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Sample records for linear-quadratic lq model

  1. Effects of oxygen on intrinsic radiation sensitivity: A test of the relationship between aerobic and hypoxic linear-quadratic (LQ) model parameters

    Carlson, David J.; Stewart, Robert D.; Semenenko, Vladimir A.

    2006-01-01

    The poor treatment prognosis for tumors with high levels of hypoxia is usually attributed to the decreased sensitivity of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation. Mechanistic considerations suggest that linear quadratic (LQ) survival model radiosensitivity parameters for hypoxic (H) and aerobic (A) cells are related by α H =α A /oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and (α/β) H =OER(α/β) A . The OER parameter may be interpreted as the ratio of the dose to the hypoxic cells to the dose to the aerobic cells required to produce the same number of DSBs per cell. The validity of these expressions is tested against survival data for mammalian cells irradiated in vitro with low- and high-LET radiation. Estimates of hypoxic and aerobic radiosensitivity parameters are derived from independent and simultaneous least-squares fits to the survival data. An external bootstrap procedure is used to test whether independent fits to the survival data give significantly better predictions than simultaneous fits to the aerobic and hypoxic data. For low-LET radiation, estimates of the OER derived from the in vitro data are between 2.3 and 3.3 for extreme levels of hypoxia. The estimated range for the OER is similar to the oxygen enhancement ratios reported in the literature for the initial yield of DSBs. The half-time for sublethal damage repair was found to be independent of oxygen concentration. Analysis of patient survival data for cervix cancer suggests an average OER less than or equal to 1.5, which corresponds to a pO 2 of 5 mm Hg (0.66%) in the in vitro experiments. Because the OER derived from the cervix cancer data is averaged over cells at all oxygen levels, cells irradiated in vivo under extreme levels of hypoxia (<0.5 mm Hg) may have an OER substantially higher than 1.5. The reported analyses of in vitro data, as well as mechanistic considerations, provide strong support for the expressions relating hypoxic and aerobic radiosensitivity parameters. The formulas are also useful

  2. Importance of time factor (γ/α) of linear quadratic (LQ) model for predicting laryngeal edema in irradiation treatment of early glottic cancer

    Deore, S.M.; Fontenla, D.P.; Beitler, J.J.; Vikram, B.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: The time factor (γ/α) in the LQ model has been considered irrelevant for the late normal tissue injury (1). The failure of the LQ model to predict spinal cord injury in the CHART protocol questions the validity of this hypothesis. In this investigation, the incidence of radiation induced laryngeal edema was evaluated retrospectively in patients treated with different dose fractionation regimes for carcinoma of glottic cancer (2). The BED values of the LQ model calculated for different values of time factor (γ/α) were correlated with the incidence of radiation induced laryngeal edema. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis was carried out for 208 patients T 1 and T 2 squamous cell cancer of the vocal cord treated with radical radiotherapy during 1975-80. There were 156 patients with T 1 lesions and the remaining 52 patients had T 2 lesions. All these patients were treated with three different fractionation regimens of 60.75 Gy/ 27 F/ 39 D, 60 Gy/24 F/34 D and 50 Gy/15 F/ 22 D, using fraction sizes 2.25 Gy, 2.5 Gy and 3.33 Gy, respectively. For the minimum follow up of 4 years, the incidence of laryngeal edema was related to fraction size (see table). To investigate the importance of the time factor (γ/α) of LQ model, BED values were calculated for different values of γ/α and ∞/β = 2.0 Gy. RESULTS: As shown in the table below, the incidence of radiation induced laryngeal edema was found in 17.2% of patients with 2.25 Gy/F compared to 44.4% using 3.33 Gy/F. The TDF model failed to correlate with the incidence of laryngeal edema. The BED values of LQ model also fails to show statistically significant correlation with the incidence of late complications. However, the BED values accounting for the time factor (particularly γ/α = 1.2 Gy/day) show significant improvement in correlation with incidence of laryngeal edema. CONCLUSION: For comparable TDF values the incidence of laryngeal edema varied from 17% to 44.4%. The analysis with

  3. linear-quadratic-linear model

    Tanwiwat Jaikuna

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To develop an in-house software program that is able to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram by physical dose conversion using the linear-quadratic-linear (LQL model. Material and methods : The Isobio software was developed using MATLAB version 2014b to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histograms. The physical dose from each voxel in treatment planning was extracted through Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR, and the accuracy was verified by the differentiation between the dose volume histogram from CERR and the treatment planning system. An equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD2 was calculated using biological effective dose (BED based on the LQL model. The software calculation and the manual calculation were compared for EQD2 verification with pair t-test statistical analysis using IBM SPSS Statistics version 22 (64-bit. Results: Two and three-dimensional biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram were displayed correctly by the Isobio software. Different physical doses were found between CERR and treatment planning system (TPS in Oncentra, with 3.33% in high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV determined by D90%, 0.56% in the bladder, 1.74% in the rectum when determined by D2cc, and less than 1% in Pinnacle. The difference in the EQD2 between the software calculation and the manual calculation was not significantly different with 0.00% at p-values 0.820, 0.095, and 0.593 for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and 0.240, 0.320, and 0.849 for brachytherapy (BT in HR-CTV, bladder, and rectum, respectively. Conclusions : The Isobio software is a feasible tool to generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram for treatment plan evaluation in both EBRT and BT.

  4. Comparison between linear quadratic and early time dose models

    Chougule, A.A.; Supe, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    During the 70s, much interest was focused on fractionation in radiotherapy with the aim of improving tumor control rate without producing unacceptable normal tissue damage. To compare the radiobiological effectiveness of various fractionation schedules, empirical formulae such as Nominal Standard Dose, Time Dose Factor, Cumulative Radiation Effect and Tumour Significant Dose, were introduced and were used despite many shortcomings. It has been claimed that a recent linear quadratic model is able to predict the radiobiological responses of tumours as well as normal tissues more accurately. We compared Time Dose Factor and Tumour Significant Dose models with the linear quadratic model for tumour regression in patients with carcinomas of the cervix. It was observed that the prediction of tumour regression estimated by the Tumour Significant Dose and Time Dose factor concepts varied by 1.6% from that of the linear quadratic model prediction. In view of the lack of knowledge of the precise values of the parameters of the linear quadratic model, it should be applied with caution. One can continue to use the Time Dose Factor concept which has been in use for more than a decade as its results are within ±2% as compared to that predicted by the linear quadratic model. (author). 11 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Underprediction of human skin erythema at low doses per fraction by the linear quadratic model

    Hamilton, Christopher S.; Denham, James W.; O'Brien, Maree; Ostwald, Patricia; Kron, Tomas; Wright, Suzanne; Doerr, Wolfgang

    1996-01-01

    Background and purpose. The erythematous response of human skin to radiotherapy has proven useful for testing the predictions of the linear quadratic (LQ) model in terms of fractionation sensitivity and repair half time. No formal investigation of the response of human skin to doses less than 2 Gy per fraction has occurred. This study aims to test the validity of the LQ model for human skin at doses ranging from 0.4 to 5.2 Gy per fraction. Materials and methods. Complete erythema reaction profiles were obtained using reflectance spectrophotometry in two patient populations: 65 patients treated palliatively with 5, 10, 12 and 20 daily treatment fractions (varying thicknesses of bolus, various body sites) and 52 patients undergoing prostatic irradiation for localised carcinoma of the prostate (no bolus, 30-32 fractions). Results and conclusions. Gender, age, site and prior sun exposure influence pre- and post-treatment erythema values independently of dose administered. Out-of-field effects were also noted. The linear quadratic model significantly underpredicted peak erythema values at doses less than 1.5 Gy per fraction. This suggests that either the conventional linear quadratic model does not apply for low doses per fraction in human skin or that erythema is not exclusively initiated by radiation damage to the basal layer. The data are potentially explained by an induced repair model

  6. On using the linear-quadratic model in daily clinical practice

    Yaes, R.J.; Patel, P.; Maruyama, Y.

    1991-01-01

    To facilitate its use in the clinic, Barendsen's formulation of the Linear-Quadratic (LQ) model is modified by expressing isoeffect doses in terms of the Standard Effective Dose, Ds, the isoeffective dose for the standard fractionation schedule of 2 Gy fractions given once per day, 5 days per week. For any arbitrary fractionation schedule, where total dose D is given in N fractions of size d in a total time T, the corresponding Standard Effective Dose, Ds, will be proportional to the total dose D and the proportionality constant will be called the Standard Relative Effectiveness, SRE, to distinguish it from Barendsen's Relative Effectiveness, RE. Thus, Ds = SRE.D. The constant SRE depends on the parameters of the fractionation schedule, and on the tumor or normal tissue being irradiated. For the simple LQ model with no time dependence, which is applicable to late reacting tissue, SRE = [(d + delta)/(2 + delta)], where d is the fraction size and delta = alpha/beta is the alpha/beta ratio for the tissue of interest, with both d and delta expressed in units of Gy. Application of this method to the Linear Quadratic model with a time dependence, the LQ + time model, and to low dose rate brachytherapy will be discussed. To clarify the method of calculation, and to demonstrate its simplicity, examples from the clinical literature will be used

  7. Radiotherapy treatment planning linear-quadratic radiobiology

    Chapman, J Donald

    2015-01-01

    Understand Quantitative Radiobiology from a Radiation Biophysics PerspectiveIn the field of radiobiology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) equation has become the standard for defining radiation-induced cell killing. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning: Linear-Quadratic Radiobiology describes tumor cell inactivation from a radiation physics perspective and offers appropriate LQ parameters for modeling tumor and normal tissue responses.Explore the Latest Cell Killing Numbers for Defining Iso-Effective Cancer TreatmentsThe book compil

  8. Linear-quadratic model predictions for tumor control probability

    Yaes, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Sigmoid dose-response curves for tumor control are calculated from the linear-quadratic model parameters α and Β, obtained from human epidermoid carcinoma cell lines, and are much steeper than the clinical dose-response curves for head and neck cancers. One possible explanation is the presence of small radiation-resistant clones arising from mutations in an initially homogeneous tumor. Using the mutation theory of Delbruck and Luria and of Goldie and Coldman, the authors discuss the implications of such radiation-resistant clones for clinical radiation therapy

  9. Comments on a time-dependent version of the linear-quadratic model

    Tucker, S.L.; Travis, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy and interpretation of the 'LQ + time' model are discussed. Evidence is presented, based on data in the literature, that this model does not accurately describe the changes in isoeffect dose occurring with protraction of the overall treatment time during fractionated irradiation of the lung. This lack of fit of the model explains, in part, the surprisingly large values of γ/α that have been derived from experimental lung data. The large apparent time factors for lung suggested by the model are also partly explained by the fact that γT/α, despite having units of dose, actually measures the influence of treatment time on the effect scale, not the dose scale, and is shown to consistently overestimate the change in total dose. The unusually high values of α/β that have been derived for lung using the model are shown to be influenced by the method by which the model was fitted to data. Reanalyses of the data using a more statistically valid regression procedure produce estimates of α/β more typical of those usually cited for lung. Most importantly, published isoeffect data from lung indicate that the true deviation from the linear-quadratic (LQ) model is nonlinear in time, instead of linear, and also depends on other factors such as the effect level and the size of dose per fraction. Thus, the authors do not advocate the use of the 'LQ + time' expression as a general isoeffect model. (author). 32 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  10. On the analysis of clonogenic survival data: Statistical alternatives to the linear-quadratic model

    Unkel, Steffen; Belka, Claus; Lauber, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently used method to quantitatively describe the response to ionizing irradiation in terms of clonogenic survival is the linear-quadratic (LQ) model. In the LQ model, the logarithm of the surviving fraction is regressed linearly on the radiation dose by means of a second-degree polynomial. The ratio of the estimated parameters for the linear and quadratic term, respectively, represents the dose at which both terms have the same weight in the abrogation of clonogenic survival. This ratio is known as the α/β ratio. However, there are plausible scenarios in which the α/β ratio fails to sufficiently reflect differences between dose-response curves, for example when curves with similar α/β ratio but different overall steepness are being compared. In such situations, the interpretation of the LQ model is severely limited. Colony formation assays were performed in order to measure the clonogenic survival of nine human pancreatic cancer cell lines and immortalized human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells upon irradiation at 0-10 Gy. The resulting dataset was subjected to LQ regression and non-linear log-logistic regression. Dimensionality reduction of the data was performed by cluster analysis and principal component analysis. Both the LQ model and the non-linear log-logistic regression model resulted in accurate approximations of the observed dose-response relationships in the dataset of clonogenic survival. However, in contrast to the LQ model the non-linear regression model allowed the discrimination of curves with different overall steepness but similar α/β ratio and revealed an improved goodness-of-fit. Additionally, the estimated parameters in the non-linear model exhibit a more direct interpretation than the α/β ratio. Dimensionality reduction of clonogenic survival data by means of cluster analysis was shown to be a useful tool for classifying radioresistant and sensitive cell lines. More quantitatively, principal component analysis allowed

  11. Linear-quadratic model underestimates sparing effect of small doses per fraction in rat spinal cord

    Shun Wong, C.; Toronto University; Minkin, S.; Hill, R.P.; Toronto University

    1993-01-01

    The application of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to describe iso-effective fractionation schedules for dose fraction sizes less than 2 Gy has been controversial. Experiments are described in which the effect of daily fractionated irradiation given with a wide range of fraction sizes was assessed in rat cervical spine cord. The first group of rats was given doses in 1, 2, 4, 8 and 40 fractions/day. The second group received 3 initial 'top-up'doses of 9 Gy given once daily, representing 3/4 tolerance, followed by doses in 1, 2, 10, 20, 30 and 40 fractions/day. The fractionated portion of the irradiation schedule therefore constituted only the final quarter of the tolerance dose. The endpoint of the experiments was paralysis of forelimbs secondary to white matter necrosis. Direct analysis of data from experiments with full course fractionation up to 40 fractions/day (25.0-1.98 Gy/fraction) indicated consistency with the LQ model yielding an α/β value of 2.41 Gy. Analysis of data from experiments in which the 3 'top-up' doses were followed by up to 10 fractions (10.0-1.64 Gy/fraction) gave an α/β value of 3.41 Gy. However, data from 'top-up' experiments with 20, 30 and 40 fractions (1.60-0.55 Gy/fraction) were inconsistent with LQ model and gave a very small α/β of 0.48 Gy. It is concluded that LQ model based on data from large doses/fraction underestimates the sparing effect of small doses/fraction, provided sufficient time is allowed between each fraction for repair of sublethal damage. (author). 28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  12. A generalized linear-quadratic model incorporating reciprocal time pattern of radiation damage repair

    Huang, Zhibin; Mayr, Nina A.; Lo, Simon S.; Wang, Jian Z.; Jia Guang; Yuh, William T. C.; Johnke, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: It has been conventionally assumed that the repair rate for sublethal damage (SLD) remains constant during the entire radiation course. However, increasing evidence from animal studies suggest that this may not the case. Rather, it appears that the repair rate for radiation-induced SLD slows down with increasing time. Such a slowdown in repair would suggest that the exponential repair pattern would not necessarily accurately predict repair process. As a result, the purpose of this study was to investigate a new generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model incorporating a repair pattern with reciprocal time. The new formulas were tested with published experimental data. Methods: The LQ model has been widely used in radiation therapy, and the parameter G in the surviving fraction represents the repair process of sublethal damage with T r as the repair half-time. When a reciprocal pattern of repair process was adopted, a closed form of G was derived analytically for arbitrary radiation schemes. The published animal data adopted to test the reciprocal formulas. Results: A generalized LQ model to describe the repair process in a reciprocal pattern was obtained. Subsequently, formulas for special cases were derived from this general form. The reciprocal model showed a better fit to the animal data than the exponential model, particularly for the ED50 data (reduced χ 2 min of 2.0 vs 4.3, p = 0.11 vs 0.006), with the following gLQ parameters: α/β = 2.6-4.8 Gy, T r = 3.2-3.9 h for rat feet skin, and α/β = 0.9 Gy, T r = 1.1 h for rat spinal cord. Conclusions: These results of repair process following a reciprocal time suggest that the generalized LQ model incorporating the reciprocal time of sublethal damage repair shows a better fit than the exponential repair model. These formulas can be used to analyze the experimental and clinical data, where a slowing-down repair process appears during the course of radiation therapy.

  13. [The enigma of the biological interpretation of the linear-quadratic model finally resolved? A summary for non-mathematicians].

    Bodgi, L; Canet, A; Granzotto, A; Britel, M; Puisieux, A; Bourguignon, M; Foray, N

    2016-06-01

    The linear-quadratic (LQ) model is the only mathematical formula linking cellular survival and radiation dose that is sufficiently consensual to help radiation oncologists and radiobiologists in describing the radiation-induced events. However, this formula proposed in the 1970s and α and β parameters on which it is based remained without relevant biological meaning. From a collection of cutaneous fibroblasts with different radiosensitivity, built over 12 years by more than 50 French radiation oncologists, we recently pointed out that the ATM protein, major actor of the radiation response, diffuses from the cytoplasm to the nucleus after irradiation. The evidence of this nuclear shuttling of ATM allowed us to provide a biological interpretation of the LQ model in its mathematical features, validated by a hundred of radiosensitive cases. A mechanistic explanation of the radiosensitivity of syndromes caused by the mutation of cytoplasmic proteins and of the hypersensitivity to low-dose phenomenon has been proposed, as well. In this review, we present our resolution of the LQ model in the most didactic way. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Biologically effective dose distribution based on the linear quadratic model and its clinical relevance

    Lee, Steve P.; Leu, Min Y.; Smathers, James B.; McBride, William H.; Parker, Robert G.; Withers, H. Rodney

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy plans based on physical dose distributions do not necessarily entirely reflect the biological effects under various fractionation schemes. Over the past decade, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has emerged as a convenient tool to quantify biological effects for radiotherapy. In this work, we set out to construct a mechanism to display biologically oriented dose distribution based on the LQ model. Methods and Materials: A computer program that converts a physical dose distribution calculated by a commercially available treatment planning system to a biologically effective dose (BED) distribution has been developed and verified against theoretical calculations. This software accepts a user's input of biological parameters for each structure of interest (linear and quadratic dose-response and repopulation kinetic parameters), as well as treatment scheme factors (number of fractions, fractional dose, and treatment time). It then presents a two-dimensional BED display in conjunction with anatomical structures. Furthermore, to facilitate clinicians' intuitive comparison with conventional fractionation regimen, a conversion of BED to normalized isoeffective dose (NID) is also allowed. Results: Two sample cases serve to illustrate the application of our tool in clinical practice. (a) For an orthogonal wedged pair of x-ray beams treating a maxillary sinus tumor, the biological effect at the ipsilateral mandible can be quantified, thus illustrates the so-called 'double-trouble' effects very well. (b) For a typical four-field, evenly weighted prostate treatment using 10 MV x-rays, physical dosimetry predicts a comparable dose at the femoral necks between an alternate two-fields/day and four-fields/day schups. However, our BED display reveals an approximate 21% higher BED for the two-fields/day scheme. This excessive dose to the femoral necks can be eliminated if the treatment is delivered with a 3:2 (anterio-posterior/posterio-anterior (AP

  15. Tip-tilt disturbance model identification based on non-linear least squares fitting for Linear Quadratic Gaussian control

    Yang, Kangjian; Yang, Ping; Wang, Shuai; Dong, Lizhi; Xu, Bing

    2018-05-01

    We propose a method to identify tip-tilt disturbance model for Linear Quadratic Gaussian control. This identification method based on Levenberg-Marquardt method conducts with a little prior information and no auxiliary system and it is convenient to identify the tip-tilt disturbance model on-line for real-time control. This identification method makes it easy that Linear Quadratic Gaussian control runs efficiently in different adaptive optics systems for vibration mitigation. The validity of the Linear Quadratic Gaussian control associated with this tip-tilt disturbance model identification method is verified by experimental data, which is conducted in replay mode by simulation.

  16. An online re-linearization scheme suited for Model Predictive and Linear Quadratic Control

    Henriksen, Lars Christian; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    This technical note documents the equations for primal-dual interior-point quadratic programming problem solver used for MPC. The algorithm exploits the special structure of the MPC problem and is able to reduce the computational burden such that the computational burden scales with prediction...... horizon length in a linear way rather than cubic, which would be the case if the structure was not exploited. It is also shown how models used for design of model-based controllers, e.g. linear quadratic and model predictive, can be linearized both at equilibrium and non-equilibrium points, making...

  17. A linear-quadratic model of cell survival considering both sublethal and potentially lethal radiation damage

    Rutz, H.P.; Coucke, P.A.; Mirimanoff, R.O.

    1991-01-01

    The authors assessed the dose-dependence of repair of potentially lethal damage in Chinese hamster ovary cells x-irradiated in vitro. The recovery ratio (RR) by which survival (SF) of the irradiated cells was enhanced increased exponentially with a linear and a quadratic component namely ζ and ψ: RR=exp(ζD+ψD 2 ). Survival of irradiated cells can thus be expressed by a combined linear-quadratic model considering 4 variables, namely α and β for the capacity of the cells to accumulate sublethal damage, and ζ and ψ for their capacity to repair potentially lethal damage: SF=exp((ζ-α)D+ (ψ-β)D 2 ). author. 26 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  18. Application of the linear-quadratic model to myelotoxicity associated with radioimmunotherapy

    Wilder, R.B.; DeNardo, G.L.; Sheri, S.; Fowler, J.F.; Wessels, B.W.; DeNardo, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were: To use the linear-quadratic model to determine time-dependent biologically effective doses (BEDs) that were delivered to the bone marrow by multiple infusions of radiolabeled antibodies, and (2) to determine whether granulocyte and platelet counts correlate better with BED than administered radioactivity. Twenty patients with B-cell malignancies that had progressed despite intensive chemotherapy and who had a significant number of malignant cells in their bone marrow were treated with multiple 0.7-3.7 GBq/m 2 intravenous infusions of Lym-1, a murine monoclonal antibody that binds to a tumour-associated antigen, labeled with iodine-131. Granulocyte and platelet counts were measured in order to assess bone marrow toxicity. The cumulative 131 I-Lym-1 radioactivity administered to each patient was calculated. BEDs from multiple 131 I-Lym-1 infusions were summated in order to arrive at a total BED for each patient. There was a weak association between granulocyte and platelet counts and radioactivity. Likewise, there was a weak association between granulocyte and platelet counts and BED. The attempt to take bone marrow absorbed doses and overall treatment time into consideration with the linear-quadratic model did not produce a stronger association than was observed between peripheral blood counts and administered radioactivity. The association between granulocyte and platelet counts and BED may have been weakened by several factors, including variable bone marrow reserve at the start of 131 I-Lym-1 therapy and the delivery of heterogeneous, absorbed doses of radiation to the bone marrow. (orig./MG)

  19. Radiobiological evaluation of the radiation dose as used in high-precision radiotherapy. Effect of prolonged delivery time and applicability of the linear-quadratic model

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Otsuka, Shinya; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Sugie, Chikao; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Natsuo

    2012-01-01

    Since the dose delivery pattern in high-precision radiotherapy is different from that in conventional radiation, radiobiological assessment of the physical dose used in stereotactic irradiation and intensity-modulated radiotherapy has become necessary. In these treatments, the daily dose is usually given intermittently over a time longer than that used in conventional radiotherapy. During prolonged radiation delivery, sublethal damage repair takes place, leading to the decreased effect of radiation. This phenomenon is almost universarily observed in vitro. In in vivo tumors, however, this decrease in effect can be counterbalanced by rapid reoxygenation, which has been demonstrated in a laboratory study. Studies on reoxygenation in human tumors are warranted to better evaluate the influence of prolonged radiation delivery. Another issue related to radiosurgery and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy is the mathematical model for dose evaluation and conversion. Many clinicians use the linear-quadratic (LQ) model and biologically effective dose (BED) to estimate the effects of various radiation schedules, but it has been suggested that the LQ model is not applicable to high doses per fraction. Recent experimental studies verified the inadequacy of the LQ model in converting hypofractionated doses into single doses. The LQ model overestimates the effect of high fractional doses of radiation. BED is particularly incorrect when it is used for tumor responses in vivo, since it does not take reoxygenation into account. For normal tissue responses, improved models have been proposed, but, for in vivo tumor responses, the currently available models are not satisfactory, and better ones should be proposed in future studies. (author)

  20. Neural network-based nonlinear model predictive control vs. linear quadratic gaussian control

    Cho, C.; Vance, R.; Mardi, N.; Qian, Z.; Prisbrey, K.

    1997-01-01

    One problem with the application of neural networks to the multivariable control of mineral and extractive processes is determining whether and how to use them. The objective of this investigation was to compare neural network control to more conventional strategies and to determine if there are any advantages in using neural network control in terms of set-point tracking, rise time, settling time, disturbance rejection and other criteria. The procedure involved developing neural network controllers using both historical plant data and simulation models. Various control patterns were tried, including both inverse and direct neural network plant models. These were compared to state space controllers that are, by nature, linear. For grinding and leaching circuits, a nonlinear neural network-based model predictive control strategy was superior to a state space-based linear quadratic gaussian controller. The investigation pointed out the importance of incorporating state space into neural networks by making them recurrent, i.e., feeding certain output state variables into input nodes in the neural network. It was concluded that neural network controllers can have better disturbance rejection, set-point tracking, rise time, settling time and lower set-point overshoot, and it was also concluded that neural network controllers can be more reliable and easy to implement in complex, multivariable plants.

  1. Evaluation of uneven fractionation radiotherapy of cervical lymph node-metastases by linear quadratic model

    Sasaki, Takehito; Kamata, Rikisaburo; Urahashi, Shingo; Yamaguchi, Tetsuji.

    1993-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-nine cervical lymph node-metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinomas treated with either even fractionation or uneven fractionation regimens were analyzed in the present investigation. Logistic multivariate regression analysis indicated that: type of fractionation (even vs uneven), size of metastases, T value of primary tumors, and total dose are independent variables out of 18 variables that significantly influenced the rate of tumor clearance. The data, with statistical bias corrected by the regression equation, indicated that the uneven fractionation scheme significantly improved the rate of tumor clearance for the same size of metastases, total dose, and overall time compared to the even fractionation scheme. Further analysis by a linear-quadratic cell survival model indicated that the clinical improvement by uneven fractionation might not be explained entirely by a larger dose per fraction. It is suggested that tumor cells irradiated with an uneven fractionation regimen might repopulate more slowly, or they might be either less hypoxic or redistributed in a more radiosensitive phase in the cell cycle than those irradiated with even fractionation. This conclusion is clearly not definite, but it is suitable, pending the results of further investigation. (author)

  2. A computer tool for daily application of the linear quadratic model

    Macias Jaen, J.; Galan Montenegro, P.; Bodineau Gil, C.; Wals Zurita, A.; Serradilla Gil, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to indicate the relevance of the criteria A.S.A.R.A. (As Short As Reasonably Achievable) in the optimization of a fractionated radiotherapy schedule and the presentation of a Windows computer program as an easy tool in order to: Evaluate the Biological Equivalent Dose (BED) in a fractionated schedule; Make comparison between different treatments; Compensate a treatment when a delay has been happened with a version of the Linear Quadratic model that has into account the factor of accelerated repopulation. Conclusions: Delays in the normal radiotherapy schedule are items that have to be controlled as much as possible because it is able to be a very important parameter in order to release a good application of treatment, principally when the tumour is fast growing. It is necessary to evaluate them. ASARA criteria is useful to indicate the relevance of this aspect. Also, computer tools like this one could help us in order to achieve this. (author)

  3. Stochastic Linear Quadratic Optimal Control Problems

    Chen, S.; Yong, J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the stochastic linear quadratic optimal control problem (LQ problem, for short) for which the coefficients are allowed to be random and the cost functional is allowed to have a negative weight on the square of the control variable. Some intrinsic relations among the LQ problem, the stochastic maximum principle, and the (linear) forward-backward stochastic differential equations are established. Some results involving Riccati equation are discussed as well

  4. Results of radiotherapy in craniopharyngiomas analysed by the linear quadratic model

    Guerkaynak, M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Oezyar, E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Zorlu, F. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Akyol, F.H. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Lale Atahan, I. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey)

    1994-12-31

    In 23 craniopharyngioma patients treated by limited surgery and external radiotherapy, the results concerning local control were analysed by linear quadratic formula. A biologically effective dose (BED) of 55 Gy, calculated with time factor and an {alpha}/{beta} value of 10 Gy, seemed to be adequate for local control. (orig.).

  5. Application of the linear-quadratic model with incomplete repair to radionuclide directed therapy

    Millar, W.T.; Glasgow Univ.

    1991-01-01

    The LQ model has now been extended to include a general time varying dose rate profile, and the equations can be readily evaluated if an exponential radiation damage repair process is assumed. These equations are applicable to radionuclide directed therapy, including brachytherapy. Kinetic uptake data obtained during radionuclide directed therapy may therefore be used to determine the radiobiological dosimetry of the target and non-target tissues. Also, preliminary tracer studies may be used to pre-plan the radionuclide directed therapy, provided that tracer and therapeutic amounts of the radionuclide carrier are identically processed by the tissues. It is also shown that continuous radionuclide therapy will induce less damage in late-responding tissues than 2 Gy/fraction external beam therapy if the ratio of the maximum dose rate and the sublethal damage repair half-life in the tissue is less than 1.0 Gy. Similar inequalities may be derived for β-particle radionuclide directed therapy. (author)

  6. Biological equivalence between LDR and PDR in cervical cancer: multifactor analysis using the linear-quadratic model

    José Guilherme Couto; Isabel Bravo; Rui Pirraco

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was the biological comparison between Low Dose Rate (LDR) and Pulsed Dose Rate (PDR) in cervical cancer regarding the discontinuation of the afterloading system used for the LDR treatments at our Institution since December 2009. Material and methods In the first phase we studied the influence of the pulse dose and the pulse time in the biological equivalence between LDR and PDR treatments using the Linear Quadratic Model (LQM). In the second phase, the equival...

  7. Medium-dose-rate brachytherapy of cancer of the cervix: preliminary results of a prospectively designed schedule based on the linear-quadratic model

    Leborgne, Felix; Fowler, Jack F.; Leborgne, Jose H.; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Curochquin, Rene

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To compare results and complications of our previous low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy schedule for early-stage cancer of the cervix, with a prospectively designed medium-dose-rate (MDR) schedule, based on the linear-quadratic model (LQ). Methods and Materials: A combination of brachytherapy, external beam pelvic and parametrial irradiation was used in 102 consecutive Stage Ib-IIb LDR treated patients (1986-1990) and 42 equally staged MDR treated patients (1994-1996). The planned MDR schedule consisted of three insertions on three treatment days with six 8-Gy brachytherapy fractions to Point A, two on each treatment day with an interfraction interval of 6 hours, plus 18 Gy external whole pelvic dose, and followed by additional parametrial irradiation. The calculated biologically effective dose (BED) for tumor was 90 Gy 10 and for rectum below 125 Gy 3 . Results: In practice the MDR brachytherapy schedule achieved a tumor BED of 86 Gy 10 and a rectal BED of 101 Gy 3 . The latter was better than originally planned due to a reduction from 85% to 77% in the percentage of the mean dose to the rectum in relation to Point A. The mean overall treatment time was 10 days shorter for MDR in comparison with LDR. The 3-year actuarial central control for LDR and MDR was 97% and 98% (p = NS), respectively. The Grades 2 and 3 late complications (scale 0 to 3) were 1% and 2.4%, respectively for LDR (3-year) and MDR (2-year). Conclusions: LQ is a reliable tool for designing new schedules with altered fractionation and dose rates. The MDR schedule has proven to be an equivalent treatment schedule compared with LDR, with an additional advantage of having a shorter overall treatment time. The mean rectal BED Gy 3 was lower than expected

  8. NTCP modelling of lung toxicity after SBRT comparing the universal survival curve and the linear quadratic model for fractionation correction

    Wennberg, Berit M.; Baumann, Pia; Gagliardi, Giovanna

    2011-01-01

    Background. In SBRT of lung tumours no established relationship between dose-volume parameters and the incidence of lung toxicity is found. The aim of this study is to compare the LQ model and the universal survival curve (USC) to calculate biologically equivalent doses in SBRT to see if this will improve knowledge on this relationship. Material and methods. Toxicity data on radiation pneumonitis grade 2 or more (RP2+) from 57 patients were used, 10.5% were diagnosed with RP2+. The lung DVHs were corrected for fractionation (LQ and USC) and analysed with the Lyman- Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. In the LQ-correction α/β = 3 Gy was used and the USC parameters used were: α/β = 3 Gy, D 0 = 1.0 Gy, n = 10, α 0.206 Gy-1 and d T = 5.8 Gy. In order to understand the relative contribution of different dose levels to the calculated NTCP the concept of fractional NTCP was used. This might give an insight to the questions of whether 'high doses to small volumes' or 'low doses to large volumes' are most important for lung toxicity. Results and Discussion. NTCP analysis with the LKB-model using parameters m = 0.4, D50 = 30 Gy resulted for the volume dependence parameter (n) with LQ correction n = 0.87 and with USC correction n = 0.71. Using parameters m = 0.3, D 50 = 20 Gy n = 0.93 with LQ correction and n 0.83 with USC correction. In SBRT of lung tumours, NTCP modelling of lung toxicity comparing models (LQ,USC) for fractionation correction, shows that low dose contribute less and high dose more to the NTCP when using the USC-model. Comparing NTCP modelling of SBRT data and data from breast cancer, lung cancer and whole lung irradiation implies that the response of the lung is treatment specific. More data are however needed in order to have a more reliable modelling

  9. Parallel Implementation of Riccati Recursion for Solving Linear-Quadratic Control Problems

    Frison, Gianluca; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2013-01-01

    In both Active-Set (AS) and Interior-Point (IP) algorithms for Model Predictive Control (MPC), sub-problems in the form of linear-quadratic (LQ) control problems need to be solved at each iteration. The solution of these sub-problems is usually the main computational effort. In this paper...... an alternative version of the Riccati recursion solver for LQ control problems is presented. The performance of both the classical and the alternative version is analyzed from a theoretical as well as a numerical point of view, and the alternative version is found to be approximately 50% faster than...

  10. Gain-scheduled Linear Quadratic Control of Wind Turbines Operating at High Wind Speed

    Østergaard, Kasper Zinck; Stoustrup, Jakob; Brath, Per

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses state estimation and linear quadratic (LQ) control of variable speed variable pitch wind turbines. On the basis of a nonlinear model of a wind turbine, a set of operating conditions is identified and a LQ controller is designed for each operating point. The controller gains...... are then interpolated linearly to get a control law for the entire operating envelope. A nonlinear state estimator is designed as a combination of two unscented Kalman filters and a linear disturbance estimator. The gain-scheduling variable (wind speed) is then calculated from the output of these state estimators...

  11. Linear quadratic optimization for positive LTI system

    Muhafzan, Yenti, Syafrida Wirma; Zulakmal

    2017-05-01

    Nowaday the linear quadratic optimization subject to positive linear time invariant (LTI) system constitute an interesting study considering it can become a mathematical model of variety of real problem whose variables have to nonnegative and trajectories generated by these variables must be nonnegative. In this paper we propose a method to generate an optimal control of linear quadratic optimization subject to positive linear time invariant (LTI) system. A sufficient condition that guarantee the existence of such optimal control is discussed.

  12. The Linear Quadratic Adjustment Cost Model and the Demand for Labour

    Engsted, Tom; Haldrup, Niels

    1994-01-01

    Der udvikles en ny metode til estimation og test af den lineære kvadratiske tilpasningsomkostningsmodel når de underliggende tidsserier er ikke-stationære, og metoden anvendes til modellering af arbejdskraftefterspørgslen i danske industrisektorer.......Der udvikles en ny metode til estimation og test af den lineære kvadratiske tilpasningsomkostningsmodel når de underliggende tidsserier er ikke-stationære, og metoden anvendes til modellering af arbejdskraftefterspørgslen i danske industrisektorer....

  13. SU-F-T-02: Estimation of Radiobiological Doses (BED and EQD2) of Single Fraction Electronic Brachytherapy That Equivalent to I-125 Eye Plaque: By Using Linear-Quadratic and Universal Survival Curve Models

    Kim, Y; Waldron, T; Pennington, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the radiobiological impact of hypofractionated choroidal melanoma brachytherapy, we calculated single fraction equivalent doses (SFED) of the tumor that equivalent to 85 Gy of I125-BT for 20 patients. Corresponding organs-at-risks (OARs) doses were estimated. Methods: Twenty patients treated with I125-BT were retrospectively examined. The tumor SFED values were calculated from tumor BED using a conventional linear-quadratic (L-Q) model and an universal survival curve (USC). The opposite retina (α/β = 2.58), macula (2.58), optic disc (1.75), and lens (1.2) were examined. The % doses of OARs over tumor doses were assumed to be the same as for a single fraction delivery. The OAR SFED values were converted into BED and equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD2) by using both L-Q and USC models, then compared to I125-BT. Results: The USC-based BED and EQD2 doses of the macula, optic disc, and the lens were on average 118 ± 46% (p 14 Gy). Conclusion: The estimated single fraction doses were feasible to be delivered within 1 hour using a high dose rate source such as electronic brachytherapy (eBT). However, the estimated OAR doses using eBT were 112 ∼ 118% higher than when using the I125-BT technique. Continued exploration of alternative dose rate or fractionation schedules should be followed.

  14. Investigation of various growth mechanisms of solid tumour growth within the linear-quadratic model for radiotherapy

    McAneney, H; O'Rourke, S F C

    2007-01-01

    The standard linear-quadratic survival model for radiotherapy is used to investigate different schedules of radiation treatment planning to study how these may be affected by different tumour repopulation kinetics between treatments. The laws for tumour cell repopulation include the logistic and Gompertz models and this extends the work of Wheldon et al (1977 Br. J. Radiol. 50 681), which was concerned with the case of exponential re-growth between treatments. Here we also consider the restricted exponential model. This has been successfully used by Panetta and Adam (1995 Math. Comput. Modelling 22 67) in the case of chemotherapy treatment planning.Treatment schedules investigated include standard fractionation of daily treatments, weekday treatments, accelerated fractionation, optimized uniform schedules and variation of the dosage and α/β ratio, where α and β are radiobiological parameters for the tumour tissue concerned. Parameters for these treatment strategies are extracted from the literature on advanced head and neck cancer, prostate cancer, as well as radiosensitive parameters. Standardized treatment protocols are also considered. Calculations based on the present analysis indicate that even with growth laws scaled to mimic initial growth, such that growth mechanisms are comparable, variation in survival fraction to orders of magnitude emerged. Calculations show that the logistic and exponential models yield similar results in tumour eradication. By comparison the Gompertz model calculations indicate that tumours described by this law result in a significantly poorer prognosis for tumour eradication than either the exponential or logistic models. The present study also shows that the faster the tumour growth rate and the higher the repair capacity of the cell line, the greater the variation in outcome of the survival fraction. Gaps in treatment, planned or unplanned, also accentuate the differences of the survival fraction given alternative growth

  15. Isobio software: biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram from physical dose conversion using linear-quadratic-linear model.

    Jaikuna, Tanwiwat; Khadsiri, Phatchareewan; Chawapun, Nisa; Saekho, Suwit; Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit

    2017-02-01

    To develop an in-house software program that is able to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram by physical dose conversion using the linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model. The Isobio software was developed using MATLAB version 2014b to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histograms. The physical dose from each voxel in treatment planning was extracted through Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR), and the accuracy was verified by the differentiation between the dose volume histogram from CERR and the treatment planning system. An equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD 2 ) was calculated using biological effective dose (BED) based on the LQL model. The software calculation and the manual calculation were compared for EQD 2 verification with pair t -test statistical analysis using IBM SPSS Statistics version 22 (64-bit). Two and three-dimensional biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram were displayed correctly by the Isobio software. Different physical doses were found between CERR and treatment planning system (TPS) in Oncentra, with 3.33% in high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) determined by D 90% , 0.56% in the bladder, 1.74% in the rectum when determined by D 2cc , and less than 1% in Pinnacle. The difference in the EQD 2 between the software calculation and the manual calculation was not significantly different with 0.00% at p -values 0.820, 0.095, and 0.593 for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and 0.240, 0.320, and 0.849 for brachytherapy (BT) in HR-CTV, bladder, and rectum, respectively. The Isobio software is a feasible tool to generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram for treatment plan evaluation in both EBRT and BT.

  16. Biological equivalence between LDR and PDR in cervical cancer: multifactor analysis using the linear-quadratic model

    José Guilherme Couto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this work was the biological comparison between Low Dose Rate (LDR and Pulsed DoseRate (PDR in cervical cancer regarding the discontinuation of the afterloading system used for the LDR treatments atour Institution since December 2009. Material and methods: In the first phase we studied the influence of the pulse dose and the pulse time in the biologicalequivalence between LDR and PDR treatments using the Linear Quadratic Model (LQM. In the second phase,the equivalent dose in 2 Gy/fraction (EQD2 for the tumor, rectum and bladder in treatments performed with both techniqueswas evaluated and statistically compared. All evaluated patients had stage IIB cervical cancer and were treatedwith External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT plus two Brachytherapy (BT applications. Data were collected from 48 patients(26 patients treated with LDR and 22 patients with PDR. Results: In the analyses of the influence of PDR parameters in the biological equivalence between LDR and PDRtreatments (Phase 1, it was calculated that if the pulse dose in PDR was kept equal to the LDR dose rate, a small therapeuticloss was expected. If the pulse dose was decreased, the therapeutic window became larger, but a correction inthe prescribed dose was necessary. In PDR schemes with 1 hour interval between pulses, the pulse time did not influencesignificantly the equivalent dose. In the comparison between the groups treated with LDR and PDR (Phase 2 weconcluded that they were not equivalent, because in the PDR group the total EQD2 for the tumor, rectum and bladderwas smaller than in the LDR group; the LQM estimated that a correction in the prescribed dose of 6% to 10% was ne -cessary to avoid therapeutic loss. Conclusions: A correction in the prescribed dose was necessary; this correction should be achieved by calculatingthe PDR dose equivalent to the desired LDR total dose.

  17. Biological equivalence between LDR and PDR in cervical cancer: multifactor analysis using the linear-quadratic model.

    Couto, José Guilherme; Bravo, Isabel; Pirraco, Rui

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this work was the biological comparison between Low Dose Rate (LDR) and Pulsed Dose Rate (PDR) in cervical cancer regarding the discontinuation of the afterloading system used for the LDR treatments at our Institution since December 2009. In the first phase we studied the influence of the pulse dose and the pulse time in the biological equivalence between LDR and PDR treatments using the Linear Quadratic Model (LQM). In the second phase, the equivalent dose in 2 Gy/fraction (EQD(2)) for the tumor, rectum and bladder in treatments performed with both techniques was evaluated and statistically compared. All evaluated patients had stage IIB cervical cancer and were treated with External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) plus two Brachytherapy (BT) applications. Data were collected from 48 patients (26 patients treated with LDR and 22 patients with PDR). In the analyses of the influence of PDR parameters in the biological equivalence between LDR and PDR treatments (Phase 1), it was calculated that if the pulse dose in PDR was kept equal to the LDR dose rate, a small the-rapeutic loss was expected. If the pulse dose was decreased, the therapeutic window became larger, but a correction in the prescribed dose was necessary. In PDR schemes with 1 hour interval between pulses, the pulse time did not influence significantly the equivalent dose. In the comparison between the groups treated with LDR and PDR (Phase 2) we concluded that they were not equivalent, because in the PDR group the total EQD(2) for the tumor, rectum and bladder was smaller than in the LDR group; the LQM estimated that a correction in the prescribed dose of 6% to 10% was ne-cessary to avoid therapeutic loss. A correction in the prescribed dose was necessary; this correction should be achieved by calculating the PDR dose equivalent to the desired LDR total dose.

  18. Optimal linear-quadratic control of coupled parabolic-hyperbolic PDEs

    Aksikas, I.; Moghadam, A. Alizadeh; Forbes, J. F.

    2017-10-01

    This paper focuses on the optimal control design for a system of coupled parabolic-hypebolic partial differential equations by using the infinite-dimensional state-space description and the corresponding operator Riccati equation. Some dynamical properties of the coupled system of interest are analysed to guarantee the existence and uniqueness of the solution of the linear-quadratic (LQ)-optimal control problem. A state LQ-feedback operator is computed by solving the operator Riccati equation, which is converted into a set of algebraic and differential Riccati equations, thanks to the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors of the parabolic operator. The results are applied to a non-isothermal packed-bed catalytic reactor. The LQ-optimal controller designed in the early portion of the paper is implemented for the original nonlinear model. Numerical simulations are performed to show the controller performances.

  19. Efficient Implementation of the Riccati Recursion for Solving Linear-Quadratic Control Problems

    Frison, Gianluca; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2013-01-01

    In both Active-Set (AS) and Interior-Point (IP) algorithms for Model Predictive Control (MPC), sub-problems in the form of linear-quadratic (LQ) control problems need to be solved at each iteration. The solution of these sub-problems is typically the main computational effort at each iteration....... In this paper, we compare a number of solvers for an extended formulation of the LQ control problem: a Riccati recursion based solver can be considered the best choice for the general problem with dense matrices. Furthermore, we present a novel version of the Riccati solver, that makes use of the Cholesky...... factorization of the Pn matrices to reduce the number of flops. When combined with regularization and mixed precision, this algorithm can solve large instances of the LQ control problem up to 3 times faster than the classical Riccati solver....

  20. SU-F-T-02: Estimation of Radiobiological Doses (BED and EQD2) of Single Fraction Electronic Brachytherapy That Equivalent to I-125 Eye Plaque: By Using Linear-Quadratic and Universal Survival Curve Models

    Kim, Y; Waldron, T; Pennington, E [University Of Iowa, College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To test the radiobiological impact of hypofractionated choroidal melanoma brachytherapy, we calculated single fraction equivalent doses (SFED) of the tumor that equivalent to 85 Gy of I125-BT for 20 patients. Corresponding organs-at-risks (OARs) doses were estimated. Methods: Twenty patients treated with I125-BT were retrospectively examined. The tumor SFED values were calculated from tumor BED using a conventional linear-quadratic (L-Q) model and an universal survival curve (USC). The opposite retina (α/β = 2.58), macula (2.58), optic disc (1.75), and lens (1.2) were examined. The % doses of OARs over tumor doses were assumed to be the same as for a single fraction delivery. The OAR SFED values were converted into BED and equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD2) by using both L-Q and USC models, then compared to I125-BT. Results: The USC-based BED and EQD2 doses of the macula, optic disc, and the lens were on average 118 ± 46% (p < 0.0527), 126 ± 43% (p < 0.0354), and 112 ± 32% (p < 0.0265) higher than those of I125-BT, respectively. The BED and EQD2 doses of the opposite retina were 52 ± 9% lower than I125-BT. The tumor SFED values were 25.2 ± 3.3 Gy and 29.1 ± 2.5 Gy when using USC and LQ models which can be delivered within 1 hour. All BED and EQD2 values using L-Q model were significantly larger when compared to the USC model (p < 0.0274) due to its large single fraction size (> 14 Gy). Conclusion: The estimated single fraction doses were feasible to be delivered within 1 hour using a high dose rate source such as electronic brachytherapy (eBT). However, the estimated OAR doses using eBT were 112 ∼ 118% higher than when using the I125-BT technique. Continued exploration of alternative dose rate or fractionation schedules should be followed.

  1. A new formalism for modelling parameters α and β of the linear-quadratic model of cell survival for hadron therapy

    Vassiliev, Oleg N.; Grosshans, David R.; Mohan, Radhe

    2017-10-01

    We propose a new formalism for calculating parameters α and β of the linear-quadratic model of cell survival. This formalism, primarily intended for calculating relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for treatment planning in hadron therapy, is based on a recently proposed microdosimetric revision of the single-target multi-hit model. The main advantage of our formalism is that it reliably produces α and β that have correct general properties with respect to their dependence on physical properties of the beam, including the asymptotic behavior for very low and high linear energy transfer (LET) beams. For example, in the case of monoenergetic beams, our formalism predicts that, as a function of LET, (a) α has a maximum and (b) the α/β ratio increases monotonically with increasing LET. No prior models reviewed in this study predict both properties (a) and (b) correctly, and therefore, these prior models are valid only within a limited LET range. We first present our formalism in a general form, for polyenergetic beams. A significant new result in this general case is that parameter β is represented as an average over the joint distribution of energies E 1 and E 2 of two particles in the beam. This result is consistent with the role of the quadratic term in the linear-quadratic model. It accounts for the two-track mechanism of cell kill, in which two particles, one after another, damage the same site in the cell nucleus. We then present simplified versions of the formalism, and discuss predicted properties of α and β. Finally, to demonstrate consistency of our formalism with experimental data, we apply it to fit two sets of experimental data: (1) α for heavy ions, covering a broad range of LETs, and (2) β for protons. In both cases, good agreement is achieved.

  2. A Fast Condensing Method for Solution of Linear-Quadratic Control Problems

    Frison, Gianluca; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2013-01-01

    consider a condensing (or state elimination) method to solve an extended version of the LQ control problem, and we show how to exploit the structure of this problem to both factorize the dense Hessian matrix and solve the system. Furthermore, we present two efficient implementations. The first......In both Active-Set (AS) and Interior-Point (IP) algorithms for Model Predictive Control (MPC), sub-problems in the form of linear-quadratic (LQ) control problems need to be solved at each iteration. The solution of these sub-problems is usually the main computational effort. In this paper we...... implementation is formally identical to the Riccati recursion based solver and has a computational complexity that is linear in the control horizon length and cubic in the number of states. The second implementation has a computational complexity that is quadratic in the control horizon length as well...

  3. Optimal control linear quadratic methods

    Anderson, Brian D O

    2007-01-01

    This augmented edition of a respected text teaches the reader how to use linear quadratic Gaussian methods effectively for the design of control systems. It explores linear optimal control theory from an engineering viewpoint, with step-by-step explanations that show clearly how to make practical use of the material.The three-part treatment begins with the basic theory of the linear regulator/tracker for time-invariant and time-varying systems. The Hamilton-Jacobi equation is introduced using the Principle of Optimality, and the infinite-time problem is considered. The second part outlines the

  4. Experimental determination of the anisotropy function for the Model 200 103Pd 'light seed' and derivation of the anisotropy constant based upon the linear quadratic model

    Yue Ning; Nath, Ravinder

    2002-01-01

    Since the publication of the AAPM Task Group 43 report in 1995, Model 200 103 Pd seed, which has been widely used in prostate seed implants and other brachytherapy procedures, has undergone some changes in its internal geometry resulting from the manufacturer's transition from lower specific activity reactor-produced 103 Pd ('heavy seeds') to higher specific activity accelerator-produced radioactive material ('light seeds'). Based on previously reported theoretical calculations and measurements, the dose rate constants and the radial dose functions of the two types of seeds are nearly the same and have already been reported. In this work, the anisotropy function of the 'light seed' was experimentally measured and an averaging method for the determination of the anisotropy constant from distance-dependent values of anisotropy factors is presented based upon the continuous low dose rate irradiation linear quadratic model for cell killing. The anisotropy function of Model 200 103 Pd 'light seeds' was measured in a Solid Water trade mark sign phantom using 1x1x1 mm micro LiF TLD chips at radial distances of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 cm and at angles from 0 to 90 deg. with respect to the longitudinal axis of the seeds. At a radial distance of 1 cm, the measured anisotropy function of the 103 Pd 'light seed' is considerably lower than that of the 103 Pd 'heavy seed' reported in the TG 43 report. Our measured values at all radial distances are in excellent agreement with the results of a Monte Carlo simulation reported by Weaver, except for points along and near the seed longitudinal axis. The anisotropy constant of the 103 Pd 'light seed' was calculated using the linear quadratic biological model for cell killing in 30 clinical implants. For the model 200 ''light seed,'' it has a value of 0.865. However, our biological model calculations lead us to conclude that if the anisotropy factors of an interstitial brachytherapy seed vary significantly over radial distances anisotropy

  5. Frequency of micronuclei in hepatocytes following X and fast-neutron irradiations--an analysis by a linear-quadratic model

    Ono, K.; Nagata, Y.; Akuta, K.; Abe, M.; Ando, K.; Koike, S.

    1990-01-01

    The usefulness of the micronucleus assay for investigating the radiation response of hepatocytes was examined. The frequency was defined as the ratio of the total number of micronuclei to the number of hepatocytes examined. The dose-response curves were curvilinear after X rays and linear after neutrons. These dose-response curves were analyzed by a linear-quadratic model, frequency = aD + bD2 + c. The a/b ratio was 3.03 +/- 1.26 Gy following X irradiation. This value is within the range of the alpha/beta ratios reported by others using the clonogenic assay of hepatocytes. While the a/b value for neutrons was 24.3 +/- 11.7 Gy, the maximum relative biological effectiveness of neutrons was 6.30 +/- 2.53. Since the micronucleus assay is simple and rapid, it may be a good tool for evaluating the radiation response of hepatocytes in vivo

  6. Longitudinal mathematics development of students with learning disabilities and students without disabilities: a comparison of linear, quadratic, and piecewise linear mixed effects models.

    Kohli, Nidhi; Sullivan, Amanda L; Sadeh, Shanna; Zopluoglu, Cengiz

    2015-04-01

    Effective instructional planning and intervening rely heavily on accurate understanding of students' growth, but relatively few researchers have examined mathematics achievement trajectories, particularly for students with special needs. We applied linear, quadratic, and piecewise linear mixed-effects models to identify the best-fitting model for mathematics development over elementary and middle school and to ascertain differences in growth trajectories of children with learning disabilities relative to their typically developing peers. The analytic sample of 2150 students was drawn from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Kindergarten Cohort, a nationally representative sample of United States children who entered kindergarten in 1998. We first modeled students' mathematics growth via multiple mixed-effects models to determine the best fitting model of 9-year growth and then compared the trajectories of students with and without learning disabilities. Results indicate that the piecewise linear mixed-effects model captured best the functional form of students' mathematics trajectories. In addition, there were substantial achievement gaps between students with learning disabilities and students with no disabilities, and their trajectories differed such that students without disabilities progressed at a higher rate than their peers who had learning disabilities. The results underscore the need for further research to understand how to appropriately model students' mathematics trajectories and the need for attention to mathematics achievement gaps in policy. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gain scheduled linear quadratic control for quadcopter

    Okasha, M.; Shah, J.; Fauzi, W.; Hanouf, Z.

    2017-12-01

    This study exploits the dynamics and control of quadcopters using Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) control approach. The quadcopter’s mathematical model is derived using the Newton-Euler method. It is a highly manoeuvrable, nonlinear, coupled with six degrees of freedom (DOF) model, which includes aerodynamics and detailed gyroscopic moments that are often ignored in many literatures. The linearized model is obtained and characterized by the heading angle (i.e. yaw angle) of the quadcopter. The adopted control approach utilizes LQR method to track several reference trajectories including circle and helix curves with significant variation in the yaw angle. The controller is modified to overcome difficulties related to the continuous changes in the operating points and eliminate chattering and discontinuity that is observed in the control input signal. Numerical non-linear simulations are performed using MATLAB and Simulink to illustrate to accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed controller.

  8. Dose fractionated gamma knife radiosurgery for large arteriovenous malformations on daily or alternate day schedule outside the linear quadratic model: Proof of concept and early results. A substitute to volume fractionation.

    Mukherjee, Kanchan Kumar; Kumar, Narendra; Tripathi, Manjul; Oinam, Arun S; Ahuja, Chirag K; Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Kapoor, Rakesh; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kaur, Rupinder; Bhatt, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of dose fractionated gamma knife radiosurgery (DFGKRS) on a daily schedule beyond the linear quadratic (LQ) model, for large volume arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Between 2012-16, 14 patients of large AVMs (median volume 26.5 cc) unsuitable for surgery or embolization were treated in 2-3 of DFGKRS sessions. The Leksell G frame was kept in situ during the whole procedure. 86% (n = 12) patients had radiologic evidence of bleed, and 43% (n = 6) had presented with a history of seizures. 57% (n = 8) patients received a daily treatment for 3 days and 43% (n = 6) were on an alternate day (2 fractions) regimen. The marginal dose was split into 2 or 3 fractions of the ideal prescription dose of a single fraction of 23-25 Gy. The median follow up period was 35.6 months (8-57 months). In the three-fraction scheme, the marginal dose ranged from 8.9-11.5 Gy, while in the two-fraction scheme, the marginal dose ranged from 11.3-15 Gy at 50% per fraction. Headache (43%, n = 6) was the most common early postoperative complication, which was controlled with short course steroids. Follow up evaluation of at least three years was achieved in seven patients, who have shown complete nidus obliteration in 43% patients while the obliteration has been in the range of 50-99% in rest of the patients. Overall, there was a 67.8% reduction in the AVM volume at 3 years. Nidus obliteration at 3 years showed a significant rank order correlation with the cumulative prescription dose (p 0.95, P value 0.01), with attainment of near-total (more than 95%) obliteration rates beyond 29 Gy of the cumulative prescription dose. No patient receiving a cumulative prescription dose of less than 31 Gy had any severe adverse reaction. In co-variate adjusted ordinal regression, only the cumulative prescription dose had a significant correlation with common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) severity (P value 0.04), independent of age, AVM volume

  9. Time-dependent tumour repopulation factors in linear-quadratic equations

    Dale, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Tumour proliferation effects can be tentatively quantified in the linear-quadratic (LQ) method by the incorporation of a time-dependent factor, the magnitude of which is related both to the value of α in the tumour α/β ratio, and to the tumour doubling time. The method, the principle of which has been suggested by a numbre of other workers for use in fractionated therapy, is here applied to both fractionated and protracted radiotherapy treatments, and examples of its uses are given. By assuming that repopulation of late-responding tissues is significant during normal treatment strategies in terms of the behaviour of the Extrapolated Response Dose (ERD). Although the numerical credibility of the analysis used here depends on the reliability of the LQ model, and on the assumption that the rate of repopulation is constant throughout treatment, the predictions are consistent with other lines of reasoning which point to the advantages of accelerated hyperfractionation. In particular, it is demonstrated that accelerated fractionation represents a relatively 'foregiving' treatment which enables tumours of a variety of sensitivities and clonogenic growth rates to be treated moderately successfully, even though the critical cellular parameters may not be known in individual cases. The analysis also suggests that tumours which combine low intrinsic sensitivity with a very short doubling time might be bettter controlled by low dose-rate continuous therapy than by almost any form of accelerated hyperfractionation. (author). 24 refs.; 5 figs

  10. Design of Linear-Quadratic-Regulator for a CSTR process

    Meghna, P. R.; Saranya, V.; Jaganatha Pandian, B.

    2017-11-01

    This paper aims at creating a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) for a Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR). A CSTR is a common process used in chemical industries. It is a highly non-linear system. Therefore, in order to create the gain feedback controller, the model is linearized. The controller is designed for the linearized model and the concentration and volume of the liquid in the reactor are kept at a constant value as required.

  11. Estimation of transition doses for human glioblastoma, neuroblastoma and prostate cell lines using the linear-quadratic formalism

    John Akudugu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The introduction of stereotactic radiotherapy has raised concerns regarding the use of the linear-quadratic (LQ model for predicting radiation response for large fractional doses. To partly address this issue, a transition dose D* below which the LQ model retains its predictive strength has been proposed. Estimates of D* which depends on the a, β, and D0 parameters are much lower than fractional doses typically encountered in stereotactic radiotherapy. D0, often referred to as the final slope of the cell survival curve, is thought to be constant. In vitro cell survival curves generally extend over the first few logs of cell killing, where D0-values derived from the multi-target formalism may be overestimated and can lead to low transition doses. Methods:  D0-values were calculated from first principles for each decade of cell killing, using experimentally-determined a and β parameters for 17 human glioblastoma, neuroblastoma, and prostate cell lines, and corresponding transition doses were derived.Results: D0 was found to decrease exponentially with cell killing. Using D0-values at cell surviving fractions of the order of 10-10 yielded transition doses ~3-fold higher than those obtained from D0-values obtained from conventional approaches. D* was found to increase from 7.84 ± 0.56, 8.91 ± 1.20, and 6.55 ± 0.91 Gy to 26.84 ± 2.83, 23.95 ± 2.03, and 22.49 ± 2.31 Gy for the glioblastoma, neuroblastoma, and prostate cell lines, respectively. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the linear-quadratic formalism might be valid for estimating the effect of stereotactic radiotherapy with fractional doses in excess of 20 Gy.

  12. The application of the linear-quadratic model to fractionated radiotherapy when there is incomplete normal tissue recovery between fractions, and possible implications for treatments involving multiple fractions per day

    Dale, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    By extending a previously developed mathematical model based on the linear-quadratic dose-effect relationship, it is possible to examine the consequences of performing fractionated treatments for which there is insufficient time between fractions to allow complete damage repair. Equations are derived which give the relative effectiveness of such treatments in terms of tissue-repair constants (μ values) and α/β ratios, and these are then applied to some examples of treatments involving multiple fractions per day. The interplay of the various mechanisms involved (including repopulation effects) and their possible influence on treatments involving closely spaced fractions are examined. If current indications of the differences in recovery rates between early- and late-reacting normal tissues are representative, then it is shown that such differences may limit the clinical potential of accelerated fractionation regimes, where several fractions per day are given in a relatively short overall time. (author)

  13. Continuous-Time Mean-Variance Portfolio Selection: A Stochastic LQ Framework

    Zhou, X.Y.; Li, D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a continuous-time mean-variance portfolio selection model that is formulated as a bicriteria optimization problem. The objective is to maximize the expected terminal return and minimize the variance of the terminal wealth. By putting weights on the two criteria one obtains a single objective stochastic control problem which is however not in the standard form due to the variance term involved. It is shown that this nonstandard problem can be 'embedded' into a class of auxiliary stochastic linear-quadratic (LQ) problems. The stochastic LQ control model proves to be an appropriate and effective framework to study the mean-variance problem in light of the recent development on general stochastic LQ problems with indefinite control weighting matrices. This gives rise to the efficient frontier in a closed form for the original portfolio selection problem

  14. Stability and Linear Quadratic Differential Games of Discrete-Time Markovian Jump Linear Systems with State-Dependent Noise

    Huiying Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We mainly consider the stability of discrete-time Markovian jump linear systems with state-dependent noise as well as its linear quadratic (LQ differential games. A necessary and sufficient condition involved with the connection between stochastic Tn-stability of Markovian jump linear systems with state-dependent noise and Lyapunov equation is proposed. And using the theory of stochastic Tn-stability, we give the optimal strategies and the optimal cost values for infinite horizon LQ stochastic differential games. It is demonstrated that the solutions of infinite horizon LQ stochastic differential games are concerned with four coupled generalized algebraic Riccati equations (GAREs. Finally, an iterative algorithm is presented to solve the four coupled GAREs and a simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of it.

  15. Numerical Methods for Solution of the Extended Linear Quadratic Control Problem

    Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Frison, Gianluca; Gade-Nielsen, Nicolai Fog

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the extended linear quadratic control problem, its efficient solution, and a discussion of how it arises in the numerical solution of nonlinear model predictive control problems. The extended linear quadratic control problem is the optimal control problem corresponding...... to the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker system that constitute the majority of computational work in constrained nonlinear and linear model predictive control problems solved by efficient MPC-tailored interior-point and active-set algorithms. We state various methods of solving the extended linear quadratic control problem...... and discuss instances in which it arises. The methods discussed in the paper have been implemented in efficient C code for both CPUs and GPUs for a number of test examples....

  16. A smart rotor configuration with linear quadratic control of adaptive trailing edge flaps for active load alleviation

    Bergami, Leonardo; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a smart rotor configuration where adaptive trailing edge flaps (ATEFs) are employed for active alleviation of the aerodynamic loads on the blades of the NREL 5 MW reference turbine. The flaps extend for 20% of the blade length and are controlled by a linear quadratic (LQ....... The effects of active flap control are assessed with aeroelastic simulations of the turbine in normal operation conditions, as prescribed by the International Electrotechnical Commission standard. The turbine lifetime fatigue damage equivalent loads provide a convenient summary of the results achieved...

  17. Genetic algorithm–based varying parameter linear quadratic regulator control for four-wheel independent steering vehicle

    Linlin Gao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available From the perspective of vehicle dynamics, the four-wheel independent steering vehicle dynamics stability control method is studied, and a four-wheel independent steering varying parameter linear quadratic regulator control system is proposed with the help of expert control method. In the article, a four-wheel independent steering linear quadratic regulator controller for model following purpose is designed first. Then, by analyzing the four-wheel independent steering vehicle dynamic characteristics and the influence of linear quadratic regulator control parameters on control performance, a linear quadratic regulator control parameter adjustment strategy based on vehicle steering state is proposed to achieve the adaptive adjustment of linear quadratic regulator control parameters. In addition, to further improve the control performance, the proposed varying parameter linear quadratic regulator control system is optimized by genetic algorithm. Finally, simulation studies have been conducted by applying the proposed control system to the 8-degree-of-freedom four-wheel independent steering vehicle dynamics model. The simulation results indicate that the proposed control system has better performance and robustness and can effectively improve the stability and steering safety of the four-wheel independent steering vehicle.

  18. Decentralized linear quadratic power system stabilizers for multi ...

    Linear quadratic stabilizers are well-known for their superior control capabilities when compared to the conventional lead–lag power system stabilizers. However, they have not seen much of practical importance as the state variables are generally not measurable; especially the generator rotor angle measurement is not ...

  19. Pareto optimality in infinite horizon linear quadratic differential games

    Reddy, P.V.; Engwerda, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we derive conditions for the existence of Pareto optimal solutions for linear quadratic infinite horizon cooperative differential games. First, we present a necessary and sufficient characterization for Pareto optimality which translates to solving a set of constrained optimal

  20. Linear Quadratic Controller with Fault Detection in Compact Disk Players

    Vidal, Enrique Sanchez; Hansen, K.G.; Andersen, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    The design of the positioning controllers in Optical Disk Drives are today subjected to a trade off between an acceptable suppression of external disturbances and an acceptable immunity against surfaces defects. In this paper an algorithm is suggested to detect defects of the disk surface combined...... with an observer and a Linear Quadratic Regulator. As a result, the mentioned trade off is minimized and the playability of the tested compact disk player is considerably enhanced....

  1. Resolving Actuator Redundancy - Control Allocation vs. Linear Quadratic Control

    Härkegård, Ola

    2004-01-01

    When designing control laws for systems with more inputs than controlled variables, one issue to consider is how to deal with actuator redundancy. Two tools for distributing the control effort among a redundant set of actuators are control allocation and linear quadratic control design. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between these two design tools when a quadratic performance index is used for control allocation. We show that for a particular class of linear systems, they give...

  2. On a linear-quadratic problem with Caputo derivative

    Dariusz Idczak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study a linear-quadratic optimal control problem with a fractional control system containing a Caputo derivative of unknown function. First, we derive the formulas for the differential and gradient of the cost functional under given constraints. Next, we prove an existence result and derive a maximum principle. Finally, we describe the gradient and projection of the gradient methods for the problem under consideration.

  3. Hyperspectral and multispectral data fusion based on linear-quadratic nonnegative matrix factorization

    Benhalouche, Fatima Zohra; Karoui, Moussa Sofiane; Deville, Yannick; Ouamri, Abdelaziz

    2017-04-01

    This paper proposes three multisharpening approaches to enhance the spatial resolution of urban hyperspectral remote sensing images. These approaches, related to linear-quadratic spectral unmixing techniques, use a linear-quadratic nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) multiplicative algorithm. These methods begin by unmixing the observable high-spectral/low-spatial resolution hyperspectral and high-spatial/low-spectral resolution multispectral images. The obtained high-spectral/high-spatial resolution features are then recombined, according to the linear-quadratic mixing model, to obtain an unobservable multisharpened high-spectral/high-spatial resolution hyperspectral image. In the first designed approach, hyperspectral and multispectral variables are independently optimized, once they have been coherently initialized. These variables are alternately updated in the second designed approach. In the third approach, the considered hyperspectral and multispectral variables are jointly updated. Experiments, using synthetic and real data, are conducted to assess the efficiency, in spatial and spectral domains, of the designed approaches and of linear NMF-based approaches from the literature. Experimental results show that the designed methods globally yield very satisfactory spectral and spatial fidelities for the multisharpened hyperspectral data. They also prove that these methods significantly outperform the used literature approaches.

  4. Comparison of the predictions of the LQ and CRE models for normal tissue damage due to biologically targeted radiotherapy with exponentially decaying dose rates

    O'Donoghue, J.A.; West of Schotland Health Boards, Glasgow

    1989-01-01

    For biologically targeted radiotherapy organ dose rates may be complex functions of time, related to the biodistribution kinetics of the delivery vehicle and radiolabel. The simples situation is where dose rates are exponentially decaying functions of time. Two normal tissue isoeffect models enable the effects of exponentially decaying dose rates to be addressed. These are the extension of the linear-quadratic model and the cumulative radiation effect model. This communication will compare the predictions of these models. (author). 14 refs.; 1 fig

  5. Linear quadratic Gaussian controller design for plasma current, position and shape control system in ITER

    Belyakov, V.; Kavin, A.; Rumyantsev, E.; Kharitonov, V.; Misenov, B.; Ovsyannikov, A.; Ovsyannikov, D.; Veremei, E.; Zhabko, A.; Mitrishkin, Y.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is focused on the linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller synthesis methodology for the ITER plasma current, position and shape control system as well as power derivative management system. It has been shown that some poloidal field (PF) coils have less influence on reference plasma-wall gaps control during plasma disturbances and hence they have been used to reduce total control power derivative by means of the additional non-linear feedback. The design has been done on the basis of linear models. Simulation was provided for non-linear model and results are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  6. Robust output LQ optimal control via integral sliding modes

    Fridman, Leonid; Bejarano, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Featuring original research from well-known experts in the field of sliding mode control, this monograph presents new design schemes for implementing LQ control solutions in situations where the output system is the only information provided about the state of the plant. This new design works under the restrictions of matched disturbances without losing its desirable features. On the cutting-edge of optimal control research, Robust Output LQ Optimal Control via Integral Sliding Modes is an excellent resource for both graduate students and professionals involved in linear systems, optimal control, observation of systems with unknown inputs, and automatization. In the theory of optimal control, the linear quadratic (LQ) optimal problem plays an important role due to its physical meaning, and its solution is easily given by an algebraic Riccati equation. This solution turns out to be restrictive, however, because of two assumptions: the system must be free from disturbances and the entire state vector must be kn...

  7. Trajectory generation for manipulators using linear quadratic optimal tracking

    Olav Egeland

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available The reference trajectory is normally known in advance in manipulator control which makes it possible to apply linear quadratic optimal tracking. This gives a control system which rounds corners and generates optimal feedforward. The method may be used for references consisting of straight-line segments as an alternative to the two-step method of using splines to smooth the reference and then applying feedforward. In addition, the method can be used for more complex trajectories. The actual dynamics of the manipulator are taken into account, and this results in smooth and accurate tracking. The method has been applied in combination with the computed torque technique and excellent performance was demonstrated in a simulation study. The method has also been applied experimentally to an industrial spray-painting robot where a saw-tooth reference was tracked. The corner was rounded extremely well, and the steady-state tracking error was eliminated by the optimal feedforward.

  8. Technical report. The application of probability-generating functions to linear-quadratic radiation survival curves.

    Kendal, W S

    2000-04-01

    To illustrate how probability-generating functions (PGFs) can be employed to derive a simple probabilistic model for clonogenic survival after exposure to ionizing irradiation. Both repairable and irreparable radiation damage to DNA were assumed to occur by independent (Poisson) processes, at intensities proportional to the irradiation dose. Also, repairable damage was assumed to be either repaired or further (lethally) injured according to a third (Bernoulli) process, with the probability of lethal conversion being directly proportional to dose. Using the algebra of PGFs, these three processes were combined to yield a composite PGF that described the distribution of lethal DNA lesions in irradiated cells. The composite PGF characterized a Poisson distribution with mean, chiD+betaD2, where D was dose and alpha and beta were radiobiological constants. This distribution yielded the conventional linear-quadratic survival equation. To test the composite model, the derived distribution was used to predict the frequencies of multiple chromosomal aberrations in irradiated human lymphocytes. The predictions agreed well with observation. This probabilistic model was consistent with single-hit mechanisms, but it was not consistent with binary misrepair mechanisms. A stochastic model for radiation survival has been constructed from elementary PGFs that exactly yields the linear-quadratic relationship. This approach can be used to investigate other simple probabilistic survival models.

  9. Cell kinetical aspect of normal tissue damages in relation to radiosensitivity of cells, especially from the points of LQ model

    Tsubouchi, Susumu; Oohara, Hiroshi.

    1989-01-01

    Several points on the early and late radiation induced-normal tissue damages in terms of LQ model in multifractionation experiments of isoeffect were discussed from two fractors, (1) dose-responses of cell survivals or of tissue damages and (2) principles of the model. Application of the model to the both early and late tissue damages was fairly difficult in several tissues and several experimental conditions. In early damages, cell survival curve of single irradiation did not always fit to LQ model and further more incomlete repair as well as repopulation in multifractionation experiment contradicted the model especially in low dose fractionation. In late damages, the damages themselves did not express directly cell survival but probably indicate the degree of functional cell damage at the level of 10 -1 . As most isoeffects in early damages were taken at the level of 10 -3 , the comparison of two results from early and late tissue damages indicated the lack of coordinations both conceptionally and experimentally. (author)

  10. Day of the Week Effect Terhadap Return Dan Volume Perdagangan Saham Lq45 Dan Non Lq45

    Bachtiar, Yanuar

    2009-01-01

    This research aimed to know: fi rst, day of the week effect that infl uence the return of LQ45and non LQ45 stocks. Second, to know day of the week effect that infl uenced the volume of commerceof LQ45 and non LQ45 stocks. The taken samples were a property stock and real estate stocksincluding 2 stocks that was part of LQ45 and 2 other stocks in non LQ45 at Jakarta Stock Exchange(JSX) in January up to December 2006 (242 trade days) by fulfi lling samples which were already valid.Analysis model...

  11. Local hyperspectral data multisharpening based on linear/linear-quadratic nonnegative matrix factorization by integrating lidar data

    Benhalouche, Fatima Zohra; Karoui, Moussa Sofiane; Deville, Yannick; Ouamri, Abdelaziz

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a new Spectral-Unmixing-based approach, using Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF), is proposed to locally multi-sharpen hyperspectral data by integrating a Digital Surface Model (DSM) obtained from LIDAR data. In this new approach, the nature of the local mixing model is detected by using the local variance of the object elevations. The hyper/multispectral images are explored using small zones. In each zone, the variance of the object elevations is calculated from the DSM data in this zone. This variance is compared to a threshold value and the adequate linear/linearquadratic spectral unmixing technique is used in the considered zone to independently unmix hyperspectral and multispectral data, using an adequate linear/linear-quadratic NMF-based approach. The obtained spectral and spatial information thus respectively extracted from the hyper/multispectral images are then recombined in the considered zone, according to the selected mixing model. Experiments based on synthetic hyper/multispectral data are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed multi-sharpening approach and literature linear/linear-quadratic approaches used on the whole hyper/multispectral data. In these experiments, real DSM data are used to generate synthetic data containing linear and linear-quadratic mixed pixel zones. The DSM data are also used for locally detecting the nature of the mixing model in the proposed approach. Globally, the proposed approach yields good spatial and spectral fidelities for the multi-sharpened data and significantly outperforms the used literature methods.

  12. The application of LQR synthesis techniques to the turboshaft engine control problem. [Linear Quadratic Regulator

    Pfeil, W. H.; De Los Reyes, G.; Bobula, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    A power turbine governor was designed for a recent-technology turboshaft engine coupled to a modern, articulated rotor system using Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and Kalman Filter (KF) techniques. A linear, state-space model of the engine and rotor system was derived for six engine power settings from flight idle to maximum continuous. An integrator was appended to the fuel flow input to reduce the steady-state governor error to zero. Feedback gains were calculated for the system states at each power setting using the LQR technique. The main rotor tip speed state is not measurable, so a Kalman Filter of the rotor was used to estimate this state. The crossover of the system was increased to 10 rad/s compared to 2 rad/sec for a current governor. Initial computer simulations with a nonlinear engine model indicate a significant decrease in power turbine speed variation with the LQR governor compared to a conventional governor.

  13. A Numerical Approximation Framework for the Stochastic Linear Quadratic Regulator on Hilbert Spaces

    Levajković, Tijana, E-mail: tijana.levajkovic@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: t.levajkovic@sf.bg.ac.rs; Mena, Hermann, E-mail: hermann.mena@uibk.ac.at [University of Innsbruck, Department of Mathematics (Austria); Tuffaha, Amjad, E-mail: atufaha@aus.edu [American University of Sharjah, Department of Mathematics (United Arab Emirates)

    2017-06-15

    We present an approximation framework for computing the solution of the stochastic linear quadratic control problem on Hilbert spaces. We focus on the finite horizon case and the related differential Riccati equations (DREs). Our approximation framework is concerned with the so-called “singular estimate control systems” (Lasiecka in Optimal control problems and Riccati equations for systems with unbounded controls and partially analytic generators: applications to boundary and point control problems, 2004) which model certain coupled systems of parabolic/hyperbolic mixed partial differential equations with boundary or point control. We prove that the solutions of the approximate finite-dimensional DREs converge to the solution of the infinite-dimensional DRE. In addition, we prove that the optimal state and control of the approximate finite-dimensional problem converge to the optimal state and control of the corresponding infinite-dimensional problem.

  14. Cost Cumulant-Based Control for a Class of Linear Quadratic Tracking Problems

    Pham, Khanh D

    2007-01-01

    .... For instance, the present paper extends the application of cost-cumulant controller design to control of a wide class of linear-quadratic tracking systems where output measurements of a tracker...

  15. The Increase in Animal Mortality Risk following Exposure to Sparsely Ionizing Radiation Is Not Linear Quadratic with Dose.

    Benjamin M Haley

    Full Text Available The US government regulates allowable radiation exposures relying, in large part, on the seventh report from the committee to estimate the Biological Effect of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VII, which estimated that most contemporary exposures- protracted or low-dose, carry 1.5 fold less risk of carcinogenesis and mortality per Gy than acute exposures of atomic bomb survivors. This correction is known as the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor for the life span study of atomic bomb survivors (DDREFLSS. It was calculated by applying a linear-quadratic dose response model to data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors and a limited number of animal studies.We argue that the linear-quadratic model does not provide appropriate support to estimate the risk of contemporary exposures. In this work, we re-estimated DDREFLSS using 15 animal studies that were not included in BEIR VII's original analysis. Acute exposure data led to a DDREFLSS estimate from 0.9 to 3.0. By contrast, data that included both acute and protracted exposures led to a DDREFLSS estimate from 4.8 to infinity. These two estimates are significantly different, violating the assumptions of the linear-quadratic model, which predicts that DDREFLSS values calculated in either way should be the same.Therefore, we propose that future estimates of the risk of protracted exposures should be based on direct comparisons of data from acute and protracted exposures, rather than from extrapolations from a linear-quadratic model. The risk of low dose exposures may be extrapolated from these protracted estimates, though we encourage ongoing debate as to whether this is the most valid approach. We also encourage efforts to enlarge the datasets used to estimate the risk of protracted exposures by including both human and animal data, carcinogenesis outcomes, a wider range of exposures, and by making more radiobiology data publicly accessible. We believe that these steps will contribute to better estimates

  16. ORACLS: A system for linear-quadratic-Gaussian control law design

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1978-01-01

    A modern control theory design package (ORACLS) for constructing controllers and optimal filters for systems modeled by linear time-invariant differential or difference equations is described. Numerical linear-algebra procedures are used to implement the linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) methodology of modern control theory. Algorithms are included for computing eigensystems of real matrices, the relative stability of a matrix, factored forms for nonnegative definite matrices, the solutions and least squares approximations to the solutions of certain linear matrix algebraic equations, the controllability properties of a linear time-invariant system, and the steady state covariance matrix of an open-loop stable system forced by white noise. Subroutines are provided for solving both the continuous and discrete optimal linear regulator problems with noise free measurements and the sampled-data optimal linear regulator problem. For measurement noise, duality theory and the optimal regulator algorithms are used to solve the continuous and discrete Kalman-Bucy filter problems. Subroutines are also included which give control laws causing the output of a system to track the output of a prescribed model.

  17. The Linear Quadratic Gaussian Multistage Game with Nonclassical Information Pattern Using a Direct Solution Method

    Clemens, Joshua William

    Game theory has application across multiple fields, spanning from economic strategy to optimal control of an aircraft and missile on an intercept trajectory. The idea of game theory is fascinating in that we can actually mathematically model real-world scenarios and determine optimal decision making. It may not always be easy to mathematically model certain real-world scenarios, nonetheless, game theory gives us an appreciation for the complexity involved in decision making. This complexity is especially apparent when the players involved have access to different information upon which to base their decision making (a nonclassical information pattern). Here we will focus on the class of adversarial two-player games (sometimes referred to as pursuit-evasion games) with nonclassical information pattern. We present a two-sided (simultaneous) optimization solution method for the two-player linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) multistage game. This direct solution method allows for further interpretation of each player's decision making (strategy) as compared to previously used formal solution methods. In addition to the optimal control strategies, we present a saddle point proof and we derive an expression for the optimal performance index value. We provide some numerical results in order to further interpret the optimal control strategies and to highlight real-world application of this game-theoretic optimal solution.

  18. Development Of Linear Quadratic Regulator Design For Small UAV System

    Cho Zin Myint

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to know the importance role of stability analysis for both unmanned aircraft system and for all control system. The objective of paper is to develop a method for dynamic stability analysis of the design process. These are categorized intoTo design model and stability analysis of UAV based on the forces and moment equations of aircraft dynamic model To choose the suitable controller for desired altitude of a particular UAV model To analyze the stability condition for aircraft using mathematical modeling and MATLAB. In this paper the analytical model of the longitudinal dynamic of flying wing UAV has been developed using aerodynamic data. The stability characteristics of UAV can be achieved from the system transfer function with LQR controller.

  19. Extensions of linear-quadratic control, optimization and matrix theory

    Jacobson, David H

    1977-01-01

    In this book, we study theoretical and practical aspects of computing methods for mathematical modelling of nonlinear systems. A number of computing techniques are considered, such as methods of operator approximation with any given accuracy; operator interpolation techniques including a non-Lagrange interpolation; methods of system representation subject to constraints associated with concepts of causality, memory and stationarity; methods of system representation with an accuracy that is the best within a given class of models; methods of covariance matrix estimation;methods for low-rank mat

  20. Linear-quadratic control and quadratic differential forms for multidimensional behaviors

    Napp, D.; Trentelman, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with systems described by constant coefficient linear partial differential equations (nD-systems) from a behavioral point of view. In this context we treat the linear-quadratic control problem where the performance functional is the integral of a quadratic differential form. We look

  1. The regular indefinite linear-quadratic problem with linear endpoint constraints

    Soethoudt, J.M.; Trentelman, H.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper deals with the infinite horizon linear-quadratic problem with indefinite cost. Given a linear system, a quadratic cost functional and a subspace of the state space, we consider the problem of minimizing the cost functional over all inputs for which the state trajectory converges to that

  2. Linear quadratic Gaussian balancing for discrete-time infinite-dimensional linear systems

    Opmeer, MR; Curtain, RF

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we study the existence of linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG)-balanced realizations for discrete-time infinite-dimensional systems. LQG-balanced realizations are those for which the smallest nonnegative self-adjoint solutions of the control and filter Riccati equations are equal. We show

  3. Analysis of a monetary union enlargement in the framework of linear-quadratic differential games

    Plasmans, J.E.J.; Engwerda, J.C.; van Aarle, B.; Michalak, T.

    2009-01-01

    "This paper studies the effects of a monetary union enlargement using the techniques and outcomes from an extensive research project on macroeconomic policy coordination in the EMU. Our approach is characterized by two main pillars: (i) linear-quadratic differential games to capture externalities,

  4. TUNING PARAMETER LINEAR QUADRATIC TRACKING MENGGUNAKAN ALGORITMA GENETIKA UNTUK PENGENDALIAN GERAK LATERAL QUADCOPTER

    Farid Choirul Akbar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gerakan lateral quadcopter dapat dilakukan apabila quadcopter dapat menjaga kestabilan pada saat hover, sehingga quadcopter dapat melakukan gerak rotasi. Perubahan sudut roll akan mengakibatkan gerak translasi pada sumbu Y, sedangkan perubahan sudut pitch akan mengakibatkan gerak translasi pada sumbu X. Disisi lain, quadcopter merupakan suatu sistem non-linear dan memiliki kestabilan yang rendah sehingga rentan terhadap gangguan. Pada penelitian Tugas Akhir ini dirancang pengendalian gerak rotasi quadcopter menggunakan Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR dan Linear Quadratic Tracking (LQT untuk pengendalian gerak translasi. Untuk mendapatkan parameter dari LQT digunakan Algoritma Genetika (GA. Hasil tuning GA yang digunakan pada LQT memiliki nilai Qx 700,1884, nilai Qy 700,6315, nilai Rx 0,1568, dan  nilai Ry 0,1579. Respon LQT tersebut memiliki RMSE pada sumbu X dan sumbu Y sebesar 1,99 % serta memiliki time lagging 0,35 detik. Dengan hasil tersebut quadcopter mampu men-tracking trajectory berbentuk segitigaTekni

  5. Legendre-tau approximation for functional differential equations. II - The linear quadratic optimal control problem

    Ito, Kazufumi; Teglas, Russell

    1987-01-01

    The numerical scheme based on the Legendre-tau approximation is proposed to approximate the feedback solution to the linear quadratic optimal control problem for hereditary differential systems. The convergence property is established using Trotter ideas. The method yields very good approximations at low orders and provides an approximation technique for computing closed-loop eigenvalues of the feedback system. A comparison with existing methods (based on averaging and spline approximations) is made.

  6. Legendre-tau approximation for functional differential equations. Part 2: The linear quadratic optimal control problem

    Ito, K.; Teglas, R.

    1984-01-01

    The numerical scheme based on the Legendre-tau approximation is proposed to approximate the feedback solution to the linear quadratic optimal control problem for hereditary differential systems. The convergence property is established using Trotter ideas. The method yields very good approximations at low orders and provides an approximation technique for computing closed-loop eigenvalues of the feedback system. A comparison with existing methods (based on averaging and spline approximations) is made.

  7. Linear Quadratic Mean Field Type Control and Mean Field Games with Common Noise, with Application to Production of an Exhaustible Resource

    Graber, P. Jameson, E-mail: jameson-graber@baylor.edu [Baylor University, Department of Mathematics (United States)

    2016-12-15

    We study a general linear quadratic mean field type control problem and connect it to mean field games of a similar type. The solution is given both in terms of a forward/backward system of stochastic differential equations and by a pair of Riccati equations. In certain cases, the solution to the mean field type control is also the equilibrium strategy for a class of mean field games. We use this fact to study an economic model of production of exhaustible resources.

  8. Near-Nash equilibrium strategies for LQ differential games with inaccurate state information

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available ε -Nash equilibrium or “near equilibrium” for a linear quadratic cost game is considered. Due to inaccurate state information, the standard solution for feedback Nash equilibrium cannot be applied. Instead, an estimation of the players' states is substituted into the optimal control strategies equation obtained for perfect state information. The magnitude of the ε in the ε -Nash equilibrium will depend on the quality of the estimation process. To illustrate this approach, a Luenberger-type observer is used in the numerical example to generate the players' state estimates in a two-player non-zero-sum LQ differential game.

  9. FAKTOR FUNDAMENTAL EKONOMI MAKRO TERHADAP HARGA SAHAM LQ45

    I Gusti Ayu Purnamawati

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The capital market was an important element that provided benefits for the economic progress through invest-ment development in a country. LQ45 index was the list of 45 excellent chosen stocks 45 which were the mostliquid and most active in the sale of the shares on the Stock Exchange. This study aimed to determine the effectof macroeconomic fundamentals on LQ45 stock price. The population used in this study was LQ45 shares inIndonesia Stock Exchange in 2007-2012. The method used in this study was the Error Correction Model(ECM. The dependent variable in this study was the stock price of LQ45, while the independent variables werethe rate of economic growth, inflation, the value of U.S. dollar against rupiah exchange rate, and SBI interestrate. The results showed that the rate of economic growth and a variable SBI interest rate had a negative effectin the short-term and long-term of LQ45 stock price. Inflation variable had a positive effect in the short-termand long-term of LQ45 stock price. While the exchange rate variable had a negative effect in the short-term andit had positive impact in long-term on the LQ45 stock price.

  10. On Solving Lq-Penalized Regressions

    Tracy Zhou Wu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lq-penalized regression arises in multidimensional statistical modelling where all or part of the regression coefficients are penalized to achieve both accuracy and parsimony of statistical models. There is often substantial computational difficulty except for the quadratic penalty case. The difficulty is partly due to the nonsmoothness of the objective function inherited from the use of the absolute value. We propose a new solution method for the general Lq-penalized regression problem based on space transformation and thus efficient optimization algorithms. The new method has immediate applications in statistics, notably in penalized spline smoothing problems. In particular, the LASSO problem is shown to be polynomial time solvable. Numerical studies show promise of our approach.

  11. Mechanistic formulation of a lineal-quadratic-linear (LQL) model: Split-dose experiments and exponentially decaying sources

    Guerrero, Mariana; Carlone, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In recent years, several models were proposed that modify the standard linear-quadratic (LQ) model to make the predicted survival curve linear at high doses. Most of these models are purely phenomenological and can only be applied in the particular case of acute doses per fraction. The authors consider a mechanistic formulation of a linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model in the case of split-dose experiments and exponentially decaying sources. This model provides a comprehensive description of radiation response for arbitrary dose rate and fractionation with only one additional parameter. Methods: The authors use a compartmental formulation of the LQL model from the literature. They analytically solve the model's differential equations for the case of a split-dose experiment and for an exponentially decaying source. They compare the solutions of the survival fraction with the standard LQ equations and with the lethal-potentially lethal (LPL) model. Results: In the case of the split-dose experiment, the LQL model predicts a recovery ratio as a function of dose per fraction that deviates from the square law of the standard LQ. The survival fraction as a function of time between fractions follows a similar exponential law as the LQ but adds a multiplicative factor to the LQ parameter β. The LQL solution for the split-dose experiment is very close to the LPL prediction. For the decaying source, the differences between the LQL and the LQ solutions are negligible when the half-life of the source is much larger than the characteristic repair time, which is the clinically relevant case. Conclusions: The compartmental formulation of the LQL model can be used for arbitrary dose rates and provides a comprehensive description of dose response. When the survival fraction for acute doses is linear for high dose, a deviation of the square law formula of the recovery ratio for split doses is also predicted.

  12. A numerical algorithm for optimal feedback gains in high dimensional linear quadratic regulator problems

    Banks, H. T.; Ito, K.

    1991-01-01

    A hybrid method for computing the feedback gains in linear quadratic regulator problem is proposed. The method, which combines use of a Chandrasekhar type system with an iteration of the Newton-Kleinman form with variable acceleration parameter Smith schemes, is formulated to efficiently compute directly the feedback gains rather than solutions of an associated Riccati equation. The hybrid method is particularly appropriate when used with large dimensional systems such as those arising in approximating infinite-dimensional (distributed parameter) control systems (e.g., those governed by delay-differential and partial differential equations). Computational advantages of the proposed algorithm over the standard eigenvector (Potter, Laub-Schur) based techniques are discussed, and numerical evidence of the efficacy of these ideas is presented.

  13. Management of linear quadratic regulator optimal control with full-vehicle control case study

    Rodrigue Tchamna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Linear quadratic regulator is a powerful technique for dealing with the control design of any linear and nonlinear system after linearization of the system around an operating point. For small systems, which have fewer state variables, the transformation of the performance index from scalar to matrix form can be straightforward. On the other hand, as the system becomes large with many state variables and controllers, appropriate design and notations should be defined to make it easy to automatically implement the technique for any large system without the need to redesign from scratch every time one requires a new system. The main aim of this article was to deal with this issue. This article shows how to automatically obtain the matrix form of the performance index matrices from the scalar version of the performance index. Control of a full-vehicle in cornering was taken as a case study in this article.

  14. Robust optimal control design using a differential game approach for open-loop linear quadratic descriptor systems

    Musthofa, M.W.; Salmah, S.; Engwerda, Jacob; Suparwanto, A.

    This paper studies the robust optimal control problem for descriptor systems. We applied differential game theory to solve the disturbance attenuation problem. The robust control problem was converted into a reduced ordinary zero-sum game. Within a linear quadratic setting, we solved the problem for

  15. Self-Tuning Linear Quadratic Supervisory Regulation of a Diesel Generator using Large-Signal State Estimation

    Knudsen, Jesper Viese; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Andersen, Palle

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a self-tuning linear quadratic supervisory regulator using a large-signal state estimator for a diesel driven generator set is proposed. The regulator improves operational efficiency, in comparison to current implementations, by (i) automating the initial tuning process and (ii...... throughout the operating range of the diesel generator....

  16. Adaptive dynamic programming for discrete-time linear quadratic regulation based on multirate generalised policy iteration

    Chun, Tae Yoon; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Jin Bae; Choi, Yoon Ho

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we propose two multirate generalised policy iteration (GPI) algorithms applied to discrete-time linear quadratic regulation problems. The proposed algorithms are extensions of the existing GPI algorithm that consists of the approximate policy evaluation and policy improvement steps. The two proposed schemes, named heuristic dynamic programming (HDP) and dual HDP (DHP), based on multirate GPI, use multi-step estimation (M-step Bellman equation) at the approximate policy evaluation step for estimating the value function and its gradient called costate, respectively. Then, we show that these two methods with the same update horizon can be considered equivalent in the iteration domain. Furthermore, monotonically increasing and decreasing convergences, so called value iteration (VI)-mode and policy iteration (PI)-mode convergences, are proved to hold for the proposed multirate GPIs. Further, general convergence properties in terms of eigenvalues are also studied. The data-driven online implementation methods for the proposed HDP and DHP are demonstrated and finally, we present the results of numerical simulations performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  17. Optimal Operation of Distribution Electronic Power Transformer Using Linear Quadratic Regulator Method

    Mohammad Hosein Rezaei

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Transformers perform many functions such as voltage transformation, isolation and noise decoupling. They are indispensable components in electric power distribution system. However, at low frequencies (50 Hz, they are one of the heaviest and the most expensive equipment in an electrical distribution system. Nowadays, electronic power transformers are used instead of conventional power transformers that do voltage transformation and power delivery in power system by power electronic converter. In this paper, the structure of distribution electronic power transformer (DEPT are analized and then paid attention on the design of a linear-quadratic-regulator (LQR with integral action to improve dynamic performance of DEPT with voltage unbalance, voltage sags, voltage harmonics and voltage flicker. The presentation control strategy is simulated by MATLAB/SIMULINK. In addition, the results that are in terms of dc-link reference voltage, input and output voltages clearly show that a better dynamic performance can be achieved by using the LQR method when compared to other techniques.

  18. Black-Litterman model on non-normal stock return (Case study four banks at LQ-45 stock index)

    Mahrivandi, Rizki; Noviyanti, Lienda; Setyanto, Gatot Riwi

    2017-03-01

    The formation of the optimal portfolio is a method that can help investors to minimize risks and optimize profitability. One model for the optimal portfolio is a Black-Litterman (BL) model. BL model can incorporate an element of historical data and the views of investors to form a new prediction about the return of the portfolio as a basis for preparing the asset weighting models. BL model has two fundamental problems, the assumption of normality and estimation parameters on the market Bayesian prior framework that does not from a normal distribution. This study provides an alternative solution where the modelling of the BL model stock returns and investor views from non-normal distribution.

  19. PENGARUH RISIKO SISTEMATIS DAN RISIKO TIDAK SISTEMATIS TERHADAP EXPECTED RETURN SAHAM DALAM RANGKA PEMBENTUKAN PORTOFOLIO SAHAM LQ-45 YANG TERDAFTAR DI BURSA EFEK INDONESIA DENGAN SINGLE INDEX MODEL PERIODE TAHUN 2009

    Ratih Paramitasari

    2015-04-01

    Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk menguji pengaruh risiko sistematis dan risiko sistematis pada hasil saham yang diharapkan portofolio terhadap perusahaan LQ45 dengan menggunakan model indeks tunggal. Populasi penelitian ini adalah semua saham yang tercatat pada Bursa Efek Indonesia. Sampel dari penelitian ini adalah saham dari kategori LQ45 dan ini ditentukan secara purposive sampling, dan itu terdiri dari 37 saham. Analisis data penelitian ini menggunakan analisis regresi berganda. Parsial dan simultan, hasilnya menunjukkan bahwa risiko sistematis dan risiko sistematis berpengaruh signifikan terhadap pengembalian yang diharapkan dari portofolio saham. Hasil ini menunjukkan perubahan variasi risiko sistematis dan risiko tidak sistematis digunakan untuk memprediksi perubahan variasi keuntungan yang diharapkan dari portofolio saham. Hasil ini sesuai dengan teori bahwa hubungan positif dan linier antara laba yang diharapkan dan risiko.

  20. Interlink Converter with Linear Quadratic Regulator Based Current Control for Hybrid AC/DC Microgrid

    Dwi Riana Aryani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid alternate current/direct current (AC/DC microgrid consists of an AC subgrid and a DC subgrid, and the subgrids are connected through the interlink bidirectional AC/DC converter. In the stand-alone operation mode, it is desirable that the interlink bidirectional AC/DC converter manages proportional power sharing between the subgrids by transferring power from the under-loaded subgrid to the over-loaded one. In terms of system security, the interlink bidirectional AC/DC converter takes an important role, so proper control strategies need to be established. In addition, it is assumed that a battery energy storage system is installed in one subgrid, and the coordinated control of interlink bidirectional AC/DC converter and battery energy storage system converter is required so that the power sharing scheme between subgrids becomes more efficient. For the purpose of designing a tracking controller for the power sharing by interlink bidirectional AC/DC converter in a hybrid AC/DC microgrid, a droop control method generates a power reference for interlink bidirectional AC/DC converter based on the deviation of the system frequency and voltages first and then interlink bidirectional AC/DC converter needs to transfer the power reference to the over-loaded subgrid. For efficiency of this power transferring, a linear quadratic regulator with exponential weighting for the current regulation of interlink bidirectional AC/DC converter is designed in such a way that the resulting microgrid can operate robustly against various uncertainties and the power sharing is carried out quickly. Simulation results show that the proposed interlink bidirectional AC/DC converter control strategy provides robust and efficient power sharing scheme between the subgrids without deteriorating the secure system operation.

  1. A time-domain decomposition iterative method for the solution of distributed linear quadratic optimal control problems

    Heinkenschloss, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    We study a class of time-domain decomposition-based methods for the numerical solution of large-scale linear quadratic optimal control problems. Our methods are based on a multiple shooting reformulation of the linear quadratic optimal control problem as a discrete-time optimal control (DTOC) problem. The optimality conditions for this DTOC problem lead to a linear block tridiagonal system. The diagonal blocks are invertible and are related to the original linear quadratic optimal control problem restricted to smaller time-subintervals. This motivates the application of block Gauss-Seidel (GS)-type methods for the solution of the block tridiagonal systems. Numerical experiments show that the spectral radii of the block GS iteration matrices are larger than one for typical applications, but that the eigenvalues of the iteration matrices decay to zero fast. Hence, while the GS method is not expected to convergence for typical applications, it can be effective as a preconditioner for Krylov-subspace methods. This is confirmed by our numerical tests.A byproduct of this research is the insight that certain instantaneous control techniques can be viewed as the application of one step of the forward block GS method applied to the DTOC optimality system.

  2. Can Drugs Enhance Hypofractionated Radiotherapy? A Novel Method of Modeling Radiosensitization Using In Vitro Data

    Ohri, Nitin; Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lawrence, Yaacov Richard, E-mail: yaacovla@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Center for Translational Research in Radiation Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer (Israel)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy (hRT) is being explored for a number of malignancies. The potential benefit of giving concurrent chemotherapy with hRT is not known. We sought to predict the effects of combined modality treatments by using mathematical models derived from laboratory data. Methods and Materials: Data from 26 published clonogenic survival assays for cancer cell lines with and without the use of radiosensitizing chemotherapy were collected. The first three data points of the RT arm of each assay were used to derive parameters for the linear quadratic (LQ) model, the multitarget (MT) model, and the generalized linear quadratic (gLQ) model. For each assay and model, the difference between the predicted and observed surviving fractions at the highest tested RT dose was calculated. The gLQ model was fitted to all the data from each RT cell survival assay, and the biologically equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2s) of clinically relevant hRT regimens were calculated. The increase in cell kill conferred by the addition of chemotherapy was used to estimate the EQD2 of hRT along with a radiosensitizing agent. For comparison, this was repeated using conventionally fractionated RT regimens. Results: At a mean RT dose of 8.0 Gy, the average errors for the LQ, MT, and gLQ models were 1.63, 0.83, and 0.56 log units, respectively, favoring the gLQ model (p < 0.05). Radiosensitizing chemotherapy increased the EQD2 of hRT schedules by an average of 28% to 82%, depending on disease site. This increase was similar to the gains predicted for the addition of chemotherapy to conventionally fractionated RT. Conclusions: Based on published in vitro assays, the gLQ equation is superior to the LQ and MT models in predicting cell kill at high doses of RT. Modeling exercises demonstrate that significant increases in biologically equivalent dose may be achieved with the addition of radiosensitizing agents to hRT. Clinical study of this approach is warranted.

  3. A model for inverse dose-rate effects - low dose-rate hyper-sensibility in response to targeted radionuclide therapy

    Murray, I.; Mather, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that the Linear-Quadratic (LQ) model of cell survival, developed for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), could be extended to targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) in order to predict dose-response relationships in a cell line exhibiting low dose hypersensitivity (LDH). Methods: aliquots of the PC-3 cancer cell line were treated with either EBRT or an in-vitro model of TRT (Irradiation of cell culture with Y-90 EDTA over 24, 48, 72 or 96 hours). Dosimetry for the TRT was calculated using radiation transport simulations with the Monte Carlo PENELOPE code. Clonogenic as well as functional biological assays were used to assess cell response. An extension of the LQ model was developed which incorporated a dose-rate threshold for activation of repair mechanisms. Results: accurate dosimetry for in-vitro exposures of cell cultures to radioactivity was established. LQ parameters of cell survival were established for the PC-3 cell line in response to EBRT. The standard LQ model did not predict survival in PC-3 cells exposed to Y 90 irradiation over periods of up to 96 hours. In fact cells were more sensitive to the same dose when irradiation was carried out over 96 hours than 24 hours. I.e. at a lower dose-rate. Deviations from the LQ predictions were most pronounced below a threshold dose-rate of 0.5 Gy/hr. These results led to an extension of the LQ model based upon a dose-rate dependent sigmoid model of single strand DNA repair. This extension to the model resulted in predicted cell survival curves that closely matched the experimental data. Conclusion: the LQ model of cell survival to radiation has been shown to be largely predictive of response to low dose-rate irradiation. However, in cells displaying LDH, further adaptation of the model was required. (authors)

  4. Combining support vector machines with linear quadratic regulator adaptation for the online design of an automotive active suspension system

    Chiou, J-S; Liu, M-T

    2008-01-01

    As a powerful machine-learning approach to pattern recognition problems, the support vector machine (SVM) is known to easily allow generalization. More importantly, it works very well in a high-dimensional feature space. This paper presents a nonlinear active suspension controller which achieves a high level performance by compensating for actuator dynamics. We use a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) to ensure optimal control of nonlinear systems. An LQR is used to solve the problem of state feedback and an SVM is used to address the question of the estimation and examination of the state. These two are then combined and designed in a way that outputs feedback control. The real-time simulation demonstrates that an active suspension using the combined SVM-LQR controller provides passengers with a much more comfortable ride and better road handling

  5. Application of Linear Quadratic Gaussian and Coefficient Diagram Techniques to Distributed Load Frequency Control of Power Systems

    Tarek Hassan Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presented both the linear quadratic Gaussian technique (LQG and the coefficient diagram method (CDM as load frequency controllers in a multi-area power system to deal with the problem of variations in system parameters and load demand change. The full states of the system including the area frequency deviation have been estimated using the Kalman filter technique. The efficiency of the proposed control method has been checked using a digital simulation. Simulation results indicated that, with the proposed CDM + LQG technique, the system is robust in the face of parameter uncertainties and load disturbances. A comparison between the proposed technique and other schemes is carried out, confirming the superiority of the proposed CDM + LQG technique.

  6. Optimal Control of Scalar Conservation Laws Using Linear/Quadratic Programming: Application to Transportation Networks

    Li, Yanning

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a new optimal control framework for transportation networks in which the state is modeled by a first order scalar conservation law. Using an equivalent formulation based on a Hamilton-Jacobi (H-J) equation and the commonly used triangular fundamental diagram, we pose the problem of controlling the state of the system on a network link, in a finite horizon, as a Linear Program (LP). We then show that this framework can be extended to an arbitrary transportation network, resulting in an LP or a Quadratic Program. Unlike many previously investigated transportation network control schemes, this method yields a globally optimal solution and is capable of handling shocks (i.e., discontinuities in the state of the system). As it leverages the intrinsic properties of the H-J equation used to model the state of the system, it does not require any approximation, unlike classical methods that are based on discretizations of the model. The computational efficiency of the method is illustrated on a transportation network. © 2014 IEEE.

  7. Optimal Control of Scalar Conservation Laws Using Linear/Quadratic Programming: Application to Transportation Networks

    Li, Yanning; Canepa, Edward S.; Claudel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a new optimal control framework for transportation networks in which the state is modeled by a first order scalar conservation law. Using an equivalent formulation based on a Hamilton-Jacobi (H-J) equation and the commonly used triangular fundamental diagram, we pose the problem of controlling the state of the system on a network link, in a finite horizon, as a Linear Program (LP). We then show that this framework can be extended to an arbitrary transportation network, resulting in an LP or a Quadratic Program. Unlike many previously investigated transportation network control schemes, this method yields a globally optimal solution and is capable of handling shocks (i.e., discontinuities in the state of the system). As it leverages the intrinsic properties of the H-J equation used to model the state of the system, it does not require any approximation, unlike classical methods that are based on discretizations of the model. The computational efficiency of the method is illustrated on a transportation network. © 2014 IEEE.

  8. Linear-quadratic dose kinetics or dose-dependent repair/misrepair

    Braby, L.A.; Nelson, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Models for the response of cells exposed to low (LET) linear energy transfer radiation can be grouped into three general types on the basis of assumptions about the nature of the interaction which results in the shoulder of the survival curve. The three forms of interaction are 1) sublethal damage becoming lethal, 2) potentially lethal damage becoming irreparable, and 3) potentially lethal damage ''saturating'' a repair system. The effects that these three forms of interaction would have on the results of specific types of experiments are investigated. Comparisons with experimental results indicate that only the second type is significant in determining the response of typical cultured mammalian cells. (author)

  9. STRATEGI AKTIF PASIF DALAM OPTIMALISASI PORTOFOLIO SAHAM INDEKS LQ-45

    Ibnu Khajar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of investors to invest their money in the stock exchange was to maximize return although theywere subject to constraints, primarily risk. Return was the motivating force in the investment process. It was thereward for undertaking the investment. To overcome and lesson the risk, an investor needed to make diversificationthrough the formation of portfolio. The aim of this research was to know the return and risk from theactive and passive strategy in the stocks of LQ45, for 6 months periods, August 2009 until January 2010. Theactive strategy used the single index model and passive used the LQ45 share itself. The results of this researchindicated that active strategy (single index model: return portfolio was 5.43% and risk was 4.03%. Passivestrategy (following the index: return portfolio was 2% and risk was 3.5% and there was a linear relationshipbetween an asset’s risk and its required rate of return, the bigger the amount of return, the bigger the risk takenby investors or the reverse. The finding showed that between the two strategies, the return and risk of activestrategy as a whole was bigger than that of the passive strategy.

  10. Mathematical models of tumour and normal tissue response

    Jones, B.; Dale, R.G.; Charing Cross Group of Hospitals, London

    1999-01-01

    The historical application of mathematics in the natural sciences and in radiotherapy is compared. The various forms of mathematical models and their limitations are discussed. The Linear Quadratic (LQ) model can be modified to include (i) radiobiological parameter changes that occur during fractionated radiotherapy, (ii) situations such as focal forms of radiotherapy, (iii) normal tissue responses, and (iv) to allow for the process of optimization. The inclusion of a variable cell loss factor in the LQ model repopulation term produces a more flexible clonogenic doubling time, which can simulate the phenomenon of 'accelerated repopulation'. Differential calculus can be applied to the LQ model after elimination of the fraction number integers. The optimum dose per fraction (maximum cell kill relative to a given normal tissue fractionation sensitivity) is then estimated from the clonogen doubling times and the radiosensitivity parameters (or α/β ratios). Economic treatment optimization is described. Tumour volume studies during or following teletherapy are used to optimize brachytherapy. The radiation responses of both individual tumours and tumour populations (by random sampling 'Monte-Carlo' techniques from statistical ranges of radiobiological and physical parameters) can be estimated. Computerized preclinical trials can be used to guide choice of dose fractionation scheduling in clinical trials. The potential impact of gene and other biological therapies on the results of radical radiotherapy are testable. New and experimentally testable hypotheses are generated from limited clinical data by exploratory modelling exercises. (orig.)

  11. LQG/LTR [linear quadratic Gaussian with loop transfer recovery] robust control system design for a low-pressure feedwater heater train

    Murphy, G.V.; Bailey, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper uses the linear quadratic Gaussian with loop transfer recovery (LQG/LTR) control system design method to obtain a level control system for a low-pressure feedwater heater train. The control system performance and stability robustness are evaluated for a given set of system design specifications. The tools for analysis are the return ratio, return difference, and inverse return difference singular-valve plots for a loop break at the plant output. 3 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Straightening Beta: Overdispersion of Lethal Chromosome Aberrations following Radiotherapeutic Doses Leads to Terminal Linearity in the Alpha–Beta Model

    Igor Shuryak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent technological advances allow precise radiation delivery to tumor targets. As opposed to more conventional radiotherapy—where multiple small fractions are given—in some cases, the preferred course of treatment may involve only a few (or even one large dose(s per fraction. Under these conditions, the choice of appropriate radiobiological model complicates the tasks of predicting radiotherapy outcomes and designing new treatment regimens. The most commonly used model for this purpose is the venerable linear-quadratic (LQ formalism as it applies to cell survival. However, predictions based on the LQ model are frequently at odds with data following very high acute doses. In particular, although the LQ predicts a continuously bending dose–response relationship for the logarithm of cell survival, empirical evidence over the high-dose region suggests that the survival response is instead log-linear with dose. Here, we show that the distribution of lethal chromosomal lesions among individual human cells (lymphocytes and fibroblasts exposed to gamma rays and X rays is somewhat overdispersed, compared with the Poisson distribution. Further, we show that such overdispersion affects the predicted dose response for cell survival (the fraction of cells with zero lethal lesions. This causes the dose response to approximate log-linear behavior at high doses, even when the mean number of lethal lesions per cell is well fitted by the continuously curving LQ model. Accounting for overdispersion of lethal lesions provides a novel, mechanistically based explanation for the observed shapes of cell survival dose responses that, in principle, may offer a tractable and clinically useful approach for modeling the effects of high doses per fraction.

  13. The implications of structural asymmetries for monetary policy and welfare in a small open economy: a linear quadratic framework

    Rychalovska, Yuliya

    -, č. 380 (2008), s. 1-56 ISSN 1211-3298 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : DSGE models * non-traded goods * optimal monetary policy Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp380.pdf

  14. Existence and Policy Effectiveness in Feedback Nash LQ-Games

    Nicola Acocella

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates how the classical theory of economic policy can profitably be used to verify some properties of the Linear Nash Feedback Equilibrium in difference LQ-games. In particular, we find that both a necessary condition for the equilibrium existence and a sufficient condition for policy ineffectiveness can be defined in the terms of the simple Tinbergen counting rule.

  15. ANALISIS VARIABEL-VARIABEL FUNDAMENTAL YANG BERPENGARUH TERHADAP PRICE EARNING RATIO SEBAGAI DASAR PENILAIAN SAHAM (Studi Pada Saham-Saham indeks LQ 45 di Bursa Efek Jakarta

    Yulianti - -

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT   The existence of the Indonesian Capital Market is very important for Indonesian economic activity, due to the fact that capital market development is one indicated of the betterment of national economy. In terms of investment, capital market development is determined by the economic fundamentals, public company performance, and investor’s tendency to invest. Stock, being the main investment object, offers several preferences to choose by the investor, one of which is LQ 45 stock indices. The Jakarta Stock Exchange (JSX focus is put on the trade of LQ 45 stock indices. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the LQ 45 stock indices by taking into account the four main variables as suggested by the Gordon model. In line with the above, this study concerns stock evaluation based on the fundamental analysis by the price earning ratio approach. Explanatory variable is dividend payout ratio, return on equity, earning growth and financial leverage, dependent variable is price earning ratio. Purposive random sampling and multiple regression using 16 emittent of LQ 45 stock indices samples were used]. The aims of this research is to know the influence of the fundamental variables on the price earning ratio, and the naturalness of LQ 45 stock indices value. The samples used are the big, established and stable companies included in  calculation of LQ 45 indices, and thus would not apply to non LQ 45 indices at the JSX from 1999 through 2000. The results of the study indicate that (1 out of the four explanatory variables used: dividend payout ratio, return on equity, earning growth and financial leverage whereas simultaneously, all the variables showed significant influence; (2 dividend payout ratio was the most significant explanatory variable influencing the price earning ratio; (3 based on the price earning ratio analysis, no natural value was evidence of LQ 45 stock indices at the JSX.   Keywords: Price Earning Ratio as Bases in Stock

  16. Design a software real-time operation platform for wave piercing catamarans motion control using linear quadratic regulator based genetic algorithm.

    Liang, Lihua; Yuan, Jia; Zhang, Songtao; Zhao, Peng

    2018-01-01

    This work presents optimal linear quadratic regulator (LQR) based on genetic algorithm (GA) to solve the two degrees of freedom (2 DoF) motion control problem in head seas for wave piercing catamarans (WPC). The proposed LQR based GA control strategy is to select optimal weighting matrices (Q and R). The seakeeping performance of WPC based on proposed algorithm is challenged because of multi-input multi-output (MIMO) system of uncertain coefficient problems. Besides the kinematical constraint problems of WPC, the external conditions must be considered, like the sea disturbance and the actuators (a T-foil and two flaps) control. Moreover, this paper describes the MATLAB and LabVIEW software plats to simulate the reduction effects of WPC. Finally, the real-time (RT) NI CompactRIO embedded controller is selected to test the effectiveness of the actuators based on proposed techniques. In conclusion, simulation and experimental results prove the correctness of the proposed algorithm. The percentage of heave and pitch reductions are more than 18% in different high speeds and bad sea conditions. And the results also verify the feasibility of NI CompactRIO embedded controller.

  17. Analysis of portfolio optimization with lot of stocks amount constraint: case study index LQ45

    Chin, Liem; Chendra, Erwinna; Sukmana, Agus

    2018-01-01

    To form an optimum portfolio (in the sense of minimizing risk and / or maximizing return), the commonly used model is the mean-variance model of Markowitz. However, there is no amount of lots of stocks constraint. And, retail investors in Indonesia cannot do short selling. So, in this study we will develop an existing model by adding an amount of lot of stocks and short-selling constraints to get the minimum risk of portfolio with and without any target return. We will analyse the stocks listed in the LQ45 index based on the stock market capitalization. To perform this analysis, we will use Solver that available in Microsoft Excel.

  18. A realistic closed-form radiobiological model of clinical tumor-control data incorporating intertumor heterogeneity

    Roberts, Stephen A.; Hendry, Jolyon H.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of intertumor heterogeneity in clinical tumor control datasets and the relationship to in vitro measurements of tumor biopsy samples. Specifically, to develop a modified linear-quadratic (LQ) model incorporating such heterogeneity that it is practical to fit to clinical tumor-control datasets. Methods and Materials: We developed a modified version of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model for tumor control, incorporating a (lagged) time factor to allow for tumor cell repopulation. We explicitly took into account the interpatient heterogeneity in clonogen number, radiosensitivity, and repopulation rate. Using this model, we could generate realistic TCP curves using parameter estimates consistent with those reported from in vitro studies, subject to the inclusion of a radiosensitivity (or dose)-modifying factor. We then demonstrated that the model was dominated by the heterogeneity in α (tumor radiosensitivity) and derived an approximate simplified model incorporating this heterogeneity. This simplified model is expressible in a compact closed form, which it is practical to fit to clinical datasets. Using two previously analysed datasets, we fit the model using direct maximum-likelihood techniques and obtained parameter estimates that were, again, consistent with the experimental data on the radiosensitivity of primary human tumor cells. This heterogeneity model includes the same number of adjustable parameters as the standard LQ model. Results: The modified model provides parameter estimates that can easily be reconciled with the in vitro measurements. The simplified (approximate) form of the heterogeneity model is a compact, closed-form probit function that can readily be fitted to clinical series by conventional maximum-likelihood methodology. This heterogeneity model provides a slightly better fit to the datasets than the conventional LQ model, with the same numbers of fitted parameters. The parameter estimates of the clinically

  19. On the Open-Loop Nash Equilibrium in LQ-Games

    Engwerda, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we consider open-loop Nash equilibria of the linear-quadratic differential game.As well the finite-planning-horizon, the infinite-planning horizon as convergence properties of the finite-planning-horizon equilibrium if the planning horizon is extended to infinity are studied.Particular

  20. Comparison of two mathematical models for describing heat-induced cell killing

    Roti Roti, J.L.; Henle, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    A computer-based minimization algorithm is utilized to obtain the optimum fits of two models to hyperthermic cell killing data. The models chosen are the multitarget, single-hit equation, which is in general use, and the linear-quadratic equation, which has been applied to cell killing by ionizing irradiation but not to heat-induced cell killing. The linear-quadratic equation fits hyperthermic cell killing data as well as the multitarget, single-hit equation. Both parameters of the linear-quadratic equation obey the Arrhenius law, whereas only one of the two parameters of the multitarget, single-hit equation obeys the Arrhenius law. Thus the linear-quadratic function can completely define cell killing as a function of both time and temperature. In addition, the linear-quadratic model will provide a simplified approach to the study of the synergism between heat and X irradiation

  1. Role of bio-effect models in improving radiotherapy of cancer

    Rao, B.S.

    2013-01-01

    Application of linear quadratic model of cell survival in radiotherapy has enabled to successfully predict the response of both the normal tissues and tumours. Even the simplest form of BED (biological effective dose) equation for fractionated radiotherapy could precisely predict the late normal tissue complications resulting from large dose per fraction. These observations have led to the development MFD (multiple fractions daily) protocol, with the specific objective of reducing late normal tissue morbidity. Protraction of treatment and consequent loss of BED and tumour control; multiple fractions delivered without adequate intervals resulting in incomplete repair of sub-lethal damage and consequent normal tissue complications, have been explained successfully by the LQ model. In the recent past LDR (low dose rate) brachytherapy is mostly replaced by HDR (high dose rate) technique. A series of calculations based on tumour bio-kinetics parameters, as well as the geometric sparing provides a sound rationale for replacing LDR technique by HDR technique. Some of the calculations relevant to this will be presented during this talk. Bio-effect models can also provide insight in to the rationale of RIT (radio-immunotherapy). With an adequate knowledge of biological half-life of antibodies in the tumour/critical organs, and biological uptake half-time in the tumour, it is possible to evaluate the efficacy of a number of radio-nuclides in RIT. Calculations based on LQ models suggest that longer lived isotopes such as 32 P, 86 Rb, 144m In may have an advantage over the shorter lived radio-nuclides. A clear knowledge of the various parameters like/values, potentially doubling time of tumour and other bio-kinetic parameters may hold the key for successful application of bio-effect models in predicting the response to radiotherapy. Feedback from the clinics will further help in refining and validating the existing models. (author)

  2. Prediksi Risiko Sistematik Saham-Saham LQ45 Bursa Efek Indonesia

    A An Arief Jusuf

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Beta has been argued, both conceptually as well as empirically. In 1960's, many practitioners used superior advantages in calculation attempted at CAPM theory for investing in asset which has high Beta. Many empirical researches on the later years refused the existence of security market line from CAPM. Afterwards, many practitioners and academicians stated the death of CAPM. Linear regression method could be used to make decision if it had already matched the criteria for Best Linear Unbiased Estimator. Prediction model is a statistic testing which aimsat knowing whether there is a relationship or effect between researched variables. Nonparametric method is an alternative action which is taken when the research model does not match normality assumption. This research, as shown by the use of weekly data, could be free from technical trading problems in predicted systematic risk. While ASII, HRUM, and TLKM stock returns are affected more by other factors. This condition has caused systematic risk not to affect significantly on those stocks. Another result has shown that banking stocks, which became part of LQ45, have higher systematic risk respectively.

  3. SU-D-16A-03: A Radiation Pneumonitis Dose-Response Model Incorporating Non- Local Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    Gordon, J; Snyder, K; Zhong, H; Chetty, I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Dose-response models that can reliably predict radiation pneumonitis (RP) to guide radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer presently do not exist. A model is proposed that incorporates non-local radiationinduced bystander effect (RIBE). Methods: A single sigmoid response function, derived from published data for whole lung irradiation, relates RP probability to cumulative lung damage, regardless of fractionation scheme. Lung damage is assumed to be caused by direct local radiation damage, quantified via the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, and RIBE. Based on published data, RIBE is assumed to be activated when per-fraction dose rises above ∼0.6 Gy, but is constant with dose above that threshold. Integral RIBE damage is assumed proportional to lung volume irradiated above ∼0.6 Gy per fraction. Key model parameters include LQ α and β, and two RIBE parameters: the single-fraction probability δ of damage, and a proportionality parameter κ that relates the potential for RIBE damage to irradiated lung volume. All parameters are tentatively fitted from published data, the RIBE parameters from published RP rates for conventionally fractionated RT (CFRT) and stereotactic body RT (SBRT). Results: The model predicts dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. It provides a tentative explanation for why V20 (33 fractions), V13 (20 fractions) and V5 (<10 fractions) are observed to be correlated with RP. It also provides a plausible explanation for the success of SBRT — RIBE damage increases with the number of fractions, so penalizes CFRT relative to SBRT. Conclusion: The proposed model is relatively simple, extrapolates from published data, plausibly explains several clinical observations, and produces dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. While capable of elaboration, its ability to explain doseresponse experience with different fractionation schemes using a small number of assumptions and parameters is an

  4. SU-D-16A-03: A Radiation Pneumonitis Dose-Response Model Incorporating Non- Local Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    Gordon, J; Snyder, K; Zhong, H; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Dept. Radiation Oncology, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose-response models that can reliably predict radiation pneumonitis (RP) to guide radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer presently do not exist. A model is proposed that incorporates non-local radiationinduced bystander effect (RIBE). Methods: A single sigmoid response function, derived from published data for whole lung irradiation, relates RP probability to cumulative lung damage, regardless of fractionation scheme. Lung damage is assumed to be caused by direct local radiation damage, quantified via the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, and RIBE. Based on published data, RIBE is assumed to be activated when per-fraction dose rises above ∼0.6 Gy, but is constant with dose above that threshold. Integral RIBE damage is assumed proportional to lung volume irradiated above ∼0.6 Gy per fraction. Key model parameters include LQ α and β, and two RIBE parameters: the single-fraction probability δ of damage, and a proportionality parameter κ that relates the potential for RIBE damage to irradiated lung volume. All parameters are tentatively fitted from published data, the RIBE parameters from published RP rates for conventionally fractionated RT (CFRT) and stereotactic body RT (SBRT). Results: The model predicts dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. It provides a tentative explanation for why V20 (33 fractions), V13 (20 fractions) and V5 (<10 fractions) are observed to be correlated with RP. It also provides a plausible explanation for the success of SBRT — RIBE damage increases with the number of fractions, so penalizes CFRT relative to SBRT. Conclusion: The proposed model is relatively simple, extrapolates from published data, plausibly explains several clinical observations, and produces dose-response curves that are consistent with clinical experience. While capable of elaboration, its ability to explain doseresponse experience with different fractionation schemes using a small number of assumptions and parameters is an

  5. A novel multitarget model of radiation-induced cell killing based on the Gaussian distribution.

    Zhao, Lei; Mi, Dong; Sun, Yeqing

    2017-05-07

    The multitarget version of the traditional target theory based on the Poisson distribution is still used to describe the dose-survival curves of cells after ionizing radiation in radiobiology and radiotherapy. However, noting that the usual ionizing radiation damage is the result of two sequential stochastic processes, the probability distribution of the damage number per cell should follow a compound Poisson distribution, like e.g. Neyman's distribution of type A (N. A.). In consideration of that the Gaussian distribution can be considered as the approximation of the N. A. in the case of high flux, a multitarget model based on the Gaussian distribution is proposed to describe the cell inactivation effects in low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation with high dose-rate. Theoretical analysis and experimental data fitting indicate that the present theory is superior to the traditional multitarget model and similar to the Linear - Quadratic (LQ) model in describing the biological effects of low-LET radiation with high dose-rate, and the parameter ratio in the present model can be used as an alternative indicator to reflect the radiation damage and radiosensitivity of the cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An example in linear quadratic optimal control

    Weiss, George; Zwart, Heiko J.

    1998-01-01

    We construct a simple example of a quadratic optimal control problem for an infinite-dimensional linear system based on a shift semigroup. This system has an unbounded control operator. The cost is quadratic in the input and the state, and the weighting operators are bounded. Despite its extreme

  7. Design and implementation of FPGA-based LQ control of active magnetic bearings

    Jastrzebski, R.

    2007-07-01

    The need for high performance, high precision, and energy saving in rotating machinery demands an alternative solution to traditional bearings. Because of the contactless operation principle, the rotating machines employing active magnetic bearings (AMBs) provide many advantages over the traditional ones. The advantages such as contamination-free operation, low maintenance costs, high rotational speeds, low parasitic losses, programmable stiffness and damping, and vibration insulation come at expense of high cost, and complex technical solution. All these properties make the use of AMBs appropriate primarily for specific and highly demanding applications. High performance and high precision control requires model-based control methods and accurate models of the flexible rotor. In turn, complex models lead to high-order controllers and feature considerable computational burden. Fortunately, in the last few years the advancements in signal processing devices provide new perspective on the real-time control of AMBs. The design and the real-time digital implementation of the high-order LQ controllers, which focus on fast execution times, are the subjects of this work. In particular, the control design and implementation in the field programmable gate array (FPGA) circuits are investigated. The optimal design is guided by the physical constraints of the system for selecting the optimal weighting matrices. The plant model is complemented by augmenting appropriate disturbance models. The compensation of the force-field nonlinearities is proposed for decreasing the uncertainty of the actuator. A disturbance-observer-based unbalance compensation for canceling the magnetic force vibrations or vibrations in the measured positions is presented. The theoretical studies are verified by the practical experiments utilizing a custom-built laboratory test rig. The test rig uses a prototyping control platform developed in the scope of this work. To sum up, the work makes a step in

  8. A unified dose response relationship to predict high dose fractionation response in the lung cancer stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Than S Kehwar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study is designed to investigate the superiority and applicability of the model among the linear-quadratic (LQ, linear-quadratic-linear (LQ-L and universal-survival-curve (USC models by fitting published radiation cell survival data of lung cancer cell lines. Materials and Method: The radiation cell survival data for small cell (SC and non-small cell (NSC lung cancer cell lines were obtained from published reports, and were used to determine the LQ and cell survival curve parameters, which ultimately were used in the curve fitting of the LQ, LQ-L and USC models. Results: The results of this study demonstrate that the LQ-L(Dt-mt model, compared with the LQ and USC models, provides best fit with smooth and gradual transition to the linear portion of the curve at transition dose Dt-mt, where the LQ model loses its validity, and the LQ-L(Dt-2α/β and USC(Dt-mt models do not transition smoothly to the linear portion of the survival curve. Conclusion: The LQ-L(Dt-mt model is able to fit wide variety of cell survival data over a very wide dose range, and retains the strength of the LQ model in the low-dose range.

  9. Effect of Zohar LQ-215, a biorational surfactant, on the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci (biotype b).

    Ishaaya, I; Khasdan, V; Horowitz, A Rami

    2006-01-01

    Zohar LQ-215, a surfactant based on plant oils, able to control nymphs of the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), under laboratory and field conditions. To evaluate the effects of the surfactant on the nymph stages of whitefly under laboratory conditions, potted cotton seedlings infested with 1st- or 3rd-instars were treated with the compound aqueous solutions. LC90 values of Zohar LQ-215 on 1st and 3rd-nymphs, based on mortality curves, were 0.78% and 1.14%, respectively. Adult mortality of 12% and 19% was obtained at concentrations of 0.5% and 1%, respectively. Under both laboratory and, in some cases, under field conditions, greater mortality was achieved when combining Zohar LQ-215 with the insect growth regulator buprofezin than when either insecticide was applied separately. Our results indicate that Zohar LQ-215 could serve as a potential compound for controlling whiteflies under light to moderate infestation and could be used in combination with other rational insecticides such as buprofezin for controlling whiteflies in integrated pest management programs.

  10. On the necessity of identifying the true parameter in adaptive LQ control

    Polderman, Jan W.

    1986-01-01

    In adaptive control problems one may drop the requirement of identifying the true system in order to simplify the problem of control. It will be shown that in the adaptive LQ control problem this does not at all lead to an easier problem.

  11. ANALISIS BEBERAPA FAKTOR YANG MEMPENGARUHI HOLDING PERIOD SAHAM BIASA PADA PERUSAHAAN GO PUBLIC YANG TERCATAT DALAM INDEX LQ45

    Vinus - Maulina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT   There are many factors influencing the decision making of investors in holding their possession on security especially common stock. Monetary crisis condition has proved to be able to influence the investors’ attitude in Jakarta Stock Market in investing their capital especially about the long/short of holding a security. This study is conducted based on the differentiation of conclusion/result of study from previous studies about decision to hold security in the long/short term. The aim of this study is to analyze variables influencing holding period of common stock on public firm listed in LQ 45 Index, that are firms generally have good performance assessed based on both market performance and firm fundamental, then analyzing the dominance influencing variable. This study is conducted in Jakarta Stock Exchange with population of stocks listed in LQ 45 index in period of 2000 – 2001 with the total of 64 firms. The Sample Taking Method is purposive sampling with the criteria that the firms at least listed twice in LQ45 index on the study period. The analysis method used to analyze independent variables: spread, market value, variance return, and dividend pay out ratio and dependent variable: holding period is two stage least squares multiple regression model,  since there is possibility that the correlation of bid-ask spread from the current period and bid-ask spread and holding period from the previous period for every stock take place simultaneously. Results of the study showed that, partially, bid-ask spread variable that constitutes the different value between the highest price provided paid by buyer with the lowest price offered by seller has significance positive correlation on holding period of common stock and there is inverse correlation/significance negative between variance return variable that reflect the risk rate from stock effected by fluctuation of stock price and holding period of common stock. While

  12. Modelling the Impact of Fractionation on Late Urinary Toxicity After Postprostatectomy Radiation Therapy

    Fiorino, Claudio, E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Cozzarini, Cesare [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Rancati, Tiziana [Prostate Cancer Program, Fondazione Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Briganti, Alberto [Department of Urology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Mangili, Paola [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Di Muzio, Nadia Gisella [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Calandrino, Riccardo [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To fit urinary toxicity data of patients treated with postprostatectomy radiation therapy with the linear quadratic (LQ) model with/without introducing a time factor. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2010, 1176 patients were treated with conventional fractionation (1.8 Gy per fraction, median 70.2 Gy, n=929) or hypofractionation (2.35-2.90 Gy per fraction, n=247). Data referred to 2004-2010 (when all schemes were in use, n=563; conventional fractionation: 316; hypofractionation: 247) were fitted as a logit function of biological equivalent dose (BED), according to the LQ model with/without including a time factor γ (fixing α/β = 5 Gy). The 3-year risks of severe urethral stenosis, incontinence, and hematuria were considered as endpoints. Best-fit parameters were derived, and the resulting BEDs were taken in multivariable backward logistic models, including relevant clinical variables, considering the whole population. Results: The 3-year incidences of severe stenosis, incontinence, and hematuria were, respectively, 6.6%, 4.8%, and 3.3% in the group treated in 2004-2010. The best-fitted α/β values were 0.81 Gy and 0.74 Gy for incontinence and hematuria, respectively, with the classic LQ formula. When fixing α/β = 5 Gy, best-fit values for γ were, respectively, 0.66 Gy/d and 0.85 Gy/d. Sensitivity analyses showed reasonable values for γ (0.6-1.0 Gy/d), with comparable goodness of fit for α/β values between 3.5 and 6.5 Gy. Likelihood ratio tests showed that the fits with/without including γ were equivalent. The resulting multivariable backward logistic models in the whole population included BED, pT4, and use of antihypertensives (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.72) for incontinence and BED, pT4, and year of surgery (AUC = 0.80) for hematuria. Stenosis data could not be fitted: a 4-variable model including only clinical factors (acute urinary toxicity, pT4, year of surgery, and use of antihypertensives) was suggested (AUC

  13. Modelling the Impact of Fractionation on Late Urinary Toxicity After Postprostatectomy Radiation Therapy

    Fiorino, Claudio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Rancati, Tiziana; Briganti, Alberto; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Mangili, Paola; Di Muzio, Nadia Gisella; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To fit urinary toxicity data of patients treated with postprostatectomy radiation therapy with the linear quadratic (LQ) model with/without introducing a time factor. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2010, 1176 patients were treated with conventional fractionation (1.8 Gy per fraction, median 70.2 Gy, n=929) or hypofractionation (2.35-2.90 Gy per fraction, n=247). Data referred to 2004-2010 (when all schemes were in use, n=563; conventional fractionation: 316; hypofractionation: 247) were fitted as a logit function of biological equivalent dose (BED), according to the LQ model with/without including a time factor γ (fixing α/β = 5 Gy). The 3-year risks of severe urethral stenosis, incontinence, and hematuria were considered as endpoints. Best-fit parameters were derived, and the resulting BEDs were taken in multivariable backward logistic models, including relevant clinical variables, considering the whole population. Results: The 3-year incidences of severe stenosis, incontinence, and hematuria were, respectively, 6.6%, 4.8%, and 3.3% in the group treated in 2004-2010. The best-fitted α/β values were 0.81 Gy and 0.74 Gy for incontinence and hematuria, respectively, with the classic LQ formula. When fixing α/β = 5 Gy, best-fit values for γ were, respectively, 0.66 Gy/d and 0.85 Gy/d. Sensitivity analyses showed reasonable values for γ (0.6-1.0 Gy/d), with comparable goodness of fit for α/β values between 3.5 and 6.5 Gy. Likelihood ratio tests showed that the fits with/without including γ were equivalent. The resulting multivariable backward logistic models in the whole population included BED, pT4, and use of antihypertensives (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.72) for incontinence and BED, pT4, and year of surgery (AUC = 0.80) for hematuria. Stenosis data could not be fitted: a 4-variable model including only clinical factors (acute urinary toxicity, pT4, year of surgery, and use of antihypertensives) was suggested (AUC

  14. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy of carcinoma of the uterine cervix and predictivity of empirical models

    Chougule, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    Carcinoma of the uterine cervix is the most common malignancy of women in India. Most of the patients attend for treatment at an advanced stage of the disease. The conventional fractionation schedule fails to give satisfactory tumour control rate in advanced malignancies. Twice daily fractionated radiotherapy (RT) with 1.2 Gy/F, 1.4 Gy/F and 1.6 Gy/F was tried in 40 cases each. The six months minimum follow-up shows that tumour control with 1.2 Gy/F twice daily (85.7%) is comparable with that of a conventional fractionation schedule (82.8%), whereas it is poor with 1.4 Gy/F (71.05%) and 1.6 Gy/F (68.0%) schedules. Attempts were made to apply time dose fractionation (TDF) and linear quadratic (LQ) models to observed tumour control rates. It was observed that time dose fractionation fails to correlate with the observed tumour control rate (p > 0.2). The extrapolated response dose (ERD) analysis also fails to correlate with the tumour control rate (p > 0.3). (author). 29 refs., 4 tabs

  15. Geotectonic evolution of lunar LQ-4 region based on multisource data

    Jianping Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Sinus Iridum region, the first choice for China's “Lunar Exploration Project” is located at the center of the lunar LQ-4 area and is the site of Chang'e-3 (CE-3's soft landing. To make the scientific exploration of Chang'e-3 more targeted and scientific, and to obtain a better macro-level understanding of the geotectonic environment of the Sinus Iridum region, the tectonic elements in LQ-4 region have been studied and the typical structures were analyzed statistically using data from CE-1, Clementine, LRO and Lunar Prospector missions. Also, the mineral components and periods of mare basalt activities in the study area have been ascertained. The present study divides the tectonic units and establishes the major tectonic events and sequence of evolution in the study area based on morphology, mineral constituents, and tectonic element distribution.

  16. An Lp−Lq version of Hardy's theorem for spherical Fourier transform on semisimple Lie groups

    S. Ben Farah

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a real semisimple Lie group G with finite center and K a maximal compact subgroup of G. We prove an Lp−Lq version of Hardy's theorem for the spherical Fourier transform on G. More precisely, let a, b be positive real numbers, 1≤p, q≤∞, and f a K-bi-invariant measurable function on G such that ha−1f∈Lp(G and eb‖λ‖2ℱ(f∈Lq(+* (ha is the heat kernel on G. We establish that if ab≥1/4 and p or q is finite, then f=0 almost everywhere. If ab<1/4, we prove that for all p, q, there are infinitely many nonzero functions f and if ab=1/4 with p=q=∞, we have f=const ha.

  17. A Schur Method for Designing LQ-optimal Systems with Prescribed Eigenvalues

    David Di Ruscio

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new algorithm for solving the LQ-optimal pole placement problem is presented. The method studied is a variant of the classical eigenvector approach and instead uses a set of Schur vectors, thereby gaining substantial numerical advantages. An important task in this method is the LQ-optimal pole placement problem for a second order (sub system. The paper presents a detailed analytical solution to this problem. This part is not only important for solving the general n-dimensional problem but also provides an understanding of the behaviour of an optimal system: The paper shows that in some cases it is an infinite number; in others a finite number, and in still others, non state weighting matrices Q that give the system a set of prescribed eigenvalues. Equations are presented that uniquely determine these state weight matrices as a function of the new prescribed eigcnvalues. From this result we have been able to derive the maximum possible imaginary part of the eigenvalues in an LQ-optimal system, irrespective of how the state weight matrix is chosen.

  18. Analyzing Accounting Ratios as Determinants of the LQ45 Stock Prices Movements in Indonesia Stock Exchange During the Period of 2002-2006

    Agus Arianto Toly

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The lack of studies regarding the determinants of stock price movement in the Indonesia Stock Exchange (ISX, which is an emerging stock exchange in the South East Asia region, and the pursue of generalization became the reasons of why this study. Previous research (Gupta, Chevalier, & Sayekt, 2000; Subiyantoro & Andreani, 2003, mostly focus on the external factors of the firms, instead of the internal factors. This study uses the accounting ratios as the determinants of the prices of stocks’ classified as the LQ45 in the ISX during 2002-2006. The panel-data regression model is used to test whether all of the independent variables involved in the equation could simultaneously explain the behavior of the dependent one. The developed model would be analyzed by the utilization of econometrics package, namely GRETL 1.7.4. After conducting some statistical treatments on the developed model, this study reveals that the shareholders’ ratios consisted of book value per share, dividend payout ratio, EPS, and ROA are the accounting ratios, which determine the LQ45’s stock price movement in the ISX during the period of 2002-2006.

  19. VALUE RELEVANCE DAN IFRS ADOPTION DI INDONESIA: INVESTIGASI PADA PERUSAHAAN LQ-45 BURSA EFEK INDONESIA

    Triandi ,

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Value relevance is being defined as the ability of information disclosed by financial statements to capture and summarize firm value. earnings per share (EPS and book value of shares (BVS and stock market price (SMP, both before and after IFRS adoption. Based on theresult,test there the valuerelevancebefore and after IFRS adoptio. The value relevance after IFRS adoption decreased. These findings differ from the findings in several countries have adopted IFRS. In many countries have adopted IFRS tends to increase the value relevance. Keyword : value relevance, earning per share, book value of equity, stock price, IFRS adoption, LQ-45

  20. HUBUNGAN PENGUNGKAPAN CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSR TERHADAP KINERJA KEUANGAN DAN HARGA SAHAM PADA PERUSAHAAN LQ45

    Mailani Hamdani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the relationship between the disclosure of Coporate Social Responsibility (CSR and financial performance stock price in the LQ45 company. This study used the annual reports of LQ45 company in period FebJul 2012 for the data. The variable were based on the standard CSR disclosure Global Reporting Initiatives(GRI, the financial performance reflected by the current ratio, return on assets (ROA, return on equity (ROE, debt to equity/CAR, as well as stock prices reflected by the return stock. The results were Coporate Social Responsibility (CSR disclosure in annual reports related significantly to financial performance, it means that better Coporate Social Responsibility (CSR disclosure in annual report will result to better financial performance. Coporate Social Responsibility (CSR disclosure in in the annual report related significantly to the stock price, it means that better Coporate Social Responsibility (CSR disclosure in annual reports will result in higher stock price. And the result for this research is the financial performance related significantly to stock price of a company, it means that the better financial performance of a company will increase the stock price in the company. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis hubungan antara pengungkapan tanggung jawab Coporate Social Responsibility (CSR dan harga saham kinerja keuangan di perusahaan LQ45 . Penulis menggunakan laporan tahunan perusahaan LQ45 pada periode Februari-Juli 2012 untuk data. Variabel didasarkan pada pengungkapan CSR standar Global Reporting Initiatives (GRI, kinerja keuangan tercermin dari rasio lancar, return on assets (ROA, return on equity (ROE, debt to equity / CAR, serta harga saham fre pantulan oleh return saham. Hasilnya menunjukkan Coporate Social Responsibility (CSR pengungkapan dalam laporan tahunan terkait signifikan terhadap kinerja keuangan, itu berarti bahwa memperluas Coporate Social Responsibility (CSR pengungkapan dalam

  1. A simulation study on the multi-pass rolling bond of 316L/Q345R stainless clad plate

    Qin Qin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an investigation into interface bonding research of 316L/Q345R stainless clad plate. A three-dimensional thermal–elastic–plastic model has been established using finite element analysis to model the multi-pass hot rolling process. Results of the model have been compared with those obtained from a rolling experiment of stainless clad plate. The comparisons of temperature and profile of the rolled stainless clad plate have indicated a satisfactory accuracy of finite element analysis simulation. Effects on interface bonding by different parameters including pre-heating temperature, multi-pass thickness reduction rules, rolling speed, covering rate, and different assemble patterns were analyzed systematically. The results show that higher temperature and larger thickness reduction are beneficial to achieve the bonding in vacuum hot rolling process. The critical reduction in the bond at the temperature of 1200 °C is 28%, and the critical thickness reduction reduces by about 2% when the temperature increases by 50 °C during the range from 1000 °C to 1250 °C. And the relationship between the minimum pass number and thickness reduction has been suggested. The results also indicate that large covering rate in the assemble pattern of outer soft and inner hard is beneficial to achieve the bond of stainless clad plate.

  2. A saturable repair model for radionuclide therapy using low LET radiation emitters

    Calderon, Carlos F.; Joaquin Gonzalez; Guido Martin

    2004-01-01

    distributed inside the tumor volume. Close-form expressions were obtained to calculate the effective irradiation time, effective dose and therapeutic efficacy. The results were compared with linear-quadratic model (LQ) predictions at low dose rate in view of saturable repair model could show similar prediction of LQ model like occurs with other sublethal damage model which offers a mechanistic interpretation for LQ model. Methods: The equation system for the model proposed by Sanchez-Reyes, modified by inclusion of cell proliferation. Conclusion: The modification of radiobiological model proposed by Sanchez-Reyes presented here let us make prediction on cell response under irradiation schemes in RN. The model will produce similar results to those one which could be obtained with LQ model at low dose rate. The formalism presented here let us to determine parameters which could be used in treatment planning for RN. (authors)

  3. SU-E-T-70: A Radiobiological Model of Reoxygenation and Fractionation Effects

    Guerrero, M [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Carlson, DJ [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a simple reoxygenation model that fulfills the following goals:1-Quantify the reoxygenation effect in biologically effective dose (BED) and compare it to the repopulation effect.2-Model the hypoxic fraction in tumors as a function of the number of fractions.3-Develop a simple analytical expression for a reoxygenation term in BED calculations. Methods: The model considers tumor cells in two compartments: one normoxic population of cells and one hypoxic compartment including cells under a range of reduced oxygen concentrations. The surviving fraction is predicted using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model. A hypoxia reduction factor (HRF) is used to quantify reductions in radiosensitivity parameters α-A and β-A as cellular oxygen concentration decreases. The HRF is defined as the ratio of the dose at a specific level of hypoxia to the dose under fully aerobic conditions to achieve equal cell killing. The model assumes that a fraction of the hypoxic cells ( ) moves from the hypoxic to the aerobic compartment after each daily fraction. As an example, we consider standard fractionation for NSCLC (d=2Gy,n=33) versus a SBRT (n=5, d=10Gy) fractionation and compare the loss in reoxygenation biological effect with the gain in repopulation biological effect. Results: An analytic expression for the surviving fraction after n daily treatments is derived and the reoxygenation term in the biological effect is calculated. Reoxygenation and repopulation effects are the same order of magnitude for potential doubling time Td values of 2 to 5 days. The hypoxic fraction increases or decreases with n depending on the reoxygenation rate Δ. For certain combinations of parameters, the biological effect of reoxygenation goes as -(n-1)*ln(1-Δ) providing a simple expression that can be introduced in BED calculations. Conclusion: A novel radiobiological model was developed that can be used to evaluate the effect of reoxygenation in fractionated radiotherapy.

  4. REAKSI PASAR MODAL INDONESIA SEPUTAR PEMILIHAN UMUM 8 JULI 2009 PADA SAHAM LQ-45

    Suryo Luhur

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research used event study methodology to investigate the stock price reac-tion to domestic political events, Indonesian presidential and vice election on July 8th, 2009on stock of LQ-45 category listed in BEI. Data analysis used one sample t-test and pairedsamples t-test. The result of the analysis revealed that abnormal returns were: (1 not signifi-cantly different before and after presidential election announcement, (2 Significantly nega-tive on day t-10, t-5, t-4, t0, and t+7 and significantly positive on t-10 and t+7 3, (3 NotSignificantly different on day 0 Trading Volume Activity before and after presidential elec-tion announcement. This results reported here indicated that Indonesian Capital Market waslittle sensitive to political events.

  5. Lunar Geologic Mapping: A Preliminary Map of a Portion of the LQ-10 ("Marius") Quadrangle

    Gregg, T. K. P.; Yingst, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    Since the first lunar mapping program ended in the 1970s, new topographical, multispectral, elemental and albedo imaging datasets have become available (e.g., Clementine, Lunar Prospector, Galileo). Lunar science has also advanced within the intervening time period. A new systematic lunar geologic mapping effort endeavors to build on the success of earlier mapping programs by fully integrating the many disparate datasets using GIS software and bringing to bear the most current understanding of lunar geologic history. As part of this program, we report on a 1:2,500,000-scale preliminary map of a subset of Lunar Quadrangle 10 ("LQ-10" or the "Marius Quadrangle," see Figures 1 and 2), and discuss the first-order science results. By generating a geologic map of this region, we can constrain the stratigraphic and geologic relationships between features, revealing information about the Moon s chemical and thermal evolution.

  6. A short note on $L^q$ theory for Stokes problem with a pressure-dependent viscosity

    Mácha, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 2 (2016), s. 317-329 ISSN 0011-4642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Stokes problem * Lq theory * pressure-dependent viscosity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.364, year: 2016 http://hdl.handle.net/10338.dmlcz/145726

  7. Sparse filtering with the generalized lp/lq norm and its applications to the condition monitoring of rotating machinery

    Jia, Xiaodong; Zhao, Ming; Di, Yuan; Li, Pin; Lee, Jay

    2018-03-01

    Sparsity is becoming a more and more important topic in the area of machine learning and signal processing recently. One big family of sparse measures in current literature is the generalized lp /lq norm, which is scale invariant and is widely regarded as normalized lp norm. However, the characteristics of the generalized lp /lq norm are still less discussed and its application to the condition monitoring of rotating devices has been still unexplored. In this study, we firstly discuss the characteristics of the generalized lp /lq norm for sparse optimization and then propose a method of sparse filtering with the generalized lp /lq norm for the purpose of impulsive signature enhancement. Further driven by the trend of industrial big data and the need of reducing maintenance cost for industrial equipment, the proposed sparse filter is customized for vibration signal processing and also implemented on bearing and gearbox for the purpose of condition monitoring. Based on the results from the industrial implementations in this paper, the proposed method has been found to be a promising tool for impulsive feature enhancement, and the superiority of the proposed method over previous methods is also demonstrated.

  8. Short-term evolution and coexistence of spots, plages and flare activity on LQ Hydrae

    Flores Soriano, M.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aim to study the short-term evolution of the chromospheric and photospheric activity of the young, single K2 dwarf LQ Hya. Methods: Four months of quasi-simultaneous spectroscopic and photometric observations were used to study the variations of the photometric light curve, the evolution of the chromospheric activity from the Hα and Hβ lines, and the distribution of cool spots from Doppler maps. Results: During our observations one side of the star was more active than the other. The equivalent width of the Hα line from the least active hemisphere increased from ≈0.7 Å at the beginning of the observation to 1.0 Å at the end. The basal emission of the most active hemisphere remained roughly constant at EWHαt1.0 Å. Intense flare activity was observed during the first twenty days, where at least four different events were detected. The line asymmetries of the Hα line suggest that one of the flares could have produced a mass ejection with a maximum projected speed of 70kms-1. The rotational modulation of the V-band photometry showed clear anti-correlation with the chromospheric activity. The difference in brightness between the opposite hemispheres decreased from 0.m16 to 0.m09 in two months. Three spots gradually moving apart from each other are dominating the photospheric Doppler maps. The comparison between the maps and the Hα line as the star rotates reveals the spatial coexistence of chromospheric Hα emission and photospheric spots. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the active regions of LQ Hya can live for at least four months. The detected changes in the photometric light curve and the spectroscopic Doppler images seem to be more a consequence of the spatial redistribution of the active regions rather than due to changes in their strength. Only one of the active regions shows significant changes in its chromospheric emission. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic telescope in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP

  9. The polymorphic insertion of the luteinizing hormone receptor "insLQ" show a negative association to LHR gene expression and to the follicular fluid hormonal profile in human small antral follicles

    Borgbo, T; Chrudimska, J; Macek, M

    2018-01-01

    (AMHR2) and LHCGR, respectively, were observed for insLQ/insLQ compared to -/insLQ and the -/- genotypes. Moreover, LHCGR and CYP19a1 together with oestradiol and inhibin-B were significantly increased in -/insLQ compared to the -/- genotype. The homozygous insLQ genotype showed strong significant......The luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR) has a little studied polymorphic 6 bp insertion (rs4539842/insLQ). This study has evaluated the insLQ polymorphism in relation to potential associations with hormonal characteristics of human small antral follicles (hSAFs). In total, 310 hSAFs were collected...... from 86 women undergoing fertility preservation. Analysis included hormonal profile of 297 follicular fluid (FF) samples and 148 corresponding granulosa cells samples were evaluated by qPCR for selected genes. Significantly reduced and non-detectable mRNA levels of anti-Müllerian hormone receptor II...

  10. SU-E-T-256: Radiation Dose Responses for Chemoradiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer: An Analysis of Compiled Clinical Data Using Biophysical Models.

    Moraru, I; Tai, A; Erickson, B; Li, X

    2012-06-01

    We have analyzed recent clinical data obtained from chemoradiation of unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer in order to examine possible benefits from radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation as well as to propose possible dose escalated fractionation schemes. A modified linear quadratic (LQ) model was used to fit clinical tumor response data from chemoradiation treatments using different fractionations. Biophysical radiosensitivy parameters, a and α/β, tumor potential doubling time, Td, and delay time for tumor doubling during treatment, Tk, were extracted from the fits and were used to calculate feasible fractionation schemes for dose escalations. Examination of published data from 20 institutions showed no clear indication of improved survival with raised radiation dose. However, an enhancement in tumor response was observed for higher irradiation doses, an important and promising clinical Result with respect to palliation and quality of life. The radiobiological parameter estimates obtained from the analysis are: α/β = 10 ± 3 Gy, a = 0.010 ± 0.003 Gŷ-1, Td = 56 ± 5 days and Tk = 7 ± 2 days. Possible dose escalation schemes are proposed based on the calculation of the biologically equivalent dose (BED) required for a 50% tumor response rate. From the point of view of tumor response, escalation of the administered radiation dose leads to a potential clinical benefit, which when combined with normal tissue complication analyses may Result in improved treatments for certain patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Based on this analysis, a dose escalation trial with 2.25 Gy/fraction up to 69.75 Gy is being initiated for unresectable pancreatic cancer at our institution. Partially supported by MCW Cancer Center Meinerz Foundation. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Geologic Mapping of the Lunar South Pole, Quadrangle LQ-30: Volcanic History and Stratigraphy of Schroedinger Basin

    Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Petro, N. E.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we use recent images and topographic data to map the geology and geomorphology of the lunar South Pole quadrangle (LQ-30) at 1:2.5M scale [1-4] in accordance with the Lunar Geologic Mapping Program. Mapping of LQ-30 began during Mest's postdoctoral appointment and has continued under the PG&G Program, from which funding became available in February 2009. Preliminary map-ping and analyses have been done using base materials compiled by Mest, but properly mosaicked and spatially registered base materials are being compiled by the USGS and should be received by the end of June 2009. The overall objective of this research is to constrain the geologic evolution of the lunar South Pole (LQ-30: 60deg -90deg S, 0deg - +/-180deg ) with specific emphasis on evaluation of a) the regional effects of basin formation on the structure and composition of the crust and b) the spatial distribution of ejecta, in particular resulting from formation of the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin and other large basins. Key scientific objectives include: 1) Constraining the geologic history of the lunar South Pole and examining the spatial and temporal variability of geologic processes within the map area. 2) Constraining the vertical and lateral structure of the lunar regolith and crust, assessing the distribution of impact-generated materials, and determining the timing and effects of major basin-forming impacts on crustal structure and stratigraphy in the map area. And 3) assessing the distribution of resources (e.g., H, Fe, Th) and their relationships with surface materials.

  12. Predictive ability of boiler production models | Ogundu | Animal ...

    The weekly body weight measurements of a growing strain of Ross broiler were used to compare the of ability of three mathematical models (the multi, linear, quadratic and Exponential) to predict 8 week body weight from early body measurements at weeks I, II, III, IV, V, VI and VII. The results suggest that the three models ...

  13. Decentralized linear quadratic power system stabilizers for multi ...

    Introduction. Modern excitation systems considerably enhance the overall transient stability of power systems ..... to the local bus rather than the angle δ measured with respect to the remote bus. ... With this in view, the linear and nonlinear per-.

  14. Feedback nash equilibria for linear quadratic descriptor differential games

    Engwerda, J.C.; Salmah, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the non-cooperative linear feedback Nash quadratic differential game with an infinite planning horizon for descriptor systems of index one. The performance function is assumed to be indefinite. We derive both necessary and sufficient conditions under which this game has a

  15. Delayed Stochastic Linear-Quadratic Control Problem and Related Applications

    Li Chen

    2012-01-01

    stochastic differential equations (FBSDEs with Itô’s stochastic delay equations as forward equations and anticipated backward stochastic differential equations as backward equations. Especially, we present the optimal feedback regulator for the time delay system via a new type of Riccati equations and also apply to a population optimal control problem.

  16. Feedback Nash Equilibria for Linear Quadratic Descriptor Differential Games

    Engwerda, J.C.; Salmah, Y.

    2010-01-01

    In this note we consider the non-cooperative linear feedback Nash quadratic differential game with an infinite planning horizon for descriptor systems of index one. The performance function is assumed to be indefinite. We derive both necessary and sufficient conditions under which this game has a

  17. Heuristic Model Of The Composite Quality Index Of Environmental Assessment

    Khabarov, A. N.; Knyaginin, A. A.; Bondarenko, D. V.; Shepet, I. P.; Korolkova, L. N.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to present the heuristic model of the composite environmental quality index based on the integrated application of the elements of utility theory, multidimensional scaling, expert evaluation and decision-making. The composite index is synthesized in linear-quadratic form, it provides higher adequacy of the results of the assessment preferences of experts and decision-makers.

  18. Modeling and Control of Industrial ROV's for Semi-Autonomous Subsea Maintenance Services

    Mai, Christian; Pedersen, Simon; Hansen, Leif

    2017-01-01

    as improving the inspection quality. This study examines an industrial ROV, where the investigations include modeling of a real industrial prototype, which is then linearized and used for Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) development. The results are validated both based on non-linear model simulations...

  19. A Random Parameter Model for Continuous-Time Mean-Variance Asset-Liability Management

    Hui-qiang Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a continuous-time mean-variance asset-liability management problem in a market with random market parameters; that is, interest rate, appreciation rates, and volatility rates are considered to be stochastic processes. By using the theories of stochastic linear-quadratic (LQ optimal control and backward stochastic differential equations (BSDEs, we tackle this problem and derive optimal investment strategies as well as the mean-variance efficient frontier analytically in terms of the solution of BSDEs. We find that the efficient frontier is still a parabola in a market with random parameters. Comparing with the existing results, we also find that the liability does not affect the feasibility of the mean-variance portfolio selection problem. However, in an incomplete market with random parameters, the liability can not be fully hedged.

  20. Analysis Of Dynamic Portfolio Allocation Of Indonesian LQ45 During 2005 – 2011 Following The Markowitz Theowry

    Agustini Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The research observed that equity portfolio and investment managers were facing challenges in determining the optimum portfolio, especially during the turbulent times. As a result, they needed to implement portfolio management strategies to overcome the risk associated with stock return volatility in turbulence periods. This research focused on selecting stocks from the LQ-45 index during 2005-2011 using The Markowitz theory combining the Solver Linear Programming. The portfolio selection method which has been introduced by Markowitz (1952 used variance or standard deviation as a risk measurement. The result of this research proves that the composition of the portfolio is not the same in the different period. In the bearish period, the composition of the optimum portfolio is dominated by the banking sector and manufacture sector. In the bullish period, the optimum portfolio is dominated by the commodity stocks.

  1. Factors Affecting the Return Stock Company in Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX LQ45 in Years 2012-2015

    Fangki A. Sorongan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to determine the effect of partially and jointly independent variable of Debt to Equity Ratio (DER, Return on Equity (ROA, Return on Equity (ROE, and Net Profit Margin (NPM against the dependent variable on the stock return. Objects of this research were companies listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange (BEI LQ45 continuously for four years in the period 2012-2015. Companies that qualify for this research were 28 companies. Based on this research, the conclusions indicate that all four independent variables; Debt to Equity Ratio (DER, Return on Equity (ROA, Return on Equity (ROE, and Net Profit Margin (NPM, either jointly or partially give the significant effect on return stock.

  2. Numerical no parametric analysis of the ionizing radiations biological effects using ELLIS and FOWLER models

    Martin Urreta, J.C.; Bilbao, P.; Cacicedo, J.M.; Ensunza, P.; Megueruela, J.T.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper the problem of dose fractionation, the expression of this and its mathematical development is studied. Likewise, a comparative study -using an exemple- between the linear quadratic model proposed by Fowler amongst others, and the time-dose fractionation of Orton and Ellis, is made. (Author)

  3. Model Predictive Controller Combined with LQG Controller and Velocity Feedback to Control the Stewart Platform

    Nadimi, Esmaeil Sharak; Bak, Thomas; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to investigate the erformance and applicability of two GPC (generalized predictive control) based control methods on a complete benchmark model of the Stewart platform made in MATLAB V6.5. The first method involves an LQG controller (Linear Quadratic Gaussian...

  4. Equivalent uniform dose concept evaluated by theoretical dose volume histograms for thoracic irradiation.

    Dumas, J L; Lorchel, F; Perrot, Y; Aletti, P; Noel, A; Wolf, D; Courvoisier, P; Bosset, J F

    2007-03-01

    The goal of our study was to quantify the limits of the EUD models for use in score functions in inverse planning software, and for clinical application. We focused on oesophagus cancer irradiation. Our evaluation was based on theoretical dose volume histograms (DVH), and we analyzed them using volumetric and linear quadratic EUD models, average and maximum dose concepts, the linear quadratic model and the differential area between each DVH. We evaluated our models using theoretical and more complex DVHs for the above regions of interest. We studied three types of DVH for the target volume: the first followed the ICRU dose homogeneity recommendations; the second was built out of the first requirements and the same average dose was built in for all cases; the third was truncated by a small dose hole. We also built theoretical DVHs for the organs at risk, in order to evaluate the limits of, and the ways to use both EUD(1) and EUD/LQ models, comparing them to the traditional ways of scoring a treatment plan. For each volume of interest we built theoretical treatment plans with differences in the fractionation. We concluded that both volumetric and linear quadratic EUDs should be used. Volumetric EUD(1) takes into account neither hot-cold spot compensation nor the differences in fractionation, but it is more sensitive to the increase of the irradiated volume. With linear quadratic EUD/LQ, a volumetric analysis of fractionation variation effort can be performed.

  5. Reply to: Analysis of the effects of fractionated irradiation to the rat heart (by E. van Rongen)

    Guttenberger, R.

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of the linear quadratic (LQ) model in the analysis of the data presented by Lauk et al. (Radiotherapy. Oncol. 8: 363-367, 1987) is investigated with the linear regression method of Tucker, by simulating fractionated irradiation experiments on tissues with α/β values varying from 1 to 20, starting from theoretical iso-effect doses. It turns out that the LQ model is unreliable for small (∼ 1) α/β values using the error probability p=0.05 and that the sensitivity of the linear regression method is dependent on the underlying α/β. 3 refs.; 1 table

  6. Actuator Control of Edgewise Vibrations in Wind Turbine Blades

    Staino, A.; Basu, B.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2012-01-01

    ) theory. Multi-Blade Coordinate (MBC) transformation is applied to an edgewise reduced order model, leading to a linear time-invariant (LTI) representation of the dynamic model. The LTI description obtained is used for the design of the active control algorithm. Linear Quadratic (LQ) regulator designed...... for the MBC transformed system is compared with the control synthesis performed directly on an assumed nominal representation of the timevarying system. The LQ regulator is also compared against vibration control performance using Direct Velocity Feedback (DVF). Numerical simulations have been carried out...

  7. Analyzing the mechanisms of cell killing by ionizing radiation in monolayer, spheroids and xenografted tumours

    Horas, J.A.; Olguín, O.R.; Rizzotto, M.G.

    2017-01-01

    A relationship between oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and parameters of Linear Quadratic (LQ) model in hypoxic and aerobic conditions in several cell lines grown as monolayer, spheroids and transplanted tumors (xenograft) is tested. By considering this relationship, the two mechanisms of cell death by radiation appear. Surviving Fraction (SF) fits are compared in both oxygenation conditions by using the LQ. The data are obtained from literature. The existence of such mechanisms and their implications in the different systems studied is shown. The validity of one or other mechanism in each case is determined and the OER dependence with dose. (authors) [es

  8. WE-AB-204-02: Molecular-Imaging Based Assessment of Liver Complications for Yttrium-90 Microsphere Treatments: Can Existing NTCP Models Explain Clinical Outcomes?

    Lin, M; Choi, E; Chuong, M; Saboury, B; Moeslein, F; D’Souza, W; Guerrero, M [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate weather the current radiobiological models can predict the normal liver complications of radioactive Yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) selective-internal-radiation-treatment (SIRT) for metastatic liver lesions based on the post-infusion {sup 90}Y PET images. Methods: A total of 20 patients with metastatic liver tumors treated with SIRT that received a post-infusion {sup 90}Y-PET/CT scan were analyzed in this work. The 3D activity distribution of the PET images was converted into a 3D dose distribution via a kernel convolution process. The physical dose distribution was converted into the equivalent dose (EQ2) delivered at 2 Gy based on the linear-quadratic (LQ) model considering the dose rate effect. The biological endpoint of this work was radiation-induce liver disease (RILD). The NTCPs were calculated with four different repair-times (T1/2-Liver-Repair= 0,0.5,1.0,2.0 hr) and three published NTCP models (Lyman-external-RT, Lyman 90Y-HCC-SIRT, parallel model) were compared to the incidence of RILD of the recruited patients to evaluate their ability of outcome prediction. Results: The mean normal liver physical dose (avg. 51.9 Gy, range 31.9–69.8 Gy) is higher than the suggested liver dose constraint for external beam treatment (∼30 Gy). However, none of the patients in our study developed RILD after the SIRT. The estimated probability of ‘no patient developing RILD’ obtained from the two Lyman models are 46.3% to 48.3% (T1/2-Liver-Repair= 0hr) and <1% for all other repair times. For the parallel model, the estimated probability is 97.3% (0hr), 51.7% (0.5hr), 2.0% (1.0hr) and <1% (2.0hr). Conclusion: Molecular-images providing the distribution of {sup 90}Y enable the dose-volume based dose/outcome analysis for SIRT. Current NTCP models fail to predict RILD complications in our patient population, unless a very short repair-time for the liver is assumed. The discrepancy between the Lyman {sup 90}Y-HCC-SIRT model predicted and the clinically

  9. Analisis Fenomena Day of the Week Effect: Pengujian Monday Effect, Week-Four Effect and Rogalski Effect (Studi Empiris Pada Perusahaan LQ 45 Di BEI)

    Satoto, Shinta Heru

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study were to provide an empirical evidence of the day of the week phenomenon in Indonesian Capital Market. This research used 39 sample firms that list on LQ 45 Indonesian Capital Market on January 1, 2009 until December 31, 2010. The results indicate that Monday returns are positive and significant on average, and significantly different from returns of the rest of the week. Thus, no evidence was uncovered to support Monday effect and week four effect in Indonesian capit...

  10. Performance of the digene LQ, RH and PS HPVs genotyping systems on clinical samples and comparison with HC2 and PCR-based Linear Array.

    Godínez, Jose M; Tous, Sara; Baixeras, Nuria; Moreno-Crespi, Judith; Alejo, María; Lejeune, Marylène; Bravo, Ignacio G; Bosch, F Xavier; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2011-11-18

    Certain Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the infectious agents involved in cervical cancer development. Detection of HPVs DNA is part of the cervical cancer screening protocols and HPVs genotyping has been proposed for its inclusion in these preventive programs. The aim of this study was to evaluate three novel genotyping tests, namely Qiagen LQ, RH and PS, in clinical samples with and without abnormalities. For this, 305 cervical samples were processed and the results of the evaluated techniques were compared with those obtained in the HPVs diagnostic process in our lab, by using HC2 and Linear Array (LA) technologies. The concordances and kappa statistics (k) for each technique compared with HC2 were 98.69% (k = 0.94) for LQ, 98.03% (k = 0.91) for RH and 91.80% (k = 0.82) for PS. There was a very good agreement in HPVs type-specific concordance for the most prevalent types HPV16 (kappa range = 0.83-0.90), HPV18 (k.r.= 0.74-0.80) and HPV45 (k.r.= 0.82-0.90). The three tests showed an overall good concordance for HPVs detection when compared with HR-HC2 system. LQ and RH rendered lower detection rate for multiple infections than LA genotyping. However, our understanding of the clinical significance of multiple HPVs infections is still incomplete and therefore the relevance of the lower ability to detect multiple infections needs to be evaluated.

  11. Biological dose estimation for charged-particle therapy using an improved PHITS code coupled with a microdosimetric kinetic model

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Watanabe, Ritsuko; Kase, Yuki; Niita, Koji; Sihver, Lembit

    2009-01-01

    High-energy heavy ions (HZE particles) have become widely used for radiotherapy of tumors owing to their high biological effectiveness. In the treatment planning of such charged-particle therapy, it is necessary to estimate not only physical but also biological dose, which is the product of physical dose and relative biological effectiveness (RBE). In the Heavy-ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), the biological dose is estimated by a method proposed by Kanai et al., which is based on the linear-quadratic (LQ) model with its parameters α and β determined by the dose distribution in terms of the unrestricted linear energy transfer (LET). Thus, RBE is simply expressed as a function of LET in their model. However, RBE of HZE particles cannot be uniquely determined from their LET because of their large cross sections for high-energy δ-ray production. Hence, development of a biological dose estimation model that can explicitly consider the track structure of δ-rays around the trajectory of HZE particles is urgently needed. Microdosimetric quantities such as lineal energy y are better indexes for representing RBE of HZE particles in comparison to LET, since they can express the decrease of ionization densities around their trajectories due to the production of δ-rays. The difference of the concept between LET and y is illustrated in Figure 1. However, the use of microdosimetric quantities in computational dosimetry was severely limited because of the difficulty in calculating their probability densities (PDs) in macroscopic matter. We therefore improved the 3-dimensional particle transport simulation code PHITS, providing it with the capability of estimating the microdosimetric PDs in a macroscopic framework by incorporating a mathematical function that can instantaneously calculate the PDs around the trajectory of HZE particles with precision equivalent to a microscopic track-structure simulation. A new method for estimating biological dose from charged

  12. WE-H-BRA-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY): Nano-Dosimetric Kinetic Model for Variable Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton and Ion Beams

    Abolfath, R; Bronk, L; Titt, U.; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Helo, Y [University College London, London (United Kingdom); Schuemann, J [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Recent clonogenic cell survival and γH2AX studies suggest proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) may be a non-linear function of linear energy transfer (LET) in the distal edge of the Bragg peak and beyond. We sought to develop a multiscale model to account for non-linear response phenomena to aid in the optimization of intensity-modulated proton therapy. Methods: The model is based on first-principle simulations of proton track structures, including secondary ions, and an analytical derivation of the dependence on particle LET of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model parameters α and β. The derived formulas are an extension of the microdosimetric kinetic (MK) model that captures dissipative track structures and non-Poissonian distribution of DNA damage at the distal edge of the Bragg peak and beyond. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to confirm the non-linear dose-response characteristics arising from the non-Poisson distribution of initial DNA damage. Results: In contrast to low LET segments of the proton depth dose, from the beam entrance to the Bragg peak, strong deviations from non-dissipative track structures and Poisson distribution in the ionization events in the Bragg peak distal edge govern the non-linear cell response and result in the transformation α=(1+c-1 L) α-x+2(c-0 L+c-2 L^2 )(1+c-1 L) β-x and β=(1+c-1 L)^2 β-x. Here L is the charged particle LET, and c-0,c-1, and c-2 are functions of microscopic parameters and can be served as fitting parameters to the cell-survival data. In the low LET limit c-1, and c-2 are negligible hence the linear model proposed and used by Wilkins-Oelfke for the proton treatment planning system can be retrieved. The present model fits well the recent clonogenic survival data measured recently in our group in MDACC. Conclusion: The present hybrid method provides higher accuracy in calculating the RBE-weighted dose in the target and normal tissues.

  13. WE-H-BRA-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY): Nano-Dosimetric Kinetic Model for Variable Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton and Ion Beams

    Abolfath, R; Bronk, L; Titt, U.; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R; Helo, Y; Schuemann, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Recent clonogenic cell survival and γH2AX studies suggest proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) may be a non-linear function of linear energy transfer (LET) in the distal edge of the Bragg peak and beyond. We sought to develop a multiscale model to account for non-linear response phenomena to aid in the optimization of intensity-modulated proton therapy. Methods: The model is based on first-principle simulations of proton track structures, including secondary ions, and an analytical derivation of the dependence on particle LET of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model parameters α and β. The derived formulas are an extension of the microdosimetric kinetic (MK) model that captures dissipative track structures and non-Poissonian distribution of DNA damage at the distal edge of the Bragg peak and beyond. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to confirm the non-linear dose-response characteristics arising from the non-Poisson distribution of initial DNA damage. Results: In contrast to low LET segments of the proton depth dose, from the beam entrance to the Bragg peak, strong deviations from non-dissipative track structures and Poisson distribution in the ionization events in the Bragg peak distal edge govern the non-linear cell response and result in the transformation α=(1+c_1 L) α_x+2(c_0 L+c_2 L^2 )(1+c_1 L) β_x and β=(1+c_1 L)^2 β_x. Here L is the charged particle LET, and c_0,c_1, and c_2 are functions of microscopic parameters and can be served as fitting parameters to the cell-survival data. In the low LET limit c_1, and c_2 are negligible hence the linear model proposed and used by Wilkins-Oelfke for the proton treatment planning system can be retrieved. The present model fits well the recent clonogenic survival data measured recently in our group in MDACC. Conclusion: The present hybrid method provides higher accuracy in calculating the RBE-weighted dose in the target and normal tissues.

  14. Constraints on models of scalar and vector leptoquarks decaying to a quark and a neutrino at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV

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Moreels, Lieselotte; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Beghin, Diego; Bilin, Bugra; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dorney, Brian; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Postiau, Nicolas; Starling, Elizabeth; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Wang, Qun; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Trocino, Daniele; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Vermassen, Basile; Vit, Martina; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caputo, Claudio; David, Pieter; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; 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Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Voevodina, Elena; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Bragagnolo, Alberto; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lujan, Paul; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Simonetto, Franco; Tiko, Andres; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Cecchi, Claudia; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Manoni, Elisa; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Fiori, Francesco; Giannini, Leonardo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Manca, Elisabetta; Mandorli, Giulio; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Daci, Nadir; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Cometti, Simona; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Soldi, Dario; Staiano, Amedeo; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Vazzoler, Federico; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Moon, Chang-Seong; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Kim, Hyunsoo; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Jeon, Dajeong; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Duran-Osuna, Cecilia; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Ramirez-Sanchez, Gabriel; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Rabadán-Trejo, Raúl Iraq; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Reyes-Almanza, Rogelio; Ramírez García, Mateo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Eysermans, Jan; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Bheesette, Srinidhi; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Szleper, Michal; Traczyk, Piotr; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Galinhas, Bruno; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Strong, Giles; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golunov, Alexander; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbounov, Nikolai; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavine, Vladimir; Korenkov, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sosnov, Dmitry; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Chadeeva, Marina; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Polikarpov, Sergey; Popova, Elena; Rusinov, Vladimir; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Rusakov, Sergey V; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Dimova, Tatyana; Kardapoltsev, Leonid; Shtol, Dmitry; Skovpen, Yuri; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Godizov, Anton; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Mandrik, Petr; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Slabospitskii, Sergei; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Babaev, Anton; Baidali, Sergei; Okhotnikov, Vitalii; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; Bachiller, Irene; Barrio Luna, Mar; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Moran, Dermot; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Triossi, Andrea; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Rodríguez Bouza, Víctor; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Fernández Manteca, Pedro José; García Alonso, Andrea; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Prieels, Cédric; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Akgun, Bora; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bendavid, Joshua; Bianco, Michele; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Brondolin, Erica; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; Cucciati, Giacomo; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Roeck, Albert; Deelen, Nikkie; Dobson, Marc; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Fallavollita, Francesco; Fasanella, Daniele; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gilbert, Andrew; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Guilbaud, Maxime; Gulhan, Doga; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jafari, Abideh; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Kornmayer, Andreas; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pantaleo, Felice; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pitters, Florian Michael; Rabady, Dinyar; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Selvaggi, Michele; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Stakia, Anna; Steggemann, Jan; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Caminada, Lea; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Wiederkehr, Stephan Albert; Backhaus, Malte; Bäni, Lukas; Berger, Pirmin; Chernyavskaya, Nadezda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dorfer, Christian; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Klijnsma, Thomas; Lustermann, Werner; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marionneau, Matthieu; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Pigazzini, Simone; Quittnat, Milena; Ruini, Daniele; Sanz Becerra, Diego Alejandro; Schönenberger, Myriam; Shchutska, Lesya; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vesterbacka Olsson, Minna Leonora; Wallny, Rainer; Zhu, De Hua; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Brzhechko, Danyyl; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Del Burgo, Riccardo; Donato, Silvio; Galloni, Camilla; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Neutelings, Izaak; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Schweiger, Korbinian; Seitz, Claudia; Takahashi, Yuta; Zucchetta, Alberto; Chang, Yu-Hsiang; Cheng, Kai-yu; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kumar, Arun; Li, You-ying; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Steen, Arnaud; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Bat, Ayse; Boran, Fatma; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dolek, Furkan; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Isik, Candan; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Tok, Ufuk Guney; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Atakisi, Ismail Okan; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Tekten, Sevgi; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Agaras, Merve Nazlim; Atay, Serhat; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Komurcu, Yildiray; Sen, Sercan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Davignon, Olivier; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Penning, Bjoern; Sakuma, Tai; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Taylor, Joseph; Titterton, Alexander; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Linacre, Jacob; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Auzinger, Georg; Bainbridge, Robert; Bloch, Philippe; Borg, Johan; Breeze, Shane; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Casasso, Stefano; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Komm, Matthias; Laner, Christian; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Martelli, Arabella; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Palladino, Vito; Pesaresi, Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Singh, Gurpreet; Stoye, Markus; Strebler, Thomas; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Virdee, Tejinder; Wardle, Nicholas; Winterbottom, Daniel; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Mackay, Catherine Kirsty; Morton, Alexander; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Zahid, Sema; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Madrid, Christopher; Mcmaster, Brooks; Pastika, Nathaniel; Smith, Caleb; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Buccilli, Andrew; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Coubez, Xavier; Cutts, David; Hadley, Mary; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Lee, Jangbae; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Usai, Emanuele; Yu, David; Band, Reyer; Brainerd, Christopher; Breedon, Richard; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Ko, Winston; Kukral, Ota; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Stolp, Dustin; Taylor, Devin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Zhangqier; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Bachtis, Michail; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Regnard, Simon; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Si, Weinan; Wang, Long; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Gilbert, Dylan; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Citron, Matthew; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Gouskos, Loukas; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Wang, Sicheng; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bornheim, Adolf; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Sun, Menglei; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; MacDonald, Emily; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Cheng, Yangyang; Chu, Jennifer; Datta, Abhisek; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Quach, Dan; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Alyari, Maral; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Pena, Cristian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schneider, Basil; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Cadamuro, Luca; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Field, Richard D; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Joshi, Bhargav Madhusudan; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Shi, Kun; Sperka, David; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Martinez, German; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Saha, Anirban; Sharma, Varun; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Rahmani, Mehdi; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Dittmer, Susan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Mills, Corrinne; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Alhusseini, Mohammad; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Hung, Wai Ting; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Bylinkin, Alexander; Castle, James; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Rogan, Christopher; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Duric, Senka; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Kim, Doyeong; Maravin, Yurii; Mendis, Dalath Rachitha; Mitchell, Tyler; Modak, Atanu; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Feng, Yongbin; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Wong, Kak; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Baty, Austin; Bauer, Gerry; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Harris, Philip; Hsu, Dylan; Hu, Miao; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lee, Yen-Jie; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Zhaozhong, Shi; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Turkewitz, Jared; Wadud, Mohammad Abrar; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Golf, Frank; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Freer, Chad; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Morse, David Michael; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Wamorkar, Tanvi; Wang, Bingran; Wisecarver, Andrew; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Bucci, Rachael; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Li, Wenzhao; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Siddireddy, Prasanna; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wightman, Andrew; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Ling, Ta-Yung; Luo, Wuming; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Higginbotham, Samuel; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Lange, David; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Norberg, Scarlet; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Das, Souvik; Gutay, Laszlo; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Peng, Cheng-Chieh; Qiu, Hao; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xiao, Rui; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Tongguang; Dolen, James; Parashar, Neeti; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Freed, Sarah; Geurts, Frank JM; Kilpatrick, Matthew; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Shi, Wei; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Zhang, Aobo; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Dulemba, Joseph Lynn; Fallon, Colin; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Taus, Rhys; Verzetti, Mauro; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Luo, Sifu; Mueller, Ryan; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Mengke, Tielige; Muthumuni, Samila; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Padeken, Klaas; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Verweij, Marta; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Joyce, Matthew; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Poudyal, Nabin; Sturdy, Jared; Thapa, Prakash; Zaleski, Shawn; Brodski, Michael; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Carlsmith, Duncan; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Hussain, Usama; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Woods, Nathaniel

    2018-01-01

    The results of a previous search by the CMS Collaboration for squarks and gluinos are reinterpreted to constrain models of leptoquark (LQ) production. The search considers jets in association with a transverse momentum imbalance, using the $ {M_{\\mathrm{T2}}} $ variable. The analysis uses proton-proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV, recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2016 and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb$^{-1}$. Leptoquark pair production is considered with LQ decays to a neutrino and a top, bottom, or light quark. This reinterpretation considers higher mass values than the original CMS search to constrain both scalar and vector LQs. Limits on the cross section for LQ pair production are derived at the 95% confidence level depending on the LQ decay mode. A vector LQ decaying with a 50% branching fraction to $ {\\mathrm{t}\

  15. Performance of the digene LQ, RH and PS HPVs genotyping systems on clinical samples and comparison with HC2 and PCR-based Linear Array

    Godínez Jose M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs are the infectious agents involved in cervical cancer development. Detection of HPVs DNA is part of the cervical cancer screening protocols and HPVs genotyping has been proposed for its inclusion in these preventive programs. The aim of this study was to evaluate three novel genotyping tests, namely Qiagen LQ, RH and PS, in clinical samples with and without abnormalities. For this, 305 cervical samples were processed and the results of the evaluated techniques were compared with those obtained in the HPVs diagnostic process in our lab, by using HC2 and Linear Array (LA technologies. Results The concordances and kappa statistics (k for each technique compared with HC2 were 98.69% (k = 0.94 for LQ, 98.03% (k = 0.91 for RH and 91.80% (k = 0.82 for PS. There was a very good agreement in HPVs type-specific concordance for the most prevalent types HPV16 (kappa range = 0.83-0.90, HPV18 (k.r.= 0.74-0.80 and HPV45 (k.r.= 0.82-0.90. Conclusions The three tests showed an overall good concordance for HPVs detection when compared with HR-HC2 system. LQ and RH rendered lower detection rate for multiple infections than LA genotyping. However, our understanding of the clinical significance of multiple HPVs infections is still incomplete and therefore the relevance of the lower ability to detect multiple infections needs to be evaluated.

  16. A comparison of numerical methods for the solution of continuous-time DSGE models

    Parra-Alvarez, Juan Carlos

    This paper evaluates the accuracy of a set of techniques that approximate the solution of continuous-time DSGE models. Using the neoclassical growth model I compare linear-quadratic, perturbation and projection methods. All techniques are applied to the HJB equation and the optimality conditions...... parameters of the model and suggest the use of projection methods when a high degree of accuracy is required....

  17. PENGARUH MEKANISME GOOD CORPORATE GOVERNANCE (GCG PADA NILAI PERUSAHAAN (Studi Pada Perusahaan Yang Masuk Indeks LQ45 Di Bursa Efek Indonesia

    Zanera Saroh Firdausya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the effect of managerial ownership, institutional ownership, board size, independent board size, board size and the size of the value of the company on the companies included in the LQ 45 index in Indonesia Stock Exchange. The sampling method used was purposive sampling. Of the population of firms that  enter  in  LQ  45  during  the  period  of  2009-2011,  taken  nineteen  sampel. Alat  companies  that  meet  the  criteria  of  analysis  used  is  multiple  linear regression analysis by first covering the classical assumption of normality test, multikolonieritas, autocorrelation, heteroskedasticity. is partially managerial ownership. While the variable institutional ownership, board size, board size independent, board size and size has no effect on firm value. Keywords: agency theory, corporate governance, corporate performance

  18. Therapeutic analysis of high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir vaginal cuff brachytherapy for endometrial cancer using a cylindrical target volume model and varied cancer cell distributions

    Zhang, Hualin, E-mail: hualin.zhang@northwestern.edu; Donnelly, Eric D.; Strauss, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois 60611 (United States); Qi, Yujin [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCBT) in the treatment of endometrial cancer in a cylindrical target volume with either a varied or a constant cancer cell distributions using the linear quadratic (LQ) model. Methods: A Monte Carlo (MC) technique was used to calculate the 3D dose distribution of HDR VCBT over a variety of cylinder diameters and treatment lengths. A treatment planning system (TPS) was used to make plans for the various cylinder diameters, treatment lengths, and prescriptions using the clinical protocol. The dwell times obtained from the TPS were fed into MC. The LQ model was used to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of two brachytherapy regimens prescribed either at 0.5 cm depth (5.5 Gy × 4 fractions) or at the vaginal mucosal surface (8.8 Gy × 4 fractions) for the treatment of endometrial cancer. An experimentally determined endometrial cancer cell distribution, which showed a varied and resembled a half-Gaussian distribution, was used in radiobiology modeling. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to cancer cells was calculated for each treatment scenario. The therapeutic ratio (TR) was defined by comparing VCBT with a uniform dose radiotherapy plan in term of normal cell survival at the same level of cancer cell killing. Calculations of clinical impact were run twice assuming two different types of cancer cell density distributions in the cylindrical target volume: (1) a half-Gaussian or (2) a uniform distribution. Results: EUDs were weakly dependent on cylinder size, treatment length, and the prescription depth, but strongly dependent on the cancer cell distribution. TRs were strongly dependent on the cylinder size, treatment length, types of the cancer cell distributions, and the sensitivity of normal tissue. With a half-Gaussian distribution of cancer cells which populated at the vaginal mucosa the most, the EUDs were between 6.9 Gy × 4 and 7.8 Gy × 4, the TRs were in the range from (5.0){sup 4} to (13

  19. Power control method for load-frequency control operation in BWRs

    Ie, Shin-ichiroo; Ohgo, Yu-kiharu; Itou, Tetsuo; Shida, Tooichi

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary design of an advanced power control method for fast load-following [load frequency control (LFC)] maneuvers in a boiling water reactor (BWR) is described in this paper. Application of a multivariable control method using an optimal linear quadratic (LQ) regulator theory effectively improves control system performance when system variables have significant interactions such as in BWRs. The control problem, however, demands strict constraints on system variable from the standpoint of plant operation. These constraints require the control system to have a nonlinear property for better improvement. Therefore, the effectiveness of LQ control is limited by these constraints, because it is based on a linear model. A new method is needed to compensate for the nonlinear property. In this study, the authors propose a new method using fuzzy reasoning with LQ control to achieve nonlinear compensation

  20. Therapeutic analysis of high-dose-rate "1"9"2Ir vaginal cuff brachytherapy for endometrial cancer using a cylindrical target volume model and varied cancer cell distributions

    Zhang, Hualin; Donnelly, Eric D.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Qi, Yujin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCBT) in the treatment of endometrial cancer in a cylindrical target volume with either a varied or a constant cancer cell distributions using the linear quadratic (LQ) model. Methods: A Monte Carlo (MC) technique was used to calculate the 3D dose distribution of HDR VCBT over a variety of cylinder diameters and treatment lengths. A treatment planning system (TPS) was used to make plans for the various cylinder diameters, treatment lengths, and prescriptions using the clinical protocol. The dwell times obtained from the TPS were fed into MC. The LQ model was used to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of two brachytherapy regimens prescribed either at 0.5 cm depth (5.5 Gy × 4 fractions) or at the vaginal mucosal surface (8.8 Gy × 4 fractions) for the treatment of endometrial cancer. An experimentally determined endometrial cancer cell distribution, which showed a varied and resembled a half-Gaussian distribution, was used in radiobiology modeling. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to cancer cells was calculated for each treatment scenario. The therapeutic ratio (TR) was defined by comparing VCBT with a uniform dose radiotherapy plan in term of normal cell survival at the same level of cancer cell killing. Calculations of clinical impact were run twice assuming two different types of cancer cell density distributions in the cylindrical target volume: (1) a half-Gaussian or (2) a uniform distribution. Results: EUDs were weakly dependent on cylinder size, treatment length, and the prescription depth, but strongly dependent on the cancer cell distribution. TRs were strongly dependent on the cylinder size, treatment length, types of the cancer cell distributions, and the sensitivity of normal tissue. With a half-Gaussian distribution of cancer cells which populated at the vaginal mucosa the most, the EUDs were between 6.9 Gy × 4 and 7.8 Gy × 4, the TRs were in the range from (5.0)"4 to (13.4)"4 for

  1. PENGARUH EARNINGS, OPERATING CASH FLOW DAN ASSET GROWTH TERHADAP STOCK RETURN PERUSAHAAN YANG TERDAFTAR PADA INDEKS LQ 45 UNTUK PERIODE 2009-2011

    Yulius ,

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to test the impact of earnings, operating cash flow and asset growth to firm’s stock return which listed in LQ 45 index in Indonesian for 2009-2011. The result of this research is earnings, operating cash flow and asset growth have not significant effect to stock return both when those variabels is tested separately or silmutaneously. This result show that earnings, operating cash flow and asset growth are not only the one to be the basis of consideration for investor to make investment to get the stock return. Therefore, for making investment, investor should consider other factors which effect the firm’s stock return as macro economics and politics. Furthermore, from this result, be expected an improvement of quality financial statement which addopted IFRS. Keyword: Earnings, Operating Cash Flow, Asset Growth, Stock Return.

  2. Universal Survival Curve and Single Fraction Equivalent Dose: Useful Tools in Understanding Potency of Ablative Radiotherapy

    Park, Clint; Papiez, Lech; Zhang Shichuan; Story, Michael; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Overprediction of the potency and toxicity of high-dose ablative radiotherapy such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) by the linear quadratic (LQ) model led to many clinicians' hesitating to adopt this efficacious and well-tolerated therapeutic option. The aim of this study was to offer an alternative method of analyzing the effect of SBRT by constructing a universal survival curve (USC) that provides superior approximation of the experimentally measured survival curves in the ablative, high-dose range without losing the strengths of the LQ model around the shoulder. Methods and Materials: The USC was constructed by hybridizing two classic radiobiologic models: the LQ model and the multitarget model. We have assumed that the LQ model gives a good description for conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) for the dose to the shoulder. For ablative doses beyond the shoulder, the survival curve is better described as a straight line as predicted by the multitarget model. The USC smoothly interpolates from a parabola predicted by the LQ model to the terminal asymptote of the multitarget model in the high-dose region. From the USC, we derived two equivalence functions, the biologically effective dose and the single fraction equivalent dose for both CFRT and SBRT. Results: The validity of the USC was tested by using previously published parameters of the LQ and multitarget models for non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. A comparison of the goodness-of-fit of the LQ and USC models was made to a high-dose survival curve of the H460 non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. Conclusion: The USC can be used to compare the dose fractionation schemes of both CFRT and SBRT. The USC provides an empirically and a clinically well-justified rationale for SBRT while preserving the strengths of the LQ model for CFRT

  3. Excesses of muon g−2, RD(⁎, and RK(⁎ in a leptoquark model

    Chuan-Hung Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate muon g−2, RK(⁎, and RD(⁎ anomalies in a specific model with one doublet, one triplet, and one singlet scalar leptoquark (LQ. When the strict limits from the ℓ′→ℓγ, ΔB=2, Bs→μ+μ−, and B+→K+νν¯ processes are considered, it is difficult to use one scalar LQ to explain all of the anomalies due to the strong correlations among the constraints and observables. After ignoring the constraints and small couplings, the muon g−2 can be explained by the doublet LQ alone due to the mt enhancement, whereas the measured and unexpected smaller RK(⁎ requires the combined effects of the doublet and triplet LQs, and the RD and RD⁎ excesses depend on the singlet LQ through scalar- and tensor-type interactions.

  4. Turn-off-the-Month Effect on Stocks in LQ45 Index and Various Sectors in the Indonesia Stock Exchange using GARCH (p,q

    Galih Pandekar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are few types of anomalies that occur in the Indonesia Stock Exchange, for example monthly effect, day-of-the-week effect, January effect, holiday effect, and turn-of-the-month effect. The existence of these anomalies is in contrast to the efficient market hypothesis theory, due to a signifi-cant difference in returns during certain periods. By using time-series analysis and the GARCH(p,q method, the existence of the turn-of-the-month effect has been found in the Jakarta Composite Index, sectoral indexes, and stocks in LQ45. The turn-of-the-month effect seems to be seen in the last two days and the four previous days of each month. The January effect does not incite the turn-of-the-month effect. The turn-of-the-month effect appears due to an increasing volume of stocks acquired by investment managers who want to see their portfolio performance better. ";} // -->activate javascript

  5. The dependence of radiation response on the dose per fraction

    Joiner, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    The linear-quadratic (LQ) model explains the dependence of total dose in a fractionated course on the dose per fraction, in a very wide range of tumour and normal tissue studies, providing the dose per fraction remains above 2 Gy. In the range 2-1 Gy per fraction, some experimental studies show less increase in total dose than predicted by LQ; a probable explanation is incomplete repair between fractions given 2 seen between 1 and 0.1 Gy per fraction. This cannot be explained by incomplete repair; a modified LQ model where α decreases sharply with increasing dose per fraction in the range 0-1 Gy fits these data. The basic LQ model describes data from neutron fractionation studies, so the relationship between relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and X-ray dose per fraction can be expressed in terms of LQ parameters and fitted directly to RBE data. Results from different experiments, different assays and both top-up and full-course fractionation techniques, can all be included in one analysis. (author)

  6. Pengaruh Pola MACD Histogram IHSG Terhadap Pola MACD Histogram Perusahaan Dari Daftar Indeks LQ45 (Periode Februari s.d Juli 2015 Bursa Efek Jakarta [Effect of MACD Histogram IHSG Patterns to Patterns of Companies Listed on the Jakarta Stock Exchange LQ-45 (Period February till July 2015

    Heri Fatkhurrokhim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of MACDIHSG pattern to the MACD Company pattern in the L045 index on the period of February until July 2015 at the Indonesia Stock Exchange. This study also aims to facilitate investors to make investment decisions in the stock market. This study provides benefits to capital market investors, especially for stock investors in the Indonesia Stock Exchange as a mean of enhancing their insights in the development of technical analysis on investing. For the general public as well in order to know that investing in the stock market differs from gambling since there are analyzes that easy and can be applied very simply. In addition, this research aims to enhance the reader's desire to invest in the stock market. The samples were the closing data price of IHSG and shares ofLQ45 in the period of February until July 2015 in the Indonesia Stock Exchange. Based on the hypothesis testing, it can be explained that the MACD Histogram IHSG has a significant effect on 38 issuers listed in LQ45. As for the difference between the MACD Histogram effect against one company with another company that is very small. From the 38 stocks that rank on the top 3 company, the Summarecon Agung Tbk is on the top 1, that amounted to 98.3348%, then Alam Sutera Reality Lestari Tbk amounted to 98.2376%, and Adhi Katya (Persero Tbk amounted to 98.1320%. The third of these shares have MACD Histogram movement that approaching the MACD Histogram IHSG.

  7. Model predictive Controller for Mobile Robot

    Alireza Rezaee

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a Model Predictive Controller (MPC) for control of a P2AT mobile robot. MPC refers to a group of controllers that employ a distinctly identical model of process to predict its future behavior over an extended prediction horizon. The design of a MPC is formulated as an optimal control problem. Then this problem is considered as linear quadratic equation (LQR) and is solved by making use of Ricatti equation. To show the effectiveness of the proposed method this controller is...

  8. Parameter resolution in two models for cell survival after radiation

    Di Cera, E.; Andreasi Bassi, F.; Arcovito, G.

    1989-01-01

    The resolvability of model parameters for the linear-quadratic and the repair-misrepair models for cell survival after radiation has been studied by Monte Carlo simulations as a function of the number of experimental data points collected in a given dose range and the experimental error. Statistical analysis of the results reveals the range of experimental conditions under which the model parameters can be resolved with sufficient accuracy, and points out some differences in the operational aspects of the two models. (orig.)

  9. Predicted allowable doses to normal organs for biologically targeted radiotherapy

    O'Donoghue, J.A.; Wheldon, T.E.; Western Regional Hospital Board, Glasgow

    1988-01-01

    The authors have used Dale's extension to the ''linear quadratic'' (LQ) model (Dale, 1985) to evaluate ''equivalent doses'' in cases involving exponentially decaying dose rates. This analysis indicates that the dose-rate effect will be a significant determinant of allowable doses to organs such as liver, kidney and lung. These organ tolerance doses constitute independent constraints on the therapeutic intensity of biologically targeted radiotherapy in exactly the same way as for conventional external beam radiotherapy. In the context of marrow rescue they will in all likelihood constitute the dose-limiting side-effects and thus be especially important. (author)

  10. Linear quadratic regulator design for an unpowered, winged re-entry vehicle

    Mooij, E.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the design of an attitude controller for an unpowered, winged re-entry vehicle. The decoupling of the symmetric and asymmetric motion makes it possible to design two separate controllers, one for the pitch mot ion and one for the lateral motion. The design of the controller, a

  11. An application of nonlinear programming to the design of regulators of a linear-quadratic formulation

    Fleming, P.

    1983-01-01

    A design technique is proposed for linear regulators in which a feedback controller of fixed structure is chosen to minimize an integral quadratic objective function subject to the satisfaction of integral quadratic constraint functions. Application of a nonlinear programming algorithm to this mathematically tractable formulation results in an efficient and useful computer aided design tool. Particular attention is paid to computational efficiency and various recommendations are made. Two design examples illustrate the flexibility of the approach and highlight the special insight afforded to the designer. One concerns helicopter longitudinal dynamics and the other the flight dynamics of an aerodynamically unstable aircraft.

  12. Vibration control of large linear quadratic symmetric systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    Jeon, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Some unique properties on a class of the second order lambda matrices were found and applied to determine a damping matrix of the decoupled subsystem in such a way that the damped system would have preassigned eigenvalues without disturbing the stiffness matrix. The resulting system was realized as a time invariant velocity only feedback control system with desired poles. Another approach using optimal control theory was also applied to the decoupled system in such a way that the mode spillover problem could be eliminated. The procedures were tested successfully by numerical examples.

  13. Modelling and control of a diffusion/LPCVD furnace

    Dewaard, H.; Dekoning, W. L.

    1988-12-01

    Heat transfer inside a cylindrical resistance diffusion/Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD) furnace is studied with the aim of developing an improved temperature controller. A model of the thermal behavior is derived, which covers the important class of furnaces equipped with semitransparent quartz process tubes. The model takes into account the thermal behavior of the thermocouples. Currently used temperature controllers are shown to be highly inefficient for very large scale integration applications. Based on the model an alternative temperature controller of the LQG (linear quadratic Gaussian) type is proposed which features direct wafer temperature control. Some simulation results are given.

  14. Mathematical modelling of steam generator and design of temperature regulator

    Bogdanovic, S.S. [EE Institute Nikola Tesla, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1999-07-01

    The paper considers mathematical modelling of once-through power station boiler and numerical algorithm for simulation of the model. Fast and numerically stable algorithm based on the linearisation of model equations and on the simultaneous solving of differential and algebraic equations is proposed. The paper also presents the design of steam temperature regulator by using the method of projective controls. Dynamic behaviour of the system closed with optimal linear quadratic regulator is taken as the reference system. The desired proprieties of the reference system are retained and solutions for superheated steam temperature regulator are determined. (author)

  15. A new moving boundary model for transient simulation of dry-expansion evaporators

    Jensen, Jakob Munch; Knudsen, Hans-Jørgen Høgaard

    2002-01-01

    A new moving boundary model is presented for describing the dynamics of dry-expansin evaporators. The model is derived from conservation equations for mass and energy integrated over the two-phase and the superheated region. The new model is numerical fast compared to discretized models and very...... robust to sudden changes in the system. The model is well suited for open loop simulation for system design and model based contol strategies as e.g. optimal LQG (linear quadratic gausian) control. Simulation results for a refrigeration system are shown for different changes in evaporator fan speed...

  16. submitter Data-driven RBE parameterization for helium ion beams

    Mairani, A; Dokic, I; Valle, S M; Tessonnier, T; Galm, R; Ciocca, M; Parodi, K; Ferrari, A; Jäkel, O; Haberer, T; Pedroni, P; Böhlen, T T

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion beams are expected to be available again in the near future for clinical use. A suitable formalism to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for treatment planning (TP) studies is needed. In this work we developed a data-driven RBE parameterization based on published in vitro experimental values. The RBE parameterization has been developed within the framework of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model as a function of the helium linear energy transfer (LET), dose and the tissue specific parameter ${{(\\alpha /\\beta )}_{\\text{ph}}}$ of the LQ model for the reference radiation. Analytic expressions are provided, derived from the collected database, describing the $\\text{RB}{{\\text{E}}_{\\alpha}}={{\\alpha}_{\\text{He}}}/{{\\alpha}_{\\text{ph}}}$ and ${{\\text{R}}_{\\beta}}={{\\beta}_{\\text{He}}}/{{\\beta}_{\\text{ph}}}$ ratios as a function of LET. Calculated RBE values at 2 Gy photon dose and at 10% survival ($\\text{RB}{{\\text{E}}_{10}}$ ) are compared with the experimental ones. Pearson's correlati...

  17. Sensitivity to plant modelling uncertainties in optimal feedback control of sound radiation from a panel

    Mørkholt, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    Optimal feedback control of broadband sound radiation from a rectangular baffled panel has been investigated through computer simulations. Special emphasis has been put on the sensitivity of the optimal feedback control to uncertainties in the modelling of the system under control.A model...... in terms of a set of radiation filters modelling the radiation dynamics.Linear quadratic feedback control applied to the panel in order to minimise the radiated sound power has then been simulated. The sensitivity of the model based controller to modelling uncertainties when using feedback from actual...

  18. Modeling and Control of the Redundant Parallel Adjustment Mechanism on a Deployable Antenna Panel

    Lili Tian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of developing multiple input and multiple output (MIMO coupling systems with a redundant parallel adjustment mechanism on the deployable antenna panel, a structural control integrated design methodology is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the modal information from the finite element model of the structure of the antenna panel is extracted, and then the mathematical model is established with the Hamilton principle; Secondly, the discrete Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR controller is added to the model in order to control the actuators and adjust the shape of the panel. Finally, the engineering practicality of the modeling and control method based on finite element analysis simulation is verified.

  19. Study of some chaotic inflationary models in f(R) gravity

    Sharif, M.; Nawazish, Iqra

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss an inflationary scenario via scalar field and fluid cosmology for an anisotropic homogeneous universe model in f(R) gravity. We consider an equation of state which corresponds to a quasi-de Sitter expansion and investigate the effect of the anisotropy parameter for different values of the deviation parameter. We evaluate potential models like linear, quadratic and quartic models which correspond to chaotic inflation. We construct the observational parameters for a power-law model of f(R) gravity and construct the graphical analysis of tensor-scalar ratio and spectral index which indicates the consistency of these parameters with Planck 2015 data.

  20. Modeling of DNA damage-cluster, cell-cycle and repair pathway dependent radiosensitivity after low- and high-LET irradiation

    Guenther, Paul

    2017-01-01

    This work focuses on modeling of the effects of ionizing radiation on cells, primarily on, the influence of the DNA repair pathway availability and the radiation quality on the cell-survival probability. The availability of DNA repair pathways depends on the replication state and defects of the DNA repair pathways. The radiation quality manifests itself in the microscopic ionization pattern. The Giant LOop Binary LEsion (GLOBLE) model and the Local Effect Model (LEM) describe the cell-survival after photon and ion irradiation, respectively. Both models assume that cell survival can be modeled based on the spatial distribution of Double-Strand Breaks (DSB) of the DNA (damage pattern), within a higher order chromatin structure. Single DSB are referred to as isolated DSB (iDSB) and two or more DSB in close proximity (within 540 nm) are called complex DSB (cDSB). In order to predict the cell-survival, the GLOBLE-Model considers different iDSB repair-pathways and their availability. One central assumption of the LEM is that the same damage patterns imply same effects, regardless of the radiation quality. In order to predict the damage pattern the microscopic local dose distribution of ions, described by the amorphous track structure, is evaluated. The cell survival after ion irradiation is predicted from a comparison with corresponding damage patterns after photon irradiation. The cell-survival curves after high dose photon irradiation cannot be predicted from the Linear Quadratic (LQ) Model due to their transition towards a linear dose dependence. This work uses the GLOBLE-Model to introduce a novel mechanistic approach, which allows the threshold dose to be predicted for the transition from a linear quadratic dose dependence, of survival curves at low doses, to a linear dose dependence at high doses. Furthermore, a method is presented, which allows LEM to predict the survival of synchronous cells after ion irradiation based on the cell survival after photon

  1. Optimasi Portofolio Investasi Dengan Menggunakan Model Markowitz

    Priyatna, Yayat; Sukono, F

    2003-01-01

    Permasalahan pokok dalam paper ini adalah memilih dua saham unggulan dan proporsi dana yang akan diinvestasikan dalam pembentukan suatu portofolio. Optimasi portofolio investasi di sini dilakukan dengan menggunakan model Markowitz. Dari empat saham unggulan versi LQ 45 yang dianalisis menunjukkan bahwa saham HM Sampurna dan Telkom memberikan hasil yang optimum dalam pembentukan portofolio investasi dengan proporsi dana berturut-turut sebesar 51% dan 49%.

  2. Modeling and control of diffusion and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition furnaces

    De Waard, H.; De Koning, W. L.

    1990-03-01

    In this paper a study is made of the heat transfer inside cylindrical resistance diffusion and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition furnaces, aimed at developing an improved temperature controller. A model of the thermal behavior is derived which also covers the important class of furnaces equipped with semitransparent quartz process tubes. The model takes into account the thermal behavior of the thermocouples. It is shown that currently used temperature controllers are highly inefficient for very large scale integration applications. Based on the model an alternative temperature controller of the linear-quadratic-Gaussian type is proposed which features direct wafer temperature control. Some simulation results are given.

  3. The shape of the cancer mortality dose-response curve for atomic bomb survivors

    Pierce, D.A.; Vaeth, M.

    1989-10-01

    The shape of the cancer mortality dose-response in the atomic bomb survivor data is analyzed in the context of linear-quadratic (LQ) models. Results are given for all cancers except leukemia as a group, for leukemia, and for combined inferences assuming common curvature. Since there is substantial information aside from these data suggesting a dose-response concave from above, the emphasis here is not on estimating the best-fitting dose-response curve, but rather on assessing the maximal extent of curvature under LQ models which is consistent with the data. Such inferences are substantially affected by imprecision in the dose estimates, and methods are applied which make explicit allowances for biases due to this. The primary means used here to express the extent of curvature is the factor by which linear risk estimates should be divided to arrive at appropriate low-dose risk estimates. In the past, influential committees have recommended ranges of 2-10 and of 1.5-3 for such a factor. Results here suggest that values greater than about 2 are at least moderately inconsistent with these data, within the context of LQ models. It is emphasized, however, that there is little direct information in these data regarding low-dose risks; the inferences here depend strongly on the link between low-dose and high-dose risks provided by the assumption of an LQ model. (author)

  4. Convex reformulation of biologically-based multi-criteria intensity-modulated radiation therapy optimization including fractionation effects.

    Hoffmann, Aswin L; den Hertog, Dick; Siem, Alex Y D; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Huizenga, Henk

    2008-11-21

    Finding fluence maps for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be formulated as a multi-criteria optimization problem for which Pareto optimal treatment plans exist. To account for the dose-per-fraction effect of fractionated IMRT, it is desirable to exploit radiobiological treatment plan evaluation criteria based on the linear-quadratic (LQ) cell survival model as a means to balance the radiation benefits and risks in terms of biologic response. Unfortunately, the LQ-model-based radiobiological criteria are nonconvex functions, which make the optimization problem hard to solve. We apply the framework proposed by Romeijn et al (2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 1991-2013) to find transformations of LQ-model-based radiobiological functions and establish conditions under which transformed functions result in equivalent convex criteria that do not change the set of Pareto optimal treatment plans. The functions analysed are: the LQ-Poisson-based model for tumour control probability (TCP) with and without inter-patient heterogeneity in radiation sensitivity, the LQ-Poisson-based relative seriality s-model for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) under the LQ-Poisson model and the fractionation-corrected Probit-based model for NTCP according to Lyman, Kutcher and Burman. These functions differ from those analysed before in that they cannot be decomposed into elementary EUD or generalized-EUD functions. In addition, we show that applying increasing and concave transformations to the convexified functions is beneficial for the piecewise approximation of the Pareto efficient frontier.

  5. Modeling of DNA damage-cluster, cell-cycle and repair pathway dependent radiosensitivity after low- and high-LET irradiation; Modellierung der DNA-Schadenscluster-, Zellzyklus- und Reparaturweg-abhaengigen Strahlenempfindlichkeit nach niedrig- und hoch-LET-Bestrahlung

    Guenther, Paul

    2017-07-17

    This work focuses on modeling of the effects of ionizing radiation on cells, primarily on, the influence of the DNA repair pathway availability and the radiation quality on the cell-survival probability. The availability of DNA repair pathways depends on the replication state and defects of the DNA repair pathways. The radiation quality manifests itself in the microscopic ionization pattern. The Giant LOop Binary LEsion (GLOBLE) model and the Local Effect Model (LEM) describe the cell-survival after photon and ion irradiation, respectively. Both models assume that cell survival can be modeled based on the spatial distribution of Double-Strand Breaks (DSB) of the DNA (damage pattern), within a higher order chromatin structure. Single DSB are referred to as isolated DSB (iDSB) and two or more DSB in close proximity (within 540 nm) are called complex DSB (cDSB). In order to predict the cell-survival, the GLOBLE-Model considers different iDSB repair-pathways and their availability. One central assumption of the LEM is that the same damage patterns imply same effects, regardless of the radiation quality. In order to predict the damage pattern the microscopic local dose distribution of ions, described by the amorphous track structure, is evaluated. The cell survival after ion irradiation is predicted from a comparison with corresponding damage patterns after photon irradiation. The cell-survival curves after high dose photon irradiation cannot be predicted from the Linear Quadratic (LQ) Model due to their transition towards a linear dose dependence. This work uses the GLOBLE-Model to introduce a novel mechanistic approach, which allows the threshold dose to be predicted for the transition from a linear quadratic dose dependence, of survival curves at low doses, to a linear dose dependence at high doses. Furthermore, a method is presented, which allows LEM to predict the survival of synchronous cells after ion irradiation based on the cell survival after photon

  6. Optimal control of coupled parabolic-hyperbolic non-autonomous PDEs: infinite-dimensional state-space approach

    Aksikas, I.; Moghadam, A. Alizadeh; Forbes, J. F.

    2018-04-01

    This paper deals with the design of an optimal state-feedback linear-quadratic (LQ) controller for a system of coupled parabolic-hypebolic non-autonomous partial differential equations (PDEs). The infinite-dimensional state space representation and the corresponding operator Riccati differential equation are used to solve the control problem. Dynamical properties of the coupled system of interest are analysed to guarantee the existence and uniqueness of the solution of the LQ-optimal control problem and also to guarantee the exponential stability of the closed-loop system. Thanks to the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the parabolic operator and also the fact that the hyperbolic-associated operator Riccati differential equation can be converted to a scalar Riccati PDE, an algorithm to solve the LQ control problem has been presented. The results are applied to a non-isothermal packed-bed catalytic reactor. The LQ optimal controller designed in the early portion of the paper is implemented for the original non-linear model. Numerical simulations are performed to show the controller performances.

  7. Biliary System Architecture: Experimental Models and Visualization Techniques

    Sarnová, Lenka; Gregor, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 3 (2017), s. 383-390 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA ČR GA15-23858S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Biliary system * Mouse model * Cholestasis * Visualisation * Morphology Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  8. Agreement of quadratic and CRE models in predicting the late effects of continuous low dose-rate radiotherapy; and reply

    O'Donoghue, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    These letters discuss the problems associated with the fact that the normal tissue isoeffect formulae based on the Ellis equation (1969) do not correctly account for the late-occurring effects of fractionated radiotherapy, and with the extension of the linear quadratic model to include continuous low dose-rate radiotherapy with constant or decaying sources by R.G. Dale (1985). J.A. O'Donoghue points out that the 'late effects' and CRE curves correspond closely, whilst the 'acute effects; and CRE curves are in obvious disagreement. For continuous low-dose-rate radiotherapy, the CRE and late effects quadratic model are in agreement. Useful bibliography. (U.K.)

  9. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Low LET radiation: Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models

    Abrahamson, S.; Bender, M.; Book, S.

    1989-05-01

    This report provides dose-response models intended to be used in estimating the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents. Models of early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects are provided. Two-parameter Weibull hazard functions are recommended for estimating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary and gastrointestinal syndromes -- are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating cancer risks. Parameters are given for analyzing the risks of seven types of cancer in adults -- leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid and ''other''. The category, ''other'' cancers, is intended to reflect the combined risks of multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, kidney, brain, ovary, uterus and cervix. Models of childhood cancers due to in utero exposure are also provided. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Linear and linear-quadratic models are also recommended for assessing genetic risks. Five classes of genetic disease -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocation and multifactorial diseases --are considered. In addition, the impact of radiation-induced genetic damage on the incidence of peri-implantation embryo losses is discussed. The uncertainty in modeling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of all model parameters. Data are provided which should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk. 22 refs., 14 figs., 51 tabs

  10. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Low LET radiation: Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models

    Abrahamson, S.; Bender, M.; Book, S.; Buncher, C.; Denniston, C.; Gilbert, E.; Hahn, F.; Hertzberg, V.; Maxon, H.; Scott, B.

    1989-05-01

    This report provides dose-response models intended to be used in estimating the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents. Models of early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects are provided. Two-parameter Weibull hazard functions are recommended for estimating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary and gastrointestinal syndromes -- are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating cancer risks. Parameters are given for analyzing the risks of seven types of cancer in adults -- leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid and ''other''. The category, ''other'' cancers, is intended to reflect the combined risks of multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, kidney, brain, ovary, uterus and cervix. Models of childhood cancers due to in utero exposure are also provided. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Linear and linear-quadratic models are also recommended for assessing genetic risks. Five classes of genetic disease -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocation and multifactorial diseases --are considered. In addition, the impact of radiation-induced genetic damage on the incidence of peri-implantation embryo losses is discussed. The uncertainty in modeling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of all model parameters. Data are provided which should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk. 22 refs., 14 figs., 51 tabs.

  11. Design and implementation of fuzzy-PD controller based on relation models: A cross-entropy optimization approach

    Anisimov, D. N.; Dang, Thai Son; Banerjee, Santo; Mai, The Anh

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, an intelligent system use fuzzy-PD controller based on relation models is developed for a two-wheeled self-balancing robot. Scaling factors of the fuzzy-PD controller are optimized by a Cross-Entropy optimization method. A linear Quadratic Regulator is designed to bring a comparison with the fuzzy-PD controller by control quality parameters. The controllers are ported and run on STM32F4 Discovery Kit based on the real-time operating system. The experimental results indicate that the proposed fuzzy-PD controller runs exactly on embedded system and has desired performance in term of fast response, good balance and stabilize.

  12. Anisotropic charged generalized polytropic models

    Nasim, A.; Azam, M.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we found some new anisotropic charged models admitting generalized polytropic equation of state with spherically symmetry. An analytic solution of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations is obtained through the transformation introduced by Durgapal and Banerji (Phys. Rev. D 27:328, 1983). The physical viability of solutions corresponding to polytropic index η =1/2, 2/3, 1, 2 is analyzed graphically. For this, we plot physical quantities such as radial and tangential pressure, anisotropy, speed of sound which demonstrated that these models achieve all the considerable physical conditions required for a relativistic star. Further, it is mentioned here that previous results for anisotropic charged matter with linear, quadratic and polytropic equation of state can be retrieved.

  13. Modelling and control of a flotation process

    Ding, L.; Gustafsson, T.

    1999-01-01

    A general description of a flotation process is given. The dynamic model of a MIMO nonlinear subprocess in flotation, i. e. the pulp levels in five compartments in series is developed and the model is verified with real data from a production plant. In order to reject constant disturbances five extra states are introduced and the model is modified. An exact linearization has been made for the non-linear model and a linear quadratic gaussian controller is proposed based on the linearized model. The simulation result shows an improved performance of the pulp level control when the set points are changed or a disturbance occur. In future the controller will be tested in production. (author)

  14. Computer models for optimizing radiation therapy

    Duechting, W.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this contribution is to outline how methods of system analysis, control therapy and modelling can be applied to simulate normal and malignant cell growth and to optimize cancer treatment as for instance radiation therapy. Based on biological observations and cell kinetic data, several types of models have been developed describing the growth of tumor spheroids and the cell renewal of normal tissue. The irradiation model is represented by the so-called linear-quadratic model describing the survival fraction as a function of the dose. Based thereon, numerous simulation runs for different treatment schemes can be performed. Thus, it is possible to study the radiation effect on tumor and normal tissue separately. Finally, this method enables a computer-assisted recommendation for an optimal patient-specific treatment schedule prior to clinical therapy. (orig.) [de

  15. Interpolation-Based Condensation Model Reduction Part 1: Frequency Window Reduction Method Application to Structural Acoustics

    Ingel, R

    1999-01-01

    ... (which require derivative information) interpolation functions as well as standard Lagrangian functions, which can be linear, quadratic or cubic, have been used to construct the interpolation windows...

  16. A low-energy compatible SU(4)-type model for vector leptoquarks of mass ≤ 1 TeV

    Blumhofer, A.; Lampe, B.

    1999-02-01

    The Standard Model is extended by a SU(2)_L singlet of vector leptoquarks. An additional SU(4) gauge symmetry between right-handed up quarks and right-handed leptons is introduced to render the model renormalizable. The arrangement is made in such a way that no conflict with low energy restrictions is encountered. The SU(2)_L singlet mediates interactions between the right-handed leptons and up type quarks for which only moderate low energy restrictions M_{LQ}/g_{LQ} > few hundred GeV exist. However, it is not a candidate to explain the anomalous HERA data at large Q^2 because theoretical reasons imply that g_{LQ} ≥ g_s which would give a much stronger anomalous HERA effect. We furthermore argue that the inequality g_{LQ} ≥ g_s is a general feature of consistent vector leptoquark models. Although our model is not relevant for HERA, it is interesting per se as a description of leptoquarks of mass ≤ 1 TeV consistent with all low-energy requirements.

  17. Lack of evidence for increased tolerance of rat spinal cord with decreasing fraction doses below 2 Gy

    Ang, K.K.; van der Kogel, A.J.; van der Schueren, E.

    1985-01-01

    The radiation tolerance of the spinal cord, both in man and in rats, has been shown to depend strongly on the size of the dose per fraction. With fraction doses down to about 2 Gy, the spinal cord tolerance can be predicted by a modified Ellis formula. More recently alternative isoeffect formulas were based on the linear-quadratic (LQ) model of cell survival where the effect of dose fractionation is characterized by the ratio α/β which varies from tissue to tissue. For the spinal cord, as well as for other late responding tissues, the ratio α/β is small, in contrast to most acutely responding tissues. Both the Ellis-type formula, and to a lesser extent the LQ-model, predict a continuously increasing tolerance dose with decreasing fraction size. From previous experiments on the rat cervical spinal cord with doses per fraction down to about 2 Gy, the ratio α/β was determined to be 1.7 Gy, and the LQ-model would predict a rise in tolerance with a reduction in fraction size to far below 2 Gy. Based on these predictions clinical studies have been initiated assuming a significantly increased tolerance by reduction of fraction size to about 1 Gy. However, in the present experiments no evidence was found for such an increase in tolerance with fraction sizes below 2 Gy

  18. Radiobiological equivalent of low/high dose rate brachytherapy and evaluation of tumor and normal responses to the dose.

    Manimaran, S

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the biological equivalent of low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in terms of the more recent linear quadratic (LQ) model, which leads to theoretical estimation of biological equivalence. One of the key features of the LQ model is that it allows a more systematic radiobiological comparison between different types of treatment because the main parameters alpha/beta and micro are tissue-specific. Such comparisons also allow assessment of the likely change in the therapeutic ratio when switching between LDR and HDR treatments. The main application of LQ methodology, which focuses on by increasing the availability of remote afterloading units, has been to design fractionated HDR treatments that can replace existing LDR techniques. In this study, with LDR treatments (39 Gy in 48 h) equivalent to 11 fractions of HDR irradiation at the experimental level, there are increasing reports of reproducible animal models that may be used to investigate the biological basis of brachytherapy and to help confirm theoretical predictions. This is a timely development owing to the nonavailability of sufficient retrospective patient data analysis. It appears that HDR brachytherapy is likely to be a viable alternative to LDR only if it is delivered without a prohibitively large number of fractions (e.g., fewer than 11). With increased scientific understanding and technological capability, the prospect of a dose equivalent to HDR brachytherapy will allow greater utilization of the concepts discussed in this article.

  19. Repair models of cell survival and corresponding computer program for survival curve fitting

    Shen Xun; Hu Yiwei

    1992-01-01

    Some basic concepts and formulations of two repair models of survival, the incomplete repair (IR) model and the lethal-potentially lethal (LPL) model, are introduced. An IBM-PC computer program for survival curve fitting with these models was developed and applied to fit the survivals of human melanoma cells HX118 irradiated at different dose rates. Comparison was made between the repair models and two non-repair models, the multitar get-single hit model and the linear-quadratic model, in the fitting and analysis of the survival-dose curves. It was shown that either IR model or LPL model can fit a set of survival curves of different dose rates with same parameters and provide information on the repair capacity of cells. These two mathematical models could be very useful in quantitative study on the radiosensitivity and repair capacity of cells

  20. Proposal of a probabilistic dose-response model

    Barrachina, M.

    1997-01-01

    A biologically updated dose-response model is presented as an alternative to the linear-quadratic model currently in use for cancer risk assessment. The new model is based on the probability functions for misrepair and/or unrepair of DNA lesions, in terms of the radiation damage production rate in the cell (supposedly, a stem cell) and its repair-rate constant. The model makes use, interpreting it on the basis of misrepair probabilities, of the ''dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor'' of ICRP, and provides the way for a continuous extrapolation between the high and low dose-rate regions, ratifying the ''linear non-threshold hypothesis'' as the main option. Anyhow, the model throws some doubts about the additive property of the dose. (author)

  1. The Increase in Animal Mortality Risk following Exposure to Sparsely Ionizing Radiation Is Not Linear Quadratic with Dose

    Haley, Benjamin M.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Grdina, David J.; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The US government regulates allowable radiation exposures relying, in large part, on the seventh report from the committee to estimate the Biological Effect of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VII), which estimated that most contemporary exposures- protracted or low-dose, carry 1.5 fold less risk of carcinogenesis and mortality per Gy than acute exposures of atomic bomb survivors. This correction is known as the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor for the life span study of atomic bo...

  2. A non-linear programming approach to the computer-aided design of regulators using a linear-quadratic formulation

    Fleming, P.

    1985-01-01

    A design technique is proposed for linear regulators in which a feedback controller of fixed structure is chosen to minimize an integral quadratic objective function subject to the satisfaction of integral quadratic constraint functions. Application of a non-linear programming algorithm to this mathematically tractable formulation results in an efficient and useful computer-aided design tool. Particular attention is paid to computational efficiency and various recommendations are made. Two design examples illustrate the flexibility of the approach and highlight the special insight afforded to the designer.

  3. An Adaptive, Multi-Rate Linear Quadratic Regulator for a Shipboard MVDC Distribution System with Constant Power Loads

    2017-09-01

    investigation into the factors which most strongly influence ROA size would be instructive. The genetic algorithm could be modified to assess ROA size and an...DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM WITH CONSTANT POWER LOADS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS REL95 REK4K 6. AUTHOR(S) Adam J. Mills 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND

  4. Radiobiological modelling of dose-gradient effects in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed brachytherapy

    Armpilia, C; Dale, R G; Sandilos, P; Vlachos, L

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a generalization of a previously published methodology which quantified the radiobiological consequences of dose-gradient effects in brachytherapy applications. The methodology uses the linear-quadratic (LQ) formulation to identify an equivalent biologically effective dose (BED eq ) which, if applied uniformly to a specified tissue volume, would produce the same net cell survival as that achieved by a given non-uniform brachytherapy application. Multiplying factors (MFs), which enable the equivalent BED for an enclosed volume to be estimated from the BED calculated at the dose reference surface, have been calculated and tabulated for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. The main types of brachytherapy (high dose rate (HDR), low dose rate (LDR) and pulsed (PB)) have been examined for a range of radiobiological parameters/dimensions. Equivalent BEDs are consistently higher than the BEDs calculated at the reference surface by an amount which depends on the treatment prescription (magnitude of the prescribed dose) at the reference point. MFs are closely related to the numerical BED values, irrespective of how the original BED was attained (e.g., via HDR, LDR or PB). Thus, an average MF can be used for a given prescribed BED as it will be largely independent of the assumed radiobiological parameters (radiosensitivity and α/β) and standardized look-up tables may be applicable to all types of brachytherapy treatment. This analysis opens the way to more systematic approaches for correlating physical and biological effects in several types of brachytherapy and for the improved quantitative assessment and ranking of clinical treatments which involve a brachytherapy component

  5. Rotor-Flying Manipulator: Modeling, Analysis, and Control

    Bin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Equipping multijoint manipulators on a mobile robot is a typical redesign scheme to make the latter be able to actively influence the surroundings and has been extensively used for many ground robots, underwater robots, and space robotic systems. However, the rotor-flying robot (RFR is difficult to be made such redesign. This is mainly because the motion of the manipulator will bring heavy coupling between itself and the RFR system, which makes the system model highly complicated and the controller design difficult. Thus, in this paper, the modeling, analysis, and control of the combined system, called rotor-flying multijoint manipulator (RF-MJM, are conducted. Firstly, the detailed dynamics model is constructed and analyzed. Subsequently, a full-state feedback linear quadratic regulator (LQR controller is designed through obtaining linearized model near steady state. Finally, simulations are conducted and the results are analyzed to show the basic control performance.

  6. [Medical and biological consequences of nuclear disasters].

    Stalpers, Lukas J A; van Dullemen, Simon; Franken, N A P Klaas

    2012-01-01

    Medical risks of radiation exaggerated; psychological risks underestimated. The discussion about atomic energy has become topical again following the nuclear accident in Fukushima. There is some argument about the gravity of medical and biological consequences of prolonged exposure to radiation. The risk of cancer following a low dose of radiation is usually estimated by linear extrapolation of the incidence of cancer among survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. The radiobiological linear-quadratic model (LQ-model) gives a more accurate description of observed data, is radiobiologically more plausible and is better supported by experimental and clinical data. On the basis of this model there is less risk of cancer being induced following radiation exposure. The gravest consequence of Chernobyl and Fukushima is not the medical and biological damage, but the psychological and economical impact on rescue workers and former inhabitants.

  7. A complex-valued firing-rate model that approximates the dynamics of spiking networks.

    Evan S Schaffer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Firing-rate models provide an attractive approach for studying large neural networks because they can be simulated rapidly and are amenable to mathematical analysis. Traditional firing-rate models assume a simple form in which the dynamics are governed by a single time constant. These models fail to replicate certain dynamic features of populations of spiking neurons, especially those involving synchronization. We present a complex-valued firing-rate model derived from an eigenfunction expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation and apply it to the linear, quadratic and exponential integrate-and-fire models. Despite being almost as simple as a traditional firing-rate description, this model can reproduce firing-rate dynamics due to partial synchronization of the action potentials in a spiking model, and it successfully predicts the transition to spike synchronization in networks of coupled excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

  8. A complex-valued firing-rate model that approximates the dynamics of spiking networks.

    Schaffer, Evan S; Ostojic, Srdjan; Abbott, L F

    2013-10-01

    Firing-rate models provide an attractive approach for studying large neural networks because they can be simulated rapidly and are amenable to mathematical analysis. Traditional firing-rate models assume a simple form in which the dynamics are governed by a single time constant. These models fail to replicate certain dynamic features of populations of spiking neurons, especially those involving synchronization. We present a complex-valued firing-rate model derived from an eigenfunction expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation and apply it to the linear, quadratic and exponential integrate-and-fire models. Despite being almost as simple as a traditional firing-rate description, this model can reproduce firing-rate dynamics due to partial synchronization of the action potentials in a spiking model, and it successfully predicts the transition to spike synchronization in networks of coupled excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

  9. Probabilistically Tuned LQ Control for Mechatronic Applications

    Belda, Květoslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2009), s. 19-24 ISSN 1336-5010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : adaptive control * state-space realization * mechatronic applications Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/historie/belda-0332695.pdf

  10. Probabilistic Design and Tuning of LQ Control

    Belda, Květoslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2009), s. 355-368 ISSN 1230-2384 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : adaptive control * closed-loop control * dynamic programming * state- space realization * tuneable filters Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/historie/belda-0332706.pdf

  11. Fuzzy modeling and control of rotary inverted pendulum system using LQR technique

    Fairus, M A; Mohamed, Z; Ahmad, M N

    2013-01-01

    Rotary inverted pendulum (RIP) system is a nonlinear, non-minimum phase, unstable and underactuated system. Controlling such system can be a challenge and is considered a benchmark in control theory problem. Prior to designing a controller, equations that represent the behaviour of the RIP system must be developed as accurately as possible without compromising the complexity of the equations. Through Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy modeling technique, the nonlinear system model is then transformed into several local linear time-invariant models which are then blended together to reproduce, or approximate, the nonlinear system model within local region. A parallel distributed compensation (PDC) based fuzzy controller using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) technique is designed to control the RIP system. The results show that the designed controller able to balance the RIP system

  12. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 04: What if bystander effects influence cell kill within a target volume? Potential consequences of dose heterogeneity on TCP and EUD on intermediate risk prostate patients

    Balderson, M.J.; Kirkby, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Jack Ady Cancer Centre, Lethbridge, Alberta (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    In vitro evidence has suggested that radiation induced bystander effects may enhance non-local cell killing which may influence radiotherapy treatment planning paradigms. This work applies a bystander effect model, which has been derived from published in vitro data, to calculate equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumour control probability (TCP) and compare them with predictions from standard linear quadratic (LQ) models that assume a response due only to local absorbed dose. Comparisons between the models were made under increasing dose heterogeneity scenarios. Dose throughout the CTV was modeled with normal distributions, where the degree of heterogeneity was then dictated by changing the standard deviation (SD). The broad assumptions applied in the bystander effect model are intended to place an upper limit on the extent of the results in a clinical context. The bystander model suggests a moderate degree of dose heterogeneity yields as good or better outcome compared to a uniform dose in terms of EUD and TCP. Intermediate risk prostate prescriptions of 78 Gy over 39 fractions had maximum EUD and TCP values at SD of around 5Gy. The plots only dropped below the uniform dose values for SD ∼ 10 Gy, almost 13% of the prescribed dose. The bystander model demonstrates the potential to deviate from the common local LQ model predictions as dose heterogeneity through a prostate CTV is varies. The results suggest the potential for allowing some degree of dose heterogeneity within a CTV, although further investigations of the assumptions of the bystander model are warranted.

  13. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 04: What if bystander effects influence cell kill within a target volume? Potential consequences of dose heterogeneity on TCP and EUD on intermediate risk prostate patients

    Balderson, M.J.; Kirkby, C.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro evidence has suggested that radiation induced bystander effects may enhance non-local cell killing which may influence radiotherapy treatment planning paradigms. This work applies a bystander effect model, which has been derived from published in vitro data, to calculate equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumour control probability (TCP) and compare them with predictions from standard linear quadratic (LQ) models that assume a response due only to local absorbed dose. Comparisons between the models were made under increasing dose heterogeneity scenarios. Dose throughout the CTV was modeled with normal distributions, where the degree of heterogeneity was then dictated by changing the standard deviation (SD). The broad assumptions applied in the bystander effect model are intended to place an upper limit on the extent of the results in a clinical context. The bystander model suggests a moderate degree of dose heterogeneity yields as good or better outcome compared to a uniform dose in terms of EUD and TCP. Intermediate risk prostate prescriptions of 78 Gy over 39 fractions had maximum EUD and TCP values at SD of around 5Gy. The plots only dropped below the uniform dose values for SD ∼ 10 Gy, almost 13% of the prescribed dose. The bystander model demonstrates the potential to deviate from the common local LQ model predictions as dose heterogeneity through a prostate CTV is varies. The results suggest the potential for allowing some degree of dose heterogeneity within a CTV, although further investigations of the assumptions of the bystander model are warranted

  14. Asymmetrical Interleaved DC/DC Switching Converters for Photovoltaic and Fuel Cell Applications—Part 2: Control-Oriented Models

    Sergio Ignacio Serna-Garces

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A previous article has presented the members of the asymmetrical interleaved dc/dc switching converters family as very appropriate candidates to interface between photovoltaic or fuel cell generators and their loads because of their reduced ripple and increased current processing capabilities. After a review of the main modeling methods suitable for high-order converters operating, as the asymmetrical interleaved converters (AIC ones, in discontinuous current conduction mode a full-order averaged model has been adapted and improved to describe the dynamic behavior of AIC. The excellent agreement between the mathematical model predictions, the switched simulations and the experimental results has allowed for satisfactory design of a linear-quadratic regulator (LQR in a fuel-cell application example, which demonstrates the usefulness of the improved control-oriented modeling approach when the switching converters operate in discontinuous conduction mode.

  15. Exploring Ackermann and LQR stability control of stochastic state-space model of hexacopter equipped with robotic arm

    Ibrahim, I. N.; Akkad, M. A. Al; Abramov, I. V.

    2018-05-01

    This paper discusses the control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for active interaction and manipulation of objects. The manipulator motion with an unknown payload was analysed concerning force and moment disturbances, which influence the mass distribution, and the centre of gravity (CG). Therefore, a general dynamics mathematical model of a hexacopter was formulated where a stochastic state-space model was extracted in order to build anti-disturbance controllers. Based on the compound pendulum method, the disturbances model that simulates the robotic arm with a payload was inserted into the stochastic model. This study investigates two types of controllers in order to study the stability of a hexacopter. A controller based on Ackermann’s method and the other - on the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) approach - were presented. The latter constitutes a challenge for UAV control performance especially with the presence of uncertainties and disturbances.

  16. ECONOMETRIC MODEL OF FIRM’S VALUE IN LIQUID MARKET: CASE OF INDONESIA

    Putu Agus Ardiana

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to investigate variables affecting Tobin’s Q which represents the value of public  companies listed on LQ45 Index on the Indonesia Stock Exchange by developing a  BLUE(Best Linear UnbiasedEstimators econometric model for cross-sectional data of 2007, 2008, and 2009 as well as panel data. The models vary across different data but there are important findings to note. Public companies listed  on LQ45 Index have experienced overliquidity problem during the period of observation leading to a decline in firm’s value. In addition, those public companies have low financial risk so they have chance to  increase their debts especially long-term debts.

  17. On Active Surge Control of Compression Systems via Characteristic Linearization and Model Nonlinearity Cancellation

    Yohannes S.M. Simamora

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple approach of active surge control of compression systems is presented. Specifically, nonlinear components of the pressure ratio and rotating speed states of the Moore-Greitzer model are transferred into the input vectors. Subsequently, the compressor characteristic is linearized into two modes, which describe the stable region and the unstable region respectively. As a result, the system’s state and input matrices both appear linear, to which linear realization and analysis are applicable. A linear quadratic regulator plus integrator is then chosen as closed-loop controller. By simulation it was shown that the modified model and characteristics can describe surge behavior, while the closed-loop controller can stabilize the system in the unstable operating region. The last-mentioned was achieved when massflow was 5.38 per cent less than the surge point.

  18. What next in fractionated radiotherapy

    Fowler, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Trends in models for predicting the total dose required to produce tolerable normal-tissue injury can be seen by the progression from the ''cube root law'', through Strandqvist's slope of 0.22, to NSD, TDF and CRE which have separate time and fraction number exponents, to even better approximations now available. The dose-response formulae that can be used to define the effect of fraction size (and number) include (1) the linear quadratic (LQ) model (2) the two-component (TC) multi-target model and (3) repair-misrepair models. The LQ model offers considerable convenience, requires only two parameters to be determined, and emphasizes the difference between late and early normal-tissue dependence on dose per fraction first shown by exponents greater than the NSD slope of 0.24. Exponents of overall time, e.g. Tsup(0.11), yield the wrong shape of time curve, suggesting that most proliferating occurs early, although it really occurs after a delay depending on the turnover time of the tissue. Improved clinical results are being sought by hyperfractionation, accelerated fractionation, or continuous low dose rate irradiation as in interstitial implants. (U.K.)

  19. A viable mouse model for Netherton syndrome based on mosaic inactivation of the Spink5 gene

    Kašpárek, Petr; Ileninová, Zuzana; Hanečková, Radka; Kanchev, Ivan; Jeníčková, Irena; Sedláček, Radislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 397, č. 12 (2016), s. 1287-1292 ISSN 1431-6730 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011032; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : mosaicism * mouse model * netherton syndrome * skin * SPINK5 * TALEN Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.273, year: 2016

  20. Temperature uniformity control in RTP using multivariable adaptive control

    Morales, S.; Dahhou, B.; Dilhac, J.M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France); Morales, S.

    1995-12-31

    In Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP) control of the wafer temperature during all processing to get good trajectory following, together with spatial temperature uniformity, is essential. It is well know as RTP process is nonlinear, classical control laws are not very efficient. In this work, the authors aim at studying the applicability of MIMO (Multiple Inputs Multiple Outputs) adaptive techniques to solve the temperature control problems in RTP. A multivariable linear discrete time CARIMA (Controlled Auto Regressive Integrating Moving Average) model of the highly non-linear process is identified on-line using a robust identification technique. The identified model is used to compute an infinite time LQ (Linear Quadratic) based control law, with a partial state reference model. This reference model smooths the original setpoint sequence, and at the same time gives a tracking capability to the LQ control law. After an experimental open-loop investigation, the results of the application of the adaptive control law are presented. Finally, some comments on the future difficulties and developments of the application of adaptive control in RTP are given. (author) 13 refs.

  1. Epidemiological studies on the effects of low-level ionizing radiation on cancer risk

    Akiba, Suminori

    2010-01-01

    The health effects of low-level ionizing radiation are yet unclear. As pointed out by Upton in his review (Upton, 1989), low-level ionizing radiation seems to have different biological effects from what high-level radiation has. If so, the hazard identification of ionizing radiation should he conducted separately for low- and high-level ionizing radiation; the hazard identification of low-level radiation is yet to be completed. What makes hazard identification of ionizing radiation difficult, particularly in the case of carcinogenic effect, is the difficulty in distinguishing radiation-induced cancer from other cancers with respect to clinicopathological features and molecular biological characteristics. Actually, it is suspected that radiation-induced carcinogenesis involves mechanisms not specific for radiation, such as oxidative stress. Excess risk per dose in medium-high dose ranges can be extrapolated to a low-dose range if dose-response can be described by the linear-non-threshold model. The cancer risk data of atomic-bomb survivors describes leukemia risk with a linear-quadratic (LQ) model and solid-cancer risk with linear non-threshold (LNT) model. The LQ model for leukemia and the LNT model for solid cancer correspond to the two-hit model and the one-hit model, respectively. Although the one-hit model is an unlikely dose-response for carcinogenesis, there is no convincing epidemiological evidence supporting the LQ model or non-threshold model for solid cancer. It should be pointed out, however, even if the true dose response is non-linear various noises involved in epidemiological data may mask the truth. In this paper, the potential contribution of epidemiological studies on nuclear workers and residents in high background radiation areas will be discussed. (author)

  2. Input-constrained model predictive control via the alternating direction method of multipliers

    Sokoler, Leo Emil; Frison, Gianluca; Andersen, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm, based on the alternating direction method of multipliers, for the convex optimal control problem arising in input-constrained model predictive control. We develop an efficient implementation of the algorithm for the extended linear quadratic control problem (LQCP......) with input and input-rate limits. The algorithm alternates between solving an extended LQCP and a highly structured quadratic program. These quadratic programs are solved using a Riccati iteration procedure, and a structure-exploiting interior-point method, respectively. The computational cost per iteration...... is quadratic in the dimensions of the controlled system, and linear in the length of the prediction horizon. Simulations show that the approach proposed in this paper is more than an order of magnitude faster than several state-of-the-art quadratic programming algorithms, and that the difference in computation...

  3. Changes in the radiation sensitivity of mouse skin during fractionated and prolonged treatments

    Ruifrok, A.C.C.; Mason, K.A.; Hunter, N.; Thames, H.D.

    1994-01-01

    Reactions of the skin of the right thigh of mice were used as an experimental model to test possible changes in the radiosensitivity of mouse skin, as represented by changes in the linear-quadratic (LQ) model parameters α and β, as a function of fractionation interval and overall treatment time. In the first series of experiments, variable numbers of 3-Gy fractions with intervals of 6, 24 or 48 h were applied, followed by top-up doses to increase the skin damage to a level that could be scored. The results showed that mouse skin is more sensitive to 3-Gy fractions applied with 48-h intervals than to 3-Gy fractions applied with 6- or 24-h intervals. In the second series of experiments we used single-dose or fractonated test treatments for previously unirradiated mice and mice treated with priming doses of 10, 20 or 30 Gy given 1-18 days before the test treatment. The sensitivity appeared to be higher after intervals of 14-18 days than after 1-10 days after priming treatments of 20 and 30 Gy. The increased sensitivity 18 days after 20 Gy was mainly the result of an increase in the β component of the LQ model; higher values of α were also determined. We conclude that the radiosensitivity of mouse skin is higher during a radiation-induced proliferative response. 28 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  4. Dynamic modelling and adaptive robust tracking control of a space robot with two-link flexible manipulators under unknown disturbances

    Yang, Xinxin; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; He, Wei

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, both the closed-form dynamics and adaptive robust tracking control of a space robot with two-link flexible manipulators under unknown disturbances are developed. The dynamic model of the system is described with assumed modes approach and Lagrangian method. The flexible manipulators are represented as Euler-Bernoulli beams. Based on singular perturbation technique, the displacements/joint angles and flexible modes are modelled as slow and fast variables, respectively. A sliding mode control is designed for trajectories tracking of the slow subsystem under unknown but bounded disturbances, and an adaptive sliding mode control is derived for slow subsystem under unknown slowly time-varying disturbances. An optimal linear quadratic regulator method is proposed for the fast subsystem to damp out the vibrations of the flexible manipulators. Theoretical analysis validates the stability of the proposed composite controller. Numerical simulation results demonstrate the performance of the closed-loop flexible space robot system.

  5. Sensitivity of human squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx to fractionated radiotherapy

    Rezvani, M.; Hopewell, J.W.; Alcock, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    Data obtained for the response of tumours from two multicentre clinical trials of the British Institute of Radiology have been combined and studied. Both trials involved patients with laryngopharyngeal carcinoma. There were 734 patients in the first trial, and 611 patients in the second. T-class and the nodal status of the patient at the start of the treatment were important factors in the determination of both observed survival and tumour-free rates. Overall treatment time was an important factor in determining the recurrence of tumour. The longer the overall treatment time the greater the chance of tumour recurrence. The linear-quadratic (LQ) model was used in analysis of the tumour recurrence data for a large group of patients with laryngeal tumours without nodal involvement. A small α/β ratio of 0.94 Gy was obtained for T3 tumours while that of T2 tumours was negative, -10.5 Gy. The value for T1 tumours was higher at 23 Gy. Use of the LQ model with a time component increased the α/β ratios to 26.0 ± 27.20 Gy, 18.0 ± 12.33 Gy and 13.38 ± 5.40 Gy for T1, T2 and T3 tumours, respectively. (Author)

  6. Model-Based Control of a Ballast-Stabilized Floating Wind Turbine Exposed to Wind and Waves

    Christiansen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    wind turbine, for water depths beyond 50 meters where winds are stronger and less turbulent. A floating wind turbine is subject to not only aerodynamics and wind induced loads, but also to hy-drodynamics and wave induced loads. In contrast to a bottom fixed wind turbine, the floating structure......, the hydrodynamics and the loads change the dynamic behavior of a floating wind turbine. Consequently, conventional wind turbine control cause instabilities on floating wind turbines. This work addresses the control of a floating spar buoy wind turbine, and focuses on the impact of the additional platform dynamics....... A time varying control model is presented based on the wind speed and wave frequency. Estimates of the wind speed and wave frequency are used as scheduling variables in a gain scheduled linear quadratic controller to improve the electrical power production while reducing fatigue. To address the problem...

  7. Polynomial Digital Control of a Series Equal Liquid Tanks

    Bobála Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-delays are mainly caused by the time required to transport mass, energy or information, but they can also be caused by processing time or accumulation. Typical examples of such processes are e.g. pumps, liquid storing tanks, distillation columns or some types of chemical reactors. In many cases time-delay is caused by the effect produced by the accumulation of a large number of low-order systems. Several industrial processes have the time-delay effect produced by the accumulation of a great number of low-order systems with the identical dynamic. The dynamic behavior of series these low-order systems is expressed by high-order system. One of possibilities of control of such processes is their approximation by low-order model with time-delay. The paper is focused on the design of the digital polynomial control of a set of equal liquid cylinder atmospheric tanks. The designed control algorithms are realized using the digital Smith Predictor (SP based on polynomial approach – by minimization of the Linear Quadratic (LQ criterion. The LQ criterion was combined with pole assignment.

  8. Modelling and control of large cryogenic refrigerator

    Bonne, Francois

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript is concern with both the modeling and the derivation of control schemes for large cryogenic refrigerators. The particular case of those which are submitted to highly variable pulsed heat load is studied. A model of each object that normally compose a large cryo-refrigerator is proposed. The methodology to gather objects model into the model of a subsystem is presented. The manuscript also shows how to obtain a linear equivalent model of the subsystem. Based on the derived models, advances control scheme are proposed. Precisely, a linear quadratic controller for warm compression station working with both two and three pressures state is derived, and a predictive constrained one for the cold-box is obtained. The particularity of those control schemes is that they fit the computing and data storage capabilities of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) with are well used in industry. The open loop model prediction capability is assessed using experimental data. Developed control schemes are validated in simulation and experimentally on the 400W1.8K SBT's cryogenic test facility and on the CERN's LHC warm compression station. (author) [fr

  9. Calculation of the biological effect of fractionated radiotherapy: the importance of radiation-induced apoptosis

    Olsen, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    The total effect (TE) has been calculated for two different fractionation formalisms: the consecutive and repetitive fractionation mechanism, using a modified linear quadratic (LQ) model which includes the effect of apoptosis. For a given total dose, an increase in TE is seen when increasing the dose per fraction as well as the apoptotic fraction (F a ). Also, the TE increases with increasing α/β ratio (of the modified LQ model). The ratio of TE for tumour tissue and TE for late reacting tissue is calculated assuming the absence of apoptosis in late reacting tissue and a common value of α/β (of the modified LQ model). The biological effect ratio (BR) is higher for a large F a and low doses per fraction, than for large doses per fraction and a small F a . Assuming a consecutive fractionation mechanism, the TE formalism is unable to predict a log cell kill of more than 3 for β values of 0.010-0.028. It is less dependent on dose per fraction and F a than the repetitive fractionation mechanism. The biological effect ratio is only slightly higher than 1, and is less influenced by F a , dose per fraction and α/β ratio. A repetitive fractionation mechanism is also consistent with the preliminary results of published fractionation experiments. The calculations indicate that designing fractionation regimes for optimization of biological effect is a process where the role of apoptotic cell inactivation must be maximized, and where the influence of mitotic cell inactivation may be of less importance. (author)

  10. Cytogenetic characterization of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity in Cobalt-60 irradiated human lymphoblastoid cells

    Joshi, Gnanada S. [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Joiner, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Tucker, James D., E-mail: jtucker@biology.biosci.wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Human cells were irradiated in G1 or G2 and evaluated for micronuclei and bridges. • Cells irradiated in G2 but not in G1 exhibit low dose hyper-radiosensitivity. • Response curves of cells irradiated in G2 do not fit a linear-no-threshold model. • Response curves of cells irradiated in G1 fit a linear-no-threshold model. - Abstract: The dose-effect relationships of cells exposed to ionizing radiation are frequently described by linear quadratic (LQ) models over an extended dose range. However, many mammalian cell lines, when acutely irradiated in G2 at doses ≤0.3 Gy, show hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) as measured by reduced clonogenic cell survival, thereby indicating greater cell lethality than is predicted by extrapolation from high-dose responses. We therefore hypothesized that the cytogenetic response in G2 cells to low doses would also be steeper than predicted by LQ extrapolation from high doses. We tested our hypothesis by exposing four normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines to 0–400 cGy of Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The cytokinesis block micronucleus assay was used to determine the frequencies of micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridges. To characterize the dependence of the cytogenetic damage on dose, univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to compare the responses in the low- (HRS) and high-dose response regions. Our data indicate that the slope of the response for all four cell lines at ≤20 cGy during G2 is greater than predicted by an LQ extrapolation from the high-dose responses for both micronuclei and bridges. These results suggest that the biological consequences of low-dose exposures could be underestimated and may not provide accurate risk assessments following such exposures.

  11. Using multistage models to describe radiation-induced leukaemia

    Little, M.P.; Muirhead, C.R.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Kleinerman, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Armitage-Doll model of carcinogenesis is fitted to data on leukaemia mortality among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors with the DS86 dosimetry and on leukaemia incidence in the International Radiation Study of Cervical Cancer patients. Two different forms of model are fitted: the first postulates up to two radiation-affected stages and the second additionally allows for the presence at birth of a non-trivial population of cells which have already accumulated the first of the mutations leading to malignancy. Among models of the first form, a model with two adjacent radiation-affected stages appears to fit the data better than other models of the first form, including both models with two affected stages in any order and models with only one affected stage. The best fitting model predicts a linear-quadratic dose-response and reductions of relative risk with increasing time after exposure and age at exposure, in agreement with what has previously been observed in the Japanese and cervical cancer data. However, on the whole it does not provide an adequate fit to either dataset. The second form of model appears to provide a rather better fit, but the optimal models have biologically implausible parameters (the number of initiated cells at birth is negative) so that this model must also be regarded as providing an unsatisfactory description of the data. (author)

  12. Data Transmission Over Networks for Estimation and Control

    Gupta, Vijay; Dana, Amir F.; Hespanha, Joao P.; Murray, Richard M.; Hassibi, Babak

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of controlling a linear time invariant process when the controller is located at a location remote from where the sensor measurements are being generated. The communication from the sensor to the controller is supported by a communication network with arbitrary topology composed of analog erasure channels. Using a separation principle, we prove that the optimal linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) controller consists of an LQ optimal regulator along with an estimator that e...

  13. Analysis of chromosome aberration data by hybrid-scale models

    Indrawati, Iwiq; Kumazawa, Shigeru

    2000-02-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for analyzing data of chromosome aberrations, which is useful to understand the characteristics of dose-response relationships and to construct the calibration curves for the biological dosimetry. The hybrid scale of linear and logarithmic scales brings a particular plotting paper, where the normal section paper, two types of semi-log papers and the log-log paper are continuously connected. The hybrid-hybrid plotting paper may contain nine kinds of linear relationships, and these are conveniently called hybrid scale models. One can systematically select the best-fit model among the nine models by among the conditions for a straight line of data points. A biological interpretation is possible with some hybrid-scale models. In this report, the hybrid scale models were applied to separately reported data on chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes as well as on chromosome breaks in Tradescantia. The results proved that the proposed models fit the data better than the linear-quadratic model, despite the demerit of the increased number of model parameters. We showed that the hybrid-hybrid model (both variables of dose and response using the hybrid scale) provides the best-fit straight lines to be used as the reliable and readable calibration curves of chromosome aberrations. (author)

  14. Mean-Variance Portfolio Selection Problem with Stochastic Salary for a Defined Contribution Pension Scheme: A Stochastic Linear-Quadratic-Exponential Framework

    Charles Nkeki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a mean-variance portfolio selection problem with stochastic salary and inflation protection strategy in the accumulation phase of a defined contribution (DC pension plan. The utility function is assumed to be quadratic. It was assumed that the flow of contributions made by the PPM are invested into a market that is characterized by a cash account, an inflation-linked bond and a stock. In this paper, inflationlinked bond is traded and used to hedge inflation risks associated with the investment. The aim of this paper is to maximize the expected final wealth and minimize its variance. Efficient frontier for the three classes of assets (under quadratic utility function that will enable pension plan members (PPMs to decide their own wealth and risk in their investment profile at retirement was obtained.

  15. Project of multiple controller models for the maintenance of air/fuel ratio in natural gas internal combustion motors; Projeto de controladores multiplos modelos para manutencao da relacao ar/combustivel em motores de combustao interna movidos a gas natural

    Freitas Junior, Fernando Sousa e; Fleury, Agenor de Toledo [Sao Paulo Univ. SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mails: ffreitas@usp.br; agfleury@ipt.br

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this work is the study of advanced control techniques for the reduction of pollutant gases generated by internal combustion engines powered by natural gas. In this paper three techniques are applied to control the fuel injection and the ignition timing: the Generalized Predictive Control (GPC), the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and H{infinity} Control by Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMI). To each one of those techniques were developed a multiple model structure seeking to include the vast operation region of the engine. The controller's performance is measured by the efficiency in maintaining the fuel/air ratio around 1% of maximum deviation in relation to the stoichiometric value. The results show the possibility of controlling pollutant emission generated by this kind of engine to conform to international emission standards, improving life quality. (author)

  16. Some hybrid models applicable to dose-response relationships

    Kumazawa, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    A new type of models of dose-response relationships has been studied as an initial stage to explore a reliable extrapolation of the relationships decided by high dose data to the range of low dose covered by radiation protection. The approach is to use a 'hybrid scale' of linear and logarithmic scales; the first model is that the normalized surviving fraction (ρ S > 0) in a hybrid scale decreases linearly with dose in a linear scale, and the second is that the induction in a log scale increases linearly with the normalized dose (τ D > 0) in a hybrid scale. The hybrid scale may reflect an overall effectiveness of a complex system against adverse events caused by various agents. Some data of leukemia in the atomic bomb survivors and of rodent experiments were used to show the applicability of hybrid scale models. The results proved that proposed models fit these data not less than the popular linear-quadratic models, providing the possible interpretation of shapes of dose-response curves, e.g. shouldered survival curves varied by recovery time. (author)

  17. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis

    Evans, J.S.; Abrahmson, S.; Bender, M.A.; Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1993-10-01

    This report is a revision of NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990), Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis. This revision has been made to incorporate changes to the Health Effects Models recommended in two addenda to the NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 11, 1989 report. The first of these addenda provided recommended changes to the health effects models for low-LET radiations based on recent reports from UNSCEAR, ICRP and NAS/NRC (BEIR V). The second addendum presented changes needed to incorporate alpha-emitting radionuclides into the accident exposure source term. As in the earlier version of this report, models are provided for early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating the risks of seven types of cancer in adults - leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and ''other''. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Five classes of genetic diseases -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocations, and multifactorial diseases are also considered. Data are provided that should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk

  18. Health effects model for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part I. Introduction, integration, and summary. Part II. Scientific basis for health effects models

    Evans, J.S.; Moeller, D.W.; Cooper, D.W.

    1985-07-01

    Analysis of the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents requires models for predicting early health effects, cancers and benign thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study, additional information on radiological health effects has become available. This report summarizes the efforts of a program designed to provide revised health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence modeling. The new models for early effects address four causes of mortality and nine categories of morbidity. The models for early effects are based upon two parameter Weibull functions. They permit evaluation of the influence of dose protraction and address the issue of variation in radiosensitivity among the population. The piecewise-linear dose-response models used in the Reactor Safety Study to predict cancers and thyroid nodules have been replaced by linear and linear-quadratic models. The new models reflect the most recently reported results of the follow-up of the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and permit analysis of both morbidity and mortality. The new models for genetic effects allow prediction of genetic risks in each of the first five generations after an accident and include information on the relative severity of various classes of genetic effects. The uncertainty in modeloling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of risks. An approach is outlined for summarizing the health consequences of nuclear power plant accidents. 298 refs., 9 figs., 49 tabs.

  19. Health effects model for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part I. Introduction, integration, and summary. Part II. Scientific basis for health effects models

    Evans, J.S.; Moeller, D.W.; Cooper, D.W.

    1985-07-01

    Analysis of the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents requires models for predicting early health effects, cancers and benign thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study, additional information on radiological health effects has become available. This report summarizes the efforts of a program designed to provide revised health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence modeling. The new models for early effects address four causes of mortality and nine categories of morbidity. The models for early effects are based upon two parameter Weibull functions. They permit evaluation of the influence of dose protraction and address the issue of variation in radiosensitivity among the population. The piecewise-linear dose-response models used in the Reactor Safety Study to predict cancers and thyroid nodules have been replaced by linear and linear-quadratic models. The new models reflect the most recently reported results of the follow-up of the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and permit analysis of both morbidity and mortality. The new models for genetic effects allow prediction of genetic risks in each of the first five generations after an accident and include information on the relative severity of various classes of genetic effects. The uncertainty in modeloling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of risks. An approach is outlined for summarizing the health consequences of nuclear power plant accidents. 298 refs., 9 figs., 49 tabs

  20. WE-F-304-05: Cranial TCP/NTCP Modeling Insights and Caveats

    El Naqa, I. [University of Michigan (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) was introduced clinically more than twenty years ago, and many subsequent publications have reported safety and efficacy data. The AAPM Working Group on Biological Effects of Hypofractionated Radiotherapy/SBRT (WGSBRT) extracted published treatment outcomes data from extensive literature searches to summarize and construct tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for six anatomical regions: Cranial, Head and Neck, Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic, and Spinal. In this session, we present the WGSBRT’s work for cranial sites, and recurrent head and neck cancer. From literature-based data and associated models, guidelines to aid with safe and effective hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment are being determined. Further, the ability of existing and proposed radiobiological models to fit these data is considered as to the ability to distinguish between the linear-quadratic and alternative radiobiological models such as secondary cell death from vascular damage, immunogenic, or bystander effects. Where appropriate, specific model parameters are estimated. As described in “The lessons of QUANTEC,” (1), lack of adequate reporting standards continues to limit the amount of useful quantitative information that can be extracted from peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations regarding reporting standards are considered, to enable such reviews to achieve more complete characterization of clinical outcomes. 1 Jackson A, Marks LB, Bentzen SM, Eisbruch A, Yorke ED, Ten Haken RK, Constine LS, Deasy JO. The lessons of QUANTEC: recommendations for reporting and gathering data on dose-volume dependencies of treatment outcome. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Mar 1;76(3 Suppl):S155–60. Learning Objectives: Describe the techniques, types of cancer and dose schedules used in treating recurrent H&N cancers with SBRT List the radiobiological models that compete with the linear-quadratic model

  1. WE-F-304-05: Cranial TCP/NTCP Modeling Insights and Caveats

    El Naqa, I.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) was introduced clinically more than twenty years ago, and many subsequent publications have reported safety and efficacy data. The AAPM Working Group on Biological Effects of Hypofractionated Radiotherapy/SBRT (WGSBRT) extracted published treatment outcomes data from extensive literature searches to summarize and construct tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for six anatomical regions: Cranial, Head and Neck, Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic, and Spinal. In this session, we present the WGSBRT’s work for cranial sites, and recurrent head and neck cancer. From literature-based data and associated models, guidelines to aid with safe and effective hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment are being determined. Further, the ability of existing and proposed radiobiological models to fit these data is considered as to the ability to distinguish between the linear-quadratic and alternative radiobiological models such as secondary cell death from vascular damage, immunogenic, or bystander effects. Where appropriate, specific model parameters are estimated. As described in “The lessons of QUANTEC,” (1), lack of adequate reporting standards continues to limit the amount of useful quantitative information that can be extracted from peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations regarding reporting standards are considered, to enable such reviews to achieve more complete characterization of clinical outcomes. 1 Jackson A, Marks LB, Bentzen SM, Eisbruch A, Yorke ED, Ten Haken RK, Constine LS, Deasy JO. The lessons of QUANTEC: recommendations for reporting and gathering data on dose-volume dependencies of treatment outcome. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Mar 1;76(3 Suppl):S155–60. Learning Objectives: Describe the techniques, types of cancer and dose schedules used in treating recurrent H&N cancers with SBRT List the radiobiological models that compete with the linear-quadratic model

  2. Rate-Based Model Predictive Control of Turbofan Engine Clearance

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.

    2006-01-01

    An innovative model predictive control strategy is developed for control of nonlinear aircraft propulsion systems and sub-systems. At the heart of the controller is a rate-based linear parameter-varying model that propagates the state derivatives across the prediction horizon, extending prediction fidelity to transient regimes where conventional models begin to lose validity. The new control law is applied to a demanding active clearance control application, where the objectives are to tightly regulate blade tip clearances and also anticipate and avoid detrimental blade-shroud rub occurrences by optimally maintaining a predefined minimum clearance. Simulation results verify that the rate-based controller is capable of satisfying the objectives during realistic flight scenarios where both a conventional Jacobian-based model predictive control law and an unconstrained linear-quadratic optimal controller are incapable of doing so. The controller is evaluated using a variety of different actuators, illustrating the efficacy and versatility of the control approach. It is concluded that the new strategy has promise for this and other nonlinear aerospace applications that place high importance on the attainment of control objectives during transient regimes.

  3. Search for Supersymmetry with a dominant R-Parity violating $LQ\\overline{D}$ Coupling in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 GeV to 172 GeV

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Lucotte, A.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Nief, J.Y.; Perrodo, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Morawitz, P.; Pacheco, A.; Park, I.C.; Pascual, A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Boix, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Halley, A.W.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Tournefier, E.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wachsmuth, H.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D.E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Chalmers, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Ward, J.J.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Marinelli, N.; Martin, E.B.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Robertson, A.N.; Williams, M.I.; van Gemmeren, P.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Krocker, M.; Nurnberger, H.A.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; de Vivie de Regie, J.B.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Chambers, J.T.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Wright, A.E.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faif, G.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Prange, G.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A.; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1999-01-01

    A search for pair-production of supersymmetric particles under the assumption that R-parity is violated via a dominant LQDbar coupling has been performed using the data collected by ALEPH at centre-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV. The observed candidate events in the data are in agreement with the Standard Model expectation. This result is translated into lower limits on the masses of charginos, neutralinos, sleptons, sneutrinos and squarks. For instance, for m_0=500 GeV/c^2 and tan(beta)=sqrt(2) charginos with masses smaller than 81 GeV/c^2 and neutralinos with masses smaller than 29 GeV/c^2 are excluded at the 95% confidence level for any generation structure of the LQDbar coupling.

  4. Ensemble of cell survival experiments after ion irradiation for validation of RBE models

    Friedrich, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Scholz, Michael [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, TU Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    There is persistent interest in understanding the systematics of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Models such as the Local Effect Model (LEM) or the Microdosimetric Kinetic Model have the goal to predict the RBE. For the validation of these models a collection of many in-vitro cell survival experiments is most appropriate. The set-up of an ensemble of in-vitro cell survival data comprising about 850 survival experiments after both ion and photon irradiation is reported. The survival curves have been taken out from publications. The experiments encompass survival curves obtained in different labs, using different ion species from protons to uranium, varying irradiation modalities (shaped or monoenergetic beam), various energies and linear energy transfers, and a whole variety of cell types (human or rodent; normal, mutagenic or tumor; radioresistant or -sensitive). Each cell survival curve has been parameterized by the linear-quadratic model. The photon parameters have been added to the data base to allow to calculate the experimental RBE to any survival level. We report on experimental trends found within the data ensemble. The data will serve as a testing ground for RBE models such as the LEM. Finally, a roadmap for further validation and first model results using the data base in combination with the LEM are presented.

  5. Is α/β for breast cancer really low?

    Qi, X. Sharon; White, Julia; Li, X. Allen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Low α/β ratio for breast cancer has drawn a growing interest for exploring hypofractionation for breast irradiation. This work is to confirm the low α/β ratio based on large randomized clinical trials of breast irradiation. Methods and materials: A model based on the generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model and Poisson statistical model was developed to calculate disease-free survival with consideration of clonogen proliferation during the course of radiation treatment and exponential behavior of survival rate with follow-up time. Outcome data from a series of randomized clinical trials of early-stage breast radiotherapy were fitted to estimate the model parameters. Other clinical outcomes, including treatments with surgery alone or radiotherapy alone were used to validate the model and the estimated parameters. Hypofractionation regimens were proposed based on the newly estimated LQ parameters. Results: Plausible population averaged radiobiologic parameters for breast cancer (95% confidence level) are α/β = 2.88 (0.75-5.01) Gy; α = 0.08 ± 0.02 Gy -1 ; potential doubling time T d = 14.4 ± 7.8 day. The analysis of the radiation-alone data suggested an α/β ratio of 3.89 ± 6.25 Gy, verifying the low α/β ratio based on the post-lumpectomy irradiation data. The hypofractionation regimens that are equivalent to the conventional regimen of 2.0 Gy x 25 in 5 weeks include 2.26 Gy x 20, 3.34 Gy x 10, 4.93 Gy x 5 or 3.39 Gy x 10 (BID). Conclusions: The analysis of the available clinical data from multiple institutions support that breast cancer has a low ratio of α/β, encouraging hypofractionated radiotherapy regimens for breast cancer.

  6. A Bayesian Approach to Functional Mixed Effect Modeling for Longitudinal Data with Binomial Outcomes

    Kliethermes, Stephanie; Oleson, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal growth patterns are routinely seen in medical studies where individual and population growth is followed over a period of time. Many current methods for modeling growth presuppose a parametric relationship between the outcome and time (e.g., linear, quadratic); however, these relationships may not accurately capture growth over time. Functional mixed effects (FME) models provide flexibility in handling longitudinal data with nonparametric temporal trends. Although FME methods are well-developed for continuous, normally distributed outcome measures, nonparametric methods for handling categorical outcomes are limited. We consider the situation with binomially distributed longitudinal outcomes. Although percent correct data can be modeled assuming normality, estimates outside the parameter space are possible and thus estimated curves can be unrealistic. We propose a binomial FME model using Bayesian methodology to account for growth curves with binomial (percentage) outcomes. The usefulness of our methods is demonstrated using a longitudinal study of speech perception outcomes from cochlear implant users where we successfully model both the population and individual growth trajectories. Simulation studies also advocate the usefulness of the binomial model particularly when outcomes occur near the boundary of the probability parameter space and in situations with a small number of trials. PMID:24723495

  7. Selection of carbon beam therapy: biophysical models of carbon beam therapy.

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro

    2018-03-01

    Variation in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) within the irradiation field of a carbon beam makes carbon-ion radiotherapy unique and advantageous in delivering the therapeutic dose to a deep-seated tumor, while sparing surrounding normal tissues. However, it is crucial to consider the RBE, not only in designing the dose distribution during treatment planning, but also in analyzing the clinical response retrospectively. At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, the RBE model was established based on the response of human salivary gland cells. The response was originally handled with a linear-quadratic model, and later with a microdosimetric kinetic model. Retrospective analysis with a tumor-control probability model of non-small cell cancer treatment revealed a steep dose response in the tumor, and that the RBE of the tumor was adequately estimated using the model. A commonly used normal tissue complication probability model has not yet fully been accountable for the variable RBE of carbon ions; however, analysis of rectum injury after prostate cancer treatment suggested a highly serial-organ structure for the rectum, and a steep dose response similar to that observed for tumors.

  8. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Low LET radiation

    Evans, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes dose-response models intended to be used in estimating the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents. Models of early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects are provided. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes -- are considered. In addition, models are included for assessing the risks of several nonlethal early and continuing effects -- including prodromal vomiting and diarrhea, hypothyroidism and radiation thyroiditis, skin burns, reproductive effects, and pregnancy losses. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating cancer risks. Parameters are given for analyzing the risks of seven types of cancer in adults -- leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and ''other.'' The category, ''other'' cancers, is intended to reflect the combined risks of multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, kidney, brain, ovary, uterus and cervix. Models of childhood cancers due to in utero exposure are also developed. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. The models of cancer risk are derived largely from information summarized in BEIR III -- with some adjustment to reflect more recent studies. 64 refs., 18 figs., 46 tabs

  9. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Low LET radiation

    Evans, J.S. (Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (USA). School of Public Health)

    1990-01-01

    This report describes dose-response models intended to be used in estimating the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents. Models of early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects are provided. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes -- are considered. In addition, models are included for assessing the risks of several nonlethal early and continuing effects -- including prodromal vomiting and diarrhea, hypothyroidism and radiation thyroiditis, skin burns, reproductive effects, and pregnancy losses. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating cancer risks. Parameters are given for analyzing the risks of seven types of cancer in adults -- leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and other.'' The category, other'' cancers, is intended to reflect the combined risks of multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, kidney, brain, ovary, uterus and cervix. Models of childhood cancers due to in utero exposure are also developed. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. The models of cancer risk are derived largely from information summarized in BEIR III -- with some adjustment to reflect more recent studies. 64 refs., 18 figs., 46 tabs.

  10. A longitudinal study of growth and development among prenatally exposed atomic-bomb survivors

    Otake, Masanori; Fujikoshi, Yasunori; Schull, W.J.; Izumi, Shizue.

    1994-05-01

    Growth retardation due to A-bomb exposure has been evaluated for 455 individuals with nine repeated measurements of stature at age 10-18 yr using growth curve analysis and either two covariates, Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) uterine absorbed dose and postovulatory age (weeks), or three covariates, DS86 uterine dose, DS86 uterine dose squared, and postovulatory age. Of the several comparisons made by city, sex, DS86 dose, and postovulatory age, the largest significant difference was found. However, on the basis of a linear-quadratic (L-Q) dose response, no significant difference was found. A highly significant growth retardation due to DS86 uterine absorbed dose was observed for all trimesters combined and for the first and second trimesters. In the first trimester, all parameter estimates based on a linear (L) or L-Q dose-response relationship were negative in relation to DS86 uterine absorbed dose. The parameter estimates in the second trimester were negative for a constant term and positive for an L or L-Q term. Radiation-related growth retardation at age 10-18 yr is clearly evident. The dose effect in the third trimester was not significant with either the L or the L-Q model. A growth analysis, based on an L dose-response relationship, was made for 704 and 838 children with four repeated measurements of stature from ages 10-13 and 15-18 yr, respectively. The retardation effect is clearly evident at age 10-13 and continues at age 15-18. Growth retardation in age 10-13 was highly significant for all trimesters combined but suggestive only for the first trimester. The group age 15-18 revealed a highly significant growth retardation for both the first and second trimesters. The relationship between birth weights and repeated measurements of stature in adolescence was discussed on the basis of the results obtained by a growth curve analysis. (J.P.N.)

  11. SU-E-T-352: Why Is the Survival Rate Low in Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

    Huang, Z; Feng, Y; Rasmussen, K; Rice, J; Stephenson, S; Ferreira, Maria C [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Liu, T [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Yuh, K [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Wang, R; Grecula, J [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lo, S [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Mayr, N; Yuh, W [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumors are composed of a large number of clonogens that have the capability of indefinite reproduction. Even when there is complete clinical or radiographic regression of the gross tumor mass after treatment, tumor recurrence can occur if the clonogens are not completely eradicated by radiotherapy. This study was to investigate the colonogen number and its association with the tumor control probability (TCP) in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCCA). Methods: A literature search was conducted to collect clinical information of patients with OSCCA, including the prescription dose, tumor volume and survival rate. The linear-quadratic (LQ) model was incorporated into TCP model for clinical data analysis. The total dose ranged from 60 to 70 Gy and tumor volume ranged from 10 to 50 cc. The TCP was calculated for each group according to tumor size and dose. The least χ{sup 2} method was used to fit the TCP calculation to clinical data while other LQ model parameters (α, β) were adopted from the literature, due to the limited patient data. Results: A total of 190 patients with T2–T4 OSCCA were included. The association with HPV was not available for all the patients. The 3-year survival rate was about 82% for T2 squamous cell carcinoma and 40% for advanced tumors. Fitting the TCP model to the survival data, the average clonogen number was 1.56×10{sup 12}. For the prescription dose of 70 Gy, the calculated TCP ranged from 40% to 90% when the tumor volume varied from 10 to 50 cc. Conclusion: Our data suggests variation between the clonogen number and TCP in OSCCA. Tumors with larger colonogen number tend to have lower TCP and therefore dose escalation above 70 Gy may be indicated in order to improve the TCP and survival rate. Our result will require future confirmation with a large number of patients.

  12. Comparison of parametric, orthogonal, and spline functions to model individual lactation curves for milk yield in Canadian Holsteins

    Corrado Dimauro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Test day records for milk yield of 57,390 first lactation Canadian Holsteins were analyzed with a linear model that included the fixed effects of herd-test date and days in milk (DIM interval nested within age and calving season. Residuals from this model were analyzed as a new variable and fitted with a five parameter model, fourth-order Legendre polynomials, with linear, quadratic and cubic spline models with three knots. The fit of the models was rather poor, with about 30-40% of the curves showing an adjusted R-square lower than 0.20 across all models. Results underline a great difficulty in modelling individual deviations around the mean curve for milk yield. However, the Ali and Schaeffer (5 parameter model and the fourth-order Legendre polynomials were able to detect two basic shapes of individual deviations among the mean curve. Quadratic and, especially, cubic spline functions had better fitting performances but a poor predictive ability due to their great flexibility that results in an abrupt change of the estimated curve when data are missing. Parametric and orthogonal polynomials seem to be robust and affordable under this standpoint.

  13. Longitudinal models of reading achievement of students with learning disabilities and without disabilities.

    Sullivan, Amanda L; Kohli, Nidhi; Farnsworth, Elyse M; Sadeh, Shanna; Jones, Leila

    2017-09-01

    Accurate estimation of developmental trajectories can inform instruction and intervention. We compared the fit of linear, quadratic, and piecewise mixed-effects models of reading development among students with learning disabilities relative to their typically developing peers. We drew an analytic sample of 1,990 students from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort of 1998, using reading achievement scores from kindergarten through eighth grade to estimate three models of students' reading growth. The piecewise mixed-effects models provided the best functional form of the students' reading trajectories as indicated by model fit indices. Results showed slightly different trajectories between students with learning disabilities and without disabilities, with varying but divergent rates of growth throughout elementary grades, as well as an increasing gap over time. These results highlight the need for additional research on appropriate methods for modeling reading trajectories and the implications for students' response to instruction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Utility of Normal Tissue-to-Tumor {alpha}/{beta} Ratio When Evaluating Isodoses of Isoeffective Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Jin Jianyue [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Chang, Albert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve a better understanding of the effect of the number of fractions on normal tissue sparing for equivalent tumor control in radiation therapy plans by using equivalent biologically effective dose (BED) isoeffect calculations. Methods and Materials: The simple linear quadratic (LQ) model was assumed to be valid up to 10 Gy per fraction. Using the model, we formulated a well-known mathematical equality for the tumor prescription dose and probed and solved a second mathematical problem for normal tissue isoeffect. That is, for a given arbitrary relative isodose distribution (treatment plan in percentages), 2 isoeffective tumor treatment regimens (N fractions of the dose D and n fractions of the dose d) were denoted, which resulted in the same BED (corresponding to 100% prescription isodose). Given these situations, the LQ model was further exploited to mathematically establish a unique relative isodose level, z (%), for the same arbitrary treatment plan, where the BED to normal tissues was also isoeffective for both fractionation regimens. Results: For the previously stated problem, the relative isodose level z (%), where the BEDs to the normal tissue were also equal, was defined by the normal tissue {alpha}/{beta} ratio divided by the tumor {alpha}/{beta} times 100%. Fewer fractions offers a therapeutic advantage for those portions of the normal tissue located outside the isodose surface, z, whereas more fractions offer a therapeutic advantage for those portions of the normal tissue within the isodose surface, z. Conclusions: Relative isodose-based treatment plan evaluations may be useful for comparing isoeffective tumor regimens in terms of normal tissue effects. Regions of tissues that would benefit from hypofractionation or standard fractionation can be identified.

  15. On the surviving fraction in irradiated multicellular tumour spheroids: calculation of overall radiosensitivity parameters, influence of hypoxia and volume effects

    Horas, Jorge A; Olguin, Osvaldo R; Rizzotto, Marcos G

    2005-01-01

    We model the heterogeneous response to radiation of multicellular tumour spheroids assuming position- and volume-dependent radiosensitivity. We propose a method to calculate the overall radiosensitivity parameters to obtain the surviving fraction of tumours. A mathematical model of a spherical tumour with a hypoxic core and a viable rim which is a caricature of a real tumour is constructed. The model is embedded in a two-compartment linear-quadratic (LQ) model, assuming a mixed bivariated Gaussian distribution to attain the radiosensitivity parameters. Ergodicity, i.e., the equivalence between ensemble and volumetric averages is used to obtain the overall radiosensitivities for the two compartments. We obtain expressions for the overall radiosensitivity parameters resulting from the use of both a linear and a nonlinear dependence of the local radiosensitivity with position. The model's results are compared with experimental data of surviving fraction (SF) for multicellular spheroids of different sizes. We make one fit using only the smallest spheroid data and we are able to predict the SF for the larger spheroids. These predictions are acceptable particularly using bounded sensitivities. We conclude with the importance of taking into account the contribution of clonogenic hypoxic cells to radiosensitivity and with the convenience of using bounded local sensitivities to predict overall radiosensitivity parameters

  16. A new adaptive control scheme based on the interacting multiple model (IMM) estimation

    Afshari, Hamed H.; Al-Ani, Dhafar; Habibi, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an Interacting multiple model (IMM) adaptive estimation approach is incorporated to design an optimal adaptive control law for stabilizing an Unmanned vehicle. Due to variations of the forward velocity of the Unmanned vehicle, its aerodynamic derivatives are constantly changing. In order to stabilize the unmanned vehicle and achieve the control objectives for in-flight conditions, one seeks for an adaptive control strategy that can adjust itself to varying flight conditions. In this context, a bank of linear models is used to describe the vehicle dynamics in different operating modes. Each operating mode represents a particular dynamic with a different forward velocity. These models are then used within an IMM filter containing a bank of Kalman filters (KF) in a parallel operating mechanism. To regulate and stabilize the vehicle, a Linear quadratic regulator (LQR) law is designed and implemented for each mode. The IMM structure determines the particular mode based on the stored models and in-flight input-output measurements. The LQR controller also provides a set of controllers; each corresponds to a particular flight mode and minimizes the tracking error. Finally, the ultimate control law is obtained as a weighted summation of all individual controllers whereas weights are obtained using mode probabilities of each operating mode.

  17. Dose rate effects of low-LET ionizing radiation on fish cells

    Vo, Nguyen T.K. [McMaster University, Radiation Sciences Program, School of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Seymour, Colin B.; Mothersill, Carmel E. [McMaster University, Radiation Sciences Program, School of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, Hamilton, ON (Canada); McMaster University, Department of Biology, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2017-11-15

    Radiobiological responses of a highly clonogenic fish cell line, eelB, to low-LET ionizing radiation and effects of dose rates were studied. In acute exposure to 0.1-12 Gy of gamma rays, eelB's cell survival curve displayed a linear-quadratic (LQ) relationship. In the LQ model, α, β, and α/β ratio were 0.0024, 0.037, and 0.065, respectively; for the first time that these values were reported for fish cells. In the multi-target model, n, D{sub o}, and D{sub q} values were determined to be 4.42, 2.16, and 3.21 Gy, respectively, and were the smallest among fish cell lines being examined to date. The mitochondrial potential response to gamma radiation in eelB cells was at least biphasic: mitochondria hyperpolarized 2 h and then depolarized 5 h post-irradiation. Upon receiving gamma rays with a total dose of 5 Gy, dose rates (ranging between 83 and 1366 mGy/min) had different effects on the clonogenic survival but not the mitochondrial potential. The clonogenic survival was significantly higher at the lowest dose rate of 83 mGy/min than at the other higher dose rates. Upon continuous irradiation with beta particles from tritium at 0.5, 5, 50, and 500 mGy/day for 7 days, mitochondria significantly depolarized at the three higher dose rates. Clearly, dose rates had differential effects on the clonogenic survival of and mitochondrial membrane potential in fish cells. (orig.)

  18. Transformation of Physical DVHs to Radiobiologically Equivalent Ones in Hypofractionated Radiotherapy Analyzing Dosimetric and Clinical Parameters: A Practical Approach for Routine Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology

    Zoi Thrapsanioti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to transform DVHs from physical to radiobiological ones as well as to evaluate their reliability by correlations of dosimetric and clinical parameters for 50 patients with prostate cancer and 50 patients with breast cancer, who were submitted to Hypofractionated Radiotherapy. Methods and Materials. To achieve this transformation, we used both the linear-quadratic model (LQ model and the Niemierko model. The outcome of radiobiological DVHs was correlated with acute toxicity score according to EORTC/RTOG criteria. Results. Concerning the prostate radiotherapy, there was a significant correlation between RTOG acute rectal toxicity and ( and ( dosimetric parameters, calculated for  Gy. Moreover, concerning the breast radiotherapy there was a significant correlation between RTOG skin toxicity and dosimetric parameter, calculated for both  Gy ( and  Gy (. The new tool seems reliable and user-friendly. Conclusions. Our proposed model seems user-friendly. Its reliability in terms of agreement with the presented acute radiation induced toxicity was satisfactory. However, more patients are needed to extract safe conclusions.

  19. A therapeutic gain model for brachytherapy

    Wigg, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    When treating with continuous irradiation the potential therapeutic gain or loss depends on several treatment, normal tissue and tumour variables. There are similarities between equations defining tissue effects with fractionated treatment and brachytherapy. The former is sensitive to dose per fraction (and incomplete repair for short intervals between treatments) and the later is sensitive to dose rate and continuous repair factors. Because of these similarities, for typical tumours and normal tissues, dose per fraction and dose rates generally work in similar directions. As the dose per fraction or dose rate increases the therapeutic gain falls. With continuous irradiation the dose rates effects are determined by Beta cell kill and hence the absolute value of Beta . Minimal sensitivity occurs at very low and very high dose rates. The magnitude of cell kill also depends on the Continuous Repair Factor (g) which is a function of the treatment time and the Repair Half Time (in hours) of the tissues (Repair Half Time T 1/2Ln(2)/h, when h the Repair Constant). An interactive optimising model has been written to predict the therapeutic gain or loss as the parameter values are varied. This model includes the tumour and normal tissue parameters alpha and beta Gy (or individual values), their Repair Half Times, dose rates and overall treatment time. The model is based on the Linear-Quadratic equation and the Total Effect (TE) method of Thames and Hendry although the Extrapolated Response Dose (ERD) method of Barendsen produces the same results. The model is written so that the gain or loss may be seen when treatment is always to normal tissue tolerance doses. The magnitude of the therapeutic loss as the dose rate increases and its sensitivity to changes in normal tissue and tumour parameter values is clearly demonstrated

  20. BED-time charts and their application to the problems of interruptions in external beam radiotherapy treatments

    Sinclair, Judith A.; Oates, Jason P.; Dale, Roger G.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The use of radiobiological modelling to examine the likely consequences of interruptions to radiotherapy schedules and to assess various compensatory measures. Methods and Materials: An effect-time graphical display, the BED-time chart, has been developed using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model. This is used to examine the effects on tumour and normal tissues of treatment interruption scenarios representative of clinical situations. The mathematical criteria governing successful salvage have also been drafted and applied to typical situations. Results: The successful salvage of an interrupted treatment is dependent on a number of interacting factors and the method presented here can be used to examine the trade-offs that exist. Although the mathematics may be complex, it is shown that the dilemmas posed by an interrupted treatment may be more easily appreciated with reference to BED-time charts. These may therefore have a useful role as a teaching aid for portraying a wider variety of radiotherapy problems and also in the documentation of interruptions to treatment and the measures taken to compensate for them. Conclusions: Interruptions to radiotherapy regimes are undesirable and compensatory measures need to be initiated as soon as possible after the gap, with a view to completing the amended treatment within the originally prescribed treatment time. Adequate compensation is particularly difficult for long gaps and gaps which occur towards the end of the scheduled treatment. Modelling exercises can help establish guidelines on the available windows of opportunity

  1. Application of H∞ control theory to power control of a nonlinear reactor model

    Suzuki, Katsuo; Shimazaki, Junya; Shinohara, Yoshikuni

    1993-01-01

    The H∞ control theory is applied to the compensator design of a nonlinear nuclear reactor model, and the results are compared with standard linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control. The reactor model is assumed to be provided with a control rod drive system having the compensation of rod position feedback. The nonlinearity of the reactor model exerts a great influence on the stability of the control system, and hence, it is desirable for a power control system of a nuclear reactor to achieve robust stability and to improve the sensitivity of the feedback control system. A computer simulation based on a power control system synthesized by LQG control was performed revealing that the control system has some stationary offset and less stability. Therefore, here, attention is given to the development of a methodology for robust control that can withstand exogenous disturbances and nonlinearity in view of system parameter changes. The developed methodology adopts H∞ control theory in the feedback system and shows interesting features of robustness. The results of the computer simulation indicate that the feedback control system constructed by the developed H∞ compensator possesses sufficient robustness of control on the stability and disturbance attenuation, which are essential for the safe operation of a nuclear reactor

  2. Trajectory Planning and Optimized Adaptive Control for a Class of Wheeled Inverted Pendulum Vehicle Models.

    Yang, Chenguang; Li, Zhijun; Li, Jing

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate optimized adaptive control and trajectory generation for a class of wheeled inverted pendulum (WIP) models of vehicle systems. Aiming at shaping the controlled vehicle dynamics to be of minimized motion tracking errors as well as angular accelerations, we employ the linear quadratic regulation optimization technique to obtain an optimal reference model. Adaptive control has then been developed using variable structure method to ensure the reference model to be exactly matched in a finite-time horizon, even in the presence of various internal and external uncertainties. The minimized yaw and tilt angular accelerations help to enhance the vehicle rider's comfort. In addition, due to the underactuated mechanism of WIP, the vehicle forward velocity dynamics cannot be controlled separately from the pendulum tilt angle dynamics. Inspired by the control strategy of human drivers, who usually manipulate the tilt angle to control the forward velocity, we design a neural-network-based adaptive generator of implicit control trajectory (AGICT) of the tilt angle which indirectly "controls" the forward velocity such that it tracks the desired velocity asymptotically. The stability and optimal tracking performance have been rigorously established by theoretic analysis. In addition, simulation studies have been carried out to demonstrate the efficiency of the developed AGICT and optimized adaptive controller.

  3. Modeling bias and variation in the stochastic processes of small RNA sequencing.

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Etheridge, Alton; Sakhanenko, Nikita; Galas, David

    2017-06-20

    The use of RNA-seq as the preferred method for the discovery and validation of small RNA biomarkers has been hindered by high quantitative variability and biased sequence counts. In this paper we develop a statistical model for sequence counts that accounts for ligase bias and stochastic variation in sequence counts. This model implies a linear quadratic relation between the mean and variance of sequence counts. Using a large number of sequencing datasets, we demonstrate how one can use the generalized additive models for location, scale and shape (GAMLSS) distributional regression framework to calculate and apply empirical correction factors for ligase bias. Bias correction could remove more than 40% of the bias for miRNAs. Empirical bias correction factors appear to be nearly constant over at least one and up to four orders of magnitude of total RNA input and independent of sample composition. Using synthetic mixes of known composition, we show that the GAMLSS approach can analyze differential expression with greater accuracy, higher sensitivity and specificity than six existing algorithms (DESeq2, edgeR, EBSeq, limma, DSS, voom) for the analysis of small RNA-seq data. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part 1, Introduction, integration, and summary: Revision 2

    Evans, J.S. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Abrahmson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gilbert, E.S. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report is a revision of NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990), Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis. This revision has been made to incorporate changes to the Health Effects Models recommended in two addenda to the NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 11, 1989 report. The first of these addenda provided recommended changes to the health effects models for low-LET radiations based on recent reports from UNSCEAR, ICRP and NAS/NRC (BEIR V). The second addendum presented changes needed to incorporate alpha-emitting radionuclides into the accident exposure source term. As in the earlier version of this report, models are provided for early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating the risks of seven types of cancer in adults - leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and ``other``. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Five classes of genetic diseases -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocations, and multifactorial diseases are also considered. Data are provided that should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk.

  5. Analysis of explicit model predictive control for path-following control

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, explicit Model Predictive Control(MPC) is employed for automated lane-keeping systems. MPC has been regarded as the key to handle such constrained systems. However, the massive computational complexity of MPC, which employs online optimization, has been a major drawback that limits the range of its target application to relatively small and/or slow problems. Explicit MPC can reduce this computational burden using a multi-parametric quadratic programming technique(mp-QP). The control objective is to derive an optimal front steering wheel angle at each sampling time so that autonomous vehicles travel along desired paths, including straight, circular, and clothoid parts, at high entry speeds. In terms of the design of the proposed controller, a method of choosing weighting matrices in an optimization problem and the range of horizons for path-following control are described through simulations. For the verification of the proposed controller, simulation results obtained using other control methods such as MPC, Linear-Quadratic Regulator(LQR), and driver model are employed, and CarSim, which reflects the features of a vehicle more realistically than MATLAB/Simulink, is used for reliable demonstration. PMID:29534080

  6. Analysis of explicit model predictive control for path-following control.

    Lee, Junho; Chang, Hyuk-Jun

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, explicit Model Predictive Control(MPC) is employed for automated lane-keeping systems. MPC has been regarded as the key to handle such constrained systems. However, the massive computational complexity of MPC, which employs online optimization, has been a major drawback that limits the range of its target application to relatively small and/or slow problems. Explicit MPC can reduce this computational burden using a multi-parametric quadratic programming technique(mp-QP). The control objective is to derive an optimal front steering wheel angle at each sampling time so that autonomous vehicles travel along desired paths, including straight, circular, and clothoid parts, at high entry speeds. In terms of the design of the proposed controller, a method of choosing weighting matrices in an optimization problem and the range of horizons for path-following control are described through simulations. For the verification of the proposed controller, simulation results obtained using other control methods such as MPC, Linear-Quadratic Regulator(LQR), and driver model are employed, and CarSim, which reflects the features of a vehicle more realistically than MATLAB/Simulink, is used for reliable demonstration.

  7. Radiation damage, repopulation and cell recovery analysis of in vitro tumour cell megacolony culture data using a non-Poissonian cell repopulation TCP model

    Stavrev, P; Weldon, M; Warkentin, B; Stavreva, N; Fallone, B G

    2005-01-01

    The effects of radiation damage, tumour repopulation and cell sublethal damage repair and the possibility of extracting information about the model parameters describing them are investigated in this work. Previously published data on two different cultured cell lines were analysed with the help of a tumour control probability (TCP) model that describes tumour cell dynamics properly. Different versions of a TCP model representing the cases of full or partial cell recovery between fractions of radiation, accompanied by repopulation or no repopulation were used to fit the data and were ranked according to statistical criteria. The data analysis shows the importance of the linear-quadratic mechanism of cell damage for the description of the in vitro cell dynamics. In a previous work where in vivo data were analysed, the employment of the single hit model of cell kill and cell repopulation produced the best fit, while ignoring the quadratic term of cell damage in the current analysis leads to poor fits. It is also concluded that more experiments using different fractionation regimes producing diverse data are needed to help model analysis and better ranking of the models

  8. Autophagy influences the low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity of human lung adenocarcinoma cells by regulating MLH1.

    Wang, Qiong; Xiao, Zhuya; Lin, Zhenyu; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Weihong; Jie, Wuyun; Cao, Xing; Yin, Zhongyuan; Cheng, Jing

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the impact of autophagy on the low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) of human lung adenocarcinoma cells via MLH1 regulation. Immunofluorescent staining, Western blotting, and electron microscopy were utilized to detect autophagy in A549 and H460 cells. shRNA was used to silence MLH1 expression. The levels of MLH1, mTOR, p-mTOR, BNIP3, and Beclin-1 were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting. A549 cells, which have low levels of MLH1 expression, displayed HRS/induced radioresistance (IRR). Conversely, the radiosensitivity of H460 cells, which express high levels of MLH1, conformed to the linear-quadratic (LQ) model. After down-regulating MLH1 expression, A549 cells showed increased HRS and inhibition of autophagy, whereas H460 cells exhibited HRS/IRR. The levels of mTOR, p-mTOR, and BNIP3 were reduced in cells harboring MLH1 shRNA, and the changes in the mTOR/p-mTOR ratio mirrored those in MLH1 expression. Low MLH1-expressing A549 cells may exhibit HRS. Both the mTOR/p-mTOR and BNIP3/Beclin-1 signaling pathways were found to be related to HRS, but only mTOR/p-mTOR is involved in the regulation of HRS via MLH1 and autophagy.

  9. The simultaneous boost technique

    Lebesque, J.V.; Keus, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    Simultaneous boost technique in radiotherapy consists of delivering the boost treatment (additional doses to reduced volumes) simultaneously with the basic (large-field) treatment for all treatment sessions. Both the dose per fraction delivered by basic-treatment fields and by boost-treatment fields have to be reduced to end up with the same total dose in boost volume as in the original schedule, where basic treatment preceded boost treatment. These dose reductions and corresponding weighting factors have been calculated using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model and the concept of Normalized Total Dose (NTD). Relative NTD distributions were computed to evaluate the dose distributions resulting for the simultaneous boost technique with respect to acute and late normal tissue damage and tumor control. For the example of treatment of prostate cancer the weighting factors were calculated on basis of NTD for late normal tissue damage. For treatment of oropharyngeal cancer NTD for acute and normal tissue damage was used to determine the weighting factors. In this last example a theoretical sparing of late normal tissue damage can be demonstrated. Another advantage of simultaneous boost technique is that megavoltage images of the large basic-treatment fields facilitates the determination of the position of the patient with respect to the small boost-treatment fields. (author). 42 refs., 8 figs

  10. RTtxGap: An android radiobiological tool for compensation of radiotherapy treatment interruption

    Yusoff, A L; Mohamad, M; Bhavaraju, V M K; Idris, N R Nik; Abdullah, R

    2016-01-01

    Treatment interruption is not uncommon in radiotherapy. Common reasons for treatment interruption include machine breakdown, holidays and patient severe radiation reactions. Here RTtxGap, an Android application to assist calculations of compensation for treatment gap, is reported. It uses linear quadratic (LQ) model to calculate the biological effective dose (BED) that is used to solve for treatment gap compensations. Solutions are calculated using BED equation, with consideration for tissue proliferation. The accuracy of results has been verified using LQL Equiv software to be accurate within 1%. Five treatment interruption examples were used to illustrate the capability of the software to calculate the treatment compensation schedules. Solving these examples also illustrates the general consensus regarding compensating for unscheduled treatment interruptions, which ultimately involves balancing the BEDs of tumour and organ at risk. In addition to compensation for treatment gap, RTtxGap can also be used to calculate equivalent total dose in 2-Gy fraction (EQD2), to modify treatment schedule and to calculate alternative dose prescriptions having the same isoeffect. (paper)

  11. Dose-rate effects in external beam radiotherapy redux

    Ling, C. Clifton; Gerweck, Leo E.; Zaider, Marco; Yorke, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in external beam radiotherapy, both in technical advances and in clinical approaches, have prompted renewed discussions on the potential influence of dose-rate on radio-response in certain treatment scenarios. We consider the multiple factors that influence the dose-rate effect, e.g. radical recombination, the kinetics of sublethal damage repair for tumors and normal tissues, the difference in α/β ratio for early and late reacting tissues, and perform a comprehensive literature review. Based on radiobiological considerations and the linear-quadratic (LQ) model we estimate the influence of overall treatment time on radio-response for specific clinical situations. As the influence of dose-rate applies to both the tumor and normal tissues, in oligo-fractionated treatment using large doses per fraction, the influence of delivery prolongation is likely important, with late reacting normal tissues being generally more sensitive to the dose-rate effect than tumors and early reacting tissues. In conventional fractionated treatment using 1.8-2 Gy per fraction and treatment times of 2-10 min, the influence of dose-rate is relatively small. Lastly, the dose-rate effect in external beam radiotherapy is governed by the overall beam-on-time, not by the average linac dose-rate, nor by the instantaneous dose-rate within individual linac pulses which could be as high as 3 x 10 6 MU/min.

  12. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability - System Dynamics Modeling and Control System Design

    Melin, Alexander M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fugate, David L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This report documents the current status of the modeling, control design, and embedded control research for the magnetic bearing canned rotor pump being used as a demonstration platform for deeply integrating instrumentation and controls (I{\\&}C) into nuclear power plant components. This pump is a highly inter-connected thermo/electro/mechanical system that requires an active control system to operate. Magnetic bearings are inherently unstable system and without active, moment by moment control, the rotor would contact fixed surfaces in the pump causing physical damage. This report details the modeling of the pump rotordynamics, fluid forces, electromagnetic properties of the protective cans, active magnetic bearings, power electronics, and interactions between different dynamical models. The system stability of the unforced and controlled rotor are investigated analytically. Additionally, controllers are designed using proportional derivative (PD) control, proportional integral derivative (PID) control, voltage control, and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control. Finally, a design optimization problem that joins the electrical, mechanical, magnetic, and control system design into one problem to balance the opposing needs of various design criteria using the embedded system approach is presented.

  13. Stabilization of a three-dimensional limit cycle walking model through step-to-step ankle control.

    Kim, Myunghee; Collins, Steven H

    2013-06-01

    Unilateral, below-knee amputation is associated with an increased risk of falls, which may be partially related to a loss of active ankle control. If ankle control can contribute significantly to maintaining balance, even in the presence of active foot placement, this might provide an opportunity to improve balance using robotic ankle-foot prostheses. We investigated ankle- and hip-based walking stabilization methods in a three-dimensional model of human gait that included ankle plantarflexion, ankle inversion-eversion, hip flexion-extension, and hip ad/abduction. We generated discrete feedback control laws (linear quadratic regulators) that altered nominal actuation parameters once per step. We used ankle push-off, lateral ankle stiffness and damping, fore-aft foot placement, lateral foot placement, or all of these as control inputs. We modeled environmental disturbances as random, bounded, unexpected changes in floor height, and defined balance performance as the maximum allowable disturbance value for which the model walked 500 steps without falling. Nominal walking motions were unstable, but were stabilized by all of the step-to-step control laws we tested. Surprisingly, step-by-step modulation of ankle push-off alone led to better balance performance (3.2% leg length) than lateral foot placement (1.2% leg length) for these control laws. These results suggest that appropriate control of robotic ankle-foot prosthesis push-off could make balancing during walking easier for individuals with amputation.

  14. Low order modelling and closed-loop thermal control of a ventilated plate subject to a heat source disturbance

    Videcoq, E; Girault, M; Petit, D

    2012-01-01

    A multi-input multi-output (MIMO) thermal control problem in real-time is investigated. An aluminum slab is heated on one side by a radiative heat source and cooled on the other side by a fan panel. Starting from a nominal steady state configuration of heat source power and ventilation level, the objective is to control temperature at 4 chosen locations on the rear side when the thermal system is subject to a perturbation: the heat source power. The 4 actuators are the ventilation levels of 4 fans. The hypothesis of small inputs and temperature responses deviations is made, resulting in the assumption of a linear control problem. The originality of this work is twofold: (i) instead of a (large-sized) classical heat transfer model built from spatial discretization of local partial differential equations governing physics over the system domain, a low order model is identified from experimental data using the Modal Identification Method, (ii) this low order model is used to perform state feedback control in real time through a Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) compensator.

  15. Design of model based LQG control for integrated building systems

    Yahiaoui, A.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Soethout, L.L.; Paassen, van A.H.C.

    2006-01-01

    The automation of the operation of integrated building systems requires using modern control techniques to enhance the quality of the building indoor environments. This paper describes the theatrical base and practical application of an optimal dynamic regulator using modelbased Linear Quadratic

  16. Predicting seizures in untreated temporal lobe epilepsy using point-process nonlinear models of heartbeat dynamics.

    Valenza, G; Romigi, A; Citi, L; Placidi, F; Izzi, F; Albanese, M; Scilingo, E P; Marciani, M G; Duggento, A; Guerrisi, M; Toschi, N; Barbieri, R

    2016-08-01

    Symptoms of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are frequently associated with autonomic dysregulation, whose underlying biological processes are thought to strongly contribute to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). While abnormal cardiovascular patterns commonly occur during ictal events, putative patterns of autonomic cardiac effects during pre-ictal (PRE) periods (i.e. periods preceding seizures) are still unknown. In this study, we investigated TLE-related heart rate variability (HRV) through instantaneous, nonlinear estimates of cardiovascular oscillations during inter-ictal (INT) and PRE periods. ECG recordings from 12 patients with TLE were processed to extract standard HRV indices, as well as indices of instantaneous HRV complexity (dominant Lyapunov exponent and entropy) and higher-order statistics (bispectra) obtained through definition of inhomogeneous point-process nonlinear models, employing Volterra-Laguerre expansions of linear, quadratic, and cubic kernels. Experimental results demonstrate that the best INT vs. PRE classification performance (balanced accuracy: 73.91%) was achieved only when retaining the time-varying, nonlinear, and non-stationary structure of heartbeat dynamical features. The proposed approach opens novel important avenues in predicting ictal events using information gathered from cardiovascular signals exclusively.

  17. Least square regression based integrated multi-parameteric demand modeling for short term load forecasting

    Halepoto, I.A.; Uqaili, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, due to power crisis, electricity demand forecasting is deemed an important area for socioeconomic development and proper anticipation of the load forecasting is considered essential step towards efficient power system operation, scheduling and planning. In this paper, we present STLF (Short Term Load Forecasting) using multiple regression techniques (i.e. linear, multiple linear, quadratic and exponential) by considering hour by hour load model based on specific targeted day approach with temperature variant parameter. The proposed work forecasts the future load demand correlation with linear and non-linear parameters (i.e. considering temperature in our case) through different regression approaches. The overall load forecasting error is 2.98% which is very much acceptable. From proposed regression techniques, Quadratic Regression technique performs better compared to than other techniques because it can optimally fit broad range of functions and data sets. The work proposed in this paper, will pave a path to effectively forecast the specific day load with multiple variance factors in a way that optimal accuracy can be maintained. (author)

  18. A comparison of HDR brachytherapy and IMRT techniques for dose escalation in prostate cancer: A radiobiological modeling study

    Fatyga, M.; Williamson, J. F.; Dogan, N.; Todor, D.; Siebers, J. V.; George, R.; Barani, I.; Hagan, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, 401 College Street, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    A course of one to three large fractions of high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy is an attractive alternative to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for delivering boost doses to the prostate in combination with additional external beam irradiation for intermediate risk disease. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively compare single-fraction HDR boosts to biologically equivalent fractionated IMRT boosts, assuming idealized image guided delivery (igIMRT) and conventional delivery (cIMRT). For nine prostate patients, both seven-field IMRT and HDR boosts were planned. The linear-quadratic model was used to compute biologically equivalent dose prescriptions. The cIMRT plan was evaluated as a static plan and with simulated random and setup errors. The authors conclude that HDR delivery produces a therapeutic ratio which is significantly better than the conventional IMRT and comparable to or better than the igIMRT delivery. For the HDR, the rectal gBEUD analysis is strongly influenced by high dose DVH tails. A saturation BED, beyond which no further injury can occur, must be assumed. Modeling of organ motion uncertainties yields mean outcomes similar to static plan outcomes.

  19. Nonlinear Modeling and Coordinate Optimization of a Semi-Active Energy Regenerative Suspension with an Electro-Hydraulic Actuator

    Farong Kou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to coordinate the damping performance and energy regenerative performance of energy regenerative suspension, this paper proposes a structure of a vehicle semi-active energy regenerative suspension with an electro-hydraulic actuator (EHA. In light of the proposed concept, a specific energy regenerative scheme is designed and a mechanical properties test is carried out. Based on the test results, the parameter identification for the system model is conducted using a recursive least squares algorithm. On the basis of the system principle, the nonlinear model of the semi-active energy regenerative suspension with an EHA is built. Meanwhile, linear-quadratic-Gaussian control strategy of the system is designed. Then, the influence of the main parameters of the EHA on the damping performance and energy regenerative performance of the suspension is analyzed. Finally, the main parameters of the EHA are optimized via the genetic algorithm. The test results show that when a sinusoidal is input at the frequency of 2 Hz and the amplitude of 30 mm, the spring mass acceleration root meam square value of the optimized EHA semi-active energy regenerative suspension is reduced by 22.23% and the energy regenerative power RMS value is increased by 40.51%, which means that while meeting the requirements of vehicle ride comfort and driving safety, the energy regenerative performance is improved significantly.

  20. Modeling of Structural-Acoustic Interaction Using Coupled FE/BE Method and Control of Interior Acoustic Pressure Using Piezoelectric Actuators

    Mei, Chuh; Shi, Yacheng

    1997-01-01

    A coupled finite element (FE) and boundary element (BE) approach is presented to model full coupled structural/acoustic/piezoelectric systems. The dual reciprocity boundary element method is used so that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the coupled system can be obtained, and to extend this approach to time dependent problems. The boundary element method is applied to interior acoustic domains, and the results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structural-acoustic problems are then analyzed with the coupled finite element/boundary element method, where the finite element method models the structural domain and the boundary element method models the acoustic domain. Results for a system consisting of an isotropic panel and a cubic cavity are in good agreement with exact solutions and experiment data. The response of a composite panel backed cavity is then obtained. The results show that the mass and stiffness of piezoelectric layers have to be considered. The coupled finite element and boundary element equations are transformed into modal coordinates, which is more convenient for transient excitation. Several transient problems are solved based on this formulation. Two control designs, a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and a feedforward controller, are applied to reduce the acoustic pressure inside the cavity based on the equations in modal coordinates. The results indicate that both controllers can reduce the interior acoustic pressure and the plate deflection.

  1. Robust Control Design of Wheeled Inverted Pendulum Assistant Robot

    Magdi S.Mahmoud; Mohammad T.Nasir

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the design concept and mobile control strategy of the human assistant robot I-PENTAR(inverted pendulum type assistant robot). The motion equation is derived considering the non-holonomic constraint of the twowheeled mobile robot. Different optimal control approaches are applied to a linearized model of I-PENTAR. These include linear quadratic regulator(LQR), linear quadratic Gaussian control(LQG), H2 control and H∞ control. Simulation is performed for all the approaches yielding good performance results.

  2. LQG Control of Networked Control Systems with Limited Information

    Qing-Quan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG control problems for multi-input multioutput (MIMO, linear time-invariant (LTI systems, where the sensors and controllers are geographically separated and connected via a digital communication channel with limited data rates. An observer-based, quantized state feedback control scheme is employed in order to achieve the minimum data rate for mean square stabilization of the unstable plant. An explicit expression is presented to state the tradeoff between the LQ cost and the data rate. Sufficient conditions on the data rate for mean square stabilization are derived. An illustrative example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  3. Model-Based Control of a Continuous Coating Line for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Electrode Assembly

    Vikram Devaraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most expensive component of a fuel cell is the membrane electrode assembly (MEA, which consists of an ionomer membrane coated with catalyst material. Best-performing MEAs are currently fabricated by depositing and drying liquid catalyst ink on the membrane; however, this process is limited to individual preparation by hand due to the membrane’s rapid water absorption that leads to shape deformation and coating defects. A continuous coating line can reduce the cost and time needed to fabricate the MEA, incentivizing the commercialization and widespread adoption of fuel cells. A pilot-scale membrane coating line was designed for such a task and is described in this paper. Accurate process control is necessary to prevent manufacturing defects from occurring in the coating line. A linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG controller was developed based on a physics-based model of the coating process to optimally control the temperature and humidity of the drying zones. The process controller was implemented in the pilot-scale coating line proving effective in preventing defects.

  4. Radiation dose responses for chemoradiation therapy of pancreatic cancer: an analysis of compiled clinical data using biophysical models.

    Moraru, Ion C; Tai, An; Erickson, Beth; Li, X Allen

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed recent clinical data obtained from chemoradiation of unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) in order to examine possible benefits from radiation therapy dose escalation. A modified linear quadratic model was used to fit clinical tumor response and survival data of chemoradiation treatments for LAPC reported from 20 institutions. Biophysical radiosensitivity parameters were extracted from the fits. Examination of the clinical data demonstrated an enhancement in tumor response with higher irradiation dose, an important clinical result for palliation and quality of life. Little indication of improvement in 1-year survival with increased radiation dose was observed. Possible dose escalation schemes are proposed based on calculations of the biologically effective dose required for a 50% tumor response rate. Based on the evaluation of tumor response data, the escalation of radiation dose presents potential clinical benefits which when combined with normal tissue complication analyses may result in improved treatment outcome for locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. PEMILIHAN SAHAM YANG OPTIMAL MENGGUNAKAN CAPITAL ASSET PRICING MODEL (CAPM

    Dioda Ardi Wibisono

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Optimal portfolio is the basis for investors to invest in stock. Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM is a method to determine the value of the risk and return of a company stock. This research uses a secondary data from the closing price of the monthly stock price (monthly closing price, Stock Price Index (SPI, and the monthly SBI rate. The samples of this research are 41 stocks in LQ45 February-July 2015 on the Indonesian Stock Exchange (ISE. The study period is during 5 year from October 2010 - October 2015. The result of analysis shows that the optimal portfolio consists of 18 companies. The average return of the optimal portfolio is higher than the average risk-free return (SBI rate and the average market return. This proves that investing in stocks is more profitable than a risk-free investment. � Keywords: Stock, CAPM, return, risk�

  6. A Numerical Implementation of a Nonlinear Mild Slope Model for Shoaling Directional Waves

    Justin R. Davis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe the numerical implementation of a phase-resolving, nonlinear spectral model for shoaling directional waves over a mild sloping beach with straight parallel isobaths. The model accounts for non-linear, quadratic (triad wave interactions as well as shoaling and refraction. The model integrates the coupled, nonlinear hyperbolic evolution equations that describe the transformation of the complex Fourier amplitudes of the deep-water directional wave field. Because typical directional wave spectra (observed or produced by deep-water forecasting models such as WAVEWATCH III™ do not contain phase information, individual realizations are generated by associating a random phase to each Fourier mode. The approach provides a natural extension to the deep-water spectral wave models, and has the advantage of fully describing the shoaling wave stochastic process, i.e., the evolution of both the variance and higher order statistics (phase correlations, the latter related to the evolution of the wave shape. The numerical implementation (a Fortran 95/2003 code includes unidirectional (shore-perpendicular propagation as a special case. Interoperability, both with post-processing programs (e.g., MATLAB/Tecplot 360 and future model coupling (e.g., offshore wave conditions from WAVEWATCH III™, is promoted by using NetCDF-4/HD5 formatted output files. The capabilities of the model are demonstrated using a JONSWAP spectrum with a cos2s directional distribution, for shore-perpendicular and oblique propagation. The simulated wave transformation under combined shoaling, refraction and nonlinear interactions shows the expected generation of directional harmonics of the spectral peak and of infragravity (frequency <0.05 Hz waves. Current development efforts focus on analytic testing, development of additional physics modules essential for applications and validation with laboratory and field observations.

  7. SU-E-T-751: Three-Component Kinetic Model of Tumor Growth and Radiation Response for Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Watanabe, Y; Dahlman, E; Leder, K; Hui, S [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and study a kinetic model of tumor growth and its response to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) by assuming that the cells in irradiated tumor volume were made of three types. Methods: A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) were derived for three types of cells and a tumor growth rate. It is assumed that the cells were composed of actively proliferating cells, lethally damaged-dividing cells, and non-dividing cells. We modeled the tumor volume growth with a time-dependent growth rate to simulate the saturation of growth. After SRS, the proliferating cells were permanently damaged and converted to the lethally damaged cells. The amount of damaged cells were estimated by the LQ-model. The damaged cells gradually stopped dividing/proliferating and died with a constant rate. The dead cells were cleared from their original location with a constant rate. The total tumor volume was the sum of the three components. The ODEs were numerically solved with appropriate initial conditions for a given dosage. The proposed model was used to model an animal experiment, for which the temporal change of a rhabdomyosarcoma tumor volume grown in a rat was measured with time resolution sufficient to test the model. Results: To fit the model to the experimental data, the following characteristics were needed with the model parameters. The α-value in the LQ-model was smaller than the commonly used value; furthermore, it decreased with increasing dose. At the same time, the tumor growth rate after SRS had to increase. Conclusions: The new 3-component model of tumor could simulate the experimental data very well. The current study suggested that the radiation sensitivity and the growth rate of the proliferating tumor cells may change after irradiation and it depended on the dosage used for SRS. These preliminary observations must be confirmed by future animal experiments.

  8. Biophysical calculations of cell killing probability by the amorphous track structure model for heavy-ion beams

    Kase, Yuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2007-01-01

    In a treatment planning of heavy-ion radiotherapy, it is necessary to estimate the biological effect of the heavy-ion beams. Physical dose should be associated with the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at each point. Presently, carbon ion radiotherapy has been carried out at the National Institute Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI) in Germany. Both facilities take individual approach for the calculation of the RBE value. At NIRS, the classical LQ model has been used while the local effect model (LEM) has been incorporated into the treatment planning system at GSI. The first aim of this study is to explain the RBE model of NIRS by the microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM). In addition, the clarification of similarities and differences between the MKM and the LEM was also investigated. (author)

  9. Long Term Subsidence Analysis and Soil Fracturing Zonation Based on InSAR Time Series Modelling in Northern Zona Metropolitana del Valle de Mexico

    Gabriela Llanet Siles

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study deformation processes in northern Zona Metropolitana del Valle de Mexico (ZMVM are evaluated by means of advanced multi-temporal interferometry. ERS and ENVISAT time series, covering approximately an 11-year period (between 1999 and 2010, were produced showing mainly linear subsidence behaviour for almost the entire area under study, but increasing rates that reach up to 285 mm/yr. Important non-linear deformation was identified in certain areas, presumably suggesting interaction between subsidence and other processes. Thus, a methodology for identification of probable fracturing zones based on discrimination and modelling of the non-linear (quadratic function component is presented. This component was mapped and temporal subsidence evolution profiles were constructed across areas where notable acceleration (maximum of 8 mm/yr2 or deceleration (maximum of −9 mm/yr2 is found. This methodology enables location of potential soil fractures that could impact relevant infrastructure such as the Tunel Emisor Oriente (TEO (along the structure rates exceed 200 mm/yr. Additionally, subsidence behaviour during wet and dry seasons is tackled in partially urbanized areas. This paper provides useful information for geological risk assessment in the area.

  10. Correlation of a hypoxia based tumor control model with observed local control rates in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Avanzo, Michele; Stancanello, Joseph; Franchin, Giovanni; Sartor, Giovanna; Jena, Rajesh; Drigo, Annalisa; Dassie, Andrea; Gigante, Marco; Capra, Elvira [Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Research and Clinical Collaborations, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Oncology Centre, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To extend the application of current radiation therapy (RT) based tumor control probability (TCP) models of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) to include the effects of hypoxia and chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: A TCP model is described based on the linear-quadratic model modified to account for repopulation, chemotherapy, heterogeneity of dose to the tumor, and hypoxia. Sensitivity analysis was performed to determine which parameters exert the greatest influence on the uncertainty of modeled TCP. On the basis of the sensitivity analysis, the values of specific radiobiological parameters were set to nominal values reported in the literature for NPC or head and neck tumors. The remaining radiobiological parameters were determined by fitting TCP to clinical local control data from published randomized studies using both RT and CRT. Validation of the model was performed by comparison of estimated TCP and average overall local control rate (LCR) for 45 patients treated at the institution with conventional linear-accelerator-based or helical tomotherapy based intensity-modulated RT and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the model is most sensitive to the radiosensitivity term {alpha} and the dose per fraction. The estimated values of {alpha} and OER from data fitting were 0.396 Gy{sup -1} and 1.417. The model estimate of TCP (average 90.9%, range 26.9%-99.2%) showed good correlation with the LCR (86.7%). Conclusions: The model implemented in this work provides clinicians with a useful tool to predict the success rate of treatment, optimize treatment plans, and compare the effects of multimodality therapy.

  11. Correlation of a hypoxia based tumor control model with observed local control rates in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Avanzo, Michele; Stancanello, Joseph; Franchin, Giovanni; Sartor, Giovanna; Jena, Rajesh; Drigo, Annalisa; Dassie, Andrea; Gigante, Marco; Capra, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To extend the application of current radiation therapy (RT) based tumor control probability (TCP) models of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) to include the effects of hypoxia and chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: A TCP model is described based on the linear-quadratic model modified to account for repopulation, chemotherapy, heterogeneity of dose to the tumor, and hypoxia. Sensitivity analysis was performed to determine which parameters exert the greatest influence on the uncertainty of modeled TCP. On the basis of the sensitivity analysis, the values of specific radiobiological parameters were set to nominal values reported in the literature for NPC or head and neck tumors. The remaining radiobiological parameters were determined by fitting TCP to clinical local control data from published randomized studies using both RT and CRT. Validation of the model was performed by comparison of estimated TCP and average overall local control rate (LCR) for 45 patients treated at the institution with conventional linear-accelerator-based or helical tomotherapy based intensity-modulated RT and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the model is most sensitive to the radiosensitivity term α and the dose per fraction. The estimated values of α and OER from data fitting were 0.396 Gy -1 and 1.417. The model estimate of TCP (average 90.9%, range 26.9%-99.2%) showed good correlation with the LCR (86.7%). Conclusions: The model implemented in this work provides clinicians with a useful tool to predict the success rate of treatment, optimize treatment plans, and compare the effects of multimodality therapy.

  12. SU-E-T-480: Radiobiological Dose Comparison of Single Fraction SRS, Multi-Fraction SRT and Multi-Stage SRS of Large Target Volumes Using the Linear-Quadratic Formula

    Ding, C; Hrycushko, B; Jiang, S; Meyer, J; Timmerman, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the radiobiological effect on large tumors and surrounding normal tissues from single fraction SRS, multi-fractionated SRT, and multi-staged SRS treatment. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom with a centrally located large volume target (18.2 cm 3 ) was scanned using a 16 slice large bore CT simulator. Scans were imported to the Multiplan treatment planning system where a total prescription dose of 20Gy was used for a single, three staged and three fractionated treatment. Cyber Knife treatment plans were inversely optimized for the target volume to achieve at least 95% coverage of the prescription dose. For the multistage plan, the target was segmented into three subtargets having similar volume and shape. Staged plans for individual subtargets were generated based on a planning technique where the beam MUs of the original plan on the total target volume are changed by weighting the MUs based on projected beam lengths within each subtarget. Dose matrices for each plan were export in DICOM format and used to calculate equivalent dose distributions in 2Gy fractions using an alpha beta ratio of 10 for the target and 3 for normal tissue. Results: Singe fraction SRS, multi-stage plan and multi-fractionated SRT plans had an average 2Gy dose equivalent to the target of 62.89Gy, 37.91Gy and 33.68Gy, respectively. The normal tissue within 12Gy physical dose region had an average 2Gy dose equivalent of 29.55Gy, 16.08Gy and 13.93Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The single fraction SRS plan had the largest predicted biological effect for the target and the surrounding normal tissue. The multi-stage treatment provided for a more potent biologically effect on target compared to the multi-fraction SRT treatments with less biological normal tissue than single-fraction SRS treatment

  13. Geometry Modeling and Adaptive Control of Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicles

    Vick, Tyler Joseph

    Air-breathing hypersonic vehicles have the potential to provide global reach and affordable access to space. Recent technological advancements have made scramjet-powered flight achievable, as evidenced by the successes of the X-43A and X-51A flight test programs over the last decade. Air-breathing hypersonic vehicles present unique modeling and control challenges in large part due to the fact that scramjet propulsion systems are highly integrated into the airframe, resulting in strongly coupled and often unstable dynamics. Additionally, the extreme flight conditions and inability to test fully integrated vehicle systems larger than X-51 before flight leads to inherent uncertainty in hypersonic flight. This thesis presents a means to design vehicle geometries, simulate vehicle dynamics, and develop and analyze control systems for hypersonic vehicles. First, a software tool for generating three-dimensional watertight vehicle surface meshes from simple design parameters is developed. These surface meshes are compatible with existing vehicle analysis tools, with which databases of aerodynamic and propulsive forces and moments can be constructed. A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear dynamics simulation model which incorporates this data is presented. Inner-loop longitudinal and lateral control systems are designed and analyzed utilizing the simulation model. The first is an output feedback proportional-integral linear controller designed using linear quadratic regulator techniques. The second is a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC) which augments this baseline linear controller with an adaptive element. The performance and robustness of each controller are analyzed through simulated time responses to angle-of-attack and bank angle commands, while various uncertainties are introduced. The MRAC architecture enables the controller to adapt in a nonlinear fashion to deviations from the desired response, allowing for improved tracking performance, stability, and

  14. Potential implications of the bystander effect on TCP and EUD when considering target volume dose heterogeneity.

    Balderson, Michael J; Kirkby, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In light of in vitro evidence suggesting that radiation-induced bystander effects may enhance non-local cell killing, there is potential for impact on radiotherapy treatment planning paradigms such as the goal of delivering a uniform dose throughout the clinical target volume (CTV). This work applies a bystander effect model to calculate equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) for external beam prostate treatment and compares the results with a more common model where local response is dictated exclusively by local absorbed dose. The broad assumptions applied in the bystander effect model are intended to place an upper limit on the extent of the results in a clinical context. EUD and TCP of a prostate cancer target volume under conditions of increasing dose heterogeneity were calculated using two models: One incorporating bystander effects derived from previously published in vitro bystander data ( McMahon et al. 2012 , 2013a); and one using a common linear-quadratic (LQ) response that relies exclusively on local absorbed dose. Dose through the CTV was modelled as a normal distribution, where the degree of heterogeneity was then dictated by changing the standard deviation (SD). Also, a representative clinical dose distribution was examined as cold (low dose) sub-volumes were systematically introduced. The bystander model suggests a moderate degree of dose heterogeneity throughout a target volume will yield as good or better outcome compared to a uniform dose in terms of EUD and TCP. For a typical intermediate risk prostate prescription of 78 Gy over 39 fractions maxima in EUD and TCP as a function of increasing SD occurred at SD ∼ 5 Gy. The plots only dropped below the uniform dose values for SD ∼ 10 Gy, almost 13% of the prescribed dose. Small, but potentially significant differences in the outcome metrics between the models were identified in the clinically-derived dose distribution as cold sub-volumes were introduced. In terms of

  15. PEMBENTUKAN PORTOFOLIO OPTIMAL SAHAM – SAHAM PERBANKAN DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN MODEL INDEKS TUNGGAL

    Sari Yuniarti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available When Investor making an investment, they willing to get an optimal return, but on the reality, investor facedby uncertainty called risk. By making diversification, investor can be done by forming combination ofportfolio to reduce the rate of risk and optimizes the rate of expected return. This research aimed atanalyzing the form of optimal portfolio at the stocks of banking by using Single Index Model based onportfolio chosen theory which was increased first time by Markowitz (1952. Data used was secondary dataconsisting the data of banking stocks price which was in LQ-45 during 2009. By using single index modelwhere the combination of optimal portfolio was consisted of return and risk level of banking stock individually,composition of each candidate forming optimal portfolio was stock of BRI Bank, BCA, and BNI

  16. Evaluation of linearly solvable Markov decision process with dynamic model learning in a mobile robot navigation task.

    Kinjo, Ken; Uchibe, Eiji; Doya, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Linearly solvable Markov Decision Process (LMDP) is a class of optimal control problem in which the Bellman's equation can be converted into a linear equation by an exponential transformation of the state value function (Todorov, 2009b). In an LMDP, the optimal value function and the corresponding control policy are obtained by solving an eigenvalue problem in a discrete state space or an eigenfunction problem in a continuous state using the knowledge of the system dynamics and the action, state, and terminal cost functions. In this study, we evaluate the effectiveness of the LMDP framework in real robot control, in which the dynamics of the body and the environment have to be learned from experience. We first perform a simulation study of a pole swing-up task to evaluate the effect of the accuracy of the learned dynamics model on the derived the action policy. The result shows that a crude linear approximation of the non-linear dynamics can still allow solution of the task, despite with a higher total cost. We then perform real robot experiments of a battery-catching task using our Spring Dog mobile robot platform. The state is given by the position and the size of a battery in its camera view and two neck joint angles. The action is the velocities of two wheels, while the neck joints were controlled by a visual servo controller. We test linear and bilinear dynamic models in tasks with quadratic and Guassian state cost functions. In the quadratic cost task, the LMDP controller derived from a learned linear dynamics model performed equivalently with the optimal linear quadratic regulator (LQR). In the non-quadratic task, the LMDP controller with a linear dynamics model showed the best performance. The results demonstrate the usefulness of the LMDP framework in real robot control even when simple linear models are used for dynamics learning.

  17. Modeling the effects of repeated systemic administrations of small activity amounts In radionuclide therapy with beta emitters

    Calderon, Carlos; Gonzalez, Joaquin; Cepero, Janet; Colom, Camila; Rodriguez, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Good results for radionuclide therapy treatments where repeated short time spaced systemic injection of small activity amounts are given have been reported. Bone marrow and kidneys are usually considered as dose-limiting organs in radionuclide therapy. The treatments in radionuclide therapy with repeated administration could be optimized if irradiation effects in those one might be estimated. Xeno-grafted mice is the often biological model used during the evaluation of candidates for radionuclide therapy. A mathematical model of tumor cell kinetics was combined with another one reported for marrow cell kinetics which allows the calculation of marrow cell survival and proliferation in response to different irradiation schemes. Radionuclide therapy treatment with repeated administrations with radiopharmaceuticals labeled with beta emitters were simulated. The effects on fast-growing and slow-growing tumors were evaluated, as well as radiosensitive and radioresistant tumors. For more realistic estimation of absorbed dose in mice organs the cross-irradiation due to high energy beta particles was included into the MIRD's formula. Tumor and kidneys responses to the irradiation were estimated on the linear-quadratic model framework which was adapted for a multi-exponential dose rate function describing radionuclide therapy treatments with repeated administrations. Published values for murine tumors kinetics, marrows cellular turnover rates and radiosensitivities were used during the calculations. Iso-effective schemes were also determined varying the interval between fractions and the number of administration. For a given tolerated level of thrombocytopenia and absorbed dose in kidneys an optimal regime of radionuclide therapy with repeated administration could be found. The mathematical model presented here allows the prediction of the nadir and duration of thrombocytopenia, the effects on kidneys and the tumor cell response to various treatment schemes

  18. Dynamics Modeling and first Design of Drag-Free Controller for ASTROD I

    Li, H.; Theil, S.; Pettazzi, L.; Guilherme, M.-S.; Ni, W.-T.

    The Astrodynamical Space Test of Relativity using Optical Devices I ASTROD I mainly aims at testing relativistic gravity and measuring the solar-system parameters with high precision by carrying out laser ranging between a spacecraft in a solar orbit and ground stations It is the first step of ASTROD with 3 spacecraft In order to design the Drag-Free and Attitude Control system DFACS for the spacecraft a numerical simulator of spacecraft and test mass dynamics as well as models of main forces and torques are established using Matlab Simulink The aims of the DFACS are to reduce the acceleration disturbance on the test mass to a level of 10 -13 m cdot s -2 cdot Hz -1 2 at a frequency of 0 1 mHz in one axis and keep the telescope pointing to the ground stations on the earth The dynamics of spacecraft and test mass is a coupled multiple degree of freedom non-linear system So the first step of the DFACS design is to reduce the order of the system with assumptions without loss of generality Then the system is linearized at nominal state With the linear state space model of the system a Linear Quadratic Gaussian Regulator LQG is derived LQR and the feed-forward of a constant disturbance constitute the controller This paper will present the numerical simulator and the first drag-free controller design for ASTROD I It will show the development of the simulator the derivation of the controller as well as first simulation results

  19. Evaluation of linearly solvable Markov decision process with dynamic model learning in a mobile robot navigation task

    Ken eKinjo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Linearly solvable Markov Decision Process (LMDP is a class of optimal control problem in whichthe Bellman’s equation can be converted into a linear equation by an exponential transformation ofthe state value function (Todorov, 2009. In an LMDP, the optimal value function and the correspondingcontrol policy are obtained by solving an eigenvalue problem in a discrete state space or an eigenfunctionproblem in a continuous state using the knowledge of the system dynamics and the action, state, andterminal cost functions.In this study, we evaluate the effectiveness of the LMDP framework in real robot control, in whichthe dynamics of the body and the environment have to be learned from experience. We first perform asimulation study of a pole swing-up task to evaluate the effect of the accuracy of the learned dynam-ics model on the derived the action policy. The result shows that a crude linear approximation of thenonlinear dynamics can still allow solution of the task, despite with a higher total cost.We then perform real robot experiments of a battery-catching task using our Spring Dog mobile robotplatform. The state is given by the position and the size of a battery in its camera view and two neck jointangles. The action is the velocities of two wheels, while the neck joints were controlled by a visual servocontroller. We test linear and bilinear dynamic models in tasks with quadratic and Guassian state costfunctions. In the quadratic cost task, the LMDP controller derived from a learned linear dynamics modelperformed equivalently with the optimal linear quadratic controller (LQR. In the non-quadratic task, theLMDP controller with a linear dynamics model showed the best performance. The results demonstratethe usefulness of the LMDP framework in real robot control even when simple linear models are usedfor dynamics learning.

  20. Radiobiologically based assessments of the net costs of fractionated radiotherapy

    Dale, Roger G.; Jones, Bleddyn

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To examine how the long-term costs of radiation therapy may be influenced by modifications to fractionation schemes, and how any improvements in tumor control might, in principle, be translated into a potential cost saving for the responsible healthcare organization. Methods and Materials: Standard radiobiological modeling based on the linear-quadratic (LQ) model is combined with financial parameters relating to the estimated costs of different aspects of radiotherapy treatment delivery. The cost model includes provision for the long-term costs of treatment failure and enables the extra costs of near optimal radiotherapy to be balanced against suboptimal alternatives, which are more likely to be associated with further radiotherapy, salvage surgery, and continuing care. Results: A number of caveats are essential in presenting a model such as this for the first time, and these are clearly stated. However, a recurring observation is that, in terms of the whole cost of supporting a patient from first radiotherapy treatment onwards, high quality radiotherapy (i.e., based on individual patterns of fractionation that are near optimal for particular subpopulations of tumor) will frequently be associated with the lowest global cost. Conclusions: This work adds weight to the case for identifying fast and accurate predictive assay techniques, and supports the argument that suboptimal radiotherapy is usually more costly in the long term. Although the article looks only at the cost-benefit consequences of altered patterns of fractionation, the method will, in principle, have application to other changes in the way radiotherapy can be performed, e.g., to examining the cost-benefit aspects of tumor dose escalation as a consequence of using advanced conformal treatment planning

  1. WE-H-BRA-03: Development of a Model to Include the Evolution of Resistant Tumor Subpopulations Into the Treatment Optimization Process for Schedules Involving Targeted Agents in Chemoradiation Therapy

    Grassberger, C; Paganetti, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model that includes the process of resistance development into the treatment optimization process for schedules that include targeted therapies. Further, to validate the approach using clinical data and to apply the model to assess the optimal induction period with targeted agents before curative treatment with chemo-radiation in stage III lung cancer. Methods: Growth of the tumor and its subpopulations is modeled by Gompertzian growth dynamics, resistance induction as a stochastic process. Chemotherapy induced cell kill is modeled by log-cell kill dynamics, targeted agents similarly but restricted to the sensitive population. Radiation induced cell kill is assumed to follow the linear-quadratic model. The validation patient data consist of a cohort of lung cancer patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors that had longitudinal imaging data available. Results: The resistance induction model was successfully validated using clinical trial data from 49 patients treated with targeted agents. The observed recurrence kinetics, with tumors progressing from 1.4–63 months, result in tumor growth equaling a median volume doubling time of 92 days [34–248] and a median fraction of pre-existing resistance of 0.035 [0–0.22], in agreement with previous clinical studies. The model revealed widely varying optimal time points for the use of curative therapy, reaching from ∼1m to >6m depending on the patient’s growth rate and amount of pre-existing resistance. This demonstrates the importance of patient-specific treatment schedules when targeted agents are incorporated into the treatment. Conclusion: We developed a model including evolutionary dynamics of resistant sub-populations with traditional chemotherapy and radiation cell kill models. Fitting to clinical data yielded patient specific growth rates and resistant fraction in agreement with previous studies. Further application of the model demonstrated how proper timing of chemo

  2. WE-H-BRA-03: Development of a Model to Include the Evolution of Resistant Tumor Subpopulations Into the Treatment Optimization Process for Schedules Involving Targeted Agents in Chemoradiation Therapy

    Grassberger, C; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a model that includes the process of resistance development into the treatment optimization process for schedules that include targeted therapies. Further, to validate the approach using clinical data and to apply the model to assess the optimal induction period with targeted agents before curative treatment with chemo-radiation in stage III lung cancer. Methods: Growth of the tumor and its subpopulations is modeled by Gompertzian growth dynamics, resistance induction as a stochastic process. Chemotherapy induced cell kill is modeled by log-cell kill dynamics, targeted agents similarly but restricted to the sensitive population. Radiation induced cell kill is assumed to follow the linear-quadratic model. The validation patient data consist of a cohort of lung cancer patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors that had longitudinal imaging data available. Results: The resistance induction model was successfully validated using clinical trial data from 49 patients treated with targeted agents. The observed recurrence kinetics, with tumors progressing from 1.4–63 months, result in tumor growth equaling a median volume doubling time of 92 days [34–248] and a median fraction of pre-existing resistance of 0.035 [0–0.22], in agreement with previous clinical studies. The model revealed widely varying optimal time points for the use of curative therapy, reaching from ∼1m to >6m depending on the patient’s growth rate and amount of pre-existing resistance. This demonstrates the importance of patient-specific treatment schedules when targeted agents are incorporated into the treatment. Conclusion: We developed a model including evolutionary dynamics of resistant sub-populations with traditional chemotherapy and radiation cell kill models. Fitting to clinical data yielded patient specific growth rates and resistant fraction in agreement with previous studies. Further application of the model demonstrated how proper timing of chemo

  3. Model based multivariable controller for large scale compression stations. Design and experimental validation on the LHC 18KW cryorefrigerator

    Bonne, François; Bonnay, Patrick [INAC, SBT, UMR-E 9004 CEA/UJF-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Alamir, Mazen [Gipsa-Lab, Control Systems Department, CNRS-University of Grenoble, 11, rue des Mathématiques, BP 46, 38402 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Bradu, Benjamin [CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-29

    In this paper, a multivariable model-based non-linear controller for Warm Compression Stations (WCS) is proposed. The strategy is to replace all the PID loops controlling the WCS with an optimally designed model-based multivariable loop. This new strategy leads to high stability and fast disturbance rejection such as those induced by a turbine or a compressor stop, a key-aspect in the case of large scale cryogenic refrigeration. The proposed control scheme can be used to have precise control of every pressure in normal operation or to stabilize and control the cryoplant under high variation of thermal loads (such as a pulsed heat load expected to take place in future fusion reactors such as those expected in the cryogenic cooling systems of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced fusion experiment JT-60SA). The paper details how to set the WCS model up to synthesize the Linear Quadratic Optimal feedback gain and how to use it. After preliminary tuning at CEA-Grenoble on the 400W@1.8K helium test facility, the controller has been implemented on a Schneider PLC and fully tested first on the CERN's real-time simulator. Then, it was experimentally validated on a real CERN cryoplant. The efficiency of the solution is experimentally assessed using a reasonable operating scenario of start and stop of compressors and cryogenic turbines. This work is partially supported through the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) Goal Oriented Training Program, task agreement WP10-GOT-GIRO.

  4. Model-based control of a ballast-stabilized floating wind turbine exposed to wind and waves

    Christiansen, Soeren

    2013-01-15

    The wind turbine is a commercial product which is competing against other sources of energy, such as coal and gas. This competition drives a constant development to reduce costs and improve efficiency in order to reduce the total cost of the energy. The latest offshore development is the floating wind turbine, for water depths beyond 50 meters where winds are stronger and less turbulent. A floating wind turbine is subject to not only aerodynamics and wind induced loads, but also to hydrodynamics and wave induced loads. In contrast to a bottom fixed wind turbine, the floating structure, the hydrodynamics and the loads change the dynamic behavior of a floating wind turbine. Consequently, conventional wind turbine control cause instabilities on floating wind turbines. This work addresses the control of a floating spar buoy wind turbine, and focuses on the impact of the additional platform dynamics. A time varying control model is presented based on the wind speed and wave frequency. Estimates of the wind speed and wave frequency are used as scheduling variables in a gain scheduled linear quadratic controller to improve the electrical power production while reducing fatigue. To address the problem of negative damped fore-aft tower motion, additional control loops are suggested which stabilize the response of the onshore controller and reduce the impact of the wave induced loads. This research is then extended to model predictive control, to further address wave disturbances. In the context of control engineering, the dynamics and disturbances of a floating wind turbine have been identified and modeled. The objectives of maximizing the production of electrical power and minimizing fatigue have been reached by using advanced methods of estimation and control. (Author)

  5. Modeling, Control, and Numerical Simulations of a Novel Binary-Controlled Variable Stiffness Actuator (BcVSA

    Irfan Hussain

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This research work aims at realizing a new compliant robotic actuator for safe human-robotic interaction. In this paper, we present the modeling, control, and numerical simulations of a novel Binary-Controlled Variable Stiffness Actuator (BcVSA aiming to be used for the development of a novel compliant robotic manipulator. BcVSA is the proof of concept of the active revolute joint with the variable recruitment of series-parallel elastic elements. We briefly recall the basic design principle which is based on a stiffness varying mechanism consisting of a motor, three inline clutches, and three torsional springs with stiffness values (K0, 2K0, 4K0 connected to the load shaft and the motor shaft through two planetary sun gear trains with ratios (4:1, 4:1 respectively. We present the design concept, stiffness and dynamic modeling, and control of our BcVSA. We implemented three kinds of Multiple Model Predictive Control (MPC to control our actuator. The main motivation of choosing this controller lies in the fact that working principle of multiple MPC and multiple states space representation (stiffness level of our actuator share similar interests. In particular, we implemented Multiple MPC, Multiple Explicit MPC, and Approximated Multiple Explicit MPC. Numerical simulations are performed in order to evaluate their effectiveness for the future experiments on the prototype of our actuator. The simulation results showed that the Multiple MPC, and the Multiple Explicit MPC have similar results from the robustness point of view. On the other hand, the robustness performance of Approximated Multiple Explicit MPC is not good as compared to other controllers but it works in the offline framework while having the capability to compute the sub-optimal results. We also performed the comparison of MPC based controllers with the Computed Torque Control (CTC, and Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR. In future, we are planning to test the presented approach on the

  6. Effect of edema, relative biological effectiveness, and dose heterogeneity on prostate brachytherapy

    Wang, Jian Z.; Mayr, Nina A.; Nag, Subir; Montebello, Joseph; Gupta, Nilendu; Samsami, Nina; Kanellitsas, Christos

    2006-01-01

    Many factors influence response in low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of prostate cancer. Among them, edema, relative biological effectiveness (RBE), and dose heterogeneity have not been fully modeled previously. In this work, the generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model, extended to account for the effects of edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity, was used to assess these factors and their combination effect. Published clinical data have shown that prostate edema after seed implant has a magnitude (ratio of post- to preimplant volume) of 1.3-2.0 and resolves exponentially with a half-life of 4-25 days over the duration of the implant dose delivery. Based on these parameters and a representative dose-volume histogram (DVH), we investigated the influence of edema on the implant dose distribution. The LQ parameters (α=0.15 Gy -1 and α/β=3.1 Gy) determined in earlier studies were used to calculate the equivalent uniform dose in 2 Gy fractions (EUD 2 ) with respect to three effects: edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity for 125 I and 103 Pd implants. The EUD 2 analysis shows a negative effect of edema and dose heterogeneity on tumor cell killing because the prostate edema degrades the dose coverage to tumor target. For the representative DVH, the V 100 (volume covered by 100% of prescription dose) decreases from 93% to 91% and 86%, and the D 90 (dose covering 90% of target volume) decrease from 107% to 102% and 94% of prescription dose for 125 I and 103 Pd implants, respectively. Conversely, the RBE effect of LDR brachytherapy [versus external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy] enhances dose effect on tumor cell kill. In order to balance the negative effects of edema and dose heterogeneity, the RBE of prostate brachytherapy was determined to be approximately 1.2-1.4 for 125 I and 1.3-1.6 for 103 Pd implants. These RBE values are consistent with the RBE data published in the literature. These results may explain why in earlier modeling studies

  7. Correlation between the parameters of radiosensitivity in human cancer cell lines

    Park, Woo Yoon; Kim, Won Dong; Min, Kyung Soo

    1998-01-01

    We conducted clonogenic assay using human cancer cell lines (MKN-45, PC-14, Y-79, HeLa) to investigate a correlation between the parameters of radiosensitivity. Human cancer cell lines were irradiated with single doses of 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 10Gy for the study of radiosensitivity and sublethal damage repair capacity was assessed with two fractions of 5Gy separated with a time interval of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 24 hours. Surviving fraction was assessed with clonogenic assay using Sperman-Karber method and mathematical analysis of survival curves was done with linear-quadratic (LQ), multitarget-single hit(MS) model and mean inactivation dose(D). Surviving fractions at 2Gy(SF2) were variable among the cell lines, ranged from 0.174 to 0.85. The SF2 of Y-79 was lowest and that of PC-14 was highest(p<0.05, t-test). LQ model analysis showed that the values of α for Y-79, MKN-45, HeLa and PC-14 were 0.603, 0.356, 0.275 and 0.102 respectively, and those of β were 0.005, 0.016, 0.025 and 0.027 respectively. Fitting to MS model showed that the values of Do for Y-79, MKN-45, HeLa and PC-14 were 1.59, 1.84, 1.88 and 2.52 respectively, and those of n were 0.97, 1.46, 1.52 and 1.69 respectively. The Ds calculated by Gauss-Laguerre method were 1.62, 2.37, 2.61 and 3.95 respectively. So the SF2 was significantly correlated with α, Do and D. Their Pearson correlation coefficiencics were -0.953 and 0.993, 0.999 respectively(p<0.05). Sublethal damage repair was saturated around 4 hours and recovery ratios (RR) at plateau phase ranged from 2 to 3.79. But RR was not correlated with SF2, α, β, Do, D. The intrinsic radiosensitivity was very different among the tested human cell lines. Y-79 was the most sensitive and PC-14 was the least sensitive. SF2 was well correlated with α, Do, and D. RR was high for MKN-45 and HeLa but had nothing to do with radiosensitivity parameters. These basic parameters can be used as baseline data for various in vitro radiobiological experiments

  8. Radiosensitivity of mesothelioma cell lines

    Haekkinen, A.M.; Laasonen, A.; Linnainmaa, K.; Mattson, K.; Pyrhoenen, S.

    1996-01-01

    The present study was carried out in order to examine the radiosensitivity of malignant pleural mesothelioma cell lines. Cell kinetics, radiation-induced delay of the cell cycle and DNA ploidy of the cell lines were also determined. For comparison an HeLa and a human foetal fibroblast cell line were simultaneously explored. Six previously cytogenetically and histologically characterized mesothelioma tumor cell lines were applied. A rapid tiazolyl blue microtiter (MTT) assay was used to analyze radiosensitivity and cell kinetics and DNA ploidy of the cultured cells were determined by flow cytometry. The survival fraction after a dose of 2 Gy (SF2), parameters α and β of the linear quadratic model (LQ-model) and mean inactivation dose (D MID ) were also estimated. The DNA index of four cell lines equaled 1.0 and two cell lines equaled 1.5 and 1.6. Different mesothelioma cell lines showed a great variation in radiosensitivity. Mean survival fraction after a radiation dose of 2 Gy (SF2) was 0.60 and ranged from 0.36 to 0.81 and mean α value was 0.26 (range 0.48-0.083). The SF2 of the most sensitive diploid mesothelioma cell line was 0.36: Less than that of the foetal fibroblast cell line (0.49). The survival fractions (0.81 and 0.74) of the two most resistant cell lines, which also were aneuploid, were equal to that of the HeLa cell line (0.78). The α/β ratios of the most sensitive cell lines were almost an order of magnitude greater than those of the two most resistant cell lines. Radiation-induced delay of the most resistant aneuploid cell line was similar to that of HeLa cells but in the most sensitive (diploid cells) there was practically no entry into the G1 phase following the 2 Gy radiation dose during 36 h. (orig.)

  9. SU-F-T-01: Optimization of the Accelerated Partial Breast Brachytherapy Fractionation with Consideration of Physical Doses to Tumor and Organ at Risk

    Fu, W; Huq, M [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with brachytherapy prescribes 34Gy to be delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive working days without considering the physical dose to the target and organs at risk (OARs) for an individual patient. The purpose of this study is to optimize the fractionation scheme by evaluating the radiation effect on tumor and OARs with a modified linear-quadratic (LQ) model based on dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Methods: Five breast patients treated with multilumen balloon brachytherapy were selected. The minimum skin and rib spacing were ranged from 2.5mm to 14.3mm and from 1.0mm to 25.0mm, respectively. The LQ model parameters were set as: (1) breast: α=0.08, β=0.028, doubling time Tpot=14.4 days, and starting time Tk=21days; (2) skin: acute reaction α=0.101, β=0.009; late reaction α=0.064, β=0.029; (3) rib: α=0.3, β=0.12. Boundary dose Dt was 6 Gy for both target and OARs. The relation between radiation effects on the tumor (ET) and OARs (EOAR) were plotted for fraction number from 1 to 20. Results: The value of radiation effect from routine 3.4Gyx10 fractions was used as reference, ETref and EOARref. If set ET=ETref, the fractionation that results in minimum EOAR values correspond to the optimal fractionation. For these patients, the optimal numbers are 10 fractions for skin acute reaction, 18 fractions for skin and rib late reaction while the doses per fraction are 3.4Gy and 2.05–2.10Gy, respectively. If set EOAR=EOARref, the fractionation that results in a maximum ET value corresponds to the optimal fractionation. The optimal fractionation is 3.4Gyx10 fractions for skin acute reaction, and 2.10–2.25Gyx18 fractions for skin late reaction and rib. Conclusion: For APBI brachytherapy, the routine 3.4Gyx10 fractions is optimal fractionation for skin acute reaction, while 2.05–2.25Gyx18 fractions is optimal fractionation for late reaction of skin and rib.

  10. Analysis of a large number of clinical studies for breast cancer radiotherapy: estimation of radiobiological parameters for treatment planning

    Guerrero, M; Li, X Allen

    2003-01-01

    Numerous studies of early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) have been published in recent years. Both external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy (BT) with different fractionation schemes are currently used. The present RT practice is largely based on empirical experience and it lacks a reliable modelling tool to compare different RT modalities or to design new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work is to derive a plausible set of radiobiological parameters that can be used for RT treatment planning. The derivation is based on existing clinical data and is consistent with the analysis of a large number of published clinical studies on early-stage breast cancer. A large number of published clinical studies on the treatment of early breast cancer with BCS plus RT (including whole breast EBRT with or without a boost to the tumour bed, whole breast EBRT alone, brachytherapy alone) and RT alone are compiled and analysed. The linear quadratic (LQ) model is used in the analysis. Three of these clinical studies are selected to derive a plausible set of LQ parameters. The potential doubling time is set a priori in the derivation according to in vitro measurements from the literature. The impact of considering lower or higher T pot is investigated. The effects of inhomogeneous dose distributions are considered using clinically representative dose volume histograms. The derived LQ parameters are used to compare a large number of clinical studies using different regimes (e.g., RT modality and/or different fractionation schemes with different prescribed dose) in order to validate their applicability. The values of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and biologically effective dose (BED) are used as a common metric to compare the biological effectiveness of each treatment regime. We have obtained a plausible set of radiobiological parameters for breast cancer. This set of parameters is consistent with in vitro

  11. A model of photon cell killing based on the spatio-temporal clustering of DNA damage in higher order chromatin structures.

    Lisa Herr

    Full Text Available We present a new approach to model dose rate effects on cell killing after photon radiation based on the spatio-temporal clustering of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs within higher order chromatin structures of approximately 1-2 Mbp size, so called giant loops. The main concept of this approach consists of a distinction of two classes of lesions, isolated and clustered DSBs, characterized by the number of double strand breaks induced in a giant loop. We assume a low lethality and fast component of repair for isolated DSBs and a high lethality and slow component of repair for clustered DSBs. With appropriate rates, the temporal transition between the different lesion classes is expressed in terms of five differential equations. These allow formulating the dynamics involved in the competition of damage induction and repair for arbitrary dose rates and fractionation schemes. Final cell survival probabilities are computable with a cell line specific set of three parameters: The lethality for isolated DSBs, the lethality for clustered DSBs and the half-life time of isolated DSBs. By comparison with larger sets of published experimental data it is demonstrated that the model describes the cell line dependent response to treatments using either continuous irradiation at a constant dose rate or to split dose irradiation well. Furthermore, an analytic investigation of the formulation concerning single fraction treatments with constant dose rates in the limiting cases of extremely high or low dose rates is presented. The approach is consistent with the Linear-Quadratic model extended by the Lea-Catcheside factor up to the second moment in dose. Finally, it is shown that the model correctly predicts empirical findings about the dose rate dependence of incidence probabilities for deterministic radiation effects like pneumonitis and the bone marrow syndrome. These findings further support the general concepts on which the approach is based.

  12. Treatment-time-dependence models of early and delayed radiation injury in rat small intestine

    Denham, James W.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Kron, Tomas; Langberg, Carl W.

    2000-01-01

    Background: The present study modeled data from a large series of experiments originally designed to investigate the influence of time, dose, and fractionation on early and late pathologic endpoints in rat small intestine after localized irradiation. The objective was to obtain satisfactory descriptions of the regenerative response to injury together with the possible relationships between early and late endpoints. Methods: Two- and 26-week pathologic radiation injury data in groups of Sprague-Dawley rats irradiated with 27 different fractionation schedules were modeled using the incomplete repair (IR) version of the linear-quadratic model with or without various time correction models. The following time correction models were tested: (1) No time correction; (2) A simple exponential (SE) regenerative response beginning at an arbitrary time after starting treatment; and (3) A bi-exponential response with its commencement linked to accumulated cellular depletion and fraction size (the 'intelligent response model' [INTR]). Goodness of fit of the various models was assessed by correlating the predicted biological effective dose for each dose group with the observed radiation injury score. Results: (1) The incomplete repair model without time correction did not provide a satisfactory description of either the 2- or 26-week data. (2) The models using SE time correction performed better, providing modest descriptions of the data. (3) The INTR model provided reasonable descriptions of both the 2- and 26-week data, confirming a treatment time dependence of both early and late pathological endpoints. (4) The most satisfactory descriptions of the data by the INTR model were obtained when the regenerative response was assumed to cease 2 weeks after irradiation rather than at the end of irradiation. A fraction-size-dependent delay of the regenerative response was also suggested in the best fitting models. (5) Late endpoints were associated with low-fractionation sensitivity

  13. Effect of radiation on the induction of cell death in melanoma cells

    Notcovich, C; Delgado Gonzalez, D; Salguero, N; Bracalente, C; Molinari, B; Duran H

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is one of the desired effects of radiation during tumor treatment with radiotherapy. However, cutaneous melanoma cells are highly resistant to this kind of treatment. In order to understand the impact of radiation on melanoma cells apoptosis, the aim of this study was to characterize the radiobiological response of human melanoma cells, and to study whether a correlation between intrinsic radiosensitivity and apoptosis exists. The human melanoma cell lines A375, MELJ and SB2 were gamma-irradiated ( 137 Cs) and their radiosensitivity was evaluated through the α parameter and surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) of a clonogenic assay, adjusted to the Linear-Quadratic (LQ) survival model. MELJ resulted the most radioresistant (α= 0,150±0,034 SF2= 0,71), while A375 and SB2 were the most sensitive (α=0,45±0,028 SF2=0,29 and α=0,41±0,004 SF2=0,21 respectively). Apoptotic process was evaluated at 0, 2, 6, 24 and 48 hs post irradiation at 2 and 4 Gy. Nuclear morphology was analyzed by Hoechst staining, and PARP-1 cleavage by western blot. The three cell lines nucleus with apoptotic morphology were found, being A375 and SB2 percentage of apoptotic nucleus higher than MELJ (p<0.01%). Besides, PARP-1 western blot showed for MEL-J a low presence of the cleaved forms (apoptosis indicator) compared to A375 and SB2 cell lines. Our results indicate that MELJ, the most radioresistant cell line in this study, is the less radiation induced apoptotic, demonstrating a correlation between cellular intrinsic radiosensitivity and apoptosis. Understanding melanoma radioresistance mechanism becomes extremely important in the search of new therapeutic targets that allow cell sensitization to radiotherapy (author)

  14. Quantification of the clinical synergy between hyperthermia and radiation

    Crezee, Johannes; Kok, Petra; Bel, Arjan; Stalpers, Lukas; Franken, Klaas

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia (HT) therapy, raising tumor temperature to 41-45℃, enhances the effect of radiotherapy (RT) in tumor tissue. Combined HT-RT treatment is successfully applied for different tumors. The sensitizing effect of HT is maximal when given simultaneously with RT, but HT is more tumor selective when given before or after RT. Our purpose was to integrate existing preclinical and clinical data into an integrated RT-HT treatment planning system (R-HTP) to predict the biological effect of different sequences of RT and HT for clinically realistic temperatures and dose distributions. We developed a prototype R-HTP system and applied this for a retrospective analysis and comparison of RT+HT with RT alone for 15 prostate cancer patients. We used the linear quadratic (LQ) model with temperature dependent parameters alpha and beta obtained from the literature. The original RT plans were used which at 70 Gy on the PTV, in 35 2 Gy fractions. HT was simulated to be given with a phased array loco-regional HT system with realistic temperature distributions optimized to achieve maximal tumor temperature while maintaining normal tissue below 45℃. For the 15 patients an average median tumor temperature of 41.6℃ was achieved. This yielded an average effective radiotherapy dose of 86.1 Gy for the combined RT+HT treatment, compared to an average effective dose of 75.9 Gy when RT was given alone. The resulting increase in local tumor control probability (TCP) varies between 10% for low risk prostate cancer patients to 40% for high risk prostate cancer patients. This form of multi-modality planning is useful to predict the enhancement of RT by HT. (author)

  15. Theoretical analysis of the dose dependence of the oxygen enhancement ratio and its relevance for clinical applications

    Wenzl, Tatiana; Wilkens, Jan J

    2011-01-01

    The increased resistance of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation is usually believed to be the primary reason for treatment failure in tumors with oxygen-deficient areas. This oxygen effect can be expressed quantitatively by the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). Here we investigate theoretically the dependence of the OER on the applied local dose for different types of ionizing irradiation and discuss its importance for clinical applications in radiotherapy for two scenarios: small dose variations during hypoxia-based dose painting and larger dose changes introduced by altered fractionation schemes. Using the widespread Alper-Howard-Flanders and standard linear-quadratic (LQ) models, OER calculations are performed for T1 human kidney and V79 Chinese hamster cells for various dose levels and various hypoxic oxygen partial pressures (pO2) between 0.01 and 20 mmHg as present in clinical situations in vivo. Our work comprises the analysis for both low linear energy transfer (LET) treatment with photons or protons and high-LET treatment with heavy ions. A detailed analysis of experimental data from the literature with respect to the dose dependence of the oxygen effect is performed, revealing controversial opinions whether the OER increases, decreases or stays constant with dose. The behavior of the OER with dose per fraction depends primarily on the ratios of the LQ parameters alpha and beta under hypoxic and aerobic conditions, which themselves depend on LET, pO2 and the cell or tissue type. According to our calculations, the OER variations with dose in vivo for low-LET treatments are moderate, with changes in the OER up to 11% for dose painting (1 or 3 Gy per fraction compared to 2 Gy) and up to 22% in hyper-/hypofractionation (0.5 or 20 Gy per fraction compared to 2 Gy) for oxygen tensions between 0.2 and 20 mmHg typically measured clinically in hypoxic tumors. For extremely hypoxic cells (0.01 mmHg), the dose dependence of the OER becomes more pronounced (up to 36

  16. Normal tissue complication probability modeling of radiation-induced hypothyroidism after head-and-neck radiation therapy.

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen; Hashemi, Bijan; Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi; Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2013-02-01

    To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with α/β = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D(50) estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. The implemented normal tissue complication probability models showed a parallel architecture for the

  17. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented

  18. Model or metaphor. More comments on the BEIR III report

    Herbert, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Data have been obtained for Hiroshima and Nagasaki from which were prepared the estimates of somatic risk coefficients for ionizing radiation presented in the BEIR III Report. Several Poisson regression models of these data by both Bayesian and Sampling Theory methods. The results of the evaluations disclose some interesting idiosyncracies in the statistical methods by which the BEIR III estimates and inferences were obtained. The paper presents these results in the format of a textual criticism of the foundations of the received estimates of risk that are presented in the Somatic Effects Sections of the BEIR III Report. Whatever the resolution of the current difficulties with the validity of the T65 estimates of dose, the utility of any estimates of risk coefficients depends upon the suitability of the statistical methods by which any estimates of dose are mapped into estimates of risk. The statistical methods of the BEIR III Report seem idiosyncratic. Use of standard methods discloses that its rival models (LQ-L, L-L AND Q-L) may be more effective as metaphors of expression than as models of radiation response

  19. Monte-Carlo model development for evaluation of current clinical target volume definition for heterogeneous and hypoxic glioblastoma.

    Moghaddasi, L; Bezak, E; Harriss-Phillips, W

    2016-05-07

    Clinical target volume (CTV) determination may be complex and subjective. In this work a microscopic-scale tumour model was developed to evaluate current CTV practices in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) external radiotherapy. Previously, a Geant4 cell-based dosimetry model was developed to calculate the dose deposited in individual GBM cells. Microscopic extension probability (MEP) models were then developed using Matlab-2012a. The results of the cell-based dosimetry model and MEP models were combined to calculate survival fractions (SF) for CTV margins of 2.0 and 2.5 cm. In the current work, oxygenation and heterogeneous radiosensitivity profiles were incorporated into the GBM model. The genetic heterogeneity was modelled using a range of α/β values (linear-quadratic model parameters) associated with different GBM cell lines. These values were distributed among the cells randomly, taken from a Gaussian-weighted sample of α/β values. Cellular oxygen pressure was distributed randomly taken from a sample weighted to profiles obtained from literature. Three types of GBM models were analysed: homogeneous-normoxic, heterogeneous-normoxic, and heterogeneous-hypoxic. The SF in different regions of the tumour model and the effect of the CTV margin extension from 2.0-2.5 cm on SFs were investigated for three MEP models. The SF within the beam was increased by up to three and two orders of magnitude following incorporation of heterogeneous radiosensitivities and hypoxia, respectively, in the GBM model. However, the total SF was shown to be overdominated by the presence of tumour cells in the penumbra region and to a lesser extent by genetic heterogeneity and hypoxia. CTV extension by 0.5 cm reduced the SF by a maximum of 78.6  ±  3.3%, 78.5  ±  3.3%, and 77.7  ±  3.1% for homogeneous and heterogeneous-normoxic, and heterogeneous hypoxic GBMs, respectively. Monte-Carlo model was developed to quantitatively evaluate SF for genetically

  20. Models of mixed irradiation with a 'reciprocal-time' pattern of the repair function

    Suzuki, Shozo; Miura, Yuri; Mizuno, Shoichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Inst. of Gerontology (Japan); Furusawa, Yoshiya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Suzuki presented models for mixed irradiation with two and multiple types of radiation by extending the Zaider and Rossi model, which is based on the theory of dual radiation action. In these models, the repair function was simply assumed to be semi-logarithmically linear (i.e., monoexponential), or a first-order process, which has been experimentally contradicted. Fowler, however, suggested that the repair of radiation damage might be largely a second-order process rather than a first-order one, and presented data in support of this hypothesis. In addition, a second-order repair function is preferred to an n-exponential repair function for the reason that only one parameter is used in the former instead of 2n-1 parameters for the latter, although both repair functions show a good fit to the experimental data. However, according to a second-order repair function, the repair rate depends on the dose, which is incompatible with the experimental data. We, therefore, revised the models for mixed irradiation by Zaider and Rossi and by Suzuki, by substituting a 'reciprocal-time' pattern of the repair function, which is derived from the assumption that the repair rate is independent of the dose in a second-order repair function, for a first-order one in reduction and interaction factors of the models, although the underlying mechanism for this assumption cannot be well-explained. The reduction factor, which reduces the contribution of the square of a dose to cell killing in the linear-quadratic model and its derivatives, and the interaction factor, which also reduces the contribution of the interaction of two or more doses of different types of radiation, were formulated by using a 'reciprocal-time' patterns of the repair function. Cell survivals calculated from the older and the newly modified models were compared in terms of the dose-rate by assuming various types of single and mixed irradiation. The result implies that the newly modified models for

  1. LDR vs. HDR brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer: the view from radiobiological models.

    King, Christopher R

    2002-01-01

    Permanent LDR brachytherapy and temporary HDR brachytherapy are competitive techniques for clinically localized prostate radiotherapy. Although a randomized trial will likely never be conducted comparing these two forms of brachytherapy, a comparative radiobiological modeling analysis proves useful in understanding some of their intrinsic differences, several of which could be exploited to improve outcomes. Radiobiological models based upon the linear quadratic equations are presented for fractionated external beam, fractionated (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy, and (125)I and (103)Pd LDR brachytherapy. These models incorporate the dose heterogeneities present in brachytherapy based upon patient-derived dose volume histograms (DVH) as well as tumor doubling times and repair kinetics. Radiobiological parameters are normalized to correspond to three accepted clinical risk factors based upon T-stage, PSA, and Gleason score to compare models with clinical series. Tumor control probabilities (TCP) for LDR and HDR brachytherapy (as monotherapy or combined with external beam) are compared with clinical bNED survival rates. Predictions are made for dose escalation with HDR brachytherapy regimens. Model predictions for dose escalation with external beam agree with clinical data and validate the models and their underlying assumptions. Both LDR and HDR brachytherapy achieve superior tumor control when compared with external beam at conventional doses (LDR brachytherapy as boost achieves superior tumor control than when used as monotherapy. Stage for stage, both LDR and current HDR regimens achieve similar tumor control rates, in agreement with current clinical data. HDR monotherapy with large-dose fraction sizes might achieve superior tumor control compared with LDR, especially if prostate cancer possesses a high sensitivity to dose fractionation (i.e., if the alpha/beta ratio is low). Radiobiological models support the current clinical evidence for equivalent outcomes in localized

  2. Weighted L2 and Lq approaches to fluid flow past a rotating body

    Farwig, R.; Kračmar, S.; Krbec, Miroslav; Nečasová, Šárka; Penel, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 86, - (2009), s. 59-81 ISSN 0137-6934 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190505; GA AV ČR IAA100190804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : variational approach * maximal operator * Littlewood-Paley theory * Oseen flow Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  3. Page 1 (J\\SWLDQ -RXUQDO RI %LRORJ\\ 9RO SS ” 3ULQWHG LQ ...

    yakoub@AHMED

    With respect to the heart, there is accumulating evidence řrom both animal and ... apoptosis in the diagnosis and therapy oř heart disease in other species. ..... Cell. Cardiol. 25: 759o800. Henderson CE (1996) Programmed cell death in the developing nervous system. Neuron. 17: 579o585. Kang PM, Haunstetter A, Aoki H, ...

  4. PENGARUH INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL TERHADAP KINERJA KEUANGAN PERUSAHAAN (STUDI EMPIRIS PERUSAHAAN LQ 45

    Indah Fajarini S.W.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh intelectual capital terhadap kinerja keuangan perusahaan, kinerja keuangan perusahaan masa akan datang dan rata-rata pertumbuhan intelectual capital terhadap kinerja keuangan perusahaan masa akan datang. Penentuan sampel dilakukan secara purposive sampling dan diperoleh sampel sebanyak 18 perusahaan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa terdapat pengaruh signifikan antara IC (VAICTM terhadap kinerja keuangan perusahaan, terdapat pengaruh IC (VAICTM terhadap kinerja keuangan masa depan perusahaan dan terdapat pengaruh ROGIC terhadap kinerja keuangan masa depan perusahaan, baik untuk periode ROGIC 2006-2007 terhadap kinerja keuangan 2006 maupun ROGIC 2006-2007 terhadap kinerja keuangan 2007. Abstract The objective of study investigates the effects of intellectual capital to corporate financial performance, financial performance and the growth average of intellectual capital  to the company’s future financial performance. In ditermining the sample,  purposive sampling method is employed and 18 companies are obtained. The results show that there is IC (VAICTM influence to the company’s financial performance, there is influence of IC (VAICTM to the company’s future financial performance and there is ROGIC influence to the company’s future financial performance. Those are for both  the ROGIC period of 2006-2007 to financial performance of  2006 and the ROGIC period of 2006-2007 to the financial performance of 2007.

  5. LQ optimal and reaching law-based sliding modes for inventory management systems

    Ignaciuk, Przemysław; Bartoszewicz, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the theory of discrete sliding-mode control is used to design new supply strategies for periodic-review inventory systems. In the considered systems, the stock used to fulfil an unknown, time-varying demand can be replenished from a single supply source or from multiple suppliers procuring orders with different delays. The proposed strategies guarantee that demand is always entirely satisfied from the on-hand stock (yielding the maximum service level), and the warehouse capacity is not exceeded (which eliminates the cost of emergency storage). In contrast to the classical, stochastic approaches, in this article, we focus on optimising the inventory system dynamics. The parameters of the first control strategy are selected by minimising a quadratic cost functional. Next, it is shown how the system dynamical performance can be improved by applying the concept of a reaching law with the appropriately adjusted reaching phase. The stable, nonoscillatory behaviour of the closed-loop system is demonstrated and the properties of the designed controllers are discussed and strictly proved.

  6. BID-ASK SPREAD DAN PERIODE KEPEMILIKAN SAHAM PADA PERUSAHAAN LQ-45

    Vinus Maulina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Global crisis gives quite big impact to the Indonesian Stock Exchange and also changes the investor behavior as well. Fundamental exchange which is considered fragile becomes instability threat and reflects uncertain condition. This research aims to analyze and explain empirically the impact of variance return, trading volume, stock prices and return shares toward bid-ask spread which is the measurement of asymmetrical information cost, also the impact of variance return, market value, bid-ask spread and dividend pay out towards common shares holding periods in Indonesia Stock Exchange and some dominant variable that affect them.The findings of this research strengthen the presumption that in conducting the investment, investors in Indonesian Stock Exchange is more oriented to short term investment by expecting more on common shares than dividend. Most investors keep their ownership in common shares in Indonesian Stock Exchange for two years. Besides, the efficient investment strategy which optimizes profit is “switching strategy”, following the market movement every time exactly, using technical information to active shares by moving from the shares that the price is predicted to decline to the increased ones. Moreover, the researcher also got the evidence that the investors in Indonesian capital market conduct their investment irrationally, investor’s analysis is getting technical and gives less attention to the fundamental factors. The decision of selling and buying which is conducted by the investors on common shares is based on the trading activity, that is actually a measurement of the scale of asymmetry information.

  7. Lq-solution of the Robin problem for the Oseen system

    Medková, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 142, č. 1 (2016), s. 61-79 ISSN 0167-8019 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Oseen equations * Robin problem * single layer potential Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.702, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10440-015-0014-5

  8. Lq-perturbations of leading coefficients of elliptic operators: Asymptotics of eigenvalues

    Vladimir Kozlov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider eigenvalues of elliptic boundary value problems, written in variational form, when the leading coefficients are perturbed by terms which are small in some integral sense. We obtain asymptotic formulae. The main specific of these formulae is that the leading term is different from that in the corresponding formulae when the perturbation is small in L∞-norm.

  9. Gradient $L^q$ theory for a class of non-diagonal nonlinear elliptic systems

    Bulíček, M.; Kalousek, M.; Kaplický, P.; Mácha, Václav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 171, June (2018), s. 156-169 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-03230S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : regularity * gradient estimates * non-diagonal elliptic systems Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.192, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ article /pii/S0362546X18300385

  10. LQ Optimal Sliding Mode Control of Periodic Review Perishable Inventories with Transportation Losses

    Leśniewski, Piotr; Bartoszewicz, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    In this work we apply the control-theoretic approach to design a new replenishment strategy for inventory systems with perishable stock. Such systems are supposed to effectively satisfy an unknown and permanently time-varying consumers’ demand. The main obstacle of achieving this goal is the need of obtaining supplies from a distant source. During the supply process goods are inevitably lost due to various causes. Furthermore, those goods which successfully arrive at the distribution center s...

  11. Gradient $L^q$ theory for a class of non-diagonal nonlinear elliptic systems

    Bulíček, M.; Kalousek, M.; Kaplický, P.; Mácha, Václav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 171, June (2018), s. 156-169 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-03230S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : regularity * gradient estimates * non-diagonal elliptic systems Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.192, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0362546X18300385

  12. LQ Optimal Sliding Mode Control of Periodic Review Perishable Inventories with Transportation Losses

    Piotr Leśniewski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we apply the control-theoretic approach to design a new replenishment strategy for inventory systems with perishable stock. Such systems are supposed to effectively satisfy an unknown and permanently time-varying consumers’ demand. The main obstacle of achieving this goal is the need of obtaining supplies from a distant source. During the supply process goods are inevitably lost due to various causes. Furthermore, those goods which successfully arrive at the distribution center still deteriorate while stored in its warehouse. We explicitly take into account both of these factors in designing our control strategy. We propose a sliding mode strategy and choose its parameters to minimize a quadratic quality criterion. This approach allows us to ameliorate the bullwhip effect (the amplification of the demand variations when going up in the supply chain. The control strategy proposed in this work ensures bounded orders, guarantees full consumers’ demand satisfaction, and eliminates the risk of exceeding the warehouse capacity. These properties are stated in three theorems and proved in the paper.

  13. Predicting the efficacy of radiotherapy in individual glioblastoma patients in vivo: a mathematical modeling approach

    Rockne, R; Alvord, E C Jr; Swanson, K R; Rockhill, J K; Kalet, I; Hendrickson, K; Mrugala, M; Spence, A M; Lai, A; Cloughesy, T

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant form of primary brain tumors known as gliomas. They proliferate and invade extensively and yield short life expectancies despite aggressive treatment. Response to treatment is usually measured in terms of the survival of groups of patients treated similarly, but this statistical approach misses the subgroups that may have responded to or may have been injured by treatment. Such statistics offer scant reassurance to individual patients who have suffered through these treatments. Furthermore, current imaging-based treatment response metrics in individual patients ignore patient-specific differences in tumor growth kinetics, which have been shown to vary widely across patients even within the same histological diagnosis and, unfortunately, these metrics have shown only minimal success in predicting patient outcome. We consider nine newly diagnosed GBM patients receiving diagnostic biopsy followed by standard-of-care external beam radiation therapy (XRT). We present and apply a patient-specific, biologically based mathematical model for glioma growth that quantifies response to XRT in individual patients in vivo. The mathematical model uses net rates of proliferation and migration of malignant tumor cells to characterize the tumor's growth and invasion along with the linear-quadratic model for the response to radiation therapy. Using only routinely available pre-treatment MRIs to inform the patient-specific bio-mathematical model simulations, we find that radiation response in these patients, quantified by both clinical and model-generated measures, could have been predicted prior to treatment with high accuracy. Specifically, we find that the net proliferation rate is correlated with the radiation response parameter (r = 0.89, p = 0.0007), resulting in a predictive relationship that is tested with a leave-one-out cross-validation technique. This relationship predicts the tumor size post-therapy to within inter

  14. Recent Developments of the Local Effect Model (LEM) - Implications of clustered damage on cell transformation

    Elsässer, Thilo

    Exposure to radiation of high-energy and highly charged ions (HZE) causes a major risk to human beings, since in long term space explorations about 10 protons per month and about one HZE particle per month hit each cell nucleus (1). Despite the larger number of light ions, the high ionisation power of HZE particles and its corresponding more complex damage represents a major hazard for astronauts. Therefore, in order to get a reasonable risk estimate, it is necessary to take into account the entire mixed radiation field. Frequently, neoplastic cell transformation serves as an indicator for the oncogenic potential of radiation exposure. It can be measured for a small number of ion and energy combinations. However, due to the complexity of the radiation field it is necessary to know the contribution to the radiation damage of each ion species for the entire range of energies. Therefore, a model is required which transfers the few experimental data to other particles with different LETs. We use the Local Effect Model (LEM) (2) with its cluster extension (3) to calculate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neoplastic transformation. It was originally developed in the framework of hadrontherapy and is applicable for a large range of ions and energies. The input parameters for the model include the linear-quadratic parameters for the induction of lethal events as well as for the induction of transformation events per surviving cell. Both processes of cell inactivation and neoplastic transformation per viable cell are combined to eventually yield the RBE for cell transformation. We show that the Local Effect Model is capable of predicting the RBE of neoplastic cell transformation for a broad range of ions and energies. The comparison of experimental data (4) with model calculations shows a reasonable agreement. We find that the cluster extension results in a better representation of the measured RBE values. With this model it should be possible to better

  15. Flavor democracy in standard models at high energies

    Cvetic, G.; Kim, C.S.

    1993-01-01

    It is possible that the standard model (SM) is replaced around some transition energy Λ by a new, possibly Higgsless, 'flavor gauge theory' such that the Yukawa (running) parameters of SM at E∼Λ show up an (approximate) flavor democracy (FD). We investigate the latter possibility by studying the renormalization group equations for the Yukawa couplings of SM with one and two Higgs doublets, by evolving them from given physical values at low energies (E≅1 GeV) to Λ (∼Λ pole ) and comparing the resulting fermion masses and CKM matrix elements at E≅Λ for various m t phy and ratios y u /y d of vacuum expectation values. We find that the minimal SM and the closely related SM with two Higgs doublets (type I) show increasing deviation from FD when energy is increased, but that SM with two Higgs doublets (type II) clearly tends to FD with increasing energy - in both the quark and the leptonic sector (q-q and l-l FD). Furthermore, we find within the type-II model that, for Λ pole Planck , m t phy can be less than 200 GeV in most cases of chosen y u /y d . Under the assumption that also the corresponding Yukawa couplings in the quark and the leptonic sector at E≅Λ are equal (l-q FD), we derive estimates of bounds on masses of top quark and tau-neutrino, which are compatible with experimental bounds. (orig.)

  16. PERBANDINGAN CAPITAL ASSET PRICING MODEL (CAPM DAN THREE FACTORS MODEL FAMA AND FRENCH (TFMFF DALAM MENGESTIMASI RETURN SAHAM

    KADEK MIRA PITRIYANTI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In 1996, Fama and French developed the CAPM in Three Factor Model Fama and French (TFMFF to analyze the relationship between risk with rate of return by adding firm size factor that is proxied by Small Minus Big (SMB and value factor at Book to Market Ratio that is proxied by High Minus Low (HML on the CAPM model. The aim of this research is to compare the ability of CAPM and TFMFF in estimating the returns on six types of portfolios which are formed based on firm size and BE/ME. Selected samples are stocks of LQ-45 in period of February 2014, which have passed the selection of firm profits and ROE Warren Buffett criteria. Simple linear regression and Multiple linear regression with t test and F test statistics are used to demonstrate the influence and significance level of each variable. The results showed that TFMFF was more superior than CAPM. Market risk factor consistently affected each portfolio. SMB and HML is not always significantly effect on each portfolio, such as portfolio B/H, only market risk factor has a significant effect. However, the addition of SMB factors and HML factors could increase the coefficient of determination in each formed portfolio.

  17. Advantages of coherent feedback for cooling quantum oscillators.

    Hamerly, Ryan; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2012-10-26

    We model the cooling of open optical and optomechanical resonators via optical feedback in the linear quadratic Gaussian setting of stochastic control theory. We show that coherent feedback control schemes, in which the resonator is embedded in an interferometer to achieve all-optical feedback, can outperform the best possible linear quadratic Gaussian measurement-based schemes in the quantum regime of low steady-state excitation number. Such performance gains are attributed to the coherent controller's ability to process noncommuting output field quadratures simultaneously without loss of fidelity, and may provide important clues for the design of coherent feedback schemes for more general problems of nonlinear and robust control.

  18. Repopulation of interacting tumor cells during fractionated radiotherapy: Stochastic modeling of the tumor control probability

    Fakir, Hatim; Hlatky, Lynn; Li, Huamin; Sachs, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Optimal treatment planning for fractionated external beam radiation therapy requires inputs from radiobiology based on recent thinking about the “five Rs” (repopulation, radiosensitivity, reoxygenation, redistribution, and repair). The need is especially acute for the newer, often individualized, protocols made feasible by progress in image guided radiation therapy and dose conformity. Current stochastic tumor control probability (TCP) models incorporating tumor repopulation effects consider “stem-like cancer cells” (SLCC) to be independent, but the authors here propose that SLCC-SLCC interactions may be significant. The authors present a new stochastic TCP model for repopulating SLCC interacting within microenvironmental niches. Our approach is meant mainly for comparing similar protocols. It aims at practical generalizations of previous mathematical models. Methods: The authors consider protocols with complete sublethal damage repair between fractions. The authors use customized open-source software and recent mathematical approaches from stochastic process theory for calculating the time-dependent SLCC number and thereby estimating SLCC eradication probabilities. As specific numerical examples, the authors consider predicted TCP results for a 2 Gy per fraction, 60 Gy protocol compared to 64 Gy protocols involving early or late boosts in a limited volume to some fractions. Results: In sample calculations with linear quadratic parameters α = 0.3 per Gy, α/β = 10 Gy, boosting is predicted to raise TCP from a dismal 14.5% observed in some older protocols for advanced NSCLC to above 70%. This prediction is robust as regards: (a) the assumed values of parameters other than α and (b) the choice of models for intraniche SLCC-SLCC interactions. However, α = 0.03 per Gy leads to a prediction of almost no improvement when boosting. Conclusions: The predicted efficacy of moderate boosts depends sensitively on α. Presumably, the larger values of α are

  19. Repopulation of interacting tumor cells during fractionated radiotherapy: stochastic modeling of the tumor control probability.

    Fakir, Hatim; Hlatky, Lynn; Li, Huamin; Sachs, Rainer

    2013-12-01

    Optimal treatment planning for fractionated external beam radiation therapy requires inputs from radiobiology based on recent thinking about the "five Rs" (repopulation, radiosensitivity, reoxygenation, redistribution, and repair). The need is especially acute for the newer, often individualized, protocols made feasible by progress in image guided radiation therapy and dose conformity. Current stochastic tumor control probability (TCP) models incorporating tumor repopulation effects consider "stem-like cancer cells" (SLCC) to be independent, but the authors here propose that SLCC-SLCC interactions may be significant. The authors present a new stochastic TCP model for repopulating SLCC interacting within microenvironmental niches. Our approach is meant mainly for comparing similar protocols. It aims at practical generalizations of previous mathematical models. The authors consider protocols with complete sublethal damage repair between fractions. The authors use customized open-source software and recent mathematical approaches from stochastic process theory for calculating the time-dependent SLCC number and thereby estimating SLCC eradication probabilities. As specific numerical examples, the authors consider predicted TCP results for a 2 Gy per fraction, 60 Gy protocol compared to 64 Gy protocols involving early or late boosts in a limited volume to some fractions. In sample calculations with linear quadratic parameters α = 0.3 per Gy, α∕β = 10 Gy, boosting is predicted to raise TCP from a dismal 14.5% observed in some older protocols for advanced NSCLC to above 70%. This prediction is robust as regards: (a) the assumed values of parameters other than α and (b) the choice of models for intraniche SLCC-SLCC interactions. However, α = 0.03 per Gy leads to a prediction of almost no improvement when boosting. The predicted efficacy of moderate boosts depends sensitively on α. Presumably, the larger values of α are the ones appropriate for individualized

  20. Optimization of the temporal pattern of applied dose for a single fraction of radiation: Implications for radiation therapy

    Altman, Michael B.

    The increasing prevalence of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as a treatment modality has led to a renewed interest in the potential for interaction between prolonged treatment time, as frequently associated with IMRT, and the underlying radiobiology of the irradiated tissue. A particularly relevant aspect of radiobiology is cell repair capacity, which influences cell survival, and thus directly relates to the ability to control tumors and spare normal tissues. For a single fraction of radiation, the linear quadratic (LQ) model is commonly used to relate the radiation dose to the fraction of cells surviving. The LQ model implies a dependence on two time-related factors which correlate to radiobiological effects: the duration of radiation application, and the functional form of how the dose is applied over that time (the "temporal pattern of applied dose"). Although the former has been well studied, the latter has not. Thus, the goal of this research is to investigate the impact of the temporal pattern of applied dose on the survival of human cells and to explore how the manipulation of this temporal dose pattern may be incorporated into an IMRT-based radiation therapy treatment planning scheme. The hypothesis is that the temporal pattern of applied dose in a single fraction of radiation can be optimized to maximize or minimize cell kill. Furthermore, techniques which utilize this effect could have clinical ramifications. In situations where increased cell kill is desirable, such as tumor control, or limiting the degree of cell kill is important, such as the sparing of normal tissue, temporal sequences of dose which maximize or minimize cell kill (temporally "optimized" sequences) may provide greater benefit than current clinically used radiation patterns. In the first part of this work, an LQ-based modeling analysis of effects of the temporal pattern of dose on cell kill is performed. Through this, patterns are identified for maximizing cell kill for a

  1. Calibration of two complex ecosystem models with different likelihood functions

    Hidy, Dóra; Haszpra, László; Pintér, Krisztina; Nagy, Zoltán; Barcza, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    goodness metric on calibration. The different likelihoods are different functions of RMSE (root mean squared error) weighted by measurement uncertainty: exponential / linear / quadratic / linear normalized by correlation. As a first calibration step sensitivity analysis was performed in order to select the influential parameters which have strong effect on the output data. In the second calibration step only the sensitive parameters were calibrated (optimal values and confidence intervals were calculated). In case of PaSim more parameters were found responsible for the 95% of the output data variance than is case of BBGC MuSo. Analysis of the results of the optimized models revealed that the exponential likelihood estimation proved to be the most robust (best model simulation with optimized parameter, highest confidence interval increase). The cross-validation of the model simulations can help in constraining the highly uncertain greenhouse gas budget of grasslands.

  2. A composite microdose Adaptive Response (AR) and Bystander Effect (BE) model-application to low LET and high LET AR and BE data.

    Leonard, Bobby E

    2008-08-01

    It has been suggested that Adaptive Response (AR) may reduce risk of adverse health effects due to ionizing radiation. But very low dose Bystander Effects (BE) may impose dominant deleterious human risks. These conflicting behaviors have stimulated controversy regarding the Linear No-Threshold human risk model. A dose and dose rate-dependent microdose model, to examine AR behavior, was developed in prior work. In the prior work a number of in vitro and in vivo dose response data were examined with the model. Recent new data show AR behavior with some evidence of very low dose BE. The purpose of this work is to supplement the microdose model to encompass the Brenner and colleagues BaD (Bystander and Direct Damage) model and apply this composite model to obtain new knowledge regarding AR and BE and illustrate the use of the model to plan radio-biology experiments. The biophysical composite AR and BE Microdose Model quantifies the accumulation of hits (Poisson distributed, microdose specific energy depositions) to cell nucleus volumes. This new composite AR and BE model provides predictions of dose response at very low dose BE levels, higher dose AR levels and even higher dose Direct (linear-quadratic) Damage radiation levels. We find good fits of the model to both BE data from the Columbia University microbeam facility and combined AR and BE data for low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) and high LET data. A Bystander Factor of about 27,000 and an AR protection factor of 0.61 are obtained for the low LET in vivo mouse spleen exposures. A Bystander Factor of 317 and an AR protection factor of 0.53 are obtained for high LET radon alpha particles in human lymphocytes. In both cases the AR is activated at most by one or two radiation induced charged particle traversals through the cell nucleus. The results of the model analysis is consistent with a premise that both Bystander damage and Adaptive Response radioprotection can occur in the same cell type, derived from the same

  3. Modelling

    Spädtke, P

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of technical machines became a standard technique since computer became powerful enough to handle the amount of data relevant to the specific system. Simulation of an existing physical device requires the knowledge of all relevant quantities. Electric fields given by the surrounding boundary as well as magnetic fields caused by coils or permanent magnets have to be known. Internal sources for both fields are sometimes taken into account, such as space charge forces or the internal magnetic field of a moving bunch of charged particles. Used solver routines are briefly described and some bench-marking is shown to estimate necessary computing times for different problems. Different types of charged particle sources will be shown together with a suitable model to describe the physical model. Electron guns are covered as well as different ion sources (volume ion sources, laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron resonance ion sources, and H$^-$-sources) together with some remarks on beam transport.

  4. Model-based Optimization and Feedback Control of the Current Density Profile Evolution in NSTX-U

    Ilhan, Zeki Okan

    trajectories and analyzing the resulting plasma evolution. Finally, the proposed control-oriented model is embedded in feedback control schemes based on optimal control and Model Predictive Control (MPC) approaches. Integrators are added to the standard Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) and MPC formulations to provide robustness against various modeling uncertainties and external disturbances. The effectiveness of the proposed feedback controllers in regulating the current density profile in NSTX-U is demonstrated in closed-loop nonlinear simulations. Moreover, the optimal feedback control algorithm has been implemented successfully in closed-loop control simulations within TRANSP through the recently developed Expert routine. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  5. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  6. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  7. Variable RBE in proton therapy: comparison of different model predictions and their influence on clinical-like scenarios

    Giovannini, Giulia; Böhlen, Till; Cabal, Gonzalo; Bauer, Julia; Tessonnier, Thomas; Frey, Kathrin; Debus, Jürgen; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    In proton radiation therapy a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 is usually assumed. However, biological experiments have evidenced RBE dependencies on dose level, proton linear energy transfer (LET) and tissue type. This work compares the predictions of three of the main radio-biological models proposed in the literature by Carabe-Fernandez, Wedenberg, Scholz and coworkers. Using the chosen models, a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) as well as two exemplary clinical cases (single field and two fields) for cranial proton irradiation, all delivered with state-of-the-art pencil-beam scanning, have been analyzed in terms of absorbed dose, dose-averaged LET (LET D ), RBE-weighted dose (D RBE ) and biological range shift distributions. In the systematic comparison of RBE predictions by the three models we could show different levels of agreement depending on (α/β) x and LET values. The SOBP study emphasizes the variation of LET D and RBE not only as a function of depth but also of lateral distance from the central beam axis. Application to clinical-like scenario shows consistent discrepancies from the values obtained for a constant RBE of 1.1, when using a variable RBE scheme for proton irradiation in tissues with low (α/β) x , regardless of the model. Biological range shifts of 0.6– 2.4 mm (for high (α/β) x ) and 3.0 – 5.4 mm (for low (α/β) x ) were found from the fall-off analysis of individual profiles of RBE-weighted fraction dose along the beam penetration depth. Although more experimental evidence is needed to validate the accuracy of the investigated models and their input parameters, their consistent trend suggests that their main RBE dependencies (dose, LET and (α/β) x ) should be included in treatment planning systems. In particular, our results suggest that simpler models based on the linear-quadratic formalism and LET D might already be sufficient to reproduce important RBE dependencies for re-evaluation of plans optimized with

  8. A new incomplete-repair model based on a ''reciprocal-time'' pattern of sublethal damage repair

    Dale, R.G.; Fowler, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    A radiobiological model for closely spaced non-instantaneous radiation fractions is presented, based on the premise that the time process of sublethal damage (SLD) repair is 'reciprocal-time' (second order), rather than exponential (first order), in form. The initial clinical implications of such an incomplete-repair model are assessed. A previously derived linear-quadratic-based model was revised to take account of the possibility that SLD may repair with time such that the fraction of an element of initial damage remaining at time t is given as 1/(1+zt), where z is an appropriate rate constant; z is the reciprocal of the first half-time (τ) of repair. The general equation so derived for incomplete repair is applicable to all types of radiotherapy delivered at high, low and medium dose-rate in fractions delivered at regular time intervals. The model allows both the fraction duration and interfraction intervals to vary between zero and infinity. For any given value of z, reciprocal repair is associated with an apparent 'slowing-down' in the SLD repair rate as treatment proceeds. The instantaneous repair rates are not directly governed by total dose or dose per fraction, but are influenced by the treatment duration and individual fraction duration. Instantaneous repair rates of SLD appear to be slower towards the end of a continuous treatment, and are also slower following 'long' fractions than they are following 'short' fractions. The new model, with its single repair-rate parameter, is shown to be capable of providing a degree of quantitative explanation for some enigmas that have been encountered in clinical studies. A single-component reciprocal repair process provides an alternative explanation for the apparent existence of a range of repair rates in human tissues, and which have hitherto been explained by postulating the existence of a multi-exponential repair process. The build-up of SLD over extended treatments is greater than would be inferred using a

  9. Discrete Optimal Multirate Techniques for Excitation Controller Design of a Synchronous Machine

    D. I. Pappas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An optimal control strategy based on Two-Point-Multirate Controllers (TPMRCs, is used to design a desirable excitation controller of a hydrogenerator system, in order to enhance its dynamic stability characteristics. In the TPMRCs based scheme, the control is constrained to a certain piecewise constant signal, while each of the controlled plant outputs is detected many times over a fundamental sampling period T0. On the basis on this strategy, the original problem is reduced to an associate discrete-time linear quadratic (LQ regulation problem for the performance index with cross product terms, for which a fictitious static state feedback controller is needed to be computed. Simulation results for the actual 117 MVA synchronous generator with conventional exciter supplying line to an infinite grid show the effectiveness of the proposed method which has a quite satisfactory performance.

  10. Guaranteed cost control of mobile sensor networks with Markov switching topologies.

    Zhao, Yuan; Guo, Ge; Ding, Lei

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates the consensus seeking problem of mobile sensor networks (MSNs) with random switching topologies. The network communication topologies are composed of a set of directed graphs (or digraph) with a spanning tree. The switching of topologies is governed by a Markov chain. The consensus seeking problem is addressed by introducing a global topology-aware linear quadratic (LQ) cost as the performance measure. By state transformation, the consensus problem is transformed to the stabilization of a Markovian jump system with guaranteed cost. A sufficient condition for global mean-square consensus is derived in the context of stochastic stability analysis of Markovian jump systems. A computational algorithm is given to synchronously calculate both the sub-optimal consensus controller gains and the sub-minimum upper bound of the cost. The effectiveness of the proposed design method is illustrated by three numerical examples. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inclusion of molecular biotherapies with radical radiotherapy: modeling of combined modality treatment schedules

    Jones, Bleddyn; Dale, Roger G.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The use of molecular biology based therapies concurrently with radical radiotherapy is likely to offer potential benefits, but there is relatively little use of classical radiobiology in the rationale for such applications. The biological mechanisms that govern the outcomes of radiotherapy need to be completely understood before rational application and optimization of such adjuvant biotherapies with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Existing biomathematical models of radiotherapy can be used to explore the possible impact of biotherapies that modify tumor proliferation rates and/or radiosensitivity parameters during radiotherapy. Equations that show how to incorporate biotherapies with the linear-quadratic model of radiation cell kill are presented. Also considered are changes in tumor physiology, such as improved blood flow with enhanced delivery of biotherapy to the tumor cells and accelerated clonogen repopulation during radiotherapy. Monte Carlo random sampling methods are used to simulate these effects in heterogenous tumor populations with variation in radiosensitivities, clonogen numbers, and doubling times, as well as variations in repopulation onset rates and in vascular perfusion rates with time. Results: The time onset and duration of exposure of each type of biotherapy during radical radiotherapy can influence the predicted tumor cure probabilities in subtle ways. In general, the efficacy of biotherapies that radiosensitize will depend upon the number of radiotherapy fractions that are sensitized and the change in blood flow with time during radiotherapy. Biotherapies that control repopulation will depend not only on the duration of exposure but also, where accelerated repopulation occurs, on the time at which biotherapy is initiated during radiotherapy. From the ranges of radiobiological parameters and biotherapy efficacies assumed for exploratory examples, large changes of tumor control probability (TCP) are encountered in individual

  12. Study on dependence of dose enhancement on cluster morphology of gold nanoparticles in radiation therapy using a body-centred cubic model

    Ahn, Sang Hee; Chung, Kwangzoo; Shin, Jung Wook; Cheon, Wonjoong; Han, Youngyih; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho

    2017-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) injected in a body for dose enhancement in radiation therapy are known to form clusters. We investigated the dependence of dose enhancement on the GNP morphology using Monte-Carlo simulations and compared the model predictions with experimental data. The cluster morphology was approximated as a body-centred cubic (BCC) structure by placing GNPs at the 8 corners and the centre of a cube with an edge length of 0.22-1.03 µm in a 4  ×  4  ×  4 µm3 water-filled phantom. We computed the dose enhancement ratio (DER) for 50 and 260 kVp photons as a function of the distance from the cube centre for 12 different cube sizes. A 10 nm-wide concentric shell shaped detector was placed up to 100 nm away from a GNP at the cube centre. For model validation, simulations based on BCC and nanoparticle random distribution (NRD) models were performed using parameters that corresponded to the experimental conditions, which measured increases in the relative biological effect due to GNPs. We employed the linear quadratic model to compute cell surviving fraction (SF) and sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER). The DER is inversely proportional to the distance to the GNPs. The largest DERs were 1.97 and 1.80 for 50 kVp and 260 kVp photons, respectively. The SF predicted by the BCC model agreed with the experimental value within 10%, up to a 5 Gy dose, while the NRD model showed a deviation larger than 10%. The SERs were 1.21  ±  0.13, 1.16  ±  0.11, and 1.08  ±  0.11 according to the experiment, BCC, and NRD models, respectively. We most accurately predicted the GNP radiosensitization effect using the BCC approximation and suggest that the BCC model is effective for use in nanoparticle dosimetry.

  13. What minimum number of fractions is required with high dose-rate remote afterloading; and reply

    Orton, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    The author presents 'a more rigorous application of the linear quadratic model for protracted radiotherapy than Dale (1985)' and demonstrates that considerably fewer than 17 fractions are needed, a conclusion particularly relevant to treatment of cancer of the cervix. Dale's reply is based on the tenet that Orton has misquoted the use of the damage repair constants. (UK)

  14. A Simulation Study of an ASEAN Monetary Union (Replaces CentER DP 2010-100)

    Boldea, O.; Engwerda, J.C.; Michalak, T.; Plasmans, J.E.J.; Salmah, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes some pros and cons of a monetary union for the ASEAN1 countries, excluding Myanmar. We estimate a stylized open-economy dynamic general equilibrium model for the ASEAN countries. Using the framework of linear quadratic differential games, we contrast the potential gains or losses

  15. A Simulation Study of an ASEAN Monetary Union (Replaced by CentER DP 2011-098)

    Boldea, O.; Engwerda, J.C.; Michalak, T.; Plasmans, J.E.J.; Salmah, Y.

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the pros and cons of a monetary union for the ASEAN1 countries, excluding Myanmar. We estimate a stylized open-economy dynamic general equilibrium model for the ASEAN countries. Using the framework of linear quadratic differential games, we contrast the potential gains or losses

  16. Teaching Tool for a Control Systems Laboratory Using a Quadrotor as a Plant in MATLAB

    Khan, Subhan; Jaffery, Mujtaba Hussain; Hanif, Athar; Asif, Muhammad Rizwan

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a MATLAB-based application to teach the guidance, navigation, and control concepts of a quadrotor to undergraduate students, using a graphical user interface (GUI) and 3-D animations. The Simulink quadrotor model is controlled by a proportional integral derivative controller and a linear quadratic regulator controller. The GUI…

  17. The effect of sub-lethal damage repair and exchange on the final slope of cell survival curves

    Carlone, M.C.; Wilkins, D.E.; Raaphorst, G.P.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The Lea-Catcheside dose rate protraction factor, G, is the most widely used model to describe the effects of dose rate on cell survival. In the linear quadratic formalism, this factor modifies the beta component of cell killing; G is greatest for acute irradiations while vanishing at low dose rates. We have found a simple compartmental model that can derive the Lea-Catcheside function. This compartmental model clearly shows that the G function can only be derived using a little known assumption: the diminution of sub-lethal damage due to exchange of repairable lesions is negligible compared to that due to repair. This assumption was explicitly stated by Lea, but it does not appear to have been restated or verified since very early work on cell survival. The implication of this assumption is that sub-lethal damage can be modeled without considering exchange, which is evidenced by the fact that the G function does not contain parameters relating to exchange. By using a new model that fully accounts for repair and exchange of sublethal lesions, a cell survival expression that has a modified G function, but that retains the linear quadratic formalism, can be obtained. At low doses, this new model predicts linear-quadratic behavior, but the behavior gradually changes to mono-exponential at high doses, which is consistent with experimental observations. Modeling cell survival of well-known survival curves using the modified linear quadratic model shows statistically significant improvement in the fits to the cell survival data as compared to best fits obtained with the linear quadratic model. It is shown that these improvements in fits are due to a superior representation of the high dose region of the survival curve

  18. Model based control of grate combustion; Modellbaserad roststyrning

    Broden, Henrik; Kjellstroem, Bjoern; Niklasson, Fredrik; Boecher Poulsen, Kristian

    2006-12-15

    An existing dynamic model for grate combustion has been further developed. The model has been used for studies of possible advantages that can be gained from utilisation of measurements of grate temperatures and fuel bed height for control of a boiler after disturbances caused by varying fuel moisture and fuel feeding. The objective was to asses the possibilities to develop a control system that would adjust for such disturbances quicker than measurements of steam output and oxygen in the exhaust. The model is based on dividing the fuel bed into three layers, where the different layers include fuel being dried, fuel being pyrolysed and char reacting with oxygen. The grate below the fuel bed is also considered. A mass balance, an energy balance and a volume balance is considered for each layer in 22 cells along the grate. The energy balances give the temperature distribution and the volume balances the bed height. The earlier version of the model could not handle layers that are consumed. This weakness has now been eliminated. Comparisons between predicted grate temperatures and measurements in a 25 MW boiler fuelled with biofuel have been used for validation of the model. The comparisons include effects of variations in primary air temperature, fuel moisture and output power. The model shows good agreement with observations for changes in the air temperature but the ability of the model to predict effects of changed fuel moisture is difficult to judge since the steam dome pressure control caused simultaneous changes of the primary air flow, which probably had a larger influence on the grate temperature. A linearised, tuned and reduced version of the model was used for design of a linear quadratic controller. This was used for studies of advantages of using measurements of grate temperatures and bed height for control of pusher velocity, grate speed, primary air flow and air temperature after disturbances of fuel moisture and fuel flow. Measurements of the grate

  19. Optic nerve tolerance to single and fractionated radiation simulating radiosurgery: a rabbit model using visual evoked potentials, fundoscopy and histology

    Bastin, Kenneth; Mehta, Minesh

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To develop a rabbit model enabling single or fractionated optic nerve irradiation, measure post-irradiation visual evoked potentials (VEP), fundoscopic and histopathologic changes, and relate different radiation dosing fractions to these measurable physiologic changes. Materials and Methods: Forty male New Zealand white rabbits underwent surgical right orbital prolapse with template-guided optic nerve irradiation using an iridium-192 high dose rate afterloader. Rabbits were randomized into single fraction groups (0 (control), 10, 12.5, 15, 20, and 30 Gy (3 per group); or two fraction groups of 0 (control) 5, 7.5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy (3 per group); or three fractions groups of 10 and 15 Gy (2 per group). Bilateral fundoscopy and pattern-reversal VEPs (0.5 and 1 c/deg, 1 hertz) were performed at 6 and 12 months (mos) following scheduled irradiation. VEP peaks (P1) were measured. Sacrifice and necropsy followed 12 month evaluation, allowing for histological changes. Results: Excluding deaths from anesthesia (2), CNS mite infection (2), sepsis, pyothorax, 'undetermined' and technically non-analyzable VEP recordings, 24 complete rabbit data sets were evaluated. Fundoscopy demonstrated no gross changes at any dose. Histopathology demonstrated generalized optic nerve atrophy without radiation dose correlation. Among single fraction groups, VEP showed a 6 mos post-irradiation P1 prolongation only in the 20 and 30 Gy groups (maximum 67%). At 12 mos lower dose single fraction groups had a prolonged P1 peak. All fractionated groups above 5 Gy x 2 had P1 prolongation times at 6 mos (maximum 46% in the 15 Gy x 3 data set) but by 12 mos these groups had non-measurable, deteriorated VEPs. Correlating VEP P1 latency with the calculated linear quadratic formula (LQM) biologically equivalent dose (BED,α/β=3) for each group demonstrated a general correlation (t-Test P<.001) as shown: Conclusion: Using a rabbit model for selective optic nerve irradiation we conclude

  20. Modelos de determinação não-destrutiva da área foliar em girassol Models for estimating leaf area in sunflower

    Ivan Carlos Maldaner

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste trabalho foram obter e testar modelos matemáticos de estimativa da área do limbo foliar em função das suas dimensões lineares para o girassol. Foram conduzidos dois experimentos na área experimental do departamento de Fitotecnia da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria. As plantas de girassol foram coletadas a partir dos 27 dias após emergência (DAE. A área foliar (AF foi determinada pelo método dos discos. Ajustaram-se modelos lineares, quadráticos, cúbicos e potenciais entre área foliar e comprimento ou largura e seus produtos (comprimento*largura, sendo eliminados os que apresentaram coeficiente de determinação menor do que 0,90. A estatística utilizada para avaliar o desempenho dos modelos foi a raiz do quadrado médio do erro (RQME. Os modelos que melhor se ajustaram aos dados foram: potência, quadrático e cúbico, considerando a largura como variável independente. A área foliar de girassol pode ser estimada com o modelo potência, por ser o mais preciso, e a largura da folha.The objective of this study was to obtain and to numerical models to estimate the leaf area in function leaves linear dimension in sunflower. Two experiments were conducted at the experimental area of the Plant Science Department of the Federal University of Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS, Brazil. Plants of sunflower were collected starting 27 days after emergency (DAE. The disks method was used to determine the leaf area (LA. Leaves were dried in oven at 65°C until constant weight. Linear, quadratic, cubic and power models between leaf area and length or width, and the product (length * width, were fitted. Models that apresented coefficient of determination lower than 0.90 were not selected. The statistic used to evaluate the performance of the models was the root mean square error (RQME. Models that had the best fit were power, quadratic and cubic using blade width as the independent variable. Leaf area in sunflower can be

  1. Biological modelling of fuzzy target volumes in 3D radiotherapy

    Levegruen, S.; Kampen, M. van; Waschek, T.; Engenhart, R.; Schlegel, W.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The outcome of each radiotherapy depends critically on the optimal choice of the target volume. The goal of the radiotherapist is to include all tumor spread at the same time as saving as much healthy tissue as possible. Even when the information of all imaging modalities is combined, the diagnostic techniques are not sensitive and specific enough to visualize all microscopic tumor cell spread. Due to this lack of information there is room for different interpretations concerning the extend of the target volume, leading to a fuzzy target volume. The aim of this work is to develop a model to score different target volume boundaries within the region of diagnostic uncertainty in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Materials and Methods: In order to assess the region of diagnostic uncertainty, the radiotherapist defines interactively a minimal planning target volume that absolutely must be irradiated according to the diagnostic information available and a maximal planning target volume outside which no tumor cell spread is expected. For the NTCP calculation we use the Lyman 4 parameter model to estimate the response of an organ at risk to a uniform partial volume irradiation. The TCP calculation is based on the Poisson model of cell killing. The TCP estimation depends not only on volume, dose, clonogenic cell density and the α parameter of the linear quadratic model but also on the probability to find clonogenic cells in the considered volume. Inside the minimal PTV this probability is 1, outside the maximal PTV it is 0. Therefore all voxels inside the minimal PTV are assigned the value of 1 with respect to the target volume, all voxels outside the maximal PTV the value of 0. For voxels in the region of uncertainty in between, a 3D linear interpolation is performed. Here we assume the probability to follow the interpolated values. Starting with the minimal PTV, the expected gain in TCP and

  2. Leptoquark toolbox for precision collider studies

    Doršner, Ilja; Greljo, Admir

    2018-05-01

    We implement scalar and vector leptoquark (LQ) models in the universal FeynRules output (UFO) format assuming the Standard Model fermion content and conservation of baryon and lepton numbers. Scalar LQ implementations include next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections. We report the NLO QCD inclusive cross sections in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV, 14 TeV, and 27 TeV for all on-shell LQ production processes. These comprise (i) LQ pair production ( pp → ΦΦ) and (ii) single LQ + lepton production ( pp → Φ ℓ) for all initial quark flavours ( u, d, s, c, and b). Vector LQ implementation includes adjustable non-minimal QCD coupling. We discuss several aspects of LQ searches at a hadron collider, emphasising the implications of SU(2) gauge invariance, electroweak and flavour constraints, on the possible signatures. Finally, we outline the high- p T search strategy for LQs recently proposed in the literature to resolve experimental anomalies in B-meson decays. In this context, we stress the importance of complementarity of the three LQ related processes, namely, pp → ΦΦ, pp → Φ ℓ, and pp → ℓℓ.

  3. Combinatorial DNA Damage Pairing Model Based on X-Ray-Induced Foci Predicts the Dose and LET Dependence of Cell Death in Human Breast Cells

    Vadhavkar, Nikhil [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Pham, Christopher [University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States). MD Anderson Cancer Center; Georgescu, Walter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Deschamps, Thomas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Heuskin, Anne-Catherine [Univ. of Namur (Belgium). Namur Research inst. for Life Sciences (NARILIS), Research Center for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR); Tang, Jonathan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Costes, Sylvain V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    2014-09-01

    In contrast to the classic view of static DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) being repaired at the site of damage, we hypothesize that DSBs move and merge with each other over large distances (m). As X-ray dose increases, the probability of having DSB clusters increases as does the probability of misrepair and cell death. Experimental work characterizing the X-ray dose dependence of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) is used here to validate a DSB clustering model. We then use the principles of the local effect model (LEM) to predict the yield of DSBs at the submicron level. Two mechanisms for DSB clustering, namely random coalescence of DSBs versus active movement of DSBs into repair domains are compared and tested. Simulations that best predicted both RIF dose dependence and cell survival after X-ray irradiation favored the repair domain hypothesis, suggesting the nucleus is divided into an array of regularly spaced repair domains of ~;;1.55 m sides. Applying the same approach to high-linear energy transfer (LET) ion tracks, we are able to predict experimental RIF/m along tracks with an overall relative error of 12percent, for LET ranging between 30 350 keV/m and for three different ions. Finally, cell death was predicted by assuming an exponential dependence on the total number of DSBs and of all possible combinations of paired DSBs within each simulated RIF. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) predictions for cell survival of MCF10A exposed to high-LET showed an LET dependence that matches previous experimental results for similar cell types. Overall, this work suggests that microdosimetric properties of ion tracks at the submicron level are sufficient to explain both RIF data and survival curves for any LET, similarly to the LEM assumption. Conversely, high-LET death mechanism does not have to infer linear-quadratic dose formalism as done in the LEM. In addition, the size of repair domains derived in our model

  4. Limitations of a convolution method for modeling geometric uncertainties in radiation therapy: the radiobiological dose-per-fraction effect

    Song, William; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2004-01-01

    The convolution method can be used to model the effect of random geometric uncertainties into planned dose distributions used in radiation treatment planning. This is effectively done by linearly adding infinitesimally small doses, each with a particular geometric offset, over an assumed infinite number of fractions. However, this process inherently ignores the radiobiological dose-per-fraction effect since only the summed physical dose distribution is generated. The resultant potential error on predicted radiobiological outcome [quantified in this work with tumor control probability (TCP), equivalent uniform dose (EUD), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD)] has yet to be thoroughly quantified. In this work, the results of a Monte Carlo simulation of geometric displacements are compared to those of the convolution method for random geometric uncertainties of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mm (standard deviation). The α/β CTV ratios of 0.8, 1.5, 3, 5, and 10 Gy are used to represent the range of radiation responses for different tumors, whereas a single α/β OAR ratio of 3 Gy is used to represent all the organs at risk (OAR). The analysis is performed on a four-field prostate treatment plan of 18 MV x rays. The fraction numbers are varied from 1-50, with isoeffective adjustments of the corresponding dose-per-fractions to maintain a constant tumor control, using the linear-quadratic cell survival model. The average differences in TCP and EUD of the target, and in NTCP and gEUD of the OAR calculated from the convolution and Monte Carlo methods reduced asymptotically as the total fraction number increased, with the differences reaching negligible levels beyond the treatment fraction number of ≥20. The convolution method generally overestimates the radiobiological indices, as compared to the Monte Carlo method, for the target volume, and underestimates those for the OAR. These effects are interconnected and attributed

  5. SU-D-207B-07: Development of a CT-Radiomics Based Early Response Prediction Model During Delivery of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    Klawikowski, S; Christian, J; Schott, D; Zhang, M; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Pilot study developing a CT-texture based model for early assessment of treatment response during the delivery of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Daily CT data acquired for 24 pancreatic head cancer patients using CT-on-rails, during the routine CT-guided CRT delivery with a radiation dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, were analyzed. The pancreas head was contoured on each daily CT. Texture analysis was performed within the pancreas head contour using a research tool (IBEX). Over 1300 texture metrics including: grey level co-occurrence, run-length, histogram, neighborhood intensity difference, and geometrical shape features were calculated for each daily CT. Metric-trend information was established by finding the best fit of either a linear, quadratic, or exponential function for each metric value verses accumulated dose. Thus all the daily CT texture information was consolidated into a best-fit trend type for a given patient and texture metric. Linear correlation was performed between the patient histological response vector (good, medium, poor) and all combinations of 23 patient subgroups (statistical jackknife) determining which metrics were most correlated to response and repeatedly reliable across most patients. Control correlations against CT scanner, reconstruction kernel, and gated/nongated CT images were also calculated. Euclidean distance measure was used to group/sort patient vectors based on the data of these trend-response metrics. Results: We found four specific trend-metrics (Gray Level Coocurence Matrix311-1InverseDiffMomentNorm, Gray Level Coocurence Matrix311-1InverseDiffNorm, Gray Level Coocurence Matrix311-1 Homogeneity2, and Intensity Direct Local StdMean) that were highly correlated with patient response and repeatedly reliable. Our four trend-metric model successfully ordered our pilot response dataset (p=0.00070). We found no significant correlation to our control parameters: gating (p=0.7717), scanner (p

  6. Single vector leptoquark production in e+e- and γe colliders

    Aliev, T.M.; Iltan, E.; Pak, N.K.

    1996-01-01

    We consider the single vector leptoquark (LQ) production at e + e - and γe colliders for two values of the center-of-mass energy √s=500GeV and √s=1000 GeV, in a model-independent framework. We find that the cross sections for the single gauge and nongauge vector LQ productions are almost equal. The discovery limit for a single vector LQ production is obtained for both cases. It is shown that in e + e - collisions the single vector LQ production is more favorable than the vector LQ pair production, if the Yukawa coupling constant is κ∼1. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  7. WE-AB-202-10: Modelling Individual Tumor-Specific Control Probability for Hypoxia in Rectal Cancer

    Warren, S; Warren, DR; Wilson, JM; Muirhead, R; Hawkins, MA; Maughan, T; Partridge, M [University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate hypoxia-guided dose-boosting for increased tumour control and improved normal tissue sparing using FMISO-PET images Methods: Individual tumor-specific control probability (iTSCP) was calculated using a modified linear-quadratic model with rectal-specific radiosensitivity parameters for three limiting-case assumptions of the hypoxia / FMISO uptake relationship. {sup 18}FMISO-PET images from 2 patients (T3N0M0) from the RHYTHM trial (Investigating Hypoxia in Rectal Tumours NCT02157246) were chosen to delineate a hypoxic region (GTV-MISO defined as tumor-to-muscle ratio > 1.3) within the anatomical GTV. Three VMAT treatment plans were created in Eclipse (Varian): STANDARD (45Gy / 25 fractions to PTV4500); BOOST-GTV (simultaneous integrated boost of 60Gy / 25fr to GTV +0.5cm) and BOOST-MISO (60Gy / 25fr to GTV-MISO+0.5cm). GTV mean dose (in EQD2), iTSCP and normal tissue dose-volume metrics (small bowel, bladder, anus, and femoral heads) were recorded. Results: Patient A showed small hypoxic volume (15.8% of GTV) and Patient B moderate hypoxic volume (40.2% of GTV). Dose escalation to 60Gy was achievable, and doses to femoral heads and small bowel in BOOST plans were comparable to STANDARD plans. For patient A, a reduced maximum bladder dose was observed in BOOST-MISO compared to BOOST-GTV (D0.1cc 49.2Gy vs 54.0Gy). For patient B, a smaller high dose volume was observed for the anus region in BOOST-MISO compared to BOOST-GTV (V55Gy 19.9% vs 100%), which could potentially reduce symptoms of fecal incontinence. For BOOST-MISO, the largest iTSCPs (A: 95.5% / B: 90.0%) assumed local correlation between FMISO uptake and hypoxia, and approached iTSCP values seen for BOOST-GTV (A: 96.1% / B: 90.5%). Conclusion: Hypoxia-guided dose-boosting is predicted to improve local control in rectal tumors when FMISO is spatially correlated to hypoxia, and to reduce dose to organs-at-risk compared to boosting the whole GTV. This could lead to organ

  8. Peranan Konservatisme Akuntansi dan Faktor Risiko Makro dalam Model Laba Residual: Sebuah Studi di Bursa Efek Indonesia

    Andry Irwanto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the association of accounting conservatism, growth and macro-economic risk factors and valuation error of residual income model in Indonesian Stock Exchange. We use beta, book to market ratio, and size as proxies for macro-economic risk. Using sample of 186 companies taken from LQ-45 for the year of 2001 – 2005, we find that accounting conservatism and growth, have no significant influence toward residual income model valuation error. B/M has significant influence toward valuation error and has consistent sign as predicted by theory. Beta and Size has no significant influence toward valuation error. Overall, macro-economic risk factors can explain the valuation error better than accounting-based factors.Future research is expected to find accounting variables that can represent macro-economic risk and test their ability to explain valuation error. Also, future research need to confirm the relevance of accounting conservatism in stock valuation after implementation of IFRS in Indonesia.

  9. Computationally Efficient Modeling of Hydrocarbon Oxidation Chemistry and Flames Using Constituents and Species

    2012-02-10

    Cremer , J-Y Chen, C.K. Westbrook, L.Q. Maurice, J. Propul. Power 18 (1) (2002) 192–198. K. Harstad, J. Bellan / Combustion and Flame 157 (2010) 1594... Cremer , J.-Y. Chen, C.K. Westbrook, L.Q. Maurice, J. Propuls. Power 18 (1) (2002) 192–198. a 10-9 10-7 10-5 10-3 10-1 101 N oh (m ol /m 3 ) T0 = 800...Caltech by the Army Research Office under the direction of Drs. David Mann, Kevin McNesby and Ralph Anthenien. References 1U. C. Müeller, N. Peters, A

  10. Optimal control of xenon concentration by observer design under reactor model uncertainty

    Cho, Nam Z.; Yang, Chae Y.; Woo, Hae S.

    1989-01-01

    The state feedback in control theory enjoys many advantages, such as stabilization and improved transient response, which could be beneficially used for control of the xenon oscillation in a power reactor. It is, however, not possible in nuclear reactors to measure the state variables, such as xenon and iodine concentrations. For implementation of the optimal state feedback control law, it is thus necessary to estimate the unmeasurable state variables. This paper uses the Luenberger observer to estimate the xenon and iodine concentrations to be used in a linear quadratic problem with state feedback. To overcome the stiffness problem in reactor kinetics, a singular perturbation method is used

  11. Pulse frequency in pulsed brachytherapy based on tissue repair kinetics

    Sminia, Peter; Schneider, Christoph J.; Koedooder, Kees; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Blank, Leo E.C.M.; Gonzalez Gonzalez, Dionisio

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Investigation of normal tissue sparing in pulsed brachytherapy (PB) relative to continuous low-dose rate irradiation (CLDR) by adjusting pulse frequency based on tissue repair characteristics. Method: Using the linear quadratic model, the relative effectiveness (RE) of a 20 Gy boost was calculated for tissue with an α/β ratio ranging from 2 to 10 Gy and a half-time of sublethal damage repair between 0.1 and 3 h. The boost dose was considered to be delivered either in a number of pulses varying from 2 to 25, or continuously at a dose rate of 0.50, 0.80, or 1.20 Gy/h. Results: The RE of 20 Gy was found to be identical for PB in 25 pulses of 0.80 Gy each h and CLDR delivered at 0.80 Gy/h for any α/β value and for a repair half-time > 0.75 h. When normal tissue repair half-times are assumed to be longer than tumor repair half-times, normal tissue sparing can be obtained, within the restriction of a fixed overall treatment time, with higher dose per pulse and longer period time (time elapsed between start of pulse n and start of pulse n + 1). An optimum relative normal tissue sparing larger than 10% was found with 4 pulses of 5 Gy every 8 h. Hence, a therapeutic gain might be obtained when changing from CLDR to PB by adjusting the physical dose in such a way that the biological dose on the tumor is maintained. The normal tissue-sparing phenomenon can be explained by an increase in RE with longer period time for tissue with high α/β ratio and fast or intermediate repair half-time, and the RE for tissue with low α/β ratio and long repair half-time remains almost constant. Conclusion: Within the benchmark of the LQ model, advantage in normal tissue-sparing is expected when matching the pulse frequency to the repair kinetics of the normal tissue exposed. A period time longer than 1 h may lead to a reduction of late normal tissue complications. This theoretical advantage emphasizes the need for better knowledge of human tissue-repair kinetics

  12. Radiosensitivity of mesothelioma cell lines

    Haekkinen, A.M. [Dept. of Oncology, Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Laasonen, A. [Dept. of Pathology, Central Hospital of Etelae-Pohjanmaa, Seinaejoki (Finland); Linnainmaa, K. [Dept. of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Inst. of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland); Mattson, K. [Dept. Pulmonary Medicine, Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Pyrhoenen, S. [Dept. of Oncology, Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-10-01

    The present study was carried out in order to examine the radiosensitivity of malignant pleural mesothelioma cell lines. Cell kinetics, radiation-induced delay of the cell cycle and DNA ploidy of the cell lines were also determined. For comparison an HeLa and a human foetal fibroblast cell line were simultaneously explored. Six previously cytogenetically and histologically characterized mesothelioma tumor cell lines were applied. A rapid tiazolyl blue microtiter (MTT) assay was used to analyze radiosensitivity and cell kinetics and DNA ploidy of the cultured cells were determined by flow cytometry. The survival fraction after a dose of 2 Gy (SF2), parameters {alpha} and {beta} of the linear quadratic model (LQ-model) and mean inactivation dose (D{sub MID}) were also estimated. The DNA index of four cell lines equaled 1.0 and two cell lines equaled 1.5 and 1.6. Different mesothelioma cell lines showed a great variation in radiosensitivity. Mean survival fraction after a radiation dose of 2 Gy (SF2) was 0.60 and ranged from 0.36 to 0.81 and mean {alpha} value was 0.26 (range 0.48-0.083). The SF2 of the most sensitive diploid mesothelioma cell line was 0.36: Less than that of the foetal fibroblast cell line (0.49). The survival fractions (0.81 and 0.74) of the two most resistant cell lines, which also were aneuploid, were equal to that of the HeLa cell line (0.78). The {alpha}/{beta} ratios of the most sensitive cell lines were almost an order of magnitude greater than those of the two most resistant cell lines. Radiation-induced delay of the most resistant aneuploid cell line was similar to that of HeLa cells but in the most sensitive (diploid cells) there was practically no entry into the G1 phase following the 2 Gy radiation dose during 36 h. (orig.).

  13. BIANCA, a biophysical model of cell survival and chromosome damage by protons, C-ions and He-ions at energies and doses used in hadrontherapy

    Pietro Carante, Mario; Aimè, Chiara; Tello Cajiao, John James; Ballarini, Francesca

    2018-04-01

    An upgraded version of the BIANCA II biophysical model, which describes more realistically interphase chromosome organization and the link between chromosome aberrations and cell death, was applied to V79 and AG01522 cells exposed to protons, C-ions and He-ions over a wide LET interval (0.6–502 keV µm‑1), as well as proton-irradiated U87 cells. The model assumes that (i) ionizing radiation induces DNA ‘cluster lesions’ (CLs), where by definition each CL produces two independent chromosome fragments; (ii) fragment (distance-dependent) mis-rejoining, or un-rejoining, produces chromosome aberrations; (iii) some aberrations lead to cell death. The CL yield, which mainly depends on radiation quality but is also modulated by the target cell, is an adjustable parameter. The fragment un-rejoining probability, f, is the second, and last, parameter. The value of f, which is assumed to depend on the cell type but not on radiation quality, was taken from previous studies, and only the CL yield was adjusted in the present work. Good agreement between simulations and experimental data was obtained, suggesting that BIANCA II is suitable for calculating the biological effectiveness of hadrontherapy beams. For both V79 and AG01522 cells, the mean number of CLs per micrometer was found to increase with LET in a linear-quadratic fashion before the over-killing region, where a less rapid increase, with a tendency to saturation, was observed. Although the over-killing region deserves further investigation, the possibility of fitting the CL yields is an important feature for hadrontherapy, because it allows performing predictions also at LET values where experimental data are not available. Finally, an approach was proposed to predict the ion-response of the cell line(s) of interest from the ion-response of a reference cell line and the photon response of both. A pilot study on proton-irradiated AG01522 and U87 cells, taking V79 cells as a reference, showed encouraging

  14. Automatic control design procedures for restructurable aircraft control

    Looze, D. P.; Krolewski, S.; Weiss, J.; Barrett, N.; Eterno, J.

    1985-01-01

    A simple, reliable automatic redesign procedure for restructurable control is discussed. This procedure is based on Linear Quadratic (LQ) design methodologies. It employs a robust control system design for the unfailed aircraft to minimize the effects of failed surfaces and to extend the time available for restructuring the Flight Control System. The procedure uses the LQ design parameters for the unfailed system as a basis for choosing the design parameters of the failed system. This philosophy alloys the engineering trade-offs that were present in the nominal design to the inherited by the restructurable design. In particular, it alloys bandwidth limitations and performance trade-offs to be incorporated in the redesigned system. The procedure also has several other desirable features. It effectively redistributes authority among the available control effectors to maximize the system performance subject to actuator limitations and constraints. It provides a graceful performance degradation as the amount of control authority lessens. When given the parameters of the unfailed aircraft, the automatic redesign procedure reproduces the nominal control system design.

  15. Finite Energy and Bounded Actuator Attacks on Cyber-Physical Systems

    Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL; Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Ferragut, Erik M [ORNL; Laska, Jason A [ORNL; Dong, Jin [ORNL; Drira, Anis [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    As control system networks are being connected to enterprise level networks for remote monitoring, operation, and system-wide performance optimization, these same connections are providing vulnerabilities that can be exploited by malicious actors for attack, financial gain, and theft of intellectual property. Much effort in cyber-physical system (CPS) protection has focused on protecting the borders of the system through traditional information security techniques. Less effort has been applied to the protection of cyber-physical systems from intelligent attacks launched after an attacker has defeated the information security protections to gain access to the control system. In this paper, attacks on actuator signals are analyzed from a system theoretic context. The threat surface is classified into finite energy and bounded attacks. These two broad classes encompass a large range of potential attacks. The effect of theses attacks on a linear quadratic (LQ) control are analyzed, and the optimal actuator attacks for both finite and infinite horizon LQ control are derived, therefore the worst case attack signals are obtained. The closed-loop system under the optimal attack signals is given and a numerical example illustrating the effect of an optimal bounded attack is provided.

  16. Power angle control of grid-connected voltage source converter in a wind energy application

    Svensson, Jan [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Electric Power Engineering

    1996-12-31

    In this thesis, the connection of a voltage source converter to the grid in a wind energy application is examined. The possibility of using a cheap control system without grid current measurements, is investigated. The control method is based on controlling the voltage angle of the inverter, which governs the active power flow. The highest frequency of the power variation, coming from wind turbine, is approx. 5 Hz. Since the proposed control method easily can handle such power variations it is very well suited for wind turbine applications. The characteristics of the system depend on the DC-link capacitor, the grid filter inductance and resistance. Large values of the resistance damp the system well but increase the energy losses. A high inductance leads to a reduced harmonic level on the grid but makes the system slower. By using feed-forward of the generator/rectifier current signal, the performance is increased compared to an ordinary PI-control. Combining the Linear Quadratic (LQ) control method with Kalman filtered input signals, a robust control method with a good performance is obtained. The LQ controller controls both the phase displacement angle and the modulation index, resulting in higher bandwidth, and the typical power angle resonance at the grid frequency disappears. 22 refs, 109 figs, 14 tabs

  17. Radiosensitizing effect of RHOB protein in melanoma cells

    Notcovich, C.; Grissi, C.; Sánchez Crespo, R.; Delgado, D.C.; Molinari, B.; Ibañez, I.L.; Durán, H.

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma cells are highly resistant to chemo or radiotherapy. DNA damage agents such as ionizing radiation induce apoptosis involving RhoB protein. In a great variety of tumors the levels of this protein decrease along tumor progression. RhoB is considered a tumor suppressor gene due to its antiproliferative and proapoptotic effect. Considering the aforementioned, the aim of this study was to characterize the radiobiological response of different human melanoma cell lines, and to evaluate the possible correlation between RhoB expression and radiosensitivity. The human melanoma cell lines A375, MELJ and SB2 were gamma-irradiated ( 137 Cs). Survival curves were obtained by clonogenic assay and fitted to the Linear-Quadratic (LQ) model. Radiosensitivity was evaluated by surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2). Results showed that MELJ was significantly more radioresistant (SF2=0.71) than A375 and SB2 (0.29 and 0.21 respectively. Expression levels of RhoB, evaluated by western blot, increased in all lines vs. non-irradiated control. SB2, the most radiosensitive cells, showed a greater induction (p<0.05) of RhoB. Finally, to study whether RhoB has a radiosensitizing effect, these cell lines were stably transfected with a wild type RhoB construction, a constitutively active RhoB mutant V14, or with the empty plasmid as control. For all cell lines higher expression level of this protein was found in RhoB or V14 transfected cells (p<0.05). Sensitization was evaluated by SF2. Significant radiosensitization was demonstrated in clones derived from A375 and SB2 ((p<0.05), while for MELJ cells, radio-sensitization was only found in clones overexpressing V14. In conclusion, the increase of RhoB in melanoma cell lines, either by radiation or transfection has a radiosensitizing effect. Thus, we propose RhoB modulation as a potential therapeutic tool to improve the radiation response of radioresistant melanoma. (authors)

  18. Calculation of integrated biological response in brachytherapy

    Dale, Roger G.; Coles, Ian P.; Deehan, Charles; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To present analytical methods for calculating or estimating the integrated biological response in brachytherapy applications, and which allow for the presence of dose gradients. Methods and Materials: The approach uses linear-quadratic (LQ) formulations to identify an equivalent biologically effective dose (BED eq ) which, if applied to a specified tissue volume, would produce the same biological effect as that achieved by a given brachytherapy application. For simple geometrical cases, BED multiplying factors have been derived which allow the equivalent BED for tumors to be estimated from a single BED value calculated at a dose reference point. For more complex brachytherapy applications a voxel-by-voxel determination of the equivalent BED will be more accurate. Equations are derived which when incorporated into brachytherapy software would facilitate such a process. Results: At both high and low dose rates, the BEDs calculated at the dose reference point are shown to be lower than the true values by an amount which depends primarily on the magnitude of the prescribed dose; the BED multiplying factors are higher for smaller prescribed doses. The multiplying factors are less dependent on the assumed radiobiological parameters. In most clinical applications involving multiple sources, particularly those in multiplanar arrays, the multiplying factors are likely to be smaller than those derived here for single sources. The overall suggestion is that the radiobiological consequences of dose gradients in well-designed brachytherapy treatments, although important, may be less significant than is sometimes supposed. The modeling exercise also demonstrates that the integrated biological effect associated with fractionated high-dose-rate (FHDR) brachytherapy will usually be different from that for an 'equivalent' continuous low-dose-rate (CLDR) regime. For practical FHDR regimes involving relatively small numbers of fractions, the integrated biological effect to

  19. Response of rat spinal cord to very small doses per fraction: lack of enhanced radiosensitivity

    Shun, Wong C.; Yong, Hao; Hill, Richard P.

    1995-01-01

    Our previous work with rat spinal cord demonstrated that the linear quadratic (LQ) model based on data for large fraction sizes ((α(β)) of 2.4 Gy) failed to predict isoeffective doses between 1 and 2 Gy per fraction, and under-estimated the sparing effect of small doses per fraction given once daily. In contrast, data from mouse skin and kidney, and recent in vitro results revealed a paradoxical increase in radiosensitivity at below 1 Gy per fraction. To assess whether enhanced radiosensitivity is present in the spinal cord below 1 Gy per fraction, the rat spinal cord (C2-T2) was irradiated initially with three daily doses of 10.25 Gy (top-up doses representing 90% of tolerance), followed by graded single doses or fractionated doses in 1.5, 1.0, 0.8, 0.6 or 0.4 Gy fractions given once daily. To limit the overall treatment time to ≤ 8 weeks, a small number of the 0.6- and 0.4-Gy fractions were given twice daily with an interfraction interval of 16 h. The end-point was forelimb paralysis secondary to white matter necrosis, confirmed histologically. The ED 50 values, excluding the top-up doses, were 5.8, 10.6, 14.8, 15.2, 15.9 and 19.1 Gy for a single dose and doses in 1.5-, 1.0-, 0.8-, 0.6- and 0.4-Gy fractions, respectively. The data gave an (α(β)) of 2.1 Gy (95% CI, 1.4, 2.7 Gy). Pooling the data separately, the (α(β)) value was 2.3 Gy (95% CI, 0.82, 3.7 Gy) for fraction sizes ≥ 1 Gy, and 1.2 Gy (95% CI, 0.16, 2.3 Gy) for the 0.8-, 0.6- and 0.4-Gy experiments. These results in which top-up doses were given initially are consistent with a large sparing effect of very small fraction sizes in rat spinal cord provided sufficient time is allowed for repair of sublethal damage between fractions, and provide no evidence for a paradoxical increase in radiosensitivity in the rat spinal cord below 1 Gy down to 0.4 Gy per fraction

  20. Backward Stochastic Riccati Equations and Infinite Horizon L-Q Optimal Control with Infinite Dimensional State Space and Random Coefficients

    Guatteri, Giuseppina; Tessitore, Gianmario

    2008-01-01

    We study the Riccati equation arising in a class of quadratic optimal control problems with infinite dimensional stochastic differential state equation and infinite horizon cost functional. We allow the coefficients, both in the state equation and in the cost, to be random.In such a context backward stochastic Riccati equations are backward stochastic differential equations in the whole positive real axis that involve quadratic non-linearities and take values in a non-Hilbertian space. We prove existence of a minimal non-negative solution and, under additional assumptions, its uniqueness. We show that such a solution allows to perform the synthesis of the optimal control and investigate its attractivity properties. Finally the case where the coefficients are stationary is addressed and an example concerning a controlled wave equation in random media is proposed

  1. The Influence of Fundamental Factors on Stock Return (Case Study: Company Listed in Lq45 2011-2014)

    Rumokoy, Farlane; Tamunu, Sonnia Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Consumption and investment are the two things are related because, delay consumption at a time could be interpreted as an investment that is used for future consumption. The investment is an investment for one or more assets owned and usually in a long period of time with the hope of obtaining a profit in the future. Investments can be classified into direct investment and indirect investment. Direct investment made by purchasing directly from a companys financial assets either through interm...

  2. Evaluating Portfolio Performance of Companies€™stock Listed in Lq45 Based on Sharpe, Treynor and Jensen Method

    Tumewu, Ferdinand; Zakarias, Vernando A

    2015-01-01

    Capital market activity has an important role in developing the national economy, in order to enter the financial market, the investor needs to know about the risk in the capital market itself and determine the best stock to be taken. There are three common methods of analysis such as Sharpe ratio, Trenor ratio and Jensen€™s alpha which are sometimes confuse the investor in order to take which one of these three is the better method. This research objective is to identify whether there is a d...

  3. Dose-response relationships and risk estimates for the induction of cancer due to low doses of low-LET radiation

    Elaguppillai, V.

    1981-01-01

    Risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer at low doses can be obtained only by extrapolation from the known effects at high doses and high dose rates, using a suitable dose-response model. The applicability of three different models, linear, sublinear and supralinear, are discussed in this paper. Several experimental studies tend to favour a sublinear dose-response model (linear-quadratic model) for low-LET radiation. However, human epidemiological studies do not exclude any of the dose-response relationships. The risk estimates based on linear and linear quadratic dose-response models are compared and it is concluded that, for low-LET radiation, the linear dose-response model would probably over-estimate the actual risk of cancer by a factor of two or more. (author)

  4. Modelling carcinogenesis after radiotherapy using Poisson statistics: implications for IMRT, protons and ions

    Jones, Bleddyn [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Bleddyn.Jones@rob.ox.ac.uk

    2009-06-01

    Current technical radiotherapy advances aim to (a) better conform the dose contours to cancers and (b) reduce the integral dose exposure and thereby minimise unnecessary dose exposure to normal tissues unaffected by the cancer. Various types of conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using x-rays can achieve (a) while charged particle therapy (CPT)-using proton and ion beams-can achieve both (a) and (b), but at greater financial cost. Not only is the long term risk of radiation related normal tissue complications important, but so is the risk of carcinogenesis. Physical dose distribution plans can be generated to show the differences between the above techniques. IMRT is associated with a dose bath of low to medium dose due to fluence transfer: dose is effectively transferred from designated organs at risk to other areas; thus dose and risk are transferred. Many clinicians are concerned that there may be additional carcinogenesis many years after IMRT. CPT reduces the total energy deposition in the body and offers many potential advantages in terms of the prospects for better quality of life along with cancer cure. With C ions there is a tail of dose beyond the Bragg peaks, due to nuclear fragmentation; this is not found with protons. CPT generally uses higher linear energy transfer (which varies with particle and energy), which carries a higher relative risk of malignant induction, but also of cell death quantified by the relative biological effect concept, so at higher dose levels the frank development of malignancy should be reduced. Standard linear radioprotection models have been used to show a reduction in carcinogenesis risk of between two- and 15-fold depending on the CPT location. But the standard risk models make no allowance for fractionation and some have a dose limit at 4 Gy. Alternatively, tentative application of the linear quadratic model and Poissonian statistics to chromosome breakage and cell kill simultaneously allows estimation of

  5. Anisotropic charged physical models with generalized polytropic equation of state

    Nasim, A.; Azam, M. [University of Education, Division of Science and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2018-01-15

    In this paper, we found the exact solutions of Einstein-Maxwell equations with generalized polytropic equation of state (GPEoS). For this, we consider spherically symmetric object with charged anisotropic matter distribution. We rewrite the field equations into simple form through transformation introduced by Durgapal (Phys Rev D 27:328, 1983) and solve these equations analytically. For the physically acceptability of these solutions, we plot physical quantities like energy density, anisotropy, speed of sound, tangential and radial pressure. We found that all solutions fulfill the required physical conditions. It is concluded that all our results are reduced to the case of anisotropic charged matter distribution with linear, quadratic as well as polytropic equation of state. (orig.)

  6. Moving Horizon Estimation and Control

    Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    successful and applied methodology beyond PID-control for control of industrial processes. The main contribution of this thesis is introduction and definition of the extended linear quadratic optimal control problem for solution of numerical problems arising in moving horizon estimation and control...... problems. Chapter 1 motivates moving horizon estimation and control as a paradigm for control of industrial processes. It introduces the extended linear quadratic control problem and discusses its central role in moving horizon estimation and control. Introduction, application and efficient solution....... It provides an algorithm for computation of the maximal output admissible set for linear model predictive control. Appendix D provides results concerning linear regression. Appendix E discuss prediction error methods for identification of linear models tailored for model predictive control....

  7. Parametric optimal control of uncertain systems under an optimistic value criterion

    Li, Bo; Zhu, Yuanguo

    2018-01-01

    It is well known that the optimal control of a linear quadratic model is characterized by the solution of a Riccati differential equation. In many cases, the corresponding Riccati differential equation cannot be solved exactly such that the optimal feedback control may be a complex time-oriented function. In this article, a parametric optimal control problem of an uncertain linear quadratic model under an optimistic value criterion is considered for simplifying the expression of optimal control. Based on the equation of optimality for the uncertain optimal control problem, an approximation method is presented to solve it. As an application, a two-spool turbofan engine optimal control problem is given to show the utility of the proposed model and the efficiency of the presented approximation method.

  8. New approach to the approximation of «dose – effect» dependence during the human somatic cells irradiation

    V. F. Chekhun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available New data on cytogenetic approximation of the experimental cytogenetic dependence "dose - effect" based on the spline regression model that improves biological dosimetry of human radiological exposure were received. This is achieved by reducing the error of the determination of absorbed dose as compared to the traditional use of linear and linear-quadratic models and makes it possible to predict the effect of dose curves on plateau.

  9. Estimating the effects of land-use and catchment characteristics on lake water quality: Irish lakes 2004-2009

    Curtis, John; Morgenroth, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    This paper attributes the variation in water quality across Irish lakes to a range of contributory factors such as human population, septic tanks, urban waste water treatment, phosphorous excreted by livestock, as well as catchment soil and geology. Both linear and non-linear quadratic models were estimated in the analysis, which attempts to account for point and non-point sources of pollution affecting water quality in 216 lake catchments. The models show a clear link between activities with...

  10. Atomistic Modeling-Based Design of Novel Materials

    Holec, D.; Zhou, LC.; Riedl, H.; Koller, Christian M.; Mayrhofer, P. H.; Friák, Martin; Šob, Mojmír; Kormann, F.; Neugebauer, J.; Music, D.; Hartmann, M A.; Fischer, F D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 1600688. ISSN 1438-1656 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-24711S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : AB-INITIO CALCULATIONS * ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT APPLICATIONS * DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL THEORY Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.319, year: 2016

  11. Modelling of Phase Equlibria in the Hf-V System\

    Vřešťál, Jan; Pavlů, Jana; Wdowik, U. D.; Šob, Mojmír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2017), s. 239-247 ISSN 1450-5339 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-15576S; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Laves phases * Hf-V system * Ab initio calculations * Phase diagram * Zero Kelvin * CALPHAD method Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 0.804, year: 2016

  12. Induced Stress, Artificial Environment, Simulated Tactical Operations Center Model

    1973-06-01

    hiebman, Stress Situations (Philadelphia: J. Is. IJ iui ott CO., .lqý1.), pp. ’ - 6. ’ | ;* .- -~~~~~~~~. , ’ • :• ",. . .... . , • . 33 provides one or...April 1964, pp. 545-556. ~ .~:.;a-d K. " -Iu: izodoiog;ical Ls;suL5- in Experiuienting, withi Sil-.ISiilatý’ionS of Lusincss Pim ~"paper presentecd at

  13. A direct method for estimating the alpha/beta ratio from quantitative dose-response data

    Stuschke, M.

    1989-01-01

    A one-step optimization method based on a least squares fit of the linear quadratic model to quantitative tissue response data after fractionated irradiation is proposed. Suitable end-points that can be analysed by this method are growth delay, host survival and quantitative biochemical or clinical laboratory data. The functional dependence between the transformed dose and the measured response is approximated by a polynomial. The method allows for the estimation of the alpha/beta ratio and its confidence limits from all observed responses of the different fractionation schedules. Censored data can be included in the analysis. A method to test the appropriateness of the fit is presented. A computer simulation illustrates the method and its accuracy as examplified by the growth delay end point. A comparison with a fit of the linear quadratic model to interpolated isoeffect doses shows the advantages of the direct method. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Modelling the dynamics of total precipitation and aboveground net primary production of fescue-feather grass steppe at Askania Nova according to global climate change scenariosModelling the dynamics of total precipitation and aboveground net primary production of fescue-feather grass steppe at Askania Nova according to global climate change scenarios

    S. O. Belyakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses modelling of Aboveground Net Primary Production (ANPP of steppe (arid grassland ecosystems plant species in relation to changes in total precipitation over the previous year at the “Stara” study site, Biosphere Reserve “Askania-Nova”, Khersonregion (Ukraine. To investigate linkages between precipitation and Aboveground Net Primary Production, correlation analysis was chosen and a time series regression analysis was based on the data set for the period 1988–2012. The NPP dependence on quantity of precipitation was found to be more significant for the previous autumn-winter-spring period (AWSP than for the previous 12 month period. A regression model of ANPP’s dependence on AWSP is proposed. This model was further validated by the authors’ samples of ANPP, collected at the “Stara” study site in 2013–2016. The regression model showed a non-linear (quadratic dependence of net primary production of zonal and intrazonal plant coenoses and total precipitation for the autumn-winter-spring period for arid grasslands with a coefficient of determination equal to 0.54 and significance level less than 0.05. The non-linear equation for these relations, visualized by a parabola curve, was calculated using the Nonlinear Least-Squares Regression Method. The data set, based on calculated predicted values, using the calculated equation, had a similar dynamic to the historical data on ANPP, but the model could not predict critical values. For this reason, additional studies are required for critical precipitation events. Non-linear response, investigated according to regression analysis, reveals optimal zones of plant growth, depending on the total precipitation level before the vegetation peak. For research areas where the dominant species are the turf grasses Stipa ucrainica P. Smirn., S. capillata L., S. lessingiana Trin. & Rupr., Festuca valesiaca Gaudin, Koeleria cristata (L. Pers. the optimal precipitation rates

  15. Toward the development of a corporate social responsibility leadership questionnaire: An adaptation of the LBI-2

    Ronel du Preez; Liam T. van Zyl

    2015-01-01

    Orientation: Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has grown exponentially in South African organisations, making leadership in CSR crucial. This article describes the first phase towards the development of a CSR leadership questionnaire (CSR-LQ), based on the Leadership Behaviour Inventory version 2 (LBI-2). Research purpose: To develop a CSR leadership questionnaire (the CSR-LQ) that would serve as a basis for developing a CSR leadership competency model in future. Motivation for the stu...

  16. Analisis Sektor/Sub Sektor Unggulan di Kabupaten Bungo

    Gafur Gafur

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This study aimed to analyze the leading sectors in Bungo. The method used is Location Quotient (LQ, Dynamic Location Quotient (DLQ, specialization index, Growth Ratio Model (MRP. Based on analysis of LQ and DLQ, there are only two basis sectors at present and in the future, namely the construction sector and trade, hotels and restaurants. Based on the analysis of Specialization Index, in Bungo Regency has a concentration of the economy in the agricultural sector and the manufacturing sector. Based on MRP analysis also showed that prominent sector growth at the level of Bungo and Jambi Province, namely electricity, gas and water supply; the building sector; and trade, hotels and restaurants. Keywords : Location Quotient (LQ, Dinamic Location Quotient (DLQ, Specialization Index, Growth Ratio Model   Abstrak. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis sektor unggulan di Kabupaten Bungo. Metode yang digunakan adalah analisis Location Quotient (LQ, Dinamic Location Quotient (DLQ, indeks spesialisasi, Model Rasio Pertumbuhan (MRP. Berdasarkan analisis LQ dan DLQ,  hanya ada 2 sektor yang menjadi sektor basis pada saat ini dan pada masa yang akan datang yaitu sektor bangunan dan sektor perdagangan, hotel dan restoran. Berdasarkan analisis Indeks Spesialisasi, di Kabupaten Bungo telah terjadi konsentrasi ekonomi pada sektor pertanian dan sektor industri pengolahan. Berdasarkan analisis MRP juga dapat diketahui bahwa sektor yang menonjol pertumbuhannya pada tingkat Kabupaten Bungo dan Provinsi Jambi yaitu sektor listrik, gas dan air bersih; sektor bangunan; serta sektor perdagangan, hotel dan restoran. Kata Kunci : Location Quotient (LQ, Dinamic Location Quotient (DLQ, indeks spesialisasi, Model Rasio Pertumbuhan

  17. Yaw control for active damping of structural dynamics

    Ekelund, T. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Control Engineering Lab.

    1996-12-01

    Yaw torque control for reduction of structural dynamic loads in a two-bladed wind turbine is investigated. The models are obtained using rigid-body mechanics. Linear quadratic control theory is utilized for design and analysis. The analysis of two simple examples, where the teeter angle and the tower lateral bending motion are regarded, shows that a time-varying controller has some advantages compared with a time-invariant controller. 6 refs, 9 figs

  18. Optimization of Malaxation Process using Major Aroma Compounds in Virgin Olive Oil

    Cevik,Serife; Ozkan,Gulcan; Kıralan,Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Optimization of major aroma compounds in olive oils produced from fruits at three maturity stages wasstudied. A central composite design was used for the optimization of malaxation conditions of temperature and times, each at five levels with 13 runs including five central points. The responses of interest were trans-2-hexenal and hexanal, which were investigated and their contents were optimized. A full quadratic second order regression model including the linear, quadratic, and two...

  19. Reconfigurable Flight Control Design using a Robust Servo LQR and Radial Basis Function Neural Networks

    Burken, John J.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of a Robust Servo Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and a Radial Basis Function (RBF) Neural Network in reconfigurable flight control designs in adaptation to a aircraft part failure. The method uses a robust LQR servomechanism design with model Reference adaptive control, and RBF neural networks. During the failure the LQR servomechanism behaved well, and using the neural networks improved the tracking.

  20. Inventory Investment and the Real Interest Rate

    Junayed, Sadaquat; Khan, Hashmat

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between inventory investment and the real interest rate has been difficult to assess empirically. Recent work has proposed a linear-quadratic inventory model with time-varying discount factor to identify the effects of the real interest rate on inventory investment. The authors show that this framework does not separately identify the effects of real interest rate on inventory investment from variables that determine the expected marginal cost of production. In other words, t...

  1. Active Vibration damping of Smart composite beams based on system identification technique

    Bendine, Kouider; Satla, Zouaoui; Boukhoulda, Farouk Benallel; Nouari, Mohammed

    2018-03-01

    In the present paper, the active vibration control of a composite beam using piezoelectric actuator is investigated. The space state equation is determined using system identification technique based on the structure input output response provided by ANSYS APDL finite element package. The Linear Quadratic (LQG) control law is designed and integrated into ANSYS APDL to perform closed loop simulations. Numerical examples for different types of excitation loads are presented to test the efficiency and the accuracy of the proposed model.

  2. Implications of tissue target-cell survival-curve shape for values of split-dose recovery doses: late versus early effects

    Redpath, J.L.; Peel, D.M.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Recent data from this laboratory on split-dose recovery for early and late effects in pig skin are consistent with the linear-quadratic model for cell survival, and with relative cell survival-curve shapes for early- and late-effect target cells where the early-effect cells have an intially steeper and straighter survival-curve than the late-effect cells. (author)

  3. Differences in Dynamic Brand Competition Across Markets: An Empirical Analysis

    Jean-Pierre Dubé; Puneet Manchanda

    2005-01-01

    We investigate differences in the dynamics of marketing decisions across geographic markets empirically. We begin with a linear-quadratic game involving forward-looking firms competing on prices and advertising. Based on the corresponding Markov perfect equilibrium, we propose estimable econometric equations for demand and marketing policy. Our model allows us to measure empirically the strategic response of competitors along with economic measures such as firm profitability. We use a rich da...

  4. A spatio-temporal simulation model of the response of solid tumours to radiotherapy in vivo: parametric validation concerning oxygen enhancement ratio and cell cycle duration

    Antipas, Vassilis P; Stamatakos, Georgios S; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos K; Dionysiou, Dimitra D; Dale, Roger G

    2004-01-01

    Advanced bio-simulation methods are expected to substantially improve radiotherapy treatment planning. To this end a novel spatio-temporal patient-specific simulation model of the in vivo response of malignant tumours to radiotherapy schemes has been recently developed by our group. This paper discusses recent improvements to the model: an optimized algorithm leading to conformal shrinkage of the tumour as a response to radiotherapy, the introduction of the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), a realistic initial cell phase distribution and finally an advanced imaging-based algorithm simulating the neovascularization field. A parametric study of the influence of the cell cycle duration T c , OER, OER β for the beta LQ parameter on tumour growth, shrinkage and response to irradiation under two different fractionation schemes has been made. The model has been applied to two glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cases, one with wild type (wt) and another one with mutated (mt) p53 gene. Furthermore, the model has been applied to a hypothetical GBM tumour with α and β values corresponding to those of generic radiosensitive tumours. According to the model predictions, a whole tumour with shorter T c tends to repopulate faster, as is to be expected. Furthermore, a higher OER value for the dormant cells leads to a more radioresistant whole tumour. A small variation of the OER β value does not seem to play a major role in the tumour response. Accelerated fractionation proved to be superior to the standard scheme for the whole range of the OER values considered. Finally, the tumour with mt p53 was shown to be more radioresistant compared to the tumour with wt p53. Although all simulation predictions agree at least qualitatively with the clinical experience and literature, a long-term clinical adaptation and quantitative validation procedure is in progress

  5. Search for 1st Generation Leptoquarks in the eejj channel with the DZero experiment

    Barfuss, Anne-Fleur [Univ. of the Mediterranean, Marseille (France)

    2008-09-12

    An evidence of the existence of leptoquarks (LQ) would prove the validity of various extensions of the Standard Model of Particle Physics (SM). The search for first generation leptoquarks presented in this dissertation has been performed by analyzing a 1.02 fb-1 sample of data collected by the D0 detector, events with a final state comprising two light jets and two electrons. The absence of an excess of events in comparison to SM expectations leads to exclude scalar LQ masses up to 292 GeV and vector LQ masses from 350 to 458 GeV, depending on the LQ-l-q coupling type. The great importance of a good jet energy measurement motivated the study of the instrumental backgrounds correlated to the calorimeter, as much as studies of the hadronic showers energy resolution in γ + jets events.

  6. An integrated logistic formula for prediction of complications from radiosurgery

    Flickinger, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated logistic model for predicting the probability of complications when small volumes of tissue receive an inhomogeneous radiation dose is described. This model can be used with either an exponential or linear quadratic correction for dose per fraction and time. Both the exponential and linear quadratic versions of this integrated logistic formula provide reasonable estimates of the tolerance of brain to radiosurgical dose distributions where there are small volumes of brain receiving high radiation doses and larger volumes receiving lower doses. This makes it possible to predict the probability of complications from stereotactic radiosurgery, as well as combinations of fractionated large volume irradiation with a radiosurgical boost. Complication probabilities predicted for single fraction radiosurgery with the Leksell Gamma Unit using 4, 8, 14, and 18 mm diameter collimators as well as for whole brain irradiation combined with a radiosurgical boost are presented. The exponential and linear quadratic versions of the integrated logistic formula provide useful methods of calculating the probability of complications from radiosurgical treatment

  7. WE-H-BRA-08: A Monte Carlo Cell Nucleus Model for Assessing Cell Survival Probability Based On Particle Track Structure Analysis

    Lee, B [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia); Wang, C [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To correlate the damage produced by particles of different types and qualities to cell survival on the basis of nanodosimetric analysis and advanced DNA structures in the cell nucleus. Methods: A Monte Carlo code was developed to simulate subnuclear DNA chromatin fibers (CFs) of 30nm utilizing a mean-free-path approach common to radiation transport. The cell nucleus was modeled as a spherical region containing 6000 chromatin-dense domains (CDs) of 400nm diameter, with additional CFs modeled in a sparser interchromatin region. The Geant4-DNA code was utilized to produce a particle track database representing various particles at different energies and dose quantities. These tracks were used to stochastically position the DNA structures based on their mean free path to interaction with CFs. Excitation and ionization events intersecting CFs were analyzed using the DBSCAN clustering algorithm for assessment of the likelihood of producing DSBs. Simulated DSBs were then assessed based on their proximity to one another for a probability of inducing cell death. Results: Variations in energy deposition to chromatin fibers match expectations based on differences in particle track structure. The quality of damage to CFs based on different particle types indicate more severe damage by high-LET radiation than low-LET radiation of identical particles. In addition, the model indicates more severe damage by protons than of alpha particles of same LET, which is consistent with differences in their track structure. Cell survival curves have been produced showing the L-Q behavior of sparsely ionizing radiation. Conclusion: Initial results indicate the feasibility of producing cell survival curves based on the Monte Carlo cell nucleus method. Accurate correlation between simulated DNA damage to cell survival on the basis of nanodosimetric analysis can provide insight into the biological responses to various radiation types. Current efforts are directed at producing cell

  8. A simple reductionist model for cancer risk in atom bomb survivors

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1995-01-01

    1) In data from the atom bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the roughly linear-quadratic radiation dose responses for chromosome aberration and leukemia correspond closely to each other, as do the linear dose responses for gene mutation and solid cancer incidence. 2) In view of the increasing evidence for multiple oncogene and suppressor gene changes in human cancer, as well as the evidence that human cancer rate is often proportional to age to the power of 6 or so, it is postulated that the radiation has contributed one and only one oncogenic mutational event to the radiation induced cancers. 3) The radiation induced cancers should therefore display a cancer rate versus age relationship that has a power of n-1, where n is the power for the corresponding background cancers. 4) It is shown that this is precisely what is happening in the collective solid cancer incidence of the atom bomb survivors. (author)

  9. Dislocations via incompatibilities in phase-field models of microstructure evolution

    Gröger, Roman; Marchand, B.; Lookman, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 5 (2016), 054105-1-054105-13 ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-13797S; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Grant - others:Marie Curie Actions(CZ) 247705 MesoPhysDel Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : dislocation * incompatibility * phase field * Nye tensor * phase transition Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  10. Fractionation in normal tissues: the (α/β)eff concept can account for dose heterogeneity and volume effects.

    Hoffmann, Aswin L; Nahum, Alan E

    2013-10-07

    The simple Linear-Quadratic (LQ)-based Withers iso-effect formula (WIF) is widely used in external-beam radiotherapy to derive a new tumour dose prescription such that there is normal-tissue (NT) iso-effect when changing the fraction size and/or number. However, as conventionally applied, the WIF is invalid unless the normal-tissue response is solely determined by the tumour dose. We propose a generalized WIF (gWIF) which retains the tumour prescription dose, but replaces the intrinsic fractionation sensitivity measure (α/β) by a new concept, the normal-tissue effective fractionation sensitivity, [Formula: see text], which takes into account both the dose heterogeneity in, and the volume effect of, the late-responding normal-tissue in question. Closed-form analytical expressions for [Formula: see text] ensuring exact normal-tissue iso-effect are derived for: (i) uniform dose, and (ii) arbitrary dose distributions with volume-effect parameter n = 1 from the normal-tissue dose-volume histogram. For arbitrary dose distributions and arbitrary n, a numerical solution for [Formula: see text] exhibits a weak dependence on the number of fractions. As n is increased, [Formula: see text] increases from its intrinsic value at n = 0 (100% serial normal-tissue) to values close to or even exceeding the tumour (α/β) at n = 1 (100% parallel normal-tissue), with the highest values of [Formula: see text] corresponding to the most conformal dose distributions. Applications of this new concept to inverse planning and to highly conformal modalities are discussed, as is the effect of possible deviations from LQ behaviour at large fraction sizes.

  11. Postoperative vaginal irradiation by a high dose-rate afterloading technique in endometrial carcinoma stage I

    Sorbe, B.; Smeds, A.C.

    1989-01-01

    A high dose-rate (cobalt-60) afterloading technique was used for postoperative vaginal irradiation in a series of 404 women with endometrial carcinoma stage I. The total recurrence rate was 3.7% with 0.7% vaginal lesions. The crude 5-year survival rate for the complete series was 91.8% compared to 13.3% for those with recurrences. Depth of myometrical infiltration (>1/3 of the uterine wall) and nuclear grade were the most important prognostic factors. Clinically significant late radiation reactions (bladder and/or rectum) were recorded in 6.9%. The absorbed dose per fraction and the size of the treatment volume were significantly related to the occurrence of both early and late radiation reactions. Vaginal shortening was closely related to the dose per fraction, length of the referce isodose and the applicator diameter. The shape of the vaginal applicator versus the isodose contours and the importance of the source train geometry and relative activity for absorbed dose inhomogeneitis within the treatment volume are discussed. Cumulative radiation effect (CRE) and linear-quadratic (LQ) calculations have been performed and related to tissue reactions within the target volume and in the risk organs. An alpha-beta quotient of 8.8 Gy for vaginal shrinkage effect and 2.0 Gy for late rectal complications are suggested on the basis of calculations using a maximum likelihood method for quantal radiation data. (orig.)

  12. Postoperative vaginal irradiation with high dose rate afterloading technique in endometrial carcinoma stage I

    Sorbe, B.G.; Smeds, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    A high dose rate ( 60 Co) afterloading technique was used for postoperative prophylactic vaginal irradiation in a series of 404 women with endometrial carcinoma Stage I. The total recurrence rate was 3.7% with 0.7% vaginal deposits. The crude 5-year survival rate for the complete series was 91.8% compared to 13.3% for those with recurrences. Depth of myometrial infiltration (greater than 1/3 of the uterine wall) and nuclear grade were the most important prognostic factors. Clinically significant late radiation reactions (bladder and/or rectum) were recorded in 6.9%. Dose per fraction and the size of the target volume were highly significantly related to the occurrence of both early and late radiation reactions. Vaginal shortening is closely related to the dose per fraction, length of the reference isodose, and the applicator diameter. The shape of the vaginal applicator versus the isodoses and the importance of the source train geometry and relative activity for dose gradient inhomogeneities within the target volume are discussed. Cumulative radiation effect (CRE) and linear-quadratic (LQ) calculations have been performed and related to tissue reactions within the target volume and in the risk organs. An alpha-beta quotient of 8.8 for vaginal shrinkage effect and 2.0 for late rectal complications are suggested on the basis of calculations using a maximum likelihood method for quantal radiation data

  13. A two-stage approach for managing actuators redundancy and its application to fault tolerant flight control

    Zhong Lunlong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In safety-critical systems such as transportation aircraft, redundancy of actuators is introduced to improve fault tolerance. How to make the best use of remaining actuators to allow the system to continue achieving a desired operation in the presence of some actuators failures is the main subject of this paper. Considering that many dynamical systems, including flight dynamics of a transportation aircraft, can be expressed as an input affine nonlinear system, a new state representation is adopted here where the output dynamics are related with virtual inputs associated with the intended operation. This representation, as well as the distribution matrix associated with the effectiveness of the remaining operational actuators, allows us to define different levels of fault tolerant governability with respect to actuators’ failures. Then, a two-stage control approach is developed, leading first to the inversion of the output dynamics to get nominal values for the virtual inputs and then to the solution of a linear quadratic (LQ problem to compute the solicitation of each operational actuator. The proposed approach is applied to the control of a transportation aircraft which performs a stabilized roll maneuver while a partial failure appears. Two fault scenarios are considered and the resulting performance of the proposed approach is displayed and discussed.

  14. Single-dose radiotherapy for painful bone metastases

    Kal, H.B.

    1999-01-01

    Background: External beam radiotherapy is frequently applied for palliative treatment of painful bone lesions with a variety of fractionation schemes. There is a continuous interest to administer only 1 or a few dose fractions for inducing pain relief. Methods: A review of the literature was made with the aim to determine whether a treatment can be deduced that is simple and effective. The linear-quadratic (L-Q) concept was applied to compare reported therapy schemes which each other for the iso-effect pain relief. Results: Single-dose and fractionated radiotherapy resulted in partial or complete pain relief in about 80% of the patients. Complete responses have been observed in about 43% of the patients. For patients responding to treatment, the duration of pain relief is at least 3 to 4 months with reported duration of up to 1 year or even longer. Conclusion: Based on this review of literature data concerning randomized trials a treatment with a single dose of 8 Gy is effective for inducing pain relief. (orig.) [de

  15. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Modeling of the Cellular Dosimetry of 64Cu: Comparison with MIRDcell S Values and Implications for Studies of Its Cytotoxic Effects.

    Cai, Zhongli; Kwon, Yongkyu Luke; Reilly, Raymond M

    2017-02-01

    64 Cu emits positrons as well as β - particles and Auger and internal conversion electrons useful for radiotherapy. Our objective was to model the cellular dosimetry of 64 Cu under different geometries commonly used to study the cytotoxic effects of 64 Cu. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) was used to simulate the transport of all particles emitted by 64 Cu from the cell surface (CS), cytoplasm (Cy), or nucleus (N) of a single cell; monolayer in a well (radius = 0.32-1.74 cm); or a sphere (radius = 50-6,000 μm) of cells to calculate S values. The radius of the cell and N ranged from 5 to 12 μm and 2 to 11 μm, respectively. S values were obtained by MIRDcell for comparison. MCF7/HER2-18 cells were exposed in vitro to 64 Cu-labeled trastuzumab. The subcellular distribution of 64 Cu was measured by cell fractionation. The surviving fraction was determined in a clonogenic assay. The relative differences of MCNP versus MIRDcell self-dose S values (S self ) for 64 Cu ranged from -0.2% to 3.6% for N to N (S N←N ), 2.3% to 8.6% for Cy to N (S N←Cy ), and -12.0% to 7.3% for CS to N (S N←CS ). The relative differences of MCNP versus MIRDcell cross-dose S values were 25.8%-30.6% for a monolayer and 30%-34% for a sphere, respectively. The ratios of S N←N versus S N←Cy and S N←Cy versus S N←CS decreased with increasing ratio of the N of the cell versus radius of the cell and the size of the monolayer or sphere. The surviving fraction of MCF7 /: HER2-18 cells treated with 64 Cu-labeled trastuzumab (0.016-0.368 MBq/μg, 67 nM) for 18 h versus the absorbed dose followed a linear survival curve with α = 0.51 ± 0.05 Gy -1 and R 2 = 0.8838. This is significantly different from the linear quadratic survival curve of MCF7 /: HER2-18 cells exposed to γ-rays. MCNP- and MIRDcell-calculated S values agreed well. 64 Cu in the N increases the dose to the N in isolated single cells but has less effect in a cell monolayer or small cluster of cells simulating a micrometastasis

  16. Pulsed dose rate and fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy: choice of brachytherapy schedules to replace low dose rate treatments

    Visser, Andries G.; Aardweg, Gerard J.M.J. van den; Levendag, Peter C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a new type of afterloading brachytherapy (BT) in which a continuous low dose rate (LDR) treatment is simulated by a series of 'pulses,' i.e., fractions of short duration (less than 0.5 h) with intervals between fractions of 1 to a few hours. At the Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, the term 'PDR brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with a large number of fractions (at least four per day), while the term 'fractionated high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with just one or two brachytherapy fractions per day. Both treatments can be applied as alternatives for LDR BT. This article deals with the choice between PDR and fractionated HDR schedules and proposes possible fractionation schedules. Methods and Materials: To calculate HDR and PDR fractionation schedules with the intention of being equivalent to LDR BT, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been used in an incomplete repair formulation as given by Brenner and Hall, and by Thames. In contrast to earlier applications of this model, both the total physical dose and the overall time were not kept identical for LDR and HDR/PDR schedules. A range of possible PDR treatment schedules is presented, both for booster applications (in combination with external radiotherapy (ERT) and for BT applications as a single treatment. Because the knowledge of both α/β values and the half time for repair of sublethal damage (T (1(2)) ), which are required for these calculations, is quite limited, calculations regarding the equivalence of LDR and PDR treatments have been performed for a wide range of values of α/β and T (1(2)) . The results are presented graphically as PDR/LDR dose ratios and as ratios of the PDR/LDR tumor control probabilities. Results: If the condition that total physical dose and overall time of a PDR treatment must be exactly identical to the values for the corresponding LDR treatment regimen is not applied, there appears

  17. Leptoquarks: Neutrino masses and related accelerator signals

    Aristizabal Sierra, D.; Hirsch, M.; Kovalenko, S. G.

    2008-01-01

    Leptoquark-Higgs interactions induce mixing between leptoquark (LQ) states with different chiralities once the electroweak symmetry is broken. In such LQ models Majorana neutrino masses are generated at 1-loop order. Here we calculate the neutrino mass matrix and explore the constraints on the parameter space enforced by the assumption that LQ-loops explain current neutrino oscillation data. LQs will be produced at the CERN LHC, if their masses are at or below the TeV scale. Since the fermionic decays of LQs are governed by the same Yukawa couplings, which are responsible for the nontrivial neutrino mass matrix, several decay branching ratios of LQ states can be predicted from measured neutrino data. Especially interesting is that large lepton flavor violating rates in muon and tau final states are expected. In addition, the model predicts that, if kinematically possible, heavier LQs decay into lighter ones plus either a standard model Higgs boson or a Z 0 /W ± gauge boson. Thus, experiments at the LHC might be able to exclude the LQ mechanism as an explanation of neutrino data.

  18. An Lq-approach with generalized anisotropic weight of the weak solution of the Oseen flow around a rotating body in the whole space

    Kračmar, S.; Krbec, Miroslav; Nečasová, Šárka; Penel, P.; Schumacher, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 12 (2009), e2940-e2957 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : littlewood-Paley theory * maximal operators * rotating body * Muckenhoupt weights * one-sided weights Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2009

  19. THE EXISTENCE OF THE STABILIZING SOLUTION OF THE RICCATI EQUATION ARISING IN DISCRETE-TIME STOCHASTIC ZERO SUM LQ DYNAMIC GAMES WITH PERIODIC COEFFICIENTS

    Vasile Dr ̆agan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the problem for solving a discrete-time periodic gen- eralized Riccati equation with an indefinite sign of the quadratic term. A necessary condition for the existence of bounded and stabilizing solution of the discrete-time Riccati equation with an indefinite quadratic term is derived. The stabilizing solution is positive semidefinite and satisfies the introduced sign conditions. The proposed condition is illustrated via a numerical example.

  20. Analysis of Market Risk, Financial Leverage, and Firm Size Toward Stock Return on Non-banking Companies Listed in Lq45 Index of Idx

    Tumewu, Ferdinand; Pangemanan, Sifrid S.; Koluku, Rini Feronica

    2015-01-01

    In the world of investment, one underlies the decision of investors is stock returns that are depend on many factors. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of Market Risk, Financial Leverage, and Firm Size to Stock Return. By counting these factors, investors can see the effect of stock returns are important in decision making. The research methods associative with regression analysis and classical assumption techniques that include normality, multicollinearity, heteroscedastici...

  1. Resource-efficient ILC for LTI/LTV systems through LQ tracking and stable inversion: enabling large feedforward tasks on a position-dependent printer

    van Zundert, J.; Bolder, J.J.; Koekebakker, S.H.; Oomen, T.A.E.

    Iterative learning control (ILC) enables high performance for systems that execute repeating tasks. Norm-optimal ILC based on lifted system representations provides an analytic expression for the optimal feedforward signal. However, for large tasks the computational load increases rapidly for

  2. Effects of radiation quality and oxygen on clustered DNA lesions and cell death.

    Stewart, Robert D; Yu, Victor K; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Koumenis, Constantinos; Park, Joo Han; Carlson, David J

    2011-11-01

    decreases from 100% to 0%. For a 12 MeV (12)C ion (681 keV/μm), the 'predicted RBE for DSB induction increases from 3.4 (100% O(2)) to 9.8 (0% O(2)). Estimates of linear-quadratic (LQ) cell survival model parameters (α and β) are closely correlated to the Monte Carlo-predicted trends in DSB induction for a wide range of particle types, energies and oxygen concentrations. The analysis suggests α is, as a first approximation, proportional to the initial number of DSBs per cell, and β is proportional to the square of the initial number of DSBs per cell. Although the reported studies provide some evidence supporting the hypothesis that DSBs are a biologically critical form of clustered DNA lesion, the induction of Fpg and Endo III clusters in HeLa cells irradiated by γ rays exhibits similar trends with oxygen concentration. Other types of non-DSB cluster may still play an important role in reproductive cell death. The MCDS captures many of the essential trends in the formation of clustered DNA lesions by ionizing radiation and provides useful information to probe the multiscale effects and interactions of ionizing radiation in cells and tissues. Information from Monte Carlo simulations of cluster induction may also prove useful for efforts to better exploit radiation quality and reduce the impact of tumor hypoxia in proton and carbon-ion radiation therapy.

  3. Is radiation an appropriate model for chemical mutagenesis and carcinogenesis

    Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter attempts to show why the quadratic, or ''linear quadratic,'' relationship holds for organ dose-single cell radiation effects, and to explore the extension of this relationship to chemical exposures in general. Demonstrates that although the ''αD + βD 2 relationship'' may be unexpected for normal pharmacologicalmedical dose-response relationships, a linear, no-threshold curve of this kind is expected for all stochastic-type (accidental or risk) situations with health consequences (e.g. all common accidents) including exposure to ''low-level radiation'' (LLR). Discusses the stochastic or risk approach, relevant radiobiology, and the stochastic for chemicals. Assumes that even though actual mutational rates cannot be expected to apply to the relevance of Tradescantia or any other single cell system as a predictor for mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in animals and man, the cardinal principles of genetics largely transcend species and the particular environment in which the cell is located. Concludes that with regard to LLR, the curve shapes and other relationships developed for Tradescantia would be expected to apply in principle to animal and human mutagenesis and carcinogenesis

  4. Modeling, Control, and Estimation of Flexible, Aerodynamic Structures

    Ray, Cody W.

    Engineers have long been inspired by nature’s flyers. Such animals navigate complex environments gracefully and efficiently by using a variety of evolutionary adaptations for high-performance flight. Biologists have discovered a variety of sensory adaptations that provide flow state feedback and allow flying animals to feel their way through flight. A specialized skeletal wing structure and plethora of robust, adaptable sensory systems together allow nature’s flyers to adapt to myriad flight conditions and regimes. In this work, motivated by biology and the successes of bio-inspired, engineered aerial vehicles, linear quadratic control of a flexible, morphing wing design is investigated, helping to pave the way for truly autonomous, mission-adaptive craft. The proposed control algorithm is demonstrated to morph a wing into desired positions. Furthermore, motivated specifically by the sensory adaptations organisms possess, this work transitions to an investigation of aircraft wing load identification using structural response as measured by distributed sensors. A novel, recursive estimation algorithm is utilized to recursively solve the inverse problem of load identification, providing both wing structural and aerodynamic states for use in a feedback control, mission-adaptive framework. The recursive load identification algorithm is demonstrated to provide accurate load estimate in both simulation and experiment.

  5. Modelling Practice

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    This chapter deals with the practicalities of building, testing, deploying and maintaining models. It gives specific advice for each phase of the modelling cycle. To do this, a modelling framework is introduced which covers: problem and model definition; model conceptualization; model data...... requirements; model construction; model solution; model verification; model validation and finally model deployment and maintenance. Within the adopted methodology, each step is discussedthrough the consideration of key issues and questions relevant to the modelling activity. Practical advice, based on many...

  6. Leadership Models.

    Freeman, Thomas J.

    This paper discusses six different models of organizational structure and leadership, including the scalar chain or pyramid model, the continuum model, the grid model, the linking pin model, the contingency model, and the circle or democratic model. Each model is examined in a separate section that describes the model and its development, lists…

  7. Ghost-free, finite, fourth-order D = 3 gravity.

    Deser, S

    2009-09-04

    Canonical analysis of a recently proposed linear + quadratic curvature gravity model in D = 3 establishes its pure, irreducibly fourth derivative, quadratic curvature limit as both ghost-free and power-counting UV finite, thereby maximally violating standard folklore. This limit is representative of a generic class whose kinetic terms are conformally invariant in any dimension, but it is unique in simultaneously avoiding the transverse-traceless graviton ghosts plaguing D > 3 quadratic actions as well as double pole propagators in its other variables. While the two-term model is also unitary, its additional mode's second-derivative nature forfeits finiteness.

  8. Dynamic analysis of clustered building structures using substructures methods

    Leimbach, K.R.; Krutzik, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic substructure approach to the building cluster on a common base mat starts with the generation of Ritz-vectors for each building on a rigid foundation. The base mat plus the foundation soil is subjected to kinematic constraint modes, for example constant, linear, quadratic or cubic constraints. These constraint modes are also imposed on the buildings. By enforcing kinematic compatibility of the complete structural system on the basis of the constraint modes a reduced Ritz model of the complete cluster is obtained. This reduced model can now be analyzed by modal time history or response spectrum methods

  9. Hypofractionated stereotactic irradiation. Basic and clinical researches

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Miyakawa, Akifumi; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Otsuka, Shinya; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Ayakawa, Shiho

    2011-01-01

    Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) has a number of biological advantages over single-session radiosurgery. An apparent trend is seen in the clinic towards shift from the latter to the former; however, there is no adequate model to convert single doses to hypofractionated doses. The linear-quadratic model overestimates the effect of single-fraction radiation. This should be kept in mind in evaluating the doses of stereotactic irradiation. ''Biological effective dose'' should not be used in radiosurgery and hypofractionated SRT. Clinically, we have used 3- to 10-fraction SRT for acoustic neuroma and benign skull base tumors using cyberknife and tomotherapy. Preliminary results are encouraging. (author)

  10. Multivariable adaptive control of bio process

    Maher, M.; Bahhou, B.; Roux, G. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France); Maher, M. [Faculte des Sciences, Rabat (Morocco). Lab. de Physique

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a multivariable adaptive control of a continuous-flow fermentation process for the alcohol production. The linear quadratic control strategy is used for the regulation of substrate and ethanol concentrations in the bioreactor. The control inputs are the dilution rate and the influent substrate concentration. A robust identification algorithm is used for the on-line estimation of linear MIMO model`s parameters. Experimental results of a pilot-plant fermenter application are reported and show the control performances. (authors) 8 refs.

  11. Accounting for radiation quality in heavy ion therapy

    Kellerer, A.M.; Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung, Muenchen

    1997-01-01

    This introductory contribution outlines the need for models and their use in radiotherapy dose planning. The linear-quadratic dose relation is now predominantly used in therapy dose planning. In Section I it is linked to the earlier quantitative scheme for conventional radiotherapy. In Section II two major approaches are presented in a form that makes them comparable; the section can be read by itself, if this comparison alone is of interest. Models for therapy planning are tools, largely of empirical character; they do not need to elucidate unknown mechanisms of radiation action. The emphasis is, therefore, on the computational scheme, not on its interpretation. (orig.)

  12. Accounting for radiation quality in heavy ion therapy

    Kellerer, A M [LMU, Muenchen (Germany). Radiobiological Inst.; [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Nuklearbiologie

    1997-09-01

    This introductory contribution outlines the need for models and their use in radiotherapy dose planning. The linear-quadratic dose relation is now predominantly used in therapy dose planning. In Section I it is linked to the earlier quantitative scheme for conventional radiotherapy. In Section II two major approaches are presented in a form that makes them comparable; the section can be read by itself, if this comparison alone is of interest. Models for therapy planning are tools, largely of empirical character; they do not need to elucidate unknown mechanisms of radiation action. The emphasis is, therefore, on the computational scheme, not on its interpretation. (orig.)

  13. Control and Optimization of Network in Networked Control System

    Wang Zhiwen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to avoid quality of performance (QoP degradation resulting from quality of service (QoS, the solution to network congestion from the point of control theory, which marks departure of our results from the existing methods, is proposed in this paper. The congestion and bandwidth are regarded as state and control variables, respectively; then, the linear time-invariant (LTI model between congestion state and bandwidth of network is established. Consequently, linear quadratic method is used to eliminate the network congestion by allocating bandwidth dynamically. At last, numerical simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of this modeling approach.

  14. Models and role models.

    ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    Developing experimental models to understand dental caries has been the theme in our research group. Our first, the pH-cycling model, was developed to investigate the chemical reactions in enamel or dentine, which lead to dental caries. It aimed to leverage our understanding of the fluoride mode of action and was also utilized for the formulation of oral care products. In addition, we made use of intra-oral (in situ) models to study other features of the oral environment that drive the de/remineralization balance in individual patients. This model addressed basic questions, such as how enamel and dentine are affected by challenges in the oral cavity, as well as practical issues related to fluoride toothpaste efficacy. The observation that perhaps fluoride is not sufficiently potent to reduce dental caries in the present-day society triggered us to expand our knowledge in the bacterial aetiology of dental caries. For this we developed the Amsterdam Active Attachment biofilm model. Different from studies on planktonic ('single') bacteria, this biofilm model captures bacteria in a habitat similar to dental plaque. With data from the combination of these models, it should be possible to study separate processes which together may lead to dental caries. Also products and novel agents could be evaluated that interfere with either of the processes. Having these separate models in place, a suggestion is made to design computer models to encompass the available information. Models but also role models are of the utmost importance in bringing and guiding research and researchers. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Spinal Cord Doses in Palliative Lung Radiotherapy Schedules

    Ffrrcsi, F.H.; Parton, C.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: We aim to check the safety of the standard palliative radiotherapy techniques by using the Linear quadratic model for a careful estimation of the doses received by the spinal cord, in all standard palliative lung radiotherapy fields and fractionation. Material and Methods: All patients surveyed at this prospective audit were treated with palliative chest radio-therapy for lung cancer over a period from January to June 2005 by different clinical oncology specialists within the department. Radiotherapy field criteria were recorded and compared with the recommended limits of the MRC trial protocols for the dose and fractionation prescribed. Doses delivered to structures off the field central axis were estimated using a standard CT scan of the chest. Dose estimates were made using an SLPLAN planning system. As unexpected spinal cord toxicity has been reported after hypo fractionated chest radiotherapy, a sagittal view was used to calculate the isodoses along the length of the spinal cord that could lie within the RT field. Equivalent dose estimates are made using the Linear Quadratic Equivalent Dose formula (LQED). The relative radiation sensitivity of spinal cord for myelopathy (the a/b dose) cord has been estimated as a/b = 1 Gy. Results: 17 Gy in 2 fraction and 39 Gy in 13 fraction protocols have spinal cord equivalent doses (using the linear-quadratic model) that lie within the conventional safe limits of 50 Gy in 25 fractions for the 100% isodose. However when the dosimetry is modelled for a 6 MV 100 cm isocentric linac in 3 dimensions, and altered separations and air space inhomogeneity are considered, the D-Max doses consistently fall above this limit on our 3 model patients. Conclusion: The 17 Gy in 2 fraction and 39 Gy in 13 fraction protocol would risk spinal cord damage if the radio therapist was unaware of the potential spinal cord doses. Alterative doses are suggested below 15.5 Gy/ 2 fractions (7 days apart) would be most acceptable

  16. Radiation-induced lung damage in rats: The influence of fraction spacing on effect per fraction

    Haston, C.K.; Hill, R.P.; Newcomb, C.H.; Van Dyk, J.

    1994-01-01

    When the linear-quadratic model is used to predict fractionated treatments which are isoeffective, it is usually assumed that each (equal size) treatment fraction has an equal effect, independent of the time at which it was delivered during a course of treatment. Previous work has indicated that this assumption may not be valid in the context of radiation-induced lung damage in rats. Consequently the authors tested directly the validity of the assumption that each fraction has an equal effect, independent of the time it is delivered. An experiment was completed in which fractionated irradiation was given to whole thoraces of Sprague-Dawley rats. All treatment schedules consisted of eleven equal dose fractions in 36 days given as a split course, with some groups receiving the bulk of the doses early in the treatment schedule, before a 27-day gap, and others receiving most of the dose toward the end of the treatment schedule, after the time gap. To monitor the incidence of radiation-induced damage, breathing rate and lethality assays were used. The maximum differences in the LD 50 s and breathing rate ED 50 s for the different fractionation schedules were 4.0% and 7.7% respectively. The lethality data and breathing rate data were consistent with results expected from modelling using the linear-quadratic model with the inclusion of an overall time factor, but not the generalized linear-quadratic model which accounted for fraction spacing. For conventional daily fractionation, and within the range of experimental uncertainties, the results indicate that the effect of a treatment fraction does not depend on the time at which it is given (its position) in the treatment. The results indicate no need to extend isoeffect formulae to consider the effect of each fraction separately for radiation-induced lung damage. 21 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Model(ing) Law

    Carlson, Kerstin

    The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) was the first and most celebrated of a wave of international criminal tribunals (ICTs) built in the 1990s designed to advance liberalism through international criminal law. Model(ing) Justice examines the case law of the ICTY...

  18. Models and role models

    ten Cate, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Developing experimental models to understand dental caries has been the theme in our research group. Our first, the pH-cycling model, was developed to investigate the chemical reactions in enamel or dentine, which lead to dental caries. It aimed to leverage our understanding of the fluoride mode of

  19. LARP Long Nb3Sn Quadrupole Design

    Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Chlachidize, G.; Dietderich, D.; Feher, S.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, R.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Kerby, J.; Lamm, M.; Lietzke, A.; McInturff, A.; Muratore, J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitsky, I.; Sabbi, G.L.; Schmalzle, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; Wanderer, P.; Whitson, G.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    A major milestone for the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is the test, by the end of 2009, of two 4m-long quadrupole magnets (LQ) wound with Nb 3 Sn conductor. The goal of these magnets is to be a proof of principle that Nb 3 Sn is a viable technology for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. The design of the LQ is based on the design of the LARP Technological Quadrupoles, presently under development at FNAL and LBNL, with 90-mm aperture and gradient higher than 200 T/m. The design of the first LQ model will be completed by the end of 2007 with the selection of a mechanical design. In this paper we present the coil design addressing some fabrication technology issues, the quench protection study, and three designs of the support structure

  20. LARP Long Nb3Sn Quadrupole Design

    Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Chlachidize, G.; Dietderich, D.; Feher, S.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Fermilab; Brookhaven; LBL, Berkeley; Texas A-M

    2007-01-01

    A major milestone for the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is the test, by the end of 2009, of two 4m-long quadrupole magnets (LQ) wound with Nb3Sn conductor. The goal of these magnets is to be a proof of principle that Nb3Sn is a viable technology for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. The design of the LQ is based on the design of the LARP Technological Quadrupoles, presently under development at FNAL and LBNL, with 90-mm aperture and gradient higher than 200 T/m. The design of the first LQ model will be completed by the end of 2007 with the selection of a mechanical design. In this paper we present the coil design addressing some fabrication technology issues, the quench protection study, and three designs of the support structure

  1. LARP Long Nb3Sn Quadrupole Design

    Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Chlachidize, G.; Dietderich, D.; Feher, S.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A.; Hafalia, A.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Kerby, J.; Lamm, M.; Lietzke, A.; McInturff, A.; Muratore, J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitsky, I.; Sabbi, G.L.; Schmalzle, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; Wanderer, P.; Whitson, G.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    A major milestone for the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is the test, by the end of 2009, of two 4m-long quadrupole magnets (LQ) wound with Nb 3 Sn conductor. The goal of these magnets is to be a proof of principle that Nb 3 Sn is a viable technology for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. The design of the LQ is based on the design of the LARP Technological Quadrupoles, presently under development at FNAL and LBNL, with 90-mm aperture and gradient higher than 200 T/m. The design of the first LQ model will be completed by the end of 2007 with the selection of a mechanical design. In this paper we present the coil design addressing some fabrication technology issues, the quench protection study, and three designs of the support structure

  2. Repair-dependent cell radiation survival and transformation: an integrated theory

    Sutherland, John C

    2014-01-01

    The repair-dependent model of cell radiation survival is extended to include radiation-induced transformations. The probability of transformation is presumed to scale with the number of potentially lethal damages that are repaired in a surviving cell or the interactions of such damages. The theory predicts that at doses corresponding to high survival, the transformation frequency is the sum of simple polynomial functions of dose; linear, quadratic, etc, essentially as described in widely used linear-quadratic expressions. At high doses, corresponding to low survival, the ratio of transformed to surviving cells asymptotically approaches an upper limit. The low dose fundamental- and high dose plateau domains are separated by a downwardly concave transition region. Published transformation data for mammalian cells show the high-dose plateaus predicted by the repair-dependent model for both ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. For the neoplastic transformation experiments that were analyzed, the data can be fit with only the repair-dependent quadratic function. At low doses, the transformation frequency is strictly quadratic, but becomes sigmodial over a wider range of doses. Inclusion of data from the transition region in a traditional linear-quadratic analysis of neoplastic transformation frequency data can exaggerate the magnitude of, or create the appearance of, a linear component. Quantitative analysis of survival and transformation data shows good agreement for ultraviolet radiation; the shapes of the transformation components can be predicted from survival data. For ionizing radiations, both neutrons and x-rays, survival data overestimate the transforming ability for low to moderate doses. The presumed cause of this difference is that, unlike UV photons, a single x-ray or neutron may generate more than one lethal damage in a cell, so the distribution of such damages in the population is not accurately described by Poisson statistics. However, the complete

  3. Asymptotic Method of Solution for a Problem of Construction of Optimal Gas-Lift Process Modes

    Fikrat A. Aliev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical model in oil extraction by gas-lift method for the case when the reciprocal value of well's depth represents a small parameter is considered. Problem of optimal mode construction (i.e., construction of optimal program trajectories and controls is reduced to the linear-quadratic optimal control problem with a small parameter. Analytic formulae for determining the solutions at the first-order approximation with respect to the small parameter are obtained. Comparison of the obtained results with known ones on a specific example is provided, which makes it, in particular, possible to use obtained results in realizations of oil extraction problems by gas-lift method.

  4. Response of human and rabbit lymphocytes to low doses of X-rays

    Fabry, L.

    1982-01-01

    The response of human and rabbit lymphocytes to low doses of X-rays was studied by the yields of dicentrics in first division metaphases. For both species, the dose-response curve was best fitted to the linear-quadratic model with a linear component predominating up to 67 and 42 rad respectively for man and rabbit. A calibration curve (5-400 rad) was obtained by combining the present results on man with previous data at higher doses. On the other hand, it appears that, at low doses, the radiosentivity of human lymphocytes is significantly higher than that of rabbit lymphocytes [fr

  5. Design Robust Controller for Rotary Kiln

    Omar D. Hernández-Arboleda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a robust controller for a rotary kiln. The designed controller is a combination of a fractional PID and linear quadratic regulator (LQR, these are not used to control the kiln until now, in addition robustness criteria are evaluated (gain margin, phase margin, strength gain, rejecting high frequency noise and sensitivity applied to the entire model (controller-plant, obtaining good results with a frequency range of 0.020 to 90 rad/s, which contributes to the robustness of the system.

  6. Establishment and validation of a dose-effect curve for γ-rays by cytogenetic analysis

    Barquinero, Joan F.; Caballin, Maria Rosa; Barrios, Leonardo; Ribas, Montserrat; Miro, Rosa; Egozcue, Josep

    1995-01-01

    A dose-effect curve obtained by analysis of dicentric chromosomes after irradiation of peripheral blood samples, from one donor, at 11 different doses of γ-rays is presented. For the elaboration of this curve, more than 18,000 first division metaphases have been analyzed. The results fit very well to the linear-quadratic model. To validate the curve, samples from six individuals (three controls and three occupationally exposed persons) were irradiated at 2 Gy. The results obtained, when compared with the curve, showed that in all cases the 95% confidence interval included the 2 Gy dose, with estimated dose ranges from 1.82 to 2.19 Gy

  7. A contingency table approach to nonparametric testing

    Rayner, JCW

    2000-01-01

    Most texts on nonparametric techniques concentrate on location and linear-linear (correlation) tests, with less emphasis on dispersion effects and linear-quadratic tests. Tests for higher moment effects are virtually ignored. Using a fresh approach, A Contingency Table Approach to Nonparametric Testing unifies and extends the popular, standard tests by linking them to tests based on models for data that can be presented in contingency tables.This approach unifies popular nonparametric statistical inference and makes the traditional, most commonly performed nonparametric analyses much more comp

  8. Iterative algorithms for computing the feedback Nash equilibrium point for positive systems

    Ivanov, I.; Imsland, Lars; Bogdanova, B.

    2017-03-01

    The paper studies N-player linear quadratic differential games on an infinite time horizon with deterministic feedback information structure. It introduces two iterative methods (the Newton method as well as its accelerated modification) in order to compute the stabilising solution of a set of generalised algebraic Riccati equations. The latter is related to the Nash equilibrium point of the considered game model. Moreover, we derive the sufficient conditions for convergence of the proposed methods. Finally, we discuss two numerical examples so as to illustrate the performance of both of the algorithms.

  9. Stable and optimal fuzzy control of a laboratory Antilock Braking System

    Precup, Radu-Emil; Spataru, Sergiu; Petriu, Emil M.

    2010-01-01

    of the rules using the domains of the input variables, and doing the local linearization of the plant model. The original T-S FCs are designed by parallel distributed compensation to obtain the state feedback gain matrices in the consequents of the rules. Two T-S FCs are tuned by imposing relaxed stability...... conditions to the fuzzy control systems (FCSs) and the other two T-S FCs are tuned by the linear-quadratic regulator approach applied to each rule. Linear matrix inequalities are solved to guarantee the global stability of the FCSs. Real-time experimental results validate the original T-S FCs and design...

  10. Robust control technique for nuclear power plants

    Murphy, G.V.; Bailey, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    This report summarizes the linear quadratic Guassian (LQG) design technique with loop transfer recovery (LQG/LTR) for design of control systems. The concepts of return ratio, return difference, inverse return difference, and singular values are summarized. The LQG/LTR design technique allows the synthesis of a robust control system. To illustrate the LQG/LTR technique, a linearized model of a simple process has been chosen. The process has three state variables, one input, and one output. Three control system design methods are compared: LQG, LQG/LTR, and a proportional plus integral controller (PI). 7 refs., 20 figs., 6 tabs

  11. Minimum mean square error estimation and approximation of the Bayesian update

    Litvinenko, Alexander; Matthies, Hermann G.; Zander, Elmar

    2015-01-01

    Given: a physical system modeled by a PDE or ODE with uncertain coefficient q(w), a measurement operator Y (u(q); q), where u(q; w) uncertain solution. Aim: to identify q(w). The mapping from parameters to observations is usually not invertible, hence this inverse identification problem is generally ill-posed. To identify q(w) we derived non-linear Bayesian update from the variational problem associated with conditional expectation. To reduce cost of the Bayesian update we offer a functional approximation, e.g. polynomial chaos expansion (PCE). New: We derive linear, quadratic etc approximation of full Bayesian update.

  12. Induction of lacI- mutations in Escherichia coli cells after single and split-dose irradiation

    Kozubek, S.; Ryznar, L.

    1992-01-01

    In the lacI system of Escherichia coli, X-ray mutagenesis follows a linear-quadratic curve with suppression; the survival curve is exponential. Dose fractionation leads to nearly complete repair of premutational lesions during an incubation interval of 3.5 h. Repair starts with a delay of 1.5-2 h, suggesting the involvement of an inducible repair/mutation fixation system. The dose-dependence of mutagenesis is described by a simple model assuming two hits being required. A probable explanation might be that the premutagenic lesions consist of two closely spaced lesions on the opposite strands of the DNA molecule. (author)

  13. Genetic effects of low x-ray doses. Progress report, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Abrahamson, S.; Meyer, H.U.

    1977-09-01

    A linear-quadratic model of dose-kinetics is proposed for x-ray induced recessive lethal mutations in oogonia of Drosophila. From this it should follow that at higher total doses fractionation treatments should give a lower yield of mutations than an equivalent acute exposure. A dose of 6000 R, given acutely and in 3 different fractionation regimes gave results in the expected direction for 2 x 3000 R, and a significant decrease for 3 x 2000 R and for 4 x 1500 R fractionations

  14. Multivariable control in nuclear power stations

    Parent, M.; McMorran, P.D.

    1982-11-01

    Multivariable methods have the potential to improve the control of large systems such as nuclear power stations. Linear-quadratic optimal control is a multivariable method based on the minimization of a cost function. A related technique leads to the Kalman filter for estimation of plant state from noisy measurements. A design program for optimal control and Kalman filtering has been developed as part of a computer-aided design package for multivariable control systems. The method is demonstrated on a model of a nuclear steam generator, and simulated results are presented

  15. Statistical methods in regression and calibration analysis of chromosome aberration data

    Merkle, W.

    1983-01-01

    The method of iteratively reweighted least squares for the regression analysis of Poisson distributed chromosome aberration data is reviewed in the context of other fit procedures used in the cytogenetic literature. As an application of the resulting regression curves methods for calculating confidence intervals on dose from aberration yield are described and compared, and, for the linear quadratic model a confidence interval is given. Emphasis is placed on the rational interpretation and the limitations of various methods from a statistical point of view. (orig./MG)

  16. Radiosurgery and the double logistic product formula

    Flickinger, J.C.; Steiner, L.

    1990-01-01

    The double logistic product formula is proposed as a method for predicting the probability of developing brain necrosis after high dose irradiation of small target volumes as used in stereotactic radiosurgery. Dose-response data observed for the production of localized radiation necreosis for treating intractable pain with the original Leksell gamma unit were used to choose the best fitting parameters for the double logistic product formula. This model can be used with either exponential or linear quadratic formulas to account for the effects of dose, fractionation and time in addition to volume. Dose-response predictions for stereotactic radiosurgery with different sized collimators are presented. (author). 41 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  17. Maximum principle for a stochastic delayed system involving terminal state constraints.

    Wen, Jiaqiang; Shi, Yufeng

    2017-01-01

    We investigate a stochastic optimal control problem where the controlled system is depicted as a stochastic differential delayed equation; however, at the terminal time, the state is constrained in a convex set. We firstly introduce an equivalent backward delayed system depicted as a time-delayed backward stochastic differential equation. Then a stochastic maximum principle is obtained by virtue of Ekeland's variational principle. Finally, applications to a state constrained stochastic delayed linear-quadratic control model and a production-consumption choice problem are studied to illustrate the main obtained result.

  18. Optimization of radiotherapeutic treatment with means scarcity: our two years experience; Optimizacion del tratamiento radioterapico con carestia de medios: nuestra experiencia de dos anios

    Velazquez M, S.; Carrera M, F.; Gomez-Millan B, J.; Bayo L, E.; Gutierrez B, L. [Hospital Juan Ramon Jimenez, Ronda Norte s/n, 21005 Huelva (Spain)

    1998-12-31

    The objectives of this work are to present solutions adopted with the purpose to improve the technical quality of our treatments. It is described the ICRU-50 nomenclature employed in our department, the application of the linear quadratic radiobiological model for the non conventional division into fractions calculations and some proposals from diverse localizations. It is described some techniques for treatments planning, as the use of modulator fields and mobile gaps with hemi-fields. Also it is described some contrivances utilized, such as the shoulders tensor in head and neck tumors. The radiotherapeutic treatment with few sources it is optimized with the personnel effort and the low costs. (Author)

  19. Optimization of radiotherapeutic treatment with means scarcity: our two years experience

    Velazquez M, S.; Carrera M, F.; Gomez-Millan B, J.; Bayo L, E.; Gutierrez B, L.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to present solutions adopted with the purpose to improve the technical quality of our treatments. It is described the ICRU-50 nomenclature employed in our department, the application of the linear quadratic radiobiological model for the non conventional division into fractions calculations and some proposals from diverse localizations. It is described some techniques for treatments planning, as the use of modulator fields and mobile gaps with hemi-fields. Also it is described some contrivances utilized, such as the shoulders tensor in head and neck tumors. The radiotherapeutic treatment with few sources it is optimized with the personnel effort and the low costs. (Author)

  20. Minimum mean square error estimation and approximation of the Bayesian update

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2015-01-07

    Given: a physical system modeled by a PDE or ODE with uncertain coefficient q(w), a measurement operator Y (u(q); q), where u(q; w) uncertain solution. Aim: to identify q(w). The mapping from parameters to observations is usually not invertible, hence this inverse identification problem is generally ill-posed. To identify q(w) we derived non-linear Bayesian update from the variational problem associated with conditional expectation. To reduce cost of the Bayesian update we offer a functional approximation, e.g. polynomial chaos expansion (PCE). New: We derive linear, quadratic etc approximation of full Bayesian update.

  1. Calibration in a manikin of a high dose rate equipment by remote charge

    Alfonso La Guardia, Rodolfo; Toledo Jimenez, Pablo; Pich Leon, Victor

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to know the immediate results obtained with laparoscopic cholecystectomy in The use of High Dose Rate brachytherapy in Cuba has been limited to AGAT-V Soviet installations. In order to calibrate one of these installations for its clinical use, it was developed a procedure based on the direct measurement of the dose absorbed in referral point B of a paraffin manikin. Results obtained as a result of calibration are shown. According to these results, it was carried out an evaluation of the effective doses administered on prescription point A by using the linear quadratic model

  2. Production in Incomplete Markets

    Crès, Hervé; Tvede, Mich

    Abstract In the present paper we study voting-based corporate control in a general equilibrium model with incomplete financial markets. Since voting takes place in a multi-dimensional setting, super-majority rules are needed to ensure existence of equilibrium. In a linear-quadratic setup we show ...... that the endogenization of voting weights (given by portfolio holdings) can give rise to - through selffulfilling expectations - dramatical political instability, i.e. Condorcet cycles of length two even for very high majority rules....

  3. Production in incomplete markets

    Crès, Hervé; Tvede, Mich

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper we study voting-based corporate control in a general equilibrium model with incomplete financial markets. Since voting takes place in a multi-dimensional setting, super-majority rules are needed to ensure existence of equilibrium. In a linear-quadratic setup we show that the ...... that the endogenization of voting weights (given by portfolio holdings) can give rise to - through self-fulfilling expectations - dramatical political instability, i.e. Condorcet cycles of length two even for very high majority rules....

  4. Modelling SDL, Modelling Languages

    Michael Piefel

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Today's software systems are too complex to implement them and model them using only one language. As a result, modern software engineering uses different languages for different levels of abstraction and different system aspects. Thus to handle an increasing number of related or integrated languages is the most challenging task in the development of tools. We use object oriented metamodelling to describe languages. Object orientation allows us to derive abstract reusable concept definitions (concept classes from existing languages. This language definition technique concentrates on semantic abstractions rather than syntactical peculiarities. We present a set of common concept classes that describe structure, behaviour, and data aspects of high-level modelling languages. Our models contain syntax modelling using the OMG MOF as well as static semantic constraints written in OMG OCL. We derive metamodels for subsets of SDL and UML from these common concepts, and we show for parts of these languages that they can be modelled and related to each other through the same abstract concepts.

  5. Acumulação de capital, utilização da capacidade produtiva e inflação: Uma análise a partir de um modelo pós-keynesiano não linear Capital acumulation, capacity utilization and inflation: an analisys based in a non-linear post-keynesian macrodynamic model

    José Luís Oreiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem por objetivo analisar os efeitos da inflação sobre a acumulação de capital e o grau de utilização da capacidade produtiva no âmbito de um modelo pós-keynesiano de crescimento, no qual o investimento é uma função não linear (quadrática da taxa de inflação. Nesse contexto, demonstra-se a existência de dois valores de equilíbrio de curto prazo para a taxa de inflação e o grau de utilização da capacidade produtiva. O primeiro equilíbrio é caracterizado pela existência de um baixo nível de utilização da capacidade produtiva e uma baixa taxa de inflação. No segundo equilíbrio, o grau de utilização da capacidade produtiva é alto, mas a inflação também é elevada. Esse resultado faz com que a condução da política de estabilização seja condicionada à posição de equilíbrio na qual a economia se encontra. A estabilidade do equilíbrio de longo prazo dependerá não só da posição de equilíbrio de curto prazo em que a economia se encontra (baixo ou alto bem como da velocidade de resposta da política monetária a divergências entre a inflação efetiva e a meta de inflação definida pelo Banco Central e da velocidade de correção dos erros de previsão dos agentes econômicos quanto à taxa de inflação. Desse modo, como corolário desta conclusão, segue-se que não existe uma regra ótima de política econômica que possa ser aplicada independentemente do estado em que a economia se encontra.The aim of this article is to analyze the effects of inflation on capital accumulation and on the degree of capacity utilization within the ambit of post Keynesian growth and distribution model in which investment is supposed to be a non-linear (quadratic function of inflation rate. Within this framework we demonstrate the existence of two short-run equilibrium values for the inflation rate and the degree of capacity utilization. The first equilibrium is characterized by a low degree of capacity

  6. Modelling the models

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    By analysing the production of mesons in the forward region of LHC proton-proton collisions, the LHCf collaboration has provided key information needed to calibrate extremely high-energy cosmic ray models.   Average transverse momentum (pT) as a function of rapidity loss ∆y. Black dots represent LHCf data and the red diamonds represent SPS experiment UA7 results. The predictions of hadronic interaction models are shown by open boxes (sibyll 2.1), open circles (qgsjet II-03) and open triangles (epos 1.99). Among these models, epos 1.99 shows the best overall agreement with the LHCf data. LHCf is dedicated to the measurement of neutral particles emitted at extremely small angles in the very forward region of LHC collisions. Two imaging calorimeters – Arm1 and Arm2 – take data 140 m either side of the ATLAS interaction point. “The physics goal of this type of analysis is to provide data for calibrating the hadron interaction models – the well-known &...

  7. Search for second generation leptoquarks with ATLAS at the LHC

    Krobath, Gernot

    2008-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider will collide protons with protons at a center-of-mass energy of up to 14 TeV. New physics phenomena and new particles are predicted to be detectable with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. One of these predicted new particles beyond the Standard Model are leptoquarks. This thesis deals with the search for scalar second generation leptoquarks produced in pairs. Second generation leptoquarks decay into a muon-type lepton and a quark. In this thesis the decay of both second generation leptoquarks into a muon and a quark is considered. Since pair production is studied the final state consists of two high-energetic muons and two high-energetic jets. This thesis studies second generation leptoquarks with masses of m LQ =300 GeV, m LQ =400 GeV, m LQ =600 GeV and m LQ =800 GeV. The best cut variables for the discrimination between the signal and the main Standard Model backgrounds t anti t and Z/γ * found in this analysis are the p T of the muons, S T (the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of the two selected muons and the transverse energies of the two selected jets), the mass of the selected dimuon system and the reconstructed leptoquark mass. The latter three cut variables have been optimized for a discovery with a 5σ significance including the systematic uncertainties and trigger efficiencies. Second generation leptoquarks have been excluded up to the mass of 300 GeV with a 95% confidence level at present experiments. The expected integrated luminosities needed for a 5σ discovery of the tested second generation leptoquark masses with the ATLAS detector have been calculated. This thesis shows that for a discovery with 5σ significance of a second generation leptoquark with m LQ =300 GeV and m LQ =400 GeV an expected integrated luminosity of 1.51 pb -1 and 7.42 pb -1 is needed respectively; this corresponds to a very early phase, i.e. the first few months, of the Large Hadron Collider run. For the discovery with a 5

  8. Application of finite-element method to three-dimensional nuclear reactor analysis

    Cheung, K.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the finite element method to solve a realistic one-or-two energy group, multiregion, three-dimensional static neutron diffusion problem is studied. Linear, quadratic, and cubic serendipity box-shape elements are used. The resulting sets of simultaneous algebraic equations with thousands of unknowns are solved by the conjugate gradient method, without forming the large coefficient matrix explicitly. This avoids the complicated data management schemes to store such a large coefficient matrix. Three finite-element computer programs: FEM-LINEAR, FEM-QUADRATIC and FEM-CUBIC were developed, using the linear, quadratic, and cubic box-shape elements respectively. They are self-contained, using simple nodal labeling schemes, without the need for separate finite element mesh generating routines. The efficiency and accuracy of these computer programs are then compared among themselves, and with other computer codes. The cubic element model is not recommended for practical usage because it gives almost identical results as the quadratic model, but it requires considerably longer computation time. The linear model is less accurate than the quadratic model, but it requires much shorter computation time. For a large 3-D problem, the linear model is to be preferred since it gives acceptable accuracy. The quadratic model may be used if improved accuracy is desired

  9. Existence of positive solutions to semilinear elliptic problems with ...

    57

    In mathematical modeling, elliptic partial differential equations are used together with boundary conditions specifying the .... Note that the trace map X ↩→ Lq(∂Ω) is compact for q ∈ [1, 2∗) (see, e.g., [4, ..... [2] Ambrosetti A and Rabinowitz P H, Dual variational methods in critical point theory and applications, J. Functional ...

  10. Solution structure of domain 1.1 of the sigma(A) factor from Bacillus subtilis is preformed for binding to the RNA polymerase core

    Zachrdla, M.; Padrta, P.; Rabatinová, Alžběta; Šanderová, Hana; Barvík, I.; Krásný, Libor; Žídek, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 292, č. 28 (2017), s. 11610-11617 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-16842S; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Bacillus * molecular modeling * nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2016

  11. Modeling and control for a magnetic levitation system based on SIMLAB platform in real time

    Mundher H.A. Yaseen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Levitation system becomes a hot topic of study due to the minimum friction and low energy consumption which regards as very important issues. This paper proposed a new magnetic levitation system using real-time control simulink feature of (SIMLAB microcontroller. The control system of the maglev transportation system is verified by simulations with experimental results, and its superiority is indicated in comparison with previous literature and conventional control strategies. In addition, the proposed system was implemented under effect of three controller types which are Linear–quadratic regulator (LQR, proportional–integral–derivative controller (PID and Lead compensation. As well, the controller system performance was compared in term of three parameters Peak overshoot, Settling time and Rise time. The findings prove the agreement of simulation with experimental results obtained. Moreover, the LQR controller produced a great stability and homogeneous response than other controllers used. For experimental results, the LQR brought a 14.6%, 0.199 and 0.064 for peak overshoot, Setting time and Rise time respectively. Keywords: Magnetic levitation system, Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR, PID control, Lead compensation

  12. Modeling and control for a magnetic levitation system based on SIMLAB platform in real time

    Yaseen, Mundher H. A.; Abd, Haider J.

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic Levitation system becomes a hot topic of study due to the minimum friction and low energy consumption which regards as very important issues. This paper proposed a new magnetic levitation system using real-time control simulink feature of (SIMLAB) microcontroller. The control system of the maglev transportation system is verified by simulations with experimental results, and its superiority is indicated in comparison with previous literature and conventional control strategies. In addition, the proposed system was implemented under effect of three controller types which are Linear-quadratic regulator (LQR), proportional-integral-derivative controller (PID) and Lead compensation. As well, the controller system performance was compared in term of three parameters Peak overshoot, Settling time and Rise time. The findings prove the agreement of simulation with experimental results obtained. Moreover, the LQR controller produced a great stability and homogeneous response than other controllers used. For experimental results, the LQR brought a 14.6%, 0.199 and 0.064 for peak overshoot, Setting time and Rise time respectively.

  13. Dose rate considerations in brachytherapy: biological equivalence of LDR and HDR

    Orton, C.G.

    1994-01-01

    The linear-quadratic model for cell survival and bioeffect doses is discussed and equations for low dose rate (LDR), high dose rate (HDR) and intermediate situations are presented. The model, when used to define LDR and single fractions of HDR, shows, that these correspond to irradiations lasting longer than about 14 hours or shorter than about 0.7 hours, respectively. It is shown that, for HDR to be as safe and effective as LDR, the dose-rate effect of LDR has to be replaced by the fractionation-effect of HDR. This is necessary in order to take advantage of the differential repair characteristics between late-reacting normal tissue and tumor cells at low doses and low dose rates. Using the linear-quadratic model to simulate repair mathematically, it is shown that the number of fractions required is highly dependent upon what parameters are assumed for normal tissues and tumor, as well as whether or not there is any physical advantage gained by conversion from LDR to HDR. (author). 20 refs., 7 figs

  14. Modelling Overview

    Larsen, Lars Bjørn; Vesterager, Johan

    This report provides an overview of the existing models of global manufacturing, describes the required modelling views and associated methods and identifies tools, which can provide support for this modelling activity.The model adopted for global manufacturing is that of an extended enterprise s...

  15. Document Models

    A.A. Malykh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the concept of locally simple models is considered. Locally simple models are arbitrarily complex models built from relatively simple components. A lot of practically important domains of discourse can be described as locally simple models, for example, business models of enterprises and companies. Up to now, research in human reasoning automation has been mainly concentrated around the most intellectually intensive activities, such as automated theorem proving. On the other hand, the retailer business model is formed from ”jobs”, and each ”job” can be modelled and automated more or less easily. At the same time, the whole retailer model as an integrated system is extremely complex. In this paper, we offer a variant of the mathematical definition of a locally simple model. This definition is intended for modelling a wide range of domains. Therefore, we also must take into account the perceptual and psychological issues. Logic is elitist, and if we want to attract to our models as many people as possible, we need to hide this elitism behind some metaphor, to which ’ordinary’ people are accustomed. As such a metaphor, we use the concept of a document, so our locally simple models are called document models. Document models are built in the paradigm of semantic programming. This allows us to achieve another important goal - to make the documentary models executable. Executable models are models that can act as practical information systems in the described domain of discourse. Thus, if our model is executable, then programming becomes redundant. The direct use of a model, instead of its programming coding, brings important advantages, for example, a drastic cost reduction for development and maintenance. Moreover, since the model is well and sound, and not dissolved within programming modules, we can directly apply AI tools, in particular, machine learning. This significantly expands the possibilities for automation and

  16. Model theory

    Chang, CC

    2012-01-01

    Model theory deals with a branch of mathematical logic showing connections between a formal language and its interpretations or models. This is the first and most successful textbook in logical model theory. Extensively updated and corrected in 1990 to accommodate developments in model theoretic methods - including classification theory and nonstandard analysis - the third edition added entirely new sections, exercises, and references. Each chapter introduces an individual method and discusses specific applications. Basic methods of constructing models include constants, elementary chains, Sko

  17. Dicty_cDB: VFA445 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available C: teinnvi*lq*dlshstssirkgknrr*ikscr*iwfkeqkrsmespirfsqnqkgc*rt prs**krpktyl*rfss...kr*rrkln**--- ---teinnvi*lq*dlshstssirkgknrr*ikscr*iwfkeqkrsmespirfsqnqkgc *rtprs**krpktyl*rfsspp*tpqirchgri

  18. Modeling Methods

    Healy, Richard W.; Scanlon, Bridget R.

    2010-01-01

    Simulation models are widely used in all types of hydrologic studies, and many of these models can be used to estimate recharge. Models can provide important insight into the functioning of hydrologic systems by identifying factors that influence recharge. The predictive capability of models can be used to evaluate how changes in climate, water use, land use, and other factors may affect recharge rates. Most hydrological simulation models, including watershed models and groundwater-flow models, are based on some form of water-budget equation, so the material in this chapter is closely linked to that in Chapter 2. Empirical models that are not based on a water-budget equation have also been used for estimating recharge; these models generally take the form of simple estimation equations that define annual recharge as a function of precipitation and possibly other climatic data or watershed characteristics.Model complexity varies greatly. Some models are simple accounting models; others attempt to accurately represent the physics of water movement through each compartment of the hydrologic system. Some models provide estimates of recharge explicitly; for example, a model based on the Richards equation can simulate water movement from the soil surface through the unsaturated zone to the water table. Recharge estimates can be obtained indirectly from other models. For example, recharge is a parameter in groundwater-flow models that solve for hydraulic head (i.e. groundwater level). Recharge estimates can be obtained through a model calibration process in which recharge and other model parameter values are adjusted so that simulated water levels agree with measured water levels. The simulation that provides the closest agreement is called the best fit, and the recharge value used in that simulation is the model-generated estimate of recharge.

  19. Search for Second Generation Leptoquarks with ATLAS at the LHC

    Krobath, Gernot

    The Large Hadron Collider will collide protons with protons at a center-of-mass energy of up to 14 TeV. New physics phenomena and new particles are predicted to be detectable with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. One of these predicted new particles beyond the Standard Model are leptoquarks. This thesis deals with the search for scalar second generation leptoquarks produced in pairs. Second generation leptoquarks decay into a muon-type lepton and a quark. In this thesis the decay of both second generation leptoquarks into a muon and a quark is considered. Since pair production is studied the final state consists of two high-energetic muons and two high-energetic jets. This thesis studies second generation leptoquarks with masses of mLQ = 300 GeV, mLQ = 400 GeV, mLQ = 600 GeV and mLQ = 800 GeV. The best cut variables for the discrimination between the signal and the main Standard Model backgrounds ttbar and Z/gamma* found in this analysis are the pT of the muons, ST (the scalar sum of the trans...

  20. Galactic models

    Buchler, J.R.; Gottesman, S.T.; Hunter, J.H. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on galactic models are presented. Individual topics addressed include: observations relating to galactic mass distributions; the structure of the Galaxy; mass distribution in spiral galaxies; rotation curves of spiral galaxies in clusters; grand design, multiple arm, and flocculent spiral galaxies; observations of barred spirals; ringed galaxies; elliptical galaxies; the modal approach to models of galaxies; self-consistent models of spiral galaxies; dynamical models of spiral galaxies; N-body models. Also discussed are: two-component models of galaxies; simulations of cloudy, gaseous galactic disks; numerical experiments on the stability of hot stellar systems; instabilities of slowly rotating galaxies; spiral structure as a recurrent instability; model gas flows in selected barred spiral galaxies; bar shapes and orbital stochasticity; three-dimensional models; polar ring galaxies; dynamical models of polar rings