu, which then also exhibit clear discontinuities in A(p)(T) at bulk melting points. The data suggest that the good agreement found between theory and experiment from the B3LYP calculations for eclipsed bonds in

  20. 'Syncing' Up with the Quinn-Rand-Strogatz Constant: Hurwitz-ZetaFunctions in Non-Linear physics

    Durgin, Natalie J.; Garcia, Sofia M.; Flournoy, Tamara; Bailey,David H.

    2007-12-01

    This work extends the analytical and computationalinvestigation of the Quinn-Rand-Strogatz (QRS) constants from non-linearphysics. The QRS constants (c1, c2, ..., cN) are found in a Winfreeoscillator mean-field system used to examine the transition of coupledoscillators as they lose synchronization. The constants are part of anasymptotic expansion of a function related to the oscillatorsynchronization. Previous work used high-precision software packages toevaluate c1 to 42 decimal-digits, which made it possible to recognize andprove that c1 was the root of a certain Hurwitz-zeta function. Thisallowed a value of c2 to beconjectured in terms of c1. Therefore thereis interest in determining the exact values of these constants to highprecision in the hope that general relationships can be establishedbetween the constants and the zeta functions. Here, we compute the valuesof the higher order constants (c3, c4) to more than 42-digit precision byextending an algorithm developed by D.H. Bailey, J.M. Borwein and R.E.Crandall. Several methods for speeding up the computation are exploredand an alternate proof that c1 is the root of a Hurwitz-zeta function isattempted.

  1. Effect of Annealing on Strain-Temperature Response under Constant Tensile Stress in Cold-Worked NiTi Thin Wire

    Yan, Xiaojun; Van Humbeeck, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The present paper aims to understand the influence of annealing on the strain-temperature response of a cold-worked NiTi wire under constant tensile stress. It was found that transformation behavior, stress-strain relationship, and strain-temperature response of the cold-worked NiTi wire are strongly affected by the annealing temperature. Large martensitic strains can be reached even though the applied stress is below the plateau stress of the martensite phase. At all stress levels transforma...

  2. Nonmonotonic Temperature Dependence of the Pressure-Dependent Reaction Rate Constant and Kinetic Isotope Effect of Hydrogen Radical Reaction with Benzene Calculated by Variational Transition-State Theory.

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G; Xu, Xuefei

    2017-11-30

    The reaction between H and benzene is a prototype for reactions of radicals with aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report calculations of the reaction rate constants and the branching ratios of the two channels of the reaction (H addition and H abstraction) over a wide temperature and pressure range. Our calculations, obtained with an accurate potential energy surface, are based on variational transition-state theory for the high-pressure limit of the addition reaction and for the abstraction reaction and on system-specific quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel theory calibrated by variational transition-state theory for pressure effects on the addition reaction. The latter is a very convenient way to include variational effects, corner-cutting tunneling, and anharmonicity in falloff calculations. Our results are in very good agreement with the limited experimental data and show the importance of including pressure effects in the temperature interval where the mechanism changes from addition to abstraction. We found a negative temperature effect of the total reaction rate constants at 1 atm pressure in the temperature region where experimental data are missing and accurate theoretical data were previously missing as well. We also calculated the H + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 and D + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 kinetic isotope effects, and we compared our H + C 6 H 6 results to previous theoretical data for H + toluene. We report a very novel nonmonotonic dependence of the kinetic isotope effect on temperature. A particularly striking effect is the prediction of a negative temperature dependence of the total rate constant over 300-500 K wide temperature ranges, depending on the pressure but generally in the range from 600 to 1700 K, which includes the temperature range of ignition in gasoline engines, which is important because aromatics are important components of common fuels.

  3. New insights into soil temperature time series modeling: linear or nonlinear?

    Bonakdari, Hossein; Moeeni, Hamid; Ebtehaj, Isa; Zeynoddin, Mohammad; Mahoammadian, Abdolmajid; Gharabaghi, Bahram

    2018-03-01

    Soil temperature (ST) is an important dynamic parameter, whose prediction is a major research topic in various fields including agriculture because ST has a critical role in hydrological processes at the soil surface. In this study, a new linear methodology is proposed based on stochastic methods for modeling daily soil temperature (DST). With this approach, the ST series components are determined to carry out modeling and spectral analysis. The results of this process are compared with two linear methods based on seasonal standardization and seasonal differencing in terms of four DST series. The series used in this study were measured at two stations, Champaign and Springfield, at depths of 10 and 20 cm. The results indicate that in all ST series reviewed, the periodic term is the most robust among all components. According to a comparison of the three methods applied to analyze the various series components, it appears that spectral analysis combined with stochastic methods outperformed the seasonal standardization and seasonal differencing methods. In addition to comparing the proposed methodology with linear methods, the ST modeling results were compared with the two nonlinear methods in two forms: considering hydrological variables (HV) as input variables and DST modeling as a time series. In a previous study at the mentioned sites, Kim and Singh Theor Appl Climatol 118:465-479, (2014) applied the popular Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) neural network and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) nonlinear methods and considered HV as input variables. The comparison results signify that the relative error projected in estimating DST by the proposed methodology was about 6%, while this value with MLP and ANFIS was over 15%. Moreover, MLP and ANFIS models were employed for DST time series modeling. Due to these models' relatively inferior performance to the proposed methodology, two hybrid models were implemented: the weights and membership function of MLP and

  4. Rate constant for the H˙ + H2O → ˙OH + H2 reaction at elevated temperatures measured by pulse radiolysis.

    Muroya, Y; Yamashita, S; Lertnaisat, P; Sanguanmith, S; Meesungnoen, J; Jay-Gerin, J-P; Katsumura, Y

    2017-11-22

    Maintaining the structural integrity of materials in nuclear power plants is an essential issue associated with safe operation. Hydrogen (H 2 ) addition or injection to coolants is a powerful technique that has been widely applied such that the reducing conditions in the coolant water avoid corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Because the radiation-induced reaction of ˙OH + H 2 → H˙ + H 2 O plays a crucial role in these systems, the rate constant has been measured at operation temperatures of the reactors (285-300 °C) by pulse radiolysis, generating sufficient data for analysis. The reverse reaction H˙ + H 2 O → ˙OH + H 2 is negligibly slow at ambient temperature; however, it accelerates considerably quickly at elevated temperatures. Although the reverse reaction reduces the effectiveness of H 2 addition, reliable rate constants have not yet been measured. In this study, the rate constants have been determined in a temperature range of 250-350 °C by pulse radiolysis in an aqueous I - solution.

  5. Investigation of Relative Time Constant Influence of Inertial Part of Superheater on Quality of Steam Temperature Control Behind Boiler in Broad Band of Loading Variations

    G. T. Kulakov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to computational investigation of influence relative time constant of an object which changes in broad band on quality of steam temperature control behind a boiler with due account of value of regulating action in the system with PI- and PID- regulator. The simulation has been based on a single-loop automatic control system (ACS. It has been revealed that the less value of the relative time constant of an object leads to more integral control error in system with PID- regulator while operating external ACS perturbation. Decrease of numerical value of relative time constant of an object while operating external perturbation causes decrease of relative time concerning appearance of maximum dynamic control error from common relative control time.

  6. Calculation of the Dielectric Constant as a Function of Temperature Close to the Smectic A-Smectic B Transition in B5 Using the Mean Field Model

    Hamit Yurtseven

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the static dielectric constant ( is calculated close to the smectic A-smectic B ( transition ( = 71.3°C for the liquid crystal compound B5. By expanding the free energy in terms of the order parameter in the mean field theory, the expression for the dielectric susceptibility (dielectric constant is derived and is fitted to the experimental data for which was obtained at the field strengths of 0 and 67 kV/cm from literature. Coefficients in the free energy expansion are determined from our fit for the transition of B5. Our results show that the observed behaviour of the dielectric constant close to the transition in B5 can be described satisfactorily by our mean field model.

  7. Life cycle and reproductive patterns of Triatoma rubrovaria (Blanchard, 1843 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae under constant and fluctuating conditions of temperature and humidity

    Damborsky Miryam P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the temperature and relative humidity influence in the life cycle, mortality and fecundity patterns of Triatoma rubrovaria. Four cohorts with 60 recently laid eggs each were conformed. The cohorts were divided into two groups. In the controlled conditions group insects were maintained in a dark climatic chamber under constant temperature and humidity, whereas triatomines of the ambiental temperature group were maintained at room temperature. Average incubation time was 15.6 days in the controlled conditions group and 19.1 days in the ambiental temperature. In group controlled conditions the time from egg to adult development lasted 10 months while group ambiental temperature took four months longer. Egg eclosion rate was 99.1% and 98.3% in controlled conditions and ambiental temperature, respectively. Total nymphal mortality in controlled conditions was 52.6% whereas in ambiental temperature was 51.8%. Mean number of eggs/female was 817.6 controlled conditions and 837.1 ambiental temperature. Fluctuating temperature and humidity promoted changes in the life cycle duration and in the reproductive performance of this species, although not in the species mortality.

  8. Non-linear quantization error reduction for the temperature measurement subsystem on-board LISA Pathfinder

    Sanjuan, J.; Nofrarias, M.

    2018-04-01

    Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Pathfinder is a mission to test the technology enabling gravitational wave detection in space and to demonstrate that sub-femto-g free fall levels are possible. To do so, the distance between two free falling test masses is measured to unprecedented sensitivity by means of laser interferometry. Temperature fluctuations are one of the noise sources limiting the free fall accuracy and the interferometer performance and need to be known at the ˜10 μK Hz-1/2 level in the sub-millihertz frequency range in order to validate the noise models for the future space-based gravitational wave detector LISA. The temperature measurement subsystem on LISA Pathfinder is in charge of monitoring the thermal environment at key locations with noise levels of 7.5 μK Hz-1/2 at the sub-millihertz. However, its performance worsens by one to two orders of magnitude when slowly changing temperatures are measured due to errors introduced by analog-to-digital converter non-linearities. In this paper, we present a method to reduce this effect by data post-processing. The method is applied to experimental data available from on-ground validation tests to demonstrate its performance and the potential benefit for in-flight data. The analog-to-digital converter effects are reduced by a factor between three and six in the frequencies where the errors play an important role. An average 2.7 fold noise reduction is demonstrated in the 0.3 mHz-2 mHz band.

  9. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of multilayered spherical quantum dots: Effects of geometrical size, hydrogenic impurity, hydrostatic pressure and temperature

    Karimi, M.J.; Rezaei, G.; Nazari, M.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the effective mass and parabolic one band approximations, simultaneous effects of the geometrical size, hydrogenic impurity, hydrostatic pressure, and temperature on the intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in multilayered spherical quantum dots are studied. Energy eigenvalues and eigenvectors are calculated using the fourth-order Runge–Kutta method and optical properties are obtained using the compact density matrix approach. The results indicate that the hydrogenic impurity, hydrostatic pressure, temperature and geometrical parameters such as the well and barrier widths have a great influence on the linear, the third-order nonlinear and the total optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes. -- Highlights: • Hydrogenic impurity effects on the optical properties of a MSQD are investigated. • Hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects are also studied. • Hydrogenic impurity has a great influence on the linear and nonlinear ACs and RICs. • Hydrostatic pressure and temperature change the linear and nonlinear ACs and RICs

  10. Evaluation of Candidate Linear Variable Displacement Transducers for High Temperature Irradiations in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Knudson, D.L.; Rempe, J.L.; Daw, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to promote nuclear science and technology in the U.S. Given this designation, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation's energy security needs. A fundamental component of the ATR NSUF program is to develop in-pile instrumentation capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation experiments. Dimensional change is a key parameter that must be monitored during irradiation of new materials being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can experience significant changes during high temperature irradiation. Currently, dimensional changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a defined period of time in the ATR and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The time and labor to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data (i.e., only characterizing the end state when samples are removed from the reactor) and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To address these issues, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently initiated efforts to evaluate candidate linear variable displacement transducers (LVDTs) for use during high temperature irradiation experiments in typical ATR test locations. Two nuclear grade LVDT vendor designs were identified for consideration - a smaller diameter design qualified for temperatures up to 350 C and a larger design with capabilities to 500 C. Initial evaluation efforts include collecting calibration data as a function of temperature, long duration testing of LVDT response while held at high temperature, and the assessment of changes

  11. Effect of Temperature on Acidity and Hydration Equilibrium Constants of Delphinidin-3-O- and Cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside Calculated from Uni- and Multiwavelength Spectroscopic Data.

    Vidot, Kévin; Achir, Nawel; Mertz, Christian; Sinela, André; Rawat, Nadirah; Prades, Alexia; Dangles, Olivier; Fulcrand, Hélène; Dornier, Manuel

    2016-05-25

    Delphinidin-3-O-sambubioside and cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside are the main anthocyanins of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces, traditionally used to make a bright red beverage by decoction in water. At natural pH, these anthocyanins are mainly in their flavylium form (red) in equilibrium with the quinonoid base (purple) and the hemiketal (colorless). For the first time, their acidity and hydration equilibrium constants were obtained from a pH-jump method followed by UV-vis spectroscopy as a function of temperature from 4 to 37 °C. Equilibrium constant determination was also performed by multivariate curve resolution (MCR). Acidity and hydration constants of cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside at 25 °C were 4.12 × 10(-5) and 7.74 × 10(-4), respectively, and were significantly higher for delphinidin-3-O-sambubioside (4.95 × 10(-5) and 1.21 × 10(-3), respectively). MCR enabled the obtaining of concentration and spectrum of each form but led to overestimated values for the equilibrium constants. However, both methods showed that formations of the quinonoid base and hemiketal were endothermic reactions. Equilibrium constants of anthocyanins in the hibiscus extract showed comparable values as for the isolated anthocyanins.

  12. Effects of temperature at constant air dew point on leaf carboxylation efficiency and CO2 compensation point of different leaf types.

    Weber, J A; Tenhunen, J D; Lange, O L

    1985-09-01

    The effect of temperature on photosynthesis at constant water-vapor pressure in the air was investigated using two sclerophyll species, Arbutus unedo and Quercus suber, and one mesophytic species, Spinacia oleracea. Photosynthesis and transpiration were measured over a range of temperatures, 20-39° C. The external concentration of CO2 was varied from 340 μbar to near CO2 compensation. The initial slope (carboxylation efficiency, CE) of the photosynthetic response to intercellular CO2 concentration, the CO2 compensation point (Γ), and the extrapolated rate of CO2 released into CO2-free air (R i) were calculated. At an external CO2 concentration of 320-340 μbar CO2, photosynthesis decreased with temperature in all species. The effect of temperature on Γ was similar in all species. While CE in S. oleracea changed little with temperature, CE decreased by 50% in Q. suber as temperature increased from 25 to 34° C. Arbutus unedo also exhibited a decrease in CE at higher temperatures but not as marked as Q. suber. The absolut value of R i increased with temperature in S. oleracea, while changing little or decreasing in the sclerophylls. Variations in Γ and R i of the sclerophyll species are not consistent with greater increase of respiration with temperature in the light in these species compared with S. oleracea.

  13. EXERGY AND CARBON CREDITS FOR SERIES CONNECTED N PHOTOVOLTAIC THERMAL - COMPOUND PARABOLIC CONCENTRATOR (PVT-CPC) COLLECTOR: AT CONSTANT OUTLET TEMPERATURE

    Rohit Tripathi 1,*, G. N. Tiwari 2

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, overall energy and exergy performance of partially covered N photovoltaic thermal - compound parabolic concentrators (PVT-CPC) (25% covered by glass to glass PV module) collector connected in series have been carried out at constant outlet temperature mode. Further, comparison in performance for partially covered N photovoltaic thermal - compound parabolic concentrators (PVT-CPC) [case (i)] and N compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) collector [case (ii)] connected in s...

  14. Non-linear statistical downscaling of present and LGM precipitation and temperatures over Europe

    M. Vrac

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Local-scale climate information is increasingly needed for the study of past, present and future climate changes. In this study we develop a non-linear statistical downscaling method to generate local temperatures and precipitation values from large-scale variables of a Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (here CLIMBER. Our statistical downscaling scheme is based on the concept of Generalized Additive Models (GAMs, capturing non-linearities via non-parametric techniques. Our GAMs are calibrated on the present Western Europe climate. For this region, annual GAMs (i.e. models based on 12 monthly values per location are fitted by combining two types of large-scale explanatory variables: geographical (e.g. topographical information and physical (i.e. entirely simulated by the CLIMBER model.

    To evaluate the adequacy of the non-linear transfer functions fitted on the present Western European climate, they are applied to different spatial and temporal large-scale conditions. Local projections for present North America and Northern Europe climates are obtained and compared to local observations. This partially addresses the issue of spatial robustness of our transfer functions by answering the question "does our statistical model remain valid when applied to large-scale climate conditions from a region different from the one used for calibration?". To asses their temporal performances, local projections for the Last Glacial Maximum period are derived and compared to local reconstructions and General Circulation Model outputs.

    Our downscaling methodology performs adequately for the Western Europe climate. Concerning the spatial and temporal evaluations, it does not behave as well for Northern America and Northern Europe climates because the calibration domain may be too different from the targeted regions. The physical explanatory variables alone are not capable of downscaling realistic values. However, the inclusion of

  15. Visualization of dielectric constant-electric field-temperature phase maps for imprinted relaxor ferroelectric thin films

    Frederick, J. C.; Kim, T. H.; Maeng, W.; Brewer, A. A.; Podkaminer, J. P.; Saenrang, W.; Vaithyanathan, V.; Schlom, D. G.; Li, F.; Chen, L.-Q.; Trolier-McKinstry, S.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Eom, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    The dielectric phase transition behavior of imprinted lead magnesium niobate–lead titanate relaxor ferroelectric thin films was mapped as a function of temperature and dc bias. To compensate for the presence of internal fields, an external electric bias was applied while measuring dielectric responses. The constructed three-dimensional dielectric maps provide insight into the dielectric behaviors of relaxor ferroelectric films as well as the temperature stability of the imprint. The transition temperature and diffuseness of the dielectric response correlate with crystallographic disorder resulting from strain and defects in the films grown on strontium titanate and silicon substrates; the latter was shown to induce a greater degree of disorder in the film as well as a dielectric response lower in magnitude and more diffuse in nature over the same temperature region. Strong and stable imprint was exhibited in both films and can be utilized to enhance the operational stability of piezoelectric devices through domain self-poling.

  16. The effects of constant and alternating temperatures on the reproductive potential, life span, and life expectancy of Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann (Dipteria: Tephritidae

    V. V. CARDOSO

    Full Text Available Ovarian development, oviposition, larval eclosion, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC activity, ovarian, testis and ejaculatory apodeme measurements (length, width, and area, and the number of spermatozoa of Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann were analyzed at alternating (20º/6ºC and 20º/13°C and constant (6°C; 25°C temperatures. Life span and life expectancy were also analyzed for both genders. All the results suggest that temperature, especially alternating temperatures, increase not only male and female reproductive potential but also their life span and life expectancy. These changes can be a powerful strategy triggered by A. fraterculus as a means to survive the stressful temperature conditions found in winter in the apple production region in Brazil, enabling this species to increase its population density and cause apple damage when spring begins.

  17. The effects of constant and alternating temperatures on the reproductive potential, life span, and life expectancy of Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann (Dipteria: Tephritidae

    CARDOSO V. V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian development, oviposition, larval eclosion, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC activity, ovarian, testis and ejaculatory apodeme measurements (length, width, and area, and the number of spermatozoa of Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann were analyzed at alternating (20masculine/6masculineC and 20masculine/13degreesC and constant (6degreesC; 25degreesC temperatures. Life span and life expectancy were also analyzed for both genders. All the results suggest that temperature, especially alternating temperatures, increase not only male and female reproductive potential but also their life span and life expectancy. These changes can be a powerful strategy triggered by A. fraterculus as a means to survive the stressful temperature conditions found in winter in the apple production region in Brazil, enabling this species to increase its population density and cause apple damage when spring begins.

  18. Non-linear dynamo waves in an incompressible medium when the turbulence dissipative coefficients depend on temperature

    A. D. Pataraya

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-linear α-ω; dynamo waves existing in an incompressible medium with the turbulence dissipative coefficients depending on temperature are studied in this paper. We investigate of α-ω solar non-linear dynamo waves when only the first harmonics of magnetic induction components are included. If we ignore the second harmonics in the non-linear equation, the turbulent magnetic diffusion coefficient increases together with the temperature, the coefficient of turbulent viscosity decreases, and for an interval of time the value of dynamo number is greater than 1. In these conditions a stationary solution of the non-linear equation for the dynamo wave's amplitude exists; meaning that the magnetic field is sufficiently excited. The amplitude of the dynamo waves oscillates and becomes stationary. Using these results we can explain the existence of Maunder's minimum.

  19. Trend analysis by a piecewise linear regression model applied to surface air temperatures in Southeastern Spain (1973–2014)

    Campra, Pablo; Morales, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of the trends of environmental and climatic changes is mostly derived from the slopes of the linear trends using ordinary least-square fitting. An alternative flexible fitting model, piecewise regression, has been applied here to surface air temperature records in southeastern Spain for the recent warming period (1973–2014) to gain accuracy in the description of the inner structure of change, dividing the time series into linear segments with different slopes. Breakpoint y...

  20. Population growth and development of the psocid Liposcelis rufa (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) at constant temperatures and relative humidities.

    Gautam, S G; Opit, G P; Giles, K L

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the effects of eight temperatures (22.5, 25.0, 27.5, 30.0, 32.5, 35.0, 37.5, and 40.0 degrees C) and four relative humidities (43, 55, 63, and 75%) on population growth and development of the psocid Liposcelis rufa Broadhead (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae). L. rufa did not survive at 43% RH, at all temperatures tested; at 55% RH, at the highest four temperatures; and at 63% RH and 40.0 degrees C. The greatest population growth was recorded at 35.0 degrees C and 75% RH (73-fold growth). At 40.0 degrees C, L. rufa populations declined or barely grew. L. rufa males have two to four nymphal instars, and the percentages of males with two, three, and four instars were 31, 54, and 15%, respectively. Female L. rufa have two to five instars, and the percentages of females with two, three, four, and five instars were 2, 44, 42, and 12%, respectively. The life cycle was shorter for males than females. We developed temperature-dependent developmental equations for male and female eggs, individual nymphal, combined nymphal, and combined immature stages. The ability of L. rufa to reproduce at a relative humidity of 55% and temperatures of 22.5-30.0 degrees C and at relative humidities of 63-75% and temperatures of 22.5-37.5 degrees C, in addition to being able to survive at 40.0 degrees C, suggests that this species would be expected to have a broader distribution than other Liposcelis species. These data provide a better understanding of L. rufa population dynamics and can be used to help develop effective management strategies for this psocid.

  1. A unified degree day model describes survivorship of Copitarsia corruda Pogue & Simmons (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) at different constant temperatures

    N.N. G& #243; mez; R.C. Venette; J.R. Gould; D.F. Winograd

    2009-01-01

    Predictions of survivorship are critical to quantify the probability of establishment by an alien invasive species, but survival curves rarely distinguish between the effects of temperature on development versus senescence. We report chronological and physiological age-based survival curves for a potentially invasive noctuid, recently described as Copitarsia...

  2. The elastic constants of MgSiO3 perovskite at pressures and temperatures of the Earth's mantle.

    Oganov, A R; Brodholt, J P; Price, G D

    2001-06-21

    The temperature anomalies in the Earth's mantle associated with thermal convection can be inferred from seismic tomography, provided that the elastic properties of mantle minerals are known as a function of temperature at mantle pressures. At present, however, such information is difficult to obtain directly through laboratory experiments. We have therefore taken advantage of recent advances in computer technology, and have performed finite-temperature ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the elastic properties of MgSiO3 perovskite, the major mineral of the lower mantle, at relevant thermodynamic conditions. When combined with the results from tomographic images of the mantle, our results indicate that the lower mantle is either significantly anelastic or compositionally heterogeneous on large scales. We found the temperature contrast between the coldest and hottest regions of the mantle, at a given depth, to be about 800 K at 1,000 km, 1,500 K at 2,000 km, and possibly over 2,000 K at the core-mantle boundary.

  3. Thermal conduction and linear expansion of sintered rhenium and tungsten-rhenium alloys at a temperature up to 1000 K

    Pozdnyak, N.Z.; Belyaev, R.A.; Vavilov, Yu.V.; Vinogradov, Yu.G.; Serykh, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    Preparation technology (by powder metallurgy methods) of sintered rhenium and tungsten-rhenium VR-5, VR-10, and VR-20 alloys is described. Thermal conduction of rhenium and VR-20 alloy has been measured in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 K. The value obtained turned out to be considerably less than those published elsewhere, this testifies to the great thermal contact resistance between the material grains. Also measured is the mean linear expansion coefficient for the mentioned above materials in the same temperature range. Linear expansion increases with rhenium content increase

  4. Population Growth and Development of the Psocid Liposcelis fusciceps (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) at Constant Temperatures and Relative Humidities.

    Gautam, S G; Opit, G P; Shakya, K

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the effects of seven temperatures (22.5, 25.0, 27.5, 30.0, 32.5, 35.0, and 37.5°C) and four relative humidities (43, 55, 63, and 75%) on population growth and development of the psocid Liposcelis fusciceps Badonnel (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae). Results demonstrated that L. fusciceps did not survive at 43% RH, at all temperatures tested. At 55% RH, L. fusciceps did not survive at the highest three temperatures and no psocids survived at 37.5°C and 63% RH. The highest population growth was recorded at 30.0°C and 75% RH where populations increased 16-fold from an initial population of five females. L. fusciceps males have two to four nymphal instars, and the percentages of males with two, three, and four instars were 28, 70, and 2%, respectively. Female L. fusciceps have two to five instars, and the percentages of females with two, three, four, and five instars were 2, 33, 63, and 2%, respectively. The total developmental time for males was shorter than females. We developed temperature-dependent development equations for male and female eggs, individual nymphal, combined nymphal, and combined immature stages. Based on 30-d population growth, L. fusciceps can survive and multiply at a relative humidity of 55% at 22.5-30.0°C, but does better at 27.5-32.5°C and a higher relative humidity of 75%. Relative humidities of ≤ 63% and temperatures of ≥ 32.5°C are detrimental to L. fusciceps. These data provide a better understanding of L. fusciceps population dynamics and can be used to develop effective management strategies for this psocid. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Constant post-irradiation repopulation rates and linear relationship between cellular blood response and number of transplanted bone marrow cells in inbread mice

    Petersen, B.H.

    1977-01-01

    Graded doses of syngeneic bone marrow cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. Repopulation curves of peripheral blood granulocytes and platelets were apparently exponential and parallel after doses larger than 5 x 10 5 cells. The blood platelet sub(d) was reduced from 111 h to 53-57 h, and granulocyte Tsub(d) from 57 to 40 h in transplanted groups. The mean blood cell counts were reproducible to be used as a biological assay of the amount of bone marrow cells transplanted. Linear relationship between increment of blood cells up to day 16 and number of bone marrow cells transplanted on day 1 was demonstrated (1,200 granulocytes and 14,300 platelets/μl blood per 10 5 bone marrow cells). The linearity suggested a mean Tsub(d) < 22.5 h of proliferating bone marrow cells, and allowed a rough estimation of mouse bone marrow stem cell radiosensitivity (Dsub(o) 76 rad). (author)

  6. Influence of quantum confinement on the carrier contribution to the elastic constants in quantum confined heavily doped non-linear optical and optoelectronic materials: simplified theory and the suggestion for experimental determination

    Baruah, D; Choudhury, S; Singh, K M; Ghatak, K P

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we study the carrier contribution to elastic constants in quantum confined heavily doped non-linear optical compounds on the basis of a newly formulated electron dispersion law taking into account the anisotropies of the effective electron masses and spin orbit splitting constants together with the proper inclusion of the crystal field splitting in the Hamiltonian within the framework of k.p formalism. All the results of heavily doped three, and two models of Kane for heavily doped III-V materials form special cases of our generalized analysis. It has been found, taking different heavily doped quantum confined materials that, the carrier contribution to the elastic constants increases with increase in electron statistics and decrease in film thickness in ladder like manners for all types of quantum confinements with different numerical values which are totally dependent on the energy band constants. The said contribution is greatest in quantum dots and least in quantum wells together with the fact the heavy doping enhances the said contributions for all types of quantum confined materials. We have suggested an experimental method of determining the carrier contribution to the elastic constants in nanostructured materials having arbitrary band structures

  7. On the evaluation of temperature dependence of elastic constants of martensitic phases in shape memory alloys from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy studies

    Landa, Michal; Sedlak, Petr; Sittner, Petr; Seiner, Hanus; Heller, Ludek

    2008-01-01

    Elastic constants of austenite and martensite phases in shape memory alloys reflect fundamental thermodynamic properties of these materials-i.e. important physical information can be deduced not just from the values of the constants but, mainly from their temperature and stress dependencies. As regards to the parent austenite phase, such information is available in the literature for most of the known shape memory alloys. For the martensitic phases, however, only few reliable experimental data exist, due to the experimental difficulties with the preparation of martensite single crystals as well as due to the difficulties with the ultrasonic measurement of elastic properties of strongly anisotropic media with low symmetry. In this work, the temperature dependence of all elastic constants of cubic austenite and orthorhombic 2H martensite phases in Cu-Al-Ni alloy determined by resonance ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) is reported. Experimental and theoretical improvements of the RUS method which had to be made to perform the successful measurements on strongly anisotropic and martensitic phases are discussed

  8. Reaction F + C2H4: Rate Constant and Yields of the Reaction Products as a Function of Temperature over 298-950 K.

    Bedjanian, Yuri

    2018-03-29

    The kinetics and products of the reaction of F + C 2 H 4 have been studied in a discharge flow reactor combined with an electron impact ionization mass spectrometer at nearly 2 Torr total pressure of helium in the temperature range 298-950 K. The total rate constant of the reaction, k 1 = (1.78 ± 0.30) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , determined under pseudo-first-order conditions, monitoring the kinetics of F atom consumption in excess of C 2 H 4 , was found to be temperature independent in the temperature range used. H, C 2 H 3 F, and HF were identified as the reaction products. Absolute measurements of the yields of these species allowed to determine the branching ratios, k 1b / k 1 = (0.73 ± 0.07) exp(-(425 ± 45)/ T) and k 1a / k 1 = 1 - (0.73 ± 0.07) exp(-(425 ± 45)/ T) and partial rate constants for addition-elimination (H + C 2 H 3 F) and H atom abstraction (HF + C 2 H 3 ) pathways of the title reaction: k 1a = (0.80 ± 0.07) × 10 -10 exp(189 ± 37/ T) and k 1b = (1.26 ± 0.13) × 10 -10 exp(-414 ± 45/ T) cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , respectively, at T = 298-950 K and with 2σ quoted uncertainties. The overall reaction rate constant can be adequately described by both the temperature independent value and as a sum of k 1a and k 1b . The kinetic and mechanistic data from the present study are discussed in comparison with previous absolute and relative measurements and theoretical calculations.

  9. Nuclear constants

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 1 to 56. (A.L.B.)

  10. Nuclear constants

    Foos, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  11. Nuclear constants

    Foos, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is made of two tables. The first table describes the different particles (bosons and fermions) while the second one gives the nuclear constants of isotopes from the different elements with Z = 1 to 25. (J.S.)

  12. Nuclear constants

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  13. Atmospheric reaction of Cl + methacrolein: a theoretical study on the mechanism, and pressure- and temperature-dependent rate constants.

    Sun, Cuihong; Xu, Baoen; Zhang, Shaowen

    2014-05-22

    Methacrolein is a major degradation product of isoprene, the reaction of methacrolein with Cl atoms may play some roles in the degradation of isoprene where these species are relatively abundant. However, the energetics and kinetics of this reaction, which govern the reaction branching, are still not well understood so far. In the present study, two-dimensional potential energy surfaces were constructed to analyze the minimum energy path of the barrierless addition process between Cl and the C═C double bond of methacrolein, which reveals that the terminal addition intermediate is directly formed from the addition reaction. The terminal addition intermediate can further yield different products among which the reaction paths abstracting the aldehyde hydrogen atom and the methyl hydrogen atom are dominant reaction exits. The minimum reaction path for the direct aldehydic hydrogen atom abstraction is also obtained. The reaction kinetics was calculated by the variational transition state theory in conjunction with the master equation method. From the theoretical model we predicted that the overall rate constant of the Cl + methacrolein reaction at 297 K and atmospheric pressure is koverall = 2.3× 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and the branching ratio of the aldehydic hydrogen abstraction is about 12%. The reaction is pressure dependent at P pressure limit at about 100 Torr. The calculated results could well account for the experimental observations.

  14. Comparison of inter-diffusion coefficients for Ni/Cu thin films determined from classical heating analysis and linear temperature ramping analysis by means of profile reconstruction and a numerical solution of Fick's law

    Joubert, H.D.; Terblans, J.J.; Swart, H.C.

    2009-01-01

    Classical inter-diffusion studies assume a constant time of annealing when samples are annealed in a furnace. It is assumed that the sample temperature reaches the annealing temperature immediately after insertion, while the sample temperature immediately drops to room temperature after removal, the annealing time being taken as the time between insertion and removal. Using the above assumption, the diffusion coefficient can be calculated in a number of ways. In reality, the sample temperature does not immediately reach the annealing temperature; instead it rises at a rate governed by several heat transfer mechanisms, depending on the annealing procedure. For short annealing times, the sample temperature may not attain the annealing temperature, while for extended annealing times the sample temperature may reach the annealing temperature only for a fraction of the annealing time. To eliminate the effect of heat transfer mechanisms, a linear temperature ramping regime is proposed. Used in conjunction with a suitable profile reconstructing technique and a numerical solution of Fick's second law, the inter-diffusion parameters obtained from a linear ramping of Ni/Cu thin film samples can be compared to those obtained from calculations performed with the so-called Mixing-Roughness-Information model or any other suitable method used to determine classical diffusion coefficients.

  15. Seasonal variation in the effect of constant ambient temperature of 24 C in reducing FDG uptake by brown adipose tissue in children

    Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Fahey, Frederic H.; Laffin, Stephen; Davis, Royal; Treves, S. Ted; Grant, Frederick D.; Drubach, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that warming patients prior to and during 18 F-FDG uptake by controlling the room temperature can decrease uptake by brown adipose tissue (BAT). The aim of this study is to determine if this effect is subject to seasonal variation. A retrospective review was conducted of all patients referred for whole-body 18 F-FDG PET between December 2006 and December 2008. After December 2007, all patients were kept in the PET injection room at a constant 24 C for 30 min before and until 1 h following FDG administration. Patients over 22 years of age and those who received pre-medication known to reduce FDG uptake by BAT were excluded. One hundred and three patients were warmed to 24 C prior to scanning. The number of patients showing uptake by BAT in this group was compared to a control group of 99 patients who underwent PET prior to December 2007 when the injection room temperature was 21 C. Uptake by BAT occurred in 9% of studies performed after patient warming (24 C), compared to 27% of studies performed on the control group (21 C) (p 0.05). Maintaining room temperature at a constant 24 C for 30 min prior to and 1 h after IV tracer administration significantly decreases FDG uptake by BAT in children. This effect is greatest in the summer and winter. (orig.)

  16. Population growth and development of the psocid Liposcelis brunnea (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) at constant temperatures and relative humidities.

    Opit, G P; Throne, J E

    2009-06-01

    We studied the effects of temperature and relative humidity on population growth and development of the psocid Liposcelis brunnea Motschulsky. L. brunnea did not survive at 43% RH, but populations increased from 22.5 to 32.5 degrees C and 55-75% RH. Interestingly, we found population growth was higher at 63% RH than at 75% RH, and the greatest population growth was recorded at 32.5 degrees C and 63% RH. At 35 degrees C, L. brunnea nymphal survivorship was 33%, and populations declined or barely grew. L. brunnea males have two to four nymphal instars, and the percentages of males with two, three, and four instars were 13, 82, and 5%, respectively. Female L. brunnea have three to five instars, and the percentages of females with three, four, and five instars were 18, 78, and 4%, respectively. The life cycle was shorter for males than females. We developed temperature-dependent development equations for male and female eggs, individual nymphal, combined nymphal, and combined immature stages and nymphal survivorship. The ability of L. brunnea to multiply rather rapidly at 55% RH may allow it to thrive under conditions of low relative humidity where other Liposcelis species may not. These data give us a better understanding of L. brunnea population dynamics and can be used to help develop effective management strategies for this psocid.

  17. Influence of temperature, cold deformation and a constant mechanical load on the microstructural stability of a nitrogen alloyed duplex stainless steel

    Weisbrodt-Reisch, A.; Brummer, M.; Hadler, B.; Wolbank, B.; Werner, E.A.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of temperature, cold deformation and constant mechanical load on the microstructural stability and the kinetics of phase decomposition of a nitrogen-alloyed duplex stainless steel (0.34 wt.% N) was investigated. Calculation of the phase equilibria was done with THERMOCALC using the steel database TCFE3 in order to predict the stability of the phases and to estimate the influence of temperature on the fraction and chemical composition of the phases. Various ageing treatments between 800 deg. C and 1300 deg. C were performed for different time intervals with controlled heating and cooling rates. In order to determine the influence of deformation, annealing at 800 deg. C after cold deformation as well as dilatometry experiments were performed under a constant mechanical compressive load at 800 deg. C and 900 deg. C. Microstructural characterization was carried out by means of light microscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. It was found that the microstructural evolution under a thermal load alone in the temperature range above 950 deg. C concerns mainly the transformation of austenite to ferrite, while below 950 deg. C ferrite decomposition and precipitation of nitrides occur. Since duplex stainless steels possess a microstructure consisting of paramagnetic austenite and ferromagnetic ferrite, the kinetics of ferrite decomposition can be determined easily by magnetic inductive measurements. The results of the microstructural investigations and the measurements of the saturation magnetization show that there is a satisfactory agreement with the theoretical predictions based on THERMOCALC. Ferrite decomposition is significantly accelerated by strain introduced during cold deformation. Furthermore, even under a small mechanical load the kinetics of phase decomposition behaviour at 900 deg. C is drastically changed. Whereas during short annealing times the microstructure remains nearly stable the same annealing conditions under a constant

  18. The Effect of Nitrogen Cross-Over on Water Balance Measurements in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Using Constant Temperature Anemometry

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to obtain an ad-hoc and real time electrical signal of the PEMFC water balance by employing a constant temperature hot wire anemometry has been developed by our fuel cell research group. In this work, the effect of nitrogen-cross over on this method is experimentally demonstrated...... by introducing 1% of nitrogen concentration to the dry and humidified hydrogen flow simulating the PEMFC anode outlet. The hot wire voltage is measured with and without nitrogen and it was slightly lower with the presence of nitrogen. The effect of the voltage reduction on the measured water balance is small...

  19. Are fundamental constants really constant

    Norman, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    Reasons for suspecting that fundamental constants might change with time are reviewed. Possible consequences of such variations are examined. The present status of experimental tests of these ideas is discussed

  20. Flexible Acyclic Polyol-Chloride Anion Complexes and Their Characterization by Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Variable Temperature Binding Constant Determinations

    Shokri, Alireza; Wang, Xue B.; Wang, Yangping; O' Doherty, George A.; Kass, Steven R.

    2016-03-17

    Flexible acyclic alcohols with 1–5 hydroxyl groups were bound to chloride anion and these complexes were interrogated by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy and companion density functional theory computations. The resulting vertical detachment energies are reproduced on average to 0.10 eV by M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ predictions and range from 4.45 – 5.96 eV. These values are 0.84 – 2.35 eV larger than the adiabatic detachment energy of Cl– as a result of the larger hydrogen bond networks in the bigger polyols. Adiabatic detachment energies of the alcohol–Cl– clusters are more difficult to determine both experimentally and computationally. This is due to the large geometry changes that occur upon photodetachment and the large bond dissociation energy of H–Cl which enables the resulting chlorine atom to abstract a hydrogen from any of the methylene (CH2) or methine (CH) positions. Both ionic and non-ionic hydrogen bonds (i.e., OH•••Cl– and OH•••OH•••Cl–) form in the larger polyols complexes, and are found to be energetically comparable. Subtle structural differences, consequently can lead to the formation of different types of hydrogen bonds and maximizing the ionic ones is not always preferred. Solution equilibrium binding constants between the alcohols and tetrrabuylammonium chloride (TBACl) in acetonitrile at -24.2, 22.0, and 53.6 °C were also determined. The free energies of association are nearly identical for all of the substrates (i.e., ΔG° = -2.8 ± 0.7 kcal mol–1). Compensating enthalpy and entropy values reveal, contrary to expectation and the intrinsic gas-phase preferences, that the bigger systems with more hydroxyl groups are entropically favored and enthalpically disfavored relative to the smaller species. This suggests that more solvent molecules are released upon binding TBACl to alcohols with more hydroxyl groups and is consistent with the measured negative heat capacities. These quantities increase with

  1. Molding of plasmonic resonances in metallic nanostructures: Dependence of the non-linear electric permittivity on system size and temperature

    Alabastri, A.; Tuccio, S.; Giugni, A.; Toma, A.; Liberale, Carlo; Das, G.; Angelis, F.D.; Fabrizio, E.D.; Zaccaria, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we review the principal theoretical models through which the dielectric function of metals can be described. Starting from the Drude assumptions for intraband transitions, we show how this model can be improved by including interband absorption and temperature effect in the damping coefficients. Electronic scattering processes are described and included in the dielectric function, showing their role in determining plasmon lifetime at resonance. Relationships among permittivity, electric conductivity and refractive index are examined. Finally, a temperature dependent permittivity model is presented and is employed to predict temperature and non-linear field intensity dependence on commonly used plasmonic geometries, such as nanospheres. 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  2. Molding of plasmonic resonances in metallic nanostructures: Dependence of the non-linear electric permittivity on system size and temperature

    Alabastri, A.

    2013-10-25

    In this paper, we review the principal theoretical models through which the dielectric function of metals can be described. Starting from the Drude assumptions for intraband transitions, we show how this model can be improved by including interband absorption and temperature effect in the damping coefficients. Electronic scattering processes are described and included in the dielectric function, showing their role in determining plasmon lifetime at resonance. Relationships among permittivity, electric conductivity and refractive index are examined. Finally, a temperature dependent permittivity model is presented and is employed to predict temperature and non-linear field intensity dependence on commonly used plasmonic geometries, such as nanospheres. 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  3. A linear regression model for predicting PNW estuarine temperatures in a changing climate

    Pacific Northwest coastal regions, estuaries, and associated ecosystems are vulnerable to the potential effects of climate change, especially to changes in nearshore water temperature. While predictive climate models simulate future air temperatures, no such projections exist for...

  4. The reaction of atomic hydrogen with germane - Temperature dependence of the rate constant and implications for germane photochemistry in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn

    Nava, David F.; Payne, Walter A.; Marston, George; Stief, Louis J.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the formation and loss processes for GeH4 are required in order to provide data to help determine the major chemical form in which germanium exists in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. The reaction of hydrogen atoms with germane is one of the most important of these reactions. The absolute rate constant for this reaction as a function of temperature and pressure is studied. Flash photolysis of dilute mixtures of GeH4 in argon, combined with time-resolved detection of H atoms via Lyman alpha resonance fluorescence, is employed to measure the reaction rate. The reaction is shown to be moderately rapid, independent of total pressure, but possessing a positive temperature dependence.

  5. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of O(3P) atoms with ethylene, propylene, and propylene-d6 over the temperature range 258--861 K

    Perry, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction of O( 3 P) with ethylene, propylene, and propylene-d6 were determined over the temperature range 258--861 K using a laser photolysis-chemiluminescence technique. The following empirical expressions are the best fits to the data: k/sub ethylene/ = 2.12 x 10 -13 T -63 e -1370 /sup ///sup R//sup T/, k/sub propylene/ = 3.40 x 10 -19 T/sup 2.56/e/sup 1130/RT/, and k/sub propylene-d/6 = 3.40 x 10 -19 T/sup 2.53/ e/sup 1210/R/T cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . A simple transition state theory model is shown to provide a reasonable explanation for non-Arrhenius temperature behavior

  6. Linear thermal expansion coefficient (at temperatures from 130 to 800 K) of borosilicate glasses applicable for coupling with silicon in microelectronics

    Sinev, Leonid S.; Petrov, Ivan D.

    2017-01-01

    Processing results of measurements of linear thermal expansion coefficients and linear thermal expansion of two brands of borosilicate glasses --- LK5 and Borofloat 33 --- are presented. The linear thermal expansion of glass samples have been determined in the temperature range 130 to 800 K (minus 143 to 526 $\\deg$C) using thermomechanical analyzer TMA7100. Relative imprecision of indirectly measured linear thermal expansion coefficients and linear thermal expansion of both glass brands is le...

  7. The effect of transition metals additions on the temperature coefficient of linear expansion of titanium and vanadium

    Lesnaya, M.I.; Volokitin, G.G.; Kashchuk, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported of an experimental research into the influence of small additions of α-transition metals on the temperature coefficient of linear expansion of titanium and vanadium. Using the configuration model of substance as the basis, expeained are the lowering of the critical liquefaction temperature or the melting point of vanadium and the raising of it, as caused by the addition of metals of the 6 group of the periodic chart and by the addition of metals of the 8 group, respectively, and also a shift in the temperature of the polymorphic α-β-transformation of titanium. Suggested as the best alloying metal for vanadium are tungsten and tantalum; for titaniums is vanadium whose admixtures lower the melting point and shift the polymorphic transformation temperature by as much as 100 to 120 degrees

  8. The effect of changes in sea surface temperature on linear growth of Porites coral in Ambon Bay

    Corvianawatie, Corry; Putri, Mutiara R.; Cahyarini, Sri Y.

    2015-01-01

    Coral is one of the most important organisms in the coral reef ecosystem. There are several factors affecting coral growth, one of them is changes in sea surface temperature (SST). The purpose of this research is to understand the influence of SST variability on the annual linear growth of Porites coral taken from Ambon Bay. The annual coral linear growth was calculated and compared to the annual SST from the Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature version 3b (ERSST v3b) model. Coral growth was calculated by using Coral X-radiograph Density System (CoralXDS) software. Coral sample X-radiographs were used as input data. Chronology was developed by calculating the coral’s annual growth bands. A pair of high and low density banding patterns observed in the coral’s X-radiograph represent one year of coral growth. The results of this study shows that Porites coral extents from 2001-2009 and had an average growth rate of 1.46 cm/year. Statistical analysis shows that the annual coral linear growth declined by 0.015 cm/year while the annual SST declined by 0.013°C/year. SST and the annual linear growth of Porites coral in the Ambon Bay is insignificantly correlated with r=0.304 (n=9, p>0.05). This indicates that annual SST variability does not significantly influence the linear growth of Porites coral from Ambon Bay. It is suggested that sedimentation load, salinity, pH or other environmental factors may affect annual linear coral growth

  9. The effect of changes in sea surface temperature on linear growth of Porites coral in Ambon Bay

    Corvianawatie, Corry, E-mail: corvianawatie@students.itb.ac.id; Putri, Mutiara R., E-mail: mutiara.putri@fitb.itb.ac.id [Oceanography Study Program, Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia); Cahyarini, Sri Y., E-mail: yuda@geotek.lipi.go.id [Research Center for Geotechnology, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Coral is one of the most important organisms in the coral reef ecosystem. There are several factors affecting coral growth, one of them is changes in sea surface temperature (SST). The purpose of this research is to understand the influence of SST variability on the annual linear growth of Porites coral taken from Ambon Bay. The annual coral linear growth was calculated and compared to the annual SST from the Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature version 3b (ERSST v3b) model. Coral growth was calculated by using Coral X-radiograph Density System (CoralXDS) software. Coral sample X-radiographs were used as input data. Chronology was developed by calculating the coral’s annual growth bands. A pair of high and low density banding patterns observed in the coral’s X-radiograph represent one year of coral growth. The results of this study shows that Porites coral extents from 2001-2009 and had an average growth rate of 1.46 cm/year. Statistical analysis shows that the annual coral linear growth declined by 0.015 cm/year while the annual SST declined by 0.013°C/year. SST and the annual linear growth of Porites coral in the Ambon Bay is insignificantly correlated with r=0.304 (n=9, p>0.05). This indicates that annual SST variability does not significantly influence the linear growth of Porites coral from Ambon Bay. It is suggested that sedimentation load, salinity, pH or other environmental factors may affect annual linear coral growth.

  10. Pt/ZnO nanoarray nanogenerator as self-powered active gas sensor with linear ethanol sensing at room temperature.

    Zhao, Yayu; Lai, Xuan; Deng, Ping; Nie, Yuxin; Zhang, Yan; Xing, Lili; Xue, Xinyu

    2014-03-21

    A self-powered gas sensor that can actively detect ethanol at room temperature has been realized from a Pt/ZnO nanoarray nanogenerator. Pt nanoparticles are uniformly distributed on the whole surface of ZnO nanowires. The piezoelectric output of Pt/ZnO nanoarrays can act not only as a power source, but also as a response signal to ethanol at room temperature. Upon exposure to dry air and 1500 ppm ethanol at room temperature, the piezoelectric output of the device under the same compressive strain is 0.672 and 0.419 V, respectively. Moreover, a linear dependence of the sensitivity on the ethanol concentration is observed. Such a linear ethanol sensing at room temperature can be attributed to the atmosphere-dependent variety of the screen effect on the piezoelectric output of ZnO nanowires, the catalytic properties of Pt nanoparticles, and the Schottky barriers at Pt/ZnO interfaces. The present results can stimulate research in the direction of designing new material systems for self-powered room-temperature gas sensing.

  11. Simultaneous interferometric measurement of linear coefficient of thermal expansion and temperature-dependent refractive index coefficient of optical materials.

    Corsetti, James A; Green, William E; Ellis, Jonathan D; Schmidt, Greg R; Moore, Duncan T

    2016-10-10

    Characterizing the thermal properties of optical materials is necessary for understanding how to design an optical system for changing environmental conditions. A method is presented for simultaneously measuring both the linear coefficient of thermal expansion and the temperature-dependent refractive index coefficient of a sample interferometrically in air. Both the design and fabrication of the interferometer is presented as well as a discussion of the results of measuring both a steel and a CaF2 sample.

  12. Suggestions for the interpretation of temperature noise measurements in a heated linear bundle in a water loop

    Schwalm, D.

    1975-09-01

    A concept is described how to use temperature noise for the detection and identification of a simulated malfunction (e.g. a blockage) in a heated linear bundle in the preboiling state. At first, methods are proposed how to find an optimal detector position down stream from the bundle exit in such a way that the detector sees the total bundle cross section. In addition some methods are proposed for the identification of the malfunction by making use of random data analysis

  13. Identification of a dynamic temperature threshold for soil moisture freeze/thaw (F/T) state classification using soil real dielectric constant derivatives.

    Pardo, R.; Berg, A. A.; Warland, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    The use of microwave remote sensing for surface ground ice detection has been well documented using both active and passive systems. Typical validation of these remotely sensed F/T state products relies on in-situ air or soil temperature measurements and a threshold of 0°C to identify frozen soil. However, in soil pores, the effects of capillary and adsorptive forces combine with the presence of dissolved salts to depress the freezing point. This is further confounded by the fact that water over this temperature range releases/absorbs latent heat of freezing/fusion. Indeed, recent results from SLAPEx2015, a campaign conducted to evaluate the ability to detect F/T state and examine the controls on F/T detection at multiple resolutions, suggest that using a soil temperature of 0°C as a threshold for freezing may not be appropriate. Coaxial impedance sensors, like Steven's HydraProbeII (HP), are the most widely used soil sensor in water supply forecast and climatological networks. These soil moisture probes have recently been used to validate remote sensing F/T products. This kind of validation is still relatively uncommon and dependent on categorical techniques based on seasonal reference states of frozen and non-frozen soil conditions. An experiment was conducted to identify the correlation between the phase state of the soil moisture and the probe measurements. Eight soil cores were subjected to F/T transitions in an environmental chamber. For each core, at a depth of 2.5 cm, the temperature and real dielectric constant (rdc) were measured every five minutes using HPs while two heat pulse probes captured the apparent heat capacity 24 minutes apart. Preliminary results show the phase transition of water is bounded by inflection points in the soil temperature, attributed to latent heat. The rdc, however, appears to be highly sensitive to changes in the water preceding the phase change. This opens the possibility of estimating a dynamic temperature threshold for

  14. Complete sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of pure and MgO-doped lithium niobate crystals at room temperature

    Andrushchak, A. S.; Laba, H. P.; Yurkevych, O. V.; Mytsyk, B. G.; Solskii, I. M.; Kityk, A. V.; Sahraoui, B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of ultrasonic measurements of LiNbO 3 and LiNbO 3 :MgO crystals. The tensors of piezoelectric coefficients, elastic stiffness constants, and elastic compliances are determined for both crystals at room temperature. Combining these data with the results of piezo-optical measurements, a complete set of photoelastic tensor coefficients is also calculated. Doping of LiNbO 3 crystals by MgO does not lead to a considerable modification of their elastic and photoelastic properties. However, LiNbO 3 :MgO is characterized by a considerably higher resistance with respect to powerful light radiation, making it promising for future application in acousto-optic devices that deal with superpowerful laser radiation. Presented here are the complete tensor sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of LiNbO 3 and LiNbO 3 :MgO crystals that may be used for a geometry optimization of acousto-optical interaction providing the best diffraction efficiency of acousto-optical cells made of these materials.

  15. Measurement of Linear Coefficient of Thermal Expansion and Temperature-Dependent Refractive Index Using Interferometric System

    Corsetti, James A.; Green, William E.; Ellis, Jonathan D.; Schmidt, Greg R.; Moore, Duncan T.

    2017-01-01

    A system combining an interferometer with an environmental chamber for measuring both coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and temperature-dependent refractive index (dn/dT) simultaneously is presented. The operation and measurement results of this instrument are discussed.

  16. The Fermion boson interaction within the linear sigma model at finite temperature

    Caldas, H.C.G.

    2000-01-01

    We study the interaction of massless bosons at finite temperature. Specifically, we calculate the self-energy of massless fermions due to interaction with massless bosons at high temperature, which is the region where thermal effects are maximal. The calculations are concentrated in the limit of vanishing fermion three momentum and after considering the effective boson dressed mass, we obtain the damping rate of the fermion. It is shown that in the limit k O 2 T + g 3 T. (author)

  17. ANALYSIS OF MARANGONI CONVECTION OF NON-NEWTONIAN POWER LAW FLUIDS WITH LINEAR TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION

    Yan Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of steady, laminar, thermal Marangoni convection flow of non-Newtonian power law fluid along a horizontal surface with variable surface temperature is studied. The partial differential equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations by using a suitable similarity transformation and analytical approximate solutions are obtained by an efficient transformation, asymptotic expansion and Padé approximants technique. The effects of power law index and Marangoni number on velocity and temperature profiles are examined and discussed.

  18. High Precision Piezoelectric Linear Motors for Operations at Cryogenic Temperatures and Vacuum

    Wong, D.; Carman, G.; Stam, M.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Sen, A.; Henry, P.; Bearman, G.; Moacanin, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory evaluated the use of an electromechanical device for optically positioning a mirror system during the pre-project phase of the Pluto-Fast-Flyby (PFF) mission. The device under consideration was a piezoelectric driven linear motor functionally dependent upon a time varying electric field which induces displacements ranging from submicrons to millimeters with positioning accuracy within nanometers. Using a control package, the mirror system provides image motion compensation and mosaicking capabilities. While this device offers unique advantages, there were concerns pertaining to its operational capabilities for the PFF mission. The issues include irradiation effects and thermal concerns. A literature study indicated that irradiation effects will not significantly impact the linear motor's operational characteristics. On the other hand, thermal concerns necessitated an in depth study.

  19. Modeling the pH and temperature dependence of aqueousphase hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants of organic micropollutants using QSPR approach.

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita

    2017-11-01

    Designing of advanced oxidation process (AOP) requires knowledge of the aqueous phase hydroxyl radical ( ● OH) reactions rate constants (k OH ), which are strictly dependent upon the pH and temperature of the medium. In this study, pH- and temperature-dependent quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models based on the decision tree boost (DTB) approach were developed for the prediction of k OH of diverse organic contaminants following the OECD guidelines. Experimental datasets (n = 958) pertaining to the k OH values of aqueous phase reactions at different pH (n = 470; 1.4 × 10 6 to 3.8 × 10 10  M -1  s -1 ) and temperature (n = 171; 1.0 × 10 7 to 2.6 × 10 10  M -1  s -1 ) were considered and molecular descriptors of the compounds were derived. The Sanderson scale electronegativity, topological polar surface area, number of double bonds, and halogen atoms in the molecule, in addition to the pH and temperature, were found to be the relevant predictors. The models were validated and their external predictivity was evaluated in terms of most stringent criteria parameters derived on the test data. High values of the coefficient of determination (R 2 ) and small root mean squared error (RMSE) in respective training (> 0.972, ≤ 0.12) and test (≥ 0.936, ≤ 0.16) sets indicated high generalization and predictivity of the developed QSPR model. Other statistical parameters derived from the training and test data also supported the robustness of the models and their suitability for screening new chemicals within the defined chemical space. The developed QSPR models provide a valuable tool for predicting the ● OH reaction rate constants of emerging new water contaminants for their susceptibility to AOPs.

  20. Effects of ambient temperature and oxygen concentration on diesel spray combustion using a single-nozzle injector in a constant volume combustion chamber

    Jing, Wei; Roberts, William L.; Fang, Tiegang

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates the effects of ambient conditions on diesel spray combustion in an optically accessible, constant volume chamber using a single-nozzle fuel injector. The ambient O2 concentration was varied between five discrete values from 10% to 21% and three different ambient temperatures (800 K, 1000 K, and 1200 K). These conditions simulate different exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) levels and ambient temperatures in diesel engines. Both conventional diesel combustion and low temperature combustion (LTC) modes were observed under these conditions. A transient analysis and a quasi-steady state analysis are employed in this article. The transient analysis focuses on the flame development from beginning to the end, illustrating how the flame structure changes during this process; the quasi-steady state analysis focuses on the stable flame structure. The transient analysis was conducted using high-speed imaging of both OH* chemiluminescence and natural luminosity (NL). In addition, three different images were acquired using an ICCD camera, corresponding to OH* chemiluminescence, narrow-band flame emission at 430 nm (Band A) and at 470 nm (Band B), and were used to investigate the quasi-steady state combustion process. From the transient analysis, it was found that the NL signal becomes stronger and confined to narrow regions when the temperature and O2 concentration increase during the development of flame. The OH* intensity is much lower for the 10% ambient O2 and 800 K conditions compared to the higher temperatures and O2 levels. This implies the occurrence of LTC under these conditions. Results from the quasi-steady combustion stage indicate that high-temperature reactions effectively oxidize the soot in the downstream locations where only OH* signal is observed. In addition, an area was calculated for each spectral region, and results show that the area of Band A and Band B emissions in these images is larger than the area of OH* emissions at the lower O2

  1. Effects of ambient temperature and oxygen concentration on diesel spray combustion using a single-nozzle injector in a constant volume combustion chamber

    Jing, Wei

    2013-09-02

    This work investigates the effects of ambient conditions on diesel spray combustion in an optically accessible, constant volume chamber using a single-nozzle fuel injector. The ambient O2 concentration was varied between five discrete values from 10% to 21% and three different ambient temperatures (800 K, 1000 K, and 1200 K). These conditions simulate different exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) levels and ambient temperatures in diesel engines. Both conventional diesel combustion and low temperature combustion (LTC) modes were observed under these conditions. A transient analysis and a quasi-steady state analysis are employed in this article. The transient analysis focuses on the flame development from beginning to the end, illustrating how the flame structure changes during this process; the quasi-steady state analysis focuses on the stable flame structure. The transient analysis was conducted using high-speed imaging of both OH* chemiluminescence and natural luminosity (NL). In addition, three different images were acquired using an ICCD camera, corresponding to OH* chemiluminescence, narrow-band flame emission at 430 nm (Band A) and at 470 nm (Band B), and were used to investigate the quasi-steady state combustion process. From the transient analysis, it was found that the NL signal becomes stronger and confined to narrow regions when the temperature and O2 concentration increase during the development of flame. The OH* intensity is much lower for the 10% ambient O2 and 800 K conditions compared to the higher temperatures and O2 levels. This implies the occurrence of LTC under these conditions. Results from the quasi-steady combustion stage indicate that high-temperature reactions effectively oxidize the soot in the downstream locations where only OH* signal is observed. In addition, an area was calculated for each spectral region, and results show that the area of Band A and Band B emissions in these images is larger than the area of OH* emissions at the lower O2

  2. The Fermion boson interaction within the linear sigma model at finite temperature

    Caldas, H.C.G. [Fundacao de Ensino Superior de Sao Joao del Rei (FUNREI), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Naturais (DCNAT)

    2000-07-01

    We study the interaction of massless bosons at finite temperature. Specifically, we calculate the self-energy of massless fermions due to interaction with massless bosons at high temperature, which is the region where thermal effects are maximal. The calculations are concentrated in the limit of vanishing fermion three momentum and after considering the effective boson dressed mass, we obtain the damping rate of the fermion. It is shown that in the limit k{sub O} <

  3. Hourly predictive Levenberg-Marquardt ANN and multi linear regression models for predicting of dew point temperature

    Zounemat-Kermani, Mohammad

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the ability of two models of multi linear regression (MLR) and Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) feed-forward neural network was examined to estimate the hourly dew point temperature. Dew point temperature is the temperature at which water vapor in the air condenses into liquid. This temperature can be useful in estimating meteorological variables such as fog, rain, snow, dew, and evapotranspiration and in investigating agronomical issues as stomatal closure in plants. The availability of hourly records of climatic data (air temperature, relative humidity and pressure) which could be used to predict dew point temperature initiated the practice of modeling. Additionally, the wind vector (wind speed magnitude and direction) and conceptual input of weather condition were employed as other input variables. The three quantitative standard statistical performance evaluation measures, i.e. the root mean squared error, mean absolute error, and absolute logarithmic Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient ( {| {{{Log}}({{NS}})} |} ) were employed to evaluate the performances of the developed models. The results showed that applying wind vector and weather condition as input vectors along with meteorological variables could slightly increase the ANN and MLR predictive accuracy. The results also revealed that LM-NN was superior to MLR model and the best performance was obtained by considering all potential input variables in terms of different evaluation criteria.

  4. Linear, Constant-rounds Bit-decomposition

    Reistad, Tord; Toft, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    When performing secure multiparty computation, tasks may often be simple or difficult depending on the representation chosen. Hence, being able to switch representation efficiently may allow more efficient protocols. We present a new protocol for bit-decomposition: converting a ring element x ∈ ℤ M...

  5. Effect of temperature and pressure on non-linear conduction in GeTeSe chalcogenide glass

    El-Mansy, M.K.

    1998-01-01

    The I-V characteristic curves were studied in the temperature range 301-359 K and pressure range up to 7.15 x 10 9 Pa which illustrate a non-linear behaviour below (high-resistance region) and beyond (negative-resistance region) a breakdown point characterising Ge 27 Te 62 Se 11 chalcogenide glasses. The general behaviour is shifted towards lower voltage and higher current when the ambient temperature and/or the applied pressure were increased. The non-linear behaviour in the pre breakdown region is discussed according to the Poole-Frenkel field emission of electrons from deep traps located at a depth equal to 0.372eV. The analysis of the effect of field on the non-linear conduction in Ge 27 Te 62 Se 11 chalcogenide glass suggests a modification of the energy difference between filled and empty sites, where the effect of pressure suggests a reduction of the energy gap width. The analysis based on simple thermal effects in the region closer to the breakdown point implies the electrothermal process initiating the negative resistance region. The results of post breakdown region (negative-resistance region) imply the electron hopping between filled and empty localised states at Fermi level. The density of localised states is estimated which lies in the range 5.7 x 10 16 -1.84 x 10 18 cm -3 /eV

  6. On a non-linear problem posed by the temperature determination in an electrically heated plate

    Gerber, R.

    1958-01-01

    Let us consider a flat plate, electrically heated, with one face thermally insulated and the other face isothermal. It is shown that a two-dimensional perturbation of the insulated face has no influence on the temperature of this face. (author) [fr

  7. A non-linear steady state characteristic performance curve for medium temperature solar energy collectors

    Eames, P. C.; Norton, B.

    A numerical simulation model was employed to investigate the effects of ambient temperature and insolation on the efficiency of compound parabolic concentrating solar energy collectors. The limitations of presently-used collector performance characterization curves were investigated and a new approach proposed.

  8. Influence of gamma ray irradiation and annealing temperature on the optical constants and spectral dispersion parameters of metal-free and zinc tetraphenylporphyrin thin films: A comparative study.

    Zeyada, H M; Makhlouf, M M; El-Nahass, M M

    2015-09-05

    In this work, we report on the effect of γ-ray irradiation and annealing temperature on the optical properties of metal-free tetraphenylporphyrin, H2TPP, and zinc tetraphenylporphyrin, ZnTPP, thin films. Thin films of H2TPP and ZnTPP were successfully prepared by the thermal evaporation technique. The optical properties of H2TPP and ZnTPP films were investigated using spectrophotometric measurements of the transmittance and reflectance at normal incidence of light in the wavelength range from 200 to 2500 nm. The absorption spectra of H2TPP showed four absorption bands, namely the Q, B, N and M bands. The effect of inserting Zn atom into the cavity of porphyrin macrocycle in ZnTPP molecule distorted the Q and B bands, reduced the width of absorption region and influenced the optical constants and dispersion parameters. In all conditions, the type of electron transition is indirect allowed transition. Anomalous dispersion is observed in the absorption region but normal dispersion occurs in the transparent region of spectra. We adopted multi-oscillator model and the single oscillator model to interpret the anomalous and normal dispersion, respectively. We have found that the annealing temperature has mostly the opposite effect of γ-ray irradiation on absorption and dispersion characteristics of these films. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermodynamic constants of N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl-3-amino]propanesulfonic acid (Taps) from the temperatures 278.15 K to 328.15 K

    Roy, Rabindra N.; Roy, Lakshmi N.; LeNoue, Sean R.; Denton, Cole E.; Simon, Ashley N.; Richards, Sarah J.; Moore, Andrew C.; Roy, Chandra N.; Redmond, R. Ryan; Bryant, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    Values of the second thermodynamic dissociation constant pK 2 of N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl-3-amino]propanesulfonic acid (Taps) have been determined at twelve temperatures from 278.15 K to 328.15 K including 310.15 K by measurements of the electromotive-force for cells without liquid junction of the type: Pt|H 2 (g, p - bar =101.325 kPa)|Taps (m 1 ), NaTapsate (m 2 ), NaCl (m 3 )|AgCl|Ag, where m denotes molality. The pK 2 values for the dissociation of Taps are represented by the equation: pK 2 =2969.61.(K/T) - 17.05052+2.73697.ln(T/K). The values of pK 2 for Taps were found to be (8.502+/-0.0007) at T=298.15 K and (8.225+/-0.0009) at T=310.15 K, respectively, indicating thereby to be useful as buffer solutions for pH control in the region 7.4 to 8.5. The thermodynamic quantities, ΔG - bar , ΔH - bar , ΔS - bar , and ΔC p - bar dissociation process of Taps have been derived from the temperature coefficients of the pK 2

  10. Raman spectroscopic determination of the length, strength, compressibility, Debye temperature, elasticity, and force constant of the C-C bond in graphene.

    Yang, X X; Li, J W; Zhou, Z F; Wang, Y; Yang, L W; Zheng, W T; Sun, Chang Q

    2012-01-21

    From the perspective of bond relaxation and bond vibration, we have formulated the Raman phonon relaxation of graphene, under the stimuli of the number-of-layers, the uni-axial strain, the pressure, and the temperature, in terms of the response of the length and strength of the representative bond of the entire specimen to the applied stimuli. Theoretical unification of the measurements clarifies that: (i) the opposite trends of the Raman shifts, which are due to the number-of-layers reduction, of the G-peak shift and arises from the vibration of a pair of atoms, while the D- and the 2D-peak shifts involve the z-neighbor of a specific atom; (ii) the tensile strain-induced phonon softening and phonon-band splitting arise from the asymmetric response of the C(3v) bond geometry to the C(2v) uni-axial bond elongation; (iii) the thermal softening of the phonons originates from bond expansion and weakening; and (iv) the pressure stiffening of the phonons results from bond compression and work hardening. Reproduction of the measurements has led to quantitative information about the referential frequencies from which the Raman frequencies shift as well as the length, energy, force constant, Debye temperature, compressibility and elastic modulus of the C-C bond in graphene, which is of instrumental importance in the understanding of the unusual behavior of graphene.

  11. Thermodynamic constants of N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl-3-amino]propanesulfonic acid (Taps) from the temperatures 278.15 K to 328.15 K

    Roy, Rabindra N. [Walter H. Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, 900 N. Benton Avenue, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States)]. E-mail: rroy@drury.edu; Roy, Lakshmi N. [Walter H. Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, 900 N. Benton Avenue, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); LeNoue, Sean R. [Walter H. Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, 900 N. Benton Avenue, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Denton, Cole E. [Walter H. Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, 900 N. Benton Avenue, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Simon, Ashley N. [Walter H. Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, 900 N. Benton Avenue, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Richards, Sarah J. [Walter H. Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, 900 N. Benton Avenue, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Moore, Andrew C. [Walter H. Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, 900 N. Benton Avenue, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Roy, Chandra N. [Walter H. Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, 900 N. Benton Avenue, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Redmond, R. Ryan [Walter H. Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, 900 N. Benton Avenue, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States); Bryant, Paul A. [Walter H. Hoffman Department of Chemistry, Drury University, 900 N. Benton Avenue, Springfield, MO 65802 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Values of the second thermodynamic dissociation constant pK{sub 2} of N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl-3-amino]propanesulfonic acid (Taps) have been determined at twelve temperatures from 278.15 K to 328.15 K including 310.15 K by measurements of the electromotive-force for cells without liquid junction of the type: Pt|H{sub 2} (g, p{sup -}bar =101.325 kPa)|Taps (m{sub 1}), NaTapsate (m{sub 2}), NaCl (m{sub 3})|AgCl|Ag, where m denotes molality. The pK{sub 2} values for the dissociation of Taps are represented by the equation: pK{sub 2}=2969.61.(K/T) - 17.05052+2.73697.ln(T/K). The values of pK{sub 2} for Taps were found to be (8.502+/-0.0007) at T=298.15 K and (8.225+/-0.0009) at T=310.15 K, respectively, indicating thereby to be useful as buffer solutions for pH control in the region 7.4 to 8.5. The thermodynamic quantities, {delta}G{sup -}bar , {delta}H{sup -}bar , {delta}S{sup -}bar , and {delta}C{sub p}{sup -}bar dissociation process of Taps have been derived from the temperature coefficients of the pK{sub 2}.

  12. A non-linear, finite element, heat conduction code to calculate temperatures in solids of arbitrary geometry

    Tayal, M.

    1987-01-01

    Structures often operate at elevated temperatures. Temperature calculations are needed so that the design can accommodate thermally induced stresses and material changes. A finite element computer called FEAT has been developed to calculate temperatures in solids of arbitrary shapes. FEAT solves the classical equation for steady state conduction of heat. The solution is obtained for two-dimensional (plane or axisymmetric) or for three-dimensional problems. Gap elements are use to simulate interfaces between neighbouring surfaces. The code can model: conduction; internal generation of heat; prescribed convection to a heat sink; prescribed temperatures at boundaries; prescribed heat fluxes on some surfaces; and temperature-dependence of material properties like thermal conductivity. The user has a option of specifying the detailed variation of thermal conductivity with temperature. For convenience to the nuclear fuel industry, the user can also opt for pre-coded values of thermal conductivity, which are obtained from the MATPRO data base (sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission). The finite element method makes FEAT versatile, and enables it to accurately accommodate complex geometries. The optional link to MATPRO makes it convenient for the nuclear fuel industry to use FEAT, without loss of generality. Special numerical techniques make the code inexpensive to run, for the type of material non-linearities often encounter in the analysis of nuclear fuel. The code, however, is general, and can be used for other components of the reactor, or even for non-nuclear systems. The predictions of FEAT have been compared against several analytical solutions. The agreement is usually better than 5%. Thermocouple measurements show that the FEAT predictions are consistent with measured changes in temperatures in simulated pressure tubes. FEAT was also found to predict well, the axial variations in temperatures in the end-pellets(UO 2 ) of two fuel elements irradiated

  13. Solar wind proton temperature anisotropy: Linear theory and WIND/SWE observations

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel; Kasper, J. C.; Lazarus, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 9 (2006), L09101/1-L09101/4 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3042403 Grant - others:ESA(XE) PECS 98024; NASA (US) NAG-10915 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : proton temperature anisotropy * solar wind * in situ observations Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.602, year: 2006

  14. Study of the O(N) linear σ model at finite temperature using the 2PPI expansion

    Verschelde, H.; De Pessemier, J.

    2002-01-01

    We show that a new expansion, which sums seagull and bubble graphs to all orders, can be applied to the O(N) linear σ-model at finite temperature. We prove that this expansion can be renormalized with the usual counterterms in a mass independent scheme and that Goldstone's theorem is satisfied at each order. At the one loop order of this expansion, the Hartree result for the effective potential (daisy and superdaisy graphs) is recovered. We show that at one loop 2PPI order, the self-energy of the σ-meson can be calculated exactly and that diagrams are summed beyond the Hartree approximation. (orig.)

  15. An analytical interpretation of the high temperature linear contact between composite materials reinforced with glass fibers and steel

    Rus, Dorin; Florescu, Virgil; Bausic, Florin; Ursache, Robert; Sasu, Anca

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we have tried to present the influence of the metal surface wear and of the contact temperature on the evolution of the sliding speed, of the normal load and of the friction coefficient. We have performed numerous experimental trials that have highlighted the dependency between load and wear in relation to the friction coefficient. A dry linear friction couple was used with a large range of loads and speeds, simulating real-life working conditions: temperature, sliding speed, contact pressure. We have made a connection between the theoretical case and the experimental results arising from the use of the “wear imprint method” for the volume and depth of wear.

  16. DIRECTLY DETERMINED LINEAR RADII AND EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURES OF EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    Van Belle, Gerard T.; Von Braun, Kaspar

    2009-01-01

    We present interferometric angular sizes for 12 stars with known planetary companions, for comparison with 28 additional main-sequence stars not known to host planets. For all objects we estimate bolometric fluxes and reddenings through spectral-energy distribution (SED) fits, and in conjunction with the angular sizes, measurements of effective temperature. The angular sizes of these stars are sufficiently small that the fundamental resolution limits of our primary instrument, the Palomar Testbed Interferometer, are investigated at the sub-milliarcsecond level and empirically established based upon known performance limits. We demonstrate that the effective temperature scale as a function of dereddened (V - K) 0 color is statistically identical for stars with and without planets. A useful byproduct of this investigation is a direct calibration of the T EFF scale for solarlike stars, as a function of both spectral type and (V - K) 0 color. Additionally, in an Appendix we provide SED fits for the 166 stars with known planets which have sufficient photometry available in the literature for such fits; this derived 'XO-Rad' database includes homogeneous estimates of bolometric flux, reddening, and angular size.

  17. Design of Annular Linear Induction Pump for High Temperature Liquid Lead Transportation

    Kwak, Jae Sik; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    EM(Electro Magnetic) Pump is divided into two parts, which consisted of the primary one with electromagnetic core and exciting coils, and secondary one with liquid lead flow. The main geometrical variables of the pump included core length, inner diameter and flow gap while the electromagnetic ones covered pole pitch, turns of coil, number of pole pairs, input current and input frequency. The characteristics of design variables are analyzed by electrical equivalent circuit method taking into account hydraulic head loss in the narrow annular channel of the ALIP. The design program, which was composed by using MATLAB language, was developed to draw pump design variables according to input requirements of the flow rate, developing pressure and operation temperature from the analyses. The analysis on the design of ALIP for high temperature liquid lead transportation was carried for the produce of ALIP designing program based on MATLAB. By the using of ALIP designing program, we don't have to bother about geometrical relationship between each component during detail designing process because code calculate automatically. And prediction of outputs about designing pump can be done easily before manufacturing. By running the code, we also observe and analysis change of outputs caused by changing of pump factors. It will be helpful for the research about optimization of pump outputs.

  18. A methodology for on-line calculation of temperature and thermal stress under non-linear boundary conditions

    Botto, D.; Zucca, S.; Gola, M.M.

    2003-01-01

    In the literature many works have been written dealing with the task of on-line calculation of temperature and thermal stress for machine components and structures, in order to evaluate fatigue damage accumulation and estimate residual life. One of the most widespread methodologies is the Green's function technique (GFT), by which machine parameters such as fluid temperatures, pressures and flow rates are converted into metal temperature transients and thermal stresses. However, since the GFT is based upon the linear superposition principle, it cannot be directly used in the case of varying heat transfer coefficients. In the present work, a different methodology is proposed, based upon CMS for temperature transient calculation and upon the GFT for the related thermal stress evaluation. This new approach allows variable heat transfer coefficients to be accounted for. The methodology is applied for two different case studies, taken from the literature: a thick pipe and a nozzle connected to a spherical head, both subjected to multiple convective boundary conditions

  19. The reaction O((3)P) + HOBr: Temperature dependence of the rate constant and importance of the reaction as an HOBr stratospheric loss process

    Nesbitt, F. L.; Monks, P. S.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.; Toumi, R.

    1995-01-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction O((3)P) + HOBr has been measured between T = 233K and 423K using the discharge-flow kinetic technique coupled to mass spectrometric detection. The value of the rate coefficient at room temperature is (2.5 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp -11)cu cm/molecule/s and the derived Arrhenius expression is (1.4 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp -10) exp((-430 +/- 260)/T)cu cm/molecule/s. From these rate data the atmospheric lifetime of HOBr with respect to reaction with O((3)P) is about 0.6h at z = 25 km which is comparable to the photolysis lifetime based on recent measurements of the UV cross section for HOBr. Implications for HOBr loss in the stratosphere have been tested using a 1D photochemical box model. With the inclusion of the rate parameters and products for the O + HOBr reaction, calculated concentration profiles of BrO increase by up to 33% around z = 35 km. This result indicates that the inclusion of the O + HOBr reaction in global atmospheric chemistry models may have an impact on bromine partitioning in the middle atmosphere.

  20. Measurement of the spin temperature of optically cooled nuclei and GaAs hyperfine constants in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots

    Chekhovich, E. A.; Ulhaq, A.; Zallo, E.; Ding, F.; Schmidt, O. G.; Skolnick, M. S.

    2017-10-01

    Deep cooling of electron and nuclear spins is equivalent to achieving polarization degrees close to 100% and is a key requirement in solid-state quantum information technologies. While polarization of individual nuclear spins in diamond and SiC (ref. ) reaches 99% and beyond, it has been limited to 50-65% for the nuclei in quantum dots. Theoretical models have attributed this limit to formation of coherent `dark' nuclear spin states but experimental verification is lacking, especially due to the poor accuracy of polarization degree measurements. Here we measure the nuclear polarization in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots with high accuracy using a new approach enabled by manipulation of the nuclear spin states with radiofrequency pulses. Polarizations up to 80% are observed--the highest reported so far for optical cooling in quantum dots. This value is still not limited by nuclear coherence effects. Instead we find that optically cooled nuclei are well described within a classical spin temperature framework. Our findings unlock a route for further progress towards quantum dot electron spin qubits where deep cooling of the mesoscopic nuclear spin ensemble is used to achieve long qubit coherence. Moreover, GaAs hyperfine material constants are measured here experimentally for the first time.

  1. MOS current gain cells with electronically variable gain and constant bandwidth

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Seevinck, Evert

    1989-01-01

    Two MOS current gain cells are proposed that provide linear amplification of currents supplied by several linear MOS V-I converters. The gain is electronically variable by a voltage or a current and can be made insensitive to temperature and IC processing. The gain cells have a constant

  2. Compact very low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with mechanically driven horizontal linear positioning stage.

    Suderow, H; Guillamon, I; Vieira, S

    2011-03-01

    We describe a scanning tunneling microscope for operation in a dilution refrigerator with a sample stage which can be moved macroscopically in a range up to a cm and with an accuracy down to the tens of nm. The position of the tip over the sample as set at room temperature does not change more than a few micrometers when cooling down. This feature is particularly interesting for work on micrometer sized samples. Nanostructures can be also localized and studied, provided they are repeated over micrometer sized areas. The same stage can be used to approach a hard single crystalline sample to a knife and cleave it, or break it, in situ. In situ positioning is demonstrated with measurements at 0.1 K in nanofabricated samples. Atomic resolution down to 0.1 K and in magnetic fields of 8 T is demonstrated in NbSe(2). No heat dissipation nor an increase in mechanical noise has been observed at 0.1 K when operating the slider.

  3. Non-linear pressure/temperature-dependence of high pressure thermal inactivation of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum type B in foods.

    Maximilian B Maier

    Full Text Available The effect of high pressure thermal (HPT processing on the inactivation of spores of proteolytic type B Clostridium botulinum TMW 2.357 in four differently composed low-acid foods (green peas with ham, steamed sole, vegetable soup, braised veal was studied in an industrially feasible pressure range and temperatures between 100 and 120°C. Inactivation curves exhibited rapid inactivation during compression and decompression followed by strong tailing effects. The highest inactivation (approx. 6-log cycle reduction was obtained in braised veal at 600 MPa and 110°C after 300 s pressure-holding time. In general, inactivation curves exhibited similar negative exponential shapes, but maximum achievable inactivation levels were lower in foods with higher fat contents. At high treatment temperatures, spore inactivation was more effective at lower pressure levels (300 vs. 600 MPa, which indicates a non-linear pressure/temperature-dependence of the HPT spore inactivation efficiency. A comparison of spore inactivation levels achievable using HPT treatments versus a conventional heat sterilization treatment (121.1°C, 3 min illustrates the potential of combining high pressures and temperatures to replace conventional retorting with the possibility to reduce the process temperature or shorten the processing time. Finally, experiments using varying spore inoculation levels suggested the presence of a resistant fraction comprising approximately 0.01% of a spore population as reason for the pronounced tailing effects in survivor curves. The loss of the high resistance properties upon cultivation indicates that those differences develop during sporulation and are not linked to permanent modifications at the genetic level.

  4. Temperature Distribution in a Displacement Ventilated Room

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The vertical temperature gradient is normally given as a linear temperature distribution between a minimum temperature close to the floor and a maximum temperature close to the ceiling. The minimum temperature can either be a constant fraction of a load dependent difference or it can be connected...

  5. Effect of temperature on the structural, linear, and nonlinear optical properties of MgO-doped graphene oxide nanocomposites

    Kimiagar, Salimeh; Abrinaei, Fahimeh

    2018-01-01

    Magnesium oxide (MgO)-graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites were prepared by the hydrothermal method at different temperatures. The effect of growth temperature on the structural, linear, and nonlinear optical (NLO) parameters was investigated. The decoration of MgO on GO sheets was confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared, and UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy analyses. The energy band-gaps of MgO-GO nanocomposites were calculated from UV-vis spectrum using Tauc plot. The NLO parameters of MgO-GO nanocomposites were calculated for the first time by the simple Z-scan technique with nanosecond Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm. The nonlinear absorption coefficient β and nonlinear refractive index n2 for MgO-GO nanocomposites at the laser intensity of 1.1×108 W/cm2 were measured to be in the order of 10-7 cm/W and 10-12 cm2/W, respectively. The third-order NLO susceptibility of MgO-GO nanocomposites was measured in the order of 10-9 esu. The results showed that MgO-GO structures have negative nonlinearity as well as good nonlinear two-photon absorption at 532 nm. Furthermore, the NLO parameters increased by the enhancement of the growth temperature. As the investigation of new materials plays an important role in the advancement of optoelectronics, MgO-GO nanocomposites possess potential applications in NLO devices.

  6. Is the sun constant

    Blake, J.B.; Dearborn, D.S.P.

    1979-01-01

    Small fluctuations in the solar constant can occur on timescales much shorter than the Kelvin time. Changes in the ability of convection to transmit energy through the superadiabatic and transition regions of the convection zone cause structure adjustments which can occur on a time scale of days. The bulk of the convection zone reacts to maintain hydrostatic equilibrium (though not thermal equilibrium) and causes a luminosity change. While small radius variations will occur, most of the change will be seen in temperature

  7. Effect of input data variability on estimations of the equivalent constant temperature time for microbial inactivation by HTST and retort thermal processing.

    Salgado, Diana; Torres, J Antonio; Welti-Chanes, Jorge; Velazquez, Gonzalo

    2011-08-01

    -processing and determine opportunities for improvement. This should include a systematic approach to consider variability in the parameters for the models used by food process engineers when designing a thermal process. The Monte Carlo procedure here presented is a tool to facilitate this task for the determination of process time at a constant lethal temperature. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Universe of constant

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-10-01

    The ideal gas state equation is not applicable to ordinary gas, it should be applied to the Electromagnetic ``gas'' that is applied to the radiation, the radiation should be the ultimate state of matter changes or initial state, the universe is filled with radiation. That is, the ideal gas equation of state is suitable for the Singular point and the universe. Maybe someone consider that, there is no vessel can accommodate radiation, it is because the Ordinary container is too small to accommodate, if the radius of your container is the distance that Light through an hour, would you still think it can't accommodates radiation? Modern scientific determinate that the radius of the universe now is about 1027 m, assuming that the universe is a sphere whose volume is approximately: V = 4.19 × 1081 cubic meters, the temperature radiation of the universe (cosmic microwave background radiation temperature of the universe, should be the closest the average temperature of the universe) T = 3.15k, radiation pressure P = 5 × 10-6 N / m 2, according to the law of ideal gas state equation, PV / T = constant = 6 × 1075, the value of this constant is the universe, The singular point should also equal to the constant Author: hanyongquan

  9. Perturbative calculations of flow patterns in free convection between coaxial cylinders. Non-linear temperature dependences of the fluid properties

    Navarro, J. A.; Madariaga, J. A.; Santamaria, C. M.; Saviron, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    10 refs. Flow pattern calculations in natural convection between two vertical coaxial cylinders are reported. It is assumed trough the paper. that fluid properties, viscosity, thermal conductivity and density, depend no-linearly on temperature and that the aspects (height/radius) ratio of the cylinders is high. Velocity profiles are calculated trough a perturbative scheme and analytic results for the three first perturbation orders are presented. We outline also an iterative method to estimate the perturbations on the flow patterns which arise when a radial composition gradient is established by external forces in a two-component fluid. This procedure, based on semiempirical basis, is applied to gaseous convection. The influence of the molecules gas properties on tho flow is also discussed. (Author) 10 refs

  10. Spontaneous internal desynchronization of locomotor activity and body temperature rhythms from plasma melatonin rhythm in rats exposed to constant dim light

    Bullock Nicole M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently reported that spontaneous internal desynchronization between the locomotor activity rhythm and the melatonin rhythm may occur in rats (30% of tested animals when they are maintained in constant dim red light (LLdim for 60 days. Previous work has also shown that melatonin plays an important role in the modulation of the circadian rhythms of running wheel activity (Rw and body temperature (Tb. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect that desynchronization of the melatonin rhythm may have on the coupling and expression of circadian rhythms in Rw and Tb. Methods Rats were maintained in a temperature controlled (23–24°C ventilated lightproof room under LLdim (red dim light 1 μW/cm2 [5 Lux], lower wavelength cutoff at 640 nm. Animals were individually housed in cages equipped with a running wheel and a magnetic sensor system to detect wheel rotation; Tb was monitored by telemetry. Tb and Rw data were recorded in 5-min bins and saved on disk. For each animal, we determined the mesor and the amplitude of the Rw and Tb rhythm using waveform analysis on 7-day segments of the data. After sixty days of LLdim exposure, blood samples (80–100 μM were collected every 4 hours over a 24-hrs period from the tail artery, and serum melatonin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Results Twenty-one animals showed clear circadian rhythms Rw and Tb, whereas one animal was arrhythmic. Rw and Tb rhythms were always strictly associated and we did not observe desynchronization between these two rhythms. Plasma melatonin levels showed marked variations among individuals in the peak levels and in the night-to-day ratio. In six rats, the night-to-day ratio was less than 2, whereas in the rat that showed arrhythmicity in Rw and Tb melatonin levels were high and rhythmic with a large night-to-day ratio. In seven animals, serum melatonin levels peaked during the subjective day (from CT0 to CT8, thus suggesting

  11. Effect of temperature on the structural, linear, and nonlinear optical properties of MgO-doped graphene oxide nanocomposites

    Kimiagar Salimeh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium oxide (MgO-graphene oxide (GO nanocomposites were prepared by the hydrothermal method at different temperatures. The effect of growth temperature on the structural, linear, and nonlinear optical (NLO parameters was investigated. The decoration of MgO on GO sheets was confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared, and UV-visible (UV-vis spectroscopy analyses. The energy band-gaps of MgO-GO nanocomposites were calculated from UV-vis spectrum using Tauc plot. The NLO parameters of MgO-GO nanocomposites were calculated for the first time by the simple Z-scan technique with nanosecond Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm. The nonlinear absorption coefficient β and nonlinear refractive index n2 for MgO-GO nanocomposites at the laser intensity of 1.1×108 W/cm2 were measured to be in the order of 10−7 cm/W and 10−12 cm2/W, respectively. The third-order NLO susceptibility of MgO-GO nanocomposites was measured in the order of 10−9 esu. The results showed that MgO-GO structures have negative nonlinearity as well as good nonlinear two-photon absorption at 532 nm. Furthermore, the NLO parameters increased by the enhancement of the growth temperature. As the investigation of new materials plays an important role in the advancement of optoelectronics, MgO-GO nanocomposites possess potential applications in NLO devices.

  12. Linear chains of magnetic ions stacked with variable distance: ferromagnetic ordering with a Curie temperature above 20 K

    Friedlaender, Stefan; Poeppl, Andreas [Abteilung Magnetische Resonanz komplexer Quantenfestkoerper, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Geowissenschaften, Universitaet Leipzig (Germany); Liu, Jinxuan [Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology (China); Addicoat, Matt; Petkov, Petko; Vankova, Nina; Rueger, Robert; Kuc, Agnieszka [Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Leipzig (Germany); Guo, Wei; Zhou, Wencai; Wang, Zhengbang; Weidler, Peter G.; Woell, Christof [Institut fuer Funktionelle Grenzflaechen, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Lukose, Binit [Engineering and Science, Department of Physics and Earth Science, Jacobs University Bremen (Germany); Ziese, Michael [Abteilung Supraleitung und Magnetismus, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Geowissenschaften, Universitaet Leipzig (Germany); Heine, Thomas [Engineering and Science, Department of Physics and Earth Science, Jacobs University Bremen (Germany); Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-10-04

    We have studied the magnetic properties of the SURMOF-2 series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Contrary to bulk MOF-2 crystals, where Cu{sup 2+} ions form paddlewheels and are antiferromagnetically coupled, in this case the Cu{sup 2+} ions are connected via carboxylate groups in a zipper-like fashion. This unusual coupling of the spin {sup 1}/{sub 2} ions within the resulting one-dimensional chains is found to stabilize a low-temperature, ferromagnetic (FM) phase. In contrast to other ordered 1D systems, no strong magnetic fields are needed to induce the ferromagnetism. The magnetic coupling constants describing the interaction between the individual metal ions have been determined in SQUID experiments. They are fully consistent with the results of ab initio DFT electronic structure calculations. The theoretical results allow the unusual magnetic behavior of this exotic, yet easy-to-fabricate, material to be described in a detailed fashion. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Exploiting the atmosphere's memory for monthly, seasonal and interannual temperature forecasting using Scaling LInear Macroweather Model (SLIMM)

    Del Rio Amador, Lenin; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, most of the models for prediction of the atmosphere behavior in the macroweather and climate regimes follow a deterministic approach. However, modern ensemble forecasting systems using stochastic parameterizations are in fact deterministic/ stochastic hybrids that combine both elements to yield a statistical distribution of future atmospheric states. Nevertheless, the result is both highly complex (both numerically and theoretically) as well as being theoretically eclectic. In principle, it should be advantageous to exploit higher level turbulence type scaling laws. Concretely, in the case for the Global Circulation Models (GCM's), due to sensitive dependence on initial conditions, there is a deterministic predictability limit of the order of 10 days. When these models are coupled with ocean, cryosphere and other process models to make long range, climate forecasts, the high frequency "weather" is treated as a driving noise in the integration of the modelling equations. Following Hasselman, 1976, this has led to stochastic models that directly generate the noise, and model the low frequencies using systems of integer ordered linear ordinary differential equations, the most well-known are the Linear Inverse Models (LIM). For annual global scale forecasts, they are somewhat superior to the GCM's and have been presented as a benchmark for surface temperature forecasts with horizons up to decades. A key limitation for the LIM approach is that it assumes that the temperature has only short range (exponential) decorrelations. In contrast, an increasing body of evidence shows that - as with the models - the atmosphere respects a scale invariance symmetry leading to power laws with potentially enormous memories so that LIM greatly underestimates the memory of the system. In this talk we show that, due to the relatively low macroweather intermittency, the simplest scaling models - fractional Gaussian noise - can be used for making greatly improved forecasts

  14. Determination of the rate constant for the OH(X2Π) + OH(X2Π) → H2O + O(3P) reaction over the temperature range 295 to 701 K.

    Altinay, Gokhan; Macdonald, R Glen

    2014-01-09

    The rate constant for the radical-radical reaction OH(X(2)Π) + OH(X(2)Π) → H2O + O((3)P) has been measured over the temperature and pressure ranges 295-701 K and 2-12 Torr, respectively, in mixtures of CF4, N2O, and H2O. The OH radical was produced by the 193 nm laser photolysis of N2O. The resulting O((1)D) atoms reacted rapidly with H2O to produce the OH radical. The OH radical was detected by high-resolution time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy using a single Λ-doublet component of the OH(1,0) P1e/f(4.5) fundamental vibrational transition. A detailed kinetic model was used to determine the reaction rate constant as a function of temperature. These experiments were conducted in a new temperature controlled reaction chamber. The values of the measured rate constants are quite similar to the previous measurements from this laboratory of Bahng and Macdonald (J. Phys. Chem. A 2007 , 111 , 3850 - 3861); however, they cover a much larger temperature range. The results of the present work do not agree with recent measurements of Sangwan and Krasnoperov (J. Phys. Chem. A 2012 , 116 , 11817 - 11822). At 295 K the rate constant of the title reaction was found to be (2.52 ± 0.63) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), where the uncertainty includes both experimental scatter and an estimate of systematic errors at the 95% confidence limit. Over the temperature range of the experiments, the rate constant can be represented by k1a = 4.79 × 10(-18)T(1.79) exp(879.0/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) with a uncertainty of ±24% at the 2σ level, including experimental scatter and systematic error.

  15. Some remarks on the influence of temperature-variations, non-linearities, repeatability and ageing on modal-analysis for structural health monitoring of real bridges

    Maas Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural Health Monitoring (SHM intends to identify damage by changes of characteristics as for instance the modal parameters. The eigenfrequencies, mode-shapes and damping-values are either directly used as damage indicators or the changes of derived parameters are analysed, such as e.g. flexibilities or updated finite element models. One common way is a continuous monitoring under environmental excitation forces, such as wind or traffic, i.e. the so-called output-only modal analysis. Alternatively, a forced measured external excitation in distinct time-intervals may be used for input-output modal analysis. Both methods are limited by the precision or the repeatability under real-life conditions at site. The paper will summarize several field tests of artificially step-by-step damaged bridges prior to their final demolishment and it will show the changes of eigenfrequencies due to induced artificial damage. Additionally, some results of a monitoring campaign of a healthy bridge in Luxembourg are presented. Reinforced concrete shows non-linear behaviour in the sense that modal parameters depend on the excitation force amplitude, i.e. higher forces lead often to lower eigenfrequencies than smaller forces. Furthermore, the temperature of real bridges is neither constant in space nor in time, while for instance the stiffness of asphalt is strongly dependant on it. Finally, ageing as such can also change a bridge’s stiffness and its modal parameters, e.g. because creep and shrinkage of concrete or ageing of elastomeric bearing pads influence their modulus of elasticity. These effects cannot be considered as damage, though they influence the measurement of modal parameters and hinder damage detection.

  16. Moderate temperature-dependent surface and volume resistivity and low-frequency dielectric constant measurements of pure and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) doped polyvinyl alcohol thin films

    Edwards, Matthew; Guggilla, Padmaja; Reedy, Angela; Ijaz, Quratulann; Janen, Afef; Uba, Samuel; Curley, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Previously, we have reported measurements of temperature-dependent surface resistivity of pure and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNCT) doped amorphous Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) thin films. In the temperature range from 22 °C to 40 °C with humidity-controlled environment, we found the surface resistivity to decrease initially, but to rise steadily as the temperature continued to increase. Moreover, electric surface current density (Js) was measured on the surface of pure and MWCNT doped PVA thin films. In this regard, the surface current density and electric field relationship follow Ohm's law at low electric fields. Unlike Ohmic conduction in metals where free electrons exist, selected captive electrons are freed or provided from impurities and dopants to become conduction electrons from increased thermal vibration of constituent atoms in amorphous thin films. Additionally, a mechanism exists that seemingly decreases the surface resistivity at higher temperatures, suggesting a blocking effect for conducting electrons. Volume resistivity measurements also follow Ohm's law at low voltages (low electric fields), and they continue to decrease as temperatures increase in this temperature range, differing from surface resistivity behavior. Moreover, we report measurements of dielectric constant and dielectric loss as a function of temperature and frequency. Both the dielectric constant and dielectric loss were observed to be highest for MWCNT doped PVA compared to pure PVA and commercial paper, and with frequency and temperature for all samples.

  17. Comparison between linear and nonlinear trends in NOAA-15 AMSU-A brightness temperatures during 1998-2010

    Qin, Z. [Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Center of Data Assimilation for Research and Application, Nanjing (China); Zou, X. [Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Center of Data Assimilation for Research and Application, Nanjing (China); Florida State University, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Weng, F. [NOAA/NESDIS, Center for Satellite Applications and Research, Camp Springs, MD (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Brightness temperature observations from Microwave Sounding Unit and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) on board National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites have been widely utilized for estimating the global climate trend in the troposphere and stratosphere. A common approach for deriving the trend is linear regression, which implicitly assumes the trend being a straight line over the whole length of a time series and is often highly sensitive to the data record length. This study explores a new adaptive and temporally local data analysis method - Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) - for estimating the global trends. In EEMD, a non-stationary time series is decomposed adaptively and locally into a sequence of amplitude-frequency modulated oscillatory components and a time-varying trend. The AMSU-A data from the NOAA-15 satellite over the time period from October 26, 1998 to August 7, 2010 are employed for this study. Using data over Amazon rainforest areas, it is shown that channel 3 is least sensitive to the orbital drift among four AMSU-A surface sensitive channels. The decadal trends of AMSU-A channel 3 and other eight channels in the troposphere and stratosphere are deduced and compared using both methods. It is shown that the decadal climate trends of most AMSU-A channels are nonlinear except for channels 3-4 in Northern Hemisphere only and channels 12-13. Although the decadal trend variation of the global average brightness temperature is no more than 0.2 K, the regional decadal trend variation could be more (less) than 3 K (-3 K) in high latitudes and over high terrains. (orig.)

  18. Motion induced second order temperature and y-type anisotropies after the subtraction of linear dipole in the CMB maps

    Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Khatri, Rishi

    2013-01-01

    y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background allow us to detect clusters and groups of galaxies, filaments of hot gas and the non-uniformities in the warm hot intergalactic medium. Several CMB experiments (on small areas of sky) and theoretical groups (for full sky) have recently published y-type distortion maps. We propose to search for two artificial hot spots in such y-type maps resulting from the incomplete subtraction of the effect of the motion induced dipole on the cosmic microwave background sky. This dipole introduces, at second order, additional temperature and y-distortion anisotropy on the sky of amplitude few μK which could potentially be measured by Planck HFI and Pixie experiments and can be used as a source of cross channel calibration by CMB experiments. This y-type distortion is present in every pixel and is not the result of averaging the whole sky. This distortion, calculated exactly from the known linear dipole, can be subtracted from the final y-type maps, if desired

  19. Investigation of oxygen disorder, thermal parameters, lattice vibrations and elastic constants of UO2 and ThO2 at temperatures up to 2 930 K

    Clausen, Kurt Nørgaard; Hayes, W; Hutchings, M.T.

    1984-01-01

    temperatures has been unanswered until now. A new high temperature furnace has been purchased by Harwell for work at temperatures in this region, and a series of experiments has been carried out involving diffraction, quasielastic diffuse and inelastic neutron scattering from single crystals of UO2 and ThO2....... These have been backed by experiments in the lower temperature range to 2 500 K at I.L.L. Details of the Harwell furnace, and methods used for temperature measurement and encapsulation of the crystal samples are given, together with some examples of the principal results. These results show unambiguously...

  20. Temperature and orientation dependence of the short-term strength characteristics, Young's modulus, and linear expansion coefficient of ZhS6F alloy single crystals

    Svetlov, I L; Sukhanov, N N; Krivko, A I; Roshchina, I N; Khatsinskaia, I M

    1987-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on the temperature dependence of the short- term strength characteristics, Young's modulus, and linear expansion coefficients of single crystals of a nickel alloy, ZhS6F, with crystallographic orientations along the 001, 111, 011, and 112 lines. It is found that the mechanical properties and Young's modulus of the alloy crystals exibit anisotropy in the temperature range 20-900 C. The linear thermal expansion coefficient is isotropic up to 900 C and equal to that of the equiaxed alloy. 10 references.

  1. Assessing non-linear variation of temperature and precipitation for different growth periods of maize and their impacts on phenology in the Midwest of Jilin Province, China

    Guo, Enliang; Zhang, Jiquan; Wang, Yongfang; Alu, Si; Wang, Rui; Li, Danjun; Ha, Si

    2018-05-01

    In the past two decades, the regional climate in China has undergone significant change, resulting in crop yield reduction and complete failure. The goal of this study is to detect the variation of temperature and precipitation for different growth periods of maize and assess their impact on phenology. The daily meteorological data in the Midwest of Jilin Province during 1960-2014 were used in the study. The ensemble empirical mode decomposition method was adopted to analyze the non-linear trend and fluctuation in temperature and precipitation, and the sensitivity of the length of the maize growth period to temperature and precipitation was analyzed by the wavelet cross-transformation method. The results show that the trends of temperature and precipitation change are non-linear for different growth periods of maize, and the average temperature in the sowing-jointing stage was different from that in the other growth stages, showing a slight decrease trend, while the variation amplitude of maximum temperature is smaller than that of the minimum temperature. This indicates that the temperature difference between day and night shows a gradually decreasing trend. Precipitation in the growth period also showed a decreasing non-linear trend, while the inter-annual variability with period of quasi-3-year and quasi-6-year dominated the variation of temperature and precipitation. The whole growth period was shortened by 10.7 days, and the sowing date was advanced by approximately 11 days. We also found that there was a significant resonance period among temperature, precipitation, and phenology. Overall, a negative correlation between phenology and temperature is evident, while a positive correlation with precipitation is exhibited. The results illustrate that the climate suitability for maize has reduced over the past decades.

  2. Development of constant-power driving control for light-emitting-diode (LED) luminaire

    Huang, Bin-Juine; Chen, Chun-Wei; Ong, Chin-Dian; Du, Bo-Han; Hsu, Po-Chien

    2013-01-01

    The illumination of an LED may be affected by operating temperature even under constant-current condition. A constant-power driving technique is proposed in the present study for LED luminaire. A linear system dynamics model of LED luminaire is first derived and used in the design of the feedback control system. The PI controller was designed and tuned taking into account the control accuracy and robust properties with respect to plant uncertainty and variation of operating conditions. The control system was implemented on a microprocessor and used to control a 150W LED luminaire. The test result shows that the feedback system accurately controls the input power of LED luminaire to within 1.3 per cent error. As the ambient temperature changes from 0 to 40 °C, the LED illumination varies slightly (−1.7%) for constant-power driving, as compared to that of constant-current driving (−12%) and constant-voltage driving (+50%). The constant-power driving has revealed advantage in stabilizing the illumination of LED under large temperature variation. - Highlights: ► A constant-power driving technique is proposed for LED luminaire. ► A linear system dynamics model of LED luminaire is used in the control system design. ► The test shows that the feedback system accurately controls the input power. ► The LED illumination varies slightly (−1.7%) for constant-power driving.

  3. Rate constant and mechanism of the reaction Cl + CFCl₂H → CFCl₂ + HCl over the temperature range 298-670 K in N₂ or N₂/O₂ diluent.

    Kaiser, E W; Jawad, Khadija M

    2014-05-08

    The rate constant of the reaction Cl + CFCl2H (k1) has been measured relative to the established rate constant for the reaction Cl + CH4 (k2) at 760 Torr. The measurements were carried out in Pyrex reactors using a mixture of CFCl2H, CH4, and Cl2 in either N2 or N2/O2 diluent. Reactants and products were quantified by GC/FID analysis. Cl atoms were generated by irradiation of the mixture with 360 nm light to dissociate the Cl2 for temperatures up to ~550 K. At higher temperature, the Cl2 dissociated thermally, and no irradiation was used. Over the temperature range 298-670 K, k1 is consistently a factor of ~5 smaller than that of k2 with a nearly identical temperature dependence. The optimum non-Arrhenius rate constant is represented by the expression k1 = 1.14 × 10(-22) T(3.49) e(-241/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) with an estimated uncertainty of ±15% including uncertainty in the reference reaction. CFCl3 formed from the reaction CFCl2 + Cl2 (k3) is the sole product in N2 diluent. In ~20% O2 at 298 K, the CFCl3 product is suppressed. The rate constant of reaction 3 was measured relative to that of reaction 4 [CFCl2 + O2 (k4)] giving the result k3/k4 = 0.0031 ± 0.0005 at 298 K. An earlier experiment by others observed C(O)FCl to be the major product of reaction channel 4 [formed via the sequence, CFCl2(O2) → CFCl2O → C(O)FCl + Cl]. Our current experiments verified that there is a Cl atom chain reaction in the presence of O2 as required by this mechanism.

  4. On the non-linear nature of the variation, with intensity, of high energy cathode sputtering, and the variation of the latter with temperature (1960)

    Cassignol, C.; Ranc, G.

    1960-01-01

    A new cathode sputtering theory at high energy is presented which has been elaborated in taking in account the non-linearity of this phenomenon with the density of the impinging ions. This theory allows to predict the influence of target temperature on the rate of cathode sputtering. This influence is experimentally demonstrated. (author) [fr

  5. Constant physics and characteristics of fundamental constant

    Tarrach, R.

    1998-01-01

    We present some evidence which supports a surprising physical interpretation of the fundamental constants. First, we relate two of them through the renormalization group. This leaves as many fundamental constants as base units. Second, we introduce and a dimensional system of units without fundamental constants. Third, and most important, we find, while interpreting the units of the a dimensional system, that is all cases accessible to experimentation the fundamental constants indicate either discretization at small values or boundedness at large values of the corresponding physical quantity. (Author) 12 refs

  6. A discussion of non-linear temperature profiles at six closely spaced heat flow sites, southern Sohm Abyssal Plain, northwest Atlantic Ocean

    Burgess, M. M.

    1986-09-01

    Six heat flow measurement sites were occupied in June 1980 in a 10 x 10 km 2 flat area of the southern Sohm Abyssal Plain, western North Atlantic Ocean. Non-linear sediment temperature profiles, measured to depths of 5 m, indicate perturbations in the temperature field in sediments overlying 90 Ma ocean floor. Temperature gradients average 59.0 mK m -1 in the lower half of the profile and decrease by 25% to an average of 44.24 mK m -1 in the upper half. Thermal conductivities of sediment cores down to 12 m ranged from 0.74 to 2.12 W m -1 K -1 and averaged 1.06 W m -1K -1. The non-linearity of sediment temperature profiles cannot be accounted for by the variations in thermal conductivity. Vertical fluid convection in the sediments, with a predominantly downward migration on the order of 5 x 10 -8 ms -1 in the upper 3 m, could explain the perturbations. However, in this study area of high abyssal kinetic energy and abyssal storms, bottom-water temperature fluctuations are the likely source of observed sediment temperature perturbations. A bottom-water temperature change of 50 mK occurring 3 months prior to the cruise could produce sediment temperature perturbations similar to those observed. Heat flow determined from the lower gradient (3-5 m sediment depth interval), assuming the non-linearity in the upper sensors to be principally due to bottom-water temperature fluctuations, averages 59.2 mW m -2, a slightly higher value than that predicted for 90 Ma crust.

  7. Characterizing the relationship between temperature and mortality in tropical and subtropical cities: a distributed lag non-linear model analysis in Hue, Viet Nam, 2009-2013.

    Dang, Tran Ngoc; Seposo, Xerxes T; Duc, Nguyen Huu Chau; Thang, Tran Binh; An, Do Dang; Hang, Lai Thi Minh; Long, Tran Thanh; Loan, Bui Thi Hong; Honda, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between temperature and mortality has been found to be U-, V-, or J-shaped in developed temperate countries; however, in developing tropical/subtropical cities, it remains unclear. Our goal was to investigate the relationship between temperature and mortality in Hue, a subtropical city in Viet Nam. We collected daily mortality data from the Vietnamese A6 mortality reporting system for 6,214 deceased persons between 2009 and 2013. A distributed lag non-linear model was used to examine the temperature effects on all-cause and cause-specific mortality by assuming negative binomial distribution for count data. We developed an objective-oriented model selection with four steps following the Akaike information criterion (AIC) rule (i.e. a smaller AIC value indicates a better model). High temperature-related mortality was more strongly associated with short lags, whereas low temperature-related mortality was more strongly associated with long lags. The low temperatures increased risk in all-category mortality compared to high temperatures. We observed elevated temperature-mortality risk in vulnerable groups: elderly people (high temperature effect, relative risk [RR]=1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.11-1.83; low temperature effect, RR=2.0, 95% CI=1.13-3.52), females (low temperature effect, RR=2.19, 95% CI=1.14-4.21), people with respiratory disease (high temperature effect, RR=2.45, 95% CI=0.91-6.63), and those with cardiovascular disease (high temperature effect, RR=1.6, 95% CI=1.15-2.22; low temperature effect, RR=1.99, 95% CI=0.92-4.28). In Hue, the temperature significantly increased the risk of mortality, especially in vulnerable groups (i.e. elderly, female, people with respiratory and cardiovascular diseases). These findings may provide a foundation for developing adequate policies to address the effects of temperature on health in Hue City.

  8. A 5 V-to-3.3 V CMOS Linear Regulator with Three-Output Temperature-Independent Reference Voltages

    San-Fu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a 5 V-to-3.3 V linear regulator circuit, which uses 3.3 V CMOS transistors to replace the 5 V CMOS transistors. Thus, the complexity of the manufacturing semiconductor process can be improved. The proposed linear regulator is implemented by cascode architecture, which requires three different reference voltages as the bias voltages of its circuit. Thus, the three-output temperature-independent reference voltage circuit is proposed, which provides three accurate reference voltages simultaneously. The three-output temperature-independent reference voltages also can be used in other circuits of the chip. By using the proposed temperature-independent reference voltages, the proposed linear regulator can provide an accurate output voltage, and it is suitable for low cost, small size, and highly integrated system-on-chip (SoC applications. Moreover, the proposed linear regulator uses the cascode technique, which improves both the gain performance and the isolation performance. Therefore, the proposed linear regulator has a good performance in reference voltage to output voltage isolation. The voltage variation of the linear regulator is less than 2.153% in the temperature range of −40°C–120°C, and the power supply rejection ratio (PSRR is less than −42.8 dB at 60 Hz. The regulator can support 0~200 mA output current. The core area is less than 0.16 mm2.

  9. Title: Elucidation of Environmental Fate of Artificial Sweeteners (Aspartame, Acesulfame K and Saccharin) by Determining Bimolecular Rate Constants with Hydroxyl Radical at Various pH and Temperature Conditions and Possible Reaction By-Products

    Teraji, T.; Arakaki, T.; Suzuka, T.

    2012-12-01

    Use of artificial sweeteners in beverages and food has been rapidly increasing because of their non-calorie nature. In Japan, aspartame, acesulfame K and sucralose are among the most widely used artificial sweeteners. Because the artificial sweeteners are not metabolized in human bodies, they are directly excreted into the environment without chemical transformations. We initiated a study to better understand the fate of artificial sweeteners in the marine environment. The hydroxyl radical (OH), the most potent reactive oxygen species, reacts with various compounds and determines the environmental oxidation capacity and the life-time of many compounds. The steady-state OH concentration and the reaction rate constants between the compound and OH are used to estimate the life-time of the compound. In this study, we determine the bimolecular rate constants between aspartame, acefulfame K and saccharin and OH at various pH and temperature conditions using a competition kinetics technique. We use hydrogen peroxide as a photochemical source of OH. Bimolecular rate constant we obtained so far for aspartame was (2.6±1.2)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 3.0 and (4.9±2.3)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 5.5. Little effect was seen by changing the temperatures between 15 and 40 oC. Activation energy (Ea) was calculated to be -1.0 kJ mol-1 at pH = 3.0, +8.5 kJ mol-1 at pH = 5.5, which could be regarded as zero. We will report bimolecular rate constants at different pHs and temperatures for acesulfame K and saccharin, as well. Possible reaction by-products for aspartame will be also reported. We will further discuss the fate of aspartame in the coastal environment.

  10. Temperature and SAR measurement errors in the evaluation of metallic linear structures heating during MRI using fluoroptic (registered) probes

    Mattei, E [Department of Technologies and Health, Italian National Institute of Health, Rome (Italy); Triventi, M [Department of Technologies and Health, Italian National Institute of Health, Rome (Italy); Calcagnini, G [Department of Technologies and Health, Italian National Institute of Health, Rome (Italy); Censi, F [Department of Technologies and Health, Italian National Institute of Health, Rome (Italy); Kainz, W [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, MD (United States); Bassen, H I [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, MD (United States); Bartolini, P [Department of Technologies and Health, Italian National Institute of Health, Rome (Italy)

    2007-03-21

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the error associated with temperature and SAR measurements using fluoroptic (registered) temperature probes on pacemaker (PM) leads during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We performed temperature measurements on pacemaker leads, excited with a 25, 64, and 128 MHz current. The PM lead tip heating was measured with a fluoroptic (registered) thermometer (Luxtron, Model 3100, USA). Different contact configurations between the pigmented portion of the temperature probe and the PM lead tip were investigated to find the contact position minimizing the temperature and SAR underestimation. A computer model was used to estimate the error made by fluoroptic (registered) probes in temperature and SAR measurement. The transversal contact of the pigmented portion of the temperature probe and the PM lead tip minimizes the underestimation for temperature and SAR. This contact position also has the lowest temperature and SAR error. For other contact positions, the maximum temperature error can be as high as -45%, whereas the maximum SAR error can be as high as -54%. MRI heating evaluations with temperature probes should use a contact position minimizing the maximum error, need to be accompanied by a thorough uncertainty budget and the temperature and SAR errors should be specified.

  11. Room Temperature Optical Constants and Band Gap Evolution of Phase Pure M1-VO2 Thin Films Deposited at Different Oxygen Partial Pressures by Reactive Magnetron Sputtering

    Meng Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopic ellipsometry study was employed for phase pure VO2(M1 thin films grown at different oxygen partial pressures by reactive magnetron sputtering. The optical constants of the VO2(M1 thin films have been determined in a photon energy range between 0.73 and 5.05 eV. The near-infrared extinction coefficient and optical conductivity of VO2(M1 thin films rapidly increase with decreasing O2-Ar ratios. Moreover, two electronic transitions can be uniquely assigned. The energy gaps correlated with absorption edge (E1 at varied O2-Ar ratios are almost the same (~2.0 eV; consequently, the absorption edge is not significantly changed. However, the optical band gap corresponding to semiconductor-to-metal phase transition (E2 decreases from 0.53 to 0.18 eV with decreasing O2-Ar ratios.

  12. The Heat Resistance of Microbial Cells Represented by D Values Can be Estimated by the Transition Temperature and the Coefficient of Linear Expansion.

    Nakanishi, Koichi; Kogure, Akinori; Deuchi, Keiji; Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Ito, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed a method for evaluating the heat resistance of microorganisms by measuring the transition temperature at which the coefficient of linear expansion of a cell changes. Here, we performed heat resistance measurements using a scanning probe microscope with a nano thermal analysis system. The microorganisms studied included six strains of the genus Bacillus or related genera, one strain each of the thermophilic obligate anaerobic bacterial genera Thermoanaerobacter and Moorella, two strains of heat-resistant mold, two strains of non-sporulating bacteria, and one strain of yeast. Both vegetative cells and spores were evaluated. The transition temperature at which the coefficient of linear expansion due to heating changed from a positive value to a negative value correlated strongly with the heat resistance of the microorganism as estimated from the D value. The microorganisms with greater heat resistance exhibited higher transition temperatures. There was also a strong negative correlation between the coefficient of linear expansion and heat resistance in bacteria and yeast, such that microorganisms with greater heat resistance showed lower coefficients of linear expansion. These findings suggest that our method could be useful for evaluating the heat resistance of microorganisms.

  13. An energy stable evolution method for simulating two-phase equilibria of multi-component fluids at constant moles, volume and temperature

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu; Wang, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an energy-stable evolution method for the calculation of the phase equilibria under given volume, temperature, and moles (VT-flash). An evolution model for describing the dynamics of two-phase fluid system is based on Fick

  14. Viscoelastic creep of high-temperature concrete

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Marchertas, A.H.; Bazant, Z.P.

    1985-01-01

    Presented in this report is the analytical model for analysis of high temperature creep response of concrete. The creep law used is linear (viscoelastic), the temperature and moisture effects on the creep rate and also aging are included. Both constant and transient temperature as well as constant and transient moisture conditions are considered. Examples are presented to correlate experimental data with parameters of the analytical model by the use of a finite element scheme

  15. Cosmological Hubble constant and nuclear Hubble constant

    Horbuniev, Amelia; Besliu, Calin; Jipa, Alexandru

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of the Universe after the Big Bang and the evolution of the dense and highly excited nuclear matter formed by relativistic nuclear collisions are investigated and compared. Values of the Hubble constants for cosmological and nuclear processes are obtained. For nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies the nuclear Hubble constant is obtained in the frame of different models involving the hydrodynamic flow of the nuclear matter. Significant difference in the values of the two Hubble constant - cosmological and nuclear - is observed

  16. Innovation prize for air-conditioned assembly shop - Constant temperature allows the assembly of high-precision machining centres; Innovationspreis fuer klimatisierte Montagehalle

    Schmid, W.

    2002-07-01

    This article describes the clever combination of various techniques to achieve the goal of providing a stable ambient temperature with an accuracy of +/- 1 K in the assembly shop of a German manufacturer of precision machine tools. The requirements placed on the assembly and operation of machine tools operating to an accuracy of less that a hundredth of a millimetre are discussed. The award-winning heating and cooling system, which features the use of gravity cooling, geothermal energy (ground water for cooling) and the use of constructional elements (floor, facades, windows) for thermal buffering is described. The ingenious control system with 32 control zones and 64 sensors is described, which also provides the company's management with long-term documentation of temperature conditions for quality assurance purposes. Technical data on the installation is provided in table form.

  17. Non-linear trends and fluctuations in temperature during different growth stages of summer maize in the North China Plain from 1960 to 2014

    Wang, Cailin; Wu, Jidong; Wang, Xu; He, Xin; Li, Ning

    2017-12-01

    North China Plain has undergone severe warming trends since the 1950s, but whether this trend is the same during different growth phases for crops remains unknown. Thus, we analyzed the non-linear changes in the minimum temperature (T min ), mean temperature (T mean ) and maximum temperature (T max ) using the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition method during each growth stage of summer maize based on daily temperature data from 1960 to 2014. Our results strongly suggest that the trends and fluctuations in temperature change are non-linear. These changes can be categorized into four types of trend change according to the combinations of decreasing and increasing trends, and 8 fluctuation modes dominated by the fluctuations of expansion and shrinkage. The amplitude of the fluctuation is primarily expansion in the sowing-jointing stage and shrinkage in the jointing-maturity stage. Moreover, the temperature changes are inconsistent within each growth stage and are not consistent with the overall warming trend observed over the last 55 years. A transition period occurred in both the 1980s and the 1990s for temperatures during the sowing-tasseling stage. Furthermore, the cooling trend of the T max was significant in the sowing-emergence stage, while this cooling trend was not obvious for both T mean and T min in the jointing-tasseling stage. These results showed that temperature change was significantly different in different stages of the maize growth season. The results can serve as a scientific basis for a better understanding of the actual changes in the regional surface air temperature and agronomic heat resources.

  18. Exact constants in approximation theory

    Korneichuk, N

    1991-01-01

    This book is intended as a self-contained introduction for non-specialists, or as a reference work for experts, to the particular area of approximation theory that is concerned with exact constants. The results apply mainly to extremal problems in approximation theory, which in turn are closely related to numerical analysis and optimization. The book encompasses a wide range of questions and problems: best approximation by polynomials and splines; linear approximation methods, such as spline-approximation; optimal reconstruction of functions and linear functionals. Many of the results are base

  19. A masonry heater, a large thermal flywheel and constant temperatures : the winter of 1996/1997 of the Alberta Sustainable Home/Office

    Ostrowski, J.; Fofonoff, B.

    1997-07-01

    A masonry heater using scrapwood and firewood as the only source of back-up heat in this 1820 sq ft single-family live-in demonstration home/office, was described. The heater also contributed significantly to the thermal flywheel of the house. Together with other forms of thermal mass within the building (concrete slab, wood studs, drywall, tiles, furniture, plants, etc), the masonry heater was sufficient to see the occupants through the severe and long winter of 1996/97 with comfortable indoor temperatures. The masonry heater is located near the center of the house with a sunny view towards the south. On sunny winter days it operates as a passive solar heat sink, with the sun charging up the brick face by about five degrees C. In the evening, a 40 pound load of scrap and firewood will take about 1.25 hours to penetrate through the refractory interior core and brick exterior. This provides a cosy fireplace for the occupants, while storing heat in its mass for slow release during the next 1.5 to 3 days. It heats water for storage in the hot water tank. During the period of September 1996 to May 1997 one cord of wood was burned, which is about 12 per cent of the energy pumped into the average single family home in Calgary during the same period. Experience to-date suggests that the masonry heater performs very well as a back-up heater, maintaining an ambient temperature of about 20 degrees C throughout the winter. Some flat plate solar collectors might be necessary to provide for radiant floor heating of the mass since floor temperatures were lower than most occupants found comfortable.

  20. A method for determination of X-ray elastic constants of materials showing non-linear sin2ψ diagrams and its application to Zn-Ni-alloy electroplate

    Sasaki, Toshihiko; Kuramoto, Makoto; Yoshioka, Yasuo.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the method and the experiment for the determination of the x-ray elastic constants of Zn-Ni-alloy electroplate. For this material, the sin 2 ψ method is not adequate to use because this material shows severely curved sin 2 ψ diagrams. Therefore, a new method developed by the authors was explained first. This new method is effective for materials showing nonlinear sin 2 ψ diagrams. Secondly, the experiment was made on the application of this method to the Zn-Ni-alloy electroplate. And it was found out that the experimental data agreed well to the theory of this method. As a result, the following values were obtained as the x-ray elastic constants of the sample measured: (1+ν)/E=8.44 TPa -1 ν/E=2.02 TPa -1 (author)

  1. Shear-Induced Phase Separation in Aqueous Polymer Solutions: Temperature-Sensitive Microgels and Linear Polymer Chains

    Stieger, M.A.; Richtering, W.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of shear flow on the phase separation of aqueous poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAM) microgel suspensions was investigated by means of rheo-turbidity and rheo-small angle neutron scattering (rheo-SANS) and compared to the behavior of linear PNiPAM macromolecules. The rheological

  2. New methods to the determination of acid-base constants of solid substrates (oxides and carbon fibres) and of the transition temperatures of polymers adsorbed on oxides

    Hamieh, Tayssir

    2000-01-01

    Full text.Inverse gas chromatography technique at infinite dilution was used to calculate the acidic and basic surface characteristics of some solid substrates like oxides: Mono gal, MgO, ZnO, SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 , four different carbon fibres and polymers as PMMA at various tacticities. We determined the specific interactions between them and model organic molecules and showed the amphoteric feature of such solids. We proved that the usual relation giving the specific enthalpy of adsorption (ΔH s P) of a polar molecule adsorbed on a solid: (-ΔH s P) = (K A DN + K D AN) was not correct for oxides and carbon fibres. We proposed a new relashionship by adding a third parameter K reflecting the amphoteric character of the solid according to: (-ΔH s P) = K A .DN + K D .AN - K. AN.DN. On the other hand, we used the inverse gas chromatography (IGC) at infinite dilution to determine the glass transition temperatures and other transitions of the systems PMMA/SiO 2 and PMMA/Al 2 O 3 , at various covered surface fractions and for various tacticities of the polymer (atactic, isotactic and syndiotactic). The maxima of the dispersive component of the surface energy γ s d of our two systems, obtained by IGC at infinite dilution, indicated clearly the presence of transition temperatures (glass or local transitions). The study of the chemical physical properties of PMMA/SiO 2 and PMMA/Al 2 O 3 , revealed an important difference in the acidic and basic behaviour, in Lewis terms, of oxide covered by various concentrations of PMMA. This study also highlighted an important effect of the tacticity of the polymer on the acidic basic character of PMMA adsorbed on oxides

  3. FORMATION CONSTANTS AND THERMODYNAMIC ...

    KEY WORDS: Metal complexes, Schiff base ligand, Formation constant, DFT calculation ... best values for the formation constants of the proposed equilibrium model by .... to its positive charge distribution and the ligand deformation geometry.

  4. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  5. Characterizing the relationship between temperature and mortality in tropical and subtropical cities: a distributed lag non-linear model analysis in Hue, Viet Nam, 2009–2013

    Dang, Tran Ngoc; Seposo, Xerxes T.; Duc, Nguyen Huu Chau; Thang, Tran Binh; An, Do Dang; Hang, Lai Thi Minh; Long, Tran Thanh; Loan, Bui Thi Hong; Honda, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between temperature and mortality has been found to be U-, V-, or J-shaped in developed temperate countries; however, in developing tropical/subtropical cities, it remains unclear. Objectives Our goal was to investigate the relationship between temperature and mortality in Hue, a subtropical city in Viet Nam. Design We collected daily mortality data from the Vietnamese A6 mortality reporting system for 6,214 deceased persons between 2009 and 2013. A distributed lag non-linear model was used to examine the temperature effects on all-cause and cause-specific mortality by assuming negative binomial distribution for count data. We developed an objective-oriented model selection with four steps following the Akaike information criterion (AIC) rule (i.e. a smaller AIC value indicates a better model). Results High temperature-related mortality was more strongly associated with short lags, whereas low temperature-related mortality was more strongly associated with long lags. The low temperatures increased risk in all-category mortality compared to high temperatures. We observed elevated temperature-mortality risk in vulnerable groups: elderly people (high temperature effect, relative risk [RR]=1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.11–1.83; low temperature effect, RR=2.0, 95% CI=1.13–3.52), females (low temperature effect, RR=2.19, 95% CI=1.14–4.21), people with respiratory disease (high temperature effect, RR=2.45, 95% CI=0.91–6.63), and those with cardiovascular disease (high temperature effect, RR=1.6, 95% CI=1.15–2.22; low temperature effect, RR=1.99, 95% CI=0.92–4.28). Conclusions In Hue, the temperature significantly increased the risk of mortality, especially in vulnerable groups (i.e. elderly, female, people with respiratory and cardiovascular diseases). These findings may provide a foundation for developing adequate policies to address the effects of temperature on health in Hue City. PMID:26781954

  6. Characterizing the relationship between temperature and mortality in tropical and subtropical cities: a distributed lag non-linear model analysis in Hue, Viet Nam, 2009–2013

    Tran Ngoc Dang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The relationship between temperature and mortality has been found to be U-, V-, or J-shaped in developed temperate countries; however, in developing tropical/subtropical cities, it remains unclear. Objectives: Our goal was to investigate the relationship between temperature and mortality in Hue, a subtropical city in Viet Nam. Design: We collected daily mortality data from the Vietnamese A6 mortality reporting system for 6,214 deceased persons between 2009 and 2013. A distributed lag non-linear model was used to examine the temperature effects on all-cause and cause-specific mortality by assuming negative binomial distribution for count data. We developed an objective-oriented model selection with four steps following the Akaike information criterion (AIC rule (i.e. a smaller AIC value indicates a better model. Results: High temperature-related mortality was more strongly associated with short lags, whereas low temperature-related mortality was more strongly associated with long lags. The low temperatures increased risk in all-category mortality compared to high temperatures. We observed elevated temperature-mortality risk in vulnerable groups: elderly people (high temperature effect, relative risk [RR]=1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.11–1.83; low temperature effect, RR=2.0, 95% CI=1.13–3.52, females (low temperature effect, RR=2.19, 95% CI=1.14–4.21, people with respiratory disease (high temperature effect, RR=2.45, 95% CI=0.91–6.63, and those with cardiovascular disease (high temperature effect, RR=1.6, 95% CI=1.15–2.22; low temperature effect, RR=1.99, 95% CI=0.92–4.28. Conclusions: In Hue, the temperature significantly increased the risk of mortality, especially in vulnerable groups (i.e. elderly, female, people with respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. These findings may provide a foundation for developing adequate policies to address the effects of temperature on health in Hue City.

  7. Investigation of linearity of the ITER outer vessel steady-state magnetic field sensors at high temperature

    Entler, S.; Duran, I.; Kocan, M.; Vayakis, G.

    2017-07-01

    Three vacuum vessel sectors in ITER will be instrumented by the outer vessel steady-state magnetic field sensors. Each sensor unit features a pair of metallic Hall sensors with a sensing layer made of bismuth to measure tangential and normal components of the local magnetic field. The influence of temperature and magnetic field on the Hall coefficient was tested for the temperature range from 25 to 250 oC and the magnetic field range from 0 to 0.5 T. A fit of the Hall coefficient normalized temperature function independent of magnetic field was found, and a model of the Hall coefficient functional dependence at a wide range of temperature and magnetic field was built with the purpose to simplify the calibration procedure.

  8. One-loop dimensional reduction of the linear σ model

    Malbouisson, A.P.C.; Silva-Neto, M.B.; Svaiter, N.F.

    1997-05-01

    We perform the dimensional reduction of the linear σ model at one-loop level. The effective of the reduced theory obtained from the integration over the nonzero Matsubara frequencies is exhibited. Thermal mass and coupling constant renormalization constants are given, as well as the thermal renormalization group which controls the dependence of the counterterms on the temperature. We also recover, for the reduced theory, the vacuum instability of the model for large N. (author)

  9. An energy stable evolution method for simulating two-phase equilibria of multi-component fluids at constant moles, volume and temperature

    Kou, Jisheng

    2016-02-25

    In this paper, we propose an energy-stable evolution method for the calculation of the phase equilibria under given volume, temperature, and moles (VT-flash). An evolution model for describing the dynamics of two-phase fluid system is based on Fick’s law of diffusion for multi-component fluids and the Peng-Robinson equation of state. The mobility is obtained from diffusion coefficients by relating the gradient of chemical potential to the gradient of molar density. The evolution equation for moles of each component is derived using the discretization of diffusion equations, while the volume evolution equation is constructed based on the mechanical mechanism and the Peng-Robinson equation of state. It is proven that the proposed evolution system can well model the VT-flash problem, and moreover, it possesses the property of total energy decay. By using the Euler time scheme to discretize this evolution system, we develop an energy stable algorithm with an adaptive choice strategy of time steps, which allows us to calculate the suitable time step size to guarantee the physical properties of moles and volumes, including positivity, maximum limits, and correct definition of the Helmhotz free energy function. The proposed evolution method is also proven to be energy-stable under the proposed time step choice. Numerical examples are tested to demonstrate efficiency and robustness of the proposed method.

  10. A note on the correlation between circular and linear variables with an application to wind direction and air temperature data in a Mediterranean climate

    Lototzis, M.; Papadopoulos, G. K.; Droulia, F.; Tseliou, A.; Tsiros, I. X.

    2018-04-01

    There are several cases where a circular variable is associated with a linear one. A typical example is wind direction that is often associated with linear quantities such as air temperature and air humidity. The analysis of a statistical relationship of this kind can be tested by the use of parametric and non-parametric methods, each of which has its own advantages and drawbacks. This work deals with correlation analysis using both the parametric and the non-parametric procedure on a small set of meteorological data of air temperature and wind direction during a summer period in a Mediterranean climate. Correlations were examined between hourly, daily and maximum-prevailing values, under typical and non-typical meteorological conditions. Both tests indicated a strong correlation between mean hourly wind directions and mean hourly air temperature, whereas mean daily wind direction and mean daily air temperature do not seem to be correlated. In some cases, however, the two procedures were found to give quite dissimilar levels of significance on the rejection or not of the null hypothesis of no correlation. The simple statistical analysis presented in this study, appropriately extended in large sets of meteorological data, may be a useful tool for estimating effects of wind on local climate studies.

  11. Ion microprobe assessment of the heterogeneity of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis (bivalvia shell calcite precipitated at constant temperature

    P. S. Freitas

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale heterogeneity of biogenic carbonate elemental composition can be a significant source of error in the accurate use of element/Ca ratios as geochemical proxies. In this study ion microprobe (SIMS profiles showed significant small-scale variability of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in new shell calcite of the marine bivalves Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis that was precipitated during a constant-temperature culturing experiment. Elevated Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios were found to be associated with the deposition of elaborate shell features, i.e. a shell surface stria in P. maximus and surface shell disturbance marks in both species, the latter a common occurrence in bivalve shells. In both species the observed small-scale elemental heterogeneity most likely was not controlled by variable transport of ions to the extra-pallial fluid, but by factors such as the influence of shell organic content and/or crystal size and orientation, the latter reflecting conditions at the shell crystal-solution interface. In the mid and innermost regions of the P. maximus shell the lack of significant small-scale variation of Mg/Ca ratios, which is consistent with growth at constant temperature, suggest a potential application as a palaeotemperature proxy. Cross-growth band element/Ca ratio profiles in the interior of bivalve shells may provide more promising palaeo-environmental tools than sampling from the outer region of bivalve shells.

  12. Relationship between anelastic and non-linear visco-plastic behavior of 316 stainless steel at low homologous temperature

    Nir, N.; Huang, F.H.; Hart, E.W.; Li, C.Y.

    1976-05-01

    At low homologous temperature the plastic strain rate seems to be controlled largely by dislocation glide friction. However, since a sizeable fraction of the applied stress sigma is dissipated in overcoming the strong barriers due to dislocation tangles generated by strain hardening, only a portion of the applied stress is actually expended against the frictional resistance. A recent model for this process includes the role of dislocation pile-ups at the strong barriers. The pile-ups provide a mechanism for producing the internal back stresses that limit the effective frictional stress. The also appear in the deformation as a stored anelastic strain component. The resultant behavior at low temperature and high stress is similar to that proposed by Grupta and Li. The same model also predicts an anelastic behavior at low stress. Measurements at both high and low stress levels on 316 Stainless Steel have now shown that the predictions of the model are quantitatively consistent at both stress levels

  13. Dependence of the time-constant of a fuel rod on different design and operational parameters

    Elenkov, D.; Lassmann, K.; Schubert, A.; Laar, J. van de

    2001-01-01

    The temperature response during a reactor shutdown has been measured for many years in the OECD-Halden Project. It has been shown that the complicated shutdown processes can be characterized by a time constant τ which depends on different fuel design and operational parameters, such as fuel geometry, gap size, fill gas pressure and composition, burnup and linear heat rate. In the paper the concept of a time constant is analyzed and the dependence of the time constant on various parameters is investigated analytically. Measured time constants for different designs and conditions are compared with those derived from calculations of the TRANSURANUS code. Employing standard models results in a systematic underprediction of the time constant, i.e. the heat transfer during shutdown is overestimated. (author)

  14. Gradient-driven flux-tube simulations of ion temperature gradient turbulence close to the non-linear threshold

    Peeters, A. G.; Rath, F.; Buchholz, R.; Grosshauser, S. R.; Strintzi, D.; Weikl, A. [Physics Department, University of Bayreuth, Universitätsstrasse 30, Bayreuth (Germany); Camenen, Y. [Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345, Marseille (France); Candy, J. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Casson, F. J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB, Oxon (United Kingdom); Hornsby, W. A. [Max Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    It is shown that Ion Temperature Gradient turbulence close to the threshold exhibits a long time behaviour, with smaller heat fluxes at later times. This reduction is connected with the slow growth of long wave length zonal flows, and consequently, the numerical dissipation on these flows must be sufficiently small. Close to the nonlinear threshold for turbulence generation, a relatively small dissipation can maintain a turbulent state with a sizeable heat flux, through the damping of the zonal flow. Lowering the dissipation causes the turbulence, for temperature gradients close to the threshold, to be subdued. The heat flux then does not go smoothly to zero when the threshold is approached from above. Rather, a finite minimum heat flux is obtained below which no fully developed turbulent state exists. The threshold value of the temperature gradient length at which this finite heat flux is obtained is up to 30% larger compared with the threshold value obtained by extrapolating the heat flux to zero, and the cyclone base case is found to be nonlinearly stable. Transport is subdued when a fully developed staircase structure in the E × B shearing rate forms. Just above the threshold, an incomplete staircase develops, and transport is mediated by avalanche structures which propagate through the marginally stable regions.

  15. Effect of Enhanced Air Temperature (extreme heat, and Load of Non-Linear Against the Use of Electric Power

    I Ketut Wijaya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Usage Electric power is very easy to do, because the infrastructure for connecting  already available and widely sold. Consumption electric power is not accompanied by the ability to recognize electric power. The average increase of electricity power in Bali in extreme weather reaches 10% in years 2014, so that Bali suffered power shortages and PLN as the manager of electric power to perform scheduling on of electric power usage. Scheduling is done because many people use electric power as the load  of fan and Air Conditioner exceeding the previous time. Load of fan, air conditioning, and computers including non-linear loads which can add heat on the conductor of electricity. Non-linear load and hot weather can lead to heat on conductor so  insulation damaged  and cause electrical short circuit. Data of electric power obtained through questionnaires, surveys, measurement and retrieve data from various parties. Fires that occurred in 2014, namely 109 events, 44 is  event caused by an electric short circuit (approximately 40%. Decrease power factors can cause losses of electricity and hot. Heat can cause and adds heat on the  conductor electric. The analysis showed  understanding electric power of the average  is 27,700 with value between 20 to 40. So an understanding of the electrical power away from the understand so that many errors because of the act own. Installation tool ELCB very necessary but very necessary provide counseling   of electricity to the community.

  16. Direct measurements of rate constants for the reactions of CH3 radicals with C2H6, C2H4, and C2H2 at high temperatures.

    Peukert, S L; Labbe, N J; Sivaramakrishnan, R; Michael, J V

    2013-10-10

    The shock tube technique has been used to study the reactions CH3 + C2H6 → C2H4 + CH4 + H (1), CH3 + C2H4 → Products + H (2), and CH3 + C2H2 → Products + H (3). Biacetyl, (CH3CO)2, was used as a clean high temperature thermal source for CH3-radicals for all the three reactions studied in this work. For reaction 1, the experiments span a T-range of 1153 K ≤ T ≤ 1297 K, at P ~ 0.4 bar. The experiments on reaction 2 cover a T-range of 1176 K ≤ T ≤ 1366 K, at P ~ 1.0 bar, and those on reaction 3 a T-range of 1127 K ≤ T ≤ 1346 K, at P ~ 1.0 bar. Reflected shock tube experiments performed on reactions 1-3, monitored the formation of H-atoms with H-atom Atomic Resonance Absorption Spectrometric (ARAS). Fits to the H-atom temporal profiles using an assembled kinetics model were used to make determinations for k1, k2, and k3. In the case of C2H6, the measurements of [H]-atoms were used to derive direct high-temperature rate constants, k1, that can be represented by the Arrhenius equation k1(T) = 5.41 × 10(-12) exp(-6043 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1153 K ≤ T ≤ 1297 K) for the only bimolecular process that occurs, H-atom abstraction. TST calculations based on ab initio properties calculated at the CCSD(T)/CBS//M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory show excellent agreement, within ±20%, of the measured rate constants. For the reaction of CH3 with C2H4, the present rate constant results, k2', refer to the sum of rate constants, k(2b) + k(2c), from two competing processes, addition-elimination, and the direct abstraction CH3 + C2H4 → C3H6 + H (2b) and CH3 + C2H4 → C2H2 + H + CH4 (2c). Experimental rate constants for k2' can be represented by the Arrhenius equation k2'(T) = 2.18 × 10(-10) exp(-11830 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1176 K ≤ T ≤ 1366 K). The present results are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. The present study provides the only direct measurement for the high-temperature rate constants for these channels

  17. Production of natural gas from methane hydrate by a constant downhole pressure well

    Ahmadi, Goodarz; Ji, Chuang; Smith, Duane H.

    2007-01-01

    Natural gas production from the dissociation of methane hydrate in a confined reservoir by a depressurizing downhole well was studied. The case that the well pressure was kept constant was treated, and two different linearization schemes in an axisymmetric configuration were used in the analysis. For different fixed well pressures and reservoir temperatures, approximate self similar solutions were obtained. Distributions of temperature, pressure and gas velocity field across the reservoir were evaluated. The distance of the decomposition front from the well and the natural gas production rate as functions of time were also computed. Time evolutions of the resulting profiles were presented in graphical forms, and their differences with the constant well output results were studied. It was shown that the gas production rate was a sensitive function of well pressure and reservoir temperature. The sensitivity of the results to the linearization scheme used was also studied

  18. A new approach to modeling temperature-related mortality: Non-linear autoregressive models with exogenous input.

    Lee, Cameron C; Sheridan, Scott C

    2018-07-01

    Temperature-mortality relationships are nonlinear, time-lagged, and can vary depending on the time of year and geographic location, all of which limits the applicability of simple regression models in describing these associations. This research demonstrates the utility of an alternative method for modeling such complex relationships that has gained recent traction in other environmental fields: nonlinear autoregressive models with exogenous input (NARX models). All-cause mortality data and multiple temperature-based data sets were gathered from 41 different US cities, for the period 1975-2010, and subjected to ensemble NARX modeling. Models generally performed better in larger cities and during the winter season. Across the US, median absolute percentage errors were 10% (ranging from 4% to 15% in various cities), the average improvement in the r-squared over that of a simple persistence model was 17% (6-24%), and the hit rate for modeling spike days in mortality (>80th percentile) was 54% (34-71%). Mortality responded acutely to hot summer days, peaking at 0-2 days of lag before dropping precipitously, and there was an extended mortality response to cold winter days, peaking at 2-4 days of lag and dropping slowly and continuing for multiple weeks. Spring and autumn showed both of the aforementioned temperature-mortality relationships, but generally to a lesser magnitude than what was seen in summer or winter. When compared to distributed lag nonlinear models, NARX model output was nearly identical. These results highlight the applicability of NARX models for use in modeling complex and time-dependent relationships for various applications in epidemiology and environmental sciences. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Fine Structure Constant

    IAS Admin

    The article discusses the importance of the fine structure constant in quantum mechanics, along with the brief history of how it emerged. Al- though Sommerfelds idea of elliptical orbits has been replaced by wave mechanics, the fine struc- ture constant he introduced has remained as an important parameter in the field of ...

  20. Stability constants of scandium complexes, 1

    Itoh, Hisako; Itoh, Naomi; Suzuki, Yasuo

    1984-01-01

    The stability constants of scandium complexes with some carboxylate ligands were determined potentiometrically at 25.0 and 40.0 0 C and at an ionic strength of 0.10 with potassium nitrate as supporting electrolyte. The constants of the scandium complexes were appreciably greater than those of the corresponding lanthanoid complexes, as expected. The changes in free energy, enthalpy, and entropy for the formation of the scandium complexes were calculated from the stability constants at two temperatures. (author)

  1. Peculiar temperature aging effects on the piezoelectric constant of Pb(Mg1sol3Nb2sol3)O3-PbTiO3 single crystal near the morphotropic phase boundary

    Xu Guisheng; Wang Xiaofeng; Yang Danfeng; Duan Ziqing; Feng Chude; Chen Kai

    2005-01-01

    After temperature aging, peculiar changes of the piezoelectric response of 0.67 Pb(Mg 1sol3 Nb 2sol3 )O 3- 0.33 PbTiO 3 crystals appeared. The piezoelectric constant d 33 of the (001)-cut crystals with T RT ∼35 deg. C abruptly rose more than 1000 pC/N in some regions after heat treatment at 65 deg. C for 12 h. For the (001)-cut crystals with T RT ∼74 deg. C, in spite of a fall of 40-100 pC/N after heat treatment at 65 deg. C for 12 h, the values of d 33 rose 50-100 pC/N unexpectedly after the subsequent heat treatment at 85 deg. C for 4 h. The structure adjustment caused by the internal stress relaxation during heat treatment at T>T RT accounted for the enhancement of d 33

  2. Modeling daily soil temperature over diverse climate conditions in Iran—a comparison of multiple linear regression and support vector regression techniques

    Delbari, Masoomeh; Sharifazari, Salman; Mohammadi, Ehsan

    2018-02-01

    The knowledge of soil temperature at different depths is important for agricultural industry and for understanding climate change. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of a support vector regression (SVR)-based model in estimating daily soil temperature at 10, 30 and 100 cm depth at different climate conditions over Iran. The obtained results were compared to those obtained from a more classical multiple linear regression (MLR) model. The correlation sensitivity for the input combinations and periodicity effect were also investigated. Climatic data used as inputs to the models were minimum and maximum air temperature, solar radiation, relative humidity, dew point, and the atmospheric pressure (reduced to see level), collected from five synoptic stations Kerman, Ahvaz, Tabriz, Saghez, and Rasht located respectively in the hyper-arid, arid, semi-arid, Mediterranean, and hyper-humid climate conditions. According to the results, the performance of both MLR and SVR models was quite well at surface layer, i.e., 10-cm depth. However, SVR performed better than MLR in estimating soil temperature at deeper layers especially 100 cm depth. Moreover, both models performed better in humid climate condition than arid and hyper-arid areas. Further, adding a periodicity component into the modeling process considerably improved the models' performance especially in the case of SVR.

  3. Observation of Lorentzian lineshapes in the room temperature optical spectra of strongly coupled Jaggregate/metal hybrid nanostructures by linear two-dimensional optical spectroscopy

    Wang, Wei; Sommer, Ephraim; De Sio, Antonietta; Gross, Petra; Vogelgesang, Ralf; Lienau, Christoph; Vasa, Parinda

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the linear optical reflectivity spectra of a prototypical, strongly coupled metal/molecular hybrid nanostructure by means of a new experimental approach, linear two-dimensional optical spectroscopy. White-light, broadband spectral interferometry is used to measure amplitude and spectral phase of the sample reflectivity or transmission with high precision and to reconstruct the time structure of the electric field emitted by the sample upon impulsive excitation. A numerical analysis of this time-domain signal provides a two-dimensional representation of the coherent optical response of the sample as a function of excitation and detection frequency. The approach is used to study a nanostructure formed by depositing a thin J-aggregated dye layer on a gold grating. In this structure, strong coupling between excitons and surface plasmon polaritons results in the formation of hybrid polariton modes. In the strong coupling regime, Lorentzian lineshape profiles of different polariton modes are observed at room temperature. This is taken as an indication that the investigated strongly coupled polariton excitations are predominantly homogeneously broadened at room temperature. This new approach presents a versatile, simple and highly precise addition to nonlinear optical spectroscopic techniques for the analysis of line broadening phenomena. (paper)

  4. Cosmological constants and variations

    Barrow, John D

    2005-01-01

    We review properties of theories for the variation of the gravitation and fine structure 'constants'. We highlight some general features of the cosmological models that exist in these theories with reference to recent quasar data that is consistent with time-variation in the fine structure 'constant' since a redshift of 3.5. The behaviour of a simple class of varying alpha cosmologies is outlined in the light of all the observational constraints. We also discuss some of the consequences of varying 'constants' for oscillating universes and show by means of exact solutions that they appear to evolve monotonically in time even though the scale factor of the universe oscillates

  5. Room temperature quarter wave resonator re-buncher development for a high power heavy-ion linear accelerator

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Choi, B. H.; Han, Jaeeun; Hyun, Myung Ook; Park, Bum-Sik; Choi, Ohryoung; Lee, Doyoon; Son, Kitaek

    2018-03-01

    In the medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line system of the RAON which consists of several quadrupole magnets, three normal-conducting re-bunchers, and several diagnostic devices, a quarter wave resonator type re-buncher was chosen for minimizing longitudinal emittance growth and manipulating a longitudinal phase ellipse into the longitudinal acceptance of the low energy linac. The re-buncher has a resonant frequency of 81.25 MHz, geometrical beta (βg) of 0.049, and physical length of 24 cm. Based on the result of numerical calculations of electromagnetic field using CST-MWS and mechanical analysis of the heat distribution and deformation, an internal structure of the re-buncher was optimized to increase the effective voltage and to reduce power losses in the wall. The criteria of the multipacting effect was estimated and it was confirmed by the experiment. The position and specification of cooling channels are designed to recover a heat load up to 15 kW with reasonable margin of 25%. The coaxial and loop type RF power coupler are positioned on the high magnetic field region and two slug tuners are installed perpendicularly to the beam axis. The frequency sensitivity as a function of the tuner depth and cooling water temperature is measured and the frequency shift is in all cases within the provided tuner range. The test with a high power of 10 kW and the continuous wave is performed and the reflection power is observed less than 450 W.

  6. Simulation of herbicide degradation in different soils by use of Pedo-transfer functions (PTF) and non-linear kinetics.

    von Götz, N; Richter, O

    1999-03-01

    The degradation behaviour of bentazone in 14 different soils was examined at constant temperature and moisture conditions. Two soils were examined at different temperatures. On the basis of these data the influence of soil properties and temperature on degradation was assessed and modelled. Pedo-transfer functions (PTF) in combination with a linear and a non-linear model were found suitable to describe the bentazone degradation in the laboratory as related to soil properties. The linear PTF can be combined with a rate related to the temperature to account for both soil property and temperature influence at the same time.

  7. Non-linear thermal evolution of the crystal structure and phase transitions of LaFeO3 investigated by high temperature X-ray diffraction

    Selbach, Sverre M.; Tolchard, Julian R.; Fossdal, Anita; Grande, Tor

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure, anisotropic thermal expansion and structural phase transition of the perovskite LaFeO 3 has been studied by high-temperature X-ray diffraction from room temperature to 1533 K. The structural evolution of the orthorhombic phase with space group Pbnm and the rhombohedral phase with R3 ¯ c structure of LaFeO 3 is reported in terms of lattice parameters, thermal expansion coefficients, atomic positions, octahedral rotations and polyhedral volumes. Non-linear lattice expansion across the antiferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition of LaFeO 3 at T N =735 K was compared to the corresponding behavior of the ferroelectric antiferromagnet BiFeO 3 to gain insight to the magnetoelectric coupling in BiFeO 3 , which is also multiferroic. The first order phase transition of LaFeO 3 from Pbnm to R3 ¯ c was observed at 1228±9 K, and a subsequent transition to Pm3 ¯ m was extrapolated to occur at 2140±30 K. The stability of the Pbnm and R3 ¯ c polymorphs of LaFeO 3 is discussed in terms of the competing enthalpy and entropy of the two crystal polymorphs and the thermal evolution of the polyhedral volume ratio V A /V B . - Graphical abstract: Aniostropic thermal evolution of the lattice parameters and phase transition of LaFeO 3 . Highlights: ► The crystal structure of LaFeO 3 is studied by HTXRD from RT to 1533 K. ► A non-linear expansion across the Néel temperature is observed for LaFeO 3 . ► The ratio V A /V B is used to rationalize the thermal evolution of the structure.

  8. The cosmological constant problem

    Dolgov, A.D.

    1989-05-01

    A review of the cosmological term problem is presented. Baby universe model and the compensating field model are discussed. The importance of more accurate data on the Hubble constant and the Universe age is stressed. 18 refs

  9. Exploring C-water-temperature interactions and non-linearities in soils through developments in process-based models

    Esteban Moyano, Fernando; Vasilyeva, Nadezda; Menichetti, Lorenzo

    2016-04-01

    Soil carbon models developed over the last couple of decades are limited in their capacity to accurately predict the magnitudes and temporal variations in observed carbon fluxes and stocks. New process-based models are now emerging that attempt to address the shortcomings of their more simple, empirical counterparts. While a spectrum of ideas and hypothetical mechanisms are finding their way into new models, the addition of only a few processes known to significantly affect soil carbon (e.g. enzymatic decomposition, adsorption, Michaelis-Menten kinetics) has shown the potential to resolve a number of previous model-data discrepancies (e.g. priming, Birch effects). Through model-data validation, such models are a means of testing hypothetical mechanisms. In addition, they can lead to new insights into what soil carbon pools are and how they respond to external drivers. In this study we develop a model of soil carbon dynamics based on enzymatic decomposition and other key features of process based models, i.e. simulation of carbon in particulate, soluble and adsorbed states, as well as enzyme and microbial components. Here we focus on understanding how moisture affects C decomposition at different levels, both directly (e.g. by limiting diffusion) or through interactions with other components. As the medium where most reactions and transport take place, water is central en every aspect of soil C dynamics. We compare results from a number of alternative models with experimental data in order to test different processes and parameterizations. Among other observations, we try to understand: 1. typical moisture response curves and associated temporal changes, 2. moisture-temperature interactions, and 3. diffusion effects under changing C concentrations. While the model aims at being a process based approach and at simulating fluxes at short time scales, it remains a simplified representation using the same inputs as classical soil C models, and is thus potentially

  10. Role of Dielectric Constant on Ion Transport: Reformulated Arrhenius Equation

    Shujahadeen B. Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid and nanocomposite polymer electrolytes based on chitosan have been prepared by solution cast technique. The XRD results reveal the occurrence of complexation between chitosan (CS and the LiTf salt. The deconvolution of the diffractogram of nanocomposite solid polymer electrolytes demonstrates the increase of amorphous domain with increasing alumina content up to 4 wt.%. Further incorporation of alumina nanoparticles (6 to 10 wt.% Al2O3 results in crystallinity increase (large crystallite size. The morphological (SEM and EDX analysis well supported the XRD results. Similar trends of DC conductivity and dielectric constant with Al2O3 concentration were explained. The TEM images were used to explain the phenomena of space charge and blocking effects. The reformulated Arrhenius equation (σ(ε′,T=σoexp(-Ea/KBε′T was proposed from the smooth exponential behavior of DC conductivity versus dielectric constant at different temperatures. The more linear behavior of DC conductivity versus 1000/(ɛ′×T reveals the crucial role of dielectric constant in Arrhenius equation. The drawbacks of Arrhenius equation can be understood from the less linear behavior of DC conductivity versus 1000/T. The relaxation processes have been interpreted in terms of Argand plots.

  11. Analysis of the chemical equilibrium of combustion at constant volume

    Marius BREBENEL

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Determining the composition of a mixture of combustion gases at a given temperature is based on chemical equilibrium, when the equilibrium constants are calculated on the assumption of constant pressure and temperature. In this paper, an analysis of changes occurring when combustion takes place at constant volume is presented, deriving a specific formula of the equilibrium constant. The simple reaction of carbon combustion in pure oxygen in both cases (constant pressure and constant volume is next considered as example of application, observing the changes occurring in the composition of the combustion gases depending on temperature.

  12. Linear temperature behavior of thermopower and strong electron-electron scattering in thick F-doped SnO2 films

    Lang, Wen-Jing; Li, Zhi-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Both the semi-classical and quantum transport properties of F-doped SnO2 thick films (˜1 μm) were investigated experimentally. We found that the resistivity caused by the thermal phonons obeys Bloch-Grüneisen law from ˜90 to 300 K, while only the diffusive thermopower, which varies linearly with temperature from 300 down to 10 K, can be observed. The phonon-drag thermopower is completely suppressed due to the long electron-phonon relaxation time in the compound. These observations, together with the fact that the carrier concentration has negligible temperature dependence, indicate that the conduction electrons in F-doped SnO2 films possess free-electron-like characteristics. At low temperatures, the electron-electron scattering dominates over the electron-phonon scattering and governs the inelastic scattering process. The theoretical predications of scattering rates of large- and small-energy-transfer electron-electron scattering processes, which are negligibly weak in three-dimensional disordered conventional conductors, are quantitatively tested in this lower carrier concentration and free-electron-like highly degenerate semiconductor.

  13. Linear temperature behavior of thermopower and strong electron-electron scattering in thick F-doped SnO2 films

    Lang, Wen-Jing; Li, Zhi-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Both the semi-classical and quantum transport properties of F-doped SnO 2 thick films (∼1 μm) were investigated experimentally. We found that the resistivity caused by the thermal phonons obeys Bloch-Grüneisen law from ∼90 to 300 K, while only the diffusive thermopower, which varies linearly with temperature from 300 down to 10 K, can be observed. The phonon-drag thermopower is completely suppressed due to the long electron-phonon relaxation time in the compound. These observations, together with the fact that the carrier concentration has negligible temperature dependence, indicate that the conduction electrons in F-doped SnO 2 films possess free-electron-like characteristics. At low temperatures, the electron-electron scattering dominates over the electron-phonon scattering and governs the inelastic scattering process. The theoretical predications of scattering rates of large- and small-energy-transfer electron-electron scattering processes, which are negligibly weak in three-dimensional disordered conventional conductors, are quantitatively tested in this lower carrier concentration and free-electron-like highly degenerate semiconductor.

  14. Temperature Dependent Rate Coefficients for the Gas-Phase Reaction of the OH Radical with Linear (L2, L3) and Cyclic (D3, D4) Permethylsiloxanes.

    Bernard, François; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K; Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Burkholder, James B

    2018-04-19

    Permethylsiloxanes are emitted into the atmosphere during production and use as personal care products, lubricants, and cleaning agents. The predominate atmospheric loss process for permethylsiloxanes is expected to be via gas-phase reaction with the OH radical. In this study, rate coefficients, k(T), for the OH radical gas-phase reaction with the two simplest linear and cyclic permethylsiloxanes were measured using a pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique over the temperature range of 240-370 K and a relative rate method at 294 K: hexamethyldisiloxane ((CH 3 ) 3 SiOSi(CH 3 ) 3 , L 2 ), k 1 ; octamethyltrisiloxane ([(CH 3 ) 3 SiO] 2 Si(CH 3 ) 2 , L 3 ), k 2 ; hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane ([-Si(CH 3 ) 2 O-] 3 , D 3 ), k 3 ; and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane ([-Si(CH 3 ) 2 O-] 4 , D 4 ), k 4 . The obtained k(294 K) values and temperature-dependence expressions for the 240-370 K temperature range are (cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , 2σ absolute uncertainties): k 1 (294 K) = (1.28 ± 0.08) × 10 -12 , k 1 ( T) = (1.87 ± 0.18) × 10 -11 exp(-(791 ± 27)/ T); k 2 (294 K) = (1.72 ± 0.10) × 10 -12 , k 2 ( T) = 1.96 × 10 -13 (T/298) 4.34 exp(657/ T); k 3 (294 K) = (0.82 ± 0.05) × 10 -12 , k 3 ( T) = (1.29 ± 0.19) × 10 -11 exp(-(805 ± 43)/ T); and k 4 (294 K) = (1.12 ± 0.10) × 10 -12 , k 4 ( T) = (1.80 ± 0.26) × 10 -11 exp(-(816 ± 43)/ T). The cyclic molecules were found to be less reactive than the analogous linear molecule with the same number of -CH 3 groups, while the linear and cyclic permethylsiloxane reactivity both increase with the increasing number of CH 3 - groups. The present results are compared with previous rate coefficient determinations where available. The permethylsiloxanes included in this study are atmospherically short-lived compounds with estimated atmospheric lifetimes of 11, 8, 17, and 13 days, respectively.

  15. Development of constant-power driving control for light-emitting-diode (LED) luminaire

    Huang, Bin-Juine

    2013-01-01

    The illumination of an LED may be affected by operating temperature even under constant-current condition. A constant-power driving technique is proposed in the present study for LED luminaire. A linear system dynamics model of LED luminaire is first derived and used in the design of the feedback control system. The PI controller was designed and tuned taking into account the control accuracy and robust properties with respect to plant uncertainty and variation of operating conditions. The control system was implemented on a microprocessor and used to control a 150W LED luminaire. The test result shows that the feedback system accurately controls the input power of LED luminaire to within 1.3 per cent error. As the ambient temperature changes from 0 to 40 °C, the LED illumination varies slightly (-1.7%) for constant-power driving, as compared to that of constant-current driving (-12%) and constant-voltage driving (+50%). The constant-power driving has revealed advantage in stabilizing the illumination of LED under large temperature variation. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Garbage-free reversible constant multipliers for arbitrary integers

    Mogensen, Torben Ægidius

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for constructing reversible circuitry for multiplying integers by arbitrary integer constants. The method is based on Mealy machines and gives circuits whose size are (in the worst case) linear in the size of the constant. This makes the method unsuitable for large constants...

  17. The application of two-step linear temperature program to thermal analysis for monitoring the lipid induction of Nostoc sp. KNUA003 in large scale cultivation.

    Kang, Bongmun; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2015-02-01

    Recently, microalgae was considered as a renewable energy for fuel production because its production is nonseasonal and may take place on nonarable land. Despite all of these advantages, microalgal oil production is significantly affected by environmental factors. Furthermore, the large variability remains an important problem in measurement of algae productivity and compositional analysis, especially, the total lipid content. Thus, there is considerable interest in accurate determination of total lipid content during the biotechnological process. For these reason, various high-throughput technologies were suggested for accurate measurement of total lipids contained in the microorganisms, especially oleaginous microalgae. In addition, more advanced technologies were employed to quantify the total lipids of the microalgae without a pretreatment. However, these methods are difficult to measure total lipid content in wet form microalgae obtained from large-scale production. In present study, the thermal analysis performed with two-step linear temeperature program was applied to measure heat evolved in temperature range from 310 to 351 °C of Nostoc sp. KNUA003 obtained from large-scale cultivation. And then, we examined the relationship between the heat evolved in 310-351 °C (HE) and total lipid content of the wet Nostoc cell cultivated in raceway. As a result, the linear relationship was determined between HE value and total lipid content of Nostoc sp. KNUA003. Particularly, there was a linear relationship of 98% between the HE value and the total lipid content of the tested microorganism. Based on this relationship, the total lipid content converted from the heat evolved of wet Nostoc sp. KNUA003 could be used for monitoring its lipid induction in large-scale cultivation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Determinação das constantes cinéticas de degradação do ácido ascórbico em purê de pêssego: efeito da temperatura e concentração Determination of reaction rate constants for ascorbic acid degradation in peach pureé: effect of temperature and concentration

    Ricardo Peraça Toralles

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available O ácido ascórbico, vitamina C, é usado extensivamente na indústria de alimentos, não só devido ao seu valor nutricional, mas devido a suas contribuições funcionais na qualidade do produto. Existem muitos estudos sobre a estabilidade cinética do ácido ascórbico em bebidas, mas nenhum estudo foi encontrado sobre as constantes cinéticas de degradação do ácido ascórbico adicionado em purê de pêssego. Neste trabalho, estudou-se a cinética de degradação do ácido ascórbico em purê de pêssego da cultivar Jade, em condições anaeróbicas e na faixa de 70 a 90 °C. As concentrações de purês testadas foram 12, 22 e 32 °Brix. A análise cinética dos dados sugere que a degradação foi significativamente representada pelos modelos cinéticos de zero e primeira ordem. A velocidade de degradação do ácido ascórbico foi dependente da temperatura. A energia de ativação média foi de 45 kJ.mol-1 e independente da concentração de sólidos solúveis.Ascorbic acid (vitamin C is extensively used in the food industry, not only for its nutritional value, but also for its many functional contributions to product quality. There have been many studies on the stability of ascorbic acid in different beverages, but no study was found on the reaction rate constants for ascorbic acid degradation in peach purée. In this work, the degradation of ascorbic acid in Jade peach purée was studied in anaerobic conditions and from 70-90 °C. The peach purée concentrations tested were 12, 22 and 32 °Brix. The kinetic analysis of the data suggests that the degradation was significantly represented by zero and first-order kinetic models. The rate of ascorbic acid degradation in peach purée was temperature dependent. The average activation energy was 45 kJ.mol-1 and independent of the concentration of soluble solids.

  19. An Alternative Approach to Non-Log-Linear Thermal Microbial Inactivation: Modelling the Number of Log Cycles Reduction with Respect to Temperature

    Vasilis Panagiotis Valdramidis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical approach incorporating the shoulder effect during the quantification of microbial heat inactivation is being developed based on »the number of log cycles of reduction « concept. Hereto, the heat resistance of Escherichia coli K12 in BHI broth has been quantitatively determined in a generic and accurate way by defining the time t for x log reductions in the microbial population, i.e. txD, as a function of the treatment temperature T. Survival data of the examined microorganism are collected in a range of temperatures between 52–60.6 °C. Shoulder length Sl and specific inactivation rate kmax are derived from a mathematical expression that describes a non-log-linear behaviour. The temperature dependencies of Sl and kmax are used for structuring the txD(T function. Estimation of the txD(T parameters through a global identification procedure permits reliable predictions of the time to achieve a pre-decided microbial reduction. One of the parameters of the txD(T function is proposed as »the reference minimum temperature for inactivation«. For the case study considered, a value of 51.80 °C (with a standard error, SE, of 3.47 was identified. Finally, the time to achieve commercial sterilization and pasteurization for the product at hand, i.e. BHI broth, was found to be 11.70 s (SE=5.22, and 5.10 min (SE=1.22, respectively. Accounting for the uncertainty (based on the 90 % confidence intervals, CI a fail-safe treatment of these two processes takes 20.36 s and 7.12 min, respectively.

  20. Room-temperature single-photon sources with definite circular and linear polarizations based on single-emitter fluorescence in liquid crystal hosts

    Winkler, Justin M; Lukishova, Svetlana G; Bissell, Luke J

    2013-01-01

    Definite circular and linear polarizations of room-temperature single-photon sources, which can serve as polarization bases for quantum key distribution, are produced by doping planar-aligned liquid crystal hosts with single fluorescence emitters. Chiral 1-D photonic bandgap microcavities for a single handedness of circularly polarized light were prepared from both monomeric and oligomeric cholesteric liquid crystals. Fluorescent emitters, such as nanocrystal quantum dots, nitrogen vacancy color centers in nanodiamonds, and rare-earth ions in nanocrystals, were doped into these microcavity structures and used to produce circularly polarized fluorescence of definite handedness. Additionally, we observed circularly polarized resonances in the spectrum of nanocrystal quantum dot fluorescence at the edge of the cholesteric microcavity's photonic stopband. For this polarization we obtained a ∼4.9 enhancement of intensity compared to the polarization of the opposite handedness that propagates without photonic bandgap microcavity effects. Such a resonance is indicative of coupling of quantum dot fluorescence to the cholesteric microcavity mode. We have also used planar-aligned nematic liquid crystal hosts to align DiI dye molecules doped into the host, thereby providing a single-photon source of linear polarization of definite direction. Antibunching is demonstrated for fluorescence of nanocrystal quantum dots, nitrogen vacancy color centers, and dye molecules in these liquid crystal structures.

  1. Radiographic constant exposure technique

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1985-01-01

    The constant exposure technique has been applied to assess various industrial radiographic systems. Different X-ray films and radiographic papers of two producers were compared. Special attention was given to fast film and paper used with fluorometallic screens. Radiographic image quality...... was tested by the use of ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters used on Al and Fe test plates. Relative speed and reduction of kilovoltage obtained with the constant exposure technique were calculated. The advantages of fast radiographic systems are pointed out...

  2. Dendroclimatic transfer functions revisited: Little Ice Age and Medieval Warm Period summer temperatures reconstructed using artificial neural networks and linear algorithms

    Helama, S.; Holopainen, J.; Eronen, M. [Department of Geology, University of Helsinki, (Finland); Makarenko, N.G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation). Pulkovo Astronomical Observatory; Karimova, L.M.; Kruglun, O.A. [Institute of Mathematics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Timonen, M. [Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit (Finland); Merilaeinen, J. [SAIMA Unit of the Savonlinna Department of Teacher Education, University of Joensuu (Finland)

    2009-07-01

    Tree-rings tell of past climates. To do so, tree-ring chronologies comprising numerous climate-sensitive living-tree and subfossil time-series need to be 'transferred' into palaeoclimate estimates using transfer functions. The purpose of this study is to compare different types of transfer functions, especially linear and nonlinear algorithms. Accordingly, multiple linear regression (MLR), linear scaling (LSC) and artificial neural networks (ANN, nonlinear algorithm) were compared. Transfer functions were built using a regional tree-ring chronology and instrumental temperature observations from Lapland (northern Finland and Sweden). In addition, conventional MLR was compared with a hybrid model whereby climate was reconstructed separately for short- and long-period timescales prior to combining the bands of timescales into a single hybrid model. The fidelity of the different reconstructions was validated against instrumental climate data. The reconstructions by MLR and ANN showed reliable reconstruction capabilities over the instrumental period (AD 1802-1998). LCS failed to reach reasonable verification statistics and did not qualify as a reliable reconstruction: this was due mainly to exaggeration of the low-frequency climatic variance. Over this instrumental period, the reconstructed low-frequency amplitudes of climate variability were rather similar by MLR and ANN. Notably greater differences between the models were found over the actual reconstruction period (AD 802-1801). A marked temperature decline, as reconstructed by MLR, from the Medieval Warm Period (AD 931-1180) to the Little Ice Age (AD 1601-1850), was evident in all the models. This decline was approx. 0.5 C as reconstructed by MLR. Different ANN based palaeotemperatures showed simultaneous cooling of 0.2 to 0.5 C, depending on algorithm. The hybrid MLR did not seem to provide further benefit above conventional MLR in our sample. The robustness of the conventional MLR over the calibration

  3. On the cosmical constant

    Chandra, R.

    1977-01-01

    On the grounds of the two correspondence limits, the Newtonian limit and the special theory limit of Einstein field equations, a modification of the cosmical constant has been proposed which gives realistic results in the case of a homogeneous universe. Also, according to this modification an explanation for the negative pressure in the steady-state model of the universe has been given. (author)

  4. Cosmological constant problem

    Weinberg, S.

    1989-01-01

    Cosmological constant problem is discussed. History of the problem is briefly considered. Five different approaches to solution of the problem are described: supersymmetry, supergravity, superstring; anthropic approach; mechamism of lagrangian alignment; modification of gravitation theory and quantum cosmology. It is noted that approach, based on quantum cosmology is the most promising one

  5. The Yamabe constant

    O Murchadha, N.

    1991-01-01

    The set of riemannian three-metrics with positive Yamabe constant defines the space of independent data for the gravitational field. The boundary of this set is investigated, and it is shown that metrics close to the boundary satisfy the positive-energy theorem. (Author) 18 refs

  6. The time constant of the somatogravic illusion.

    Correia Grácio, B J; de Winkel, K N; Groen, E L; Wentink, M; Bos, J E

    2013-02-01

    Without visual feedback, humans perceive tilt when experiencing a sustained linear acceleration. This tilt illusion is commonly referred to as the somatogravic illusion. Although the physiological basis of the illusion seems to be well understood, the dynamic behavior is still subject to discussion. In this study, the dynamic behavior of the illusion was measured experimentally for three motion profiles with different frequency content. Subjects were exposed to pure centripetal accelerations in the lateral direction and were asked to indicate their tilt percept by means of a joystick. Variable-radius centrifugation during constant angular rotation was used to generate these motion profiles. Two self-motion perception models were fitted to the experimental data and were used to obtain the time constant of the somatogravic illusion. Results showed that the time constant of the somatogravic illusion was on the order of two seconds, in contrast to the higher time constant found in fixed-radius centrifugation studies. Furthermore, the time constant was significantly affected by the frequency content of the motion profiles. Motion profiles with higher frequency content revealed shorter time constants which cannot be explained by self-motion perception models that assume a fixed time constant. Therefore, these models need to be improved with a mechanism that deals with this variable time constant. Apart from the fundamental importance, these results also have practical consequences for the simulation of sustained accelerations in motion simulators.

  7. Quantitative methods for stochastic high frequency spatio-temporal and non-linear analysis: Assessing health effects of exposure to extreme ambient temperature

    Liss, Alexander

    Extreme weather events, such as heat waves and cold spells, cause substantial excess mortality and morbidity in the vulnerable elderly population, and cost billions of dollars. The accurate and reliable assessment of adverse effects of extreme weather events on human health is crucial for environmental scientists, economists, and public health officials to ensure proper protection of vulnerable populations and efficient allocation of scarce resources. However, the methodology for the analysis of large national databases is yet to be developed. The overarching objective of this dissertation is to examine the effect of extreme weather on the elderly population of the Conterminous US (ConUS) with respect to seasonality in temperature in different climatic regions by utilizing heterogeneous high frequency and spatio-temporal resolution data. To achieve these goals the author: 1) incorporated dissimilar stochastic high frequency big data streams and distinct data types into the integrated data base for use in analytical and decision support frameworks; 2) created an automated climate regionalization system based on remote sensing and machine learning to define climate regions for the Conterminous US; 3) systematically surveyed the current state of the art and identified existing gaps in the scientific knowledge; 4) assessed the dose-response relationship of exposure to temperature extremes on human health in relatively homogeneous climate regions using different statistical models, such as parametric and non-parametric, contemporaneous and asynchronous, applied to the same data; 5) assessed seasonal peak timing and synchronization delay of the exposure and the disease within the framework of contemporaneous high frequency harmonic time series analysis and modification of the effect by the regional climate; 6) modeled using hyperbolic functional form non-linear properties of the effect of exposure to extreme temperature on human health. The proposed climate

  8. MODELLING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE AND LANDSCAPE PATTERNS OF LAND USE LAND COVER CLASSIFICATION USING MULTI LINEAR REGRESSION MODELS

    A. M. Bernales

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The threat of the ailments related to urbanization like heat stress is very prevalent. There are a lot of things that can be done to lessen the effect of urbanization to the surface temperature of the area like using green roofs or planting trees in the area. So land use really matters in both increasing and decreasing surface temperature. It is known that there is a relationship between land use land cover (LULC and land surface temperature (LST. Quantifying this relationship in terms of a mathematical model is very important so as to provide a way to predict LST based on the LULC alone. This study aims to examine the relationship between LST and LULC as well as to create a model that can predict LST using class-level spatial metrics from LULC. LST was derived from a Landsat 8 image and LULC classification was derived from LiDAR and Orthophoto datasets. Class-level spatial metrics were created in FRAGSTATS with the LULC and LST as inputs and these metrics were analysed using a statistical framework. Multi linear regression was done to create models that would predict LST for each class and it was found that the spatial metric “Effective mesh size” was a top predictor for LST in 6 out of 7 classes. The model created can still be refined by adding a temporal aspect by analysing the LST of another farming period (for rural areas and looking for common predictors between LSTs of these two different farming periods.

  9. Production in constant evolution

    Lozano, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant now has 25 years of operation behind it: a quarter century adding value and demonstrating the reasons why it is one of the most important energy producing facilities in the Spanish power market. Particularly noteworthy is the enterprising spirit of the plant, which has strived to continuously improve with the large number of modernization projects that it has undertaken over the past 25 years. The plant has constantly evolved thanks to the amount of investments made to improve safety and reliability and the perseverance to stay technologically up to date. Efficiency, training and teamwork have been key to the success of the plant over these 25 years of constant change and progress. (Author)

  10. Stabilized power constant alimentation

    Roussel, L.

    1968-06-01

    The study and realization of a stabilized power alimentation variable from 5 to 100 watts are described. In order to realize a constant power drift of Lithium compensated diodes, we have searched a 1 per cent precision of regulation and a response time minus than 1 sec. Recent components like Hall multiplicator and integrated amplifiers give this possibility and it is easy to use permutable circuits. (author) [fr

  11. On Solving Linear Recurrences

    Dobbs, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A direct method is given for solving first-order linear recurrences with constant coefficients. The limiting value of that solution is studied as "n to infinity." This classroom note could serve as enrichment material for the typical introductory course on discrete mathematics that follows a calculus course.

  12. Connecting Fundamental Constants

    Di Mario, D.

    2008-01-01

    A model for a black hole electron is built from three basic constants only: h, c and G. The result is a description of the electron with its mass and charge. The nature of this black hole seems to fit the properties of the Planck particle and new relationships among basic constants are possible. The time dilation factor in a black hole associated with a variable gravitational field would appear to us as a charge; on the other hand the Planck time is acting as a time gap drastically limiting what we are able to measure and its dimension will appear in some quantities. This is why the Planck time is numerically very close to the gravitational/electric force ratio in an electron: its difference, disregarding a π√(2) factor, is only 0.2%. This is not a coincidence, it is always the same particle and the small difference is between a rotating and a non-rotating particle. The determination of its rotational speed yields accurate numbers for many quantities, including the fine structure constant and the electron magnetic moment

  13. Linear mode conversion of Langmuir/z-mode waves to radiation: Scalings of conversion efficiencies and propagation angles with temperature and magnetic field orientation

    Schleyer, F.; Cairns, Iver H.; Kim, E.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Linear mode conversion (LMC) is the linear transfer of energy from one wave mode to another in an inhomogeneous plasma. It is relevant to laboratory plasmas and multiple solar system radio emissions, such as continuum radiation from planetary magnetospheres and type II and III radio bursts from the solar corona and solar wind. This paper simulates LMC of waves defined by warm, magnetized fluid theory, specifically the conversion of Langmuir/z-mode waves to electromagnetic (EM) radiation. The primary focus is the calculation of the energy and power conversion efficiencies for LMC as functions of the angle of incidence θ of the Langmuir/z-mode wave, temperature β=T e /m e c 2 , adiabatic index γ, and orientation angle φ between the ambient density gradient ∇N 0 and ambient magnetic field B 0 in a warm, unmagnetized plasma. The ratio of these efficiencies is found to agree well as a function of θ, γ, and β with an analytical relation that depends on the group speeds of the Langmuir/z and EM wave modes. The results demonstrate that the energy conversion efficiency ε is strongly dependent on γβ, φ and θ, with ε∝(γβ) 1/2 and θ∝(γβ) 1/2 . The power conversion efficiency ε p , on the other hand, is independent of γβ but does vary significantly with θ and φ. The efficiencies are shown to be maximum for approximately perpendicular density gradients (φ≈90°) and minimal for parallel orientation (φ=0°) and both the energy and power conversion efficiencies peak at the same θ.

  14. Linear algebra

    Shilov, Georgi E

    1977-01-01

    Covers determinants, linear spaces, systems of linear equations, linear functions of a vector argument, coordinate transformations, the canonical form of the matrix of a linear operator, bilinear and quadratic forms, Euclidean spaces, unitary spaces, quadratic forms in Euclidean and unitary spaces, finite-dimensional space. Problems with hints and answers.

  15. Sensitivity of Surface Temperature to Oceanic Forcing via q-Flux Green’s Function Experiments. Part I: Linear Response Function

    Liu, Fukai; Lu, Jian; Garuba, Oluwayemi A.; Leung, Lai-Yung; Luo, Yiyong; Wan, Xiuquan

    2018-05-01

    This paper explores the use of linear response function (LRF) to relate the mean sea surface temperature (SST) response to prescribed ocean heat convergence (q-flux) forcings. Two methods for constructing the LRF based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT) and Green’s function (GRF) are examined. A 900-year preindustrial simulation from the Community Earth System Model with a slab ocean (CESM-SOM) is used to estimate the LRF using FDT. For GRF, 106 pairs of CESM-SOM simulations with warm and cold q-flux patches are performed. FDT is found to have skill in estimating the SST response to a q-flux forcing when the local SST response is strong, but it fails in inverse estimation of the q-flux forcing for a given SST pattern. In contrast, GRF is shown to be reasonably accurate in estimating both SST response and q-flux forcing. Possible degradation in FDT may be attributed to insufficient data sampling, significant departures of the SST data from Gaussian, and the non-normality of the constructed operator. The accurately estimated GRF-based LRF is used to (i) generate a global surface temperature sensitivity map that shows the q-flux forcing in higher latitudes to be three to four times more effective than in low latitudes in producing global surface warming; (ii) identify the most excitable SST mode (neutral vector) resembling Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation; and (iii) estimate a time-invariant q-flux forcing needed for maintaining the GHG-induced SST warming pattern. The GRF experiments will be used to construct LRF for other variables to further explore climate sensitivities and feedbacks.

  16. The Hubble Constant

    Neal Jackson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H_0 values of around 72–74 km s^–1 Mpc^–1, with typical errors of 2–3 km s^–1 Mpc^–1. This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67–68 km s^–1 Mpc^–1 and typical errors of 1–2 km s^–1 Mpc^–1. The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  17. The inconstant solar constant

    Willson, R.C.; Hudson, H.

    1984-01-01

    The Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM) of the Solar Maximum Mission satellite measures the radiant power emitted by the sun in the direction of the earth and has worked flawlessly since 1980. The main motivation for ACRIM's use to measure the solar constant is the determination of the extent to which this quantity's variations affect earth weather and climate. Data from the solar minimum of 1986-1987 is eagerly anticipated, with a view to the possible presence of a solar cycle variation in addition to that caused directly by sunspots

  18. Estimation of irradiation temperature within the irradiation program Rheinsberg

    Stephan, I; Prokert, F; Scholz, A

    2003-01-01

    The temperature monitoring within the irradiation programme Rheinsberg II was performed by diamond powder monitors. The method bases on the effect of temperature on the irradiation-induced increase of the diamond lattice constant. The method is described by a Russian code. In order to determine the irradiation temperature, the lattice constant is measured by means of a X-ray diffractometer after irradiation and subsequent isochronic annealing. The kink of the linearized temperature-lattice constant curves provides a value for the irradiation temperature. It has to be corrected according to the local neutron flux. The results of the lattice constant measurements show strong scatter. Furthermore there is a systematic error. The results of temperature monitoring by diamond powder are not satisfying. The most probable value lays within 255 C and 265 C and is near the value estimated from the thermal condition of the irradiation experiments.

  19. Effect of Die Head Temperature at Compounding Stage on the Degradation of Linear Low Density Polyethylene/Plastic Film Waste Blends after Accelerated Weathering

    S. M. Al-Salem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated weathering test was performed on blends of linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE and plastic film waste constituting the following percentages of polyolefin polymers (wt.%: LLDPE (46%, low density polyethylene (LDPE, 51%, high density polyethylene (HDPE, 1%, and polypropylene (PP, 2%. Compounded blends were evaluated for their mechanical and physical (optical properties. The impact of photodegradation on the formulated blends was studied, and loss of mechanical integrity was apparent with respect to both the exposure duration to weathering and waste content. The effect of processing conditions, namely, the die head temperature (DHT of the blown-film assembly used, was investigated in this work. It was witnessed that surpassing the melting point of the blends constituting polymers did not always result in a synergistic behaviour between polymers. This was suspected to be due to the loss of amorphous region that polyolefin polymers get subjected to with UV exposure under weathering conditions and the effect of the plastic waste constituents. The total change in colour (ΔE did not change with respect to DHT or waste content due to rapid change degradation on the material’s surface. Haze (% and light transmission (% decreased with the increase in waste content which was attributed to lack of miscibility between constituting polymers.

  20. Non-linear effects in the Snoek relaxation of Nb-O

    Hermida, E.B.; Povolo, F.

    1996-01-01

    Internal friction peaks measured as a function of temperature or frequency have been associated to non-linear processes only after studying how the amplitude of the applied stress affects the relaxation process. Here it is demonstrated that the partial derivative of the internal friction with respect to the frequency at constant temperature is a useful tool to determine that non-linear effects are involved. This analysis applied to actual data of the Snoek relaxation in Nb-O, reveals that at high interstitial contents non-linear effects appear. (orig.)

  1. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS CONSTANT in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1966-09-05 to 1966-11-13 (NODC Accession 6600243)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS CONSTANT in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  2. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS CONSTANT in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1969-04-28 to 1969-05-09 (NODC Accession 6900939)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS CONSTANT in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  3. Rotational partition functions for linear molecules

    McDowell, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    An accurate closed-form expression for the rotational partition function of linear polyatomic molecules in 1 summation electronic states is derived, including the effect of nuclear spin (significant at very low temperatures) and of quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion terms (significant at moderate and high temperatures). The proper first-order quantum correction to the classical rigid-rotator partition function is shown to yield Q/sub r/ ≅β -1 exp(β/3), where βequivalenthcB/kT and B is the rotational constant in cm -1 ; for β≥0.2 additional power-series terms in β are necessary. Comparison between the results of this treatment and exact summations are made for HCN and C 2 H 2 at temperatures from 2 to 5000 K, including separate evaluation of the contributions of nuclear spin and centrifugal distortion

  4. Inflation with a constant rate of roll

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2015-01-01

    We consider an inflationary scenario where the rate of inflaton roll defined by ·· φ/H φ-dot remains constant. The rate of roll is small for slow-roll inflation, while a generic rate of roll leads to the interesting case of 'constant-roll' inflation. We find a general exact solution for the inflaton potential required for such inflaton behaviour. In this model, due to non-slow evolution of background, the would-be decaying mode of linear scalar (curvature) perturbations may not be neglected. It can even grow for some values of the model parameter, while the other mode always remains constant. However, this always occurs for unstable solutions which are not attractors for the given potential. The most interesting particular cases of constant-roll inflation remaining viable with the most recent observational data are quadratic hilltop inflation (with cutoff) and natural inflation (with an additional negative cosmological constant). In these cases even-order slow-roll parameters approach non-negligible constants while the odd ones are asymptotically vanishing in the quasi-de Sitter regime

  5. Asymptotics with a positive cosmological constant II

    Kesavan, Aruna; Ashtekar, Abhay; Bonga, Beatrice

    2015-04-01

    The study of isolated systems has been vastly successful in the context of vanishing cosmological constant, Λ = 0 . However, there is no physically useful notion of asymptotics for the universe we inhabit with Λ > 0 . This means that presently there is no fundamental understanding of gravitational waves in our own universe. The full non-linear framework is still under development, but some interesting results at the linearized level have been obtained. In particular, I will discuss the quadrupole formula for gravitational radiation and its implications.

  6. Linear methods in band theory

    Andersen, O. Krogh

    1975-01-01

    of Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker, linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals, and cellular methods; the secular matrix is linear in energy, the overlap integrals factorize as potential parameters and structure constants, the latter are canonical in the sense that they neither depend on the energy nor the cell volume...

  7. Effects of quantum entropy on bag constant

    Miller, D.E.; Tawfik, A.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of quantum entropy on the bag constant are studied at low temperatures and for small chemical potentials. The inclusion of the quantum entropy of the quarks in the equation of state provides the hadronic bag with an additional heat which causes a decrease in the effective latent heat inside the bag. We have considered two types of baryonic bags, Δ and Ω - . In both cases we have found that the bag constant without the quantum entropy almost does not change with temperature and quark chemical potential. The contribution from the quantum entropy to the equation of state clearly decreases the value of the bag constant. Furthermore, we construct states densities for quarks using the 'Thomas Fermi model' and take into consideration a thermal potential for the interaction. (author)

  8. Arrhenius Rate: constant volume burn

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-06

    A constant volume burn occurs for an idealized initial state in which a large volume of reactants at rest is suddenly raised to a high temperature and begins to burn. Due to the uniform spatial state, there is no fluid motion and no heat conduction. This reduces the time evolu tion to an ODE for the reaction progress variable. With an Arrhenius reaction rate, two characteristics of thermal ignition are illustrated: induction time and thermal runaway. The Frank-Kamenetskii approximation then leads to a simple expression for the adiabatic induction time. For a first order reaction, the analytic solution is derived and used to illustrate the effect of varying the activation temperature; in particular, on the induction time. In general, the ODE can be solved numerically. This is used to illustrate the effect of varying the reaction order. We note that for a first order reaction, the time evolution of the reaction progress variable has an exponential tail. In contrast, for a reaction order less than one, the reaction completes in a nite time. The reaction order also affects the induction time.

  9. Potential constants and centrifugal distortion constants of octahedral hexafluoride molecules

    Manivannan, G [Government Thirumagal Mill' s Coll., Gudiyattam, Tamil Nadu (India)

    1981-04-01

    The kinetic constants method outlined by Thirugnanasambandham (1964) based on Wilson's (1955) group theory has been adapted in evaluating the potential constants for SF/sub 6/, SeF/sub 6/, WF/sub 6/, IrF/sub 6/, UF/sub 6/, NpF/sub 6/, and PuF/sub 6/ using the experimentally observed vibrational frequency data. These constants are used to calculate the centrifugal distortion constants for the first time.

  10. The cold effect of ambient temperature on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke hospital admissions: A large database study in Beijing, China between years 2013 and 2014-Utilizing a distributed lag non-linear analysis.

    Luo, Yanxia; Li, Haibin; Huang, Fangfang; Van Halm-Lutterodt, Nicholas; Qin Xu; Wang, Anxin; Guo, Jin; Tao, Lixin; Li, Xia; Liu, Mengyang; Zheng, Deqiang; Chen, Sipeng; Zhang, Feng; Yang, Xinghua; Tan, Peng; Wang, Wei; Xie, Xueqin; Guo, Xiuhua

    2018-01-01

    The effects of ambient temperature on stroke death in China have been well addressed. However, few studies are focused on the attributable burden for the incident of different types of stroke due to ambient temperature, especially in Beijing, China. We purpose to assess the influence of ambient temperature on hospital stroke admissions in Beijing, China. Data on daily temperature, air pollution, and relative humidity measurements and stroke admissions in Beijing were obtained between 2013 and 2014. Distributed lag non-linear model was employed to determine the association between daily ambient temperature and stroke admissions. Relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) and Attribution fraction (AF) with 95% CI were calculated based on stroke subtype, gender and age group. A total number of 147, 624 stroke admitted cases (including hemorrhagic and ischemic types of stroke) were documented. A non-linear acute effect of cold temperature on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke hospital admissions was evaluated. Compared with the 25th percentile of temperature (1.2 °C), the cumulative RR of extreme cold temperature (first percentile of temperature, -9.6 °C) was 1.51 (95% CI: 1.08-2.10) over lag 0-14 days for ischemic type and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.03-1.59) for hemorrhagic stroke over lag 0-3 days. Overall, 1.57% (95% CI: 0.06%-2.88%) of ischemic stroke and 1.90% (95% CI: 0.40%-3.41%) of hemorrhagic stroke was attributed to the extreme cold temperature over lag 0-7 days and lag 0-3 days, respectively. The cold temperature's impact on stroke admissions was found to be more obvious in male gender and the youth compared to female gender and the elderly. Exposure to extreme cold temperature is associated with increasing both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke admissions in Beijing, China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chandra Independently Determines Hubble Constant

    2006-08-01

    light years from Earth. These results do not rely on the traditional distance ladder. Bonamente and his colleagues find the Hubble constant to be 77 kilometers per second per megaparsec (a megaparsec is equal to 3.26 million light years), with an uncertainty of about 15%. This result agrees with the values determined using other techniques. The Hubble constant had previously been found to be 72, give or take 8, kilometers per second per megaparsec based on Hubble Space Telescope observations. The new Chandra result is important because it offers the independent confirmation that scientists have been seeking and fixes the age of the Universe between 12 and 14 billion years. Chandra X-ray Image of CL J1226.9+3332 Chandra X-ray Image of CL J1226.9+3332 "These new results are entirely independent of all previous methods of measuring the Hubble constant," said team member Marshall Joy also of MSFC. The astronomers used a phenomenon known as the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, where photons in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) interact with electrons in the hot gas that pervades the enormous galaxy clusters. The photons acquire energy from this interaction, which distorts the signal from the microwave background in the direction of the clusters. The magnitude of this distortion depends on the density and temperature of the hot electrons and the physical size of the cluster. Using radio telescopes to measure the distortion of the microwave background and Chandra to measure the properties of the hot gas, the physical size of the cluster can be determined. From this physical size and a simple measurement of the angle subtended by the cluster, the rules of geometry can be used to derive its distance. The Hubble constant is determined by dividing previously measured cluster speeds by these newly derived distances. Chandra X-ray Image of Abell 1689 Chandra X-ray Image of Abell 1689 This project was championed by Chandra's telescope mirror designer, Leon Van Speybroeck, who passed

  12. Linear gate

    Suwono.

    1978-01-01

    A linear gate providing a variable gate duration from 0,40μsec to 4μsec was developed. The electronic circuity consists of a linear circuit and an enable circuit. The input signal can be either unipolar or bipolar. If the input signal is bipolar, the negative portion will be filtered. The operation of the linear gate is controlled by the application of a positive enable pulse. (author)

  13. Linear Accelerators

    Vretenar, M

    2014-01-01

    The main features of radio-frequency linear accelerators are introduced, reviewing the different types of accelerating structures and presenting the main characteristics aspects of linac beam dynamics

  14. Oxidative kinetics of amino acids by peroxydisulfate: Effect of dielectric constant

    Khalid, Mohammad A. A.

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of alanine, asparagines, cysteine, glutamic acid, lysine, phenylalanine and serine by peroxydisulfate ion have been studied in aqueous acidic (sulfuric acid) medium at the temperature range 60-80C. The rate shows first order dependence on peroxydisulfate concentration and zero order dependence on amino acid concentration. The rate law observed is: -d [S2O82-] /dt = Kobs [S2O82-] [amino acid]0. An autocatalytic effect has been observed in amino acids oxidation due to formation of Schiff's base between the formed aldehyde and parent amino acid. A decrease in the dielectric constant of the medium-adding acetic acid (5-15% v/v) results in a decrease in the rate in all cases studied. Reactions were carried out at different temperature (60-80C) and the thermodynamics parameters have been calculated. The logarithm of the rate constant is linearly interrelated to the square root of the ionic strength. (author)

  15. Beyond the Hubble Constant

    1995-08-01

    about the distances to galaxies and thereby about the expansion rate of the Universe. A simple way to determine the distance to a remote galaxy is by measuring its redshift, calculate its velocity from the redshift and divide this by the Hubble constant, H0. For instance, the measured redshift of the parent galaxy of SN 1995K (0.478) yields a velocity of 116,000 km/sec, somewhat more than one-third of the speed of light (300,000 km/sec). From the universal expansion rate, described by the Hubble constant (H0 = 20 km/sec per million lightyears as found by some studies), this velocity would indicate a distance to the supernova and its parent galaxy of about 5,800 million lightyears. The explosion of the supernova would thus have taken place 5,800 million years ago, i.e. about 1,000 million years before the solar system was formed. However, such a simple calculation works only for relatively ``nearby'' objects, perhaps out to some hundred million lightyears. When we look much further into space, we also look far back in time and it is not excluded that the universal expansion rate, i.e. the Hubble constant, may have been different at earlier epochs. This means that unless we know the change of the Hubble constant with time, we cannot determine reliable distances of distant galaxies from their measured redshifts and velocities. At the same time, knowledge about such change or lack of the same will provide unique information about the time elapsed since the Universe began to expand (the ``Big Bang''), that is, the age of the Universe and also its ultimate fate. The Deceleration Parameter q0 Cosmologists are therefore eager to determine not only the current expansion rate (i.e., the Hubble constant, H0) but also its possible change with time (known as the deceleration parameter, q0). Although a highly accurate value of H0 has still not become available, increasing attention is now given to the observational determination of the second parameter, cf. also the Appendix at the

  16. Linearization Method and Linear Complexity

    Tanaka, Hidema

    We focus on the relationship between the linearization method and linear complexity and show that the linearization method is another effective technique for calculating linear complexity. We analyze its effectiveness by comparing with the logic circuit method. We compare the relevant conditions and necessary computational cost with those of the Berlekamp-Massey algorithm and the Games-Chan algorithm. The significant property of a linearization method is that it needs no output sequence from a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) because it calculates linear complexity using the algebraic expression of its algorithm. When a PRNG has n [bit] stages (registers or internal states), the necessary computational cost is smaller than O(2n). On the other hand, the Berlekamp-Massey algorithm needs O(N2) where N(≅2n) denotes period. Since existing methods calculate using the output sequence, an initial value of PRNG influences a resultant value of linear complexity. Therefore, a linear complexity is generally given as an estimate value. On the other hand, a linearization method calculates from an algorithm of PRNG, it can determine the lower bound of linear complexity.

  17. Association constants of telluronium salts

    Kovach, N.A.; Rivkin, B.B.; Sadekov, T.D.; Shvajka, O.P.

    1996-01-01

    Association constants in acetonitrile of triphenyl telluronium salts, which are dilute electrolytes, are determined through the conductometry method. Satisfactory correlation dependence of constants of interion association and threshold molar electroconductivity on the Litvinenko-Popov constants for depositing groups is identified. 6 refs

  18. Anisotropic constant-roll inflation

    Ito, Asuka; Soda, Jiro [Kobe University, Department of Physics, Kobe (Japan)

    2018-01-15

    We study constant-roll inflation in the presence of a gauge field coupled to an inflaton. By imposing the constant anisotropy condition, we find new exact anisotropic constant-roll inflationary solutions which include anisotropic power-law inflation as a special case. We also numerically show that the new anisotropic solutions are attractors in the phase space. (orig.)

  19. Quintessence and the cosmological constant

    Doran, M.; Wetterich, C.

    2003-01-01

    Quintessence -- the energy density of a slowly evolving scalar field -- may constitute a dynamical form of the homogeneous dark energy in the universe. We review the basic idea in the light of the cosmological constant problem. Cosmological observations or a time variation of fundamental 'constants' can distinguish quintessence from a cosmological constant

  20. Linear algebra

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2017-01-01

    This self-contained, clearly written textbook on linear algebra is easily accessible for students. It begins with the simple linear equation and generalizes several notions from this equation for the system of linear equations and introduces the main ideas using matrices. It then offers a detailed chapter on determinants and introduces the main ideas with detailed proofs. The third chapter introduces the Euclidean spaces using very simple geometric ideas and discusses various major inequalities and identities. These ideas offer a solid basis for understanding general Hilbert spaces in functional analysis. The following two chapters address general vector spaces, including some rigorous proofs to all the main results, and linear transformation: areas that are ignored or are poorly explained in many textbooks. Chapter 6 introduces the idea of matrices using linear transformation, which is easier to understand than the usual theory of matrices approach. The final two chapters are more advanced, introducing t...

  1. SIGMA1-2007, Doppler Broadening ENDF Format Linear-Linear. Interpolated Point Cross Section

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: SIGMA-1 Doppler broadens evaluated Cross sections given in the linear-linear interpolation form of the ENDF/B Format to one final temperature. The data is Doppler broadened, thinned, and output in the ENDF/B Format. IAEA0854/15: This version include the updates up to January 30, 2007. Changes in ENDF/B-VII Format and procedures, as well as the evaluations themselves, make it impossible for versions of the ENDF/B pre-processing codes earlier than PREPRO 2007 (2007 Version) to accurately process current ENDF/B-VII evaluations. The present code can handle all existing ENDF/B-VI evaluations through release 8, which will be the last release of ENDF/B-VI. 2 - Modifications from previous versions: Sigma-1 VERS. 2007-1 (Jan. 2007): checked against all ENDF/B-VII; increased page size from 60,000 to 360,000 energy points 3 - Method of solution: The energy grid is selected to ensure that the broadened data is linear-linear interpolable. SIGMA-1 starts from the free-atom Doppler broadening equations and adds the assumptions of linear data within the table and constant data outside the range of the table. If the Original data is not at zero Kelvin, the data is broadened by the effective temperature difference to the final temperature. If the data is already at a temperature higher than the final temperature, Doppler broadening is not performed. 4 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The input to SIGMA-1 must be data which vary linearly in energy and cross section between tabulated points. The LINEAR program provides such data. LINEAR uses only the ENDF/B BCD Format tape and copies all sections except File 3 as read. Since File 3 data are in identical Format for ENDF/B Versions I through VI, the program can be used with all these versions. - The present version Doppler broadens only to one final temperature

  2. Linear algebra

    Stoll, R R

    1968-01-01

    Linear Algebra is intended to be used as a text for a one-semester course in linear algebra at the undergraduate level. The treatment of the subject will be both useful to students of mathematics and those interested primarily in applications of the theory. The major prerequisite for mastering the material is the readiness of the student to reason abstractly. Specifically, this calls for an understanding of the fact that axioms are assumptions and that theorems are logical consequences of one or more axioms. Familiarity with calculus and linear differential equations is required for understand

  3. Linear programming

    Solow, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This text covers the basic theory and computation for a first course in linear programming, including substantial material on mathematical proof techniques and sophisticated computation methods. Includes Appendix on using Excel. 1984 edition.

  4. Linear algebra

    Liesen, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    This self-contained textbook takes a matrix-oriented approach to linear algebra and presents a complete theory, including all details and proofs, culminating in the Jordan canonical form and its proof. Throughout the development, the applicability of the results is highlighted. Additionally, the book presents special topics from applied linear algebra including matrix functions, the singular value decomposition, the Kronecker product and linear matrix equations. The matrix-oriented approach to linear algebra leads to a better intuition and a deeper understanding of the abstract concepts, and therefore simplifies their use in real world applications. Some of these applications are presented in detailed examples. In several ‘MATLAB-Minutes’ students can comprehend the concepts and results using computational experiments. Necessary basics for the use of MATLAB are presented in a short introduction. Students can also actively work with the material and practice their mathematical skills in more than 300 exerc...

  5. Linear algebra

    Berberian, Sterling K

    2014-01-01

    Introductory treatment covers basic theory of vector spaces and linear maps - dimension, determinants, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors - plus more advanced topics such as the study of canonical forms for matrices. 1992 edition.

  6. Linear Models

    Searle, Shayle R

    2012-01-01

    This 1971 classic on linear models is once again available--as a Wiley Classics Library Edition. It features material that can be understood by any statistician who understands matrix algebra and basic statistical methods.

  7. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  8. TIMTEM - a digital program for the calculation of two-dimensional, non-linear temperature fields of reactor components of complex structure taking into account inhomogeneity and anisotropy

    Simon-Weidner, J.

    1975-05-01

    The digital program TIMTEM calculates twodimensional, nonlinear temperature fields of reactor components of complex structure; inhomogeneity and anisotropy are taken into account. Systems consisting of different materials and therefore having different temperature- and/or time-dependent material characteristics are allowed. Various local, time- and/or temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be considered, too, which may be locally different from each other or can be interconnected. (orig.) [de

  9. The relationship between brightness temperature and soil moisture. Selection of frequency range for microwave remote sensing

    Rao, K.S.; Chandra, G.; Rao, P.V.N.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of brightness temperature data acquired from field and aircraft experiments demonstrates a linear relationship between soil moisture and brightness temperature. However, the analysis of brightness temperature data acquired by the Skylab radiometer demonstrates a non-linear relationship between soil moisture and brightness temperature. In view of the above and also because of recent theoretical developments for the calculation of the dielectric constant and brightness temperature under varying soil moisture profile conditions, an attempt is made to study the theoretical relationship between brightness temperature and soil moisture as a function of frequency. Through the above analysis, the appropriate microwave frequency range for soil moisture studies is recommended

  10. The application of rational approximation in the calculation of a temperature field with a non-linear surface heat-transfer coefficient during quenching for 42CrMo steel cylinder

    Cheng, Heming; Huang, Xieqing; Fan, Jiang; Wang, Honggang

    1999-10-01

    The calculation of a temperature field has a great influence upon the analysis of thermal stresses and stains during quenching. In this paper, a 42CrMo steel cylinder was used an example for investigation. From the TTT diagram of the 42CrMo steel, the CCT diagram was simulated by mathematical transformation, and the volume fraction of phase constituents was calculated. The thermal physical properties were treated as functions of temperature and the volume fraction of phase constituents. The rational approximation was applied to the finite element method. The temperature field with phase transformation and non-linear surface heat-transfer coefficients was calculated using this technique, which can effectively avoid oscillationin the numerical solution for a small time step. The experimental results of the temperature field calculation coincide with the numerical solutions.

  11. Elongational flow of polymer melts at constant strain rate, constant stress and constant force

    Wagner, Manfred H.; Rolón-Garrido, Víctor H.

    2013-04-01

    Characterization of polymer melts in elongational flow is typically performed at constant elongational rate or rarely at constant tensile stress conditions. One of the disadvantages of these deformation modes is that they are hampered by the onset of "necking" instabilities according to the Considère criterion. Experiments at constant tensile force have been performed even more rarely, in spite of the fact that this deformation mode is free from necking instabilities and is of considerable industrial relevance as it is the correct analogue of steady fiber spinning. It is the objective of the present contribution to present for the first time a full experimental characterization of a long-chain branched polyethylene melt in elongational flow. Experiments were performed at constant elongation rate, constant tensile stress and constant tensile force by use of a Sentmanat Extensional Rheometer (SER) in combination with an Anton Paar MCR301 rotational rheometer. The accessible experimental window and experimental limitations are discussed. The experimental data are modelled by using the Wagner I model. Predictions of the steady-start elongational viscosity in constant strain rate and creep experiments are found to be identical, albeit only by extrapolation of the experimental data to Hencky strains of the order of 6. For constant stress experiments, a minimum in the strain rate and a corresponding maximum in the elongational viscosity is found at a Hencky strain of the order of 3, which, although larger than the steady-state value, follows roughly the general trend of the steady-state elongational viscosity. The constitutive analysis also reveals that constant tensile force experiments indicate a larger strain hardening potential than seen in constant elongation rate or constant tensile stress experiments. This may be indicative of the effect of necking under constant elongation rate or constant tensile stress conditions according to the Considère criterion.

  12. Inflation with a smooth constant-roll to constant-roll era transition

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we study canonical scalar field models, with a varying second slow-roll parameter, that allow transitions between constant-roll eras. In the models with two constant-roll eras, it is possible to avoid fine-tunings in the initial conditions of the scalar field. We mainly focus on the stability of the resulting solutions, and we also investigate if these solutions are attractors of the cosmological system. We shall calculate the resulting scalar potential and, by using a numerical approach, we examine the stability and attractor properties of the solutions. As we show, the first constant-roll era is dynamically unstable towards linear perturbations, and the cosmological system is driven by the attractor solution to the final constant-roll era. As we demonstrate, it is possible to have a nearly scale-invariant power spectrum of primordial curvature perturbations in some cases; however, this is strongly model dependent and depends on the rate of the final constant-roll era. Finally, we present, in brief, the essential features of a model that allows oscillations between constant-roll eras.

  13. Piezooptical constants of Rochelle salt crystals

    V.Yo. Stadnyk; M.O. Romanyuk; V.Yu. Kurlyak; V.F.Vachulovych

    2000-01-01

    The influence of uniaxial mechanical pressure applied along the principal axes and the corresponding bisectors on the birefringent properties of Rochelle salt (RS) crystals are studied. The temperature (77-300 K) and spectral (300-700 nm) dependencies of the effective and absolute piezooptical constants of the RS crystals are calculated. The intercept of dispersion curves of is revealed in the region of the birefringence sign inversion. This testifies that the anizotropy of the piezooptical ...

  14. Simulated annealing with constant thermodynamic speed

    Salamon, P.; Ruppeiner, G.; Liao, L.; Pedersen, J.

    1987-01-01

    Arguments are presented to the effect that the optimal annealing schedule for simulated annealing proceeds with constant thermodynamic speed, i.e., with dT/dt = -(v T)/(ε-√C), where T is the temperature, ε- is the relaxation time, C ist the heat capacity, t is the time, and v is the thermodynamic speed. Experimental results consistent with this conjecture are presented from simulated annealing on graph partitioning problems. (orig.)

  15. Temperature effects on the immature development time of Culex eduardoi Casal and Garcia (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Loetti, V.; Schweigmann, N.J.; Burroni, N.E., E-mail: nburroni@ege.fcen.uba.a [Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Grupo de Estudio de Mosquitos

    2011-01-15

    The effect of constant temperatures on the development time from first instar to adult emergence was studied in Culex eduardoi Casal and Garcia reared at 7, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 or 33 deg C. Data were adjusted to the linear degree-day model and the nonlinear Briere model. According to the linear model, the development time was inversely related to the rearing temperatures between 7 deg C and 25 deg C. Maximum mortality (100%) was recorded at temperatures > 30 deg C. According to the linear model, the development threshold temperature and thermal constant were 5.7 deg C and 188.8 degree days, respectively. The lower and upper threshold temperatures and the optimum temperature for the nonlinear model were -2.3, 30.0 and 28.1 deg C, respectively. (author)

  16. Linear regression

    Olive, David J

    2017-01-01

    This text covers both multiple linear regression and some experimental design models. The text uses the response plot to visualize the model and to detect outliers, does not assume that the error distribution has a known parametric distribution, develops prediction intervals that work when the error distribution is unknown, suggests bootstrap hypothesis tests that may be useful for inference after variable selection, and develops prediction regions and large sample theory for the multivariate linear regression model that has m response variables. A relationship between multivariate prediction regions and confidence regions provides a simple way to bootstrap confidence regions. These confidence regions often provide a practical method for testing hypotheses. There is also a chapter on generalized linear models and generalized additive models. There are many R functions to produce response and residual plots, to simulate prediction intervals and hypothesis tests, to detect outliers, and to choose response trans...

  17. Linear Colliders

    Alcaraz, J.

    2001-01-01

    After several years of study e''+ e''- linear colliders in the TeV range have emerged as the major and optimal high-energy physics projects for the post-LHC era. These notes summarize the present status form the main accelerator and detector features to their physics potential. The LHC era. These notes summarize the present status, from the main accelerator and detector features to their physics potential. The LHC is expected to provide first discoveries in the new energy domain, whereas an e''+ e''- linear collider in the 500 GeV-1 TeV will be able to complement it to an unprecedented level of precision in any possible areas: Higgs, signals beyond the SM and electroweak measurements. It is evident that the Linear Collider program will constitute a major step in the understanding of the nature of the new physics beyond the Standard Model. (Author) 22 refs

  18. Linear algebra

    Edwards, Harold M

    1995-01-01

    In his new undergraduate textbook, Harold M Edwards proposes a radically new and thoroughly algorithmic approach to linear algebra Originally inspired by the constructive philosophy of mathematics championed in the 19th century by Leopold Kronecker, the approach is well suited to students in the computer-dominated late 20th century Each proof is an algorithm described in English that can be translated into the computer language the class is using and put to work solving problems and generating new examples, making the study of linear algebra a truly interactive experience Designed for a one-semester course, this text adopts an algorithmic approach to linear algebra giving the student many examples to work through and copious exercises to test their skills and extend their knowledge of the subject Students at all levels will find much interactive instruction in this text while teachers will find stimulating examples and methods of approach to the subject

  19. Dielectric Constant Measurements of Solid 4He

    Yin, L.; Xia, J. S.; Huan, C.; Sullivan, N. S.; Chan, M. H. W.

    2011-03-01

    Careful measurements of the dielectric properties of solid 4He have been carried out down to 35 mK, considerably lower than the temperature range of previous studies. The sample was prepared from high purity gas with 3He concentrations of the order of 200 ppb and were formed by the blocked capillary method. The molar volume of the sample was 20.30 cm3. The dielectric constant of the samples was found to be independent of temperature down to 120 mK before showing a continuous increase with decreasing temperature and saturating below 50 mK. The total increase in ɛ is 2 parts in 10-5. The temperature dependence of ɛ mimics the increase in the resonant frequency found in the torsional oscillator studies and also the increase found in the shear modulus measurements.

  20. Spectrophotometric determination of association constant

    2016-01-01

    Least-squares 'Systematic Trial-and-Error Procedure' (STEP) for spectrophotometric evaluation of association constant (equilibrium constant) K and molar absorption coefficient E for a 1:1 molecular complex, A + B = C, with error analysis according to Conrow et al. (1964). An analysis of the Charge...

  1. A non-linear model for temperature-dependent sporulation and T-2 and HT-2 production of Fusarium langsethiae and Fusarium sporotrichioides.

    Nazari, Leyla; Manstretta, Valentina; Rossi, Vittorio

    2016-04-01

    This research has produced new quantitative data on the sporulation and T-2+HT-2 toxin production that could be further integrated to develop a comprehensive disease or toxin prediction model for Fusarium langsethiae and Fusarium sporotrichioides. Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of temperature or incubation time on sporulation and the effect of temperature on T-2+HT-2 toxin production of strains of the two species. F. sporotrichioides demonstrated a preference for higher temperatures than F. langsethiae during sporulation; the optimum temperature was 24.5 ± 0.7 °C for F. langsethiae and 32.3 ± 2.1 °C for F. sporotrichioides, according to the Beta equation fitted to the data. The dynamics of sporulation over different incubation times were fitted by a Gompertz function. The maximum spore production was estimated to be after 18 and 8 d incubation at optimum temperatures for F. langsethiae and F. sporotrichioides, respectively. F. sporotrichioides produced more T-2+HT-2 than F. langsethiae. The best fit of the effect of temperature on T-2+HT-2 production in wheat grains was obtained with a Beta equation showing an optimum temperature of 14.7 ± 0.8 °C for F. langsethiae and 12.1 ± 0.2 °C for F. sporotrichioides. The optimum temperature for mycotoxin production was lower than for sporulation. Copyright © 2016 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Constant rate natural gas production from a well in a hydrate reservoir

    Ji Chuang; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2003-01-01

    Using a computational model, production of natural gas at a constant rate from a well that is drilled into a confined methane hydrate reservoir is studied. It is assumed that the pores in the reservoir are partially saturated with hydrate. A linearized model for an axisymmetric condition with a fixed well output is used in the analysis. For different reservoir temperatures and various well outputs, time evolutions of temperature and pressure profiles, as well as the gas flow rate in the hydrate zone and the gas region, are evaluated. The distance of the decomposition front from the well as a function of time is also computed. It is shown that to maintain a constant natural gas production rate, the well pressure must be decreased with time. A constant low production rate can be sustained for a long duration of time, but a high production rate demands unrealistically low pressure at the well after a relatively short production time. The simulation results show that the process of natural gas production in a hydrate reservoir is a sensitive function of reservoir temperature and hydrate zone permeability

  3. Elastic constants of diamond from molecular dynamics simulations

    Gao Guangtu; Van Workum, Kevin; Schall, J David; Harrison, Judith A

    2006-01-01

    The elastic constants of diamond between 100 and 1100 K have been calculated for the first time using molecular dynamics and the second-generation, reactive empirical bond-order potential (REBO). This version of the REBO potential was used because it was redesigned to be able to model the elastic properties of diamond and graphite at 0 K while maintaining its original capabilities. The independent elastic constants of diamond, C 11 , C 12 , and C 44 , and the bulk modulus were all calculated as a function of temperature, and the results from the three different methods are in excellent agreement. By extrapolating the elastic constant data to 0 K, it is clear that the values obtained here agree with the previously calculated 0 K elastic constants. Because the second-generation REBO potential was fit to obtain better solid-state force constants for diamond and graphite, the agreement with the 0 K elastic constants is not surprising. In addition, the functional form of the second-generation REBO potential is able to qualitatively model the functional dependence of the elastic constants and bulk modulus of diamond at non-zero temperatures. In contrast, reactive potentials based on other functional forms do not reproduce the correct temperature dependence of the elastic constants. The second-generation REBO potential also correctly predicts that diamond has a negative Cauchy pressure in the temperature range examined

  4. Measurement of Henry’s Law constant and infinite dilution activity coefficient of isopropyl mercaptan and isobutyl mercaptan in (methyldiethanolamine (1) + water (2)) with w_1 = 0.25 and 0.50 at temperature of (298 to 348) K using inert gas stripping method

    Zin, Rohani Mohd; Coquelet, Christophe; Valtz, Alain; Abdul Mutalib, Mohamed I.; Sabil, Khalik Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Measurement of Henry’s Law constants of nPM, iPM, nBM and iBM in aqueous MDEA. • Measurement of infinite dilution activity coefficients of nPM, iPM, nBM and iBM in aqueous MDEA. • Measurement using gas stripping method for T = (298 to 348) K and MDEA solution of (25 and 50) wt%. • Limiting activity coefficient and Henry’s Law constant is increasing with solute molecular size. • The experimental technique has provided information about heats of solution of aqueous MDEA. - Abstract: In this study, the Henry’s Law constant and the activity coefficients in infinite dilution in a mass fraction of (25 and 50)% of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) aqueous solution within the temperature range of (298 to 348) K at atmospheric pressure, were measured. An inert gas stripping method was used to perform all the measurements. The new values of Henry’s Law constant and the activity coefficients in infinite dilution correlation with solute molecular size were explained. The influence of the solvent is discussed taking into consideration the heat of absorptions for different MDEA concentrations. Experimental results are compared to literature data wherever available.

  5. On the second-order temperature jump coefficient of a dilute gas

    Radtke, Gregg A.; Hadjiconstantinou, N. G.; Takata, S.; Aoki, K.

    2012-09-01

    We use LVDSMC simulations to calculate the second-order temperature jump coefficient for a dilute gas whose temperature is governed by the Poisson equation with a constant forcing term. Both the hard sphere gas and the BGK model of the Boltzmann equation are considered. Our results show that the temperature jump coefficient is different from the well known linear and steady case where the temperature is governed by the homogeneous heat conduction (Laplace) equation.

  6. Linear programming

    Karloff, Howard

    1991-01-01

    To this reviewer’s knowledge, this is the first book accessible to the upper division undergraduate or beginning graduate student that surveys linear programming from the Simplex Method…via the Ellipsoid algorithm to Karmarkar’s algorithm. Moreover, its point of view is algorithmic and thus it provides both a history and a case history of work in complexity theory. The presentation is admirable; Karloff's style is informal (even humorous at times) without sacrificing anything necessary for understanding. Diagrams (including horizontal brackets that group terms) aid in providing clarity. The end-of-chapter notes are helpful...Recommended highly for acquisition, since it is not only a textbook, but can also be used for independent reading and study. —Choice Reviews The reader will be well served by reading the monograph from cover to cover. The author succeeds in providing a concise, readable, understandable introduction to modern linear programming. —Mathematics of Computing This is a textbook intend...

  7. Relationship between thermal expansion coefficient and glass transition temperature in metallic glasses

    Kato, H.; Chen, H.-S.; Inoue, A.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficients of 13 metallic glasses were measured using a thermo-mechanical analyser. A unique correlation was found between the linear thermal expansion coefficient and the glass transition temperature-their product is nearly constant ∼8.24 x 10 -3 . If one assumes the Debye expression for thermal activation, the total linear thermal expansion up to glass transition temperature (T g ) is reduced to 6 x 10 -3 , nearly 25% of that at the fusion of pure metals

  8. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    Jean-Philippe Uzan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  9. Directivity of basic linear arrays

    Bach, Henning

    1970-01-01

    For a linear uniform array ofnelements, an expression is derived for the directivity as a function of the spacing and the phase constants. The cases of isotropic elements, collinear short dipoles, and parallel short dipoles are included. The formula obtained is discussed in some detail and contour...

  10. Numerical solution of non-linear dual-phase-lag bioheat transfer equation within skin tissues.

    Kumar, Dinesh; Kumar, P; Rai, K N

    2017-11-01

    This paper deals with numerical modeling and simulation of heat transfer in skin tissues using non-linear dual-phase-lag (DPL) bioheat transfer model under periodic heat flux boundary condition. The blood perfusion is assumed temperature-dependent which results in non-linear DPL bioheat transfer model in order to predict more accurate results. A numerical method of line which is based on finite difference and Runge-Kutta (4,5) schemes, is used to solve the present non-linear problem. Under specific case, the exact solution has been obtained and compared with the present numerical scheme, and we found that those are in good agreement. A comparison based on model selection criterion (AIC) has been made among non-linear DPL models when the variation of blood perfusion rate with temperature is of constant, linear and exponential type with the experimental data and it has been found that non-linear DPL model with exponential variation of blood perfusion rate is closest to the experimental data. In addition, it is found that due to absence of phase-lag phenomena in Pennes bioheat transfer model, it achieves steady state more quickly and always predict higher temperature than thermal and DPL non-linear models. The effect of coefficient of blood perfusion rate, dimensionless heating frequency and Kirchoff number on dimensionless temperature distribution has also been analyzed. The whole analysis is presented in dimensionless form. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Stabilized power constant alimentation; Alimentation regulee a puissance constante

    Roussel, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-01

    The study and realization of a stabilized power alimentation variable from 5 to 100 watts are described. In order to realize a constant power drift of Lithium compensated diodes, we have searched a 1 per cent precision of regulation and a response time minus than 1 sec. Recent components like Hall multiplicator and integrated amplifiers give this possibility and it is easy to use permutable circuits. (author) [French] On decrit l'etude et la realisation d'une alimentation a puissance constante reglable dans une gamme de 5 a 100 watts. Prevue pour le drift a puissance constante des diodes compensees au lithium, l'etude a ete menee en vue d'obtenir une precision de regulation de 1 pour cent et un temps de reponse inferieur a la seconde. Des systemes recents tels que multiplicateurs a effet Hall et circuits integres ont permis d'atteindre ce but tout en facilitant l'emploi de modules interchangeables. (auteur)

  12. From the Rydberg constant to the fundamental constants metrology

    Nez, F.

    2005-06-01

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author since the beginning of his scientific career. This document is dedicated to the spectroscopy of hydrogen, deuterium and helium atoms. The first part is divided into 6 sub-sections: 1) the principles of hydrogen spectroscopy, 2) the measurement of the 2S-nS/nD transitions, 3) other optical frequency measurements, 4) our contribution to the determination of the Rydberg constant, 5) our current experiment on the 1S-3S transition, 6) the spectroscopy of the muonic hydrogen. Our experiments have improved the accuracy of the Rydberg Constant by a factor 25 in 15 years and we have achieved the first absolute optical frequency measurement of a transition in hydrogen. The second part is dedicated to the measurement of the fine structure constant and the last part deals with helium spectroscopy and the search for optical references in the near infrared range. (A.C.)

  13. Effect on non-linear soil-structure interaction due to base slab uplift on the seismic response of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Short, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    In high seismic regions it has often been the practice to use oversized base slabs for the major nuclear power plant structures in order to prevent, or at least minimize the amount of dynamic base slab uplift which will result from the overturning moments developed during seismic ground motion. Two major reasons have been expressed as to why dynamic base slab uplift should be minimized: (1) As nuclear power plants are normally designed for seismic loadings based upon linear analysis, and since soil-structure interaction becomes nonlinear when only a portion of the base slab is in contact with the soil, linear elasticity analysis may be acceptable if base slab uplift occurs (as the resultant design loads may be incorrect), and (2) substantial uplift could cause excessive toe pressures in the supporting soil and significant impact forces when the slab recontacts the soil. The primary purpose of this paper is to evaluate the importance of the nonlinear soil-structure interaction effects resulting from substantial base slab uplift occurring during a seismic excitation. The structure for this investigation consisted of the containment building and prestressed reactor vessel (PCRV) for a typical HTGR plant. A simplified dynamic mathematical model was utilized consisting of a conventional lumped mass structure with soil-structure interaction accounted for by translational and rotational springs whose properties are determined by elastic half space theory. Three different site soil conditions (a rock site, a moderately stiff soil, and a soft soil) and two levels of horizontal ground motion (0.3 and 0.5 g earthquakes) were considered. (Auth.)

  14. Learning Read-constant Polynomials of Constant Degree modulo Composites

    Chattopadhyay, Arkadev; Gavaldá, Richard; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt

    2011-01-01

    Boolean functions that have constant degree polynomial representation over a fixed finite ring form a natural and strict subclass of the complexity class \\textACC0ACC0. They are also precisely the functions computable efficiently by programs over fixed and finite nilpotent groups. This class...... is not known to be learnable in any reasonable learning model. In this paper, we provide a deterministic polynomial time algorithm for learning Boolean functions represented by polynomials of constant degree over arbitrary finite rings from membership queries, with the additional constraint that each variable...

  15. Linearization of resistance thermometers and other transducers

    Diamond, Joseph M.

    1970-01-01

    deflection output or to null balance output. The application to the common temperature transducers is considered. It is shown that thermistors, linear metals (e.g., copper), and nickel can be linearized in terms of temperature, but platinum cannot be. If linearization is desired in terms of the reciprocal...

  16. Determination of Henry’s Law Constants Using Internal Standards with Benchmark Values

    It is shown that Henry’s law constants can be experimentally determined by comparing headspace content of compounds with known constants to interpolate the constants of other compounds. Studies were conducted over a range of water temperatures to identify temperature dependence....

  17. On a non-linear problem posed by the temperature determination in an electrically heated plate; Sur un probleme non lineaire pose par la determination de la temperature dans une plaque chauffee electriquement

    Gerber, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Let us consider a flat plate, electrically heated, with one face thermally insulated and the other face isothermal. It is shown that a two-dimensional perturbation of the insulated face has no influence on the temperature of this face. (author) [French] Soit une plaque plane, chauffee electriquement, dont une face est isolee thermiquement et l'autre face isotherme. On montre qu'une perturbation bidimensionnelle de la face isolee est sans influence sur la temperature de cette face. (auteur)

  18. Reduction of Linear Programming to Linear Approximation

    Vaserstein, Leonid N.

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that every Chebyshev linear approximation problem can be reduced to a linear program. In this paper we show that conversely every linear program can be reduced to a Chebyshev linear approximation problem.

  19. From the Rydberg constant to the fundamental constants metrology; De la constante de Rydberg a la metrologie des constantes fondamentales

    Nez, F

    2005-06-15

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author since the beginning of his scientific career. This document is dedicated to the spectroscopy of hydrogen, deuterium and helium atoms. The first part is divided into 6 sub-sections: 1) the principles of hydrogen spectroscopy, 2) the measurement of the 2S-nS/nD transitions, 3) other optical frequency measurements, 4) our contribution to the determination of the Rydberg constant, 5) our current experiment on the 1S-3S transition, 6) the spectroscopy of the muonic hydrogen. Our experiments have improved the accuracy of the Rydberg Constant by a factor 25 in 15 years and we have achieved the first absolute optical frequency measurement of a transition in hydrogen. The second part is dedicated to the measurement of the fine structure constant and the last part deals with helium spectroscopy and the search for optical references in the near infrared range. (A.C.)

  20. Systematics of constant roll inflation

    Anguelova, Lilia; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2018-02-01

    We study constant roll inflation systematically. This is a regime, in which the slow roll approximation can be violated. It has long been thought that this approximation is necessary for agreement with observations. However, recently it was understood that there can be inflationary models with a constant, and not necessarily small, rate of roll that are both stable and compatible with the observational constraint ns ≈ 1. We investigate systematically the condition for such a constant-roll regime. In the process, we find a whole new class of inflationary models, in addition to the known solutions. We show that the new models are stable under scalar perturbations. Finally, we find a part of their parameter space, in which they produce a nearly scale-invariant scalar power spectrum, as needed for observational viability.

  1. Strain fluctuations and elastic constants

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1982-03-01

    It is shown that the elastic strain fluctuations are a direct measure of elastic compliances in a general anisotropic medium; depending on the ensemble in which the fluctuation is measured either the isothermal or the adiabatic compliances are obtained. These fluctuations can now be calculated in a constant enthalpy and pressure, and hence, constant entropy, ensemble due to recent develpments in the molecular dynamics techniques. A calculation for a Ni single crystal under uniform uniaxial 100 tensile or compressive load is presented as an illustration of the relationships derived between various strain fluctuations and the elastic modulii. The Born stability criteria and the behavior of strain fluctuations are shown to be related.

  2. On the Reference State for Exergy when Ambient Temperature Fluctuates

    Michel Pons

    2009-01-01

    Exergy (availability) is the amount of mechanical work that could be produced by reversible processes. This notion is revisited in the case when ambient temperature fluctuates. Simple examples are first considered, and then a theoretical approach is developed. It results that the most reliable way for combining entropy and total energy into an exergy function is a linear combination where entropy is multiplied by a constant temperature. It results that ambient air has non-zero exergy, but tha...

  3. Effect of pre-rigor stretch and various constant temperatures on the rate of post-mortem pH fall, rigor mortis and some quality traits of excised porcine biceps femoris muscle strips.

    Vada-Kovács, M

    1996-01-01

    Porcine biceps femoris strips of 10 cm original length were stretched by 50% and fixed within 1 hr post mortem then subjected to temperatures of 4 °, 15 ° or 36 °C until they attained their ultimate pH. Unrestrained control muscle strips, which were left to shorten freely, were similarly treated. Post-mortem metabolism (pH, R-value) and shortening were recorded; thereafter ultimate meat quality traits (pH, lightness, extraction and swelling of myofibrils) were determined. The rate of pH fall at 36 °C, as well as ATP breakdown at 36 and 4 °C, were significantly reduced by pre-rigor stretch. The relationship between R-value and pH indicated cold shortening at 4 °C. Myofibrils isolated from pre-rigor stretched muscle strips kept at 36 °C showed the most severe reduction of hydration capacity, while paleness remained below extreme values. However, pre-rigor stretched myofibrils - when stored at 4 °C - proved to be superior to shortened ones in their extractability and swelling.

  4. Determination of local concentration of H2O molecules and gas temperature in the process of hydrogen – oxygen gas mixture heating by means of linear and nonlinear laser spectroscopy

    Kozlov, D N; Kobtsev, V D; Stel'makh, O M; Smirnov, Valery V; Stepanov, E V

    2013-01-01

    Employing the methods of linear absorption spectroscopy and nonlinear four-wave mixing spectroscopy using laserinduced gratings we have simultaneously measured the local concentrations of H 2 O molecules and the gas temperature in the process of the H 2 – O 2 mixture heating. During the measurements of the deactivation rates of pulsed-laser excited singlet oxygen O 2 (b 1 Σ + g ) in collisions with H 2 in the range 294 – 850 K, the joint use of the two methods made it possible to determine the degree of hydrogen oxidation at a given temperature. As the mixture is heated, H 2 O molecules are formed by 'dark' reactions of H 2 with O 2 in the ground state. The experiments have shown that the measurements of tunable diode laser radiation absorption along an optical path through the inhomogeneously heated gas mixture in a cell allows high-accuracy determination of the local H 2 O concentration in the O 2 laser excitation volume, if the gas temperature in this volume is known. When studying the collisional deactivation of O 2 (b 1 Σ + g ) molecules, the necessary measurements of the local temperature can be implemented using laser-induced gratings, arising due to spatially periodic excitation of O 2 (X 3 Σ - g ) molecules to the b 1 Σ + g state by radiation of the pump laser of the four-wave mixing spectrometer. (laser spectroscopy)

  5. Remote Sensing of Salinity: The Dielectric Constant of Sea Water

    LeVine, David M.; Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Tarkocin, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Global monitoring of sea surface salinity from space requires an accurate model for the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature to characterize the emissivity of the surface. Measurements are being made at 1.413 GHz, the center frequency of the Aquarius radiometers, using a resonant cavity and the perturbation method. The cavity is operated in a transmission mode and immersed in a liquid bath to control temperature. Multiple measurements are made at each temperature and salinity. Error budgets indicate a relative accuracy for both real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant of about 1%.

  6. Universal relation between spectroscopic constants

    (3) The author has used eq. (6) of his paper to calculate De. This relation leads to a large deviation from the correct value depending upon the extent to which experimental values are known. Guided by this fact, in our work, we used experimentally observed De values to derive the relation between spectroscopic constants.

  7. Tachyon constant-roll inflation

    Mohammadi, A.; Saaidi, Kh.; Golanbari, T.

    2018-04-01

    The constant-roll inflation is studied where the inflaton is taken as a tachyon field. Based on this approach, the second slow-roll parameter is taken as a constant which leads to a differential equation for the Hubble parameter. Finding an exact solution for the Hubble parameter is difficult and leads us to a numerical solution for the Hubble parameter. On the other hand, since in this formalism the slow-roll parameter η is constant and could not be assumed to be necessarily small, the perturbation parameters should be reconsidered again which, in turn, results in new terms appearing in the amplitude of scalar perturbations and the scalar spectral index. Utilizing the numerical solution for the Hubble parameter, we estimate the perturbation parameter at the horizon exit time and compare it with observational data. The results show that, for specific values of the constant parameter η , we could have an almost scale-invariant amplitude of scalar perturbations. Finally, the attractor behavior for the solution of the model is presented, and we determine that the feature could be properly satisfied.

  8. Elastic constants from microscopic strain fluctuations

    Sengupta; Nielaba; Rao; Binder

    2000-02-01

    Fluctuations of the instantaneous local Lagrangian strain epsilon(ij)(r,t), measured with respect to a static "reference" lattice, are used to obtain accurate estimates of the elastic constants of model solids from atomistic computer simulations. The measured strains are systematically coarse-grained by averaging them within subsystems (of size L(b)) of a system (of total size L) in the canonical ensemble. Using a simple finite size scaling theory we predict the behavior of the fluctuations as a function of L(b)/L and extract elastic constants of the system in the thermodynamic limit at nonzero temperature. Our method is simple to implement, efficient, and general enough to be able to handle a wide class of model systems, including those with singular potentials without any essential modification. We illustrate the technique by computing isothermal elastic constants of "hard" and "soft" disk triangular solids in two dimensions from Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. We compare our results with those from earlier simulations and theory.

  9. Simultaneous achievement of high dielectric constant and low temperature dependence of capacitance in (111-oriented BaTiO3-Bi(Mg0.5Ti0.5O3-BiFeO3 solid solution thin films

    Junichi Kimura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the capacitance of (111c-oriented (0.90–xBaTiO3-0.10Bi(Mg0.5Ti0.5O3-xBiFeO3 solid solution films is investigated. These films are prepared on (111cSrRuO3/(111Pt/TiO2/SiO2/(100Si substrates by the chemical solution deposition technique. All the films have perovskite structures and the crystal symmetry at room temperature varies with increasing x ratio, from pseudocubic when x = 0–0.30 to rhombohedral when x = 0.50–0.90. The pseudocubic phase shows a high relative dielectric constant (εr (ranging between 400 and 560 at room temperature and an operating frequency of 100 kHz and a low temperature dependence of capacitance up to 400°C, while maintaining a dielectric loss (tan δ value of less than 0.2 at 100 kHz. In contrast, εr for the rhombohedral phase increases monotonically with increasing temperature up to 250°C, and increasingly high tan δ values are recorded at higher temperatures. These results indicate that pseudocubic (0.90–xBaTiO3-0.10Bi(Mg0.5Ti0.5O3-xBiFeO3 solid solution films with (111 orientation are suitable candidates for high-temperature capacitor applications.

  10. Linear thermal expansion of SrTiO3

    Tsunekawa, S.; Watanabe, H.F.J.; Takei, H.

    1984-01-01

    The linear thermal expansion of SrTiO 3 in the temperature range 10 to 150 K is measured with a relative accuracy of 5 x 10 -7 by using a three-terminal capacitance dilatometer. The dilation ΔL/L of a single-domain crystal is converted to the ratio of the pseudo-cubic cell constants a(T)/a(T/sub a/) by the equation a(T)/a(T/sub a/) = [1 + (ΔL/L)/sub T/]/[1 + (ΔL/L)/sub T//sub a/], where L is the specimen length, T/sub a/ is the cubic-to-tetragonal transition temperature and T 6 octahedra around the [001] axis. The temperature at which the dilation shows a minimum, 37.5 K, is very close to the transition point T/sub c/ = (32 +- 5) K predicted by Cowley. (author)

  11. Stabilized power constant alimentation; Alimentation regulee a puissance constante

    Roussel, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-01

    The study and realization of a stabilized power alimentation variable from 5 to 100 watts are described. In order to realize a constant power drift of Lithium compensated diodes, we have searched a 1 per cent precision of regulation and a response time minus than 1 sec. Recent components like Hall multiplicator and integrated amplifiers give this possibility and it is easy to use permutable circuits. (author) [French] On decrit l'etude et la realisation d'une alimentation a puissance constante reglable dans une gamme de 5 a 100 watts. Prevue pour le drift a puissance constante des diodes compensees au lithium, l'etude a ete menee en vue d'obtenir une precision de regulation de 1 pour cent et un temps de reponse inferieur a la seconde. Des systemes recents tels que multiplicateurs a effet Hall et circuits integres ont permis d'atteindre ce but tout en facilitant l'emploi de modules interchangeables. (auteur)

  12. linear-quadratic-linear model

    Tanwiwat Jaikuna

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To develop an in-house software program that is able to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram by physical dose conversion using the linear-quadratic-linear (LQL model. Material and methods : The Isobio software was developed using MATLAB version 2014b to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histograms. The physical dose from each voxel in treatment planning was extracted through Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR, and the accuracy was verified by the differentiation between the dose volume histogram from CERR and the treatment planning system. An equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD2 was calculated using biological effective dose (BED based on the LQL model. The software calculation and the manual calculation were compared for EQD2 verification with pair t-test statistical analysis using IBM SPSS Statistics version 22 (64-bit. Results: Two and three-dimensional biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram were displayed correctly by the Isobio software. Different physical doses were found between CERR and treatment planning system (TPS in Oncentra, with 3.33% in high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV determined by D90%, 0.56% in the bladder, 1.74% in the rectum when determined by D2cc, and less than 1% in Pinnacle. The difference in the EQD2 between the software calculation and the manual calculation was not significantly different with 0.00% at p-values 0.820, 0.095, and 0.593 for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and 0.240, 0.320, and 0.849 for brachytherapy (BT in HR-CTV, bladder, and rectum, respectively. Conclusions : The Isobio software is a feasible tool to generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram for treatment plan evaluation in both EBRT and BT.

  13. A modified phase coherence model for the non-linear c-axis V-I characteristics of highly anisotropic, high temperature superconductors

    Luo Sheng; Huang Sai Jun; He Yu Sheng; Li Chun Guang; Zhang Xue Qiang

    2003-01-01

    A modified Ambegaokar-Halperin thermal-fluctuation model has been developed to describe the c-axis V-I characteristics and low-current ohmic resistance of highly anisotropic superconductors in a magnetic field parallel to the c-axis. The model assumes loss of phase coherence across the CuO-planes associated with the correlated motion of pancake vortices in the liquid state. The predicted V-I characteristics in the current-induced transition from the superconducting to the resistive state are in good agreement with measurements on a 2212-BSCCO single crystal as a function of temperature and field, provided the effect of the interlayer capacitance is taken into account. The measurements are consistent with a flux pancake correlation length within the CuO-planes varying as xi sub 0 /(T/T sub 0 - 1) supnu, where xi sub 0 = 1.57 +- 0.08 mu m and nu = 0.50 +- 0.01. Our measurements imply a current-dependent interlayer resistance above and below T sub c.

  14. Investigations of linear contraction and shrinkage stresses development in hypereutectic al-si binary alloys

    J. Mutwil

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage phenomena during solidification and cooling of hypereutectic aluminium-silicon alloys (AlSi18, AlSi21 have been examined. A vertical shrinkage rod casting with circular cross-section (constant or fixed: tapered has been used as a test sample. Two type of experiments have been conducted: 1 on development of the test sample linear dimension changes (linear expansion/contraction, 2 on development of shrinkage stresses in the test sample. By the linear contraction experiments the linear dimension changes of the test sample and the metal test mould as well a temperature in six points of the test sample have been registered. By shrinkage stresses examination a shrinkage tension force and linear dimension changes of the test sample as well a temperature in three points of the test sample have been registered. Registered time dependences of the test bar and the test mould linear dimension changes have shown, that so-called pre-shrinkage extension has been mainly by mould thermal extension caused. The investigation results have shown that both: the linear contraction as well as the shrinkage stresses development are evident dependent on metal temperature in a warmest region the sample (thermal centre.

  15. High gradient tests of SLAC Linear Collider Accelerator Structures

    Wang, J.W.; Deruyter, H.; Eichner, J.; Fant, K.H.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Loewen, R.; Menegat, L.

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes the current SLAC R ampersand D program to develop room temperature accelerator structures for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The structures are designed to operate at 11.4 GHz at an accelerating gradient in the range of 50 to 100 MV/m. In the past year a 26 cm constant-impedance traveling-wave section, a 75 cm constant-impedance traveling-wave section, and a 1.8 m traveling-wave section with detuned deflecting modes have been high-power tested. The paper presents a brief description of the RF test setup, the design and manufacturing details of the structures, and a discussion of test results including field emission, RF processing, dark current spectrum and RF breakdown

  16. Infrared optical constants of liquid palm oil and palm oil biodiesel determined by the combined ellipsometry-transmission method.

    Wang, C C; Tan, J Y; Ma, Y Q; Liu, L H

    2017-06-20

    The optical constants of vegetable oils and biodiesels are the basic input parameters in the study of the thermal radiation transfer and monitoring the productivity of vegetable oils converting to biodiesels. In this work, a combined ellipsometry-transmission method is presented to obtain the optical constants of palm oil and palm oil biodiesel between 20°C and 150°C in the spectral range 600-4100  cm -1 and to study the temperature effect on the optical constants. In the combined method, a modified ellipsometry method is used to measure the optical constants of palm oil and palm oil biodiesel for the whole researched wave bands. For the weak absorption regions in which the ellipsometry method cannot give precise absorption indices, the transmission method is conducted to get the absorption indices using the refractive indices obtained by the proposed ellipsometry method. Deionized water and methanol are taken as examples to verify the combined ellipsometry-transmission method. It is shown that the combined method can overcome the deficiencies of the traditional ellipsometry and transmission method, which can be used for the measurements of both strong and weak absorption wave bands. The experimental analyses indicate that temperature exerts a noticeable influence on the infrared optical constants of palm oil and palm oil biodiesel. With the increase of temperature, the refractive indices at certain wavenumbers decrease nearly linearly, and the amplitudes of dominant absorption peaks show a decreasing trend. The absorption peaks located around 3550  cm -1 show blueshift trends as temperature increases. Comparing these two kinds of oils, palm oil presents larger values in refractive indices and dominant absorption peaks.

  17. Evolution of the solar constant

    Newman, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    The ultimate source of the energy utilized by life on Earth is the Sun, and the behavior of the Sun determines to a large extent the conditions under which life originated and continues to thrive. What can be said about the history of the Sun. Has the solar constant, the rate at which energy is received by the Earth from the Sun per unit area per unit time, been constant at its present level since Archean times. Three mechanisms by which it has been suggested that the solar energy output can vary with time are discussed, characterized by long (approx. 10 9 years), intermediate (approx. 10 8 years), and short (approx. years to decades) time scales

  18. Calculation of magnetic hyperfine constants

    Bufaical, R.F.; Maffeo, B.; Brandi, H.S.

    1975-01-01

    The magnetic hyperfine constants of the V sub(K) center in CaF 2 , SrF 2 and BaF 2 have been calculated assuming a phenomenological model, based on the F 2 - 'central molucule', to describe the wavefunction of the defect. Calculations have shown that introduction of a small degree of covalence, between this central molecule and neighboring ions, is necessary to improve the electronic structure description of the defect. It was also shown that the results for the hyperfine constants are strongly dependent on the relaxations of the ions neighboring the central molecule; these relaxations have been determined by fitting the experimental data. The present results are compared with other previous calculations where similar and different theoretical methods have been used

  19. Non-linear osmosis

    Diamond, Jared M.

    1966-01-01

    1. The relation between osmotic gradient and rate of osmotic water flow has been measured in rabbit gall-bladder by a gravimetric procedure and by a rapid method based on streaming potentials. Streaming potentials were directly proportional to gravimetrically measured water fluxes. 2. As in many other tissues, water flow was found to vary with gradient in a markedly non-linear fashion. There was no consistent relation between the water permeability and either the direction or the rate of water flow. 3. Water flow in response to a given gradient decreased at higher osmolarities. The resistance to water flow increased linearly with osmolarity over the range 186-825 m-osM. 4. The resistance to water flow was the same when the gall-bladder separated any two bathing solutions with the same average osmolarity, regardless of the magnitude of the gradient. In other words, the rate of water flow is given by the expression (Om — Os)/[Ro′ + ½k′ (Om + Os)], where Ro′ and k′ are constants and Om and Os are the bathing solution osmolarities. 5. Of the theories advanced to explain non-linear osmosis in other tissues, flow-induced membrane deformations, unstirred layers, asymmetrical series-membrane effects, and non-osmotic effects of solutes could not explain the results. However, experimental measurements of water permeability as a function of osmolarity permitted quantitative reconstruction of the observed water flow—osmotic gradient curves. Hence non-linear osmosis in rabbit gall-bladder is due to a decrease in water permeability with increasing osmolarity. 6. The results suggest that aqueous channels in the cell membrane behave as osmometers, shrinking in concentrated solutions of impermeant molecules and thereby increasing membrane resistance to water flow. A mathematical formulation of such a membrane structure is offered. PMID:5945254

  20. LINEAR2007, Linear-Linear Interpolation of ENDF Format Cross-Sections

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: LINEAR converts evaluated cross sections in the ENDF/B format into a tabular form that is subject to linear-linear interpolation in energy and cross section. The code also thins tables of cross sections already in that form. Codes used subsequently need thus to consider only linear-linear data. IAEA1311/15: This version include the updates up to January 30, 2007. Changes in ENDF/B-VII Format and procedures, as well as the evaluations themselves, make it impossible for versions of the ENDF/B pre-processing codes earlier than PREPRO 2007 (2007 Version) to accurately process current ENDF/B-VII evaluations. The present code can handle all existing ENDF/B-VI evaluations through release 8, which will be the last release of ENDF/B-VI. Modifications from previous versions: - Linear VERS. 2007-1 (JAN. 2007): checked against all ENDF/B-VII; increased page size from 60,000 to 600,000 points 2 - Method of solution: Each section of data is considered separately. Each section of File 3, 23, and 27 data consists of a table of cross section versus energy with any of five interpolation laws. LINEAR will replace each section with a new table of energy versus cross section data in which the interpolation law is always linear in energy and cross section. The histogram (constant cross section between two energies) interpolation law is converted to linear-linear by substituting two points for each initial point. The linear-linear is not altered. For the log-linear, linear-log and log- log laws, the cross section data are converted to linear by an interval halving algorithm. Each interval is divided in half until the value at the middle of the interval can be approximated by linear-linear interpolation to within a given accuracy. The LINEAR program uses a multipoint fractional error thinning algorithm to minimize the size of each cross section table

  1. On the gravitational constant change

    Milyukov, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    The nowadays viewpoint on the problem of G gravitational constant invariability is presented in brief. The methods and results of checking of the G dependence on the nature of substance (checking of the equivalence principle), G dependepce on distance (checking of Newton gravity law) and time (cosmological experiments) are presented. It is pointed out that all performed experiments don't give any reasons to have doubts in G constancy in space and time and G independence on the nature of the substance

  2. Photodissociation constant of NO2

    Nootebos, M.A.; Bange, P.

    1992-01-01

    The velocity of the dissociation of NO 2 into ozone and NO mainly depends on the ultraviolet sunlight quantity, and with that the cloudiness. A correct value for this reaction constant is important for the accurate modelling of O 3 - and NO 2 -concentrations in plumes of electric power plants, in particular in the case of determination of the amount of photochemical summer smog. An advanced signal processing method (deconvolution, correlation) was applied on the measurements. The measurements were carried out from aeroplanes

  3. Critical behavior of the dielectric constant in asymmetric fluids.

    Bertrand, C E; Sengers, J V; Anisimov, M A

    2011-12-08

    By applying a thermodynamic theory that incorporates the concept of complete scaling, we derive the asymptotic temperature dependence of the critical behavior of the dielectric constant above the critical temperature along the critical isochore and below the critical temperature along the coexistence curve. The amplitudes of the singular terms in the temperature expansions are related to the changes of the critical temperature and the critical chemical potential upon the introduction of an electric field. The results of the thermodynamic theory are then compared with the critical behavior implied by the classical Clausius-Mossotti approximation. The Clausius-Mossotti approximation fails to account for any singular temperature dependence of the dielectric constant above the critical temperature. Below the critical temperature it produces an apparent asymmetric critical behavior with singular terms similar to those implied by the thermodynamic theory, but with significantly different coefficients. We conclude that the Clausius-Mossotti approximation only can account for the observed asymptotic critical behavior of the dielectric constant when the dependence of the critical temperature on the electric field is negligibly small. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. High temperature XRD of Cu2GeSe3

    Premkumar, D. S.; Malar, P.; Chetty, Raju; Mallik, Ramesh Chandra

    2015-01-01

    The Cu 2 GeSe 3 is prepared by solid state synthesis method. The high temperature XRD has been done at different temperature from 30 °C to 450 °C. The reitveld refinement confirms Cu 2 GeSe 3 phase and orthorhombic crystal structure. The lattice constants are increasing with increase in the temperature and their rate of increase with respect to temperature are used for finding the thermal expansion coefficient. The calculation of the linear and volume coefficient of thermal expansion is done from 30 °C to 400 °C. Decrease in the values of linear expansion coefficients with temperature are observed along a and c axis. Since thermal expansion coefficient is the consequence of the distortion of atoms in the lattice; this can be further used to find the minimum lattice thermal conductivity at given temperature

  5. Robust control for constant thrust rendezvous under thrust failure

    Qi Yongqiang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A robust constant thrust rendezvous approach under thrust failure is proposed based on the relative motion dynamic model. Firstly, the design problem is cast into a convex optimization problem by introducing a Lyapunov function subject to linear matrix inequalities. Secondly, the robust controllers satisfying the requirements can be designed by solving this optimization problem. Then, a new algorithm of constant thrust fitting is proposed through the impulse compensation and the fuel consumption under the theoretical continuous thrust and the actual constant thrust is calculated and compared by using the method proposed in this paper. Finally, the proposed method having the advantage of saving fuel is proved and the actual constant thrust switch control laws are obtained through the isochronous interpolation method, meanwhile, an illustrative example is provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed control design method.

  6. Simulating maize phenology as a function of air temperature with a linear and a nonlinear model Simulação da fenologia do milho em função da temperatura do ar por um modelo linear e um não linear

    Nereu Augusto Streck

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to adapt a nonlinear model (Wang and Engel - WE for simulating the phenology of maize (Zea mays L., and to evaluate this model and a linear one (thermal time, in order to predict developmental stages of a field-grown maize variety. A field experiment, during 2005/2006 and 2006/2007 was conducted in Santa Maria, RS, Brazil, in two growing seasons, with seven sowing dates each. Dates of emergence, silking, and physiological maturity of the maize variety BRS Missões were recorded in six replications in each sowing date. Data collected in 2005/2006 growing season were used to estimate the coefficients of the two models, and data collected in the 2006/2007 growing season were used as independent data set for model evaluations. The nonlinear WE model accurately predicted the date of silking and physiological maturity, and had a lower root mean square error (RMSE than the linear (thermal time model. The overall RMSE for silking and physiological maturity was 2.7 and 4.8 days with WE model, and 5.6 and 8.3 days with thermal time model, respectively.O objetivo deste trabalho foi adaptar um modelo não linear (Wang e Engel - WE, para simular a fenologia do milho (Zea mays L., e avaliar esse modelo e um modelo linear (soma térmica, para estimar os estágios de desenvolvimento de uma variedade de milho cultivada em campo. Um experimento de dois anos, com sete datas anuais de semeadura cada ano, foi conduzido em Santa Maria, RS, durante os anos agrícolas 2005/2006 e 2006/2007. Foram registradas as datas de emergência, espigamento e maturação fisiológica da variedade de milho BRS Missões, em seis repetições, em cada data de semeadura. Os dados coletados no ano agrícola 2005/2006 foram usados para estimar os coeficientes dos dois modelos, e os dados coletados no ano agrícola 2006/2007 foram usados como dados independentes para avaliar os modelos. O modelo não linear (WE estimou com precisão as datas de espigamento

  7. Fine-structure constant: Is it really a constant

    Bekenstein, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    It is often claimed that the fine-structure ''constant'' α is shown to be strictly constant in time by a variety of astronomical and geophysical results. These constrain its fractional rate of change alpha-dot/α to at least some orders of magnitude below the Hubble rate H 0 . We argue that the conclusion is not as straightforward as claimed since there are good physical reasons to expect alpha-dot/α 0 . We propose to decide the issue by constructing a framework for a variability based on very general assumptions: covariance, gauge invariance, causality, and time-reversal invariance of electromagnetism, as well as the idea that the Planck-Wheeler length (10 -33 cm) is the shortest scale allowable in any theory. The framework endows α with well-defined dynamics, and entails a modification of Maxwell electrodynamics. It proves very difficult to rule it out with purely electromagnetic experiments. In a cosmological setting, the framework predicts an alpha-dot/α which can be compatible with the astronomical constraints; hence, these are too insensitive to rule out α variability. There is marginal conflict with the geophysical constraints: however, no firm decision is possible because of uncertainty about various cosmological parameters. By contrast the framework's predictions for spatial gradients of α are in fatal conflict with the results of the Eoetvoes-Dicke-Braginsky experiments. Hence these tests of the equivalence principle rule out with confidence spacetime variability of α at any level

  8. Nominal power density analysis of thermoelectric pins with non-constant cross sections

    Shi, Yaoguang; Mei, Deqing; Yao, Zhehe; Wang, Yancheng; Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Zichen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Nominal power density of TEGs with non-constant cross sections pins is analyzed. • An analytical model of nominal power density (NPD) is developed. • Influences of shape parameter on NPD for different geometric pins are investigated. • Effects of dimensionless efficiency and the temperature ratio on NPD are examined. - Abstract: The investigation of the geometric structure of TEG (thermoelectric generator) pins is essential, as their geometry determines the performance of devices. In this study, nominal power density (NPD) is used to find a better geometric structure of thermoelectric pins of TEGs, since a comparison of maximum dimensionless efficiencies for different geometric pins cannot be used to identify the optimum geometry. The influence of shape parameter on NPD for TEG pins in linear, quadratic and exponential cross-sectional functions is studied. The NPD decreases when the shape parameter increases for different geometric pins, while the maximum values of NPD are the same. Then, the effects of dimensionless efficiency and the temperature ratio on the NPD are analyzed. The NPD decreases with the increase in dimensionless efficiency and temperature ratio. Pins with linear variation in cross section have the highest NPD among the three geometries of pins evaluated

  9. A furnace and temperature controller for optical absorption studies with a spectrophotometer

    Mariani Rogat, F.

    1975-01-01

    The design and main features of a furnace with a temperature controller and programmer are shown. This system allows to measure the optical absorption spectrum of a sample from room temperature to 400 deg C, in a double beam spectrophotometer Perkin Elmer 350. The sample temperature can be linearly increased at different heating rates between 4 and 38 deg C/min. The temperature ramp can be stopped at any desired point and the sample temperature shall be stabilized in less than one minute. This temperature shall be kept constant within 0.5 deg C for hours. The sample is heated in vacuum. (author)

  10. One-of-A-Kind: A Microporous Metal-Organic Framework Capable of Adsorptive Separation of Linear, Mono- and Di-branched Alkane Isomers via Temperature- and Adsorbate-Dependent Molecular Sieving

    Wang, Hao

    2018-03-29

    Separation of alkane isomers represents a crucial process in the petrochemical industry in order to achieve high octane rating of gasoline. Herein, we report the first example of complete separation of linear, monobranched and dibranched alkane isomers by a single adsorbent. A calcium-based robust microporous metal-organic framework, Ca(H2tcpb) (tcpb = 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)-benzene) exhibits unique molecular exclusion behavior which enables full separation of binary or ternary mixtures of alkane isomers into pure form of each isomerate. The successful separation of monobranched and dibranched hexane isomers will not only lead to the production of higher quality gasoline with maximum possible octane numbers but also fill the gap in the current separation technology. Exploration of separation mechanism indicates that structural flexibility and adsorbate-dependent structure change of the porous framework plays a vital role for the observed temperature-dependent molecular sieving property of the adsorbent.

  11. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    Sanders, David M [Livermore, CA; Sampayan, Stephen [Manteca, CA; Slenes, Kirk [Albuquerque, NM; Stoller, H M [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  12. Cryptography in constant parallel time

    Applebaum, Benny

    2013-01-01

    Locally computable (NC0) functions are 'simple' functions for which every bit of the output can be computed by reading a small number of bits of their input. The study of locally computable cryptography attempts to construct cryptographic functions that achieve this strong notion of simplicity and simultaneously provide a high level of security. Such constructions are highly parallelizable and they can be realized by Boolean circuits of constant depth.This book establishes, for the first time, the possibility of local implementations for many basic cryptographic primitives such as one-way func

  13. Low power constant fraction discriminator

    Krishnan, Shanti; Raut, S.M.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a low power ultrafast constant fraction discriminator, which significantly reduces the power consumption. A conventional fast discriminator consumes about 1250 MW of power whereas this low power version consumes about 440 MW. In a multi detector system, where the number of discriminators is very large, reduction of power is of utmost importance. This low power discriminator is being designed for GRACE (Gamma Ray Atmospheric Cerenkov Experiments) telescope where 1000 channels of discriminators are required. A novel method of decreasing power consumption has been described. (author)

  14. Can coupling constants be related

    Nandi, Satyanarayan; Ng, Wing-Chiu.

    1978-06-01

    We analyze the conditions under which several coupling constants in field theory can be related to each other. When the relation is independent of the renormalization point, the relation between any g and g' must satisfy a differential equation as follows from the renormalization group equations. Using this differential equation, we investigate the criteria for the feasibility of a power-series relation for various theories, especially the Weinberg-Salam type (including Higgs bosons) with an arbitrary number of quark and lepton flavors. (orig./WL) [de

  15. Hydrodynamic constants from cosmic censorship

    Nakamura, Shin

    2008-01-01

    We study a gravity dual of Bjorken flow of N=4 SYM-theory plasma. We point out that the cosmic censorship hypothesis may explain why the regularity of the dual geometry constrains the hydrodynamic constants. We also investigate the apparent horizon of the dual geometry. We find that the dual geometry constructed on Fefferman-Graham (FG) coordinates is not appropriate for examination of the apparent horizon since the coordinates do not cover the trapped region. However, the preliminary analysis on FG coordinates suggests that the location of the apparent horizon is very sensitive to the hydrodynamic parameters. (author)

  16. Linear and non-linear energy barriers in systems of interacting single-domain ferromagnetic particles

    Petrila, Iulian; Bodale, Ilie; Rotarescu, Cristian; Stancu, Alexandru

    2011-01-01

    A comparative analysis between linear and non-linear energy barriers used for modeling statistical thermally-excited ferromagnetic systems is presented. The linear energy barrier is obtained by new symmetry considerations about the anisotropy energy and the link with the non-linear energy barrier is also presented. For a relevant analysis we compare the effects of linear and non-linear energy barriers implemented in two different models: Preisach-Neel and Ising-Metropolis. The differences between energy barriers which are reflected in different coercive field dependence of the temperature are also presented. -- Highlights: → The linear energy barrier is obtained from symmetry considerations. → The linear and non-linear energy barriers are calibrated and implemented in Preisach-Neel and Ising-Metropolis models. → The temperature and time effects of the linear and non-linear energy barriers are analyzed.

  17. Electrodynamic linear motor

    Munehiro, H

    1980-05-29

    When driving the carriage of a printer through a rotating motor, there are problems regarding the limited accuracy of the carriage position due to rotation or contraction and ageing of the cable. In order to solve the problem, a direct drive system was proposed, in which the printer carriage is driven by a linear motor. If one wants to keep the motor circuit of such a motor compact, then the magnetic flux density in the air gap must be reduced or the motor travel must be reduced. It is the purpose of this invention to create an electrodynamic linear motor, which on the one hand is compact and light and on the other hand has a relatively high constant force over a large travel. The invention is characterised by the fact that magnetic fields of alternating polarity are generated at equal intervals in the magnetic field, and that the coil arrangement has 2 adjacent coils, whose size corresponds to half the length of each magnetic pole. A logic circuit is provided to select one of the two coils and to determine the direction of the current depending on the signals of a magnetic field sensor on the coil arrangement.

  18. Tantalum high-temperature oxidation kinetics

    Grigor'ev, Yu.M.; Sarkisyan, A.A.; Merzhanov, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetics of heat release and scale growth during tantalum oxidation within 650-1300 deg C temperature range in oxygen-containing media is investigated. Kinetic equations and temperature and pressure dependences of constants are ound Applicability of the kinetic Lorie mechanism for the description of the tantalum oxidation kinetics applicably to rapid-passing processes is shown. It is stated that the process rate (reaction ability) is determined by adsorption desorption factors on the external surface of the ''protective'' oxide for the ''linear'' oxidation stage [ru

  19. Superconducting transition temperatures of the elements related to elastic constants

    Angilella, G. G. N.; March, N. H.; Pucci, R.

    2004-01-01

    For a given crystal structure, say body-centred-cubic, the many-body Hamiltonian in which nuclear and electron motions are to be treated from the outset on the same footing, has parameters, for the elements, which can be classified as (i) atomic mass M, (ii) atomic number Z, characterizing the external potential in which electrons move, and (iii) bcc lattice spacing, or equivalently one can utilize atomic volume, Omega. Since the thermodynamic quantities can be determined from H, we conclude ...

  20. Relaxing a large cosmological constant

    Bauer, Florian; Sola, Joan; Stefancic, Hrvoje

    2009-01-01

    The cosmological constant (CC) problem is the biggest enigma of theoretical physics ever. In recent times, it has been rephrased as the dark energy (DE) problem in order to encompass a wider spectrum of possibilities. It is, in any case, a polyhedric puzzle with many faces, including the cosmic coincidence problem, i.e. why the density of matter ρ m is presently so close to the CC density ρ Λ . However, the oldest, toughest and most intriguing face of this polyhedron is the big CC problem, namely why the measured value of ρ Λ at present is so small as compared to any typical density scale existing in high energy physics, especially taking into account the many phase transitions that our Universe has undergone since the early times, including inflation. In this Letter, we propose to extend the field equations of General Relativity by including a class of invariant terms that automatically relax the value of the CC irrespective of the initial size of the vacuum energy in the early epochs. We show that, at late times, the Universe enters an eternal de Sitter stage mimicking a tiny positive cosmological constant. Thus, these models could be able to solve the big CC problem without fine-tuning and have also a bearing on the cosmic coincidence problem. Remarkably, they mimic the ΛCDM model to a large extent, but they still leave some characteristic imprints that should be testable in the next generation of experiments.