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Sample records for linear regression equation

  1. Linear regression

    Olive, David J

    2017-01-01

    This text covers both multiple linear regression and some experimental design models. The text uses the response plot to visualize the model and to detect outliers, does not assume that the error distribution has a known parametric distribution, develops prediction intervals that work when the error distribution is unknown, suggests bootstrap hypothesis tests that may be useful for inference after variable selection, and develops prediction regions and large sample theory for the multivariate linear regression model that has m response variables. A relationship between multivariate prediction regions and confidence regions provides a simple way to bootstrap confidence regions. These confidence regions often provide a practical method for testing hypotheses. There is also a chapter on generalized linear models and generalized additive models. There are many R functions to produce response and residual plots, to simulate prediction intervals and hypothesis tests, to detect outliers, and to choose response trans...

  2. Recursive Algorithm For Linear Regression

    Varanasi, S. V.

    1988-01-01

    Order of model determined easily. Linear-regression algorithhm includes recursive equations for coefficients of model of increased order. Algorithm eliminates duplicative calculations, facilitates search for minimum order of linear-regression model fitting set of data satisfactory.

  3. Comparing Regression Coefficients between Nested Linear Models for Clustered Data with Generalized Estimating Equations

    Yan, Jun; Aseltine, Robert H., Jr.; Harel, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    Comparing regression coefficients between models when one model is nested within another is of great practical interest when two explanations of a given phenomenon are specified as linear models. The statistical problem is whether the coefficients associated with a given set of covariates change significantly when other covariates are added into…

  4. Analysis of the Covered Electrode Welding Process Stability on the Basis of Linear Regression Equation

    Słania J.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the process of production of coated electrodes and their welding properties. The factors concerning the welding properties and the currently applied method of assessing are given. The methodology of the testing based on the measuring and recording of instantaneous values of welding current and welding arc voltage is discussed. Algorithm for creation of reference data base of the expert system is shown, aiding the assessment of covered electrodes welding properties. The stability of voltage–current characteristics was discussed. Statistical factors of instantaneous values of welding current and welding arc voltage waveforms used for determining of welding process stability are presented. The results of coated electrodes welding properties are compared. The article presents the results of linear regression as well as the impact of the independent variables on the welding process performance. Finally the conclusions drawn from the research are given.

  5. Applied linear regression

    Weisberg, Sanford

    2013-01-01

    Praise for the Third Edition ""...this is an excellent book which could easily be used as a course text...""-International Statistical Institute The Fourth Edition of Applied Linear Regression provides a thorough update of the basic theory and methodology of linear regression modeling. Demonstrating the practical applications of linear regression analysis techniques, the Fourth Edition uses interesting, real-world exercises and examples. Stressing central concepts such as model building, understanding parameters, assessing fit and reliability, and drawing conclusions, the new edition illus

  6. Using a Linear Regression Method to Detect Outliers in IRT Common Item Equating

    He, Yong; Cui, Zhongmin; Fang, Yu; Chen, Hanwei

    2013-01-01

    Common test items play an important role in equating alternate test forms under the common item nonequivalent groups design. When the item response theory (IRT) method is applied in equating, inconsistent item parameter estimates among common items can lead to large bias in equated scores. It is prudent to evaluate inconsistency in parameter…

  7. Multiple linear regression to develop strength scaled equations for knee and elbow joints based on age, gender and segment mass

    D'Souza, Sonia; Rasmussen, John; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2012-01-01

    and valuable ergonomic tool. Objective: To investigate age and gender effects on the torque-producing ability in the knee and elbow in older adults. To create strength scaled equations based on age, gender, upper/lower limb lengths and masses using multiple linear regression. To reduce the number of dependent...... flexors. Results: Males were signifantly stronger than females across all age groups. Elbow peak torque (EPT) was better preserved from 60s to 70s whereas knee peak torque (KPT) reduced significantly (PGender, thigh mass and age best...... predicted KPT (R2=0.60). Gender, forearm mass and age best predicted EPT (R2=0.75). Good crossvalidation was established for both elbow and knee models. Conclusion: This cross-sectional study of muscle strength created and validated strength scaled equations of EPT and KPT using only gender, segment mass...

  8. Multiple linear regression analysis

    Edwards, T. R.

    1980-01-01

    Program rapidly selects best-suited set of coefficients. User supplies only vectors of independent and dependent data and specifies confidence level required. Program uses stepwise statistical procedure for relating minimal set of variables to set of observations; final regression contains only most statistically significant coefficients. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on NOVA 1200.

  9. Linear Regression Analysis

    Seber, George A F

    2012-01-01

    Concise, mathematically clear, and comprehensive treatment of the subject.* Expanded coverage of diagnostics and methods of model fitting.* Requires no specialized knowledge beyond a good grasp of matrix algebra and some acquaintance with straight-line regression and simple analysis of variance models.* More than 200 problems throughout the book plus outline solutions for the exercises.* This revision has been extensively class-tested.

  10. Advanced statistics: linear regression, part I: simple linear regression.

    Marill, Keith A

    2004-01-01

    Simple linear regression is a mathematical technique used to model the relationship between a single independent predictor variable and a single dependent outcome variable. In this, the first of a two-part series exploring concepts in linear regression analysis, the four fundamental assumptions and the mechanics of simple linear regression are reviewed. The most common technique used to derive the regression line, the method of least squares, is described. The reader will be acquainted with other important concepts in simple linear regression, including: variable transformations, dummy variables, relationship to inference testing, and leverage. Simplified clinical examples with small datasets and graphic models are used to illustrate the points. This will provide a foundation for the second article in this series: a discussion of multiple linear regression, in which there are multiple predictor variables.

  11. Regression Equations for Birth Weight Estimation using ...

    In this study, Birth Weight has been estimated from anthropometric measurements of hand and foot. Linear regression equations were formed from each of the measured variables. These simple equations can be used to estimate Birth Weight of new born babies, in order to identify those with low birth weight and referred to ...

  12. Linear regression in astronomy. II

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Babu, Gutti J.

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of least-squares linear regression procedures used in observational astronomy, particularly investigations of the cosmic distance scale, are presented and discussed. The classes of linear models considered are (1) unweighted regression lines, with bootstrap and jackknife resampling; (2) regression solutions when measurement error, in one or both variables, dominates the scatter; (3) methods to apply a calibration line to new data; (4) truncated regression models, which apply to flux-limited data sets; and (5) censored regression models, which apply when nondetections are present. For the calibration problem we develop two new procedures: a formula for the intercept offset between two parallel data sets, which propagates slope errors from one regression to the other; and a generalization of the Working-Hotelling confidence bands to nonstandard least-squares lines. They can provide improved error analysis for Faber-Jackson, Tully-Fisher, and similar cosmic distance scale relations.

  13. Advanced statistics: linear regression, part II: multiple linear regression.

    Marill, Keith A

    2004-01-01

    The applications of simple linear regression in medical research are limited, because in most situations, there are multiple relevant predictor variables. Univariate statistical techniques such as simple linear regression use a single predictor variable, and they often may be mathematically correct but clinically misleading. Multiple linear regression is a mathematical technique used to model the relationship between multiple independent predictor variables and a single dependent outcome variable. It is used in medical research to model observational data, as well as in diagnostic and therapeutic studies in which the outcome is dependent on more than one factor. Although the technique generally is limited to data that can be expressed with a linear function, it benefits from a well-developed mathematical framework that yields unique solutions and exact confidence intervals for regression coefficients. Building on Part I of this series, this article acquaints the reader with some of the important concepts in multiple regression analysis. These include multicollinearity, interaction effects, and an expansion of the discussion of inference testing, leverage, and variable transformations to multivariate models. Examples from the first article in this series are expanded on using a primarily graphic, rather than mathematical, approach. The importance of the relationships among the predictor variables and the dependence of the multivariate model coefficients on the choice of these variables are stressed. Finally, concepts in regression model building are discussed.

  14. Correlation and simple linear regression.

    Zou, Kelly H; Tuncali, Kemal; Silverman, Stuart G

    2003-06-01

    In this tutorial article, the concepts of correlation and regression are reviewed and demonstrated. The authors review and compare two correlation coefficients, the Pearson correlation coefficient and the Spearman rho, for measuring linear and nonlinear relationships between two continuous variables. In the case of measuring the linear relationship between a predictor and an outcome variable, simple linear regression analysis is conducted. These statistical concepts are illustrated by using a data set from published literature to assess a computed tomography-guided interventional technique. These statistical methods are important for exploring the relationships between variables and can be applied to many radiologic studies.

  15. Linear regression in astronomy. I

    Isobe, Takashi; Feigelson, Eric D.; Akritas, Michael G.; Babu, Gutti Jogesh

    1990-01-01

    Five methods for obtaining linear regression fits to bivariate data with unknown or insignificant measurement errors are discussed: ordinary least-squares (OLS) regression of Y on X, OLS regression of X on Y, the bisector of the two OLS lines, orthogonal regression, and 'reduced major-axis' regression. These methods have been used by various researchers in observational astronomy, most importantly in cosmic distance scale applications. Formulas for calculating the slope and intercept coefficients and their uncertainties are given for all the methods, including a new general form of the OLS variance estimates. The accuracy of the formulas was confirmed using numerical simulations. The applicability of the procedures is discussed with respect to their mathematical properties, the nature of the astronomical data under consideration, and the scientific purpose of the regression. It is found that, for problems needing symmetrical treatment of the variables, the OLS bisector performs significantly better than orthogonal or reduced major-axis regression.

  16. Quantum linear Boltzmann equation

    Vacchini, Bassano; Hornberger, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    We review the quantum version of the linear Boltzmann equation, which describes in a non-perturbative fashion, by means of scattering theory, how the quantum motion of a single test particle is affected by collisions with an ideal background gas. A heuristic derivation of this Lindblad master equation is presented, based on the requirement of translation-covariance and on the relation to the classical linear Boltzmann equation. After analyzing its general symmetry properties and the associated relaxation dynamics, we discuss a quantum Monte Carlo method for its numerical solution. We then review important limiting forms of the quantum linear Boltzmann equation, such as the case of quantum Brownian motion and pure collisional decoherence, as well as the application to matter wave optics. Finally, we point to the incorporation of quantum degeneracies and self-interactions in the gas by relating the equation to the dynamic structure factor of the ambient medium, and we provide an extension of the equation to include internal degrees of freedom.

  17. The importance of statistical modelling in clinical research : Comparing multidimensional Rasch-, structural equation and linear regression models for analyzing the depression of relatives of psychiatric patients.

    Alexandrowicz, Rainer W; Jahn, Rebecca; Friedrich, Fabian; Unger, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Various studies have shown that caregiving relatives of schizophrenic patients are at risk of suffering from depression. These studies differ with respect to the applied statistical methods, which could influence the findings. Therefore, the present study analyzes to which extent different methods may cause differing results. The present study contrasts by means of one data set the results of three different modelling approaches, Rasch Modelling (RM), Structural Equation Modelling (SEM), and Linear Regression Modelling (LRM). The results of the three models varied considerably, reflecting the different assumptions of the respective models. Latent trait models (i. e., RM and SEM) generally provide more convincing results by correcting for measurement error and the RM specifically proves superior for it treats ordered categorical data most adequately.

  18. Quantum algorithm for linear regression

    Wang, Guoming

    2017-07-01

    We present a quantum algorithm for fitting a linear regression model to a given data set using the least-squares approach. Differently from previous algorithms which yield a quantum state encoding the optimal parameters, our algorithm outputs these numbers in the classical form. So by running it once, one completely determines the fitted model and then can use it to make predictions on new data at little cost. Moreover, our algorithm works in the standard oracle model, and can handle data sets with nonsparse design matrices. It runs in time poly( log2(N ) ,d ,κ ,1 /ɛ ) , where N is the size of the data set, d is the number of adjustable parameters, κ is the condition number of the design matrix, and ɛ is the desired precision in the output. We also show that the polynomial dependence on d and κ is necessary. Thus, our algorithm cannot be significantly improved. Furthermore, we also give a quantum algorithm that estimates the quality of the least-squares fit (without computing its parameters explicitly). This algorithm runs faster than the one for finding this fit, and can be used to check whether the given data set qualifies for linear regression in the first place.

  19. Who Will Win?: Predicting the Presidential Election Using Linear Regression

    Lamb, John H.

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines a linear regression activity that engages learners, uses technology, and fosters cooperation. Students generated least-squares linear regression equations using TI-83 Plus[TM] graphing calculators, Microsoft[C] Excel, and paper-and-pencil calculations using derived normal equations to predict the 2004 presidential election.…

  20. Regularized Label Relaxation Linear Regression.

    Fang, Xiaozhao; Xu, Yong; Li, Xuelong; Lai, Zhihui; Wong, Wai Keung; Fang, Bingwu

    2018-04-01

    Linear regression (LR) and some of its variants have been widely used for classification problems. Most of these methods assume that during the learning phase, the training samples can be exactly transformed into a strict binary label matrix, which has too little freedom to fit the labels adequately. To address this problem, in this paper, we propose a novel regularized label relaxation LR method, which has the following notable characteristics. First, the proposed method relaxes the strict binary label matrix into a slack variable matrix by introducing a nonnegative label relaxation matrix into LR, which provides more freedom to fit the labels and simultaneously enlarges the margins between different classes as much as possible. Second, the proposed method constructs the class compactness graph based on manifold learning and uses it as the regularization item to avoid the problem of overfitting. The class compactness graph is used to ensure that the samples sharing the same labels can be kept close after they are transformed. Two different algorithms, which are, respectively, based on -norm and -norm loss functions are devised. These two algorithms have compact closed-form solutions in each iteration so that they are easily implemented. Extensive experiments show that these two algorithms outperform the state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of the classification accuracy and running time.

  1. A method for the selection of a functional form for a thermodynamic equation of state using weighted linear least squares stepwise regression

    Jacobsen, R. T.; Stewart, R. B.; Crain, R. W., Jr.; Rose, G. L.; Myers, A. F.

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed for establishing a rational choice of the terms to be included in an equation of state with a large number of adjustable coefficients. The methods presented were developed for use in the determination of an equation of state for oxygen and nitrogen. However, a general application of the methods is possible in studies involving the determination of an optimum polynomial equation for fitting a large number of data points. The data considered in the least squares problem are experimental thermodynamic pressure-density-temperature data. Attention is given to a description of stepwise multiple regression and the use of stepwise regression in the determination of an equation of state for oxygen and nitrogen.

  2. Unbalanced Regressions and the Predictive Equation

    Osterrieder, Daniela; Ventosa-Santaulària, Daniel; Vera-Valdés, J. Eduardo

    Predictive return regressions with persistent regressors are typically plagued by (asymptotically) biased/inconsistent estimates of the slope, non-standard or potentially even spurious statistical inference, and regression unbalancedness. We alleviate the problem of unbalancedness in the theoreti......Predictive return regressions with persistent regressors are typically plagued by (asymptotically) biased/inconsistent estimates of the slope, non-standard or potentially even spurious statistical inference, and regression unbalancedness. We alleviate the problem of unbalancedness...... in the theoretical predictive equation by suggesting a data generating process, where returns are generated as linear functions of a lagged latent I(0) risk process. The observed predictor is a function of this latent I(0) process, but it is corrupted by a fractionally integrated noise. Such a process may arise due...... to aggregation or unexpected level shifts. In this setup, the practitioner estimates a misspecified, unbalanced, and endogenous predictive regression. We show that the OLS estimate of this regression is inconsistent, but standard inference is possible. To obtain a consistent slope estimate, we then suggest...

  3. Aspects of robust linear regression

    Davies, P.L.

    1993-01-01

    Section 1 of the paper contains a general discussion of robustness. In Section 2 the influence function of the Hampel-Rousseeuw least median of squares estimator is derived. Linearly invariant weak metrics are constructed in Section 3. It is shown in Section 4 that $S$-estimators satisfy an exact

  4. Correct Linearization of Einstein's Equations

    Rabounski D.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Regularly Einstein's equations can be reduced to a wave form (linearly dependent from the second derivatives of the space metric in the absence of gravitation, the space rotation and Christoffel's symbols. As shown here, the origin of the problem is that one uses the general covariant theory of measurement. Here the wave form of Einstein's equations is obtained in the terms of Zelmanov's chronometric invariants (physically observable projections on the observer's time line and spatial section. The obtained equations depend on solely the second derivatives even if gravitation, the space rotation and Christoffel's symbols. The correct linearization proves: the Einstein equations are completely compatible with weak waves of the metric.

  5. Saturation and linear transport equation

    Kutak, K.

    2009-03-01

    We show that the GBW saturation model provides an exact solution to the one dimensional linear transport equation. We also show that it is motivated by the BK equation considered in the saturated regime when the diffusion and the splitting term in the diffusive approximation are balanced by the nonlinear term. (orig.)

  6. Hierarchical regression analysis in structural Equation Modeling

    de Jong, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    In a hierarchical or fixed-order regression analysis, the independent variables are entered into the regression equation in a prespecified order. Such an analysis is often performed when the extra amount of variance accounted for in a dependent variable by a specific independent variable is the main

  7. Basic linear partial differential equations

    Treves, Francois

    1975-01-01

    Focusing on the archetypes of linear partial differential equations, this text for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students features most of the basic classical results. The methods, however, are decidedly nontraditional: in practically every instance, they tend toward a high level of abstraction. This approach recalls classical material to contemporary analysts in a language they can understand, as well as exploiting the field's wealth of examples as an introduction to modern theories.The four-part treatment covers the basic examples of linear partial differential equations and their

  8. [From clinical judgment to linear regression model.

    Palacios-Cruz, Lino; Pérez, Marcela; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Talavera, Juan O

    2013-01-01

    When we think about mathematical models, such as linear regression model, we think that these terms are only used by those engaged in research, a notion that is far from the truth. Legendre described the first mathematical model in 1805, and Galton introduced the formal term in 1886. Linear regression is one of the most commonly used regression models in clinical practice. It is useful to predict or show the relationship between two or more variables as long as the dependent variable is quantitative and has normal distribution. Stated in another way, the regression is used to predict a measure based on the knowledge of at least one other variable. Linear regression has as it's first objective to determine the slope or inclination of the regression line: Y = a + bx, where "a" is the intercept or regression constant and it is equivalent to "Y" value when "X" equals 0 and "b" (also called slope) indicates the increase or decrease that occurs when the variable "x" increases or decreases in one unit. In the regression line, "b" is called regression coefficient. The coefficient of determination (R 2 ) indicates the importance of independent variables in the outcome.

  9. Determination of regression laws: Linear and nonlinear

    Onishchenko, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    A detailed mathematical determination of regression laws is presented in the article. Particular emphasis is place on determining the laws of X j on X l to account for source nuclei decay and detector errors in nuclear physics instrumentation. Both linear and nonlinear relations are presented. Linearization of 19 functions is tabulated, including graph, relation, variable substitution, obtained linear function, and remarks. 6 refs., 1 tab

  10. Variational linear algebraic equations method

    Moiseiwitsch, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    A modification of the linear algebraic equations method is described which ensures a variational bound on the phaseshifts for potentials having a definite sign at all points. The method is illustrated by the elastic scattering of s-wave electrons by the static field of atomic hydrogen. (author)

  11. Discriminative Elastic-Net Regularized Linear Regression.

    Zhang, Zheng; Lai, Zhihui; Xu, Yong; Shao, Ling; Wu, Jian; Xie, Guo-Sen

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we aim at learning compact and discriminative linear regression models. Linear regression has been widely used in different problems. However, most of the existing linear regression methods exploit the conventional zero-one matrix as the regression targets, which greatly narrows the flexibility of the regression model. Another major limitation of these methods is that the learned projection matrix fails to precisely project the image features to the target space due to their weak discriminative capability. To this end, we present an elastic-net regularized linear regression (ENLR) framework, and develop two robust linear regression models which possess the following special characteristics. First, our methods exploit two particular strategies to enlarge the margins of different classes by relaxing the strict binary targets into a more feasible variable matrix. Second, a robust elastic-net regularization of singular values is introduced to enhance the compactness and effectiveness of the learned projection matrix. Third, the resulting optimization problem of ENLR has a closed-form solution in each iteration, which can be solved efficiently. Finally, rather than directly exploiting the projection matrix for recognition, our methods employ the transformed features as the new discriminate representations to make final image classification. Compared with the traditional linear regression model and some of its variants, our method is much more accurate in image classification. Extensive experiments conducted on publicly available data sets well demonstrate that the proposed framework can outperform the state-of-the-art methods. The MATLAB codes of our methods can be available at http://www.yongxu.org/lunwen.html.

  12. Piecewise linear regression splines with hyperbolic covariates

    Cologne, John B.; Sposto, Richard

    1992-09-01

    Consider the problem of fitting a curve to data that exhibit a multiphase linear response with smooth transitions between phases. We propose substituting hyperbolas as covariates in piecewise linear regression splines to obtain curves that are smoothly joined. The method provides an intuitive and easy way to extend the two-phase linear hyperbolic response model of Griffiths and Miller and Watts and Bacon to accommodate more than two linear segments. The resulting regression spline with hyperbolic covariates may be fit by nonlinear regression methods to estimate the degree of curvature between adjoining linear segments. The added complexity of fitting nonlinear, as opposed to linear, regression models is not great. The extra effort is particularly worthwhile when investigators are unwilling to assume that the slope of the response changes abruptly at the join points. We can also estimate the join points (the values of the abscissas where the linear segments would intersect if extrapolated) if their number and approximate locations may be presumed known. An example using data on changing age at menarche in a cohort of Japanese women illustrates the use of the method for exploratory data analysis. (author)

  13. Comparison of Classical Linear Regression and Orthogonal Regression According to the Sum of Squares Perpendicular Distances

    KELEŞ, Taliha; ALTUN, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Regression analysis is a statistical technique for investigating and modeling the relationship between variables. The purpose of this study was the trivial presentation of the equation for orthogonal regression (OR) and the comparison of classical linear regression (CLR) and OR techniques with respect to the sum of squared perpendicular distances. For that purpose, the analyses were shown by an example. It was found that the sum of squared perpendicular distances of OR is smaller. Thus, it wa...

  14. Removing Malmquist bias from linear regressions

    Verter, Frances

    1993-01-01

    Malmquist bias is present in all astronomical surveys where sources are observed above an apparent brightness threshold. Those sources which can be detected at progressively larger distances are progressively more limited to the intrinsically luminous portion of the true distribution. This bias does not distort any of the measurements, but distorts the sample composition. We have developed the first treatment to correct for Malmquist bias in linear regressions of astronomical data. A demonstration of the corrected linear regression that is computed in four steps is presented.

  15. Systems of Inhomogeneous Linear Equations

    Scherer, Philipp O. J.

    Many problems in physics and especially computational physics involve systems of linear equations which arise e.g. from linearization of a general nonlinear problem or from discretization of differential equations. If the dimension of the system is not too large standard methods like Gaussian elimination or QR decomposition are sufficient. Systems with a tridiagonal matrix are important for cubic spline interpolation and numerical second derivatives. They can be solved very efficiently with a specialized Gaussian elimination method. Practical applications often involve very large dimensions and require iterative methods. Convergence of Jacobi and Gauss-Seidel methods is slow and can be improved by relaxation or over-relaxation. An alternative for large systems is the method of conjugate gradients.

  16. Finite Algorithms for Robust Linear Regression

    Madsen, Kaj; Nielsen, Hans Bruun

    1990-01-01

    The Huber M-estimator for robust linear regression is analyzed. Newton type methods for solution of the problem are defined and analyzed, and finite convergence is proved. Numerical experiments with a large number of test problems demonstrate efficiency and indicate that this kind of approach may...

  17. Multiple Linear Regression: A Realistic Reflector.

    Nutt, A. T.; Batsell, R. R.

    Examples of the use of Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) techniques are presented. This is done to show how MLR aids data processing and decision-making by providing the decision-maker with freedom in phrasing questions and by accurately reflecting the data on hand. A brief overview of the rationale underlying MLR is given, some basic definitions…

  18. Controlling attribute effect in linear regression

    Calders, Toon; Karim, Asim A.; Kamiran, Faisal; Ali, Wasif Mohammad; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2013-01-01

    In data mining we often have to learn from biased data, because, for instance, data comes from different batches or there was a gender or racial bias in the collection of social data. In some applications it may be necessary to explicitly control this bias in the models we learn from the data. This paper is the first to study learning linear regression models under constraints that control the biasing effect of a given attribute such as gender or batch number. We show how propensity modeling can be used for factoring out the part of the bias that can be justified by externally provided explanatory attributes. Then we analytically derive linear models that minimize squared error while controlling the bias by imposing constraints on the mean outcome or residuals of the models. Experiments with discrimination-aware crime prediction and batch effect normalization tasks show that the proposed techniques are successful in controlling attribute effects in linear regression models. © 2013 IEEE.

  19. Controlling attribute effect in linear regression

    Calders, Toon

    2013-12-01

    In data mining we often have to learn from biased data, because, for instance, data comes from different batches or there was a gender or racial bias in the collection of social data. In some applications it may be necessary to explicitly control this bias in the models we learn from the data. This paper is the first to study learning linear regression models under constraints that control the biasing effect of a given attribute such as gender or batch number. We show how propensity modeling can be used for factoring out the part of the bias that can be justified by externally provided explanatory attributes. Then we analytically derive linear models that minimize squared error while controlling the bias by imposing constraints on the mean outcome or residuals of the models. Experiments with discrimination-aware crime prediction and batch effect normalization tasks show that the proposed techniques are successful in controlling attribute effects in linear regression models. © 2013 IEEE.

  20. Post-processing through linear regression

    van Schaeybroeck, B.; Vannitsem, S.

    2011-03-01

    Various post-processing techniques are compared for both deterministic and ensemble forecasts, all based on linear regression between forecast data and observations. In order to evaluate the quality of the regression methods, three criteria are proposed, related to the effective correction of forecast error, the optimal variability of the corrected forecast and multicollinearity. The regression schemes under consideration include the ordinary least-square (OLS) method, a new time-dependent Tikhonov regularization (TDTR) method, the total least-square method, a new geometric-mean regression (GM), a recently introduced error-in-variables (EVMOS) method and, finally, a "best member" OLS method. The advantages and drawbacks of each method are clarified. These techniques are applied in the context of the 63 Lorenz system, whose model version is affected by both initial condition and model errors. For short forecast lead times, the number and choice of predictors plays an important role. Contrarily to the other techniques, GM degrades when the number of predictors increases. At intermediate lead times, linear regression is unable to provide corrections to the forecast and can sometimes degrade the performance (GM and the best member OLS with noise). At long lead times the regression schemes (EVMOS, TDTR) which yield the correct variability and the largest correlation between ensemble error and spread, should be preferred.

  1. Post-processing through linear regression

    B. Van Schaeybroeck

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Various post-processing techniques are compared for both deterministic and ensemble forecasts, all based on linear regression between forecast data and observations. In order to evaluate the quality of the regression methods, three criteria are proposed, related to the effective correction of forecast error, the optimal variability of the corrected forecast and multicollinearity. The regression schemes under consideration include the ordinary least-square (OLS method, a new time-dependent Tikhonov regularization (TDTR method, the total least-square method, a new geometric-mean regression (GM, a recently introduced error-in-variables (EVMOS method and, finally, a "best member" OLS method. The advantages and drawbacks of each method are clarified.

    These techniques are applied in the context of the 63 Lorenz system, whose model version is affected by both initial condition and model errors. For short forecast lead times, the number and choice of predictors plays an important role. Contrarily to the other techniques, GM degrades when the number of predictors increases. At intermediate lead times, linear regression is unable to provide corrections to the forecast and can sometimes degrade the performance (GM and the best member OLS with noise. At long lead times the regression schemes (EVMOS, TDTR which yield the correct variability and the largest correlation between ensemble error and spread, should be preferred.

  2. Linearized gyro-kinetic equation

    Catto, P.J.; Tsang, K.T.

    1976-01-01

    An ordering of the linearized Fokker-Planck equation is performed in which gyroradius corrections are retained to lowest order and the radial dependence appropriate for sheared magnetic fields is treated without resorting to a WKB technique. This description is shown to be necessary to obtain the proper radial dependence when the product of the poloidal wavenumber and the gyroradius is large (k rho much greater than 1). A like particle collision operator valid for arbitrary k rho also has been derived. In addition, neoclassical, drift, finite β (plasma pressure/magnetic pressure), and unperturbed toroidal electric field modifications are treated

  3. Linear determining equations for differential constraints

    Kaptsov, O V

    1998-01-01

    A construction of differential constraints compatible with partial differential equations is considered. Certain linear determining equations with parameters are used to find such differential constraints. They generalize the classical determining equations used in the search for admissible Lie operators. As applications of this approach equations of an ideal incompressible fluid and non-linear heat equations are discussed

  4. Linear integral equations and soliton systems

    Quispel, G.R.W.

    1983-01-01

    A study is presented of classical integrable dynamical systems in one temporal and one spatial dimension. The direct linearizations are given of several nonlinear partial differential equations, for example the Korteweg-de Vries equation, the modified Korteweg-de Vries equation, the sine-Gordon equation, the nonlinear Schroedinger equation, and the equation of motion for the isotropic Heisenberg spin chain; the author also discusses several relations between these equations. The Baecklund transformations of these partial differential equations are treated on the basis of a singular transformation of the measure (or equivalently of the plane-wave factor) occurring in the corresponding linear integral equations, and the Baecklund transformations are used to derive the direct linearization of a chain of so-called modified partial differential equations. Finally it is shown that the singular linear integral equations lead in a natural way to the direct linearizations of various nonlinear difference-difference equations. (Auth.)

  5. Linear regression and the normality assumption.

    Schmidt, Amand F; Finan, Chris

    2017-12-16

    Researchers often perform arbitrary outcome transformations to fulfill the normality assumption of a linear regression model. This commentary explains and illustrates that in large data settings, such transformations are often unnecessary, and worse may bias model estimates. Linear regression assumptions are illustrated using simulated data and an empirical example on the relation between time since type 2 diabetes diagnosis and glycated hemoglobin levels. Simulation results were evaluated on coverage; i.e., the number of times the 95% confidence interval included the true slope coefficient. Although outcome transformations bias point estimates, violations of the normality assumption in linear regression analyses do not. The normality assumption is necessary to unbiasedly estimate standard errors, and hence confidence intervals and P-values. However, in large sample sizes (e.g., where the number of observations per variable is >10) violations of this normality assumption often do not noticeably impact results. Contrary to this, assumptions on, the parametric model, absence of extreme observations, homoscedasticity, and independency of the errors, remain influential even in large sample size settings. Given that modern healthcare research typically includes thousands of subjects focusing on the normality assumption is often unnecessary, does not guarantee valid results, and worse may bias estimates due to the practice of outcome transformations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Linear superposition solutions to nonlinear wave equations

    Liu Yu

    2012-01-01

    The solutions to a linear wave equation can satisfy the principle of superposition, i.e., the linear superposition of two or more known solutions is still a solution of the linear wave equation. We show in this article that many nonlinear wave equations possess exact traveling wave solutions involving hyperbolic, triangle, and exponential functions, and the suitable linear combinations of these known solutions can also constitute linear superposition solutions to some nonlinear wave equations with special structural characteristics. The linear superposition solutions to the generalized KdV equation K(2,2,1), the Oliver water wave equation, and the k(n, n) equation are given. The structure characteristic of the nonlinear wave equations having linear superposition solutions is analyzed, and the reason why the solutions with the forms of hyperbolic, triangle, and exponential functions can form the linear superposition solutions is also discussed

  7. Biostatistics Series Module 6: Correlation and Linear Regression.

    Hazra, Avijit; Gogtay, Nithya

    2016-01-01

    Correlation and linear regression are the most commonly used techniques for quantifying the association between two numeric variables. Correlation quantifies the strength of the linear relationship between paired variables, expressing this as a correlation coefficient. If both variables x and y are normally distributed, we calculate Pearson's correlation coefficient ( r ). If normality assumption is not met for one or both variables in a correlation analysis, a rank correlation coefficient, such as Spearman's rho (ρ) may be calculated. A hypothesis test of correlation tests whether the linear relationship between the two variables holds in the underlying population, in which case it returns a P correlation coefficient can also be calculated for an idea of the correlation in the population. The value r 2 denotes the proportion of the variability of the dependent variable y that can be attributed to its linear relation with the independent variable x and is called the coefficient of determination. Linear regression is a technique that attempts to link two correlated variables x and y in the form of a mathematical equation ( y = a + bx ), such that given the value of one variable the other may be predicted. In general, the method of least squares is applied to obtain the equation of the regression line. Correlation and linear regression analysis are based on certain assumptions pertaining to the data sets. If these assumptions are not met, misleading conclusions may be drawn. The first assumption is that of linear relationship between the two variables. A scatter plot is essential before embarking on any correlation-regression analysis to show that this is indeed the case. Outliers or clustering within data sets can distort the correlation coefficient value. Finally, it is vital to remember that though strong correlation can be a pointer toward causation, the two are not synonymous.

  8. Neutrosophic Correlation and Simple Linear Regression

    A. A. Salama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the world is full of indeterminacy, the neutrosophics found their place into contemporary research. The fundamental concepts of neutrosophic set, introduced by Smarandache. Recently, Salama et al., introduced the concept of correlation coefficient of neutrosophic data. In this paper, we introduce and study the concepts of correlation and correlation coefficient of neutrosophic data in probability spaces and study some of their properties. Also, we introduce and study the neutrosophic simple linear regression model. Possible applications to data processing are touched upon.

  9. Invariant imbedding equations for linear scattering problems

    Apresyan, L.

    1988-01-01

    A general form of the invariant imbedding equations is investigated for the linear problem of scattering by a bounded scattering volume. The conditions for the derivability of such equations are described. It is noted that the possibility of the explicit representation of these equations for a sphere and for a layer involves the separation of variables in the unperturbed wave equation

  10. Isomorphism of Intransitive Linear Lie Equations

    Jose Miguel Martins Veloso

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We show that formal isomorphism of intransitive linear Lie equations along transversal to the orbits can be extended to neighborhoods of these transversal. In analytic cases, the word formal is dropped from theorems. Also, we associate an intransitive Lie algebra with each intransitive linear Lie equation, and from the intransitive Lie algebra we recover the linear Lie equation, unless of formal isomorphism. The intransitive Lie algebra gives the structure functions introduced by É. Cartan.

  11. Linear q-nonuniform difference equations

    Bangerezako, Gaspard

    2010-01-01

    We introduce basic concepts of q-nonuniform differentiation and integration and study linear q-nonuniform difference equations and systems, as well as their application in q-nonuniform difference linear control systems. (author)

  12. Establishment of regression dependences. Linear and nonlinear dependences

    Onishchenko, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The main problems of determination of linear and 19 types of nonlinear regression dependences are completely discussed. It is taken into consideration that total dispersions are the sum of measurement dispersions and parameter variation dispersions themselves. Approaches to all dispersions determination are described. It is shown that the least square fit gives inconsistent estimation for industrial objects and processes. The correction methods by taking into account comparable measurement errors for both variable give an opportunity to obtain consistent estimation for the regression equation parameters. The condition of the correction technique application expediency is given. The technique for determination of nonlinear regression dependences taking into account the dependence form and comparable errors of both variables is described. 6 refs., 1 tab

  13. Linear and quasi-linear equations of parabolic type

    Ladyženskaja, O A; Ural′ceva, N N; Uralceva, N N

    1968-01-01

    Equations of parabolic type are encountered in many areas of mathematics and mathematical physics, and those encountered most frequently are linear and quasi-linear parabolic equations of the second order. In this volume, boundary value problems for such equations are studied from two points of view: solvability, unique or otherwise, and the effect of smoothness properties of the functions entering the initial and boundary conditions on the smoothness of the solutions.

  14. Comparison of Linear and Non-linear Regression Analysis to Determine Pulmonary Pressure in Hyperthyroidism.

    Scarneciu, Camelia C; Sangeorzan, Livia; Rus, Horatiu; Scarneciu, Vlad D; Varciu, Mihai S; Andreescu, Oana; Scarneciu, Ioan

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the incidence of pulmonary hypertension (PH) at newly diagnosed hyperthyroid patients and at finding a simple model showing the complex functional relation between pulmonary hypertension in hyperthyroidism and the factors causing it. The 53 hyperthyroid patients (H-group) were evaluated mainly by using an echocardiographical method and compared with 35 euthyroid (E-group) and 25 healthy people (C-group). In order to identify the factors causing pulmonary hypertension the statistical method of comparing the values of arithmetical means is used. The functional relation between the two random variables (PAPs and each of the factors determining it within our research study) can be expressed by linear or non-linear function. By applying the linear regression method described by a first-degree equation the line of regression (linear model) has been determined; by applying the non-linear regression method described by a second degree equation, a parabola-type curve of regression (non-linear or polynomial model) has been determined. We made the comparison and the validation of these two models by calculating the determination coefficient (criterion 1), the comparison of residuals (criterion 2), application of AIC criterion (criterion 3) and use of F-test (criterion 4). From the H-group, 47% have pulmonary hypertension completely reversible when obtaining euthyroidism. The factors causing pulmonary hypertension were identified: previously known- level of free thyroxin, pulmonary vascular resistance, cardiac output; new factors identified in this study- pretreatment period, age, systolic blood pressure. According to the four criteria and to the clinical judgment, we consider that the polynomial model (graphically parabola- type) is better than the linear one. The better model showing the functional relation between the pulmonary hypertension in hyperthyroidism and the factors identified in this study is given by a polynomial equation of second

  15. Lie algebras and linear differential equations.

    Brockett, R. W.; Rahimi, A.

    1972-01-01

    Certain symmetry properties possessed by the solutions of linear differential equations are examined. For this purpose, some basic ideas from the theory of finite dimensional linear systems are used together with the work of Wei and Norman on the use of Lie algebraic methods in differential equation theory.

  16. Linear regression crash prediction models : issues and proposed solutions.

    2010-05-01

    The paper develops a linear regression model approach that can be applied to : crash data to predict vehicle crashes. The proposed approach involves novice data aggregation : to satisfy linear regression assumptions; namely error structure normality ...

  17. Unbalanced Regressions and the Predictive Equation

    Osterrieder, Daniela; Ventosa-Santaulària, Daniel; Vera-Valdés, J. Eduardo

    Predictive return regressions with persistent regressors are typically plagued by (asymptotically) biased/inconsistent estimates of the slope, non-standard or potentially even spurious statistical inference, and regression unbalancedness. We alleviate the problem of unbalancedness in the theoreti......Predictive return regressions with persistent regressors are typically plagued by (asymptotically) biased/inconsistent estimates of the slope, non-standard or potentially even spurious statistical inference, and regression unbalancedness. We alleviate the problem of unbalancedness...

  18. Numerical Solution of Heun Equation Via Linear Stochastic Differential Equation

    Hamidreza Rezazadeh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we intend to solve special kind of ordinary differential equations which is called Heun equations, by converting to a corresponding stochastic differential equation(S.D.E.. So, we construct a stochastic linear equation system from this equation which its solution is based on computing fundamental matrix of this system and then, this S.D.E. is solved by numerically methods. Moreover, its asymptotic stability and statistical concepts like expectation and variance of solutions are discussed. Finally, the attained solutions of these S.D.E.s compared with exact solution of corresponding differential equations.

  19. Suppression Situations in Multiple Linear Regression

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes alternative expressions for the two most prevailing definitions of suppression without resorting to the standardized regression modeling. The formulation provides a simple basis for the examination of their relationship. For the two-predictor regression, the author demonstrates that the previous results in the literature are…

  20. Two Paradoxes in Linear Regression Analysis

    FENG, Ge; PENG, Jing; TU, Dongke; ZHENG, Julia Z.; FENG, Changyong

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regression is one of the favorite tools in applied statistics. However, misuse and misinterpretation of results from regression analysis are common in biomedical research. In this paper we use statistical theory and simulation studies to clarify some paradoxes around this popular statistical method. In particular, we show that a widely used model selection procedure employed in many publications in top medical journals is wrong. Formal procedures based on solid statistical theory should be used in model selection. PMID:28638214

  1. Fuzzy multiple linear regression: A computational approach

    Juang, C. H.; Huang, X. H.; Fleming, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new computational approach for performing fuzzy regression. In contrast to Bardossy's approach, the new approach, while dealing with fuzzy variables, closely follows the conventional regression technique. In this approach, treatment of fuzzy input is more 'computational' than 'symbolic.' The following sections first outline the formulation of the new approach, then deal with the implementation and computational scheme, and this is followed by examples to illustrate the new procedure.

  2. Computing with linear equations and matrices

    Churchhouse, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    Systems of linear equations and matrices arise in many disciplines. The equations may accurately represent conditions satisfied by a system or, more likely, provide an approximation to a more complex system of non-linear or differential equations. The system may involve a few or many thousand unknowns and each individual equation may involve few or many of them. Over the past 50 years a vast literature on methods for solving systems of linear equations and the associated problems of finding the inverse or eigenvalues of a matrix has been produced. These lectures cover those methods which have been found to be most useful for dealing with such types of problem. References are given where appropriate and attention is drawn to the possibility of improved methods for use on vector and parallel processors. (orig.)

  3. Linear causal modeling with structural equations

    Mulaik, Stanley A

    2009-01-01

    Emphasizing causation as a functional relationship between variables that describe objects, Linear Causal Modeling with Structural Equations integrates a general philosophical theory of causation with structural equation modeling (SEM) that concerns the special case of linear causal relations. In addition to describing how the functional relation concept may be generalized to treat probabilistic causation, the book reviews historical treatments of causation and explores recent developments in experimental psychology on studies of the perception of causation. It looks at how to perceive causal

  4. Diffusion phenomenon for linear dissipative wave equations

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we prove the diffusion phenomenon for the linear wave equation. To derive the diffusion phenomenon, a new method is used. In fact, for initial data in some weighted spaces, we prove that for {equation presented} decays with the rate {equation presented} [0,1] faster than that of either u or v, where u is the solution of the linear wave equation with initial data {equation presented} [0,1], and v is the solution of the related heat equation with initial data v 0 = u 0 + u 1. This result improves the result in H. Yang and A. Milani [Bull. Sci. Math. 124 (2000), 415-433] in the sense that, under the above restriction on the initial data, the decay rate given in that paper can be improved by t -γ/2. © European Mathematical Society.

  5. Students’ difficulties in solving linear equation problems

    Wati, S.; Fitriana, L.; Mardiyana

    2018-03-01

    A linear equation is an algebra material that exists in junior high school to university. It is a very important material for students in order to learn more advanced mathematics topics. Therefore, linear equation material is essential to be mastered. However, the result of 2016 national examination in Indonesia showed that students’ achievement in solving linear equation problem was low. This fact became a background to investigate students’ difficulties in solving linear equation problems. This study used qualitative descriptive method. An individual written test on linear equation tasks was administered, followed by interviews. Twenty-one sample students of grade VIII of SMPIT Insan Kamil Karanganyar did the written test, and 6 of them were interviewed afterward. The result showed that students with high mathematics achievement donot have difficulties, students with medium mathematics achievement have factual difficulties, and students with low mathematics achievement have factual, conceptual, operational, and principle difficulties. Based on the result there is a need of meaningfulness teaching strategy to help students to overcome difficulties in solving linear equation problems.

  6. Dual exponential polynomials and linear differential equations

    Wen, Zhi-Tao; Gundersen, Gary G.; Heittokangas, Janne

    2018-01-01

    We study linear differential equations with exponential polynomial coefficients, where exactly one coefficient is of order greater than all the others. The main result shows that a nontrivial exponential polynomial solution of such an equation has a certain dual relationship with the maximum order coefficient. Several examples illustrate our results and exhibit possibilities that can occur.

  7. Linear Regression Based Real-Time Filtering

    Misel Batmend

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces real time filtering method based on linear least squares fitted line. Method can be used in case that a filtered signal is linear. This constraint narrows a band of potential applications. Advantage over Kalman filter is that it is computationally less expensive. The paper further deals with application of introduced method on filtering data used to evaluate a position of engraved material with respect to engraving machine. The filter was implemented to the CNC engraving machine control system. Experiments showing its performance are included.

  8. Simplified Linear Equation Solvers users manual

    Gropp, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Smith, B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1993-02-01

    The solution of large sparse systems of linear equations is at the heart of many algorithms in scientific computing. The SLES package is a set of easy-to-use yet powerful and extensible routines for solving large sparse linear systems. The design of the package allows new techniques to be used in existing applications without any source code changes in the applications.

  9. Hypocoercivity for linear kinetic equations conserving mass

    Dolbeault, Jean; Mouhot, Clé ment; Schmeiser, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We develop a new method for proving hypocoercivity for a large class of linear kinetic equations with only one conservation law. Local mass conservation is assumed at the level of the collision kernel, while transport involves a confining potential, so that the solution relaxes towards a unique equilibrium state. Our goal is to evaluate in an appropriately weighted $ L^2$ norm the exponential rate of convergence to the equilibrium. The method covers various models, ranging from diffusive kinetic equations like Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equations, to scattering models or models with time relaxation collision kernels corresponding to polytropic Gibbs equilibria, including the case of the linear Boltzmann model. In this last case and in the case of Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equations, any linear or superlinear growth of the potential is allowed. - See more at: http://www.ams.org/journals/tran/2015-367-06/S0002-9947-2015-06012-7/#sthash.ChjyK6rc.dpuf

  10. Hypocoercivity for linear kinetic equations conserving mass

    Dolbeault, Jean

    2015-02-03

    We develop a new method for proving hypocoercivity for a large class of linear kinetic equations with only one conservation law. Local mass conservation is assumed at the level of the collision kernel, while transport involves a confining potential, so that the solution relaxes towards a unique equilibrium state. Our goal is to evaluate in an appropriately weighted $ L^2$ norm the exponential rate of convergence to the equilibrium. The method covers various models, ranging from diffusive kinetic equations like Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equations, to scattering models or models with time relaxation collision kernels corresponding to polytropic Gibbs equilibria, including the case of the linear Boltzmann model. In this last case and in the case of Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equations, any linear or superlinear growth of the potential is allowed. - See more at: http://www.ams.org/journals/tran/2015-367-06/S0002-9947-2015-06012-7/#sthash.ChjyK6rc.dpuf

  11. Diffusive limits for linear transport equations

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1992-01-01

    The authors show that the Hibert and Chapman-Enskog asymptotic treatments that reduce the nonlinear Boltzmann equation to the Euler and Navier-Stokes fluid equations have analogs in linear transport theory. In this linear setting, these fluid limits are described by diffusion equations, involving familiar and less familiar diffusion coefficients. Because of the linearity extant, one can carry out explicitly the initial and boundary layer analyses required to obtain asymptotically consistent initial and boundary conditions for the diffusion equations. In particular, the effects of boundary curvature and boundary condition variation along the surface can be included in the boundary layer analysis. A brief review of heuristic (nonasymptotic) diffusion description derivations is also included in our discussion

  12. Spectral theories for linear differential equations

    Sell, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    The use of spectral analysis in the study of linear differential equations with constant coefficients is not only a fundamental technique but also leads to far-reaching consequences in describing the qualitative behaviour of the solutions. The spectral analysis, via the Jordan canonical form, will not only lead to a representation theorem for a basis of solutions, but will also give a rather precise statement of the (exponential) growth rates of various solutions. Various attempts have been made to extend this analysis to linear differential equations with time-varying coefficients. The most complete such extensions is the Floquet theory for equations with periodic coefficients. For time-varying linear differential equations with aperiodic coefficients several authors have attempted to ''extend'' the Foquet theory. The precise meaning of such an extension is itself a problem, and we present here several attempts in this direction that are related to the general problem of extending the spectral analysis of equations with constant coefficients. The main purpose of this paper is to introduce some problems of current research. The primary problem we shall examine occurs in the context of linear differential equations with almost periodic coefficients. We call it ''the Floquet problem''. (author)

  13. Solvable linear potentials in the Dirac equation

    Dominguez-Adame, F.; Gonzalez, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Dirac equation for some linear potentials leading to Schroedinger-like oscillator equations for the upper and lower components of the Dirac spinor have been solved. Energy levels for the bound states appear in pairs, so that both particles and antiparticles may be bound with the same energy. For weak coupling, the spacing between levels is proportional to the coupling constant while in the strong limit those levels are depressed compared to the nonrelativistic ones

  14. Emmy Noether and Linear Evolution Equations

    P. G. L. Leach

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Noether’s Theorem relates the Action Integral of a Lagrangian with symmetries which leave it invariant and the first integrals consequent upon the variational principle and the existence of the symmetries. These each have an equivalent in the Schrödinger Equation corresponding to the Lagrangian and by extension to linear evolution equations in general. The implications of these connections are investigated.

  15. Augmenting Data with Published Results in Bayesian Linear Regression

    de Leeuw, Christiaan; Klugkist, Irene

    2012-01-01

    In most research, linear regression analyses are performed without taking into account published results (i.e., reported summary statistics) of similar previous studies. Although the prior density in Bayesian linear regression could accommodate such prior knowledge, formal models for doing so are absent from the literature. The goal of this…

  16. A test for the parameters of multiple linear regression models ...

    A test for the parameters of multiple linear regression models is developed for conducting tests simultaneously on all the parameters of multiple linear regression models. The test is robust relative to the assumptions of homogeneity of variances and absence of serial correlation of the classical F-test. Under certain null and ...

  17. On index-2 linear implicit difference equations

    Nguyen Huu Du, [No Value; Le Cong Loi, [No Value; Trinh Khanh Duy, [No Value; Vu Tien Viet, [No Value

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with an index-2 notion for linear implicit difference equations (LIDEs) and with the solvability of initial value problems (IVPs) for index-2 LIDEs. Besides, the cocycle property as well as the multiplicative ergodic theorem of Oseledets type are also proved. (C) 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Singular Linear Differential Equations in Two Variables

    Braaksma, B.L.J.; Put, M. van der

    2008-01-01

    The formal and analytic classification of integrable singular linear differential equations has been studied among others by R. Gerard and Y. Sibuya. We provide a simple proof of their main result, namely: For certain irregular systems in two variables there is no Stokes phenomenon, i.e. there is no

  19. Sintering equation: determination of its coefficients by experiments - using multiple regression

    Windelberg, D.

    1999-01-01

    Sintering is a method for volume-compression (or volume-contraction) of powdered or grained material applying high temperature (less than the melting point of the material). Maekipirtti tried to find an equation which describes the process of sintering by its main parameters sintering time, sintering temperature and volume contracting. Such equation is called a sintering equation. It also contains some coefficients which characterise the behaviour of the material during the process of sintering. These coefficients have to be determined by experiments. Here we show that some linear regressions will produce wrong coefficients, but multiple regression results in an useful sintering equation. (orig.)

  20. Use of probabilistic weights to enhance linear regression myoelectric control.

    Smith, Lauren H; Kuiken, Todd A; Hargrove, Levi J

    2015-12-01

    Clinically available prostheses for transradial amputees do not allow simultaneous myoelectric control of degrees of freedom (DOFs). Linear regression methods can provide simultaneous myoelectric control, but frequently also result in difficulty with isolating individual DOFs when desired. This study evaluated the potential of using probabilistic estimates of categories of gross prosthesis movement, which are commonly used in classification-based myoelectric control, to enhance linear regression myoelectric control. Gaussian models were fit to electromyogram (EMG) feature distributions for three movement classes at each DOF (no movement, or movement in either direction) and used to weight the output of linear regression models by the probability that the user intended the movement. Eight able-bodied and two transradial amputee subjects worked in a virtual Fitts' law task to evaluate differences in controllability between linear regression and probability-weighted regression for an intramuscular EMG-based three-DOF wrist and hand system. Real-time and offline analyses in able-bodied subjects demonstrated that probability weighting improved performance during single-DOF tasks (p linear regression control. Use of probability weights can improve the ability to isolate individual during linear regression myoelectric control, while maintaining the ability to simultaneously control multiple DOFs.

  1. Distributed Monitoring of the R2 Statistic for Linear Regression

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The problem of monitoring a multivariate linear regression model is relevant in studying the evolving relationship between a set of input variables (features) and...

  2. Introduction to linear systems of differential equations

    Adrianova, L Ya

    1995-01-01

    The theory of linear systems of differential equations is one of the cornerstones of the whole theory of differential equations. At its root is the concept of the Lyapunov characteristic exponent. In this book, Adrianova presents introductory material and further detailed discussions of Lyapunov exponents. She also discusses the structure of the space of solutions of linear systems. Classes of linear systems examined are from the narrowest to widest: 1)�autonomous, 2)�periodic, 3)�reducible to autonomous, 4)�nearly reducible to autonomous, 5)�regular. In addition, Adrianova considers the following: stability of linear systems and the influence of perturbations of the coefficients on the stability the criteria of uniform stability and of uniform asymptotic stability in terms of properties of the solutions several estimates of the growth rate of solutions of a linear system in terms of its coefficients How perturbations of the coefficients change all the elements of the spectrum of the system is defin...

  3. Identification of Influential Points in a Linear Regression Model

    Jan Grosz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the detection and identification of influential points in the linear regression model. Three methods of detection of outliers and leverage points are described. These procedures can also be used for one-sample (independentdatasets. This paper briefly describes theoretical aspects of several robust methods as well. Robust statistics is a powerful tool to increase the reliability and accuracy of statistical modelling and data analysis. A simulation model of the simple linear regression is presented.

  4. Learning a Nonnegative Sparse Graph for Linear Regression.

    Fang, Xiaozhao; Xu, Yong; Li, Xuelong; Lai, Zhihui; Wong, Wai Keung

    2015-09-01

    Previous graph-based semisupervised learning (G-SSL) methods have the following drawbacks: 1) they usually predefine the graph structure and then use it to perform label prediction, which cannot guarantee an overall optimum and 2) they only focus on the label prediction or the graph structure construction but are not competent in handling new samples. To this end, a novel nonnegative sparse graph (NNSG) learning method was first proposed. Then, both the label prediction and projection learning were integrated into linear regression. Finally, the linear regression and graph structure learning were unified within the same framework to overcome these two drawbacks. Therefore, a novel method, named learning a NNSG for linear regression was presented, in which the linear regression and graph learning were simultaneously performed to guarantee an overall optimum. In the learning process, the label information can be accurately propagated via the graph structure so that the linear regression can learn a discriminative projection to better fit sample labels and accurately classify new samples. An effective algorithm was designed to solve the corresponding optimization problem with fast convergence. Furthermore, NNSG provides a unified perceptiveness for a number of graph-based learning methods and linear regression methods. The experimental results showed that NNSG can obtain very high classification accuracy and greatly outperforms conventional G-SSL methods, especially some conventional graph construction methods.

  5. Nonoscillation of half-linear dynamic equations

    Matucci, S.; Řehák, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 5 (2010), s. 1421-1429 ISSN 0898-1221 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100190701 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA201/07/0145 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : half-linear dynamic equation * time scale * (non)oscillation * Riccati technique Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.472, year: 2010 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0898122110004384

  6. On a representation of linear differential equations

    Neuman, František

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 52, 1-2 (2010), s. 355-360 ISSN 0895-7177 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA201/08/0469 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Brandt and Ehresmann groupoinds * transformations * canonical forms * linear differential equations Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.066, year: 2010 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0895717710001184

  7. Teaching the Concept of Breakdown Point in Simple Linear Regression.

    Chan, Wai-Sum

    2001-01-01

    Most introductory textbooks on simple linear regression analysis mention the fact that extreme data points have a great influence on ordinary least-squares regression estimation; however, not many textbooks provide a rigorous mathematical explanation of this phenomenon. Suggests a way to fill this gap by teaching students the concept of breakdown…

  8. Testing hypotheses for differences between linear regression lines

    Stanley J. Zarnoch

    2009-01-01

    Five hypotheses are identified for testing differences between simple linear regression lines. The distinctions between these hypotheses are based on a priori assumptions and illustrated with full and reduced models. The contrast approach is presented as an easy and complete method for testing for overall differences between the regressions and for making pairwise...

  9. Localization of the eigenvalues of linear integral equations with applications to linear ordinary differential equations.

    Sloss, J. M.; Kranzler, S. K.

    1972-01-01

    The equivalence of a considered integral equation form with an infinite system of linear equations is proved, and the localization of the eigenvalues of the infinite system is expressed. Error estimates are derived, and the problems of finding upper bounds and lower bounds for the eigenvalues are solved simultaneously.

  10. Evaluation of Linear Regression Simultaneous Myoelectric Control Using Intramuscular EMG.

    Smith, Lauren H; Kuiken, Todd A; Hargrove, Levi J

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of linear regression models to decode patterns of muscle coactivation from intramuscular electromyogram (EMG) and provide simultaneous myoelectric control of a virtual 3-DOF wrist/hand system. Performance was compared to the simultaneous control of conventional myoelectric prosthesis methods using intramuscular EMG (parallel dual-site control)-an approach that requires users to independently modulate individual muscles in the residual limb, which can be challenging for amputees. Linear regression control was evaluated in eight able-bodied subjects during a virtual Fitts' law task and was compared to performance of eight subjects using parallel dual-site control. An offline analysis also evaluated how different types of training data affected prediction accuracy of linear regression control. The two control systems demonstrated similar overall performance; however, the linear regression method demonstrated improved performance for targets requiring use of all three DOFs, whereas parallel dual-site control demonstrated improved performance for targets that required use of only one DOF. Subjects using linear regression control could more easily activate multiple DOFs simultaneously, but often experienced unintended movements when trying to isolate individual DOFs. Offline analyses also suggested that the method used to train linear regression systems may influence controllability. Linear regression myoelectric control using intramuscular EMG provided an alternative to parallel dual-site control for 3-DOF simultaneous control at the wrist and hand. The two methods demonstrated different strengths in controllability, highlighting the tradeoff between providing simultaneous control and the ability to isolate individual DOFs when desired.

  11. Estimating monotonic rates from biological data using local linear regression.

    Olito, Colin; White, Craig R; Marshall, Dustin J; Barneche, Diego R

    2017-03-01

    Accessing many fundamental questions in biology begins with empirical estimation of simple monotonic rates of underlying biological processes. Across a variety of disciplines, ranging from physiology to biogeochemistry, these rates are routinely estimated from non-linear and noisy time series data using linear regression and ad hoc manual truncation of non-linearities. Here, we introduce the R package LoLinR, a flexible toolkit to implement local linear regression techniques to objectively and reproducibly estimate monotonic biological rates from non-linear time series data, and demonstrate possible applications using metabolic rate data. LoLinR provides methods to easily and reliably estimate monotonic rates from time series data in a way that is statistically robust, facilitates reproducible research and is applicable to a wide variety of research disciplines in the biological sciences. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Use of probabilistic weights to enhance linear regression myoelectric control

    Smith, Lauren H.; Kuiken, Todd A.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Clinically available prostheses for transradial amputees do not allow simultaneous myoelectric control of degrees of freedom (DOFs). Linear regression methods can provide simultaneous myoelectric control, but frequently also result in difficulty with isolating individual DOFs when desired. This study evaluated the potential of using probabilistic estimates of categories of gross prosthesis movement, which are commonly used in classification-based myoelectric control, to enhance linear regression myoelectric control. Approach. Gaussian models were fit to electromyogram (EMG) feature distributions for three movement classes at each DOF (no movement, or movement in either direction) and used to weight the output of linear regression models by the probability that the user intended the movement. Eight able-bodied and two transradial amputee subjects worked in a virtual Fitts’ law task to evaluate differences in controllability between linear regression and probability-weighted regression for an intramuscular EMG-based three-DOF wrist and hand system. Main results. Real-time and offline analyses in able-bodied subjects demonstrated that probability weighting improved performance during single-DOF tasks (p < 0.05) by preventing extraneous movement at additional DOFs. Similar results were seen in experiments with two transradial amputees. Though goodness-of-fit evaluations suggested that the EMG feature distributions showed some deviations from the Gaussian, equal-covariance assumptions used in this experiment, the assumptions were sufficiently met to provide improved performance compared to linear regression control. Significance. Use of probability weights can improve the ability to isolate individual during linear regression myoelectric control, while maintaining the ability to simultaneously control multiple DOFs.

  13. Linear regression methods a ccording to objective functions

    Yasemin Sisman; Sebahattin Bektas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explain the parameter estimation methods and the regression analysis. The simple linear regressionmethods grouped according to the objective function are introduced. The numerical solution is achieved for the simple linear regressionmethods according to objective function of Least Squares and theLeast Absolute Value adjustment methods. The success of the appliedmethods is analyzed using their objective function values.

  14. Optimal choice of basis functions in the linear regression analysis

    Khotinskij, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Problem of optimal choice of basis functions in the linear regression analysis is investigated. Step algorithm with estimation of its efficiency, which holds true at finite number of measurements, is suggested. Conditions, providing the probability of correct choice close to 1 are formulated. Application of the step algorithm to analysis of decay curves is substantiated. 8 refs

  15. Common pitfalls in statistical analysis: Linear regression analysis

    Rakesh Aggarwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous article in this series, we explained correlation analysis which describes the strength of relationship between two continuous variables. In this article, we deal with linear regression analysis which predicts the value of one continuous variable from another. We also discuss the assumptions and pitfalls associated with this analysis.

  16. How Robust Is Linear Regression with Dummy Variables?

    Blankmeyer, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Researchers in education and the social sciences make extensive use of linear regression models in which the dependent variable is continuous-valued while the explanatory variables are a combination of continuous-valued regressors and dummy variables. The dummies partition the sample into groups, some of which may contain only a few observations.…

  17. On the null distribution of Bayes factors in linear regression

    We show that under the null, the 2 log (Bayes factor) is asymptotically distributed as a weighted sum of chi-squared random variables with a shifted mean. This claim holds for Bayesian multi-linear regression with a family of conjugate priors, namely, the normal-inverse-gamma prior, the g-prior, and...

  18. Fitting program for linear regressions according to Mahon (1996)

    2018-01-09

    This program takes the users' Input data and fits a linear regression to it using the prescription presented by Mahon (1996). Compared to the commonly used York fit, this method has the correct prescription for measurement error propagation. This software should facilitate the proper fitting of measurements with a simple Interface.

  19. Data Transformations for Inference with Linear Regression: Clarifications and Recommendations

    Pek, Jolynn; Wong, Octavia; Wong, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Data transformations have been promoted as a popular and easy-to-implement remedy to address the assumption of normally distributed errors (in the population) in linear regression. However, the application of data transformations introduces non-ignorable complexities which should be fully appreciated before their implementation. This paper adds to…

  20. Linear regression and sensitivity analysis in nuclear reactor design

    Kumar, Akansha; Tsvetkov, Pavel V.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Presented a benchmark for the applicability of linear regression to complex systems. • Applied linear regression to a nuclear reactor power system. • Performed neutronics, thermal–hydraulics, and energy conversion using Brayton’s cycle for the design of a GCFBR. • Performed detailed sensitivity analysis to a set of parameters in a nuclear reactor power system. • Modeled and developed reactor design using MCNP, regression using R, and thermal–hydraulics in Java. - Abstract: The paper presents a general strategy applicable for sensitivity analysis (SA), and uncertainity quantification analysis (UA) of parameters related to a nuclear reactor design. This work also validates the use of linear regression (LR) for predictive analysis in a nuclear reactor design. The analysis helps to determine the parameters on which a LR model can be fit for predictive analysis. For those parameters, a regression surface is created based on trial data and predictions are made using this surface. A general strategy of SA to determine and identify the influential parameters those affect the operation of the reactor is mentioned. Identification of design parameters and validation of linearity assumption for the application of LR of reactor design based on a set of tests is performed. The testing methods used to determine the behavior of the parameters can be used as a general strategy for UA, and SA of nuclear reactor models, and thermal hydraulics calculations. A design of a gas cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFBR), with thermal–hydraulics, and energy transfer has been used for the demonstration of this method. MCNP6 is used to simulate the GCFBR design, and perform the necessary criticality calculations. Java is used to build and run input samples, and to extract data from the output files of MCNP6, and R is used to perform regression analysis and other multivariate variance, and analysis of the collinearity of data

  1. Direction of Effects in Multiple Linear Regression Models.

    Wiedermann, Wolfgang; von Eye, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies analyzed asymmetric properties of the Pearson correlation coefficient using higher than second order moments. These asymmetric properties can be used to determine the direction of dependence in a linear regression setting (i.e., establish which of two variables is more likely to be on the outcome side) within the framework of cross-sectional observational data. Extant approaches are restricted to the bivariate regression case. The present contribution extends the direction of dependence methodology to a multiple linear regression setting by analyzing distributional properties of residuals of competing multiple regression models. It is shown that, under certain conditions, the third central moments of estimated regression residuals can be used to decide upon direction of effects. In addition, three different approaches for statistical inference are discussed: a combined D'Agostino normality test, a skewness difference test, and a bootstrap difference test. Type I error and power of the procedures are assessed using Monte Carlo simulations, and an empirical example is provided for illustrative purposes. In the discussion, issues concerning the quality of psychological data, possible extensions of the proposed methods to the fourth central moment of regression residuals, and potential applications are addressed.

  2. Linear measure functional differential equations with infinite delay

    Monteiro, G. (Giselle Antunes); Slavík, A.

    2014-01-01

    We use the theory of generalized linear ordinary differential equations in Banach spaces to study linear measure functional differential equations with infinite delay. We obtain new results concerning the existence, uniqueness, and continuous dependence of solutions. Even for equations with a finite delay, our results are stronger than the existing ones. Finally, we present an application to functional differential equations with impulses.

  3. SPLINE LINEAR REGRESSION USED FOR EVALUATING FINANCIAL ASSETS 1

    Liviu GEAMBAŞU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important preoccupations of financial markets participants was and still is the problem of determining more precise the trend of financial assets prices. For solving this problem there were written many scientific papers and were developed many mathematical and statistical models in order to better determine the financial assets price trend. If until recently the simple linear models were largely used due to their facile utilization, the financial crises that affected the world economy starting with 2008 highlight the necessity of adapting the mathematical models to variation of economy. A simple to use model but adapted to economic life realities is the spline linear regression. This type of regression keeps the continuity of regression function, but split the studied data in intervals with homogenous characteristics. The characteristics of each interval are highlighted and also the evolution of market over all the intervals, resulting reduced standard errors. The first objective of the article is the theoretical presentation of the spline linear regression, also referring to scientific national and international papers related to this subject. The second objective is applying the theoretical model to data from the Bucharest Stock Exchange

  4. Simple and multiple linear regression: sample size considerations.

    Hanley, James A

    2016-11-01

    The suggested "two subjects per variable" (2SPV) rule of thumb in the Austin and Steyerberg article is a chance to bring out some long-established and quite intuitive sample size considerations for both simple and multiple linear regression. This article distinguishes two of the major uses of regression models that imply very different sample size considerations, neither served well by the 2SPV rule. The first is etiological research, which contrasts mean Y levels at differing "exposure" (X) values and thus tends to focus on a single regression coefficient, possibly adjusted for confounders. The second research genre guides clinical practice. It addresses Y levels for individuals with different covariate patterns or "profiles." It focuses on the profile-specific (mean) Y levels themselves, estimating them via linear compounds of regression coefficients and covariates. By drawing on long-established closed-form variance formulae that lie beneath the standard errors in multiple regression, and by rearranging them for heuristic purposes, one arrives at quite intuitive sample size considerations for both research genres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Implementing fuzzy polynomial interpolation (FPI and fuzzy linear regression (LFR

    Maria Cristina Floreno

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some preliminary results arising within a general framework concerning the development of software tools for fuzzy arithmetic. The program is in a preliminary stage. What has been already implemented consists of a set of routines for elementary operations, optimized functions evaluation, interpolation and regression. Some of these have been applied to real problems.This paper describes a prototype of a library in C++ for polynomial interpolation of fuzzifying functions, a set of routines in FORTRAN for fuzzy linear regression and a program with graphical user interface allowing the use of such routines.

  6. Stochastic development regression on non-linear manifolds

    Kühnel, Line; Sommer, Stefan Horst

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a regression model for data on non-linear manifolds. The model describes the relation between a set of manifold valued observations, such as shapes of anatomical objects, and Euclidean explanatory variables. The approach is based on stochastic development of Euclidean diffusion...... processes to the manifold. Defining the data distribution as the transition distribution of the mapped stochastic process, parameters of the model, the non-linear analogue of design matrix and intercept, are found via maximum likelihood. The model is intrinsically related to the geometry encoded...

  7. Computer software for linear and nonlinear regression in organic NMR

    Canto, Eduardo Leite do; Rittner, Roberto

    1991-01-01

    Calculation involving two variable linear regressions, require specific procedures generally not familiar to chemist. For attending the necessity of fast and efficient handling of NMR data, a self explained and Pc portable software has been developed, which allows user to produce and use diskette recorded tables, containing chemical shift or any other substituent physical-chemical measurements and constants (σ T , σ o R , E s , ...)

  8. Multicollinearity in applied economics research and the Bayesian linear regression

    EISENSTAT, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This article revises the popular issue of collinearity amongst explanatory variables in the context of a multiple linear regression analysis, particularly in empirical studies within social science related fields. Some important interpretations and explanations are highlighted from the econometrics literature with respect to the effects of multicollinearity on statistical inference, as well as the general shortcomings of the once fervent search for methods intended to detect and mitigate thes...

  9. Extending the linear model with R generalized linear, mixed effects and nonparametric regression models

    Faraway, Julian J

    2005-01-01

    Linear models are central to the practice of statistics and form the foundation of a vast range of statistical methodologies. Julian J. Faraway''s critically acclaimed Linear Models with R examined regression and analysis of variance, demonstrated the different methods available, and showed in which situations each one applies. Following in those footsteps, Extending the Linear Model with R surveys the techniques that grow from the regression model, presenting three extensions to that framework: generalized linear models (GLMs), mixed effect models, and nonparametric regression models. The author''s treatment is thoroughly modern and covers topics that include GLM diagnostics, generalized linear mixed models, trees, and even the use of neural networks in statistics. To demonstrate the interplay of theory and practice, throughout the book the author weaves the use of the R software environment to analyze the data of real examples, providing all of the R commands necessary to reproduce the analyses. All of the ...

  10. Schwarz maps of algebraic linear ordinary differential equations

    Sanabria Malagón, Camilo

    2017-12-01

    A linear ordinary differential equation is called algebraic if all its solution are algebraic over its field of definition. In this paper we solve the problem of finding closed form solution to algebraic linear ordinary differential equations in terms of standard equations. Furthermore, we obtain a method to compute all algebraic linear ordinary differential equations with rational coefficients by studying their associated Schwarz map through the Picard-Vessiot Theory.

  11. Carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts empiric calculations of polymers by multi linear regression and molecular modeling

    Da Silva Pinto, P.S.; Eustache, R.P.; Audenaert, M.; Bernassau, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts empiric calculations by multi linear regression and molecular modeling. The multi linear regression is indeed one way to obtain an equation able to describe the behaviour of the chemical shift for some molecules which are in the data base (rigid molecules with carbons). The methodology consists of structures describer parameters definition which can be bound to carbon 13 chemical shift known for these molecules. Then, the linear regression is used to determine the equation significant parameters. This one can be extrapolated to molecules which presents some resemblances with those of the data base. (O.L.). 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. Fuzzy Linear Regression for the Time Series Data which is Fuzzified with SMRGT Method

    Seçil YALAZ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Our work on regression and classification provides a new contribution to the analysis of time series used in many areas for years. Owing to the fact that convergence could not obtained with the methods used in autocorrelation fixing process faced with time series regression application, success is not met or fall into obligation of changing the models’ degree. Changing the models’ degree may not be desirable in every situation. In our study, recommended for these situations, time series data was fuzzified by using the simple membership function and fuzzy rule generation technique (SMRGT and to estimate future an equation has created by applying fuzzy least square regression (FLSR method which is a simple linear regression method to this data. Although SMRGT has success in determining the flow discharge in open channels and can be used confidently for flow discharge modeling in open canals, as well as in pipe flow with some modifications, there is no clue about that this technique is successful in fuzzy linear regression modeling. Therefore, in order to address the luck of such a modeling, a new hybrid model has been described within this study. In conclusion, to demonstrate our methods’ efficiency, classical linear regression for time series data and linear regression for fuzzy time series data were applied to two different data sets, and these two approaches performances were compared by using different measures.

  13. Return-Volatility Relationship: Insights from Linear and Non-Linear Quantile Regression

    D.E. Allen (David); A.K. Singh (Abhay); R.J. Powell (Robert); M.J. McAleer (Michael); J. Taylor (James); L. Thomas (Lyn)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this paper is to examine the asymmetric relationship between price and implied volatility and the associated extreme quantile dependence using linear and non linear quantile regression approach. Our goal in this paper is to demonstrate that the relationship between the

  14. Using the Ridge Regression Procedures to Estimate the Multiple Linear Regression Coefficients

    Gorgees, HazimMansoor; Mahdi, FatimahAssim

    2018-05-01

    This article concerns with comparing the performance of different types of ordinary ridge regression estimators that have been already proposed to estimate the regression parameters when the near exact linear relationships among the explanatory variables is presented. For this situations we employ the data obtained from tagi gas filling company during the period (2008-2010). The main result we reached is that the method based on the condition number performs better than other methods since it has smaller mean square error (MSE) than the other stated methods.

  15. Construction of a Roe linearization for the ideal MHD equations

    Cargo, P.; Gallice, G.; Raviart, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    In [3], Munz has constructed a Roe linearization for the equations of gas dynamics in Lagrangian coordinates. We extend this construction to the case of the ideal magnetohydrodynamics equations again in Lagrangian coordinates. As a consequence we obtain a Roe linearization for the MHD equations in Eulerian coordinates. (author)

  16. Using Regression Equations Built from Summary Data in the Psychological Assessment of the Individual Case: Extension to Multiple Regression

    Crawford, John R.; Garthwaite, Paul H.; Denham, Annie K.; Chelune, Gordon J.

    2012-01-01

    Regression equations have many useful roles in psychological assessment. Moreover, there is a large reservoir of published data that could be used to build regression equations; these equations could then be employed to test a wide variety of hypotheses concerning the functioning of individual cases. This resource is currently underused because…

  17. On macroeconomic values investigation using fuzzy linear regression analysis

    Richard Pospíšil

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical background for abstract formalization of the vague phenomenon of complex systems is the fuzzy set theory. In the paper, vague data is defined as specialized fuzzy sets - fuzzy numbers and there is described a fuzzy linear regression model as a fuzzy function with fuzzy numbers as vague parameters. To identify the fuzzy coefficients of the model, the genetic algorithm is used. The linear approximation of the vague function together with its possibility area is analytically and graphically expressed. A suitable application is performed in the tasks of the time series fuzzy regression analysis. The time-trend and seasonal cycles including their possibility areas are calculated and expressed. The examples are presented from the economy field, namely the time-development of unemployment, agricultural production and construction respectively between 2009 and 2011 in the Czech Republic. The results are shown in the form of the fuzzy regression models of variables of time series. For the period 2009-2011, the analysis assumptions about seasonal behaviour of variables and the relationship between them were confirmed; in 2010, the system behaved fuzzier and the relationships between the variables were vaguer, that has a lot of causes, from the different elasticity of demand, through state interventions to globalization and transnational impacts.

  18. BRGLM, Interactive Linear Regression Analysis by Least Square Fit

    Ringland, J.T.; Bohrer, R.E.; Sherman, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: BRGLM is an interactive program written to fit general linear regression models by least squares and to provide a variety of statistical diagnostic information about the fit. Stepwise and all-subsets regression can be carried out also. There are facilities for interactive data management (e.g. setting missing value flags, data transformations) and tools for constructing design matrices for the more commonly-used models such as factorials, cubic Splines, and auto-regressions. 2 - Method of solution: The least squares computations are based on the orthogonal (QR) decomposition of the design matrix obtained using the modified Gram-Schmidt algorithm. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The current release of BRGLM allows maxima of 1000 observations, 99 variables, and 3000 words of main memory workspace. For a problem with N observations and P variables, the number of words of main memory storage required is MAX(N*(P+6), N*P+P*P+3*N, and 3*P*P+6*N). Any linear model may be fit although the in-memory workspace will have to be increased for larger problems

  19. A comparison of random forest regression and multiple linear regression for prediction in neuroscience.

    Smith, Paul F; Ganesh, Siva; Liu, Ping

    2013-10-30

    Regression is a common statistical tool for prediction in neuroscience. However, linear regression is by far the most common form of regression used, with regression trees receiving comparatively little attention. In this study, the results of conventional multiple linear regression (MLR) were compared with those of random forest regression (RFR), in the prediction of the concentrations of 9 neurochemicals in the vestibular nucleus complex and cerebellum that are part of the l-arginine biochemical pathway (agmatine, putrescine, spermidine, spermine, l-arginine, l-ornithine, l-citrulline, glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)). The R(2) values for the MLRs were higher than the proportion of variance explained values for the RFRs: 6/9 of them were ≥ 0.70 compared to 4/9 for RFRs. Even the variables that had the lowest R(2) values for the MLRs, e.g. ornithine (0.50) and glutamate (0.61), had much lower proportion of variance explained values for the RFRs (0.27 and 0.49, respectively). The RSE values for the MLRs were lower than those for the RFRs in all but two cases. In general, MLRs seemed to be superior to the RFRs in terms of predictive value and error. In the case of this data set, MLR appeared to be superior to RFR in terms of its explanatory value and error. This result suggests that MLR may have advantages over RFR for prediction in neuroscience with this kind of data set, but that RFR can still have good predictive value in some cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Relative Importance for Linear Regression in R: The Package relaimpo

    Ulrike Gromping

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Relative importance is a topic that has seen a lot of interest in recent years, particularly in applied work. The R package relaimpo implements six different metrics for assessing relative importance of regressors in the linear model, two of which are recommended - averaging over orderings of regressors and a newly proposed metric (Feldman 2005 called pmvd. Apart from delivering the metrics themselves, relaimpo also provides (exploratory bootstrap confidence intervals. This paper offers a brief tutorial introduction to the package. The methods and relaimpo’s functionality are illustrated using the data set swiss that is generally available in R. The paper targets readers who have a basic understanding of multiple linear regression. For the background of more advanced aspects, references are provided.

  1. Stochastic development regression on non-linear manifolds

    Kühnel, Line; Sommer, Stefan Horst

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a regression model for data on non-linear manifolds. The model describes the relation between a set of manifold valued observations, such as shapes of anatomical objects, and Euclidean explanatory variables. The approach is based on stochastic development of Euclidean diffusion...... processes to the manifold. Defining the data distribution as the transition distribution of the mapped stochastic process, parameters of the model, the non-linear analogue of design matrix and intercept, are found via maximum likelihood. The model is intrinsically related to the geometry encoded...... in the connection of the manifold. We propose an estimation procedure which applies the Laplace approximation of the likelihood function. A simulation study of the performance of the model is performed and the model is applied to a real dataset of Corpus Callosum shapes....

  2. User's Guide to the Weighted-Multiple-Linear Regression Program (WREG version 1.0)

    Eng, Ken; Chen, Yin-Yu; Kiang, Julie.E.

    2009-01-01

    Streamflow is not measured at every location in a stream network. Yet hydrologists, State and local agencies, and the general public still seek to know streamflow characteristics, such as mean annual flow or flood flows with different exceedance probabilities, at ungaged basins. The goals of this guide are to introduce and familiarize the user with the weighted multiple-linear regression (WREG) program, and to also provide the theoretical background for program features. The program is intended to be used to develop a regional estimation equation for streamflow characteristics that can be applied at an ungaged basin, or to improve the corresponding estimate at continuous-record streamflow gages with short records. The regional estimation equation results from a multiple-linear regression that relates the observable basin characteristics, such as drainage area, to streamflow characteristics.

  3. Hamiltonian structures of some non-linear evolution equations

    Tu, G.Z.

    1983-06-01

    The Hamiltonian structure of the O(2,1) non-linear sigma model, generalized AKNS equations, are discussed. By reducing the O(2,1) non-linear sigma model to its Hamiltonian form some new conservation laws are derived. A new hierarchy of non-linear evolution equations is proposed and shown to be generalized Hamiltonian equations with an infinite number of conservation laws. (author)

  4. Stability of Linear Equations--Algebraic Approach

    Cherif, Chokri; Goldstein, Avraham; Prado, Lucio M. G.

    2012-01-01

    This article could be of interest to teachers of applied mathematics as well as to people who are interested in applications of linear algebra. We give a comprehensive study of linear systems from an application point of view. Specifically, we give an overview of linear systems and problems that can occur with the computed solution when the…

  5. Multiple regression and beyond an introduction to multiple regression and structural equation modeling

    Keith, Timothy Z

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Regression and Beyond offers a conceptually oriented introduction to multiple regression (MR) analysis and structural equation modeling (SEM), along with analyses that flow naturally from those methods. By focusing on the concepts and purposes of MR and related methods, rather than the derivation and calculation of formulae, this book introduces material to students more clearly, and in a less threatening way. In addition to illuminating content necessary for coursework, the accessibility of this approach means students are more likely to be able to conduct research using MR or SEM--and more likely to use the methods wisely. Covers both MR and SEM, while explaining their relevance to one another Also includes path analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and latent growth modeling Figures and tables throughout provide examples and illustrate key concepts and techniques For additional resources, please visit: http://tzkeith.com/.

  6. Oscillation theory of linear differential equations

    Došlý, Ondřej

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 5 (2000), s. 329-343 ISSN 0044-8753 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/98/0677 Keywords : discrete oscillation theory %Sturm-Liouville equation%Riccati equation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  7. Robust linear registration of CT images using random regression forests

    Konukoglu, Ender; Criminisi, Antonio; Pathak, Sayan; Robertson, Duncan; White, Steve; Haynor, David; Siddiqui, Khan

    2011-03-01

    Global linear registration is a necessary first step for many different tasks in medical image analysis. Comparing longitudinal studies1, cross-modality fusion2, and many other applications depend heavily on the success of the automatic registration. The robustness and efficiency of this step is crucial as it affects all subsequent operations. Most common techniques cast the linear registration problem as the minimization of a global energy function based on the image intensities. Although these algorithms have proved useful, their robustness in fully automated scenarios is still an open question. In fact, the optimization step often gets caught in local minima yielding unsatisfactory results. Recent algorithms constrain the space of registration parameters by exploiting implicit or explicit organ segmentations, thus increasing robustness4,5. In this work we propose a novel robust algorithm for automatic global linear image registration. Our method uses random regression forests to estimate posterior probability distributions for the locations of anatomical structures - represented as axis aligned bounding boxes6. These posterior distributions are later integrated in a global linear registration algorithm. The biggest advantage of our algorithm is that it does not require pre-defined segmentations or regions. Yet it yields robust registration results. We compare the robustness of our algorithm with that of the state of the art Elastix toolbox7. Validation is performed via 1464 pair-wise registrations in a database of very diverse 3D CT images. We show that our method decreases the "failure" rate of the global linear registration from 12.5% (Elastix) to only 1.9%.

  8. [Multiple linear regression analysis of X-ray measurement and WOMAC scores of knee osteoarthritis].

    Ma, Yu-Feng; Wang, Qing-Fu; Chen, Zhao-Jun; Du, Chun-Lin; Li, Jun-Hai; Huang, Hu; Shi, Zong-Ting; Yin, Yue-Shan; Zhang, Lei; A-Di, Li-Jiang; Dong, Shi-Yu; Wu, Ji

    2012-05-01

    To perform Multiple Linear Regression analysis of X-ray measurement and WOMAC scores of knee osteoarthritis, and to analyze their relationship with clinical and biomechanical concepts. From March 2011 to July 2011, 140 patients (250 knees) were reviewed, including 132 knees in the left and 118 knees in the right; ranging in age from 40 to 71 years, with an average of 54.68 years. The MB-RULER measurement software was applied to measure femoral angle, tibial angle, femorotibial angle, joint gap angle from antero-posterir and lateral position of X-rays. The WOMAC scores were also collected. Then multiple regression equations was applied for the linear regression analysis of correlation between the X-ray measurement and WOMAC scores. There was statistical significance in the regression equation of AP X-rays value and WOMAC scores (Pregression equation of lateral X-ray value and WOMAC scores (P>0.05). 1) X-ray measurement of knee joint can reflect the WOMAC scores to a certain extent. 2) It is necessary to measure the X-ray mechanical axis of knee, which is important for diagnosis and treatment of osteoarthritis. 3) The correlation between tibial angle,joint gap angle on antero-posterior X-ray and WOMAC scores is significant, which can be used to assess the functional recovery of patients before and after treatment.

  9. Geometric Insight into Scalar Combination of Linear Equations

    ... Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 11. Geometric Insight into Scalar Combination of Linear Equations. Ranjit Konkar. Classroom Volume 14 Issue 11 November 2009 pp 1092-1097 ... Keywords. Linear algebra; linear dependence; linear combination; family of lines; family of planes.

  10. Estimating Loess Plateau Average Annual Precipitation with Multiple Linear Regression Kriging and Geographically Weighted Regression Kriging

    Qiutong Jin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the spatial distribution of precipitation is an important and challenging task in hydrology, climatology, ecology, and environmental science. In order to generate a highly accurate distribution map of average annual precipitation for the Loess Plateau in China, multiple linear regression Kriging (MLRK and geographically weighted regression Kriging (GWRK methods were employed using precipitation data from the period 1980–2010 from 435 meteorological stations. The predictors in regression Kriging were selected by stepwise regression analysis from many auxiliary environmental factors, such as elevation (DEM, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, solar radiation, slope, and aspect. All predictor distribution maps had a 500 m spatial resolution. Validation precipitation data from 130 hydrometeorological stations were used to assess the prediction accuracies of the MLRK and GWRK approaches. Results showed that both prediction maps with a 500 m spatial resolution interpolated by MLRK and GWRK had a high accuracy and captured detailed spatial distribution data; however, MLRK produced a lower prediction error and a higher variance explanation than GWRK, although the differences were small, in contrast to conclusions from similar studies.

  11. High-throughput quantitative biochemical characterization of algal biomass by NIR spectroscopy; multiple linear regression and multivariate linear regression analysis.

    Laurens, L M L; Wolfrum, E J

    2013-12-18

    One of the challenges associated with microalgal biomass characterization and the comparison of microalgal strains and conversion processes is the rapid determination of the composition of algae. We have developed and applied a high-throughput screening technology based on near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for the rapid and accurate determination of algal biomass composition. We show that NIR spectroscopy can accurately predict the full composition using multivariate linear regression analysis of varying lipid, protein, and carbohydrate content of algal biomass samples from three strains. We also demonstrate a high quality of predictions of an independent validation set. A high-throughput 96-well configuration for spectroscopy gives equally good prediction relative to a ring-cup configuration, and thus, spectra can be obtained from as little as 10-20 mg of material. We found that lipids exhibit a dominant, distinct, and unique fingerprint in the NIR spectrum that allows for the use of single and multiple linear regression of respective wavelengths for the prediction of the biomass lipid content. This is not the case for carbohydrate and protein content, and thus, the use of multivariate statistical modeling approaches remains necessary.

  12. Students' errors in solving linear equation word problems: Case ...

    The study examined errors students make in solving linear equation word problems with a view to expose the nature of these errors and to make suggestions for classroom teaching. A diagnostic test comprising 10 linear equation word problems, was administered to a sample (n=130) of senior high school first year Home ...

  13. Convergence diagnostics for Eigenvalue problems with linear regression model

    Shi, Bo; Petrovic, Bojan

    2011-01-01

    Although the Monte Carlo method has been extensively used for criticality/Eigenvalue problems, a reliable, robust, and efficient convergence diagnostics method is still desired. Most methods are based on integral parameters (multiplication factor, entropy) and either condense the local distribution information into a single value (e.g., entropy) or even disregard it. We propose to employ the detailed cycle-by-cycle local flux evolution obtained by using mesh tally mechanism to assess the source and flux convergence. By applying a linear regression model to each individual mesh in a mesh tally for convergence diagnostics, a global convergence criterion can be obtained. We exemplify this method on two problems and obtain promising diagnostics results. (author)

  14. Regressão linear geograficamente ponderada em ambiente SIG

    Luís Eduardo Ximenes Carvalho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Este artigo aborda considerações teóricas e resultados da implementação em ambiente SIG de um modelo confirmatório de estatística espacial — regressão linear geograficamente ponderada (RGP — não disponível em ambiente livre. Os aspectos teóricos deste modelo local de regressão espacial foram amplamente discutidos em virtude da escassa bibliografia existente. O modelo RGP foi implementado na linguagem de programação GISDK do SIG-T TransCAD, utilizando compreensivamente as ferramentas de manipulação, tratamento georreferenciado dos dados e rotinas de análise espacial disponibilizadas em plataformas SIG. Ao final, espera-se ter desenvolvido, ainda que de maneira parcial, uma importante ferramenta que contribuirá para a compreensão e refinamento da modelagem de fenômenos geográficos tão amplamente analisados em estudos de Planejamento de Transportes.

  15. Linear orbit parameters for the exact equations of motion

    Parzen, G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper defines the beta function and other linear orbit parameters using the exact equations of motion. The β, α and ψ functions are redefined using the exact equations. Expressions are found for the transfer matrix and the emittance. The differential equations for η = x/β 1/2 is found. New relationships between α, β, ψ and ν are derived

  16. GLOBAL LINEARIZATION OF DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH SPECIAL STRUCTURES

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the global linearization of the differential equations with special structures.The function in the differential equation is unbounded.We prove that the differential equation with unbounded function can be topologically linearlized if it has a special structure.

  17. On some perturbation techniques for quasi-linear parabolic equations

    Igor Malyshev

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a nonhomogeneous quasi-linear parabolic equation and introduce a method that allows us to find the solution of a nonlinear boundary value problem in “explicit” form. This task is accomplished by perturbing the original equation with a source function, which is then found as a solution of some nonlinear operator equation.

  18. A General Linear Method for Equating with Small Samples

    Albano, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Research on equating with small samples has shown that methods with stronger assumptions and fewer statistical estimates can lead to decreased error in the estimated equating function. This article introduces a new approach to linear observed-score equating, one which provides flexible control over how form difficulty is assumed versus estimated…

  19. Modeling Pan Evaporation for Kuwait by Multiple Linear Regression

    Almedeij, Jaber

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation is an important parameter for many projects related to hydrology and water resources systems. This paper constitutes the first study conducted in Kuwait to obtain empirical relations for the estimation of daily and monthly pan evaporation as functions of available meteorological data of temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. The data used here for the modeling are daily measurements of substantial continuity coverage, within a period of 17 years between January 1993 and December 2009, which can be considered representative of the desert climate of the urban zone of the country. Multiple linear regression technique is used with a procedure of variable selection for fitting the best model forms. The correlations of evaporation with temperature and relative humidity are also transformed in order to linearize the existing curvilinear patterns of the data by using power and exponential functions, respectively. The evaporation models suggested with the best variable combinations were shown to produce results that are in a reasonable agreement with observation values. PMID:23226984

  20. Iterative solution of linear equations in ODE codes. [Krylov subspaces

    Gear, C. W.; Saad, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Each integration step of a stiff equation involves the solution of a nonlinear equation, usually by a quasi-Newton method that leads to a set of linear problems. Iterative methods for these linear equations are studied. Of particular interest are methods that do not require an explicit Jacobian, but can work directly with differences of function values using J congruent to f(x + delta) - f(x). Some numerical experiments using a modification of LSODE are reported. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  1. Alpins and thibos vectorial astigmatism analyses: proposal of a linear regression model between methods

    Giuliano de Oliveira Freitas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine linear regression models between Alpins descriptive indices and Thibos astigmatic power vectors (APV, assessing the validity and strength of such correlations. METHODS: This case series prospectively assessed 62 eyes of 31 consecutive cataract patients with preoperative corneal astigmatism between 0.75 and 2.50 diopters in both eyes. Patients were randomly assorted among two phacoemulsification groups: one assigned to receive AcrySof®Toric intraocular lens (IOL in both eyes and another assigned to have AcrySof Natural IOL associated with limbal relaxing incisions, also in both eyes. All patients were reevaluated postoperatively at 6 months, when refractive astigmatism analysis was performed using both Alpins and Thibos methods. The ratio between Thibos postoperative APV and preoperative APV (APVratio and its linear regression to Alpins percentage of success of astigmatic surgery, percentage of astigmatism corrected and percentage of astigmatism reduction at the intended axis were assessed. RESULTS: Significant negative correlation between the ratio of post- and preoperative Thibos APVratio and Alpins percentage of success (%Success was found (Spearman's ρ=-0.93; linear regression is given by the following equation: %Success = (-APVratio + 1.00x100. CONCLUSION: The linear regression we found between APVratio and %Success permits a validated mathematical inference concerning the overall success of astigmatic surgery.

  2. Modelling subject-specific childhood growth using linear mixed-effect models with cubic regression splines.

    Grajeda, Laura M; Ivanescu, Andrada; Saito, Mayuko; Crainiceanu, Ciprian; Jaganath, Devan; Gilman, Robert H; Crabtree, Jean E; Kelleher, Dermott; Cabrera, Lilia; Cama, Vitaliano; Checkley, William

    2016-01-01

    Childhood growth is a cornerstone of pediatric research. Statistical models need to consider individual trajectories to adequately describe growth outcomes. Specifically, well-defined longitudinal models are essential to characterize both population and subject-specific growth. Linear mixed-effect models with cubic regression splines can account for the nonlinearity of growth curves and provide reasonable estimators of population and subject-specific growth, velocity and acceleration. We provide a stepwise approach that builds from simple to complex models, and account for the intrinsic complexity of the data. We start with standard cubic splines regression models and build up to a model that includes subject-specific random intercepts and slopes and residual autocorrelation. We then compared cubic regression splines vis-à-vis linear piecewise splines, and with varying number of knots and positions. Statistical code is provided to ensure reproducibility and improve dissemination of methods. Models are applied to longitudinal height measurements in a cohort of 215 Peruvian children followed from birth until their fourth year of life. Unexplained variability, as measured by the variance of the regression model, was reduced from 7.34 when using ordinary least squares to 0.81 (p linear mixed-effect models with random slopes and a first order continuous autoregressive error term. There was substantial heterogeneity in both the intercept (p modeled with a first order continuous autoregressive error term as evidenced by the variogram of the residuals and by a lack of association among residuals. The final model provides a parametric linear regression equation for both estimation and prediction of population- and individual-level growth in height. We show that cubic regression splines are superior to linear regression splines for the case of a small number of knots in both estimation and prediction with the full linear mixed effect model (AIC 19,352 vs. 19

  3. Linear algebra a first course with applications to differential equations

    Apostol, Tom M

    2014-01-01

    Developed from the author's successful two-volume Calculus text this book presents Linear Algebra without emphasis on abstraction or formalization. To accommodate a variety of backgrounds, the text begins with a review of prerequisites divided into precalculus and calculus prerequisites. It continues to cover vector algebra, analytic geometry, linear spaces, determinants, linear differential equations and more.

  4. Solving polynomial differential equations by transforming them to linear functional-differential equations

    Nahay, John Michael

    2008-01-01

    We present a new approach to solving polynomial ordinary differential equations by transforming them to linear functional equations and then solving the linear functional equations. We will focus most of our attention upon the first-order Abel differential equation with two nonlinear terms in order to demonstrate in as much detail as possible the computations necessary for a complete solution. We mention in our section on further developments that the basic transformation idea can be generali...

  5. Enhancement of Visual Field Predictions with Pointwise Exponential Regression (PER) and Pointwise Linear Regression (PLR).

    Morales, Esteban; de Leon, John Mark S; Abdollahi, Niloufar; Yu, Fei; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros; Caprioli, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate threshold smoothing algorithms to enhance prediction of the rates of visual field (VF) worsening in glaucoma. We studied 798 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and 6 or more years of follow-up who underwent 8 or more VF examinations. Thresholds at each VF location for the first 4 years or first half of the follow-up time (whichever was greater) were smoothed with clusters defined by the nearest neighbor (NN), Garway-Heath, Glaucoma Hemifield Test (GHT), and weighting by the correlation of rates at all other VF locations. Thresholds were regressed with a pointwise exponential regression (PER) model and a pointwise linear regression (PLR) model. Smaller root mean square error (RMSE) values of the differences between the observed and the predicted thresholds at last two follow-ups indicated better model predictions. The mean (SD) follow-up times for the smoothing and prediction phase were 5.3 (1.5) and 10.5 (3.9) years. The mean RMSE values for the PER and PLR models were unsmoothed data, 6.09 and 6.55; NN, 3.40 and 3.42; Garway-Heath, 3.47 and 3.48; GHT, 3.57 and 3.74; and correlation of rates, 3.59 and 3.64. Smoothed VF data predicted better than unsmoothed data. Nearest neighbor provided the best predictions; PER also predicted consistently more accurately than PLR. Smoothing algorithms should be used when forecasting VF results with PER or PLR. The application of smoothing algorithms on VF data can improve forecasting in VF points to assist in treatment decisions.

  6. Resonance tongues in the linear Sitnikov equation

    Misquero, Mauricio

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we deal with a Hill's equation, depending on two parameters e\\in [0,1) and Λ >0, that has applications to some problems in Celestial Mechanics of the Sitnikov type. Due to the nonlinearity of the eccentricity parameter e and the coexistence problem, the stability diagram in the (e,Λ )-plane presents unusual resonance tongues emerging from points (0,(n/2)^2), n=1,2,\\ldots The tongues bounded by curves of eigenvalues corresponding to 2π -periodic solutions collapse into a single curve of coexistence (for which there exist two independent 2π -periodic eigenfunctions), whereas the remaining tongues have no pockets and are very thin. Unlike most of the literature related to resonance tongues and Sitnikov-type problems, the study of the tongues is made from a global point of view in the whole range of e\\in [0,1). Indeed, an interesting behavior of the tongues is found: almost all of them concentrate in a small Λ -interval [1, 9 / 8] as e→ 1^-. We apply the stability diagram of our equation to determine the regions for which the equilibrium of a Sitnikov (N+1)-body problem is stable in the sense of Lyapunov and the regions having symmetric periodic solutions with a given number of zeros. We also study the Lyapunov stability of the equilibrium in the center of mass of a curved Sitnikov problem.

  7. Characteristics and Properties of a Simple Linear Regression Model

    Kowal Robert

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A simple linear regression model is one of the pillars of classic econometrics. Despite the passage of time, it continues to raise interest both from the theoretical side as well as from the application side. One of the many fundamental questions in the model concerns determining derivative characteristics and studying the properties existing in their scope, referring to the first of these aspects. The literature of the subject provides several classic solutions in that regard. In the paper, a completely new design is proposed, based on the direct application of variance and its properties, resulting from the non-correlation of certain estimators with the mean, within the scope of which some fundamental dependencies of the model characteristics are obtained in a much more compact manner. The apparatus allows for a simple and uniform demonstration of multiple dependencies and fundamental properties in the model, and it does it in an intuitive manner. The results were obtained in a classic, traditional area, where everything, as it might seem, has already been thoroughly studied and discovered.

  8. Exhaustive Search for Sparse Variable Selection in Linear Regression

    Igarashi, Yasuhiko; Takenaka, Hikaru; Nakanishi-Ohno, Yoshinori; Uemura, Makoto; Ikeda, Shiro; Okada, Masato

    2018-04-01

    We propose a K-sparse exhaustive search (ES-K) method and a K-sparse approximate exhaustive search method (AES-K) for selecting variables in linear regression. With these methods, K-sparse combinations of variables are tested exhaustively assuming that the optimal combination of explanatory variables is K-sparse. By collecting the results of exhaustively computing ES-K, various approximate methods for selecting sparse variables can be summarized as density of states. With this density of states, we can compare different methods for selecting sparse variables such as relaxation and sampling. For large problems where the combinatorial explosion of explanatory variables is crucial, the AES-K method enables density of states to be effectively reconstructed by using the replica-exchange Monte Carlo method and the multiple histogram method. Applying the ES-K and AES-K methods to type Ia supernova data, we confirmed the conventional understanding in astronomy when an appropriate K is given beforehand. However, we found the difficulty to determine K from the data. Using virtual measurement and analysis, we argue that this is caused by data shortage.

  9. REGRES: A FORTRAN-77 program to calculate nonparametric and ``structural'' parametric solutions to bivariate regression equations

    Rock, N. M. S.; Duffy, T. R.

    REGRES allows a range of regression equations to be calculated for paired sets of data values in which both variables are subject to error (i.e. neither is the "independent" variable). Nonparametric regressions, based on medians of all possible pairwise slopes and intercepts, are treated in detail. Estimated slopes and intercepts are output, along with confidence limits, Spearman and Kendall rank correlation coefficients. Outliers can be rejected with user-determined stringency. Parametric regressions can be calculated for any value of λ (the ratio of the variances of the random errors for y and x)—including: (1) major axis ( λ = 1); (2) reduced major axis ( λ = variance of y/variance of x); (3) Y on Xλ = infinity; or (4) X on Y ( λ = 0) solutions. Pearson linear correlation coefficients also are output. REGRES provides an alternative to conventional isochron assessment techniques where bivariate normal errors cannot be assumed, or weighting methods are inappropriate.

  10. Subroutine for series solutions of linear differential equations

    Tasso, H.; Steuerwald, J.

    1976-02-01

    A subroutine for Taylor series solutions of systems of ordinary linear differential equations is descriebed. It uses the old idea of Lie series but allows simple implementation and is time-saving for symbolic manipulations. (orig.) [de

  11. On a class of fourth order linear recurrence equations

    Sui-Sun Cheng

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with sequences that satisfy a class of fourth order linear recurrence equations. Basic properties of such sequences are derived. In addition, we discuss the oscillatory and nonoscillatory behavior of such sequences.

  12. Multiple regression technique for Pth degree polynominals with and without linear cross products

    Davis, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    A multiple regression technique was developed by which the nonlinear behavior of specified independent variables can be related to a given dependent variable. The polynomial expression can be of Pth degree and can incorporate N independent variables. Two cases are treated such that mathematical models can be studied both with and without linear cross products. The resulting surface fits can be used to summarize trends for a given phenomenon and provide a mathematical relationship for subsequent analysis. To implement this technique, separate computer programs were developed for the case without linear cross products and for the case incorporating such cross products which evaluate the various constants in the model regression equation. In addition, the significance of the estimated regression equation is considered and the standard deviation, the F statistic, the maximum absolute percent error, and the average of the absolute values of the percent of error evaluated. The computer programs and their manner of utilization are described. Sample problems are included to illustrate the use and capability of the technique which show the output formats and typical plots comparing computer results to each set of input data.

  13. Partitioning of late gestation energy expenditure in ewes using indirect calorimetry and a linear regression approach

    Kiani, Alishir; Chwalibog, André; Nielsen, Mette O

    2007-01-01

    Late gestation energy expenditure (EE(gest)) originates from energy expenditure (EE) of development of conceptus (EE(conceptus)) and EE of homeorhetic adaptation of metabolism (EE(homeorhetic)). Even though EE(gest) is relatively easy to quantify, its partitioning is problematic. In the present...... study metabolizable energy (ME) intake ranges for twin-bearing ewes were 220-440, 350- 700, 350-900 kJ per metabolic body weight (W0.75) at week seven, five, two pre-partum respectively. Indirect calorimetry and a linear regression approach were used to quantify EE(gest) and then partition to EE......(conceptus) and EE(homeorhetic). Energy expenditure of basal metabolism of the non-gravid tissues (EE(bmng)), derived from the intercept of the linear regression equation of retained energy [kJ/W0.75] and ME intake [kJ/W(0.75)], was 298 [kJ/ W0.75]. Values of the intercepts of the regression equations at week seven...

  14. Exact solution of some linear matrix equations using algebraic methods

    Djaferis, T. E.; Mitter, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    A study is done of solution methods for Linear Matrix Equations including Lyapunov's equation, using methods of modern algebra. The emphasis is on the use of finite algebraic procedures which are easily implemented on a digital computer and which lead to an explicit solution to the problem. The action f sub BA is introduced a Basic Lemma is proven. The equation PA + BP = -C as well as the Lyapunov equation are analyzed. Algorithms are given for the solution of the Lyapunov and comment is given on its arithmetic complexity. The equation P - A'PA = Q is studied and numerical examples are given.

  15. Approximate Method for Solving the Linear Fuzzy Delay Differential Equations

    S. Narayanamoorthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an algorithm of the approximate method to solve linear fuzzy delay differential equations using Adomian decomposition method. The detailed algorithm of the approach is provided. The approximate solution is compared with the exact solution to confirm the validity and efficiency of the method to handle linear fuzzy delay differential equation. To show this proper features of this proposed method, numerical example is illustrated.

  16. Linear matrix differential equations of higher-order and applications

    Mustapha Rachidi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we study linear differential equations of higher-order whose coefficients are square matrices. The combinatorial method for computing the matrix powers and exponential is adopted. New formulas representing auxiliary results are obtained. This allows us to prove properties of a large class of linear matrix differential equations of higher-order, in particular results of Apostol and Kolodner are recovered. Also illustrative examples and applications are presented.

  17. Weibull and lognormal Taguchi analysis using multiple linear regression

    Piña-Monarrez, Manuel R.; Ortiz-Yañez, Jesús F.

    2015-01-01

    The paper provides to reliability practitioners with a method (1) to estimate the robust Weibull family when the Taguchi method (TM) is applied, (2) to estimate the normal operational Weibull family in an accelerated life testing (ALT) analysis to give confidence to the extrapolation and (3) to perform the ANOVA analysis to both the robust and the normal operational Weibull family. On the other hand, because the Weibull distribution neither has the normal additive property nor has a direct relationship with the normal parameters (µ, σ), in this paper, the issues of estimating a Weibull family by using a design of experiment (DOE) are first addressed by using an L_9 (3"4) orthogonal array (OA) in both the TM and in the Weibull proportional hazard model approach (WPHM). Then, by using the Weibull/Gumbel and the lognormal/normal relationships and multiple linear regression, the direct relationships between the Weibull and the lifetime parameters are derived and used to formulate the proposed method. Moreover, since the derived direct relationships always hold, the method is generalized to the lognormal and ALT analysis. Finally, the method’s efficiency is shown through its application to the used OA and to a set of ALT data. - Highlights: • It gives the statistical relations and steps to use the Taguchi Method (TM) to analyze Weibull data. • It gives the steps to determine the unknown Weibull family to both the robust TM setting and the normal ALT level. • It gives a method to determine the expected lifetimes and to perform its ANOVA analysis in TM and ALT analysis. • It gives a method to give confidence to the extrapolation in an ALT analysis by using the Weibull family of the normal level.

  18. Local energy decay for linear wave equations with variable coefficients

    Ikehata, Ryo

    2005-06-01

    A uniform local energy decay result is derived to the linear wave equation with spatial variable coefficients. We deal with this equation in an exterior domain with a star-shaped complement. Our advantage is that we do not assume any compactness of the support on the initial data, and its proof is quite simple. This generalizes a previous famous result due to Morawetz [The decay of solutions of the exterior initial-boundary value problem for the wave equation, Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 14 (1961) 561-568]. In order to prove local energy decay, we mainly apply two types of ideas due to Ikehata-Matsuyama [L2-behaviour of solutions to the linear heat and wave equations in exterior domains, Sci. Math. Japon. 55 (2002) 33-42] and Todorova-Yordanov [Critical exponent for a nonlinear wave equation with damping, J. Differential Equations 174 (2001) 464-489].

  19. Analytical exact solution of the non-linear Schroedinger equation

    Martins, Alisson Xavier; Rocha Filho, Tarcisio Marciano da

    2011-01-01

    Full text: In this work we present how to classify and obtain analytical solutions of the Schroedinger equation with a generic non-linearity in 1+1 dimensions. Our approach is based on the determination of Lie symmetry transformation mapping solutions into solutions, and non-classical symmetry transformations, mapping a given solution into itself. From these symmetries it is then possible to reduce the equation to a system of ordinary differential equations which can then be solved using standard methods. The generic non-linearity is handled by considering it as an additional unknown in the determining equations for the symmetry transformations. This results in an over-determined system of non-linear partial differential equations. Its solution can then be determined in some cases by reducing it to the so called involutive (triangular) form, and then solved. This reduction is very tedious and can only performed using a computer algebra system. Once the determining system is solved, we obtain the explicit form for the non-linearity admitting a Lie or non-classical symmetry. The analytical solutions are then derived by solving the reduced ordinary differential equations. The non-linear determining system for the non-classical symmetry transformations and Lie symmetry generators are obtaining using the computer algebra package SADE (symmetry analysis of differential equations), developed at our group. (author)

  20. EPMLR: sequence-based linear B-cell epitope prediction method using multiple linear regression.

    Lian, Yao; Ge, Meng; Pan, Xian-Ming

    2014-12-19

    B-cell epitopes have been studied extensively due to their immunological applications, such as peptide-based vaccine development, antibody production, and disease diagnosis and therapy. Despite several decades of research, the accurate prediction of linear B-cell epitopes has remained a challenging task. In this work, based on the antigen's primary sequence information, a novel linear B-cell epitope prediction model was developed using the multiple linear regression (MLR). A 10-fold cross-validation test on a large non-redundant dataset was performed to evaluate the performance of our model. To alleviate the problem caused by the noise of negative dataset, 300 experiments utilizing 300 sub-datasets were performed. We achieved overall sensitivity of 81.8%, precision of 64.1% and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.728. We have presented a reliable method for the identification of linear B cell epitope using antigen's primary sequence information. Moreover, a web server EPMLR has been developed for linear B-cell epitope prediction: http://www.bioinfo.tsinghua.edu.cn/epitope/EPMLR/ .

  1. Focal decompositions for linear differential equations of the second order

    L. Birbrair

    2003-01-01

    two-points problems to itself such that the image of the focal decomposition associated to the first equation is a focal decomposition associated to the second one. In this paper, we present a complete classification for linear second-order equations with respect to this equivalence relation.

  2. Asymptotic properties for half-linear difference equations

    Cecchi, M.; Došlá, Z.; Marini, M.; Vrkoč, Ivo

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 4 (2006), s. 347-363 ISSN 0862-7959 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA201/04/0580 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : half-linear second order difference equation * nonoscillatory solutions * Riccati difference equation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  3. A Hamiltonian structure for the linearized Einstein vacuum field equations

    Torres del Castillo, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    By considering the Einstein vacuum field equations linearized about the Minkowski metric, the evolution equations for the gauge-invariant quantities characterizing the gravitational field are written in a Hamiltonian form. A Poisson bracket between functionals of the field, compatible with the constraints satisfied by the field variables, is obtained (Author)

  4. An implicit spectral formula for generalized linear Schroedinger equations

    Schulze-Halberg, A.; Garcia-Ravelo, J.; Pena Gil, Jose Juan

    2009-01-01

    We generalize the semiclassical Bohr–Sommerfeld quantization rule to an exact, implicit spectral formula for linear, generalized Schroedinger equations admitting a discrete spectrum. Special cases include the position-dependent mass Schroedinger equation or the Schroedinger equation for weighted energy. Requiring knowledge of the potential and the solution associated with the lowest spectral value, our formula predicts the complete spectrum in its exact form. (author)

  5. Identifying predictors of physics item difficulty: A linear regression approach

    Mesic, Vanes; Muratovic, Hasnija

    2011-06-01

    Large-scale assessments of student achievement in physics are often approached with an intention to discriminate students based on the attained level of their physics competencies. Therefore, for purposes of test design, it is important that items display an acceptable discriminatory behavior. To that end, it is recommended to avoid extraordinary difficult and very easy items. Knowing the factors that influence physics item difficulty makes it possible to model the item difficulty even before the first pilot study is conducted. Thus, by identifying predictors of physics item difficulty, we can improve the test-design process. Furthermore, we get additional qualitative feedback regarding the basic aspects of student cognitive achievement in physics that are directly responsible for the obtained, quantitative test results. In this study, we conducted a secondary analysis of data that came from two large-scale assessments of student physics achievement at the end of compulsory education in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Foremost, we explored the concept of “physics competence” and performed a content analysis of 123 physics items that were included within the above-mentioned assessments. Thereafter, an item database was created. Items were described by variables which reflect some basic cognitive aspects of physics competence. For each of the assessments, Rasch item difficulties were calculated in separate analyses. In order to make the item difficulties from different assessments comparable, a virtual test equating procedure had to be implemented. Finally, a regression model of physics item difficulty was created. It has been shown that 61.2% of item difficulty variance can be explained by factors which reflect the automaticity, complexity, and modality of the knowledge structure that is relevant for generating the most probable correct solution, as well as by the divergence of required thinking and interference effects between intuitive and formal physics knowledge

  6. Identifying predictors of physics item difficulty: A linear regression approach

    Hasnija Muratovic

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale assessments of student achievement in physics are often approached with an intention to discriminate students based on the attained level of their physics competencies. Therefore, for purposes of test design, it is important that items display an acceptable discriminatory behavior. To that end, it is recommended to avoid extraordinary difficult and very easy items. Knowing the factors that influence physics item difficulty makes it possible to model the item difficulty even before the first pilot study is conducted. Thus, by identifying predictors of physics item difficulty, we can improve the test-design process. Furthermore, we get additional qualitative feedback regarding the basic aspects of student cognitive achievement in physics that are directly responsible for the obtained, quantitative test results. In this study, we conducted a secondary analysis of data that came from two large-scale assessments of student physics achievement at the end of compulsory education in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Foremost, we explored the concept of “physics competence” and performed a content analysis of 123 physics items that were included within the above-mentioned assessments. Thereafter, an item database was created. Items were described by variables which reflect some basic cognitive aspects of physics competence. For each of the assessments, Rasch item difficulties were calculated in separate analyses. In order to make the item difficulties from different assessments comparable, a virtual test equating procedure had to be implemented. Finally, a regression model of physics item difficulty was created. It has been shown that 61.2% of item difficulty variance can be explained by factors which reflect the automaticity, complexity, and modality of the knowledge structure that is relevant for generating the most probable correct solution, as well as by the divergence of required thinking and interference effects between intuitive and formal

  7. Privacy-Preserving Distributed Linear Regression on High-Dimensional Data

    Gascón Adrià

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose privacy-preserving protocols for computing linear regression models, in the setting where the training dataset is vertically distributed among several parties. Our main contribution is a hybrid multi-party computation protocol that combines Yao’s garbled circuits with tailored protocols for computing inner products. Like many machine learning tasks, building a linear regression model involves solving a system of linear equations. We conduct a comprehensive evaluation and comparison of different techniques for securely performing this task, including a new Conjugate Gradient Descent (CGD algorithm. This algorithm is suitable for secure computation because it uses an efficient fixed-point representation of real numbers while maintaining accuracy and convergence rates comparable to what can be obtained with a classical solution using floating point numbers. Our technique improves on Nikolaenko et al.’s method for privacy-preserving ridge regression (S&P 2013, and can be used as a building block in other analyses. We implement a complete system and demonstrate that our approach is highly scalable, solving data analysis problems with one million records and one hundred features in less than one hour of total running time.

  8. Visual construction of characteristic equations of linear electric circuits

    V.V. Kostyukov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A visual identification method with application of partial circuits is developed for characteristic equation coefficients of transients in linear electric circuits. The method is based on interrelationship between the roots of algebraic polynomial and its coefficients. The method is illustrated with an example of a third-order linear electric circuit.

  9. A local-global problem for linear differential equations

    Put, Marius van der; Reversat, Marc

    2008-01-01

    An inhomogeneous linear differential equation Ly = f over a global differential field can have a formal solution for each place without having a global solution. The vector space lgl(L) measures this phenomenon. This space is interpreted in terms of cohomology of linear algebraic groups and is

  10. A local-global problem for linear differential equations

    Put, Marius van der; Reversat, Marc

    An inhomogeneous linear differential equation Ly = f over a global differential field can have a formal solution for each place without having a global solution. The vector space lgl(L) measures this phenomenon. This space is interpreted in terms of cohomology of linear algebraic groups and is

  11. Linear differential equations to solve nonlinear mechanical problems: A novel approach

    Nair, C. Radhakrishnan

    2004-01-01

    Often a non-linear mechanical problem is formulated as a non-linear differential equation. A new method is introduced to find out new solutions of non-linear differential equations if one of the solutions of a given non-linear differential equation is known. Using the known solution of the non-linear differential equation, linear differential equations are set up. The solutions of these linear differential equations are found using standard techniques. Then the solutions of the linear differe...

  12. Rational approximations to solutions of linear differential equations.

    Chudnovsky, D V; Chudnovsky, G V

    1983-08-01

    Rational approximations of Padé and Padé type to solutions of differential equations are considered. One of the main results is a theorem stating that a simultaneous approximation to arbitrary solutions of linear differential equations over C(x) cannot be "better" than trivial ones implied by the Dirichlet box principle. This constitutes, in particular, the solution in the linear case of Kolchin's problem that the "Roth's theorem" holds for arbitrary solutions of algebraic differential equations. Complete effective proofs for several valuations are presented based on the Wronskian methods and graded subrings of Picard-Vessiot extensions.

  13. Non-local quasi-linear parabolic equations

    Amann, H

    2005-01-01

    This is a survey of the most common approaches to quasi-linear parabolic evolution equations, a discussion of their advantages and drawbacks, and a presentation of an entirely new approach based on maximal L p regularity. The general results here apply, above all, to parabolic initial-boundary value problems that are non-local in time. This is illustrated by indicating their relevance for quasi-linear parabolic equations with memory and, in particular, for time-regularized versions of the Perona-Malik equation of image processing

  14. Darboux transformations and linear parabolic partial differential equations

    Arrigo, Daniel J.; Hickling, Fred

    2002-01-01

    Solutions for a class of linear parabolic partial differential equation are provided. These solutions are obtained by first solving a system of (n+1) nonlinear partial differential equations. This system arises as the coefficients of a Darboux transformation and is equivalent to a matrix Burgers' equation. This matrix equation is solved using a generalized Hopf-Cole transformation. The solutions for the original equation are given in terms of solutions of the heat equation. These results are applied to the (1+1)-dimensional Schroedinger equation where all bound state solutions are obtained for a 2n-parameter family of potentials. As a special case, the solutions for integral members of the regular and modified Poeschl-Teller potentials are recovered. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  15. A Proposed Method for Solving Fuzzy System of Linear Equations

    Reza Kargar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new method for solving fuzzy system of linear equations with crisp coefficients matrix and fuzzy or interval right hand side. Some conditions for the existence of a fuzzy or interval solution of m×n linear system are derived and also a practical algorithm is introduced in detail. The method is based on linear programming problem. Finally the applicability of the proposed method is illustrated by some numerical examples.

  16. Periodic feedback stabilization for linear periodic evolution equations

    Wang, Gengsheng

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces a number of recent advances regarding periodic feedback stabilization for linear and time periodic evolution equations. First, it presents selected connections between linear quadratic optimal control theory and feedback stabilization theory for linear periodic evolution equations. Secondly, it identifies several criteria for the periodic feedback stabilization from the perspective of geometry, algebra and analyses respectively. Next, it describes several ways to design periodic feedback laws. Lastly, the book introduces readers to key methods for designing the control machines. Given its coverage and scope, it offers a helpful guide for graduate students and researchers in the areas of control theory and applied mathematics.

  17. Implicit collinearity effect in linear regression: Application to basal ...

    Collinearity of predictor variables is a severe problem in the least square regression analysis. It contributes to the instability of regression coefficients and leads to a wrong prediction accuracy. Despite these problems, studies are conducted with a large number of observed and derived variables linked with a response ...

  18. Dynamical symmetries of semi-linear Schrodinger and diffusion equations

    Stoimenov, Stoimen; Henkel, Malte

    2005-01-01

    Conditional and Lie symmetries of semi-linear 1D Schrodinger and diffusion equations are studied if the mass (or the diffusion constant) is considered as an additional variable. In this way, dynamical symmetries of semi-linear Schrodinger equations become related to the parabolic and almost-parabolic subalgebras of a three-dimensional conformal Lie algebra (conf 3 ) C . We consider non-hermitian representations and also include a dimensionful coupling constant of the non-linearity. The corresponding representations of the parabolic and almost-parabolic subalgebras of (conf 3 ) C are classified and the complete list of conditionally invariant semi-linear Schrodinger equations is obtained. Possible applications to the dynamical scaling behaviour of phase-ordering kinetics are discussed

  19. New Equating Methods and Their Relationships with Levine Observed Score Linear Equating under the Kernel Equating Framework

    Chen, Haiwen; Holland, Paul

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a new curvilinear equating for the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design under the assumption of the classical test theory model, that we name curvilinear Levine observed score equating. In fact, by applying both the kernel equating framework and the mean preserving linear transformation of…

  20. Multiple regression equations modelling of groundwater of Ajmer-Pushkar railway line region, Rajasthan (India).

    Mathur, Praveen; Sharma, Sarita; Soni, Bhupendra

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, an attempt is made to formulate multiple regression equations using all possible regressions method for groundwater quality assessment of Ajmer-Pushkar railway line region in pre- and post-monsoon seasons. Correlation studies revealed the existence of linear relationships (r 0.7) for electrical conductivity (EC), total hardness (TH) and total dissolved solids (TDS) with other water quality parameters. The highest correlation was found between EC and TDS (r = 0.973). EC showed highly significant positive correlation with Na, K, Cl, TDS and total solids (TS). TH showed highest correlation with Ca and Mg. TDS showed significant correlation with Na, K, SO4, PO4 and Cl. The study indicated that most of the contamination present was water soluble or ionic in nature. Mg was present as MgCl2; K mainly as KCl and K2SO4, and Na was present as the salts of Cl, SO4 and PO4. On the other hand, F and NO3 showed no significant correlations. The r2 values and F values (at 95% confidence limit, alpha = 0.05) for the modelled equations indicated high degree of linearity among independent and dependent variables. Also the error % between calculated and experimental values was contained within +/- 15% limit.

  1. Least Squares Adjustment: Linear and Nonlinear Weighted Regression Analysis

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2007-01-01

    This note primarily describes the mathematics of least squares regression analysis as it is often used in geodesy including land surveying and satellite positioning applications. In these fields regression is often termed adjustment. The note also contains a couple of typical land surveying...... and satellite positioning application examples. In these application areas we are typically interested in the parameters in the model typically 2- or 3-D positions and not in predictive modelling which is often the main concern in other regression analysis applications. Adjustment is often used to obtain...... the clock error) and to obtain estimates of the uncertainty with which the position is determined. Regression analysis is used in many other fields of application both in the natural, the technical and the social sciences. Examples may be curve fitting, calibration, establishing relationships between...

  2. HESS Opinions: Linking Darcy's equation to the linear reservoir

    Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2018-03-01

    In groundwater hydrology, two simple linear equations exist describing the relation between groundwater flow and the gradient driving it: Darcy's equation and the linear reservoir. Both equations are empirical and straightforward, but work at different scales: Darcy's equation at the laboratory scale and the linear reservoir at the watershed scale. Although at first sight they appear similar, it is not trivial to upscale Darcy's equation to the watershed scale without detailed knowledge of the structure or shape of the underlying aquifers. This paper shows that these two equations, combined by the water balance, are indeed identical provided there is equal resistance in space for water entering the subsurface network. This implies that groundwater systems make use of an efficient drainage network, a mostly invisible pattern that has evolved over geological timescales. This drainage network provides equally distributed resistance for water to access the system, connecting the active groundwater body to the stream, much like a leaf is organized to provide all stomata access to moisture at equal resistance. As a result, the timescale of the linear reservoir appears to be inversely proportional to Darcy's conductance, the proportionality being the product of the porosity and the resistance to entering the drainage network. The main question remaining is which physical law lies behind pattern formation in groundwater systems, evolving in a way that resistance to drainage is constant in space. But that is a fundamental question that is equally relevant for understanding the hydraulic properties of leaf veins in plants or of blood veins in animals.

  3. The numerical solution of linear multi-term fractional differential equations: systems of equations

    Edwards, John T.; Ford, Neville J.; Simpson, A. Charles

    2002-11-01

    In this paper, we show how the numerical approximation of the solution of a linear multi-term fractional differential equation can be calculated by reduction of the problem to a system of ordinary and fractional differential equations each of order at most unity. We begin by showing how our method applies to a simple class of problems and we give a convergence result. We solve the Bagley Torvik equation as an example. We show how the method can be applied to a general linear multi-term equation and give two further examples.

  4. Is adult gait less susceptible than paediatric gait to hip joint centre regression equation error?

    Kiernan, D; Hosking, J; O'Brien, T

    2016-03-01

    Hip joint centre (HJC) regression equation error during paediatric gait has recently been shown to have clinical significance. In relation to adult gait, it has been inferred that comparable errors with children in absolute HJC position may in fact result in less significant kinematic and kinetic error. This study investigated the clinical agreement of three commonly used regression equation sets (Bell et al., Davis et al. and Orthotrak) for adult subjects against the equations of Harrington et al. The relationship between HJC position error and subject size was also investigated for the Davis et al. set. Full 3-dimensional gait analysis was performed on 12 healthy adult subjects with data for each set compared to Harrington et al. The Gait Profile Score, Gait Variable Score and GDI-kinetic were used to assess clinical significance while differences in HJC position between the Davis and Harrington sets were compared to leg length and subject height using regression analysis. A number of statistically significant differences were present in absolute HJC position. However, all sets fell below the clinically significant thresholds (GPS <1.6°, GDI-Kinetic <3.6 points). Linear regression revealed a statistically significant relationship for both increasing leg length and increasing subject height with decreasing error in anterior/posterior and superior/inferior directions. Results confirm a negligible clinical error for adult subjects suggesting that any of the examined sets could be used interchangeably. Decreasing error with both increasing leg length and increasing subject height suggests that the Davis set should be used cautiously on smaller subjects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. High-order quantum algorithm for solving linear differential equations

    Berry, Dominic W

    2014-01-01

    Linear differential equations are ubiquitous in science and engineering. Quantum computers can simulate quantum systems, which are described by a restricted type of linear differential equations. Here we extend quantum simulation algorithms to general inhomogeneous sparse linear differential equations, which describe many classical physical systems. We examine the use of high-order methods (where the error over a time step is a high power of the size of the time step) to improve the efficiency. These provide scaling close to Δt 2 in the evolution time Δt. As with other algorithms of this type, the solution is encoded in amplitudes of the quantum state, and it is possible to extract global features of the solution. (paper)

  6. Research on the multiple linear regression in non-invasive blood glucose measurement.

    Zhu, Jianming; Chen, Zhencheng

    2015-01-01

    A non-invasive blood glucose measurement sensor and the data process algorithm based on the metabolic energy conservation (MEC) method are presented in this paper. The physiological parameters of human fingertip can be measured by various sensing modalities, and blood glucose value can be evaluated with the physiological parameters by the multiple linear regression analysis. Five methods such as enter, remove, forward, backward and stepwise in multiple linear regression were compared, and the backward method had the best performance. The best correlation coefficient was 0.876 with the standard error of the estimate 0.534, and the significance was 0.012 (sig. regression equation was valid. The Clarke error grid analysis was performed to compare the MEC method with the hexokinase method, using 200 data points. The correlation coefficient R was 0.867 and all of the points were located in Zone A and Zone B, which shows the MEC method provides a feasible and valid way for non-invasive blood glucose measurement.

  7. Solution methods for large systems of linear equations in BACCHUS

    Homann, C.; Dorr, B.

    1993-05-01

    The computer programme BACCHUS is used to describe steady state and transient thermal-hydraulic behaviour of a coolant in a fuel element with intact geometry in a fast breeder reactor. In such computer programmes generally large systems of linear equations with sparse matrices of coefficients, resulting from discretization of coolant conservation equations, must be solved thousands of times giving rise to large demands of main storage and CPU time. Direct and iterative solution methods of the systems of linear equations, available in BACCHUS, are described, giving theoretical details and experience with their use in the programme. Besides use of a method of lines, a Runge-Kutta-method, for solution of the partial differential equation is outlined. (orig.) [de

  8. Linear Einstein equations and Kerr-Schild maps

    Gergely, Laszlo A

    2002-01-01

    We prove that given a solution of the Einstein equations g ab for the matter field T ab , an autoparallel null vector field l a and a solution (l a l c , T ac ) of the linearized Einstein equation on the given background, the Kerr-Schild metric g ac + λl a l c (λ arbitrary constant) is an exact solution of the Einstein equation for the energy-momentum tensor T ac + λT ac + λ 2 l (a T c)b l b . The mixed form of the Einstein equation for Kerr-Schild metrics with autoparallel null congruence is also linear. Some more technical conditions hold when the null congruence is not autoparallel. These results generalize previous theorems for vacuum due to Xanthopoulos and for flat seed spacetime due to Guerses and Guersey

  9. A Hamiltonian functional for the linearized Einstein vacuum field equations

    Rosas-RodrIguez, R

    2005-01-01

    By considering the Einstein vacuum field equations linearized about the Minkowski metric, the evolution equations for the gauge-invariant quantities characterizing the gravitational field are written in a Hamiltonian form by using a conserved functional as Hamiltonian; this Hamiltonian is not the analog of the energy of the field. A Poisson bracket between functionals of the field, compatible with the constraints satisfied by the field variables, is obtained. The generator of spatial translations associated with such bracket is also obtained

  10. Linearized pseudo-Einstein equations on the Heisenberg group

    Barletta, Elisabetta; Dragomir, Sorin; Jacobowitz, Howard

    2017-02-01

    We study the pseudo-Einstein equation R11bar = 0 on the Heisenberg group H1 = C × R. We consider first order perturbations θɛ =θ0 + ɛ θ and linearize the pseudo-Einstein equation about θ0 (the canonical Tanaka-Webster flat contact form on H1 thought of as a strictly pseudoconvex CR manifold). If θ =e2uθ0 the linearized pseudo-Einstein equation is Δb u - 4 | Lu|2 = 0 where Δb is the sublaplacian of (H1 ,θ0) and L bar is the Lewy operator. We solve the linearized pseudo-Einstein equation on a bounded domain Ω ⊂H1 by applying subelliptic theory i.e. existence and regularity results for weak subelliptic harmonic maps. We determine a solution u to the linearized pseudo-Einstein equation, possessing Heisenberg spherical symmetry, and such that u(x) → - ∞ as | x | → + ∞.

  11. Linear regression models for quantitative assessment of left ...

    Changes in left ventricular structures and function have been reported in cardiomyopathies. No prediction models have been established in this environment. This study established regression models for prediction of left ventricular structures in normal subjects. A sample of normal subjects was drawn from a large urban ...

  12. Linearity and Misspecification Tests for Vector Smooth Transition Regression Models

    Teräsvirta, Timo; Yang, Yukai

    The purpose of the paper is to derive Lagrange multiplier and Lagrange multiplier type specification and misspecification tests for vector smooth transition regression models. We report results from simulation studies in which the size and power properties of the proposed asymptotic tests in small...

  13. Using multiple linear regression techniques to quantify carbon ...

    Fallow ecosystems provide a significant carbon stock that can be quantified for inclusion in the accounts of global carbon budgets. Process and statistical models of productivity, though useful, are often technically rigid as the conditions for their application are not easy to satisfy. Multiple regression techniques have been ...

  14. Interpreting Multiple Linear Regression: A Guidebook of Variable Importance

    Nathans, Laura L.; Oswald, Frederick L.; Nimon, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Multiple regression (MR) analyses are commonly employed in social science fields. It is also common for interpretation of results to typically reflect overreliance on beta weights, often resulting in very limited interpretations of variable importance. It appears that few researchers employ other methods to obtain a fuller understanding of what…

  15. Testing for marginal linear effects in quantile regression

    Wang, Huixia Judy

    2017-10-23

    The paper develops a new marginal testing procedure to detect significant predictors that are associated with the conditional quantiles of a scalar response. The idea is to fit the marginal quantile regression on each predictor one at a time, and then to base the test on the t-statistics that are associated with the most predictive predictors. A resampling method is devised to calibrate this test statistic, which has non-regular limiting behaviour due to the selection of the most predictive variables. Asymptotic validity of the procedure is established in a general quantile regression setting in which the marginal quantile regression models can be misspecified. Even though a fixed dimension is assumed to derive the asymptotic results, the test proposed is applicable and computationally feasible for large dimensional predictors. The method is more flexible than existing marginal screening test methods based on mean regression and has the added advantage of being robust against outliers in the response. The approach is illustrated by using an application to a human immunodeficiency virus drug resistance data set.

  16. Testing for marginal linear effects in quantile regression

    Wang, Huixia Judy; McKeague, Ian W.; Qian, Min

    2017-01-01

    The paper develops a new marginal testing procedure to detect significant predictors that are associated with the conditional quantiles of a scalar response. The idea is to fit the marginal quantile regression on each predictor one at a time, and then to base the test on the t-statistics that are associated with the most predictive predictors. A resampling method is devised to calibrate this test statistic, which has non-regular limiting behaviour due to the selection of the most predictive variables. Asymptotic validity of the procedure is established in a general quantile regression setting in which the marginal quantile regression models can be misspecified. Even though a fixed dimension is assumed to derive the asymptotic results, the test proposed is applicable and computationally feasible for large dimensional predictors. The method is more flexible than existing marginal screening test methods based on mean regression and has the added advantage of being robust against outliers in the response. The approach is illustrated by using an application to a human immunodeficiency virus drug resistance data set.

  17. Generalised Partially Linear Regression with Misclassified Data and an Application to Labour Market Transitions

    Dlugosz, Stephan; Mammen, Enno; Wilke, Ralf

    We consider the semiparametric generalised linear regression model which has mainstream empirical models such as the (partially) linear mean regression, logistic and multinomial regression as special cases. As an extension to related literature we allow a misclassified covariate to be interacted...

  18. Comparison between Linear and Nonlinear Regression in a Laboratory Heat Transfer Experiment

    Gonçalves, Carine Messias; Schwaab, Marcio; Pinto, José Carlos

    2013-01-01

    In order to interpret laboratory experimental data, undergraduate students are used to perform linear regression through linearized versions of nonlinear models. However, the use of linearized models can lead to statistically biased parameter estimates. Even so, it is not an easy task to introduce nonlinear regression and show for the students…

  19. New non-linear modified massless Klein-Gordon equation

    Asenjo, Felipe A. [Universidad Adolfo Ibanez, UAI Physics Center, Santiago (Chile); Universidad Adolfo Ibanez, Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias, Santiago (Chile); Hojman, Sergio A. [Universidad Adolfo Ibanez, UAI Physics Center, Santiago (Chile); Universidad Adolfo Ibanez, Departamento de Ciencias, Facultad de Artes Liberales, Santiago (Chile); Universidad de Chile, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Recursos Educativos Avanzados, CREA, Santiago (Chile)

    2017-11-15

    The massless Klein-Gordon equation on arbitrary curved backgrounds allows for solutions which develop ''tails'' inside the light cone and, therefore, do not strictly follow null geodesics as discovered by DeWitt and Brehme almost 60 years ago. A modification of the massless Klein-Gordon equation is presented, which always exhibits null geodesic propagation of waves on arbitrary curved spacetimes. This new equation is derived from a Lagrangian which exhibits current-current interaction. Its non-linearity is due to a self-coupling term which is related to the quantum mechanical Bohm potential. (orig.)

  20. Exact non-linear equations for cosmological perturbations

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk [Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jai-chan [Department of Astronomy and Atmospheric Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Hyerim [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Wu, David Chan Lon; Yoo, Jaiyul, E-mail: jinn-ouk.gong@apctp.org, E-mail: jchan@knu.ac.kr, E-mail: hr@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: clwu@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: jyoo@physik.uzh.ch [Center for Theoretical Astrophysics and Cosmology, Institute for Computational Science, Universität Zürich, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2017-10-01

    We present a complete set of exact and fully non-linear equations describing all three types of cosmological perturbations—scalar, vector and tensor perturbations. We derive the equations in a thoroughly gauge-ready manner, so that any spatial and temporal gauge conditions can be employed. The equations are completely general without any physical restriction except that we assume a flat homogeneous and isotropic universe as a background. We also comment briefly on the application of our formulation to the non-expanding Minkowski background.

  1. Solving Fully Fuzzy Linear System of Equations in General Form

    A. Yousefzadeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we propose an approach for computing the positive solution of a fully fuzzy linear system where the coefficient matrix is a fuzzy $nimes n$ matrix. To do this, we use arithmetic operations on fuzzy numbers that introduced by Kaffman in and convert the fully fuzzy linear system into two $nimes n$ and $2nimes 2n$ crisp linear systems. If the solutions of these linear systems don't satisfy in positive fuzzy solution condition, we introduce the constrained least squares problem to obtain optimal fuzzy vector solution by applying the ranking function in given fully fuzzy linear system. Using our proposed method, the fully fuzzy linear system of equations always has a solution. Finally, we illustrate the efficiency of proposed method by solving some numerical examples.

  2. Variable selection in multiple linear regression: The influence of ...

    provide an indication of whether the fit of the selected model improves or ... and calculate M(−i); quantify the influence of case i in terms of a function, f(•), of M and ..... [21] Venter JH & Snyman JLJ, 1997, Linear model selection based on risk ...

  3. Linear Equating for the NEAT Design: Parameter Substitution Models and Chained Linear Relationship Models

    Kane, Michael T.; Mroch, Andrew A.; Suh, Youngsuk; Ripkey, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes five linear equating models for the "nonequivalent groups with anchor test" (NEAT) design with internal anchors (i.e., the anchor test is part of the full test). The analysis employs a two-dimensional framework. The first dimension contrasts two general approaches to developing the equating relationship. Under a "parameter…

  4. Non-linear effects in the Boltzmann equation

    Barrachina, R.O.

    1985-01-01

    The Boltzmann equation is studied by defining an integral transformation of the energy distribution function for an isotropic and homogeneous gas. This transformation may be interpreted as a linear superposition of equilibrium states with variable temperatures. It is shown that the temporal evolution features of the distribution function are determined by the singularities of said transformation. This method is applied to Maxwell and Very Hard Particle interaction models. For the latter, the solution of the Boltzmann equation with the solution of its linearized version is compared, finding out many basic discrepancies and non-linear effects. This gives a hint to propose a new rational approximation method with a clear physical meaning. Applying this technique, the relaxation features of the BKW (Bobylev, Krook anf Wu) mode is analyzed, finding a conclusive counter-example for the Krook and Wu conjecture. The anisotropic Boltzmann equation for Maxwell models is solved as an expansion in terms of the eigenfunctions of the corresponding linearized collision operator, finding interesting transient overpopulation and underpopulation effects at thermal energies as well as a new preferential spreading effect. By analyzing the initial collision, a criterion is established to deduce the general features of the final approach to equilibrium. Finally, it is shown how to improve the convergence of the eigenfunction expansion for high energy underpopulated distribution functions. As an application of this theory, the linear cascade model for sputtering is analyzed, thus finding out that many differences experimentally observed are due to non-linear effects. (M.E.L.) [es

  5. An introduction to using Bayesian linear regression with clinical data.

    Baldwin, Scott A; Larson, Michael J

    2017-11-01

    Statistical training psychology focuses on frequentist methods. Bayesian methods are an alternative to standard frequentist methods. This article provides researchers with an introduction to fundamental ideas in Bayesian modeling. We use data from an electroencephalogram (EEG) and anxiety study to illustrate Bayesian models. Specifically, the models examine the relationship between error-related negativity (ERN), a particular event-related potential, and trait anxiety. Methodological topics covered include: how to set up a regression model in a Bayesian framework, specifying priors, examining convergence of the model, visualizing and interpreting posterior distributions, interval estimates, expected and predicted values, and model comparison tools. We also discuss situations where Bayesian methods can outperform frequentist methods as well has how to specify more complicated regression models. Finally, we conclude with recommendations about reporting guidelines for those using Bayesian methods in their own research. We provide data and R code for replicating our analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electricity consumption forecasting in Italy using linear regression models

    Bianco, Vincenzo; Manca, Oronzio; Nardini, Sergio [DIAM, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Via Roma 29, 81031 Aversa (CE) (Italy)

    2009-09-15

    The influence of economic and demographic variables on the annual electricity consumption in Italy has been investigated with the intention to develop a long-term consumption forecasting model. The time period considered for the historical data is from 1970 to 2007. Different regression models were developed, using historical electricity consumption, gross domestic product (GDP), gross domestic product per capita (GDP per capita) and population. A first part of the paper considers the estimation of GDP, price and GDP per capita elasticities of domestic and non-domestic electricity consumption. The domestic and non-domestic short run price elasticities are found to be both approximately equal to -0.06, while long run elasticities are equal to -0.24 and -0.09, respectively. On the contrary, the elasticities of GDP and GDP per capita present higher values. In the second part of the paper, different regression models, based on co-integrated or stationary data, are presented. Different statistical tests are employed to check the validity of the proposed models. A comparison with national forecasts, based on complex econometric models, such as Markal-Time, was performed, showing that the developed regressions are congruent with the official projections, with deviations of {+-}1% for the best case and {+-}11% for the worst. These deviations are to be considered acceptable in relation to the time span taken into account. (author)

  7. Electricity consumption forecasting in Italy using linear regression models

    Bianco, Vincenzo; Manca, Oronzio; Nardini, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The influence of economic and demographic variables on the annual electricity consumption in Italy has been investigated with the intention to develop a long-term consumption forecasting model. The time period considered for the historical data is from 1970 to 2007. Different regression models were developed, using historical electricity consumption, gross domestic product (GDP), gross domestic product per capita (GDP per capita) and population. A first part of the paper considers the estimation of GDP, price and GDP per capita elasticities of domestic and non-domestic electricity consumption. The domestic and non-domestic short run price elasticities are found to be both approximately equal to -0.06, while long run elasticities are equal to -0.24 and -0.09, respectively. On the contrary, the elasticities of GDP and GDP per capita present higher values. In the second part of the paper, different regression models, based on co-integrated or stationary data, are presented. Different statistical tests are employed to check the validity of the proposed models. A comparison with national forecasts, based on complex econometric models, such as Markal-Time, was performed, showing that the developed regressions are congruent with the official projections, with deviations of ±1% for the best case and ±11% for the worst. These deviations are to be considered acceptable in relation to the time span taken into account. (author)

  8. Relative Importance for Linear Regression in R: The Package relaimpo

    Groemping, Ulrike

    2006-01-01

    Relative importance is a topic that has seen a lot of interest in recent years, particularly in applied work. The R package relaimpo implements six different metrics for assessing relative importance of regressors in the linear model, two of which are recommended - averaging over orderings of regressors and a newly proposed metric (Feldman 2005) called pmvd. Apart from delivering the metrics themselves, relaimpo also provides (exploratory) bootstrap confidence intervals. This paper offers a b...

  9. Linear System of Equations, Matrix Inversion, and Linear Programming Using MS Excel

    El-Gebeily, M.; Yushau, B.

    2008-01-01

    In this note, we demonstrate with illustrations two different ways that MS Excel can be used to solve Linear Systems of Equation, Linear Programming Problems, and Matrix Inversion Problems. The advantage of using MS Excel is its availability and transparency (the user is responsible for most of the details of how a problem is solved). Further, we…

  10. Constructive Development of the Solutions of Linear Equations in Introductory Ordinary Differential Equations

    Mallet, D. G.; McCue, S. W.

    2009-01-01

    The solution of linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is commonly taught in first-year undergraduate mathematics classrooms, but the understanding of the concept of a solution is not always grasped by students until much later. Recognizing what it is to be a solution of a linear ODE and how to postulate such solutions, without resorting to…

  11. Nonoscillation criteria for half-linear second order difference equations

    Došlý, Ondřej; Řehák, Pavel

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 42, - (2001), s. 453-464 ISSN 0898-1221 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/98/0677; GA ČR GA201/99/0295 Keywords : half-linear difference equation%nonoscillation criteria%variational principle Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.383, year: 2001

  12. Lie symmetries and differential galois groups of linear equations

    Oudshoorn, W.R.; Put, M. van der

    2002-01-01

    For a linear ordinary differential equation the Lie algebra of its infinitesimal Lie symmetries is compared with its differential Galois group. For this purpose an algebraic formulation of Lie symmetries is developed. It turns out that there is no direct relation between the two above objects. In

  13. Asymptotic formulae for solutions of half-linear differential equations

    Řehák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 292, January (2017), s. 165-177 ISSN 0096-3003 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : half-linear differential equation * nonoscillatory solution * regular variation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 1.738, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0096300316304581

  14. On oscillation of second-order linear ordinary differential equations

    Lomtatidze, A.; Šremr, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 54, - (2011), s. 69-81 ISSN 1512-0015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : linear second-order ordinary differential equation * Kamenev theorem * oscillation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.rmi.ge/jeomj/memoirs/vol54/abs54-4.htm

  15. Quantum osp-invariant non-linear Schroedinger equation

    Kulish, P.P.

    1985-04-01

    The generalizations of the non-linear Schroedinger equation (NS) associated with the orthosymplectic superalgebras are formulated. The simplest osp(1/2)-NS model is solved by the quantum inverse scattering method on a finite interval under periodic boundary conditions as well as on the wholeline in the case of a finite number of excitations. (author)

  16. Exponential estimates for solutions of half-linear differential equations

    Řehák, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 147, č. 1 (2015), s. 158-171 ISSN 0236-5294 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : half-linear differential equation * decreasing solution * increasing solution * asymptotic behavior Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.469, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10474-015-0522-9

  17. An inhomogeneous wave equation and non-linear Diophantine approximation

    Beresnevich, V.; Dodson, M. M.; Kristensen, S.

    2008-01-01

    A non-linear Diophantine condition involving perfect squares and arising from an inhomogeneous wave equation on the torus guarantees the existence of a smooth solution. The exceptional set associated with the failure of the Diophantine condition and hence of the existence of a smooth solution...

  18. On nonnegative solutions of second order linear functional differential equations

    Lomtatidze, Alexander; Vodstrčil, Petr

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2004), s. 59-88 ISSN 1512-0015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : second order linear functional differential equations * nonnegative solution * two-point boundary value problem Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  19. Radial solutions to semilinear elliptic equations via linearized operators

    Phuong Le

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Let $u$ be a classical solution of semilinear elliptic equations in a ball or an annulus in $\\mathbb{R}^N$ with zero Dirichlet boundary condition where the nonlinearity has a convex first derivative. In this note, we prove that if the $N$-th eigenvalue of the linearized operator at $u$ is positive, then $u$ must be radially symmetric.

  20. Minimal solution of linear formed fuzzy matrix equations

    Maryam Mosleh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper according to the structured element method, the $mimes n$ inconsistent fuzzy matrix equation $Ailde{X}=ilde{B},$ which are linear formed by fuzzy structured element, is investigated. The necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of a fuzzy solution is also discussed. some examples are presented to illustrate the proposed method.

  1. Insights into the School Mathematics Tradition from Solving Linear Equations

    Buchbinder, Orly; Chazan, Daniel; Fleming, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore how the solving of linear equations is represented in English­-language algebra text books from the early nineteenth century when schooling was becoming institutionalized, and then survey contemporary teachers. In the text books, we identify the increasing presence of a prescribed order of steps (a canonical method) for…

  2. Students' errors in solving linear equation word problems: Case ...

    kofi.mereku

    Development in most areas of life is based on effective knowledge of science and ... Problem solving, as used in mathematics education literature, refers ... word problems, on the other hand, are those linear equation tasks or ... taught LEWPs in the junior high school, many of them reach the senior high school without a.

  3. The microcomputer scientific software series 2: general linear model--regression.

    Harold M. Rauscher

    1983-01-01

    The general linear model regression (GLMR) program provides the microcomputer user with a sophisticated regression analysis capability. The output provides a regression ANOVA table, estimators of the regression model coefficients, their confidence intervals, confidence intervals around the predicted Y-values, residuals for plotting, a check for multicollinearity, a...

  4. A multiple linear regression analysis of hot corrosion attack on a series of nickel base turbine alloys

    Barrett, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine an equation for estimating hot corrosion attack for a series of Ni base cast turbine alloys. The U transform (i.e., 1/sin (% A/100) to the 1/2) was shown to give the best estimate of the dependent variable, y. A complete second degree equation is described for the centered" weight chemistries for the elements Cr, Al, Ti, Mo, W, Cb, Ta, and Co. In addition linear terms for the minor elements C, B, and Zr were added for a basic 47 term equation. The best reduced equation was determined by the stepwise selection method with essentially 13 terms. The Cr term was found to be the most important accounting for 60 percent of the explained variability hot corrosion attack.

  5. Asymptotic solutions and spectral theory of linear wave equations

    Adam, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    This review contains two closely related strands. Firstly the asymptotic solution of systems of linear partial differential equations is discussed, with particular reference to Lighthill's method for obtaining the asymptotic functional form of the solution of a scalar wave equation with constant coefficients. Many of the applications of this technique are highlighted. Secondly, the methods and applications of the theory of the reduced (one-dimensional) wave equation - particularly spectral theory - are discussed. While the breadth of application and power of the techniques is emphasised throughout, the opportunity is taken to present to a wider readership, developments of the methods which have occured in some aspects of astrophysical (particularly solar) and geophysical fluid dynamics. It is believed that the topics contained herein may be of relevance to the applied mathematician or theoretical physicist interest in problems of linear wave propagation in these areas. (orig./HSI)

  6. Non-linear wave equations:Mathematical techniques

    1978-01-01

    An account of certain well-established mathematical methods, which prove useful to deal with non-linear partial differential equations is presented. Within the strict framework of Functional Analysis, it describes Semigroup Techniques in Banach Spaces as well as variational approaches towards critical points. Detailed proofs are given of the existence of local and global solutions of the Cauchy problem and of the stability of stationary solutions. The formal approach based upon invariance under Lie transformations deserves attention due to its wide range of applicability, even if the explicit solutions thus obtained do not allow for a deep analysis of the equations. A compre ensive introduction to the inverse scattering approach and to the solution concept for certain non-linear equations of physical interest are also presented. A detailed discussion is made about certain convergence and stability problems which arise in importance need not be emphasized. (author) [es

  7. Dark energy cosmology with generalized linear equation of state

    Babichev, E; Dokuchaev, V; Eroshenko, Yu

    2005-01-01

    Dark energy with the usually used equation of state p = wρ, where w const 0 ), where the constants α and ρ 0 are free parameters. This non-homogeneous linear equation of state provides the description of both hydrodynamically stable (α > 0) and unstable (α < 0) fluids. In particular, the considered cosmological model describes the hydrodynamically stable dark (and phantom) energy. The possible types of cosmological scenarios in this model are determined and classified in terms of attractors and unstable points by using phase trajectories analysis. For the dark energy case, some distinctive types of cosmological scenarios are possible: (i) the universe with the de Sitter attractor at late times, (ii) the bouncing universe, (iii) the universe with the big rip and with the anti-big rip. In the framework of a linear equation of state the universe filled with a phantom energy, w < -1, may have either the de Sitter attractor or the big rip

  8. Approximate Controllability for Linear Stochastic Differential Equations in Infinite Dimensions

    Goreac, D.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to investigate the approximate controllability property of a linear stochastic control system with values in a separable real Hilbert space. In a first step we prove the existence and uniqueness for the solution of the dual linear backward stochastic differential equation. This equation has the particularity that in addition to an unbounded operator acting on the Y-component of the solution there is still another one acting on the Z-component. With the help of this dual equation we then deduce the duality between approximate controllability and observability. Finally, under the assumption that the unbounded operator acting on the state process of the forward equation is an infinitesimal generator of an exponentially stable semigroup, we show that the generalized Hautus test provides a necessary condition for the approximate controllability. The paper generalizes former results by Buckdahn, Quincampoix and Tessitore (Stochastic Partial Differential Equations and Applications, Series of Lecture Notes in Pure and Appl. Math., vol. 245, pp. 253-260, Chapman and Hall, London, 2006) and Goreac (Applied Analysis and Differential Equations, pp. 153-164, World Scientific, Singapore, 2007) from the finite dimensional to the infinite dimensional case

  9. Least-Squares Linear Regression and Schrodinger's Cat: Perspectives on the Analysis of Regression Residuals.

    Hecht, Jeffrey B.

    The analysis of regression residuals and detection of outliers are discussed, with emphasis on determining how deviant an individual data point must be to be considered an outlier and the impact that multiple suspected outlier data points have on the process of outlier determination and treatment. Only bivariate (one dependent and one independent)…

  10. Experimental quantum computing to solve systems of linear equations.

    Cai, X-D; Weedbrook, C; Su, Z-E; Chen, M-C; Gu, Mile; Zhu, M-J; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2013-06-07

    Solving linear systems of equations is ubiquitous in all areas of science and engineering. With rapidly growing data sets, such a task can be intractable for classical computers, as the best known classical algorithms require a time proportional to the number of variables N. A recently proposed quantum algorithm shows that quantum computers could solve linear systems in a time scale of order log(N), giving an exponential speedup over classical computers. Here we realize the simplest instance of this algorithm, solving 2×2 linear equations for various input vectors on a quantum computer. We use four quantum bits and four controlled logic gates to implement every subroutine required, demonstrating the working principle of this algorithm.

  11. Stochastic modeling of mode interactions via linear parabolized stability equations

    Ran, Wei; Zare, Armin; Hack, M. J. Philipp; Jovanovic, Mihailo

    2017-11-01

    Low-complexity approximations of the Navier-Stokes equations have been widely used in the analysis of wall-bounded shear flows. In particular, the parabolized stability equations (PSE) and Floquet theory have been employed to capture the evolution of primary and secondary instabilities in spatially-evolving flows. We augment linear PSE with Floquet analysis to formally treat modal interactions and the evolution of secondary instabilities in the transitional boundary layer via a linear progression. To this end, we leverage Floquet theory by incorporating the primary instability into the base flow and accounting for different harmonics in the flow state. A stochastic forcing is introduced into the resulting linear dynamics to model the effect of nonlinear interactions on the evolution of modes. We examine the H-type transition scenario to demonstrate how our approach can be used to model nonlinear effects and capture the growth of the fundamental and subharmonic modes observed in direct numerical simulations and experiments.

  12. Two biased estimation techniques in linear regression: Application to aircraft

    Klein, Vladislav

    1988-01-01

    Several ways for detection and assessment of collinearity in measured data are discussed. Because data collinearity usually results in poor least squares estimates, two estimation techniques which can limit a damaging effect of collinearity are presented. These two techniques, the principal components regression and mixed estimation, belong to a class of biased estimation techniques. Detection and assessment of data collinearity and the two biased estimation techniques are demonstrated in two examples using flight test data from longitudinal maneuvers of an experimental aircraft. The eigensystem analysis and parameter variance decomposition appeared to be a promising tool for collinearity evaluation. The biased estimators had far better accuracy than the results from the ordinary least squares technique.

  13. Linear fractional diffusion-wave equation for scientists and engineers

    Povstenko, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    This book systematically presents solutions to the linear time-fractional diffusion-wave equation. It introduces the integral transform technique and discusses the properties of the Mittag-Leffler, Wright, and Mainardi functions that appear in the solutions. The time-nonlocal dependence between the flux and the gradient of the transported quantity with the “long-tail” power kernel results in the time-fractional diffusion-wave equation with the Caputo fractional derivative. Time-nonlocal generalizations of classical Fourier’s, Fick’s and Darcy’s laws are considered and different kinds of boundary conditions for this equation are discussed (Dirichlet, Neumann, Robin, perfect contact). The book provides solutions to the fractional diffusion-wave equation with one, two and three space variables in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. The respective sections of the book can be used for university courses on fractional calculus, heat and mass transfer, transport processes in porous media and ...

  14. Detection of epistatic effects with logic regression and a classical linear regression model.

    Malina, Magdalena; Ickstadt, Katja; Schwender, Holger; Posch, Martin; Bogdan, Małgorzata

    2014-02-01

    To locate multiple interacting quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing a trait of interest within experimental populations, usually methods as the Cockerham's model are applied. Within this framework, interactions are understood as the part of the joined effect of several genes which cannot be explained as the sum of their additive effects. However, if a change in the phenotype (as disease) is caused by Boolean combinations of genotypes of several QTLs, this Cockerham's approach is often not capable to identify them properly. To detect such interactions more efficiently, we propose a logic regression framework. Even though with the logic regression approach a larger number of models has to be considered (requiring more stringent multiple testing correction) the efficient representation of higher order logic interactions in logic regression models leads to a significant increase of power to detect such interactions as compared to a Cockerham's approach. The increase in power is demonstrated analytically for a simple two-way interaction model and illustrated in more complex settings with simulation study and real data analysis.

  15. A simplified procedure of linear regression in a preliminary analysis

    Silvia Facchinetti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of a statistical large data-set can be led by the study of a particularly interesting variable Y – regressed – and an explicative variable X, chosen among the remained variables, conjointly observed. The study gives a simplified procedure to obtain the functional link of the variables y=y(x by a partition of the data-set into m subsets, in which the observations are synthesized by location indices (mean or median of X and Y. Polynomial models for y(x of order r are considered to verify the characteristics of the given procedure, in particular we assume r= 1 and 2. The distributions of the parameter estimators are obtained by simulation, when the fitting is done for m= r + 1. Comparisons of the results, in terms of distribution and efficiency, are made with the results obtained by the ordinary least square methods. The study also gives some considerations on the consistency of the estimated parameters obtained by the given procedure.

  16. A fast iterative scheme for the linearized Boltzmann equation

    Wu, Lei; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Haihu; Zhang, Yonghao; Reese, Jason M.

    2017-06-01

    Iterative schemes to find steady-state solutions to the Boltzmann equation are efficient for highly rarefied gas flows, but can be very slow to converge in the near-continuum flow regime. In this paper, a synthetic iterative scheme is developed to speed up the solution of the linearized Boltzmann equation by penalizing the collision operator L into the form L = (L + Nδh) - Nδh, where δ is the gas rarefaction parameter, h is the velocity distribution function, and N is a tuning parameter controlling the convergence rate. The velocity distribution function is first solved by the conventional iterative scheme, then it is corrected such that the macroscopic flow velocity is governed by a diffusion-type equation that is asymptotic-preserving into the Navier-Stokes limit. The efficiency of this new scheme is assessed by calculating the eigenvalue of the iteration, as well as solving for Poiseuille and thermal transpiration flows. We find that the fastest convergence of our synthetic scheme for the linearized Boltzmann equation is achieved when Nδ is close to the average collision frequency. The synthetic iterative scheme is significantly faster than the conventional iterative scheme in both the transition and the near-continuum gas flow regimes. Moreover, due to its asymptotic-preserving properties, the synthetic iterative scheme does not need high spatial resolution in the near-continuum flow regime, which makes it even faster than the conventional iterative scheme. Using this synthetic scheme, with the fast spectral approximation of the linearized Boltzmann collision operator, Poiseuille and thermal transpiration flows between two parallel plates, through channels of circular/rectangular cross sections and various porous media are calculated over the whole range of gas rarefaction. Finally, the flow of a Ne-Ar gas mixture is solved based on the linearized Boltzmann equation with the Lennard-Jones intermolecular potential for the first time, and the difference

  17. Novel algorithm of large-scale simultaneous linear equations

    Fujiwara, T; Hoshi, T; Yamamoto, S; Sogabe, T; Zhang, S-L

    2010-01-01

    We review our recently developed methods of solving large-scale simultaneous linear equations and applications to electronic structure calculations both in one-electron theory and many-electron theory. This is the shifted COCG (conjugate orthogonal conjugate gradient) method based on the Krylov subspace, and the most important issue for applications is the shift equation and the seed switching method, which greatly reduce the computational cost. The applications to nano-scale Si crystals and the double orbital extended Hubbard model are presented.

  18. What happens to linear properties as we move from the Klein-Gordon equation to the sine-Gordon equation

    Kovalyov, Mikhail

    2010-01-01

    In this article the sets of solutions of the sine-Gordon equation and its linearization the Klein-Gordon equation are discussed and compared. It is shown that the set of solutions of the sine-Gordon equation possesses a richer structure which partly disappears during linearization. Just like the solutions of the Klein-Gordon equation satisfy the linear superposition principle, the solutions of the sine-Gordon equation satisfy a nonlinear superposition principle.

  19. Oscillatory solutions of the Cauchy problem for linear differential equations

    Gro Hovhannisyan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider the Cauchy problem for second and third order linear differential equations with constant complex coefficients. We describe necessary and sufficient conditions on the data for the existence of oscillatory solutions. It is known that in the case of real coefficients the oscillatory behavior of solutions does not depend on initial values, but we show that this is no longer true in the complex case: hence in practice it is possible to control oscillatory behavior by varying the initial conditions. Our Proofs are based on asymptotic analysis of the zeros of solutions, represented as linear combinations of exponential functions.

  20. Infinite sets of conservation laws for linear and non-linear field equations

    Niederle, J.

    1984-01-01

    The work was motivated by a desire to understand group theoretically the existence of an infinite set of conservation laws for non-interacting fields and to carry over these conservation laws to the case of interacting fields. The relation between an infinite set of conservation laws of a linear field equation and the enveloping algebra of its space-time symmetry group was established. It is shown that in the case of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation to each symmetry of the corresponding linear equation delta sub(o)uxxx=u sub() determined by an element of the enveloping algebra of the space translation algebra, there corresponds a symmetry of the full KdV equation

  1. Refined Fuchs inequalities for systems of linear differential equations

    Gontsov, R R

    2004-01-01

    We refine the Fuchs inequalities obtained by Corel for systems of linear meromorphic differential equations given on the Riemann sphere. Fuchs inequalities enable one to estimate the sum of exponents of the system over all its singular points. We refine these well-known inequalities by considering the Jordan structure of the leading coefficient of the Laurent series for the matrix of the right-hand side of the system in the neighbourhood of a singular point

  2. Inhomogeneous linear equation in Rota-Baxter algebra

    Pietrzkowski, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    We consider a complete filtered Rota-Baxter algebra of weight $\\lambda$ over a commutative ring. Finding the unique solution of a non-homogeneous linear algebraic equation in this algebra, we generalize Spitzer's identity in both commutative and non-commutative cases. As an application, considering the Rota-Baxter algebra of power series in one variable with q-integral as the Rota-Baxter operator, we show certain Eulerian identities.

  3. A general method for enclosing solutions of interval linear equations

    Rohn, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2012), s. 709-717 ISSN 1862-4472 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/1957; GA ČR GC201/08/J020 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : interval linear equations * solution set * enclosure * absolute value inequality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.654, year: 2012

  4. Disformal invariance of continuous media with linear equation of state

    Celoria, Marco [Gran Sasso Science Institute (INFN), Viale Francesco Crispi 7, L' Aquila, I-67100 Italy (Italy); Matarrese, Sabino [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' G. Galilei' , Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, Padova, I-35131 Italy (Italy); Pilo, Luigi, E-mail: marco.celoria@gssi.infn.it, E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it, E-mail: luigi.pilo@aquila.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di L' Aquila, L' Aquila, I-67010 Italy (Italy)

    2017-02-01

    We show that the effective theory describing single component continuous media with a linear and constant equation of state of the form p = w ρ is invariant under a 1-parameter family of continuous disformal transformations. In the special case of w =1/3 (ultrarelativistic gas), such a family reduces to conformal transformations. As examples, perfect fluids, irrotational dust (mimetic matter) and homogeneous and isotropic solids are discussed.

  5. A linearizing transformation for the Korteweg-de Vries equation; generalizations to higher-dimensional nonlinear partial differential equations

    Dorren, H.J.S.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that the Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) equation can be transformed into an ordinary linear partial differential equation in the wave number domain. Explicit solutions of the KdV equation can be obtained by subsequently solving this linear differential equation and by applying a cascade of

  6. Piecewise-linear and bilinear approaches to nonlinear differential equations approximation problem of computational structural mechanics

    Leibov Roman

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a bilinear approach to nonlinear differential equations system approximation problem. Sometimes the nonlinear differential equations right-hand sides linearization is extremely difficult or even impossible. Then piecewise-linear approximation of nonlinear differential equations can be used. The bilinear differential equations allow to improve piecewise-linear differential equations behavior and reduce errors on the border of different linear differential equations systems ...

  7. Multivariate Linear Regression and CART Regression Analysis of TBM Performance at Abu Hamour Phase-I Tunnel

    Jakubowski, J.; Stypulkowski, J. B.; Bernardeau, F. G.

    2017-12-01

    The first phase of the Abu Hamour drainage and storm tunnel was completed in early 2017. The 9.5 km long, 3.7 m diameter tunnel was excavated with two Earth Pressure Balance (EPB) Tunnel Boring Machines from Herrenknecht. TBM operation processes were monitored and recorded by Data Acquisition and Evaluation System. The authors coupled collected TBM drive data with available information on rock mass properties, cleansed, completed with secondary variables and aggregated by weeks and shifts. Correlations and descriptive statistics charts were examined. Multivariate Linear Regression and CART regression tree models linking TBM penetration rate (PR), penetration per revolution (PPR) and field penetration index (FPI) with TBM operational and geotechnical characteristics were performed for the conditions of the weak/soft rock of Doha. Both regression methods are interpretable and the data were screened with different computational approaches allowing enriched insight. The primary goal of the analysis was to investigate empirical relations between multiple explanatory and responding variables, to search for best subsets of explanatory variables and to evaluate the strength of linear and non-linear relations. For each of the penetration indices, a predictive model coupling both regression methods was built and validated. The resultant models appeared to be stronger than constituent ones and indicated an opportunity for more accurate and robust TBM performance predictions.

  8. Runge-Kutta Methods for Linear Ordinary Differential Equations

    Zingg, David W.; Chisholm, Todd T.

    1997-01-01

    Three new Runge-Kutta methods are presented for numerical integration of systems of linear inhomogeneous ordinary differential equations (ODES) with constant coefficients. Such ODEs arise in the numerical solution of the partial differential equations governing linear wave phenomena. The restriction to linear ODEs with constant coefficients reduces the number of conditions which the coefficients of the Runge-Kutta method must satisfy. This freedom is used to develop methods which are more efficient than conventional Runge-Kutta methods. A fourth-order method is presented which uses only two memory locations per dependent variable, while the classical fourth-order Runge-Kutta method uses three. This method is an excellent choice for simulations of linear wave phenomena if memory is a primary concern. In addition, fifth- and sixth-order methods are presented which require five and six stages, respectively, one fewer than their conventional counterparts, and are therefore more efficient. These methods are an excellent option for use with high-order spatial discretizations.

  9. FIRE: an SPSS program for variable selection in multiple linear regression analysis via the relative importance of predictors.

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano; Ferrando, Pere J

    2011-03-01

    We provide an SPSS program that implements currently recommended techniques and recent developments for selecting variables in multiple linear regression analysis via the relative importance of predictors. The approach consists of: (1) optimally splitting the data for cross-validation, (2) selecting the final set of predictors to be retained in the equation regression, and (3) assessing the behavior of the chosen model using standard indices and procedures. The SPSS syntax, a short manual, and data files related to this article are available as supplemental materials from brm.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental.

  10. Inverse scattering solution of non-linear evolution equations in one space dimension: an introduction

    Alvarez-Estrada, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the inverse scattering solution of certain non-linear evolution equations of physical interest in one space dimension is presented. We explain in some detail the interrelated techniques which allow to linearize exactly the following equations: (1) the Korteweg and de Vries equation; (2) the non-linear Schrodinger equation; (3) the modified Korteweg and de Vries equation; (4) the Sine-Gordon equation. We concentrate in discussing the pairs of linear operators which accomplish such an exact linearization and the solution of the associated initial value problem. The application of the method to other non-linear evolution equations is reviewed very briefly

  11. A regression approach for Zircaloy-2 in-reactor creep constitutive equations

    Yung Liu, Y.; Bement, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper the methodology of multiple regressions as applied to Zircaloy-2 in-reactor creep data analysis and construction of constitutive equation are illustrated. While the resulting constitutive equation can be used in creep analysis of in-reactor Zircaloy structural components, the methodology itself is entirely general and can be applied to any creep data analysis. The promising aspects of multiple regression creep data analysis are briefly outlined as follows: (1) When there are more than one variable involved, there is no need to make the assumption that each variable affects the response independently. No separate normalizations are required either and the estimation of parameters is obtained by solving many simultaneous equations. The number of simultaneous equations is equal to the number of data sets. (2) Regression statistics such as R 2 - and F-statistics provide measures of the significance of regression creep equation in correlating the overall data. The relative weights of each variable on the response can also be obtained. (3) Special regression techniques such as step-wise, ridge, and robust regressions and residual plots, etc., provide diagnostic tools for model selections. Multiple regression analysis performed on a set of carefully selected Zircaloy-2 in-reactor creep data leads to a model which provides excellent correlations for the data. (Auth.)

  12. Causal correlation of foliar biochemical concentrations with AVIRIS spectra using forced entry linear regression

    Dawson, Terence P.; Curran, Paul J.; Kupiec, John A.

    1995-01-01

    A major goal of airborne imaging spectrometry is to estimate the biochemical composition of vegetation canopies from reflectance spectra. Remotely-sensed estimates of foliar biochemical concentrations of forests would provide valuable indicators of ecosystem function at regional and eventually global scales. Empirical research has shown a relationship exists between the amount of radiation reflected from absorption features and the concentration of given biochemicals in leaves and canopies (Matson et al., 1994, Johnson et al., 1994). A technique commonly used to determine which wavelengths have the strongest correlation with the biochemical of interest is unguided (stepwise) multiple regression. Wavelengths are entered into a multivariate regression equation, in their order of importance, each contributing to the reduction of the variance in the measured biochemical concentration. A significant problem with the use of stepwise regression for determining the correlation between biochemical concentration and spectra is that of 'overfitting' as there are significantly more wavebands than biochemical measurements. This could result in the selection of wavebands which may be more accurately attributable to noise or canopy effects. In addition, there is a real problem of collinearity in that the individual biochemical concentrations may covary. A strong correlation between the reflectance at a given wavelength and the concentration of a biochemical of interest, therefore, may be due to the effect of another biochemical which is closely related. Furthermore, it is not always possible to account for potentially suitable waveband omissions in the stepwise selection procedure. This concern about the suitability of stepwise regression has been identified and acknowledged in a number of recent studies (Wessman et al., 1988, Curran, 1989, Curran et al., 1992, Peterson and Hubbard, 1992, Martine and Aber, 1994, Kupiec, 1994). These studies have pointed to the lack of a physical

  13. Chaotic dynamics and diffusion in a piecewise linear equation

    Shahrear, Pabel; Glass, Leon; Edwards, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Genetic interactions are often modeled by logical networks in which time is discrete and all gene activity states update simultaneously. However, there is no synchronizing clock in organisms. An alternative model assumes that the logical network is preserved and plays a key role in driving the dynamics in piecewise nonlinear differential equations. We examine dynamics in a particular 4-dimensional equation of this class. In the equation, two of the variables form a negative feedback loop that drives a second negative feedback loop. By modifying the original equations by eliminating exponential decay, we generate a modified system that is amenable to detailed analysis. In the modified system, we can determine in detail the Poincaré (return) map on a cross section to the flow. By analyzing the eigenvalues of the map for the different trajectories, we are able to show that except for a set of measure 0, the flow must necessarily have an eigenvalue greater than 1 and hence there is sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Further, there is an irregular oscillation whose amplitude is described by a diffusive process that is well-modeled by the Irwin-Hall distribution. There is a large class of other piecewise-linear networks that might be analyzed using similar methods. The analysis gives insight into possible origins of chaotic dynamics in periodically forced dynamical systems

  14. Chaotic dynamics and diffusion in a piecewise linear equation

    Shahrear, Pabel; Glass, Leon; Edwards, Rod

    2015-03-01

    Genetic interactions are often modeled by logical networks in which time is discrete and all gene activity states update simultaneously. However, there is no synchronizing clock in organisms. An alternative model assumes that the logical network is preserved and plays a key role in driving the dynamics in piecewise nonlinear differential equations. We examine dynamics in a particular 4-dimensional equation of this class. In the equation, two of the variables form a negative feedback loop that drives a second negative feedback loop. By modifying the original equations by eliminating exponential decay, we generate a modified system that is amenable to detailed analysis. In the modified system, we can determine in detail the Poincaré (return) map on a cross section to the flow. By analyzing the eigenvalues of the map for the different trajectories, we are able to show that except for a set of measure 0, the flow must necessarily have an eigenvalue greater than 1 and hence there is sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Further, there is an irregular oscillation whose amplitude is described by a diffusive process that is well-modeled by the Irwin-Hall distribution. There is a large class of other piecewise-linear networks that might be analyzed using similar methods. The analysis gives insight into possible origins of chaotic dynamics in periodically forced dynamical systems.

  15. KAM for the non-linear Schroedinger equation

    Eliasson, L H

    2006-01-01

    We consider the $d$-dimensional nonlinear Schr\\"o\\-dinger equation under periodic boundary conditions:-i\\dot u=\\Delta u+V(x)*u+\\ep|u|^2u;\\quad u=u(t,x),\\;x\\in\\T^dwhere $V(x)=\\sum \\hat V(a)e^{i\\sc{a,x}}$ is an analytic function with $\\hat V$ real. (This equation is a popular model for the `real' NLS equation, where instead of the convolution term $V*u$ we have the potential term $Vu$.) For $\\ep=0$ the equation is linear and has time--quasi-periodic solutions $u$,u(t,x)=\\sum_{s\\in \\AA}\\hat u_0(a)e^{i(|a|^2+\\hat V(a))t}e^{i\\sc{a,x}}, \\quad 0<|\\hat u_0(a)|\\le1,where $\\AA$ is any finite subset of $\\Z^d$. We shall treat $\\omega_a=|a|^2+\\hat V(a)$, $a\\in\\AA$, as free parameters in some domain $U\\subset\\R^{\\AA}$. This is a Hamiltonian system in infinite degrees of freedom, degenerate but with external parameters, and we shall describe a KAM-theory which, in particular, will have the following consequence: \\smallskip {\\it If $|\\ep|$ is sufficiently small, then there is a large subset $U'$ of $U$ such that for all $...

  16. Approximate solution to neutron transport equation with linear anisotropic scattering

    Coppa, G.; Ravetto, P.; Sumini, M.

    1983-01-01

    A method to obtain an approximate solution to the transport equation, when both sources and collisions show a linearly anisotropic behavior, is outlined and the possible implications for numerical calculations in applied neutronics as well as shielding evaluations are investigated. The form of the differential system of equations taken by the method is quite handy and looks simpler and more manageable than any other today available technique. To go deeper into the efficiency of the method, some typical calculations concerning critical dimension of multiplying systems are then performed and the results are compared with the ones coming from the classical Ssub(N) approximations. The outcome of such calculations leads us to think of interesting developments of the method which could be quite useful in alternative to other today widespread approximate procedures, for any geometry, but especially for curved ones. (author)

  17. General solutions of second-order linear difference equations of Euler type

    Akane Hongyo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to give general solutions of linear difference equations which are related to the Euler-Cauchy differential equation \\(y^{\\prime\\prime}+(\\lambda/t^2y=0\\ or more general linear differential equations. We also show that the asymptotic behavior of solutions of the linear difference equations are similar to solutions of the linear differential equations.

  18. Comparison between linear and non-parametric regression models for genome-enabled prediction in wheat.

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Gianola, Daniel; González-Camacho, Juan Manuel; Crossa, José; Manès, Yann; Dreisigacker, Susanne

    2012-12-01

    In genome-enabled prediction, parametric, semi-parametric, and non-parametric regression models have been used. This study assessed the predictive ability of linear and non-linear models using dense molecular markers. The linear models were linear on marker effects and included the Bayesian LASSO, Bayesian ridge regression, Bayes A, and Bayes B. The non-linear models (this refers to non-linearity on markers) were reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) regression, Bayesian regularized neural networks (BRNN), and radial basis function neural networks (RBFNN). These statistical models were compared using 306 elite wheat lines from CIMMYT genotyped with 1717 diversity array technology (DArT) markers and two traits, days to heading (DTH) and grain yield (GY), measured in each of 12 environments. It was found that the three non-linear models had better overall prediction accuracy than the linear regression specification. Results showed a consistent superiority of RKHS and RBFNN over the Bayesian LASSO, Bayesian ridge regression, Bayes A, and Bayes B models.

  19. First order linear ordinary differential equations in associative algebras

    Gordon Erlebacher

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the linear differential equation $$ frac{dx}{dt}=sum_{i=1}^n a_i(t x b_i(t + f(t $$ in an associative but non-commutative algebra $mathcal{A}$, where the $b_i(t$ form a set of commuting $mathcal{A}$-valued functions expressed in a time-independent spectral basis consisting of mutually annihilating idempotents and nilpotents. Explicit new closed solutions are derived, and examples are presented to illustrate the theory.

  20. A Solution to the Fundamental Linear Fractional Order Differential Equation

    Hartley, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides a solution to the fundamental linear fractional order differential equation, namely, (sub c)d(sup q, sub t) + ax(t) = bu(t). The impulse response solution is shown to be a series, named the F-function, which generalizes the normal exponential function. The F-function provides the basis for a qth order "fractional pole". Complex plane behavior is elucidated and a simple example, the inductor terminated semi- infinite lossy line, is used to demonstrate the theory.

  1. Linear stochastic differential equations with anticipating initial conditions

    Khalifa, Narjess; Kuo, Hui-Hsiung; Ouerdiane, Habib

    In this paper we use the new stochastic integral introduced by Ayed and Kuo (2008) and the results obtained by Kuo et al. (2012b) to find a solution to a drift-free linear stochastic differential equation with anticipating initial condition. Our solution is based on well-known results from...... classical Itô theory and anticipative Itô formula results from Kue et al. (2012b). We also show that the solution obtained by our method is consistent with the solution obtained by the methods of Malliavin calculus, e.g. Buckdahn and Nualart (1994)....

  2. Oscillation of solutions of some higher order linear differential equations

    Hong-Yan Xu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we deal with the order of growth and the hyper order of solutions of higher order linear differential equations $$f^{(k}+B_{k-1}f^{(k-1}+\\cdots+B_1f'+B_0f=F$$ where $B_j(z (j=0,1,\\ldots,k-1$ and $F$ are entire functions or polynomials. Some results are obtained which improve and extend previous results given by Z.-X. Chen, J. Wang, T.-B. Cao and C.-H. Li.

  3. SOME STATISTICAL ISSUES RELATED TO MULTIPLE LINEAR REGRESSION MODELING OF BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS

    As a fast and effective technique, the multiple linear regression (MLR) method has been widely used in modeling and prediction of beach bacteria concentrations. Among previous works on this subject, however, several issues were insufficiently or inconsistently addressed. Those is...

  4. Predicting Fuel Ignition Quality Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Multiple Linear Regression

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani; Naser, Nimal; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Dooley, Stephen; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    An improved model for the prediction of ignition quality of hydrocarbon fuels has been developed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multiple linear regression (MLR) modeling. Cetane number (CN) and derived cetane number (DCN

  5. How to deal with continuous and dichotomic outcomes in epidemiological research: linear and logistic regression analyses

    Tripepi, Giovanni; Jager, Kitty J.; Stel, Vianda S.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Zoccali, Carmine

    2011-01-01

    Because of some limitations of stratification methods, epidemiologists frequently use multiple linear and logistic regression analyses to address specific epidemiological questions. If the dependent variable is a continuous one (for example, systolic pressure and serum creatinine), the researcher

  6. Analysis of γ spectra in airborne radioactivity measurements using multiple linear regressions

    Bao Min; Shi Quanlin; Zhang Jiamei

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the net peak counts calculating of nuclide 137 Cs at 662 keV of γ spectra in airborne radioactivity measurements using multiple linear regressions. Mathematic model is founded by analyzing every factor that has contribution to Cs peak counts in spectra, and multiple linear regression function is established. Calculating process adopts stepwise regression, and the indistinctive factors are eliminated by F check. The regression results and its uncertainty are calculated using Least Square Estimation, then the Cs peak net counts and its uncertainty can be gotten. The analysis results for experimental spectrum are displayed. The influence of energy shift and energy resolution on the analyzing result is discussed. In comparison with the stripping spectra method, multiple linear regression method needn't stripping radios, and the calculating result has relation with the counts in Cs peak only, and the calculating uncertainty is reduced. (authors)

  7. Do clinical and translational science graduate students understand linear regression? Development and early validation of the REGRESS quiz.

    Enders, Felicity

    2013-12-01

    Although regression is widely used for reading and publishing in the medical literature, no instruments were previously available to assess students' understanding. The goal of this study was to design and assess such an instrument for graduate students in Clinical and Translational Science and Public Health. A 27-item REsearch on Global Regression Expectations in StatisticS (REGRESS) quiz was developed through an iterative process. Consenting students taking a course on linear regression in a Clinical and Translational Science program completed the quiz pre- and postcourse. Student results were compared to practicing statisticians with a master's or doctoral degree in statistics or a closely related field. Fifty-two students responded precourse, 59 postcourse , and 22 practicing statisticians completed the quiz. The mean (SD) score was 9.3 (4.3) for students precourse and 19.0 (3.5) postcourse (P REGRESS quiz was internally reliable (Cronbach's alpha 0.89). The initial validation is quite promising with statistically significant and meaningful differences across time and study populations. Further work is needed to validate the quiz across multiple institutions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Improving sub-pixel imperviousness change prediction by ensembling heterogeneous non-linear regression models

    Drzewiecki Wojciech

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work nine non-linear regression models were compared for sub-pixel impervious surface area mapping from Landsat images. The comparison was done in three study areas both for accuracy of imperviousness coverage evaluation in individual points in time and accuracy of imperviousness change assessment. The performance of individual machine learning algorithms (Cubist, Random Forest, stochastic gradient boosting of regression trees, k-nearest neighbors regression, random k-nearest neighbors regression, Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines, averaged neural networks, and support vector machines with polynomial and radial kernels was also compared with the performance of heterogeneous model ensembles constructed from the best models trained using particular techniques.

  9. A Technique of Fuzzy C-Mean in Multiple Linear Regression Model toward Paddy Yield

    Syazwan Wahab, Nur; Saifullah Rusiman, Mohd; Mohamad, Mahathir; Amira Azmi, Nur; Che Him, Norziha; Ghazali Kamardan, M.; Ali, Maselan

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a hybrid model which is a combination of multiple linear regression model and fuzzy c-means method. This research involved a relationship between 20 variates of the top soil that are analyzed prior to planting of paddy yields at standard fertilizer rates. Data used were from the multi-location trials for rice carried out by MARDI at major paddy granary in Peninsular Malaysia during the period from 2009 to 2012. Missing observations were estimated using mean estimation techniques. The data were analyzed using multiple linear regression model and a combination of multiple linear regression model and fuzzy c-means method. Analysis of normality and multicollinearity indicate that the data is normally scattered without multicollinearity among independent variables. Analysis of fuzzy c-means cluster the yield of paddy into two clusters before the multiple linear regression model can be used. The comparison between two method indicate that the hybrid of multiple linear regression model and fuzzy c-means method outperform the multiple linear regression model with lower value of mean square error.

  10. A simple linear regression method for quantitative trait loci linkage analysis with censored observations.

    Anderson, Carl A; McRae, Allan F; Visscher, Peter M

    2006-07-01

    Standard quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping techniques commonly assume that the trait is both fully observed and normally distributed. When considering survival or age-at-onset traits these assumptions are often incorrect. Methods have been developed to map QTL for survival traits; however, they are both computationally intensive and not available in standard genome analysis software packages. We propose a grouped linear regression method for the analysis of continuous survival data. Using simulation we compare this method to both the Cox and Weibull proportional hazards models and a standard linear regression method that ignores censoring. The grouped linear regression method is of equivalent power to both the Cox and Weibull proportional hazards methods and is significantly better than the standard linear regression method when censored observations are present. The method is also robust to the proportion of censored individuals and the underlying distribution of the trait. On the basis of linear regression methodology, the grouped linear regression model is computationally simple and fast and can be implemented readily in freely available statistical software.

  11. Transmission of linear regression patterns between time series: from relationship in time series to complex networks.

    Gao, Xiangyun; An, Haizhong; Fang, Wei; Huang, Xuan; Li, Huajiao; Zhong, Weiqiong; Ding, Yinghui

    2014-07-01

    The linear regression parameters between two time series can be different under different lengths of observation period. If we study the whole period by the sliding window of a short period, the change of the linear regression parameters is a process of dynamic transmission over time. We tackle fundamental research that presents a simple and efficient computational scheme: a linear regression patterns transmission algorithm, which transforms linear regression patterns into directed and weighted networks. The linear regression patterns (nodes) are defined by the combination of intervals of the linear regression parameters and the results of the significance testing under different sizes of the sliding window. The transmissions between adjacent patterns are defined as edges, and the weights of the edges are the frequency of the transmissions. The major patterns, the distance, and the medium in the process of the transmission can be captured. The statistical results of weighted out-degree and betweenness centrality are mapped on timelines, which shows the features of the distribution of the results. Many measurements in different areas that involve two related time series variables could take advantage of this algorithm to characterize the dynamic relationships between the time series from a new perspective.

  12. A Matlab program for stepwise regression

    Yanhong Qi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The stepwise linear regression is a multi-variable regression for identifying statistically significant variables in the linear regression equation. In present study, we presented the Matlab program of stepwise regression.

  13. The number of subjects per variable required in linear regression analyses

    P.C. Austin (Peter); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To determine the number of independent variables that can be included in a linear regression model. Study Design and Setting We used a series of Monte Carlo simulations to examine the impact of the number of subjects per variable (SPV) on the accuracy of estimated regression

  14. Tightness of M-estimators for multiple linear regression in time series

    Johansen, Søren; Nielsen, Bent

    We show tightness of a general M-estimator for multiple linear regression in time series. The positive criterion function for the M-estimator is assumed lower semi-continuous and sufficiently large for large argument: Particular cases are the Huber-skip and quantile regression. Tightness requires...

  15. Piecewise linear regression techniques to analyze the timing of head coach dismissals in Dutch soccer clubs

    Schryver, T. de; Eisinga, R.

    2010-01-01

    The key question in research on dismissals of head coaches in sports clubs is not whether they should happen but when they will happen. This paper applies piecewise linear regression to advance our understanding of the timing of head coach dismissals. Essentially, the regression sacrifices degrees

  16. Mathematics Literacy of Secondary Students in Solving Simultanenous Linear Equations

    Sitompul, R. S. I.; Budayasa, I. K.; Masriyah

    2018-01-01

    This study examines the profile of secondary students’ mathematical literacy in solving simultanenous linear equations problems in terms of cognitive style of visualizer and verbalizer. This research is a descriptive research with qualitative approach. The subjects in this research consist of one student with cognitive style of visualizer and one student with cognitive style of verbalizer. The main instrument in this research is the researcher herself and supporting instruments are cognitive style tests, mathematics skills tests, problem-solving tests and interview guidelines. Research was begun by determining the cognitive style test and mathematics skill test. The subjects chosen were given problem-solving test about simultaneous linear equations and continued with interview. To ensure the validity of the data, the researcher conducted data triangulation; the steps of data reduction, data presentation, data interpretation, and conclusion drawing. The results show that there is a similarity of visualizer and verbalizer-cognitive style in identifying and understanding the mathematical structure in the process of formulating. There are differences in how to represent problems in the process of implementing, there are differences in designing strategies and in the process of interpreting, and there are differences in explaining the logical reasons.

  17. Two-dimensional differential transform method for solving linear and non-linear Schroedinger equations

    Ravi Kanth, A.S.V.; Aruna, K.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a reliable algorithm to develop exact and approximate solutions for the linear and nonlinear Schroedinger equations. The approach rest mainly on two-dimensional differential transform method which is one of the approximate methods. The method can easily be applied to many linear and nonlinear problems and is capable of reducing the size of computational work. Exact solutions can also be achieved by the known forms of the series solutions. Several illustrative examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the present method.

  18. Computational Tools for Probing Interactions in Multiple Linear Regression, Multilevel Modeling, and Latent Curve Analysis

    Preacher, Kristopher J.; Curran, Patrick J.; Bauer, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Simple slopes, regions of significance, and confidence bands are commonly used to evaluate interactions in multiple linear regression (MLR) models, and the use of these techniques has recently been extended to multilevel or hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) and latent curve analysis (LCA). However, conducting these tests and plotting the…

  19. Investigation of linear regression of EPR dosimetric signal of the man tooth enamel

    Pivovarov, S.P.; Rukhin, A.B.; Zhakparov, R.K.; Vasilevskaya, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    The experimental relations of the EPR radiation signal in samples of man tooth enamel of three donors of different age up to doses 1350 Gy are examined. To all of them the linear regression is applicable. The considerable errors leading to apparent non-linearity are eliminated most. (author)

  20. Genomic prediction based on data from three layer lines using non-linear regression models

    Huang, H.; Windig, J.J.; Vereijken, A.; Calus, M.P.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background - Most studies on genomic prediction with reference populations that include multiple lines or breeds have used linear models. Data heterogeneity due to using multiple populations may conflict with model assumptions used in linear regression methods. Methods - In an attempt to alleviate

  1. Multiple linear regression and regression with time series error models in forecasting PM10 concentrations in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Ng, Kar Yong; Awang, Norhashidah

    2018-01-06

    Frequent haze occurrences in Malaysia have made the management of PM 10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic less than 10 μm) pollution a critical task. This requires knowledge on factors associating with PM 10 variation and good forecast of PM 10 concentrations. Hence, this paper demonstrates the prediction of 1-day-ahead daily average PM 10 concentrations based on predictor variables including meteorological parameters and gaseous pollutants. Three different models were built. They were multiple linear regression (MLR) model with lagged predictor variables (MLR1), MLR model with lagged predictor variables and PM 10 concentrations (MLR2) and regression with time series error (RTSE) model. The findings revealed that humidity, temperature, wind speed, wind direction, carbon monoxide and ozone were the main factors explaining the PM 10 variation in Peninsular Malaysia. Comparison among the three models showed that MLR2 model was on a same level with RTSE model in terms of forecasting accuracy, while MLR1 model was the worst.

  2. Modeling Fire Occurrence at the City Scale: A Comparison between Geographically Weighted Regression and Global Linear Regression.

    Song, Chao; Kwan, Mei-Po; Zhu, Jiping

    2017-04-08

    An increasing number of fires are occurring with the rapid development of cities, resulting in increased risk for human beings and the environment. This study compares geographically weighted regression-based models, including geographically weighted regression (GWR) and geographically and temporally weighted regression (GTWR), which integrates spatial and temporal effects and global linear regression models (LM) for modeling fire risk at the city scale. The results show that the road density and the spatial distribution of enterprises have the strongest influences on fire risk, which implies that we should focus on areas where roads and enterprises are densely clustered. In addition, locations with a large number of enterprises have fewer fire ignition records, probably because of strict management and prevention measures. A changing number of significant variables across space indicate that heterogeneity mainly exists in the northern and eastern rural and suburban areas of Hefei city, where human-related facilities or road construction are only clustered in the city sub-centers. GTWR can capture small changes in the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of the variables while GWR and LM cannot. An approach that integrates space and time enables us to better understand the dynamic changes in fire risk. Thus governments can use the results to manage fire safety at the city scale.

  3. OPLS statistical model versus linear regression to assess sonographic predictors of stroke prognosis.

    Vajargah, Kianoush Fathi; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Mehdizadeh-Esfanjani, Robab; Savadi-Oskouei, Daryoush; Farhoudi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the comparable applicability of orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) statistical model vs traditional linear regression in order to investigate the role of trans cranial doppler (TCD) sonography in predicting ischemic stroke prognosis. The study was conducted on 116 ischemic stroke patients admitted to a specialty neurology ward. The Unified Neurological Stroke Scale was used once for clinical evaluation on the first week of admission and again six months later. All data was primarily analyzed using simple linear regression and later considered for multivariate analysis using PLS/OPLS models through the SIMCA P+12 statistical software package. The linear regression analysis results used for the identification of TCD predictors of stroke prognosis were confirmed through the OPLS modeling technique. Moreover, in comparison to linear regression, the OPLS model appeared to have higher sensitivity in detecting the predictors of ischemic stroke prognosis and detected several more predictors. Applying the OPLS model made it possible to use both single TCD measures/indicators and arbitrarily dichotomized measures of TCD single vessel involvement as well as the overall TCD result. In conclusion, the authors recommend PLS/OPLS methods as complementary rather than alternative to the available classical regression models such as linear regression.

  4. A study on direct determination of uranium in ore by analyzing γ-ray spectrum with dual linear regression

    Liu Chunkui

    1996-01-01

    The method introduced is based on different energy of γ-ray emitted from radionuclide in the uranium-radium decay series in ore. The pulse counting rates of two spectra bands, i.e. N 1 (55∼193 keV) and N 2 (260∼1500 keV), are measured by portable type HYX-3 400-channel γ-ray spectrometer. On the other side, the uranium content (Q U ) is obtained by chemical analysis of channel sampling. Then the regression coefficients (b 0 , b 1 ,b 2 ) can be determined through dual linear regression by using Q U and N 1 , N 2 . The direct determination of uranium can be made with the regression equation Q U = b 0 + b 1 N 1 + b 2 N 2

  5. Estimation of Ordinary Differential Equation Parameters Using Constrained Local Polynomial Regression.

    Ding, A Adam; Wu, Hulin

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new method to use a constrained local polynomial regression to estimate the unknown parameters in ordinary differential equation models with a goal of improving the smoothing-based two-stage pseudo-least squares estimate. The equation constraints are derived from the differential equation model and are incorporated into the local polynomial regression in order to estimate the unknown parameters in the differential equation model. We also derive the asymptotic bias and variance of the proposed estimator. Our simulation studies show that our new estimator is clearly better than the pseudo-least squares estimator in estimation accuracy with a small price of computational cost. An application example on immune cell kinetics and trafficking for influenza infection further illustrates the benefits of the proposed new method.

  6. A regression approach for zircaloy-2 in-reactor creep constitutive equations

    Yung Liu, Y.; Bement, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper the methodology of multiple regressions as applied to zircaloy-2 in-reactor creep data analysis and construction of constitutive equation are illustrated. While the resulting constitutive equation can be used in creep analysis of in-reactor zircaloy structural components, the methodology itself is entirely general and can be applied to any creep data analysis. From data analysis and model development point of views, both the assumption of independence and prior committment to specific model forms are unacceptable. One would desire means which can not only estimate the required parameters directly from data but also provide basis for model selections, viz., one model against others. Basic understanding of the physics of deformation is important in choosing the forms of starting physical model equations, but the justifications must rely on their abilities in correlating the overall data. The promising aspects of multiple regression creep data analysis are briefly outlined as follows: (1) when there are more than one variable involved, there is no need to make the assumption that each variable affects the response independently. No separate normalizations are required either and the estimation of parameters is obtained by solving many simultaneous equations. The number of simultaneous equations is equal to the number of data sets, (2) regression statistics such as R 2 - and F-statistics provide measures of the significance of regression creep equation in correlating the overall data. The relative weights of each variable on the response can also be obtained. (3) Special regression techniques such as step-wise, ridge, and robust regressions and residual plots, etc., provide diagnostic tools for model selections

  7. Inverse Boundary Value Problem for Non-linear Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations

    Nakamura, Gen; Vashisth, Manmohan

    2017-01-01

    In this article we are concerned with an inverse boundary value problem for a non-linear wave equation of divergence form with space dimension $n\\geq 3$. This non-linear wave equation has a trivial solution, i.e. zero solution. By linearizing this equation at the trivial solution, we have the usual linear isotropic wave equation with the speed $\\sqrt{\\gamma(x)}$ at each point $x$ in a given spacial domain. For any small solution $u=u(t,x)$ of this non-linear equation, we have the linear isotr...

  8. Choosing of mode and calculation of multiple regression equation parameters in X-ray radiometric analysis

    Mamikonyan, S.V.; Berezkin, V.V.; Lyubimova, S.V.; Svetajlo, Yu.N.; Shchekin, K.I.

    1978-01-01

    A method to derive multiple regression equations for X-ray radiometric analysis is described. Te method is realized in the form of the REGRA program in an algorithmic language. The subprograms included in the program are describe. In analyzing cement for Mg, Al, Si, Ca and Fe contents as an example, the obtainment of working equations in the course of calculations by the program is shown to simpliy the realization of computing devices in instruments for X-ray radiometric analysis

  9. An improved multiple linear regression and data analysis computer program package

    Sidik, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    NEWRAP, an improved version of a previous multiple linear regression program called RAPIER, CREDUC, and CRSPLT, allows for a complete regression analysis including cross plots of the independent and dependent variables, correlation coefficients, regression coefficients, analysis of variance tables, t-statistics and their probability levels, rejection of independent variables, plots of residuals against the independent and dependent variables, and a canonical reduction of quadratic response functions useful in optimum seeking experimentation. A major improvement over RAPIER is that all regression calculations are done in double precision arithmetic.

  10. Proposition of Regression Equations to Determine Outdoor Thermal Comfort in Tropical and Humid Environment

    Sangkertadi Sangkertadi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is about field experimentation in order to construct regression equations of perception of thermalcomfort for outdoor activities under hot and humid environment. Relationships between thermal-comfort perceptions, micro climate variables (temperatures and humidity and body parameters (activity, clothing, body measure have been observed and analyzed. 180 adults, men, and women participated as samples/respondents. This study is limited for situation where wind velocity is about 1 m/s, which touch the body of the respondents/samples. From questionnaires and field measurements, three regression equations have been developed, each for activity of normal walking, brisk walking, and sitting.

  11. Half-trek criterion for generic identifiability of linear structural equation models

    Foygel, R.; Draisma, J.; Drton, M.

    2012-01-01

    A linear structural equation model relates random variables of interest and corresponding Gaussian noise terms via a linear equation system. Each such model can be represented by a mixed graph in which directed edges encode the linear equations, and bidirected edges indicate possible correlations

  12. Half-trek criterion for generic identifiability of linear structural equation models

    Foygel, R.; Draisma, J.; Drton, M.

    2011-01-01

    A linear structural equation model relates random variables of interest and corresponding Gaussian noise terms via a linear equation system. Each such model can be represented by a mixed graph in which directed edges encode the linear equations, and bidirected edges indicate possible correlations

  13. Explicit estimating equations for semiparametric generalized linear latent variable models

    Ma, Yanyuan

    2010-07-05

    We study generalized linear latent variable models without requiring a distributional assumption of the latent variables. Using a geometric approach, we derive consistent semiparametric estimators. We demonstrate that these models have a property which is similar to that of a sufficient complete statistic, which enables us to simplify the estimating procedure and explicitly to formulate the semiparametric estimating equations. We further show that the explicit estimators have the usual root n consistency and asymptotic normality. We explain the computational implementation of our method and illustrate the numerical performance of the estimators in finite sample situations via extensive simulation studies. The advantage of our estimators over the existing likelihood approach is also shown via numerical comparison. We employ the method to analyse a real data example from economics. © 2010 Royal Statistical Society.

  14. Optimal overlapping of waveform relaxation method for linear differential equations

    Yamada, Susumu; Ozawa, Kazufumi

    2000-01-01

    Waveform relaxation (WR) method is extremely suitable for solving large systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) on parallel computers, but the convergence of the method is generally slow. In order to accelerate the convergence, the methods which decouple the system into many subsystems with overlaps some of the components between the adjacent subsystems have been proposed. The methods, in general, converge much faster than the ones without overlapping, but the computational cost per iteration becomes larger due to the increase of the dimension of each subsystem. In this research, the convergence of the WR method for solving constant coefficients linear ODEs is investigated and the strategy to determine the number of overlapped components which minimizes the cost of the parallel computations is proposed. Numerical experiments on an SR2201 parallel computer show that the estimated number of the overlapped components by the proposed strategy is reasonable. (author)

  15. Parallel computation for solving the tridiagonal linear system of equations

    Ishiguro, Misako; Harada, Hiroo; Fujii, Minoru; Fujimura, Toichiro; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Nanba, Katsumi.

    1981-09-01

    Recently, applications of parallel computation for scientific calculations have increased from the need of the high speed calculation of large scale programs. At the JAERI computing center, an array processor FACOM 230-75 APU has installed to study the applicability of parallel computation for nuclear codes. We made some numerical experiments by using the APU on the methods of solution of tridiagonal linear equation which is an important problem in scientific calculations. Referring to the recent papers with parallel methods, we investigate eight ones. These are Gauss elimination method, Parallel Gauss method, Accelerated parallel Gauss method, Jacobi method, Recursive doubling method, Cyclic reduction method, Chebyshev iteration method, and Conjugate gradient method. The computing time and accuracy were compared among the methods on the basis of the numerical experiments. As the result, it is found that the Cyclic reduction method is best both in computing time and accuracy and the Gauss elimination method is the second one. (author)

  16. Regression equations to predict 6-minute walk distance in Chinese adults aged 55–85 years

    Shirley P.C. Ngai, PhD; Alice Y.M. Jones, PhD; Sue C. Jenkins, PhD

    2014-01-01

    The 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) is used as a measure of functional exercise capacity in clinical populations and research. Reference equations to predict 6MWD in different populations have been established, however, available equations for Chinese population are scarce. This study aimed to develop regression equations to predict the 6MWD for a Hong Kong Chinese population. Fifty-three healthy individuals (25 men, 28 women; mean age = 69.3 ± 6.5 years) participated in this cross-sectional st...

  17. A Monte Carlo simulation study comparing linear regression, beta regression, variable-dispersion beta regression and fractional logit regression at recovering average difference measures in a two sample design.

    Meaney, Christopher; Moineddin, Rahim

    2014-01-24

    In biomedical research, response variables are often encountered which have bounded support on the open unit interval--(0,1). Traditionally, researchers have attempted to estimate covariate effects on these types of response data using linear regression. Alternative modelling strategies may include: beta regression, variable-dispersion beta regression, and fractional logit regression models. This study employs a Monte Carlo simulation design to compare the statistical properties of the linear regression model to that of the more novel beta regression, variable-dispersion beta regression, and fractional logit regression models. In the Monte Carlo experiment we assume a simple two sample design. We assume observations are realizations of independent draws from their respective probability models. The randomly simulated draws from the various probability models are chosen to emulate average proportion/percentage/rate differences of pre-specified magnitudes. Following simulation of the experimental data we estimate average proportion/percentage/rate differences. We compare the estimators in terms of bias, variance, type-1 error and power. Estimates of Monte Carlo error associated with these quantities are provided. If response data are beta distributed with constant dispersion parameters across the two samples, then all models are unbiased and have reasonable type-1 error rates and power profiles. If the response data in the two samples have different dispersion parameters, then the simple beta regression model is biased. When the sample size is small (N0 = N1 = 25) linear regression has superior type-1 error rates compared to the other models. Small sample type-1 error rates can be improved in beta regression models using bias correction/reduction methods. In the power experiments, variable-dispersion beta regression and fractional logit regression models have slightly elevated power compared to linear regression models. Similar results were observed if the

  18. Use of multiple linear regression and logistic regression models to investigate changes in birthweight for term singleton infants in Scotland.

    Bonellie, Sandra R

    2012-10-01

    To illustrate the use of regression and logistic regression models to investigate changes over time in size of babies particularly in relation to social deprivation, age of the mother and smoking. Mean birthweight has been found to be increasing in many countries in recent years, but there are still a group of babies who are born with low birthweights. Population-based retrospective cohort study. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression models are used to analyse data on term 'singleton births' from Scottish hospitals between 1994-2003. Mothers who smoke are shown to give birth to lighter babies on average, a difference of approximately 0.57 Standard deviations lower (95% confidence interval. 0.55-0.58) when adjusted for sex and parity. These mothers are also more likely to have babies that are low birthweight (odds ratio 3.46, 95% confidence interval 3.30-3.63) compared with non-smokers. Low birthweight is 30% more likely where the mother lives in the most deprived areas compared with the least deprived, (odds ratio 1.30, 95% confidence interval 1.21-1.40). Smoking during pregnancy is shown to have a detrimental effect on the size of infants at birth. This effect explains some, though not all, of the observed socioeconomic birthweight. It also explains much of the observed birthweight differences by the age of the mother.   Identifying mothers at greater risk of having a low birthweight baby as important implications for the care and advice this group receives. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Treating experimental data of inverse kinetic method by unitary linear regression analysis

    Zhao Yusen; Chen Xiaoliang

    2009-01-01

    The theory of treating experimental data of inverse kinetic method by unitary linear regression analysis was described. Not only the reactivity, but also the effective neutron source intensity could be calculated by this method. Computer code was compiled base on the inverse kinetic method and unitary linear regression analysis. The data of zero power facility BFS-1 in Russia were processed and the results were compared. The results show that the reactivity and the effective neutron source intensity can be obtained correctly by treating experimental data of inverse kinetic method using unitary linear regression analysis and the precision of reactivity measurement is improved. The central element efficiency can be calculated by using the reactivity. The result also shows that the effect to reactivity measurement caused by external neutron source should be considered when the reactor power is low and the intensity of external neutron source is strong. (authors)

  20. Weighted linear regression using D2H and D2 as the independent variables

    Hans T. Schreuder; Michael S. Williams

    1998-01-01

    Several error structures for weighted regression equations used for predicting volume were examined for 2 large data sets of felled and standing loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.). The generally accepted model with variance of error proportional to the value of the covariate squared ( D2H = diameter squared times height or D...

  1. Testing Mediation Using Multiple Regression and Structural Equation Modeling Analyses in Secondary Data

    Li, Spencer D.

    2011-01-01

    Mediation analysis in child and adolescent development research is possible using large secondary data sets. This article provides an overview of two statistical methods commonly used to test mediated effects in secondary analysis: multiple regression and structural equation modeling (SEM). Two empirical studies are presented to illustrate the…

  2. A primer for biomedical scientists on how to execute model II linear regression analysis.

    Ludbrook, John

    2012-04-01

    1. There are two very different ways of executing linear regression analysis. One is Model I, when the x-values are fixed by the experimenter. The other is Model II, in which the x-values are free to vary and are subject to error. 2. I have received numerous complaints from biomedical scientists that they have great difficulty in executing Model II linear regression analysis. This may explain the results of a Google Scholar search, which showed that the authors of articles in journals of physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry rarely use Model II regression analysis. 3. I repeat my previous arguments in favour of using least products linear regression analysis for Model II regressions. I review three methods for executing ordinary least products (OLP) and weighted least products (WLP) regression analysis: (i) scientific calculator and/or computer spreadsheet; (ii) specific purpose computer programs; and (iii) general purpose computer programs. 4. Using a scientific calculator and/or computer spreadsheet, it is easy to obtain correct values for OLP slope and intercept, but the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) are inaccurate. 5. Using specific purpose computer programs, the freeware computer program smatr gives the correct OLP regression coefficients and obtains 95% CI by bootstrapping. In addition, smatr can be used to compare the slopes of OLP lines. 6. When using general purpose computer programs, I recommend the commercial programs systat and Statistica for those who regularly undertake linear regression analysis and I give step-by-step instructions in the Supplementary Information as to how to use loss functions. © 2011 The Author. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. The Relationship between Economic Growth and Money Laundering – a Linear Regression Model

    Daniel Rece

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This study provides an overview of the relationship between economic growth and money laundering modeled by a least squares function. The report analyzes statistically data collected from USA, Russia, Romania and other eleven European countries, rendering a linear regression model. The study illustrates that 23.7% of the total variance in the regressand (level of money laundering is “explained” by the linear regression model. In our opinion, this model will provide critical auxiliary judgment and decision support for anti-money laundering service systems.

  4. A new linearized equation for servo valve in hydraulic control systems

    Kim, Tae Hyung; Lee, Ill Yeong

    2002-01-01

    In the procedure of the hydraulic control system analysis, a linearized approximate equation described by the first order term of Taylor's series has been widely used. Such a linearized equation is effective just near the operating point. And, as of now, there are no general standards on how to determine the operating point of a servo valve in the process of applying the linearized equation. So, in this study, a new linearized equation for valve characteristics is proposed as a modified form of the existing linearized equation. And, a method for selecting an optimal operating point is proposed for the new linearized equation. The effectiveness of the new linearized equation is confirmed through numerical simulations and experiments for a model hydraulic control system

  5. Regression Is a Univariate General Linear Model Subsuming Other Parametric Methods as Special Cases.

    Vidal, Sherry

    Although the concept of the general linear model (GLM) has existed since the 1960s, other univariate analyses such as the t-test and the analysis of variance models have remained popular. The GLM produces an equation that minimizes the mean differences of independent variables as they are related to a dependent variable. From a computer printout…

  6. A Comparison between Linear IRT Observed-Score Equating and Levine Observed-Score Equating under the Generalized Kernel Equating Framework

    Chen, Haiwen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, linear item response theory (IRT) observed-score equating is compared under a generalized kernel equating framework with Levine observed-score equating for nonequivalent groups with anchor test design. Interestingly, these two equating methods are closely related despite being based on different methodologies. Specifically, when…

  7. The number of subjects per variable required in linear regression analyses.

    Austin, Peter C; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2015-06-01

    To determine the number of independent variables that can be included in a linear regression model. We used a series of Monte Carlo simulations to examine the impact of the number of subjects per variable (SPV) on the accuracy of estimated regression coefficients and standard errors, on the empirical coverage of estimated confidence intervals, and on the accuracy of the estimated R(2) of the fitted model. A minimum of approximately two SPV tended to result in estimation of regression coefficients with relative bias of less than 10%. Furthermore, with this minimum number of SPV, the standard errors of the regression coefficients were accurately estimated and estimated confidence intervals had approximately the advertised coverage rates. A much higher number of SPV were necessary to minimize bias in estimating the model R(2), although adjusted R(2) estimates behaved well. The bias in estimating the model R(2) statistic was inversely proportional to the magnitude of the proportion of variation explained by the population regression model. Linear regression models require only two SPV for adequate estimation of regression coefficients, standard errors, and confidence intervals. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Using the classical linear regression model in analysis of the dependences of conveyor belt life

    Miriam Andrejiová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the classical linear regression model of the dependence of conveyor belt life on some selected parameters: thickness of paint layer, width and length of the belt, conveyor speed and quantity of transported material. The first part of the article is about regression model design, point and interval estimation of parameters, verification of statistical significance of the model, and about the parameters of the proposed regression model. The second part of the article deals with identification of influential and extreme values that can have an impact on estimation of regression model parameters. The third part focuses on assumptions of the classical regression model, i.e. on verification of independence assumptions, normality and homoscedasticity of residuals.

  9. Efficient Determination of Free Energy Landscapes in Multiple Dimensions from Biased Umbrella Sampling Simulations Using Linear Regression.

    Meng, Yilin; Roux, Benoît

    2015-08-11

    The weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) is a standard protocol for postprocessing the information from biased umbrella sampling simulations to construct the potential of mean force with respect to a set of order parameters. By virtue of the WHAM equations, the unbiased density of state is determined by satisfying a self-consistent condition through an iterative procedure. While the method works very effectively when the number of order parameters is small, its computational cost grows rapidly in higher dimension. Here, we present a simple and efficient alternative strategy, which avoids solving the self-consistent WHAM equations iteratively. An efficient multivariate linear regression framework is utilized to link the biased probability densities of individual umbrella windows and yield an unbiased global free energy landscape in the space of order parameters. It is demonstrated with practical examples that free energy landscapes that are comparable in accuracy to WHAM can be generated at a small fraction of the cost.

  10. Least median of squares and iteratively re-weighted least squares as robust linear regression methods for fluorimetric determination of α-lipoic acid in capsules in ideal and non-ideal cases of linearity.

    Korany, Mohamed A; Gazy, Azza A; Khamis, Essam F; Ragab, Marwa A A; Kamal, Miranda F

    2018-03-26

    This study outlines two robust regression approaches, namely least median of squares (LMS) and iteratively re-weighted least squares (IRLS) to investigate their application in instrument analysis of nutraceuticals (that is, fluorescence quenching of merbromin reagent upon lipoic acid addition). These robust regression methods were used to calculate calibration data from the fluorescence quenching reaction (∆F and F-ratio) under ideal or non-ideal linearity conditions. For each condition, data were treated using three regression fittings: Ordinary Least Squares (OLS), LMS and IRLS. Assessment of linearity, limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ), accuracy and precision were carefully studied for each condition. LMS and IRLS regression line fittings showed significant improvement in correlation coefficients and all regression parameters for both methods and both conditions. In the ideal linearity condition, the intercept and slope changed insignificantly, but a dramatic change was observed for the non-ideal condition and linearity intercept. Under both linearity conditions, LOD and LOQ values after the robust regression line fitting of data were lower than those obtained before data treatment. The results obtained after statistical treatment indicated that the linearity ranges for drug determination could be expanded to lower limits of quantitation by enhancing the regression equation parameters after data treatment. Analysis results for lipoic acid in capsules, using both fluorimetric methods, treated by parametric OLS and after treatment by robust LMS and IRLS were compared for both linearity conditions. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Regression of non-linear coupling of noise in LIGO detectors

    Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Billman, C.; Effler, A.; Klimenko, S.; Cheng, H.-P.

    2018-03-01

    In 2015, after their upgrade, the advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors started acquiring data. The effort to improve their sensitivity has never stopped since then. The goal to achieve design sensitivity is challenging. Environmental and instrumental noise couple to the detector output with different, linear and non-linear, coupling mechanisms. The noise regression method we use is based on the Wiener–Kolmogorov filter, which uses witness channels to make noise predictions. We present here how this method helped to determine complex non-linear noise couplings in the output mode cleaner and in the mirror suspension system of the LIGO detector.

  12. pKa prediction for acidic phosphorus-containing compounds using multiple linear regression with computational descriptors.

    Yu, Donghai; Du, Ruobing; Xiao, Ji-Chang

    2016-07-05

    Ninety-six acidic phosphorus-containing molecules with pKa 1.88 to 6.26 were collected and divided into training and test sets by random sampling. Structural parameters were obtained by density functional theory calculation of the molecules. The relationship between the experimental pKa values and structural parameters was obtained by multiple linear regression fitting for the training set, and tested with the test set; the R(2) values were 0.974 and 0.966 for the training and test sets, respectively. This regression equation, which quantitatively describes the influence of structural parameters on pKa , and can be used to predict pKa values of similar structures, is significant for the design of new acidic phosphorus-containing extractants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A Simple and Convenient Method of Multiple Linear Regression to Calculate Iodine Molecular Constants

    Cooper, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure using a student-friendly least-squares multiple linear-regression technique utilizing a function within Microsoft Excel is described that enables students to calculate molecular constants from the vibronic spectrum of iodine. This method is advantageous pedagogically as it calculates molecular constants for ground and excited…

  14. Analysis of interactive fixed effects dynamic linear panel regression with measurement error

    Nayoung Lee; Hyungsik Roger Moon; Martin Weidner

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies a simple dynamic panel linear regression model with interactive fixed effects in which the variable of interest is measured with error. To estimate the dynamic coefficient, we consider the least-squares minimum distance (LS-MD) estimation method.

  15. An Introduction to Graphical and Mathematical Methods for Detecting Heteroscedasticity in Linear Regression.

    Thompson, Russel L.

    Homoscedasticity is an important assumption of linear regression. This paper explains what it is and why it is important to the researcher. Graphical and mathematical methods for testing the homoscedasticity assumption are demonstrated. Sources of homoscedasticity and types of homoscedasticity are discussed, and methods for correction are…

  16. INTRODUCTION TO A COMBINED MULTIPLE LINEAR REGRESSION AND ARMA MODELING APPROACH FOR BEACH BACTERIA PREDICTION

    Due to the complexity of the processes contributing to beach bacteria concentrations, many researchers rely on statistical modeling, among which multiple linear regression (MLR) modeling is most widely used. Despite its ease of use and interpretation, there may be time dependence...

  17. Application of range-test in multiple linear regression analysis in ...

    Application of range-test in multiple linear regression analysis in the presence of outliers is studied in this paper. First, the plot of the explanatory variables (i.e. Administration, Social/Commercial, Economic services and Transfer) on the dependent variable (i.e. GDP) was done to identify the statistical trend over the years.

  18. [Prediction model of health workforce and beds in county hospitals of Hunan by multiple linear regression].

    Ling, Ru; Liu, Jiawang

    2011-12-01

    To construct prediction model for health workforce and hospital beds in county hospitals of Hunan by multiple linear regression. We surveyed 16 counties in Hunan with stratified random sampling according to uniform questionnaires,and multiple linear regression analysis with 20 quotas selected by literature view was done. Independent variables in the multiple linear regression model on medical personnels in county hospitals included the counties' urban residents' income, crude death rate, medical beds, business occupancy, professional equipment value, the number of devices valued above 10 000 yuan, fixed assets, long-term debt, medical income, medical expenses, outpatient and emergency visits, hospital visits, actual available bed days, and utilization rate of hospital beds. Independent variables in the multiple linear regression model on county hospital beds included the the population of aged 65 and above in the counties, disposable income of urban residents, medical personnel of medical institutions in county area, business occupancy, the total value of professional equipment, fixed assets, long-term debt, medical income, medical expenses, outpatient and emergency visits, hospital visits, actual available bed days, utilization rate of hospital beds, and length of hospitalization. The prediction model shows good explanatory and fitting, and may be used for short- and mid-term forecasting.

  19. Calculation of U, Ra, Th and K contents in uranium ore by multiple linear regression method

    Lin Chao; Chen Yingqiang; Zhang Qingwen; Tan Fuwen; Peng Guanghui

    1991-01-01

    A multiple linear regression method was used to compute γ spectra of uranium ore samples and to calculate contents of U, Ra, Th, and K. In comparison with the inverse matrix method, its advantage is that no standard samples of pure U, Ra, Th and K are needed for obtaining response coefficients

  20. Bayesian linear regression : different conjugate models and their (in)sensitivity to prior-data conflict

    Walter, G.M.; Augustin, Th.; Kneib, Thomas; Tutz, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    The paper is concerned with Bayesian analysis under prior-data conflict, i.e. the situation when observed data are rather unexpected under the prior (and the sample size is not large enough to eliminate the influence of the prior). Two approaches for Bayesian linear regression modeling based on

  1. A unified framework for testing in the linear regression model under unknown order of fractional integration

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Kruse, Robinson; Sibbertsen, Philipp

    We consider hypothesis testing in a general linear time series regression framework when the possibly fractional order of integration of the error term is unknown. We show that the approach suggested by Vogelsang (1998a) for the case of integer integration does not apply to the case of fractional...

  2. Power properties of invariant tests for spatial autocorrelation in linear regression

    Martellosio, F.

    2006-01-01

    Many popular tests for residual spatial autocorrelation in the context of the linear regression model belong to the class of invariant tests. This paper derives a number of exact properties of the power function of such tests. In particular, we extend the work of Krämer (2005, Journal of Statistical

  3. Linear homotopy solution of nonlinear systems of equations in geodesy

    Paláncz, Béla; Awange, Joseph L.; Zaletnyik, Piroska; Lewis, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental task in geodesy is solving systems of equations. Many geodetic problems are represented as systems of multivariate polynomials. A common problem in solving such systems is improper initial starting values for iterative methods, leading to convergence to solutions with no physical meaning, or to convergence that requires global methods. Though symbolic methods such as Groebner bases or resultants have been shown to be very efficient, i.e., providing solutions for determined systems such as 3-point problem of 3D affine transformation, the symbolic algebra can be very time consuming, even with special Computer Algebra Systems (CAS). This study proposes the Linear Homotopy method that can be implemented easily in high-level computer languages like C++ and Fortran that are faster than CAS by at least two orders of magnitude. Using Mathematica, the power of Homotopy is demonstrated in solving three nonlinear geodetic problems: resection, GPS positioning, and affine transformation. The method enlarging the domain of convergence is found to be efficient, less sensitive to rounding of numbers, and has lower complexity compared to other local methods like Newton-Raphson.

  4. Comparison of ν-support vector regression and logistic equation for ...

    Due to the complexity and high non-linearity of bioprocess, most simple mathematical models fail to describe the exact behavior of biochemistry systems. As a novel type of learning method, support vector regression (SVR) owns the powerful capability to characterize problems via small sample, nonlinearity, high dimension ...

  5. Estimate the contribution of incubation parameters influence egg hatchability using multiple linear regression analysis.

    Khalil, Mohamed H; Shebl, Mostafa K; Kosba, Mohamed A; El-Sabrout, Karim; Zaki, Nesma

    2016-08-01

    This research was conducted to determine the most affecting parameters on hatchability of indigenous and improved local chickens' eggs. Five parameters were studied (fertility, early and late embryonic mortalities, shape index, egg weight, and egg weight loss) on four strains, namely Fayoumi, Alexandria, Matrouh, and Montazah. Multiple linear regression was performed on the studied parameters to determine the most influencing one on hatchability. The results showed significant differences in commercial and scientific hatchability among strains. Alexandria strain has the highest significant commercial hatchability (80.70%). Regarding the studied strains, highly significant differences in hatching chick weight among strains were observed. Using multiple linear regression analysis, fertility made the greatest percent contribution (71.31%) to hatchability, and the lowest percent contributions were made by shape index and egg weight loss. A prediction of hatchability using multiple regression analysis could be a good tool to improve hatchability percentage in chickens.

  6. truncSP: An R Package for Estimation of Semi-Parametric Truncated Linear Regression Models

    Maria Karlsson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Problems with truncated data occur in many areas, complicating estimation and inference. Regarding linear regression models, the ordinary least squares estimator is inconsistent and biased for these types of data and is therefore unsuitable for use. Alternative estimators, designed for the estimation of truncated regression models, have been developed. This paper presents the R package truncSP. The package contains functions for the estimation of semi-parametric truncated linear regression models using three different estimators: the symmetrically trimmed least squares, quadratic mode, and left truncated estimators, all of which have been shown to have good asymptotic and ?nite sample properties. The package also provides functions for the analysis of the estimated models. Data from the environmental sciences are used to illustrate the functions in the package.

  7. Genomic prediction based on data from three layer lines using non-linear regression models.

    Huang, Heyun; Windig, Jack J; Vereijken, Addie; Calus, Mario P L

    2014-11-06

    Most studies on genomic prediction with reference populations that include multiple lines or breeds have used linear models. Data heterogeneity due to using multiple populations may conflict with model assumptions used in linear regression methods. In an attempt to alleviate potential discrepancies between assumptions of linear models and multi-population data, two types of alternative models were used: (1) a multi-trait genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP) model that modelled trait by line combinations as separate but correlated traits and (2) non-linear models based on kernel learning. These models were compared to conventional linear models for genomic prediction for two lines of brown layer hens (B1 and B2) and one line of white hens (W1). The three lines each had 1004 to 1023 training and 238 to 240 validation animals. Prediction accuracy was evaluated by estimating the correlation between observed phenotypes and predicted breeding values. When the training dataset included only data from the evaluated line, non-linear models yielded at best a similar accuracy as linear models. In some cases, when adding a distantly related line, the linear models showed a slight decrease in performance, while non-linear models generally showed no change in accuracy. When only information from a closely related line was used for training, linear models and non-linear radial basis function (RBF) kernel models performed similarly. The multi-trait GBLUP model took advantage of the estimated genetic correlations between the lines. Combining linear and non-linear models improved the accuracy of multi-line genomic prediction. Linear models and non-linear RBF models performed very similarly for genomic prediction, despite the expectation that non-linear models could deal better with the heterogeneous multi-population data. This heterogeneity of the data can be overcome by modelling trait by line combinations as separate but correlated traits, which avoids the occasional

  8. Single image super-resolution using locally adaptive multiple linear regression.

    Yu, Soohwan; Kang, Wonseok; Ko, Seungyong; Paik, Joonki

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a regularized superresolution (SR) reconstruction method using locally adaptive multiple linear regression to overcome the limitation of spatial resolution of digital images. In order to make the SR problem better-posed, the proposed method incorporates the locally adaptive multiple linear regression into the regularization process as a local prior. The local regularization prior assumes that the target high-resolution (HR) pixel is generated by a linear combination of similar pixels in differently scaled patches and optimum weight parameters. In addition, we adapt a modified version of the nonlocal means filter as a smoothness prior to utilize the patch redundancy. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm better restores HR images than existing state-of-the-art methods in the sense of the most objective measures in the literature.

  9. Predicting recovery of cognitive function soon after stroke: differential modeling of logarithmic and linear regression.

    Suzuki, Makoto; Sugimura, Yuko; Yamada, Sumio; Omori, Yoshitsugu; Miyamoto, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Jun-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive disorders in the acute stage of stroke are common and are important independent predictors of adverse outcome in the long term. Despite the impact of cognitive disorders on both patients and their families, it is still difficult to predict the extent or duration of cognitive impairments. The objective of the present study was, therefore, to provide data on predicting the recovery of cognitive function soon after stroke by differential modeling with logarithmic and linear regression. This study included two rounds of data collection comprising 57 stroke patients enrolled in the first round for the purpose of identifying the time course of cognitive recovery in the early-phase group data, and 43 stroke patients in the second round for the purpose of ensuring that the correlation of the early-phase group data applied to the prediction of each individual's degree of cognitive recovery. In the first round, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores were assessed 3 times during hospitalization, and the scores were regressed on the logarithm and linear of time. In the second round, calculations of MMSE scores were made for the first two scoring times after admission to tailor the structures of logarithmic and linear regression formulae to fit an individual's degree of functional recovery. The time course of early-phase recovery for cognitive functions resembled both logarithmic and linear functions. However, MMSE scores sampled at two baseline points based on logarithmic regression modeling could estimate prediction of cognitive recovery more accurately than could linear regression modeling (logarithmic modeling, R(2) = 0.676, PLogarithmic modeling based on MMSE scores could accurately predict the recovery of cognitive function soon after the occurrence of stroke. This logarithmic modeling with mathematical procedures is simple enough to be adopted in daily clinical practice.

  10. Linear regression metamodeling as a tool to summarize and present simulation model results.

    Jalal, Hawre; Dowd, Bryan; Sainfort, François; Kuntz, Karen M

    2013-10-01

    Modelers lack a tool to systematically and clearly present complex model results, including those from sensitivity analyses. The objective was to propose linear regression metamodeling as a tool to increase transparency of decision analytic models and better communicate their results. We used a simplified cancer cure model to demonstrate our approach. The model computed the lifetime cost and benefit of 3 treatment options for cancer patients. We simulated 10,000 cohorts in a probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) and regressed the model outcomes on the standardized input parameter values in a set of regression analyses. We used the regression coefficients to describe measures of sensitivity analyses, including threshold and parameter sensitivity analyses. We also compared the results of the PSA to deterministic full-factorial and one-factor-at-a-time designs. The regression intercept represented the estimated base-case outcome, and the other coefficients described the relative parameter uncertainty in the model. We defined simple relationships that compute the average and incremental net benefit of each intervention. Metamodeling produced outputs similar to traditional deterministic 1-way or 2-way sensitivity analyses but was more reliable since it used all parameter values. Linear regression metamodeling is a simple, yet powerful, tool that can assist modelers in communicating model characteristics and sensitivity analyses.

  11. A Cross-Domain Collaborative Filtering Algorithm Based on Feature Construction and Locally Weighted Linear Regression.

    Yu, Xu; Lin, Jun-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Du, Jun-Wei; Han, Ji-Zhong

    2018-01-01

    Cross-domain collaborative filtering (CDCF) solves the sparsity problem by transferring rating knowledge from auxiliary domains. Obviously, different auxiliary domains have different importance to the target domain. However, previous works cannot evaluate effectively the significance of different auxiliary domains. To overcome this drawback, we propose a cross-domain collaborative filtering algorithm based on Feature Construction and Locally Weighted Linear Regression (FCLWLR). We first construct features in different domains and use these features to represent different auxiliary domains. Thus the weight computation across different domains can be converted as the weight computation across different features. Then we combine the features in the target domain and in the auxiliary domains together and convert the cross-domain recommendation problem into a regression problem. Finally, we employ a Locally Weighted Linear Regression (LWLR) model to solve the regression problem. As LWLR is a nonparametric regression method, it can effectively avoid underfitting or overfitting problem occurring in parametric regression methods. We conduct extensive experiments to show that the proposed FCLWLR algorithm is effective in addressing the data sparsity problem by transferring the useful knowledge from the auxiliary domains, as compared to many state-of-the-art single-domain or cross-domain CF methods.

  12. A Cross-Domain Collaborative Filtering Algorithm Based on Feature Construction and Locally Weighted Linear Regression

    Xu Yu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cross-domain collaborative filtering (CDCF solves the sparsity problem by transferring rating knowledge from auxiliary domains. Obviously, different auxiliary domains have different importance to the target domain. However, previous works cannot evaluate effectively the significance of different auxiliary domains. To overcome this drawback, we propose a cross-domain collaborative filtering algorithm based on Feature Construction and Locally Weighted Linear Regression (FCLWLR. We first construct features in different domains and use these features to represent different auxiliary domains. Thus the weight computation across different domains can be converted as the weight computation across different features. Then we combine the features in the target domain and in the auxiliary domains together and convert the cross-domain recommendation problem into a regression problem. Finally, we employ a Locally Weighted Linear Regression (LWLR model to solve the regression problem. As LWLR is a nonparametric regression method, it can effectively avoid underfitting or overfitting problem occurring in parametric regression methods. We conduct extensive experiments to show that the proposed FCLWLR algorithm is effective in addressing the data sparsity problem by transferring the useful knowledge from the auxiliary domains, as compared to many state-of-the-art single-domain or cross-domain CF methods.

  13. Improving sub-pixel imperviousness change prediction by ensembling heterogeneous non-linear regression models

    Drzewiecki, Wojciech

    2016-12-01

    In this work nine non-linear regression models were compared for sub-pixel impervious surface area mapping from Landsat images. The comparison was done in three study areas both for accuracy of imperviousness coverage evaluation in individual points in time and accuracy of imperviousness change assessment. The performance of individual machine learning algorithms (Cubist, Random Forest, stochastic gradient boosting of regression trees, k-nearest neighbors regression, random k-nearest neighbors regression, Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines, averaged neural networks, and support vector machines with polynomial and radial kernels) was also compared with the performance of heterogeneous model ensembles constructed from the best models trained using particular techniques. The results proved that in case of sub-pixel evaluation the most accurate prediction of change may not necessarily be based on the most accurate individual assessments. When single methods are considered, based on obtained results Cubist algorithm may be advised for Landsat based mapping of imperviousness for single dates. However, Random Forest may be endorsed when the most reliable evaluation of imperviousness change is the primary goal. It gave lower accuracies for individual assessments, but better prediction of change due to more correlated errors of individual predictions. Heterogeneous model ensembles performed for individual time points assessments at least as well as the best individual models. In case of imperviousness change assessment the ensembles always outperformed single model approaches. It means that it is possible to improve the accuracy of sub-pixel imperviousness change assessment using ensembles of heterogeneous non-linear regression models.

  14. Analysis of dental caries using generalized linear and count regression models

    Javali M. Phil

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Generalized linear models (GLM are generalization of linear regression models, which allow fitting regression models to response data in all the sciences especially medical and dental sciences that follow a general exponential family. These are flexible and widely used class of such models that can accommodate response variables. Count data are frequently characterized by overdispersion and excess zeros. Zero-inflated count models provide a parsimonious yet powerful way to model this type of situation. Such models assume that the data are a mixture of two separate data generation processes: one generates only zeros, and the other is either a Poisson or a negative binomial data-generating process. Zero inflated count regression models such as the zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP, zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB regression models have been used to handle dental caries count data with many zeros. We present an evaluation framework to the suitability of applying the GLM, Poisson, NB, ZIP and ZINB to dental caries data set where the count data may exhibit evidence of many zeros and over-dispersion. Estimation of the model parameters using the method of maximum likelihood is provided. Based on the Vuong test statistic and the goodness of fit measure for dental caries data, the NB and ZINB regression models perform better than other count regression models.

  15. On the Liouvillian solution of second-order linear differential equations and algebraic invariant curves

    Man, Yiu-Kwong

    2010-01-01

    In this communication, we present a method for computing the Liouvillian solution of second-order linear differential equations via algebraic invariant curves. The main idea is to integrate Kovacic's results on second-order linear differential equations with the Prelle-Singer method for computing first integrals of differential equations. Some examples on using this approach are provided. (fast track communication)

  16. Reduced-order modelling of parameter-dependent, linear and nonlinear dynamic partial differential equation models.

    Shah, A A; Xing, W W; Triantafyllidis, V

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we develop reduced-order models for dynamic, parameter-dependent, linear and nonlinear partial differential equations using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). The main challenges are to accurately and efficiently approximate the POD bases for new parameter values and, in the case of nonlinear problems, to efficiently handle the nonlinear terms. We use a Bayesian nonlinear regression approach to learn the snapshots of the solutions and the nonlinearities for new parameter values. Computational efficiency is ensured by using manifold learning to perform the emulation in a low-dimensional space. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated on a linear and a nonlinear example, with comparisons with a global basis approach.

  17. Comparison of some biased estimation methods (including ordinary subset regression) in the linear model

    Sidik, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    Ridge, Marquardt's generalized inverse, shrunken, and principal components estimators are discussed in terms of the objectives of point estimation of parameters, estimation of the predictive regression function, and hypothesis testing. It is found that as the normal equations approach singularity, more consideration must be given to estimable functions of the parameters as opposed to estimation of the full parameter vector; that biased estimators all introduce constraints on the parameter space; that adoption of mean squared error as a criterion of goodness should be independent of the degree of singularity; and that ordinary least-squares subset regression is the best overall method.

  18. Evaluation of linear regression techniques for atmospheric applications: the importance of appropriate weighting

    C. Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Linear regression techniques are widely used in atmospheric science, but they are often improperly applied due to lack of consideration or inappropriate handling of measurement uncertainty. In this work, numerical experiments are performed to evaluate the performance of five linear regression techniques, significantly extending previous works by Chu and Saylor. The five techniques are ordinary least squares (OLS, Deming regression (DR, orthogonal distance regression (ODR, weighted ODR (WODR, and York regression (YR. We first introduce a new data generation scheme that employs the Mersenne twister (MT pseudorandom number generator. The numerical simulations are also improved by (a refining the parameterization of nonlinear measurement uncertainties, (b inclusion of a linear measurement uncertainty, and (c inclusion of WODR for comparison. Results show that DR, WODR and YR produce an accurate slope, but the intercept by WODR and YR is overestimated and the degree of bias is more pronounced with a low R2 XY dataset. The importance of a properly weighting parameter λ in DR is investigated by sensitivity tests, and it is found that an improper λ in DR can lead to a bias in both the slope and intercept estimation. Because the λ calculation depends on the actual form of the measurement error, it is essential to determine the exact form of measurement error in the XY data during the measurement stage. If a priori error in one of the variables is unknown, or the measurement error described cannot be trusted, DR, WODR and YR can provide the least biases in slope and intercept among all tested regression techniques. For these reasons, DR, WODR and YR are recommended for atmospheric studies when both X and Y data have measurement errors. An Igor Pro-based program (Scatter Plot was developed to facilitate the implementation of error-in-variables regressions.

  19. Evaluation of linear regression techniques for atmospheric applications: the importance of appropriate weighting

    Wu, Cheng; Zhen Yu, Jian

    2018-03-01

    Linear regression techniques are widely used in atmospheric science, but they are often improperly applied due to lack of consideration or inappropriate handling of measurement uncertainty. In this work, numerical experiments are performed to evaluate the performance of five linear regression techniques, significantly extending previous works by Chu and Saylor. The five techniques are ordinary least squares (OLS), Deming regression (DR), orthogonal distance regression (ODR), weighted ODR (WODR), and York regression (YR). We first introduce a new data generation scheme that employs the Mersenne twister (MT) pseudorandom number generator. The numerical simulations are also improved by (a) refining the parameterization of nonlinear measurement uncertainties, (b) inclusion of a linear measurement uncertainty, and (c) inclusion of WODR for comparison. Results show that DR, WODR and YR produce an accurate slope, but the intercept by WODR and YR is overestimated and the degree of bias is more pronounced with a low R2 XY dataset. The importance of a properly weighting parameter λ in DR is investigated by sensitivity tests, and it is found that an improper λ in DR can lead to a bias in both the slope and intercept estimation. Because the λ calculation depends on the actual form of the measurement error, it is essential to determine the exact form of measurement error in the XY data during the measurement stage. If a priori error in one of the variables is unknown, or the measurement error described cannot be trusted, DR, WODR and YR can provide the least biases in slope and intercept among all tested regression techniques. For these reasons, DR, WODR and YR are recommended for atmospheric studies when both X and Y data have measurement errors. An Igor Pro-based program (Scatter Plot) was developed to facilitate the implementation of error-in-variables regressions.

  20. Linear Multivariable Regression Models for Prediction of Eddy Dissipation Rate from Available Meteorological Data

    MCKissick, Burnell T. (Technical Monitor); Plassman, Gerald E.; Mall, Gerald H.; Quagliano, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Linear multivariable regression models for predicting day and night Eddy Dissipation Rate (EDR) from available meteorological data sources are defined and validated. Model definition is based on a combination of 1997-2000 Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) data sources, EDR from Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) deployment data, and regression variables primarily from corresponding Automated Surface Observation System (ASOS) data. Model validation is accomplished through EDR predictions on a similar combination of 1994-1995 Memphis (MEM) AVOSS and ASOS data. Model forms include an intercept plus a single term of fixed optimal power for each of these regression variables; 30-minute forward averaged mean and variance of near-surface wind speed and temperature, variance of wind direction, and a discrete cloud cover metric. Distinct day and night models, regressing on EDR and the natural log of EDR respectively, yield best performance and avoid model discontinuity over day/night data boundaries.

  1. Modeling the kinetics of essential oil hydrodistillation from juniper berries (Juniperus communis L. using non-linear regression

    Radosavljević Dragana B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents kinetics modeling of essential oil hydrodistillation from juniper berries (Juniperus communis L. by using a non-linear regression methodology. The proposed model has the polynomial-logarithmic form. The initial equation of the proposed non-linear model is q = q∞•(a•(logt2 + b•logt + c and by substituting a1=q∞•a, b1 = q∞•b and c1 = q∞•c, the final equation is obtained as q = a1•(logt2 + b1•logt + c1. In this equation q is the quantity of the obtained oil at time t, while a1, b1 and c1 are parameters to be determined for each sample. From the final equation it can be seen that the key parameter q∞, which presents the maximal oil quantity obtained after infinite time, is already included in parameters a1, b1 and c1. In this way, experimental determination of this parameter is avoided. Using the proposed model with parameters obtained by regression, the values of oil hydrodistillation in time are calculated for each sample and compared to the experimental values. In addition, two kinetic models previously proposed in literature were applied to the same experimental results. The developed model provided better agreements with the experimental values than the two, generally accepted kinetic models of this process. The average values of error measures (RSS, RSE, AIC and MRPD obtained for our model (0.005; 0.017; –84.33; 1.65 were generally lower than the corresponding values of the other two models (0.025; 0.041; –53.20; 3.89 and (0.0035; 0.015; –86.83; 1.59. Also, parameter estimation for the proposed model was significantly simpler (maximum 2 iterations per sample using the non-linear regression than that for the existing models (maximum 9 iterations per sample. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. TR-35026

  2. Equations of motion for a (non-linear) scalar field model as derived from the field equations

    Kaniel, S.; Itin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of derivation of the equations of motion from the field equations is considered. Einstein's field equations have a specific analytical form: They are linear in the second order derivatives and quadratic in the first order derivatives of the field variables. We utilize this particular form and propose a novel algorithm for the derivation of the equations of motion from the field equations. It is based on the condition of the balance between the singular terms of the field equation. We apply the algorithm to a non-linear Lorentz invariant scalar field model. We show that it results in the Newton law of attraction between the singularities of the field moved on approximately geodesic curves. The algorithm is applicable to the N-body problem of the Lorentz invariant field equations. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. A method for fitting regression splines with varying polynomial order in the linear mixed model.

    Edwards, Lloyd J; Stewart, Paul W; MacDougall, James E; Helms, Ronald W

    2006-02-15

    The linear mixed model has become a widely used tool for longitudinal analysis of continuous variables. The use of regression splines in these models offers the analyst additional flexibility in the formulation of descriptive analyses, exploratory analyses and hypothesis-driven confirmatory analyses. We propose a method for fitting piecewise polynomial regression splines with varying polynomial order in the fixed effects and/or random effects of the linear mixed model. The polynomial segments are explicitly constrained by side conditions for continuity and some smoothness at the points where they join. By using a reparameterization of this explicitly constrained linear mixed model, an implicitly constrained linear mixed model is constructed that simplifies implementation of fixed-knot regression splines. The proposed approach is relatively simple, handles splines in one variable or multiple variables, and can be easily programmed using existing commercial software such as SAS or S-plus. The method is illustrated using two examples: an analysis of longitudinal viral load data from a study of subjects with acute HIV-1 infection and an analysis of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure profiles.

  4. Variations in the Solution of Linear First-Order Differential Equations. Classroom Notes

    Seaman, Brian; Osler, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    A special project which can be given to students of ordinary differential equations is described in detail. Students create new differential equations by changing the dependent variable in the familiar linear first-order equation (dv/dx)+p(x)v=q(x) by means of a substitution v=f(y). The student then creates a table of the new equations and…

  5. Estimation of monthly solar exposure on horizontal surface by Angstrom-type regression equation

    Ravanshid, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    To obtain solar flux intensity, solar radiation measuring instruments are the best. In the absence of instrumental data there are other meteorological measurements which are related to solar energy and also it is possible to use empirical relationships to estimate solar flux intensit. One of these empirical relationships to estimate monthly averages of total solar radiation on a horizontal surface is the modified angstrom-type regression equation which has been employed in this report in order to estimate the solar flux intensity on a horizontal surface for Tehran. By comparing the results of this equation with four years measured valued by Tehran's meteorological weather station the values of meteorological constants (a,b) in the equation were obtained for Tehran. (author)

  6. Linear regression analysis: part 14 of a series on evaluation of scientific publications.

    Schneider, Astrid; Hommel, Gerhard; Blettner, Maria

    2010-11-01

    Regression analysis is an important statistical method for the analysis of medical data. It enables the identification and characterization of relationships among multiple factors. It also enables the identification of prognostically relevant risk factors and the calculation of risk scores for individual prognostication. This article is based on selected textbooks of statistics, a selective review of the literature, and our own experience. After a brief introduction of the uni- and multivariable regression models, illustrative examples are given to explain what the important considerations are before a regression analysis is performed, and how the results should be interpreted. The reader should then be able to judge whether the method has been used correctly and interpret the results appropriately. The performance and interpretation of linear regression analysis are subject to a variety of pitfalls, which are discussed here in detail. The reader is made aware of common errors of interpretation through practical examples. Both the opportunities for applying linear regression analysis and its limitations are presented.

  7. On a Linear Equation Arising in Isometric Embedding of Torus-like Surface

    Chunhe LI

    2009-01-01

    The solvability of a linear equation and the regularity of the solution are discussed.The equation is arising in a geometric problem which is concerned with the realization of Alexandroff's positive annul in R3.

  8. Contact symmetries of general linear second-order ordinary differential equations: letter to the editor

    Martini, Ruud; Kersten, P.H.M.

    1983-01-01

    Using 1-1 mappings, the complete symmetry groups of contact transformations of general linear second-order ordinary differential equations are determined from two independent solutions of those equations, and applied to the harmonic oscillator with and without damping.

  9. Some Additional Remarks on the Cumulant Expansion for Linear Stochastic Differential Equations

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.

    1984-01-01

    We summarize our previous results on cumulant expansions for linear stochastic differential equations with correlated multipliclative and additive noise. The application of the general formulas to equations with statistically independent multiplicative and additive noise is reconsidered in detail,

  10. Some additional remarks on the cumulant expansion for linear stochastic differential equations

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.

    1984-01-01

    We summarize our previous results on cumular expasions for linear stochastic differential equations with correlated multipliclative and additive noise. The application of the general formulas to equations with statistically independent multiplicative and additive noise is reconsidered in detail,

  11. Linear Regression on Sparse Features for Single-Channel Speech Separation

    Schmidt, Mikkel N.; Olsson, Rasmus Kongsgaard

    2007-01-01

    In this work we address the problem of separating multiple speakers from a single microphone recording. We formulate a linear regression model for estimating each speaker based on features derived from the mixture. The employed feature representation is a sparse, non-negative encoding of the speech...... mixture in terms of pre-learned speaker-dependent dictionaries. Previous work has shown that this feature representation by itself provides some degree of separation. We show that the performance is significantly improved when regression analysis is performed on the sparse, non-negative features, both...

  12. Linear regression based on Minimum Covariance Determinant (MCD) and TELBS methods on the productivity of phytoplankton

    Gusriani, N.; Firdaniza

    2018-03-01

    The existence of outliers on multiple linear regression analysis causes the Gaussian assumption to be unfulfilled. If the Least Square method is forcedly used on these data, it will produce a model that cannot represent most data. For that, we need a robust regression method against outliers. This paper will compare the Minimum Covariance Determinant (MCD) method and the TELBS method on secondary data on the productivity of phytoplankton, which contains outliers. Based on the robust determinant coefficient value, MCD method produces a better model compared to TELBS method.

  13. Prediction of Mind-Wandering with Electroencephalogram and Non-linear Regression Modeling.

    Kawashima, Issaku; Kumano, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Mind-wandering (MW), task-unrelated thought, has been examined by researchers in an increasing number of articles using models to predict whether subjects are in MW, using numerous physiological variables. However, these models are not applicable in general situations. Moreover, they output only binary classification. The current study suggests that the combination of electroencephalogram (EEG) variables and non-linear regression modeling can be a good indicator of MW intensity. We recorded EEGs of 50 subjects during the performance of a Sustained Attention to Response Task, including a thought sampling probe that inquired the focus of attention. We calculated the power and coherence value and prepared 35 patterns of variable combinations and applied Support Vector machine Regression (SVR) to them. Finally, we chose four SVR models: two of them non-linear models and the others linear models; two of the four models are composed of a limited number of electrodes to satisfy model usefulness. Examination using the held-out data indicated that all models had robust predictive precision and provided significantly better estimations than a linear regression model using single electrode EEG variables. Furthermore, in limited electrode condition, non-linear SVR model showed significantly better precision than linear SVR model. The method proposed in this study helps investigations into MW in various little-examined situations. Further, by measuring MW with a high temporal resolution EEG, unclear aspects of MW, such as time series variation, are expected to be revealed. Furthermore, our suggestion that a few electrodes can also predict MW contributes to the development of neuro-feedback studies.

  14. Prediction of Mind-Wandering with Electroencephalogram and Non-linear Regression Modeling

    Issaku Kawashima

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mind-wandering (MW, task-unrelated thought, has been examined by researchers in an increasing number of articles using models to predict whether subjects are in MW, using numerous physiological variables. However, these models are not applicable in general situations. Moreover, they output only binary classification. The current study suggests that the combination of electroencephalogram (EEG variables and non-linear regression modeling can be a good indicator of MW intensity. We recorded EEGs of 50 subjects during the performance of a Sustained Attention to Response Task, including a thought sampling probe that inquired the focus of attention. We calculated the power and coherence value and prepared 35 patterns of variable combinations and applied Support Vector machine Regression (SVR to them. Finally, we chose four SVR models: two of them non-linear models and the others linear models; two of the four models are composed of a limited number of electrodes to satisfy model usefulness. Examination using the held-out data indicated that all models had robust predictive precision and provided significantly better estimations than a linear regression model using single electrode EEG variables. Furthermore, in limited electrode condition, non-linear SVR model showed significantly better precision than linear SVR model. The method proposed in this study helps investigations into MW in various little-examined situations. Further, by measuring MW with a high temporal resolution EEG, unclear aspects of MW, such as time series variation, are expected to be revealed. Furthermore, our suggestion that a few electrodes can also predict MW contributes to the development of neuro-feedback studies.

  15. Solution of systems of linear algebraic equations by the method of summation of divergent series

    Kirichenko, G.A.; Korovin, Ya.S.; Khisamutdinov, M.V.; Shmojlov, V.I.

    2015-01-01

    A method for solving systems of linear algebraic equations has been proposed on the basis on the summation of the corresponding continued fractions. The proposed algorithm for solving systems of linear algebraic equations is classified as direct algorithms providing an exact solution in a finite number of operations. Examples of solving systems of linear algebraic equations have been presented and the effectiveness of the algorithm has been estimated [ru

  16. Numerical method for solving linear Fredholm fuzzy integral equations of the second kind

    Abbasbandy, S. [Department of Mathematics, Imam Khomeini International University, P.O. Box 288, Ghazvin 34194 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: saeid@abbasbandy.com; Babolian, E. [Faculty of Mathematical Sciences and Computer Engineering, Teacher Training University, Tehran 15618 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alavi, M. [Department of Mathematics, Arak Branch, Islamic Azad University, Arak 38135 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    In this paper we use parametric form of fuzzy number and convert a linear fuzzy Fredholm integral equation to two linear system of integral equation of the second kind in crisp case. We can use one of the numerical method such as Nystrom and find the approximation solution of the system and hence obtain an approximation for fuzzy solution of the linear fuzzy Fredholm integral equations of the second kind. The proposed method is illustrated by solving some numerical examples.

  17. Error analysis of dimensionless scaling experiments with multiple points using linear regression

    Guercan, Oe.D.; Vermare, L.; Hennequin, P.; Bourdelle, C.

    2010-01-01

    A general method of error estimation in the case of multiple point dimensionless scaling experiments, using linear regression and standard error propagation, is proposed. The method reduces to the previous result of Cordey (2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 052001) in the case of a two-point scan. On the other hand, if the points follow a linear trend, it explains how the estimated error decreases as more points are added to the scan. Based on the analytical expression that is derived, it is argued that for a low number of points, adding points to the ends of the scanned range, rather than the middle, results in a smaller error estimate. (letter)

  18. Technological pedagogical content knowledge of junior high school mathematics teachers in teaching linear equation

    Wati, S.; Fitriana, L.; Mardiyana

    2018-04-01

    Linear equation is one of the topics in mathematics that are considered difficult. Student difficulties of understanding linear equation can be caused by lack of understanding this concept and the way of teachers teach. TPACK is a way to understand the complex relationships between teaching and content taught through the use of specific teaching approaches and supported by the right technology tools. This study aims to identify TPACK of junior high school mathematics teachers in teaching linear equation. The method used in the study was descriptive. In the first phase, a survey using a questionnaire was carried out on 45 junior high school mathematics teachers in teaching linear equation. While in the second phase, the interview involved three teachers. The analysis of data used were quantitative and qualitative technique. The result PCK revealed teachers emphasized developing procedural and conceptual knowledge through reliance on traditional in teaching linear equation. The result of TPK revealed teachers’ lower capacity to deal with the general information and communications technologies goals across the curriculum in teaching linear equation. The result indicated that PowerPoint constitutes TCK modal technological capability in teaching linear equation. The result of TPACK seems to suggest a low standard in teachers’ technological skills across a variety of mathematics education goals in teaching linear equation. This means that the ability of teachers’ TPACK in teaching linear equation still needs to be improved.

  19. Dynamic Optimization for IPS2 Resource Allocation Based on Improved Fuzzy Multiple Linear Regression

    Maokuan Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study mainly focuses on resource allocation optimization for industrial product-service systems (IPS2. The development of IPS2 leads to sustainable economy by introducing cooperative mechanisms apart from commodity transaction. The randomness and fluctuation of service requests from customers lead to the volatility of IPS2 resource utilization ratio. Three basic rules for resource allocation optimization are put forward to improve system operation efficiency and cut unnecessary costs. An approach based on fuzzy multiple linear regression (FMLR is developed, which integrates the strength and concision of multiple linear regression in data fitting and factor analysis and the merit of fuzzy theory in dealing with uncertain or vague problems, which helps reduce those costs caused by unnecessary resource transfer. The iteration mechanism is introduced in the FMLR algorithm to improve forecasting accuracy. A case study of human resource allocation optimization in construction machinery industry is implemented to test and verify the proposed model.

  20. COLOR IMAGE RETRIEVAL BASED ON FEATURE FUSION THROUGH MULTIPLE LINEAR REGRESSION ANALYSIS

    K. Seetharaman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel technique based on feature fusion using multiple linear regression analysis, and the least-square estimation method is employed to estimate the parameters. The given input query image is segmented into various regions according to the structure of the image. The color and texture features are extracted on each region of the query image, and the features are fused together using the multiple linear regression model. The estimated parameters of the model, which is modeled based on the features, are formed as a vector called a feature vector. The Canberra distance measure is adopted to compare the feature vectors of the query and target images. The F-measure is applied to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique. The obtained results expose that the proposed technique is comparable to the other existing techniques.

  1. BFLCRM: A BAYESIAN FUNCTIONAL LINEAR COX REGRESSION MODEL FOR PREDICTING TIME TO CONVERSION TO ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    Lee, Eunjee; Zhu, Hongtu; Kong, Dehan; Wang, Yalin; Giovanello, Kelly Sullivan; Ibrahim, Joseph G

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a Bayesian functional linear Cox regression model (BFLCRM) with both functional and scalar covariates. This new development is motivated by establishing the likelihood of conversion to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in 346 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) enrolled in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1 (ADNI-1) and the early markers of conversion. These 346 MCI patients were followed over 48 months, with 161 MCI participants progressing to AD at 48 months. The functional linear Cox regression model was used to establish that functional covariates including hippocampus surface morphology and scalar covariates including brain MRI volumes, cognitive performance (ADAS-Cog), and APOE status can accurately predict time to onset of AD. Posterior computation proceeds via an efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. A simulation study is performed to evaluate the finite sample performance of BFLCRM.

  2. Inverse estimation of multiple muscle activations based on linear logistic regression.

    Sekiya, Masashi; Tsuji, Toshiaki

    2017-07-01

    This study deals with a technology to estimate the muscle activity from the movement data using a statistical model. A linear regression (LR) model and artificial neural networks (ANN) have been known as statistical models for such use. Although ANN has a high estimation capability, it is often in the clinical application that the lack of data amount leads to performance deterioration. On the other hand, the LR model has a limitation in generalization performance. We therefore propose a muscle activity estimation method to improve the generalization performance through the use of linear logistic regression model. The proposed method was compared with the LR model and ANN in the verification experiment with 7 participants. As a result, the proposed method showed better generalization performance than the conventional methods in various tasks.

  3. Alzheimer's Disease Detection by Pseudo Zernike Moment and Linear Regression Classification.

    Wang, Shui-Hua; Du, Sidan; Zhang, Yin; Phillips, Preetha; Wu, Le-Nan; Chen, Xian-Qing; Zhang, Yu-Dong

    2017-01-01

    This study presents an improved method based on "Gorji et al. Neuroscience. 2015" by introducing a relatively new classifier-linear regression classification. Our method selects one axial slice from 3D brain image, and employed pseudo Zernike moment with maximum order of 15 to extract 256 features from each image. Finally, linear regression classification was harnessed as the classifier. The proposed approach obtains an accuracy of 97.51%, a sensitivity of 96.71%, and a specificity of 97.73%. Our method performs better than Gorji's approach and five other state-of-the-art approaches. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Appearance of eigen modes for the linearized Vlasov-Poisson equation

    Degond, P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine the asymptotic behaviour, when the time goes to infinity, of the solution of the linearized Vlasov-Poisson equation, we use eigen modes, associated to continuous linear functionals on a Banach space of analytic functions [fr

  5. On the Relationship Between Confidence Sets and Exchangeable Weights in Multiple Linear Regression.

    Pek, Jolynn; Chalmers, R Philip; Monette, Georges

    2016-01-01

    When statistical models are employed to provide a parsimonious description of empirical relationships, the extent to which strong conclusions can be drawn rests on quantifying the uncertainty in parameter estimates. In multiple linear regression (MLR), regression weights carry two kinds of uncertainty represented by confidence sets (CSs) and exchangeable weights (EWs). Confidence sets quantify uncertainty in estimation whereas the set of EWs quantify uncertainty in the substantive interpretation of regression weights. As CSs and EWs share certain commonalities, we clarify the relationship between these two kinds of uncertainty about regression weights. We introduce a general framework describing how CSs and the set of EWs for regression weights are estimated from the likelihood-based and Wald-type approach, and establish the analytical relationship between CSs and sets of EWs. With empirical examples on posttraumatic growth of caregivers (Cadell et al., 2014; Schneider, Steele, Cadell & Hemsworth, 2011) and on graduate grade point average (Kuncel, Hezlett & Ones, 2001), we illustrate the usefulness of CSs and EWs for drawing strong scientific conclusions. We discuss the importance of considering both CSs and EWs as part of the scientific process, and provide an Online Appendix with R code for estimating Wald-type CSs and EWs for k regression weights.

  6. MULTIPLE LINEAR REGRESSION ANALYSIS FOR PREDICTION OF BOILER LOSSES AND BOILER EFFICIENCY

    Chayalakshmi C.L

    2018-01-01

    MULTIPLE LINEAR REGRESSION ANALYSIS FOR PREDICTION OF BOILER LOSSES AND BOILER EFFICIENCY ABSTRACT Calculation of boiler efficiency is essential if its parameters need to be controlled for either maintaining or enhancing its efficiency. But determination of boiler efficiency using conventional method is time consuming and very expensive. Hence, it is not recommended to find boiler efficiency frequently. The work presented in this paper deals with establishing the statistical mo...

  7. A Simple Linear Regression Method for Quantitative Trait Loci Linkage Analysis With Censored Observations

    Anderson, Carl A.; McRae, Allan F.; Visscher, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    Standard quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping techniques commonly assume that the trait is both fully observed and normally distributed. When considering survival or age-at-onset traits these assumptions are often incorrect. Methods have been developed to map QTL for survival traits; however, they are both computationally intensive and not available in standard genome analysis software packages. We propose a grouped linear regression method for the analysis of continuous survival data. Using...

  8. The detection of influential subsets in linear regression using an influence matrix

    Peña, Daniel; Yohai, Víctor J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a new method to identify influential subsets in linear regression problems. The procedure uses the eigenstructure of an influence matrix which is defined as the matrix of uncentered covariance of the effect on the whole data set of deleting each observation, normalized to include the univariate Cook's statistics in the diagonal. It is shown that points in an influential subset will appear with large weight in at least one of the eigenvector linked to the largest eigenvalue...

  9. USE OF THE SIMPLE LINEAR REGRESSION MODEL IN MACRO-ECONOMICAL ANALYSES

    Constantin ANGHELACHE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the fundamental aspects of the linear regression, as a toolbox which can be used in macroeconomic analyses. The article describes the estimation of the parameters, the statistical tests used, the homoscesasticity and heteroskedasticity. The use of econometrics instrument in macroeconomics is an important factor that guarantees the quality of the models, analyses, results and possible interpretation that can be drawn at this level.

  10. The regression-calibration method for fitting generalized linear models with additive measurement error

    James W. Hardin; Henrik Schmeidiche; Raymond J. Carroll

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses and illustrates the method of regression calibration. This is a straightforward technique for fitting models with additive measurement error. We present this discussion in terms of generalized linear models (GLMs) following the notation defined in Hardin and Carroll (2003). Discussion will include specified measurement error, measurement error estimated by replicate error-prone proxies, and measurement error estimated by instrumental variables. The discussion focuses on s...

  11. Linear measure functional differential equations with infinite delay

    Monteiro, Giselle Antunes; Slavík, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 287, 11-12 (2014), s. 1363-1382 ISSN 0025-584X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : measure functional differential equations * generalized ordinary differential equations * Kurzweil-Stieltjes integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.683, year: 2014 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mana.201300048/abstract

  12. Backward stochastic differential equations from linear to fully nonlinear theory

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and accessible approach to stochastic differential equations, backward stochastic differential equations, and their connection with partial differential equations, as well as the recent development of the fully nonlinear theory, including nonlinear expectation, second order backward stochastic differential equations, and path dependent partial differential equations. Their main applications and numerical algorithms, as well as many exercises, are included. The book focuses on ideas and clarity, with most results having been solved from scratch and most theories being motivated from applications. It can be considered a starting point for junior researchers in the field, and can serve as a textbook for a two-semester graduate course in probability theory and stochastic analysis. It is also accessible for graduate students majoring in financial engineering.

  13. Comparison of l₁-Norm SVR and Sparse Coding Algorithms for Linear Regression.

    Zhang, Qingtian; Hu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Bo

    2015-08-01

    Support vector regression (SVR) is a popular function estimation technique based on Vapnik's concept of support vector machine. Among many variants, the l1-norm SVR is known to be good at selecting useful features when the features are redundant. Sparse coding (SC) is a technique widely used in many areas and a number of efficient algorithms are available. Both l1-norm SVR and SC can be used for linear regression. In this brief, the close connection between the l1-norm SVR and SC is revealed and some typical algorithms are compared for linear regression. The results show that the SC algorithms outperform the Newton linear programming algorithm, an efficient l1-norm SVR algorithm, in efficiency. The algorithms are then used to design the radial basis function (RBF) neural networks. Experiments on some benchmark data sets demonstrate the high efficiency of the SC algorithms. In particular, one of the SC algorithms, the orthogonal matching pursuit is two orders of magnitude faster than a well-known RBF network designing algorithm, the orthogonal least squares algorithm.

  14. LINEAR REGRESSION MODEL ESTİMATİON FOR RIGHT CENSORED DATA

    Ersin Yılmaz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, firstly we will define a right censored data. If we say shortly right-censored data is censoring values that above the exact line. This may be related with scaling device. And then  we will use response variable acquainted from right-censored explanatory variables. Then the linear regression model will be estimated. For censored data’s existence, Kaplan-Meier weights will be used for  the estimation of the model. With the weights regression model  will be consistent and unbiased with that.   And also there is a method for the censored data that is a semi parametric regression and this method also give  useful results  for censored data too. This study also might be useful for the health studies because of the censored data used in medical issues generally.

  15. Using the fuzzy linear regression method to benchmark the energy efficiency of commercial buildings

    Chung, William

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fuzzy linear regression method is used for developing benchmarking systems. ► The systems can be used to benchmark energy efficiency of commercial buildings. ► The resulting benchmarking model can be used by public users. ► The resulting benchmarking model can capture the fuzzy nature of input–output data. -- Abstract: Benchmarking systems from a sample of reference buildings need to be developed to conduct benchmarking processes for the energy efficiency of commercial buildings. However, not all benchmarking systems can be adopted by public users (i.e., other non-reference building owners) because of the different methods in developing such systems. An approach for benchmarking the energy efficiency of commercial buildings using statistical regression analysis to normalize other factors, such as management performance, was developed in a previous work. However, the field data given by experts can be regarded as a distribution of possibility. Thus, the previous work may not be adequate to handle such fuzzy input–output data. Consequently, a number of fuzzy structures cannot be fully captured by statistical regression analysis. This present paper proposes the use of fuzzy linear regression analysis to develop a benchmarking process, the resulting model of which can be used by public users. An illustrative example is given as well.

  16. Evaluation of accuracy of linear regression models in predicting urban stormwater discharge characteristics.

    Madarang, Krish J; Kang, Joo-Hyon

    2014-06-01

    Stormwater runoff has been identified as a source of pollution for the environment, especially for receiving waters. In order to quantify and manage the impacts of stormwater runoff on the environment, predictive models and mathematical models have been developed. Predictive tools such as regression models have been widely used to predict stormwater discharge characteristics. Storm event characteristics, such as antecedent dry days (ADD), have been related to response variables, such as pollutant loads and concentrations. However it has been a controversial issue among many studies to consider ADD as an important variable in predicting stormwater discharge characteristics. In this study, we examined the accuracy of general linear regression models in predicting discharge characteristics of roadway runoff. A total of 17 storm events were monitored in two highway segments, located in Gwangju, Korea. Data from the monitoring were used to calibrate United States Environmental Protection Agency's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM). The calibrated SWMM was simulated for 55 storm events, and the results of total suspended solid (TSS) discharge loads and event mean concentrations (EMC) were extracted. From these data, linear regression models were developed. R(2) and p-values of the regression of ADD for both TSS loads and EMCs were investigated. Results showed that pollutant loads were better predicted than pollutant EMC in the multiple regression models. Regression may not provide the true effect of site-specific characteristics, due to uncertainty in the data. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hippocampal atrophy and developmental regression as first sign of linear scleroderma "en coup de sabre".

    Verhelst, Helene E; Beele, Hilde; Joos, Rik; Vanneuville, Benedicte; Van Coster, Rudy N

    2008-11-01

    An 8-year-old girl with linear scleroderma "en coup de sabre" is reported who, at preschool age, presented with intractable simple partial seizures more than 1 year before skin lesions were first noticed. MRI revealed hippocampal atrophy, controlaterally to the seizures and ipsilaterally to the skin lesions. In the following months, a mental and motor regression was noticed. Cerebral CT scan showed multiple foci of calcifications in the affected hemisphere. In previously reported patients the skin lesions preceded the neurological signs. To the best of our knowledge, hippocampal atrophy was not earlier reported as presenting symptom of linear scleroderma. Linear scleroderma should be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with unilateral hippocampal atrophy even when the typical skin lesions are not present.

  18. Multiple linear stepwise regression of liver lipid levels: proton MR spectroscopy study in vivo at 3.0 T

    Xu Li; Liang Changhong; Xiao Yuanqiu; Zhang Zhonglin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the correlations between liver lipid level determined by liver 3.0 T 1 H-MRS in vivo and influencing factors using multiple linear stepwise regression. Methods: The prospective study of liver 1 H-MRS was performed with 3.0 T system and eight-channel torso phased-array coils using PRESS sequence. Forty-four volunteers were enrolled in this study. Liver spectra were collected with a TR of 1500 ms, TE of 30 ms, volume of interest of 2 cm×2 cm×2 cm, NSA of 64 times. The acquired raw proton MRS data were processed by using a software program SAGE. For each MRS measurement, using water as the internal reference, the amplitude of the lipid signal was normalized to the sum of the signal from lipid and water to obtain percentage lipid within the liver. The statistical description of height, weight, age and BMI, Line width and water suppression were recorded, and Pearson analysis was applied to test their relationships. Multiple linear stepwise regression was used to set the statistical model for the prediction of Liver lipid content. Results: Age (39.1±12.6) years, body weight (64.4±10.4) kg, BMI (23.3±3.1) kg/m 2 , linewidth (18.9±4.4) and the water suppression (90.7±6.5)% had significant correlation with liver lipid content (0.00 to 0.96%, median 0.02%), r were 0.11, 0.44, 0.40, 0.52, -0.73 respectively (P<0.05). But only age, BMI, line width, and the water suppression entered into the multiple linear regression equation. Liver lipid content prediction equation was as follows: Y= 1.395 - (0.021×water suppression) + (0.022×BMI) + (0.014×line width) - (0.004×age), and the coefficient of determination was 0. 613, corrected coefficient of determination was 0.59. Conclusion: The regression model fitted well, since the variables of age, BMI, width, and water suppression can explain about 60% of liver lipid content changes. (authors)

  19. Explicit estimating equations for semiparametric generalized linear latent variable models

    Ma, Yanyuan; Genton, Marc G.

    2010-01-01

    which is similar to that of a sufficient complete statistic, which enables us to simplify the estimating procedure and explicitly to formulate the semiparametric estimating equations. We further show that the explicit estimators have the usual root n

  20. Localized solutions of non-linear Klein--Gordon equations

    Werle, J.

    1977-05-01

    Nondissipative, stationary solutions for a class of nonlinear Klein-Gordon equations for a scalar field were found explicitly. Since the field is different from zero only inside a sphere of definite radius, the solutions are called quantum droplets

  1. Numerical treatment of linearized equations describing inhomogeneous collisionless plasmas

    Lewis, H.R.

    1979-01-01

    The equations governing the small-signal response of spatially inhomogeneous collisionless plasmas have practical significance in physics, for example in controlled thermonuclear fusion research. Although the solutions are very complicated and the equations are different to solve numerically, effective methods for them are being developed which are applicable when the equilibrium involves only one nonignorable coordinate. The general theoretical framework probably will provide a basis for progress when there are two or three nonignorable coordinates

  2. Computer software for linear and nonlinear regression in organic NMR; Programa de computador para regressao linear e nao linear em R.M.N. organica

    Canto, Eduardo Leite do; Rittner, Roberto [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    1992-12-31

    Calculation involving two variable linear regressions, require specific procedures generally not familiar to chemist. For attending the necessity of fast and efficient handling of NMR data, a self explained and Pc portable software has been developed, which allows user to produce and use diskette recorded tables, containing chemical shift or any other substituent physical-chemical measurements and constants ({sigma}{sub T}, {sigma}{sup o}{sub R}, E{sub s}, ...) 9 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Significance tests to determine the direction of effects in linear regression models.

    Wiedermann, Wolfgang; Hagmann, Michael; von Eye, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have discussed asymmetric interpretations of the Pearson correlation coefficient and have shown that higher moments can be used to decide on the direction of dependence in the bivariate linear regression setting. The current study extends this approach by illustrating that the third moment of regression residuals may also be used to derive conclusions concerning the direction of effects. Assuming non-normally distributed variables, it is shown that the distribution of residuals of the correctly specified regression model (e.g., Y is regressed on X) is more symmetric than the distribution of residuals of the competing model (i.e., X is regressed on Y). Based on this result, 4 one-sample tests are discussed which can be used to decide which variable is more likely to be the response and which one is more likely to be the explanatory variable. A fifth significance test is proposed based on the differences of skewness estimates, which leads to a more direct test of a hypothesis that is compatible with direction of dependence. A Monte Carlo simulation study was performed to examine the behaviour of the procedures under various degrees of associations, sample sizes, and distributional properties of the underlying population. An empirical example is given which illustrates the application of the tests in practice. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  4. Effective Surfactants Blend Concentration Determination for O/W Emulsion Stabilization by Two Nonionic Surfactants by Simple Linear Regression.

    Hassan, A K

    2015-01-01

    In this work, O/W emulsion sets were prepared by using different concentrations of two nonionic surfactants. The two surfactants, tween 80(HLB=15.0) and span 80(HLB=4.3) were used in a fixed proportions equal to 0.55:0.45 respectively. HLB value of the surfactants blends were fixed at 10.185. The surfactants blend concentration is starting from 3% up to 19%. For each O/W emulsion set the conductivity was measured at room temperature (25±2°), 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80°. Applying the simple linear regression least squares method statistical analysis to the temperature-conductivity obtained data determines the effective surfactants blend concentration required for preparing the most stable O/W emulsion. These results were confirmed by applying the physical stability centrifugation testing and the phase inversion temperature range measurements. The results indicated that, the relation which represents the most stable O/W emulsion has the strongest direct linear relationship between temperature and conductivity. This relationship is linear up to 80°. This work proves that, the most stable O/W emulsion is determined via the determination of the maximum R² value by applying of the simple linear regression least squares method to the temperature-conductivity obtained data up to 80°, in addition to, the true maximum slope is represented by the equation which has the maximum R² value. Because the conditions would be changed in a more complex formulation, the method of the determination of the effective surfactants blend concentration was verified by applying it for more complex formulations of 2% O/W miconazole nitrate cream and the results indicate its reproducibility.

  5. Improving the Prediction of Total Surgical Procedure Time Using Linear Regression Modeling.

    Edelman, Eric R; van Kuijk, Sander M J; Hamaekers, Ankie E W; de Korte, Marcel J M; van Merode, Godefridus G; Buhre, Wolfgang F F A

    2017-01-01

    For efficient utilization of operating rooms (ORs), accurate schedules of assigned block time and sequences of patient cases need to be made. The quality of these planning tools is dependent on the accurate prediction of total procedure time (TPT) per case. In this paper, we attempt to improve the accuracy of TPT predictions by using linear regression models based on estimated surgeon-controlled time (eSCT) and other variables relevant to TPT. We extracted data from a Dutch benchmarking database of all surgeries performed in six academic hospitals in The Netherlands from 2012 till 2016. The final dataset consisted of 79,983 records, describing 199,772 h of total OR time. Potential predictors of TPT that were included in the subsequent analysis were eSCT, patient age, type of operation, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification, and type of anesthesia used. First, we computed the predicted TPT based on a previously described fixed ratio model for each record, multiplying eSCT by 1.33. This number is based on the research performed by van Veen-Berkx et al., which showed that 33% of SCT is generally a good approximation of anesthesia-controlled time (ACT). We then systematically tested all possible linear regression models to predict TPT using eSCT in combination with the other available independent variables. In addition, all regression models were again tested without eSCT as a predictor to predict ACT separately (which leads to TPT by adding SCT). TPT was most accurately predicted using a linear regression model based on the independent variables eSCT, type of operation, ASA classification, and type of anesthesia. This model performed significantly better than the fixed ratio model and the method of predicting ACT separately. Making use of these more accurate predictions in planning and sequencing algorithms may enable an increase in utilization of ORs, leading to significant financial and productivity related benefits.

  6. Improving the Prediction of Total Surgical Procedure Time Using Linear Regression Modeling

    Eric R. Edelman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For efficient utilization of operating rooms (ORs, accurate schedules of assigned block time and sequences of patient cases need to be made. The quality of these planning tools is dependent on the accurate prediction of total procedure time (TPT per case. In this paper, we attempt to improve the accuracy of TPT predictions by using linear regression models based on estimated surgeon-controlled time (eSCT and other variables relevant to TPT. We extracted data from a Dutch benchmarking database of all surgeries performed in six academic hospitals in The Netherlands from 2012 till 2016. The final dataset consisted of 79,983 records, describing 199,772 h of total OR time. Potential predictors of TPT that were included in the subsequent analysis were eSCT, patient age, type of operation, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA physical status classification, and type of anesthesia used. First, we computed the predicted TPT based on a previously described fixed ratio model for each record, multiplying eSCT by 1.33. This number is based on the research performed by van Veen-Berkx et al., which showed that 33% of SCT is generally a good approximation of anesthesia-controlled time (ACT. We then systematically tested all possible linear regression models to predict TPT using eSCT in combination with the other available independent variables. In addition, all regression models were again tested without eSCT as a predictor to predict ACT separately (which leads to TPT by adding SCT. TPT was most accurately predicted using a linear regression model based on the independent variables eSCT, type of operation, ASA classification, and type of anesthesia. This model performed significantly better than the fixed ratio model and the method of predicting ACT separately. Making use of these more accurate predictions in planning and sequencing algorithms may enable an increase in utilization of ORs, leading to significant financial and productivity related

  7. Applicability of refined Born approximation to non-linear equations

    Rayski, J.

    1990-01-01

    A computational method called ''Refined Born Approximation'', formerly applied exclusively to linear problems, is shown to be successfully applicable also to non-linear problems enabling me to compute bifurcations and other irregular solutions which cannot be obtained by the standard perturbation procedures. (author)

  8. Bivariate least squares linear regression: Towards a unified analytic formalism. I. Functional models

    Caimmi, R.

    2011-08-01

    Concerning bivariate least squares linear regression, the classical approach pursued for functional models in earlier attempts ( York, 1966, 1969) is reviewed using a new formalism in terms of deviation (matrix) traces which, for unweighted data, reduce to usual quantities leaving aside an unessential (but dimensional) multiplicative factor. Within the framework of classical error models, the dependent variable relates to the independent variable according to the usual additive model. The classes of linear models considered are regression lines in the general case of correlated errors in X and in Y for weighted data, and in the opposite limiting situations of (i) uncorrelated errors in X and in Y, and (ii) completely correlated errors in X and in Y. The special case of (C) generalized orthogonal regression is considered in detail together with well known subcases, namely: (Y) errors in X negligible (ideally null) with respect to errors in Y; (X) errors in Y negligible (ideally null) with respect to errors in X; (O) genuine orthogonal regression; (R) reduced major-axis regression. In the limit of unweighted data, the results determined for functional models are compared with their counterparts related to extreme structural models i.e. the instrumental scatter is negligible (ideally null) with respect to the intrinsic scatter ( Isobe et al., 1990; Feigelson and Babu, 1992). While regression line slope and intercept estimators for functional and structural models necessarily coincide, the contrary holds for related variance estimators even if the residuals obey a Gaussian distribution, with the exception of Y models. An example of astronomical application is considered, concerning the [O/H]-[Fe/H] empirical relations deduced from five samples related to different stars and/or different methods of oxygen abundance determination. For selected samples and assigned methods, different regression models yield consistent results within the errors (∓ σ) for both

  9. Improvement of Storm Forecasts Using Gridded Bayesian Linear Regression for Northeast United States

    Yang, J.; Astitha, M.; Schwartz, C. S.

    2017-12-01

    Bayesian linear regression (BLR) is a post-processing technique in which regression coefficients are derived and used to correct raw forecasts based on pairs of observation-model values. This study presents the development and application of a gridded Bayesian linear regression (GBLR) as a new post-processing technique to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP) of rain and wind storm forecasts over northeast United States. Ten controlled variables produced from ten ensemble members of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) real-time prediction system are used for a GBLR model. In the GBLR framework, leave-one-storm-out cross-validation is utilized to study the performances of the post-processing technique in a database composed of 92 storms. To estimate the regression coefficients of the GBLR, optimization procedures that minimize the systematic and random error of predicted atmospheric variables (wind speed, precipitation, etc.) are implemented for the modeled-observed pairs of training storms. The regression coefficients calculated for meteorological stations of the National Weather Service are interpolated back to the model domain. An analysis of forecast improvements based on error reductions during the storms will demonstrate the value of GBLR approach. This presentation will also illustrate how the variances are optimized for the training partition in GBLR and discuss the verification strategy for grid points where no observations are available. The new post-processing technique is successful in improving wind speed and precipitation storm forecasts using past event-based data and has the potential to be implemented in real-time.

  10. Evaluating Non-Linear Regression Models in Analysis of Persian Walnut Fruit Growth

    I. Karamatlou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Persian walnut (Juglans regia L. is a large, wind-pollinated, monoecious, dichogamous, long lived, perennial tree cultivated for its high quality wood and nuts throughout the temperate regions of the world. Growth model methodology has been widely used in the modeling of plant growth. Mathematical models are important tools to study the plant growth and agricultural systems. These models can be applied for decision-making anddesigning management procedures in horticulture. Through growth analysis, planning for planting systems, fertilization, pruning operations, harvest time as well as obtaining economical yield can be more accessible.Non-linear models are more difficult to specify and estimate than linear models. This research was aimed to studynon-linear regression models based on data obtained from fruit weight, length and width. Selecting the best models which explain that fruit inherent growth pattern of Persian walnut was a further goal of this study. Materials and Methods: The experimental material comprising 14 Persian walnut genotypes propagated by seed collected from a walnut orchard in Golestan province, Minoudasht region, Iran, at latitude 37◦04’N; longitude 55◦32’E; altitude 1060 m, in a silt loam soil type. These genotypes were selected as a representative sampling of the many walnut genotypes available throughout the Northeastern Iran. The age range of walnut trees was 30 to 50 years. The annual mean temperature at the location is16.3◦C, with annual mean rainfall of 690 mm.The data used here is the average of walnut fresh fruit and measured withgram/millimeter/day in2011.According to the data distribution pattern, several equations have been proposed to describesigmoidal growth patterns. Here, we used double-sigmoid and logistic–monomolecular models to evaluate fruit growth based on fruit weight and4different regression models in cluding Richards, Gompertz, Logistic and Exponential growth for evaluation

  11. POSITIVE SOLUTIONS TO SEMI-LINEAR SECOND-ORDER ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS IN BANACH SPACE

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we study the existence of positive periodic solution to some second- order semi-linear differential equation in Banach space.By the fixed point index theory, we prove that the semi-linear differential equation has two positive periodic solutions.

  12. On the Linearized Darboux Equation Arising in Isometric Embedding of the Alexandrov Positive Annulus

    Chunhe LI

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper,the solvability condition of the linearized Gauss-Codazzi system and the solutions to the homogenous system are given.In the meantime,the Solvability of a relevant linearized Darboux equation is given.The equations are arising in a geometric problem which is concerned with the realization of the Alexandrov's positive annulus in R3.

  13. Collective spin by linearization of the Schrodinger equation for nuclear collective motion

    Greiner, M.; Scheid, W.; Herrmann, R.

    1988-01-01

    The free Schrodinger equation for multipole degrees of freedom is linearized so that energy and momentum operators appear only in first order. As an example, the authors demonstrate the linearization procedure for quadrupole degrees of freedom. The wave function solving this equation carries a spin. The authors derive the operator of the collective spin and its eigen values depending on multipolarity

  14. New approach to solve fully fuzzy system of linear equations using ...

    This paper proposes two new methods to solve fully fuzzy system of linear equations. The fuzzy system has been converted to a crisp system of linear equations by using single and double parametric form of fuzzy numbers to obtain the non-negative solution. Double parametric form of fuzzy numbers is defined and applied ...

  15. Supporting Students' Understanding of Linear Equations with One Variable Using Algebra Tiles

    Saraswati, Sari; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Somakim

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to describe how algebra tiles can support students' understanding of linear equations with one variable. This article is a part of a larger research on learning design of linear equations with one variable using algebra tiles combined with balancing method. Therefore, it will merely discuss one activity focused on how students…

  16. An Evaluation of Five Linear Equating Methods for the NEAT Design

    Mroch, Andrew A.; Suh, Youngsuk; Kane, Michael T.; Ripkey, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    This study uses the results of two previous papers (Kane, Mroch, Suh, & Ripkey, this issue; Suh, Mroch, Kane, & Ripkey, this issue) and the literature on linear equating to evaluate five linear equating methods along several dimensions, including the plausibility of their assumptions and their levels of bias and root mean squared difference…

  17. A canonical form of the equation of motion of linear dynamical systems

    Kawano, Daniel T.; Salsa, Rubens Goncalves; Ma, Fai; Morzfeld, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    The equation of motion of a discrete linear system has the form of a second-order ordinary differential equation with three real and square coefficient matrices. It is shown that, for almost all linear systems, such an equation can always be converted by an invertible transformation into a canonical form specified by two diagonal coefficient matrices associated with the generalized acceleration and displacement. This canonical form of the equation of motion is unique up to an equivalence class for non-defective systems. As an important by-product, a damped linear system that possesses three symmetric and positive definite coefficients can always be recast as an undamped and decoupled system.

  18. Building a new predictor for multiple linear regression technique-based corrective maintenance turnaround time.

    Cruz, Antonio M; Barr, Cameron; Puñales-Pozo, Elsa

    2008-01-01

    This research's main goals were to build a predictor for a turnaround time (TAT) indicator for estimating its values and use a numerical clustering technique for finding possible causes of undesirable TAT values. The following stages were used: domain understanding, data characterisation and sample reduction and insight characterisation. Building the TAT indicator multiple linear regression predictor and clustering techniques were used for improving corrective maintenance task efficiency in a clinical engineering department (CED). The indicator being studied was turnaround time (TAT). Multiple linear regression was used for building a predictive TAT value model. The variables contributing to such model were clinical engineering department response time (CE(rt), 0.415 positive coefficient), stock service response time (Stock(rt), 0.734 positive coefficient), priority level (0.21 positive coefficient) and service time (0.06 positive coefficient). The regression process showed heavy reliance on Stock(rt), CE(rt) and priority, in that order. Clustering techniques revealed the main causes of high TAT values. This examination has provided a means for analysing current technical service quality and effectiveness. In doing so, it has demonstrated a process for identifying areas and methods of improvement and a model against which to analyse these methods' effectiveness.

  19. Linear and evolutionary polynomial regression models to forecast coastal dynamics: Comparison and reliability assessment

    Bruno, Delia Evelina; Barca, Emanuele; Goncalves, Rodrigo Mikosz; de Araujo Queiroz, Heithor Alexandre; Berardi, Luigi; Passarella, Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the Evolutionary Polynomial Regression data modelling strategy has been applied to study small scale, short-term coastal morphodynamics, given its capability for treating a wide database of known information, non-linearly. Simple linear and multilinear regression models were also applied to achieve a balance between the computational load and reliability of estimations of the three models. In fact, even though it is easy to imagine that the more complex the model, the more the prediction improves, sometimes a "slight" worsening of estimations can be accepted in exchange for the time saved in data organization and computational load. The models' outcomes were validated through a detailed statistical, error analysis, which revealed a slightly better estimation of the polynomial model with respect to the multilinear model, as expected. On the other hand, even though the data organization was identical for the two models, the multilinear one required a simpler simulation setting and a faster run time. Finally, the most reliable evolutionary polynomial regression model was used in order to make some conjecture about the uncertainty increase with the extension of extrapolation time of the estimation. The overlapping rate between the confidence band of the mean of the known coast position and the prediction band of the estimated position can be a good index of the weakness in producing reliable estimations when the extrapolation time increases too much. The proposed models and tests have been applied to a coastal sector located nearby Torre Colimena in the Apulia region, south Italy.

  20. A Linear Regression Model for Global Solar Radiation on Horizontal Surfaces at Warri, Nigeria

    Michael S. Okundamiya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The growing anxiety on the negative effects of fossil fuels on the environment and the global emission reduction targets call for a more extensive use of renewable energy alternatives. Efficient solar energy utilization is an essential solution to the high atmospheric pollution caused by fossil fuel combustion. Global solar radiation (GSR data, which are useful for the design and evaluation of solar energy conversion system, are not measured at the forty-five meteorological stations in Nigeria. The dearth of the measured solar radiation data calls for accurate estimation. This study proposed a temperature-based linear regression, for predicting the monthly average daily GSR on horizontal surfaces, at Warri (latitude 5.020N and longitude 7.880E an oil city located in the south-south geopolitical zone, in Nigeria. The proposed model is analyzed based on five statistical indicators (coefficient of correlation, coefficient of determination, mean bias error, root mean square error, and t-statistic, and compared with the existing sunshine-based model for the same study. The results indicate that the proposed temperature-based linear regression model could replace the existing sunshine-based model for generating global solar radiation data. Keywords: air temperature; empirical model; global solar radiation; regression analysis; renewable energy; Warri

  1. Generating linear regression model to predict motor functions by use of laser range finder during TUG.

    Adachi, Daiki; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Hotta, Takayuki; Tashiro, Yuto; Morino, Saori; Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nozaki, Yuma; Hirata, Hinako; Yamaguchi, Moe; Yorozu, Ayanori; Takahashi, Masaki; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate which spatial and temporal parameters of the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test are associated with motor function in elderly individuals. This study included 99 community-dwelling women aged 72.9 ± 6.3 years. Step length, step width, single support time, variability of the aforementioned parameters, gait velocity, cadence, reaction time from starting signal to first step, and minimum distance between the foot and a marker placed to 3 in front of the chair were measured using our analysis system. The 10-m walk test, five times sit-to-stand (FTSTS) test, and one-leg standing (OLS) test were used to assess motor function. Stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis was used to determine which TUG test parameters were associated with each motor function test. Finally, we calculated a predictive model for each motor function test using each regression coefficient. In stepwise linear regression analysis, step length and cadence were significantly associated with the 10-m walk test, FTSTS and OLS test. Reaction time was associated with the FTSTS test, and step width was associated with the OLS test. Each predictive model showed a strong correlation with the 10-m walk test and OLS test (P motor function test. Moreover, the TUG test time regarded as the lower extremity function and mobility has strong predictive ability in each motor function test. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Robust best linear estimation for regression analysis using surrogate and instrumental variables.

    Wang, C Y

    2012-04-01

    We investigate methods for regression analysis when covariates are measured with errors. In a subset of the whole cohort, a surrogate variable is available for the true unobserved exposure variable. The surrogate variable satisfies the classical measurement error model, but it may not have repeated measurements. In addition to the surrogate variables that are available among the subjects in the calibration sample, we assume that there is an instrumental variable (IV) that is available for all study subjects. An IV is correlated with the unobserved true exposure variable and hence can be useful in the estimation of the regression coefficients. We propose a robust best linear estimator that uses all the available data, which is the most efficient among a class of consistent estimators. The proposed estimator is shown to be consistent and asymptotically normal under very weak distributional assumptions. For Poisson or linear regression, the proposed estimator is consistent even if the measurement error from the surrogate or IV is heteroscedastic. Finite-sample performance of the proposed estimator is examined and compared with other estimators via intensive simulation studies. The proposed method and other methods are applied to a bladder cancer case-control study.

  3. Predicting recycling behaviour: Comparison of a linear regression model and a fuzzy logic model.

    Vesely, Stepan; Klöckner, Christian A; Dohnal, Mirko

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that fuzzy logic can provide a better tool for predicting recycling behaviour than the customarily used linear regression. To show this, we take a set of empirical data on recycling behaviour (N=664), which we randomly divide into two halves. The first half is used to estimate a linear regression model of recycling behaviour, and to develop a fuzzy logic model of recycling behaviour. As the first comparison, the fit of both models to the data included in estimation of the models (N=332) is evaluated. As the second comparison, predictive accuracy of both models for "new" cases (hold-out data not included in building the models, N=332) is assessed. In both cases, the fuzzy logic model significantly outperforms the regression model in terms of fit. To conclude, when accurate predictions of recycling and possibly other environmental behaviours are needed, fuzzy logic modelling seems to be a promising technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Distributed Monitoring of the R(sup 2) Statistic for Linear Regression

    Bhaduri, Kanishka; Das, Kamalika; Giannella, Chris R.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of monitoring a multivariate linear regression model is relevant in studying the evolving relationship between a set of input variables (features) and one or more dependent target variables. This problem becomes challenging for large scale data in a distributed computing environment when only a subset of instances is available at individual nodes and the local data changes frequently. Data centralization and periodic model recomputation can add high overhead to tasks like anomaly detection in such dynamic settings. Therefore, the goal is to develop techniques for monitoring and updating the model over the union of all nodes data in a communication-efficient fashion. Correctness guarantees on such techniques are also often highly desirable, especially in safety-critical application scenarios. In this paper we develop DReMo a distributed algorithm with very low resource overhead, for monitoring the quality of a regression model in terms of its coefficient of determination (R2 statistic). When the nodes collectively determine that R2 has dropped below a fixed threshold, the linear regression model is recomputed via a network-wide convergecast and the updated model is broadcast back to all nodes. We show empirically, using both synthetic and real data, that our proposed method is highly communication-efficient and scalable, and also provide theoretical guarantees on correctness.

  5. Single Image Super-Resolution Using Global Regression Based on Multiple Local Linear Mappings.

    Choi, Jae-Seok; Kim, Munchurl

    2017-03-01

    Super-resolution (SR) has become more vital, because of its capability to generate high-quality ultra-high definition (UHD) high-resolution (HR) images from low-resolution (LR) input images. Conventional SR methods entail high computational complexity, which makes them difficult to be implemented for up-scaling of full-high-definition input images into UHD-resolution images. Nevertheless, our previous super-interpolation (SI) method showed a good compromise between Peak-Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) performances and computational complexity. However, since SI only utilizes simple linear mappings, it may fail to precisely reconstruct HR patches with complex texture. In this paper, we present a novel SR method, which inherits the large-to-small patch conversion scheme from SI but uses global regression based on local linear mappings (GLM). Thus, our new SR method is called GLM-SI. In GLM-SI, each LR input patch is divided into 25 overlapped subpatches. Next, based on the local properties of these subpatches, 25 different local linear mappings are applied to the current LR input patch to generate 25 HR patch candidates, which are then regressed into one final HR patch using a global regressor. The local linear mappings are learned cluster-wise in our off-line training phase. The main contribution of this paper is as follows: Previously, linear-mapping-based conventional SR methods, including SI only used one simple yet coarse linear mapping to each patch to reconstruct its HR version. On the contrary, for each LR input patch, our GLM-SI is the first to apply a combination of multiple local linear mappings, where each local linear mapping is found according to local properties of the current LR patch. Therefore, it can better approximate nonlinear LR-to-HR mappings for HR patches with complex texture. Experiment results show that the proposed GLM-SI method outperforms most of the state-of-the-art methods, and shows comparable PSNR performance with much lower

  6. An evaluation of bias in propensity score-adjusted non-linear regression models.

    Wan, Fei; Mitra, Nandita

    2018-03-01

    Propensity score methods are commonly used to adjust for observed confounding when estimating the conditional treatment effect in observational studies. One popular method, covariate adjustment of the propensity score in a regression model, has been empirically shown to be biased in non-linear models. However, no compelling underlying theoretical reason has been presented. We propose a new framework to investigate bias and consistency of propensity score-adjusted treatment effects in non-linear models that uses a simple geometric approach to forge a link between the consistency of the propensity score estimator and the collapsibility of non-linear models. Under this framework, we demonstrate that adjustment of the propensity score in an outcome model results in the decomposition of observed covariates into the propensity score and a remainder term. Omission of this remainder term from a non-collapsible regression model leads to biased estimates of the conditional odds ratio and conditional hazard ratio, but not for the conditional rate ratio. We further show, via simulation studies, that the bias in these propensity score-adjusted estimators increases with larger treatment effect size, larger covariate effects, and increasing dissimilarity between the coefficients of the covariates in the treatment model versus the outcome model.

  7. A note on the use of multiple linear regression in molecular ecology.

    Frasier, Timothy R

    2016-03-01

    Multiple linear regression analyses (also often referred to as generalized linear models--GLMs, or generalized linear mixed models--GLMMs) are widely used in the analysis of data in molecular ecology, often to assess the relative effects of genetic characteristics on individual fitness or traits, or how environmental characteristics influence patterns of genetic differentiation. However, the coefficients resulting from multiple regression analyses are sometimes misinterpreted, which can lead to incorrect interpretations and conclusions within individual studies, and can propagate to wider-spread errors in the general understanding of a topic. The primary issue revolves around the interpretation of coefficients for independent variables when interaction terms are also included in the analyses. In this scenario, the coefficients associated with each independent variable are often interpreted as the independent effect of each predictor variable on the predicted variable. However, this interpretation is incorrect. The correct interpretation is that these coefficients represent the effect of each predictor variable on the predicted variable when all other predictor variables are zero. This difference may sound subtle, but the ramifications cannot be overstated. Here, my goals are to raise awareness of this issue, to demonstrate and emphasize the problems that can result and to provide alternative approaches for obtaining the desired information. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Weighted functional linear regression models for gene-based association analysis.

    Belonogova, Nadezhda M; Svishcheva, Gulnara R; Wilson, James F; Campbell, Harry; Axenovich, Tatiana I

    2018-01-01

    Functional linear regression models are effectively used in gene-based association analysis of complex traits. These models combine information about individual genetic variants, taking into account their positions and reducing the influence of noise and/or observation errors. To increase the power of methods, where several differently informative components are combined, weights are introduced to give the advantage to more informative components. Allele-specific weights have been introduced to collapsing and kernel-based approaches to gene-based association analysis. Here we have for the first time introduced weights to functional linear regression models adapted for both independent and family samples. Using data simulated on the basis of GAW17 genotypes and weights defined by allele frequencies via the beta distribution, we demonstrated that type I errors correspond to declared values and that increasing the weights of causal variants allows the power of functional linear models to be increased. We applied the new method to real data on blood pressure from the ORCADES sample. Five of the six known genes with P models. Moreover, we found an association between diastolic blood pressure and the VMP1 gene (P = 8.18×10-6), when we used a weighted functional model. For this gene, the unweighted functional and weighted kernel-based models had P = 0.004 and 0.006, respectively. The new method has been implemented in the program package FREGAT, which is freely available at https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/FREGAT/index.html.

  9. Infinite sets of conservation laws for linear and nonlinear field equations

    Mickelsson, J.

    1984-01-01

    The relation between an infinite set of conservation laws of a linear field equation and the enveloping algebra of the space-time symmetry group is established. It is shown that each symmetric element of the enveloping algebra of the space-time symmetry group of a linear field equation generates a one-parameter group of symmetries of the field equation. The cases of the Maxwell and Dirac equations are studied in detail. Then it is shown that (at least in the sense of a power series in the 'coupling constant') the conservation laws of the linear case can be deformed to conservation laws of a nonlinear field equation which is obtained from the linear one by adding a nonlinear term invariant under the group of space-time symmetries. As an example, our method is applied to the Korteweg-de Vries equation and to the massless Thirring model. (orig.)

  10. Time-Frequency Analysis of Non-Stationary Biological Signals with Sparse Linear Regression Based Fourier Linear Combiner

    Yubo Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is often difficult to analyze biological signals because of their nonlinear and non-stationary characteristics. This necessitates the usage of time-frequency decomposition methods for analyzing the subtle changes in these signals that are often connected to an underlying phenomena. This paper presents a new approach to analyze the time-varying characteristics of such signals by employing a simple truncated Fourier series model, namely the band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC. In contrast to the earlier designs, we first identified the sparsity imposed on the signal model in order to reformulate the model to a sparse linear regression model. The coefficients of the proposed model are then estimated by a convex optimization algorithm. The performance of the proposed method was analyzed with benchmark test signals. An energy ratio metric is employed to quantify the spectral performance and results show that the proposed method Sparse-BMFLC has high mean energy (0.9976 ratio and outperforms existing methods such as short-time Fourier transfrom (STFT, continuous Wavelet transform (CWT and BMFLC Kalman Smoother. Furthermore, the proposed method provides an overall 6.22% in reconstruction error.

  11. Time-Frequency Analysis of Non-Stationary Biological Signals with Sparse Linear Regression Based Fourier Linear Combiner.

    Wang, Yubo; Veluvolu, Kalyana C

    2017-06-14

    It is often difficult to analyze biological signals because of their nonlinear and non-stationary characteristics. This necessitates the usage of time-frequency decomposition methods for analyzing the subtle changes in these signals that are often connected to an underlying phenomena. This paper presents a new approach to analyze the time-varying characteristics of such signals by employing a simple truncated Fourier series model, namely the band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC). In contrast to the earlier designs, we first identified the sparsity imposed on the signal model in order to reformulate the model to a sparse linear regression model. The coefficients of the proposed model are then estimated by a convex optimization algorithm. The performance of the proposed method was analyzed with benchmark test signals. An energy ratio metric is employed to quantify the spectral performance and results show that the proposed method Sparse-BMFLC has high mean energy (0.9976) ratio and outperforms existing methods such as short-time Fourier transfrom (STFT), continuous Wavelet transform (CWT) and BMFLC Kalman Smoother. Furthermore, the proposed method provides an overall 6.22% in reconstruction error.

  12. On the equivalence between particular types of Navier-Stokes and non-linear Schroedinger equations

    Dietrich, K.; Vautherin, D.

    1985-01-01

    We derive a Schroedinger equation equivalent to the Navier-Stokes equation in the special case of constant kinematic viscosities. This equation contains a non-linear term similar to that proposed by Kostin for a quantum description of friction [fr

  13. A non linear half space problem for radiative transfer equations. Application to the Rosseland approximation

    Sentis, R.

    1984-07-01

    The radiative transfer equations may be approximated by a non linear diffusion equation (called Rosseland equation) when the mean free paths of the photons are small with respect to the size of the medium. Some technical assomptions are made, namely about the initial conditions, to avoid any problem of initial layer terms

  14. Hyers-Ulam stability for second-order linear differential equations with boundary conditions

    Pasc Gavruta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We prove the Hyers-Ulam stability of linear differential equations of second-order with boundary conditions or with initial conditions. That is, if y is an approximate solution of the differential equation $y''+ eta (x y = 0$ with $y(a = y(b =0$, then there exists an exact solution of the differential equation, near y.

  15. Linear and nonlinear analogues of the Schroedinger equation in the contextual approach in quantum mechanics

    Khrennikov, A.Yu.

    2005-01-01

    One derived the general evolutionary differential equation within the Hilbert space describing dynamics of the wave function. The derived contextual model is more comprehensive in contrast to a quantum one. The contextual equation may be a nonlinear one. Paper presents the conditions ensuring linearity of the evolution and derivation of the Schroedinger equation [ru

  16. ADM For Solving Linear Second-Order Fredholm Integro-Differential Equations

    Karim, Mohd F.; Mohamad, Mahathir; Saifullah Rusiman, Mohd; Che-Him, Norziha; Roslan, Rozaini; Khalid, Kamil

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we apply Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM) as numerically analyse linear second-order Fredholm Integro-differential Equations. The approximate solutions of the problems are calculated by Maple package. Some numerical examples have been considered to illustrate the ADM for solving this equation. The results are compared with the existing exact solution. Thus, the Adomian decomposition method can be the best alternative method for solving linear second-order Fredholm Integro-Differential equation. It converges to the exact solution quickly and in the same time reduces computational work for solving the equation. The result obtained by ADM shows the ability and efficiency for solving these equations.

  17. From the hypergeometric differential equation to a non-linear Schrödinger one

    Plastino, A.; Rocca, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the q-exponential function is a hypergeometric function. Accordingly, it obeys the hypergeometric differential equation. We demonstrate that this differential equation can be transformed into a non-linear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). This NLSE exhibits both similarities and differences vis-a-vis the Nobre–Rego-Monteiro–Tsallis one. - Highlights: • We show that the q-exponential is a hypergeometric function. • It thus obeys the hypergeometric differential equation (HDE). • We show that the HDE can be cast as a non-linear Schrödinger equation. • This is different from the Nobre, Rego-Monteiro, Tsallis one.

  18. Solving the Linear 1D Thermoelasticity Equations with Pure Delay

    Denys Ya. Khusainov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a system of partial differential equations with a single constant delay τ>0 describing the behavior of a one-dimensional thermoelastic solid occupying a bounded interval of R1. For an initial-boundary value problem associated with this system, we prove a well-posedness result in a certain topology under appropriate regularity conditions on the data. Further, we show the solution of our delayed model to converge to the solution of the classical equations of thermoelasticity as τ→0. Finally, we deduce an explicit solution representation for the delay problem.

  19. Integration of differential equations by the pseudo-linear (PL) approximation

    Bonalumi, Riccardo A.

    1998-01-01

    A new method of integrating differential equations was originated with the technique of approximately calculating the integrals called the pseudo-linear (PL) procedure: this method is A-stable. This article contains the following examples: 1st order ordinary differential equations (ODEs), 2nd order linear ODEs, stiff system of ODEs (neutron kinetics), one-dimensional parabolic (diffusion) partial differential equations. In this latter case, this PL method coincides with the Crank-Nicholson method

  20. Adaptive Linear and Normalized Combination of Radial Basis Function Networks for Function Approximation and Regression

    Yunfeng Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel adaptive linear and normalized combination (ALNC method that can be used to combine the component radial basis function networks (RBFNs to implement better function approximation and regression tasks. The optimization of the fusion weights is obtained by solving a constrained quadratic programming problem. According to the instantaneous errors generated by the component RBFNs, the ALNC is able to perform the selective ensemble of multiple leaners by adaptively adjusting the fusion weights from one instance to another. The results of the experiments on eight synthetic function approximation and six benchmark regression data sets show that the ALNC method can effectively help the ensemble system achieve a higher accuracy (measured in terms of mean-squared error and the better fidelity (characterized by normalized correlation coefficient of approximation, in relation to the popular simple average, weighted average, and the Bagging methods.

  1. Multivariate sparse group lasso for the multivariate multiple linear regression with an arbitrary group structure.

    Li, Yanming; Nan, Bin; Zhu, Ji

    2015-06-01

    We propose a multivariate sparse group lasso variable selection and estimation method for data with high-dimensional predictors as well as high-dimensional response variables. The method is carried out through a penalized multivariate multiple linear regression model with an arbitrary group structure for the regression coefficient matrix. It suits many biology studies well in detecting associations between multiple traits and multiple predictors, with each trait and each predictor embedded in some biological functional groups such as genes, pathways or brain regions. The method is able to effectively remove unimportant groups as well as unimportant individual coefficients within important groups, particularly for large p small n problems, and is flexible in handling various complex group structures such as overlapping or nested or multilevel hierarchical structures. The method is evaluated through extensive simulations with comparisons to the conventional lasso and group lasso methods, and is applied to an eQTL association study. © 2015, The International Biometric Society.

  2. Linear and support vector regressions based on geometrical correlation of data

    Kaijun Wang

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Linear regression (LR and support vector regression (SVR are widely used in data analysis. Geometrical correlation learning (GcLearn was proposed recently to improve the predictive ability of LR and SVR through mining and using correlations between data of a variable (inner correlation. This paper theoretically analyzes prediction performance of the GcLearn method and proves that GcLearn LR and SVR will have better prediction performance than traditional LR and SVR for prediction tasks when good inner correlations are obtained and predictions by traditional LR and SVR are far away from their neighbor training data under inner correlation. This gives the applicable condition of GcLearn method.

  3. Radioligand assays - methods and applications. IV. Uniform regression of hyperbolic and linear radioimmunoassay calibration curves

    Keilacker, H; Becker, G; Ziegler, M; Gottschling, H D [Zentralinstitut fuer Diabetes, Karlsburg (German Democratic Republic)

    1980-10-01

    In order to handle all types of radioimmunoassay (RIA) calibration curves obtained in the authors' laboratory in the same way, they tried to find a non-linear expression for their regression which allows calibration curves with different degrees of curvature to be fitted. Considering the two boundary cases of the incubation protocol they derived a hyperbolic inverse regression function: x = a/sub 1/y + a/sub 0/ + asub(-1)y/sup -1/, where x is the total concentration of antigen, asub(i) are constants, and y is the specifically bound radioactivity. An RIA evaluation procedure based on this function is described providing a fitted inverse RIA calibration curve and some statistical quality parameters. The latter are of an order which is normal for RIA systems. There is an excellent agreement between fitted and experimentally obtained calibration curves having a different degree of curvature.

  4. A computer tool for a minimax criterion in binary response and heteroscedastic simple linear regression models.

    Casero-Alonso, V; López-Fidalgo, J; Torsney, B

    2017-01-01

    Binary response models are used in many real applications. For these models the Fisher information matrix (FIM) is proportional to the FIM of a weighted simple linear regression model. The same is also true when the weight function has a finite integral. Thus, optimal designs for one binary model are also optimal for the corresponding weighted linear regression model. The main objective of this paper is to provide a tool for the construction of MV-optimal designs, minimizing the maximum of the variances of the estimates, for a general design space. MV-optimality is a potentially difficult criterion because of its nondifferentiability at equal variance designs. A methodology for obtaining MV-optimal designs where the design space is a compact interval [a, b] will be given for several standard weight functions. The methodology will allow us to build a user-friendly computer tool based on Mathematica to compute MV-optimal designs. Some illustrative examples will show a representation of MV-optimal designs in the Euclidean plane, taking a and b as the axes. The applet will be explained using two relevant models. In the first one the case of a weighted linear regression model is considered, where the weight function is directly chosen from a typical family. In the second example a binary response model is assumed, where the probability of the outcome is given by a typical probability distribution. Practitioners can use the provided applet to identify the solution and to know the exact support points and design weights. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Unbounded solutions of quasi-linear difference equations

    Cecchi, M.; Došlá, Zuzana; Marini, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 45, 10-11 (2003), s. 1113-1123 ISSN 0898-1221 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : nonlinear difference equation * possitive increasing solution * strongly increasing solution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.498, year: 2003

  6. Ten-Year-Old Students Solving Linear Equations

    Brizuela, Barbara; Schliemann, Analucia

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors seek to re-conceptualize the perspective regarding students' difficulties with algebra. While acknowledging that students "do" have difficulties when learning algebra, they also argue that the generally espoused criteria for algebra as the ability to work with the syntactical rules for solving equations is…

  7. Healthcare Expenditures Associated with Depression Among Individuals with Osteoarthritis: Post-Regression Linear Decomposition Approach.

    Agarwal, Parul; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2015-12-01

    Depression is common among individuals with osteoarthritis and leads to increased healthcare burden. The objective of this study was to examine excess total healthcare expenditures associated with depression among individuals with osteoarthritis in the US. Adults with self-reported osteoarthritis (n = 1881) were identified using data from the 2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Among those with osteoarthritis, chi-square tests and ordinary least square regressions (OLS) were used to examine differences in healthcare expenditures between those with and without depression. Post-regression linear decomposition technique was used to estimate the relative contribution of different constructs of the Anderson's behavioral model, i.e., predisposing, enabling, need, personal healthcare practices, and external environment factors, to the excess expenditures associated with depression among individuals with osteoarthritis. All analysis accounted for the complex survey design of MEPS. Depression coexisted among 20.6 % of adults with osteoarthritis. The average total healthcare expenditures were $13,684 among adults with depression compared to $9284 among those without depression. Multivariable OLS regression revealed that adults with depression had 38.8 % higher healthcare expenditures (p regression linear decomposition analysis indicated that 50 % of differences in expenditures among adults with and without depression can be explained by differences in need factors. Among individuals with coexisting osteoarthritis and depression, excess healthcare expenditures associated with depression were mainly due to comorbid anxiety, chronic conditions and poor health status. These expenditures may potentially be reduced by providing timely intervention for need factors or by providing care under a collaborative care model.

  8. Tutorial on Biostatistics: Linear Regression Analysis of Continuous Correlated Eye Data.

    Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen G; Glynn, Robert; Rosner, Bernard

    2017-04-01

    To describe and demonstrate appropriate linear regression methods for analyzing correlated continuous eye data. We describe several approaches to regression analysis involving both eyes, including mixed effects and marginal models under various covariance structures to account for inter-eye correlation. We demonstrate, with SAS statistical software, applications in a study comparing baseline refractive error between one eye with choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and the unaffected fellow eye, and in a study determining factors associated with visual field in the elderly. When refractive error from both eyes were analyzed with standard linear regression without accounting for inter-eye correlation (adjusting for demographic and ocular covariates), the difference between eyes with CNV and fellow eyes was 0.15 diopters (D; 95% confidence interval, CI -0.03 to 0.32D, p = 0.10). Using a mixed effects model or a marginal model, the estimated difference was the same but with narrower 95% CI (0.01 to 0.28D, p = 0.03). Standard regression for visual field data from both eyes provided biased estimates of standard error (generally underestimated) and smaller p-values, while analysis of the worse eye provided larger p-values than mixed effects models and marginal models. In research involving both eyes, ignoring inter-eye correlation can lead to invalid inferences. Analysis using only right or left eyes is valid, but decreases power. Worse-eye analysis can provide less power and biased estimates of effect. Mixed effects or marginal models using the eye as the unit of analysis should be used to appropriately account for inter-eye correlation and maximize power and precision.

  9. Face Hallucination with Linear Regression Model in Semi-Orthogonal Multilinear PCA Method

    Asavaskulkiet, Krissada

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new face hallucination technique, face images reconstruction in HSV color space with a semi-orthogonal multilinear principal component analysis method. This novel hallucination technique can perform directly from tensors via tensor-to-vector projection by imposing the orthogonality constraint in only one mode. In our experiments, we use facial images from FERET database to test our hallucination approach which is demonstrated by extensive experiments with high-quality hallucinated color faces. The experimental results assure clearly demonstrated that we can generate photorealistic color face images by using the SO-MPCA subspace with a linear regression model.

  10. Estimating integrated variance in the presence of microstructure noise using linear regression

    Holý, Vladimír

    2017-07-01

    Using financial high-frequency data for estimation of integrated variance of asset prices is beneficial but with increasing number of observations so-called microstructure noise occurs. This noise can significantly bias the realized variance estimator. We propose a method for estimation of the integrated variance robust to microstructure noise as well as for testing the presence of the noise. Our method utilizes linear regression in which realized variances estimated from different data subsamples act as dependent variable while the number of observations act as explanatory variable. We compare proposed estimator with other methods on simulated data for several microstructure noise structures.

  11. Application of genetic algorithm - multiple linear regressions to predict the activity of RSK inhibitors

    Avval Zhila Mohajeri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with developing a linear quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR model for predicting the RSK inhibition activity of some new compounds. A dataset consisting of 62 pyrazino [1,2-α] indole, diazepino [1,2-α] indole, and imidazole derivatives with known inhibitory activities was used. Multiple linear regressions (MLR technique combined with the stepwise (SW and the genetic algorithm (GA methods as variable selection tools was employed. For more checking stability, robustness and predictability of the proposed models, internal and external validation techniques were used. Comparison of the results obtained, indicate that the GA-MLR model is superior to the SW-MLR model and that it isapplicable for designing novel RSK inhibitors.

  12. Construction of local and non-local conservation laws for non-linear field equations

    Vladimirov, V.S.; Volovich, I.V.

    1984-08-01

    A method of constructing conserved currents for non-linear field equations is presented. More explicitly for non-linear equations, which can be derived from compatibility conditions of some linear system with a parameter, a procedure of obtaining explicit expressions for local and non-local currents is developed. Some examples such as the classical Heisenberg spin chain and supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory are considered. (author)

  13. Sensitivity theory for general non-linear algebraic equations with constraints

    Oblow, E.M.

    1977-04-01

    Sensitivity theory has been developed to a high state of sophistication for applications involving solutions of the linear Boltzmann equation or approximations to it. The success of this theory in the field of radiation transport has prompted study of possible extensions of the method to more general systems of non-linear equations. Initial work in the U.S. and in Europe on the reactor fuel cycle shows that the sensitivity methodology works equally well for those non-linear problems studied to date. The general non-linear theory for algebraic equations is summarized and applied to a class of problems whose solutions are characterized by constrained extrema. Such equations form the basis of much work on energy systems modelling and the econometrics of power production and distribution. It is valuable to have a sensitivity theory available for these problem areas since it is difficult to repeatedly solve complex non-linear equations to find out the effects of alternative input assumptions or the uncertainties associated with predictions of system behavior. The sensitivity theory for a linear system of algebraic equations with constraints which can be solved using linear programming techniques is discussed. The role of the constraints in simplifying the problem so that sensitivity methodology can be applied is highlighted. The general non-linear method is summarized and applied to a non-linear programming problem in particular. Conclusions are drawn in about the applicability of the method for practical problems

  14. Symmetry groups of integro-differential equations for linear thermoviscoelastic materials with memory

    Zhou, L.-Q.; Meleshko, S. V.

    2017-07-01

    The group analysis method is applied to a system of integro-differential equations corresponding to a linear thermoviscoelastic model. A recently developed approach for calculating the symmetry groups of such equations is used. The general solution of the determining equations for the system is obtained. Using subalgebras of the admitted Lie algebra, two classes of partially invariant solutions of the considered system of integro-differential equations are studied.

  15. Linear analysis of the momentum cooling Fokker-Planck equation

    Rosenzweig, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    In order to optimize the extraction scheme used to take antiprotons out of the accumulator, it is necessary to understand the basic processes involved. At present, six antiproton bunches per Tevatron store are removed sequentially by RF unstacking from the accumulator. The phase space dynamics of this process, with its accompanying phase displacement deceleration and phase space dilution of portions of the stack, can be modelled by numerical solution of the longitudinal equations of motion for a large number of particles. We have employed the tracking code ESME for this purpose. In between RF extractions, however, the stochastic cooling system is turned on for a short time, and we must take into account the effect of momentum stochastic cooling on the antiproton energy spectrum. This process is described by the Fokker-Planck equation, which models the evolution of the antiproton stack energy distribution by accounting for the cooling through an applied coherent drag force and the competing heating of the stack due to diffusion, which can arise from intra-beam scattering, amplifier noise and coherent (Schottky) effects. In this note we examine the aspects of the Fokker-Planck in the regime where the nonlinear terms due to Schottky effects are small. This discussion ultimately leads to solution of the equation in terms of an orthonormal set of functions which are closely related to the quantum simple-harmonic oscillator wave-functions. 5 refs

  16. Estimating traffic volume on Wyoming low volume roads using linear and logistic regression methods

    Dick Apronti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Traffic volume is an important parameter in most transportation planning applications. Low volume roads make up about 69% of road miles in the United States. Estimating traffic on the low volume roads is a cost-effective alternative to taking traffic counts. This is because traditional traffic counts are expensive and impractical for low priority roads. The purpose of this paper is to present the development of two alternative means of cost-effectively estimating traffic volumes for low volume roads in Wyoming and to make recommendations for their implementation. The study methodology involves reviewing existing studies, identifying data sources, and carrying out the model development. The utility of the models developed were then verified by comparing actual traffic volumes to those predicted by the model. The study resulted in two regression models that are inexpensive and easy to implement. The first regression model was a linear regression model that utilized pavement type, access to highways, predominant land use types, and population to estimate traffic volume. In verifying the model, an R2 value of 0.64 and a root mean square error of 73.4% were obtained. The second model was a logistic regression model that identified the level of traffic on roads using five thresholds or levels. The logistic regression model was verified by estimating traffic volume thresholds and determining the percentage of roads that were accurately classified as belonging to the given thresholds. For the five thresholds, the percentage of roads classified correctly ranged from 79% to 88%. In conclusion, the verification of the models indicated both model types to be useful for accurate and cost-effective estimation of traffic volumes for low volume Wyoming roads. The models developed were recommended for use in traffic volume estimations for low volume roads in pavement management and environmental impact assessment studies.

  17. The Embedding Method for Linear Partial Differential Equations

    The recently suggested embedding method to solve linear boundary value problems is here extended to cover situations where the domain of interest is unbounded or multiply connected. The extensions involve the use of complete sets of exterior and interior eigenfunctions on canonical domains. Applications to typical ...

  18. Canonical structure of evolution equations with non-linear ...

    The dispersion produced is compensated by non-linear effects resulting in the formation of exponentially localized .... determining the values of Lagrange's multipliers αis. We postulate that a slightly .... c3 «w2x -v. (36). To include the effect of the secondary constraint c3 in the total Hamiltonian H we modify. (33) as. 104.

  19. Oscillation and non-oscillation criterion for Riemann–Weber type half-linear differential equations

    Petr Hasil

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available By the combination of the modified half-linear Prüfer method and the Riccati technique, we study oscillatory properties of half-linear differential equations. Taking into account the transformation theory of half-linear equations and using some known results, we show that the analysed equations in the Riemann–Weber form with perturbations in both terms are conditionally oscillatory. Within the process, we identify the critical oscillation values of their coefficients and, consequently, we decide when the considered equations are oscillatory and when they are non-oscillatory. As a direct corollary of our main result, we solve the so-called critical case for a certain type of half-linear non-perturbed equations.

  20. Introduction to statistical modelling 2: categorical variables and interactions in linear regression.

    Lunt, Mark

    2015-07-01

    In the first article in this series we explored the use of linear regression to predict an outcome variable from a number of predictive factors. It assumed that the predictive factors were measured on an interval scale. However, this article shows how categorical variables can also be included in a linear regression model, enabling predictions to be made separately for different groups and allowing for testing the hypothesis that the outcome differs between groups. The use of interaction terms to measure whether the effect of a particular predictor variable differs between groups is also explained. An alternative approach to testing the difference between groups of the effect of a given predictor, which consists of measuring the effect in each group separately and seeing whether the statistical significance differs between the groups, is shown to be misleading. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Method validation using weighted linear regression models for quantification of UV filters in water samples.

    da Silva, Claudia Pereira; Emídio, Elissandro Soares; de Marchi, Mary Rosa Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the validation of a method consisting of solid-phase extraction followed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of the ultraviolet (UV) filters benzophenone-3, ethylhexyl salicylate, ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate and octocrylene. The method validation criteria included evaluation of selectivity, analytical curve, trueness, precision, limits of detection and limits of quantification. The non-weighted linear regression model has traditionally been used for calibration, but it is not necessarily the optimal model in all cases. Because the assumption of homoscedasticity was not met for the analytical data in this work, a weighted least squares linear regression was used for the calibration method. The evaluated analytical parameters were satisfactory for the analytes and showed recoveries at four fortification levels between 62% and 107%, with relative standard deviations less than 14%. The detection limits ranged from 7.6 to 24.1 ng L(-1). The proposed method was used to determine the amount of UV filters in water samples from water treatment plants in Araraquara and Jau in São Paulo, Brazil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reduction of interferences in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry by multiple linear regression modelling

    Grotti, Marco; Abelmoschi, Maria Luisa; Soggia, Francesco; Tiberiade, Christian; Frache, Roberto

    2000-12-01

    The multivariate effects of Na, K, Mg and Ca as nitrates on the electrothermal atomisation of manganese, cadmium and iron were studied by multiple linear regression modelling. Since the models proved to efficiently predict the effects of the considered matrix elements in a wide range of concentrations, they were applied to correct the interferences occurring in the determination of trace elements in seawater after pre-concentration of the analytes. In order to obtain a statistically significant number of samples, a large volume of the certified seawater reference materials CASS-3 and NASS-3 was treated with Chelex-100 resin; then, the chelating resin was separated from the solution, divided into several sub-samples, each of them was eluted with nitric acid and analysed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (for trace element determinations) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (for matrix element determinations). To minimise any other systematic error besides that due to matrix effects, accuracy of the pre-concentration step and contamination levels of the procedure were checked by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric measurements. Analytical results obtained by applying the multiple linear regression models were compared with those obtained with other calibration methods, such as external calibration using acid-based standards, external calibration using matrix-matched standards and the analyte addition technique. Empirical models proved to efficiently reduce interferences occurring in the analysis of real samples, allowing an improvement of accuracy better than for other calibration methods.

  3. A Feature-Free 30-Disease Pathological Brain Detection System by Linear Regression Classifier.

    Chen, Yi; Shao, Ying; Yan, Jie; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Qu, Yanwen; Lee, Elizabeth; Wang, Shuihua

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease patients are increasing rapidly every year. Scholars tend to use computer vision methods to develop automatic diagnosis system. (Background) In 2015, Gorji et al. proposed a novel method using pseudo Zernike moment. They tested four classifiers: learning vector quantization neural network, pattern recognition neural network trained by Levenberg-Marquardt, by resilient backpropagation, and by scaled conjugate gradient. This study presents an improved method by introducing a relatively new classifier-linear regression classification. Our method selects one axial slice from 3D brain image, and employed pseudo Zernike moment with maximum order of 15 to extract 256 features from each image. Finally, linear regression classification was harnessed as the classifier. The proposed approach obtains an accuracy of 97.51%, a sensitivity of 96.71%, and a specificity of 97.73%. Our method performs better than Gorji's approach and five other state-of-the-art approaches. Therefore, it can be used to detect Alzheimer's disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Linear Regression between CIE-Lab Color Parameters and Organic Matter in Soils of Tea Plantations

    Chen, Yonggen; Zhang, Min; Fan, Dongmei; Fan, Kai; Wang, Xiaochang

    2018-02-01

    To quantify the relationship between the soil organic matter and color parameters using the CIE-Lab system, 62 soil samples (0-10 cm, Ferralic Acrisols) from tea plantations were collected from southern China. After air-drying and sieving, numerical color information and reflectance spectra of soil samples were measured under laboratory conditions using an UltraScan VIS (HunterLab) spectrophotometer equipped with CIE-Lab color models. We found that soil total organic carbon (TOC) and nitrogen (TN) contents were negatively correlated with the L* value (lightness) ( r = -0.84 and -0.80, respectively), a* value (correlation coefficient r = -0.51 and -0.46, respectively) and b* value ( r = -0.76 and -0.70, respectively). There were also linear regressions between TOC and TN contents with the L* value and b* value. Results showed that color parameters from a spectrophotometer equipped with CIE-Lab color models can predict TOC contents well for soils in tea plantations. The linear regression model between color values and soil organic carbon contents showed it can be used as a rapid, cost-effective method to evaluate content of soil organic matter in Chinese tea plantations.

  5. The Cauchy problem for non-linear Klein-Gordon equations

    Simon, J.C.H.; Taflin, E.

    1993-01-01

    We consider in R n+1 , n≥2, the non-linear Klein-Gordon equation. We prove for such an equation that there is neighbourhood of zero in a Hilbert space of initial conditions for which the Cauchy problem has global solutions and on which there is asymptotic completeness. The inverse of the wave operator linearizes the non-linear equation. If, moreover, the equation is manifestly Poincare covariant then the non-linear representation of the Poincare-Lie algebra, associated with the non-linear Klein-Gordon equation is integrated to a non-linear representation of the Poincare group on an invariant neighbourhood of zero in the Hilbert space. This representation is linearized by the inverse of the wave operator. The Hilbert space is, in both cases, the closure of the space of the differentiable vectors for the linear representation of the Poincare group, associated with the Klein-Gordon equation, with respect to a norm defined by the representation of the enveloping algebra. (orig.)

  6. Multivariate linear regression of high-dimensional fMRI data with multiple target variables.

    Valente, Giancarlo; Castellanos, Agustin Lage; Vanacore, Gianluca; Formisano, Elia

    2014-05-01

    Multivariate regression is increasingly used to study the relation between fMRI spatial activation patterns and experimental stimuli or behavioral ratings. With linear models, informative brain locations are identified by mapping the model coefficients. This is a central aspect in neuroimaging, as it provides the sought-after link between the activity of neuronal populations and subject's perception, cognition or behavior. Here, we show that mapping of informative brain locations using multivariate linear regression (MLR) may lead to incorrect conclusions and interpretations. MLR algorithms for high dimensional data are designed to deal with targets (stimuli or behavioral ratings, in fMRI) separately, and the predictive map of a model integrates information deriving from both neural activity patterns and experimental design. Not accounting explicitly for the presence of other targets whose associated activity spatially overlaps with the one of interest may lead to predictive maps of troublesome interpretation. We propose a new model that can correctly identify the spatial patterns associated with a target while achieving good generalization. For each target, the training is based on an augmented dataset, which includes all remaining targets. The estimation on such datasets produces both maps and interaction coefficients, which are then used to generalize. The proposed formulation is independent of the regression algorithm employed. We validate this model on simulated fMRI data and on a publicly available dataset. Results indicate that our method achieves high spatial sensitivity and good generalization and that it helps disentangle specific neural effects from interaction with predictive maps associated with other targets. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Two-Sample Tests for High-Dimensional Linear Regression with an Application to Detecting Interactions.

    Xia, Yin; Cai, Tianxi; Cai, T Tony

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by applications in genomics, we consider in this paper global and multiple testing for the comparisons of two high-dimensional linear regression models. A procedure for testing the equality of the two regression vectors globally is proposed and shown to be particularly powerful against sparse alternatives. We then introduce a multiple testing procedure for identifying unequal coordinates while controlling the false discovery rate and false discovery proportion. Theoretical justifications are provided to guarantee the validity of the proposed tests and optimality results are established under sparsity assumptions on the regression coefficients. The proposed testing procedures are easy to implement. Numerical properties of the procedures are investigated through simulation and data analysis. The results show that the proposed tests maintain the desired error rates under the null and have good power under the alternative at moderate sample sizes. The procedures are applied to the Framingham Offspring study to investigate the interactions between smoking and cardiovascular related genetic mutations important for an inflammation marker.

  8. Synthesis of linear regression coefficients by recovering the within-study covariance matrix from summary statistics.

    Yoneoka, Daisuke; Henmi, Masayuki

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the number of regression models has dramatically increased in several academic fields. However, within the context of meta-analysis, synthesis methods for such models have not been developed in a commensurate trend. One of the difficulties hindering the development is the disparity in sets of covariates among literature models. If the sets of covariates differ across models, interpretation of coefficients will differ, thereby making it difficult to synthesize them. Moreover, previous synthesis methods for regression models, such as multivariate meta-analysis, often have problems because covariance matrix of coefficients (i.e. within-study correlations) or individual patient data are not necessarily available. This study, therefore, proposes a brief explanation regarding a method to synthesize linear regression models under different covariate sets by using a generalized least squares method involving bias correction terms. Especially, we also propose an approach to recover (at most) threecorrelations of covariates, which is required for the calculation of the bias term without individual patient data. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Soil moisture estimation using multi linear regression with terraSAR-X data

    G. García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The first five centimeters of soil form an interface where the main heat fluxes exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere occur. Besides ground measurements, remote sensing has proven to be an excellent tool for the monitoring of spatial and temporal distributed data of the most relevant Earth surface parameters including soil’s parameters. Indeed, active microwave sensors (Synthetic Aperture Radar - SAR offer the opportunity to monitor soil moisture (HS at global, regional and local scales by monitoring involved processes. Several inversion algorithms, that derive geophysical information as HS from SAR data, were developed. Many of them use electromagnetic models for simulating the backscattering coefficient and are based on statistical techniques, such as neural networks, inversion methods and regression models. Recent studies have shown that simple multiple regression techniques yield satisfactory results. The involved geophysical variables in these methodologies are descriptive of the soil structure, microwave characteristics and land use. Therefore, in this paper we aim at developing a multiple linear regression model to estimate HS on flat agricultural regions using TerraSAR-X satellite data and data from a ground weather station. The results show that the backscatter, the precipitation and the relative humidity are the explanatory variables of HS. The results obtained presented a RMSE of 5.4 and a R2  of about 0.6

  10. Linear relativistic gyrokinetic equation in general magnetically confined plasmas

    Tsai, S.T.; Van Dam, J.W.; Chen, L.

    1983-08-01

    The gyrokinetic formalism for linear electromagnetic waves of arbitrary frequency in general magnetic-field configurations is extended to include full relativistic effects. The derivation employs the small adiabaticity parameter rho/L 0 where rho is the Larmor radius and L 0 the equilibrium scale length. The effects of the plasma and magnetic field inhomogeneities and finite Larmor-radii effects are also contained

  11. Uncertainty of pesticide residue concentration determined from ordinary and weighted linear regression curve.

    Yolci Omeroglu, Perihan; Ambrus, Árpad; Boyacioglu, Dilek

    2018-03-28

    Determination of pesticide residues is based on calibration curves constructed for each batch of analysis. Calibration standard solutions are prepared from a known amount of reference material at different concentration levels covering the concentration range of the analyte in the analysed samples. In the scope of this study, the applicability of both ordinary linear and weighted linear regression (OLR and WLR) for pesticide residue analysis was investigated. We used 782 multipoint calibration curves obtained for 72 different analytical batches with high-pressure liquid chromatography equipped with an ultraviolet detector, and gas chromatography with electron capture, nitrogen phosphorus or mass spectrophotometer detectors. Quality criteria of the linear curves including regression coefficient, standard deviation of relative residuals and deviation of back calculated concentrations were calculated both for WLR and OLR methods. Moreover, the relative uncertainty of the predicted analyte concentration was estimated for both methods. It was concluded that calibration curve based on WLR complies with all the quality criteria set by international guidelines compared to those calculated with OLR. It means that all the data fit well with WLR for pesticide residue analysis. It was estimated that, regardless of the actual concentration range of the calibration, relative uncertainty at the lowest calibrated level ranged between 0.3% and 113.7% for OLR and between 0.2% and 22.1% for WLR. At or above 1/3 of the calibrated range, uncertainty of calibration curve ranged between 0.1% and 16.3% for OLR and 0% and 12.2% for WLR, and therefore, the two methods gave comparable results.

  12. Calculations of stationary solutions for the non linear viscous resistive MHD equations in slab geometry

    Edery, D.

    1983-11-01

    The reduced system of the non linear resistive MHD equations is used in the 2-D one helicity approximation in the numerical computations of stationary tearing modes. The critical magnetic Raynolds number S (S=tausub(r)/tausub(H) where tausub(R) and tausub(H) are respectively the characteristic resistive and hydro magnetic times) and the corresponding linear solution are computed as a starting approximation for the full non linear equations. These equations are then treated numerically by an iterative procedure which is shown to be rapidly convergent. A numerical application is given in the last part of this paper

  13. Heteroscedasticity as a Basis of Direction Dependence in Reversible Linear Regression Models.

    Wiedermann, Wolfgang; Artner, Richard; von Eye, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Heteroscedasticity is a well-known issue in linear regression modeling. When heteroscedasticity is observed, researchers are advised to remedy possible model misspecification of the explanatory part of the model (e.g., considering alternative functional forms and/or omitted variables). The present contribution discusses another source of heteroscedasticity in observational data: Directional model misspecifications in the case of nonnormal variables. Directional misspecification refers to situations where alternative models are equally likely to explain the data-generating process (e.g., x → y versus y → x). It is shown that the homoscedasticity assumption is likely to be violated in models that erroneously treat true nonnormal predictors as response variables. Recently, Direction Dependence Analysis (DDA) has been proposed as a framework to empirically evaluate the direction of effects in linear models. The present study links the phenomenon of heteroscedasticity with DDA and describes visual diagnostics and nine homoscedasticity tests that can be used to make decisions concerning the direction of effects in linear models. Results of a Monte Carlo simulation that demonstrate the adequacy of the approach are presented. An empirical example is provided, and applicability of the methodology in cases of violated assumptions is discussed.

  14. Biomass estimates of freshwater zooplankton from length-carbon regression equations

    Patrizia COMOLI

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available We present length/carbon regression equations of zooplankton species collected from Lake Maggiore (N. Italy during 1992. The results are discussed in terms of the environmental factors, e.g. food availability, predation, controlling biomass production of particle- feeders and predators in the pelagic system of lakes. The marked seasonality in the length-standardized carbon content of Daphnia, and its time-specific trend suggest that from spring onward food availability for Daphnia population may be regarded as a simple decay function. Seasonality does not affect the carbon content/unit length of the two predator Cladocera Leptodora kindtii and Bythotrephes longimanus. Predation is probably the most important regulating factor for the seasonal dynamics of their carbon biomass. The existence of a constant factor to convert the diameter of Conochilus colonies into carbon seems reasonable for an organism whose population comes on quickly and just as quickly disappears.

  15. A land use regression model for ambient ultrafine particles in Montreal, Canada: A comparison of linear regression and a machine learning approach.

    Weichenthal, Scott; Ryswyk, Keith Van; Goldstein, Alon; Bagg, Scott; Shekkarizfard, Maryam; Hatzopoulou, Marianne

    2016-04-01

    Existing evidence suggests that ambient ultrafine particles (UFPs) (regression model for UFPs in Montreal, Canada using mobile monitoring data collected from 414 road segments during the summer and winter months between 2011 and 2012. Two different approaches were examined for model development including standard multivariable linear regression and a machine learning approach (kernel-based regularized least squares (KRLS)) that learns the functional form of covariate impacts on ambient UFP concentrations from the data. The final models included parameters for population density, ambient temperature and wind speed, land use parameters (park space and open space), length of local roads and rail, and estimated annual average NOx emissions from traffic. The final multivariable linear regression model explained 62% of the spatial variation in ambient UFP concentrations whereas the KRLS model explained 79% of the variance. The KRLS model performed slightly better than the linear regression model when evaluated using an external dataset (R(2)=0.58 vs. 0.55) or a cross-validation procedure (R(2)=0.67 vs. 0.60). In general, our findings suggest that the KRLS approach may offer modest improvements in predictive performance compared to standard multivariable linear regression models used to estimate spatial variations in ambient UFPs. However, differences in predictive performance were not statistically significant when evaluated using the cross-validation procedure. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Estimating leaf photosynthetic pigments information by stepwise multiple linear regression analysis and a leaf optical model

    Liu, Pudong; Shi, Runhe; Wang, Hong; Bai, Kaixu; Gao, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Leaf pigments are key elements for plant photosynthesis and growth. Traditional manual sampling of these pigments is labor-intensive and costly, which also has the difficulty in capturing their temporal and spatial characteristics. The aim of this work is to estimate photosynthetic pigments at large scale by remote sensing. For this purpose, inverse model were proposed with the aid of stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR) analysis. Furthermore, a leaf radiative transfer model (i.e. PROSPECT model) was employed to simulate the leaf reflectance where wavelength varies from 400 to 780 nm at 1 nm interval, and then these values were treated as the data from remote sensing observations. Meanwhile, simulated chlorophyll concentration (Cab), carotenoid concentration (Car) and their ratio (Cab/Car) were taken as target to build the regression model respectively. In this study, a total of 4000 samples were simulated via PROSPECT with different Cab, Car and leaf mesophyll structures as 70% of these samples were applied for training while the last 30% for model validation. Reflectance (r) and its mathematic transformations (1/r and log (1/r)) were all employed to build regression model respectively. Results showed fair agreements between pigments and simulated reflectance with all adjusted coefficients of determination (R2) larger than 0.8 as 6 wavebands were selected to build the SMLR model. The largest value of R2 for Cab, Car and Cab/Car are 0.8845, 0.876 and 0.8765, respectively. Meanwhile, mathematic transformations of reflectance showed little influence on regression accuracy. We concluded that it was feasible to estimate the chlorophyll and carotenoids and their ratio based on statistical model with leaf reflectance data.

  17. Boosted regression trees, multivariate adaptive regression splines and their two-step combinations with multiple linear regression or partial least squares to predict blood-brain barrier passage: a case study.

    Deconinck, E; Zhang, M H; Petitet, F; Dubus, E; Ijjaali, I; Coomans, D; Vander Heyden, Y

    2008-02-18

    The use of some unconventional non-linear modeling techniques, i.e. classification and regression trees and multivariate adaptive regression splines-based methods, was explored to model the blood-brain barrier (BBB) passage of drugs and drug-like molecules. The data set contains BBB passage values for 299 structural and pharmacological diverse drugs, originating from a structured knowledge-based database. Models were built using boosted regression trees (BRT) and multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), as well as their respective combinations with stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) and partial least squares (PLS) regression in two-step approaches. The best models were obtained using combinations of MARS with either stepwise MLR or PLS. It could be concluded that the use of combinations of a linear with a non-linear modeling technique results in some improved properties compared to the individual linear and non-linear models and that, when the use of such a combination is appropriate, combinations using MARS as non-linear technique should be preferred over those with BRT, due to some serious drawbacks of the BRT approaches.

  18. An Etude in non-linear Dyson-Schwinger Equations

    Kreimer, Dirk; Yeats, Karen

    2006-01-01

    We show how to use the Hopf algebra structure of quantum field theory to derive nonperturbative results for the short-distance singular sector of a renormalizable quantum field theory in a simple but generic example. We discuss renormalized Green functions G R (α,L) in such circumstances which depend on a single scale L=lnq 2 /μ 2 and start from an expansion in the scale G R (α,L)=1+-bar k γ k (α)L k . We derive recursion relations between the γ k which make full use of the renormalization group. We then show how to determine the Green function by the use of a Mellin transform on suitable integral kernels. We exhibit our approach in an example for which we find a functional equation relating weak and strong coupling expansions

  19. Daily Suspended Sediment Discharge Prediction Using Multiple Linear Regression and Artificial Neural Network

    Uca; Toriman, Ekhwan; Jaafar, Othman; Maru, Rosmini; Arfan, Amal; Saleh Ahmar, Ansari

    2018-01-01

    Prediction of suspended sediment discharge in a catchments area is very important because it can be used to evaluation the erosion hazard, management of its water resources, water quality, hydrology project management (dams, reservoirs, and irrigation) and to determine the extent of the damage that occurred in the catchments. Multiple Linear Regression analysis and artificial neural network can be used to predict the amount of daily suspended sediment discharge. Regression analysis using the least square method, whereas artificial neural networks using Radial Basis Function (RBF) and feedforward multilayer perceptron with three learning algorithms namely Levenberg-Marquardt (LM), Scaled Conjugate Descent (SCD) and Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno Quasi-Newton (BFGS). The number neuron of hidden layer is three to sixteen, while in output layer only one neuron because only one output target. The mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), coefficient of determination (R2 ) and coefficient of efficiency (CE) of the multiple linear regression (MLRg) value Model 2 (6 input variable independent) has the lowest the value of MAE and RMSE (0.0000002 and 13.6039) and highest R2 and CE (0.9971 and 0.9971). When compared between LM, SCG and RBF, the BFGS model structure 3-7-1 is the better and more accurate to prediction suspended sediment discharge in Jenderam catchment. The performance value in testing process, MAE and RMSE (13.5769 and 17.9011) is smallest, meanwhile R2 and CE (0.9999 and 0.9998) is the highest if it compared with the another BFGS Quasi-Newton model (6-3-1, 9-10-1 and 12-12-1). Based on the performance statistics value, MLRg, LM, SCG, BFGS and RBF suitable and accurately for prediction by modeling the non-linear complex behavior of suspended sediment responses to rainfall, water depth and discharge. The comparison between artificial neural network (ANN) and MLRg, the MLRg Model 2 accurately for to prediction suspended sediment discharge (kg

  20. Shield Optimization and Formulation of Regression Equations for Split-Ring Resonator

    Tahir Ejaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave resonators are widely used for numerous applications including communication, biomedical and chemical applications, material testing, and food grading. Split-ring resonators in both planar and nonplanar forms are a simple structure which has been in use for several decades. This type of resonator is characterized with low cost, ease of fabrication, moderate quality factor, low external noise interference, high stability, and so forth. Due to these attractive features and ease in handling, nonplanar form of structure has been utilized for material characterization in 1–5 GHz range. Resonant frequency and quality factor are two important parameters for determination of material properties utilizing perturbation theory. Shield made of conducting material is utilized to enclose split-ring resonator which enhances quality factor. This work presents a novel technique to develop shield around a predesigned nonplanar split-ring resonator to yield optimized quality factor. Based on this technique and statistical analysis regression equations have also been formulated for resonant frequency and quality factor which is a major outcome of this work. These equations quantify dependence of output parameters on various factors of shield made of different materials. Such analysis is instrumental in development of devices/designs where improved/optimum result is required.

  1. Perturbations of linear delay differential equations at the verge of instability.

    Lingala, N; Namachchivaya, N Sri

    2016-06-01

    The characteristic equation for a linear delay differential equation (DDE) has countably infinite roots on the complex plane. This paper considers linear DDEs that are on the verge of instability, i.e., a pair of roots of the characteristic equation lies on the imaginary axis of the complex plane and all other roots have negative real parts. It is shown that when small noise perturbations are present, the probability distribution of the dynamics can be approximated by the probability distribution of a certain one-dimensional stochastic differential equation (SDE) without delay. This is advantageous because equations without delay are easier to simulate and one-dimensional SDEs are analytically tractable. When the perturbations are also linear, it is shown that the stability depends on a specific complex number. The theory is applied to study oscillators with delayed feedback. Some errors in other articles that use multiscale approach are pointed out.

  2. Excited-state lifetime measurements: Linearization of the Foerster equation by the phase-plane method

    Love, J.C.; Demas, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The Foerster equation describes excited-state decay curves involving resonance intermolecular energy transfer. A linearized solution based on the phase-plane method has been developed. The new method is quick, insensitive to the fitting region, accurate, and precise

  3. Stability of the trivial solution for linear stochastic differential equations with Poisson white noise

    Grigoriu, Mircea; Samorodnitsky, Gennady

    2004-01-01

    Two methods are considered for assessing the asymptotic stability of the trivial solution of linear stochastic differential equations driven by Poisson white noise, interpreted as the formal derivative of a compound Poisson process. The first method attempts to extend a result for diffusion processes satisfying linear stochastic differential equations to the case of linear equations with Poisson white noise. The developments for the method are based on Ito's formula for semimartingales and Lyapunov exponents. The second method is based on a geometric ergodic theorem for Markov chains providing a criterion for the asymptotic stability of the solution of linear stochastic differential equations with Poisson white noise. Two examples are presented to illustrate the use and evaluate the potential of the two methods. The examples demonstrate limitations of the first method and the generality of the second method

  4. An implicit iterative scheme for solving large systems of linear equations

    Barry, J.M.; Pollard, J.P.

    1986-12-01

    An implicit iterative scheme for the solution of large systems of linear equations arising from neutron diffusion studies is presented. The method is applied to three-dimensional reactor studies and its performance is compared with alternative iterative approaches

  5. Solution of linear transport equation using Chebyshev polynomials and Laplace transform

    Cardona, A.V.; Vilhena, M.T.M.B. de

    1994-01-01

    The Chebyshev polynomials and the Laplace transform are combined to solve, analytically, the linear transport equation in planar geometry, considering isotropic scattering and the one-group model. Numerical simulation is presented. (author)

  6. On a class of strongly degenerate and singular linear elliptic equation

    Duong Minh Duc, D.M.; Le Dung.

    1992-11-01

    We consider a class of strongly degenerate linear elliptic equation. The boundedness and the Holder regularity of the weak solutions in the weighted Sobolev-Hardy spaces will be studied. (author). 9 refs

  7. SUPPORTING STUDENTS’ UNDERSTANDING OF LINEAR EQUATIONS WITH ONE VARIABLE USING ALGEBRA TILES

    Sari Saraswati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to describe how algebra tiles can support students’ understanding of linear equations with one variable. This article is a part of a larger research on learning design of linear equations with one variable using algebra tiles combined with balancing method. Therefore, it will merely discuss one activity focused on how students use the algebra tiles to find a method to solve linear equations with one variable. Design research was used as an approach in this study. It consists of three phases, namely preliminary design, teaching experiment and retrospective analysis. Video registrations, students’ written works, pre-test, post-test, field notes, and interview are technic to collect data. The data were analyzed by comparing the hypothetical learning trajectory (HLT and the actual learning process. The result shows that algebra tiles could supports students’ understanding to find the formal solution of linear equation with one variable.

  8. Generalized Partially Linear Regression with Misclassified Data and an Application to Labour Market Transitions

    Dlugosz, Stephan; Mammen, Enno; Wilke, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Large data sets that originate from administrative or operational activity are increasingly used for statistical analysis as they often contain very precise information and a large number of observations. But there is evidence that some variables can be subject to severe misclassification...... or contain missing values. Given the size of the data, a flexible semiparametric misclassification model would be good choice but their use in practise is scarce. To close this gap a semiparametric model for the probability of observing labour market transitions is estimated using a sample of 20 m...... observations from Germany. It is shown that estimated marginal effects of a number of covariates are sizeably affected by misclassification and missing values in the analysis data. The proposed generalized partially linear regression extends existing models by allowing a misclassified discrete covariate...

  9. hMuLab: A Biomedical Hybrid MUlti-LABel Classifier Based on Multiple Linear Regression.

    Wang, Pu; Ge, Ruiquan; Xiao, Xuan; Zhou, Manli; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2017-01-01

    Many biomedical classification problems are multi-label by nature, e.g., a gene involved in a variety of functions and a patient with multiple diseases. The majority of existing classification algorithms assumes each sample with only one class label, and the multi-label classification problem remains to be a challenge for biomedical researchers. This study proposes a novel multi-label learning algorithm, hMuLab, by integrating both feature-based and neighbor-based similarity scores. The multiple linear regression modeling techniques make hMuLab capable of producing multiple label assignments for a query sample. The comparison results over six commonly-used multi-label performance measurements suggest that hMuLab performs accurately and stably for the biomedical datasets, and may serve as a complement to the existing literature.

  10. Linear regression models and k-means clustering for statistical analysis of fNIRS data.

    Bonomini, Viola; Zucchelli, Lucia; Re, Rebecca; Ieva, Francesca; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Contini, Davide; Paganoni, Anna; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new algorithm, based on a linear regression model, to statistically estimate the hemodynamic activations in fNIRS data sets. The main concern guiding the algorithm development was the minimization of assumptions and approximations made on the data set for the application of statistical tests. Further, we propose a K-means method to cluster fNIRS data (i.e. channels) as activated or not activated. The methods were validated both on simulated and in vivo fNIRS data. A time domain (TD) fNIRS technique was preferred because of its high performances in discriminating cortical activation and superficial physiological changes. However, the proposed method is also applicable to continuous wave or frequency domain fNIRS data sets.

  11. Multiple Linear Regression Model Based on Neural Network and Its Application in the MBR Simulation

    Chunqing Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The computer simulation of the membrane bioreactor MBR has become the research focus of the MBR simulation. In order to compensate for the defects, for example, long test period, high cost, invisible equipment seal, and so forth, on the basis of conducting in-depth study of the mathematical model of the MBR, combining with neural network theory, this paper proposed a three-dimensional simulation system for MBR wastewater treatment, with fast speed, high efficiency, and good visualization. The system is researched and developed with the hybrid programming of VC++ programming language and OpenGL, with a multifactor linear regression model of affecting MBR membrane fluxes based on neural network, applying modeling method of integer instead of float and quad tree recursion. The experiments show that the three-dimensional simulation system, using the above models and methods, has the inspiration and reference for the future research and application of the MBR simulation technology.

  12. Railway Crossing Risk Area Detection Using Linear Regression and Terrain Drop Compensation Techniques

    Chen, Wen-Yuan; Wang, Mei; Fu, Zhou-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Most railway accidents happen at railway crossings. Therefore, how to detect humans or objects present in the risk area of a railway crossing and thus prevent accidents are important tasks. In this paper, three strategies are used to detect the risk area of a railway crossing: (1) we use a terrain drop compensation (TDC) technique to solve the problem of the concavity of railway crossings; (2) we use a linear regression technique to predict the position and length of an object from image processing; (3) we have developed a novel strategy called calculating local maximum Y-coordinate object points (CLMYOP) to obtain the ground points of the object. In addition, image preprocessing is also applied to filter out the noise and successfully improve the object detection. From the experimental results, it is demonstrated that our scheme is an effective and corrective method for the detection of railway crossing risk areas. PMID:24936948

  13. Railway Crossing Risk Area Detection Using Linear Regression and Terrain Drop Compensation Techniques

    Wen-Yuan Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Most railway accidents happen at railway crossings. Therefore, how to detect humans or objects present in the risk area of a railway crossing and thus prevent accidents are important tasks. In this paper, three strategies are used to detect the risk area of a railway crossing: (1 we use a terrain drop compensation (TDC technique to solve the problem of the concavity of railway crossings; (2 we use a linear regression technique to predict the position and length of an object from image processing; (3 we have developed a novel strategy called calculating local maximum Y-coordinate object points (CLMYOP to obtain the ground points of the object. In addition, image preprocessing is also applied to filter out the noise and successfully improve the object detection. From the experimental results, it is demonstrated that our scheme is an effective and corrective method for the detection of railway crossing risk areas.

  14. Matrix form of Legendre polynomials for solving linear integro-differential equations of high order

    Kammuji, M.; Eshkuvatov, Z. K.; Yunus, Arif A. M.

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents an effective approximate solution of high order of Fredholm-Volterra integro-differential equations (FVIDEs) with boundary condition. Legendre truncated series is used as a basis functions to estimate the unknown function. Matrix operation of Legendre polynomials is used to transform FVIDEs with boundary conditions into matrix equation of Fredholm-Volterra type. Gauss Legendre quadrature formula and collocation method are applied to transfer the matrix equation into system of linear algebraic equations. The latter equation is solved by Gauss elimination method. The accuracy and validity of this method are discussed by solving two numerical examples and comparisons with wavelet and methods.

  15. Predicting Fuel Ignition Quality Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Multiple Linear Regression

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2016-09-14

    An improved model for the prediction of ignition quality of hydrocarbon fuels has been developed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multiple linear regression (MLR) modeling. Cetane number (CN) and derived cetane number (DCN) of 71 pure hydrocarbons and 54 hydrocarbon blends were utilized as a data set to study the relationship between ignition quality and molecular structure. CN and DCN are functional equivalents and collectively referred to as D/CN, herein. The effect of molecular weight and weight percent of structural parameters such as paraffinic CH3 groups, paraffinic CH2 groups, paraffinic CH groups, olefinic CH–CH2 groups, naphthenic CH–CH2 groups, and aromatic C–CH groups on D/CN was studied. A particular emphasis on the effect of branching (i.e., methyl substitution) on the D/CN was studied, and a new parameter denoted as the branching index (BI) was introduced to quantify this effect. A new formula was developed to calculate the BI of hydrocarbon fuels using 1H NMR spectroscopy. Multiple linear regression (MLR) modeling was used to develop an empirical relationship between D/CN and the eight structural parameters. This was then used to predict the DCN of many hydrocarbon fuels. The developed model has a high correlation coefficient (R2 = 0.97) and was validated with experimentally measured DCN of twenty-two real fuel mixtures (e.g., gasolines and diesels) and fifty-nine blends of known composition, and the predicted values matched well with the experimental data.

  16. Standardizing effect size from linear regression models with log-transformed variables for meta-analysis.

    Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Tobías, Aurelio; Redondo, Daniel; Molina-Portillo, Elena; Sánchez, María José

    2017-03-17

    Meta-analysis is very useful to summarize the effect of a treatment or a risk factor for a given disease. Often studies report results based on log-transformed variables in order to achieve the principal assumptions of a linear regression model. If this is the case for some, but not all studies, the effects need to be homogenized. We derived a set of formulae to transform absolute changes into relative ones, and vice versa, to allow including all results in a meta-analysis. We applied our procedure to all possible combinations of log-transformed independent or dependent variables. We also evaluated it in a simulation based on two variables either normally or asymmetrically distributed. In all the scenarios, and based on different change criteria, the effect size estimated by the derived set of formulae was equivalent to the real effect size. To avoid biased estimates of the effect, this procedure should be used with caution in the case of independent variables with asymmetric distributions that significantly differ from the normal distribution. We illustrate an application of this procedure by an application to a meta-analysis on the potential effects on neurodevelopment in children exposed to arsenic and manganese. The procedure proposed has been shown to be valid and capable of expressing the effect size of a linear regression model based on different change criteria in the variables. Homogenizing the results from different studies beforehand allows them to be combined in a meta-analysis, independently of whether the transformations had been performed on the dependent and/or independent variables.

  17. Multiple linear combination (MLC) regression tests for common variants adapted to linkage disequilibrium structure.

    Yoo, Yun Joo; Sun, Lei; Poirier, Julia G; Paterson, Andrew D; Bull, Shelley B

    2017-02-01

    By jointly analyzing multiple variants within a gene, instead of one at a time, gene-based multiple regression can improve power, robustness, and interpretation in genetic association analysis. We investigate multiple linear combination (MLC) test statistics for analysis of common variants under realistic trait models with linkage disequilibrium (LD) based on HapMap Asian haplotypes. MLC is a directional test that exploits LD structure in a gene to construct clusters of closely correlated variants recoded such that the majority of pairwise correlations are positive. It combines variant effects within the same cluster linearly, and aggregates cluster-specific effects in a quadratic sum of squares and cross-products, producing a test statistic with reduced degrees of freedom (df) equal to the number of clusters. By simulation studies of 1000 genes from across the genome, we demonstrate that MLC is a well-powered and robust choice among existing methods across a broad range of gene structures. Compared to minimum P-value, variance-component, and principal-component methods, the mean power of MLC is never much lower than that of other methods, and can be higher, particularly with multiple causal variants. Moreover, the variation in gene-specific MLC test size and power across 1000 genes is less than that of other methods, suggesting it is a complementary approach for discovery in genome-wide analysis. The cluster construction of the MLC test statistics helps reveal within-gene LD structure, allowing interpretation of clustered variants as haplotypic effects, while multiple regression helps to distinguish direct and indirect associations. © 2016 The Authors Genetic Epidemiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method for Solving the Linear Fredholm Integral Equations of the First Kind

    Mohammad Almousa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present the use of a semi analytical method called the optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM for solving the linear Fredholm integral equations of the first kind. Three examples are discussed to show the ability of the method to solve the linear Fredholm integral equations of the first kind. The results indicated that the method is very effective and simple.

  19. Some applications of linear difference equations in finance with wolfram|alpha and maple

    Dana Rıhová

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The principle objective of this paper is to show how linear difference equations can be applied to solve some issues of financial mathematics. We focus on the area of compound interest and annuities. In both cases we determine appropriate recursive rules, which constitute the first order linear difference equations with constant coefficients, and derive formulas required for calculating examples. Finally, we present possibilities of application of two selected computer algebra systems Wolfram|Alpha and Maple in this mathematical area.

  20. Solving Linear Equations by Classical Jacobi-SR Based Hybrid Evolutionary Algorithm with Uniform Adaptation Technique

    Jamali, R. M. Jalal Uddin; Hashem, M. M. A.; Hasan, M. Mahfuz; Rahman, Md. Bazlar

    2013-01-01

    Solving a set of simultaneous linear equations is probably the most important topic in numerical methods. For solving linear equations, iterative methods are preferred over the direct methods especially when the coefficient matrix is sparse. The rate of convergence of iteration method is increased by using Successive Relaxation (SR) technique. But SR technique is very much sensitive to relaxation factor, {\\omega}. Recently, hybridization of classical Gauss-Seidel based successive relaxation t...

  1. Growth of meromorphic solutions of higher-order linear differential equations

    Wenjuan Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the higher-order linear differential equations with meromorphic coefficients. We improve and extend a result of M.S. Liu and C.L. Yuan, by using the estimates for the logarithmic derivative of a transcendental meromorphic function due to Gundersen, and the extended Winman-Valiron theory which proved by J. Wang and H.X. Yi. In addition, we also consider the nonhomogeneous linear differential equations.

  2. Solution of linear ordinary differential equations by means of the method of variation of arbitrary constants

    Mejlbro, Leif

    1997-01-01

    An alternative formula for the solution of linear differential equations of order n is suggested. When applicable, the suggested method requires fewer and simpler computations than the well-known method using Wronskians.......An alternative formula for the solution of linear differential equations of order n is suggested. When applicable, the suggested method requires fewer and simpler computations than the well-known method using Wronskians....

  3. A SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE CHILDBEARING COEFFICIENT IN THE ALTAI REGION BASED ON METHOD OF FUZZY LINEAR REGRESSION

    Sergei Vladimirovich Varaksin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Construction of a mathematical model of the dynamics of childbearing change in the Altai region in 2000–2016, analysis of the dynamics of changes in birth rates for multiple age categories of women of childbearing age. Methodology. A auxiliary analysis element is the construction of linear mathematical models of the dynamics of childbearing by using fuzzy linear regression method based on fuzzy numbers. Fuzzy linear regression is considered as an alternative to standard statistical linear regression for short time series and unknown distribution law. The parameters of fuzzy linear and standard statistical regressions for childbearing time series were defined with using the built in language MatLab algorithm. Method of fuzzy linear regression is not used in sociological researches yet. Results. There are made the conclusions about the socio-demographic changes in society, the high efficiency of the demographic policy of the leadership of the region and the country, and the applicability of the method of fuzzy linear regression for sociological analysis.

  4. Direct integral linear least square regression method for kinetic evaluation of hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    Shuke, Noriyuki

    1991-01-01

    In hepatobiliary scintigraphy, kinetic model analysis, which provides kinetic parameters like hepatic extraction or excretion rate, have been done for quantitative evaluation of liver function. In this analysis, unknown model parameters are usually determined using nonlinear least square regression method (NLS method) where iterative calculation and initial estimate for unknown parameters are required. As a simple alternative to NLS method, direct integral linear least square regression method (DILS method), which can determine model parameters by a simple calculation without initial estimate, is proposed, and tested the applicability to analysis of hepatobiliary scintigraphy. In order to see whether DILS method could determine model parameters as good as NLS method, or to determine appropriate weight for DILS method, simulated theoretical data based on prefixed parameters were fitted to 1 compartment model using both DILS method with various weightings and NLS method. The parameter values obtained were then compared with prefixed values which were used for data generation. The effect of various weights on the error of parameter estimate was examined, and inverse of time was found to be the best weight to make the error minimum. When using this weight, DILS method could give parameter values close to those obtained by NLS method and both parameter values were very close to prefixed values. With appropriate weighting, the DILS method could provide reliable parameter estimate which is relatively insensitive to the data noise. In conclusion, the DILS method could be used as a simple alternative to NLS method, providing reliable parameter estimate. (author)

  5. Neck-focused panic attacks among Cambodian refugees; a logistic and linear regression analysis.

    Hinton, Devon E; Chhean, Dara; Pich, Vuth; Um, Khin; Fama, Jeanne M; Pollack, Mark H

    2006-01-01

    Consecutive Cambodian refugees attending a psychiatric clinic were assessed for the presence and severity of current--i.e., at least one episode in the last month--neck-focused panic. Among the whole sample (N=130), in a logistic regression analysis, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI; odds ratio=3.70) and the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS; odds ratio=2.61) significantly predicted the presence of current neck panic (NP). Among the neck panic patients (N=60), in the linear regression analysis, NP severity was significantly predicted by NP-associated flashbacks (beta=.42), NP-associated catastrophic cognitions (beta=.22), and CAPS score (beta=.28). Further analysis revealed the effect of the CAPS score to be significantly mediated (Sobel test [Baron, R. M., & Kenny, D. A. (1986). The moderator-mediator variable distinction in social psychological research: conceptual, strategic, and statistical considerations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 51, 1173-1182]) by both NP-associated flashbacks and catastrophic cognitions. In the care of traumatized Cambodian refugees, NP severity, as well as NP-associated flashbacks and catastrophic cognitions, should be specifically assessed and treated.

  6. QSAR Study of Insecticides of Phthalamide Derivatives Using Multiple Linear Regression and Artificial Neural Network Methods

    Adi Syahputra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR for 21 insecticides of phthalamides containing hydrazone (PCH was studied using multiple linear regression (MLR, principle component regression (PCR and artificial neural network (ANN. Five descriptors were included in the model for MLR and ANN analysis, and five latent variables obtained from principle component analysis (PCA were used in PCR analysis. Calculation of descriptors was performed using semi-empirical PM6 method. ANN analysis was found to be superior statistical technique compared to the other methods and gave a good correlation between descriptors and activity (r2 = 0.84. Based on the obtained model, we have successfully designed some new insecticides with higher predicted activity than those of previously synthesized compounds, e.g.2-(decalinecarbamoyl-5-chloro-N’-((5-methylthiophen-2-ylmethylene benzohydrazide, 2-(decalinecarbamoyl-5-chloro-N’-((thiophen-2-yl-methylene benzohydrazide and 2-(decaline carbamoyl-N’-(4-fluorobenzylidene-5-chlorobenzohydrazide with predicted log LC50 of 1.640, 1.672, and 1.769 respectively.

  7. Bayesian linear regression with skew-symmetric error distributions with applications to survival analysis

    Rubio, Francisco J.

    2016-02-09

    We study Bayesian linear regression models with skew-symmetric scale mixtures of normal error distributions. These kinds of models can be used to capture departures from the usual assumption of normality of the errors in terms of heavy tails and asymmetry. We propose a general noninformative prior structure for these regression models and show that the corresponding posterior distribution is proper under mild conditions. We extend these propriety results to cases where the response variables are censored. The latter scenario is of interest in the context of accelerated failure time models, which are relevant in survival analysis. We present a simulation study that demonstrates good frequentist properties of the posterior credible intervals associated with the proposed priors. This study also sheds some light on the trade-off between increased model flexibility and the risk of over-fitting. We illustrate the performance of the proposed models with real data. Although we focus on models with univariate response variables, we also present some extensions to the multivariate case in the Supporting Information.

  8. Large-time asymptotic behaviour of solutions of non-linear Sobolev-type equations

    Kaikina, Elena I; Naumkin, Pavel I; Shishmarev, Il'ya A

    2009-01-01

    The large-time asymptotic behaviour of solutions of the Cauchy problem is investigated for a non-linear Sobolev-type equation with dissipation. For small initial data the approach taken is based on a detailed analysis of the Green's function of the linear problem and the use of the contraction mapping method. The case of large initial data is also closely considered. In the supercritical case the asymptotic formulae are quasi-linear. The asymptotic behaviour of solutions of a non-linear Sobolev-type equation with a critical non-linearity of the non-convective kind differs by a logarithmic correction term from the behaviour of solutions of the corresponding linear equation. For a critical convective non-linearity, as well as for a subcritical non-convective non-linearity it is proved that the leading term of the asymptotic expression for large times is a self-similar solution. For Sobolev equations with convective non-linearity the asymptotic behaviour of solutions in the subcritical case is the product of a rarefaction wave and a shock wave. Bibliography: 84 titles.

  9. A simplified calculation procedure for mass isotopomer distribution analysis (MIDA) based on multiple linear regression.

    Fernández-Fernández, Mario; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a novel, rapid and easy calculation procedure for Mass Isotopomer Distribution Analysis based on multiple linear regression which allows the simultaneous calculation of the precursor pool enrichment and the fraction of newly synthesized labelled proteins (fractional synthesis) using linear algebra. To test this approach, we used the peptide RGGGLK as a model tryptic peptide containing three subunits of glycine. We selected glycine labelled in two 13 C atoms ( 13 C 2 -glycine) as labelled amino acid to demonstrate that spectral overlap is not a problem in the proposed methodology. The developed methodology was tested first in vitro by changing the precursor pool enrichment from 10 to 40% of 13 C 2 -glycine. Secondly, a simulated in vivo synthesis of proteins was designed by combining the natural abundance RGGGLK peptide and 10 or 20% 13 C 2 -glycine at 1 : 1, 1 : 3 and 3 : 1 ratios. Precursor pool enrichments and fractional synthesis values were calculated with satisfactory precision and accuracy using a simple spreadsheet. This novel approach can provide a relatively rapid and easy means to measure protein turnover based on stable isotope tracers. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Describing Growth Pattern of Bali Cows Using Non-linear Regression Models

    Mohd. Hafiz A.W

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the best fit non-linear regression model to describe the growth pattern of Bali cows. Estimates of asymptotic mature weight, rate of maturing and constant of integration were derived from Brody, von Bertalanffy, Gompertz and Logistic models which were fitted to cross-sectional data of body weight taken from 74 Bali cows raised in MARDI Research Station Muadzam Shah Pahang. Coefficient of determination (R2 and residual mean squares (MSE were used to determine the best fit model in describing the growth pattern of Bali cows. Von Bertalanffy model was the best model among the four growth functions evaluated to determine the mature weight of Bali cattle as shown by the highest R2 and lowest MSE values (0.973 and 601.9, respectively, followed by Gompertz (0.972 and 621.2, respectively, Logistic (0.971 and 648.4, respectively and Brody (0.932 and 660.5, respectively models. The correlation between rate of maturing and mature weight was found to be negative in the range of -0.170 to -0.929 for all models, indicating that animals of heavier mature weight had lower rate of maturing. The use of non-linear model could summarize the weight-age relationship into several biologically interpreted parameters compared to the entire lifespan weight-age data points that are difficult and time consuming to interpret.

  11. Association of footprint measurements with plantar kinetics: a linear regression model.

    Fascione, Jeanna M; Crews, Ryan T; Wrobel, James S

    2014-03-01

    The use of foot measurements to classify morphology and interpret foot function remains one of the focal concepts of lower-extremity biomechanics. However, only 27% to 55% of midfoot variance in foot pressures has been determined in the most comprehensive models. We investigated whether dynamic walking footprint measurements are associated with inter-individual foot loading variability. Thirty individuals (15 men and 15 women; mean ± SD age, 27.17 ± 2.21 years) walked at a self-selected speed over an electronic pedography platform using the midgait technique. Kinetic variables (contact time, peak pressure, pressure-time integral, and force-time integral) were collected for six masked regions. Footprints were digitized for area and linear boundaries using digital photo planimetry software. Six footprint measurements were determined: contact area, footprint index, arch index, truncated arch index, Chippaux-Smirak index, and Staheli index. Linear regression analysis with a Bonferroni adjustment was performed to determine the association between the footprint measurements and each of the kinetic variables. The findings demonstrate that a relationship exists between increased midfoot contact and increased kinetic values in respective locations. Many of these variables produced large effect sizes while describing 38% to 71% of the common variance of select plantar kinetic variables in the medial midfoot region. In addition, larger footprints were associated with larger kinetic values at the medial heel region and both masked forefoot regions. Dynamic footprint measurements are associated with dynamic plantar loading kinetics, with emphasis on the midfoot region.

  12. A linear functional differential equation with distributions in the input

    Vadim Z. Tsalyuk

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the functional differential equation $$ dot x(t = int_a^t {d_s R(t,s, x(s} + F'(t, quad t in [a,b], $$ where $F'$ is a generalized derivative, and $R(t,cdot$ and $F$ are functions of bounded variation. A solution is defined by the difference $x - F$ being absolutely continuous and satisfying the inclusion $$ frac{d}{dt} (x(t - F(t in int_a^t {d_s R(t,s,x(s}. $$ Here, the integral in the right is the multivalued Stieltjes integral presented in cite{VTs1} (in this article we review and extend the results in cite{VTs1}. We show that the solution set for the initial-value problem is nonempty, compact, and convex. A solution $x$ is said to have memory if there exists the function $x$ such that $x(a = x(a$, $x(b = x(b$, $ x(t in [x(t-0,x(t+0]$ for $t in (a,b$, and $frac{d}{dt} (x(t - F(t = int_a^t {d_s R(t,s,{x}(s}$, where Lebesgue-Stieltjes integral is used. We show that such solutions form a nonempty, compact, and convex set. It is shown that solutions with memory obey the Cauchy-type formula $$ x(t in C(t,ax(a + int_a^t C(t,s, dF(s. $$

  13. Factorization of a class of almost linear second-order differential equations

    Estevez, P G; Kuru, S; Negro, J; Nieto, L M

    2007-01-01

    A general type of almost linear second-order differential equations, which are directly related to several interesting physical problems, is characterized. The solutions of these equations are obtained using the factorization technique, and their non-autonomous invariants are also found by means of scale transformations

  14. The H-N method for solving linear transport equation: theory and application

    Kaskas, A.; Gulecyuz, M.C.; Tezcan, C.

    2002-01-01

    The system of singular integral equation which is obtained from the integro-differential form of the linear transport equation as a result of Placzec lemma is solved. Application are given using the exit distributions and the infinite medium Green's function. The same theoretical results are also obtained with the use of the singular eigenfunction of the method of elementary solutions

  15. Bounded solutions of self-adjoint second order linear difference equations with periodic coeffients

    Encinas A.M.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work we obtain easy characterizations for the boundedness of the solutions of the discrete, self–adjoint, second order and linear unidimensional equations with periodic coefficients, including the analysis of the so-called discrete Mathieu equations as particular cases.

  16. A study on linear and nonlinear Schrodinger equations by the variational iteration method

    Wazwaz, Abdul-Majid

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a framework to obtain exact solutions to linear and nonlinear Schrodinger equations. The He's variational iteration method (VIM) is used for analytic treatment of these equations. Numerical examples are tested to show the pertinent features of this method

  17. Could solitons be adiabatic invariants attached to certain non linear equations

    Lochak, P.

    1984-01-01

    Arguments are given to support the claim that solitons should be the adiabatic invariants associated to certain non linear partial differential equations; a precise mathematical form of this conjecture is then stated. As a particular case of the conjecture, the Korteweg-de Vries equation is studied. (Auth.)

  18. Diffusion phenomenon for linear dissipative wave equations in an exterior domain

    Ikehata, Ryo

    Under the general condition of the initial data, we will derive the crucial estimates which imply the diffusion phenomenon for the dissipative linear wave equations in an exterior domain. In order to derive the diffusion phenomenon for dissipative wave equations, the time integral method which was developed by Ikehata and Matsuyama (Sci. Math. Japon. 55 (2002) 33) plays an effective role.

  19. Prolongation structure and linear eigenvalue equations for Einstein-Maxwell fields

    Kramer, D.; Neugebauer, G.

    1981-01-01

    The Einstein-Maxwell equations for stationary axisymmetric exterior fields are shown to be the integrability conditions of a set of linear eigenvalue equations for pseudopotentials. Using the method of Wahlquist and Estabrook (J. Math Phys.; 16:1 (1975)) it is shown that the prolongation structure of the Einstein-Maxwell equations contains the SU(2,1) Lie algebra. A new mapping of known solutions to other solutions has been found. (author)

  20. GDTM-Padé technique for the non-linear differential-difference equation

    Lu Jun-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on applying the GDTM-Padé technique to solve the non-linear differential-difference equation. The bell-shaped solitary wave solution of Belov-Chaltikian lattice equation is considered. Comparison between the approximate solutions and the exact ones shows that this technique is an efficient and attractive method for solving the differential-difference equations.