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Sample records for line-shaped contrails detectable

  1. Importance of representing optical depth variability for estimates of global line-shaped contrail radiative forcing.

    Kärcher, Bernd; Burkhardt, Ulrike; Ponater, Michael; Frömming, Christine

    2010-11-09

    Estimates of the global radiative forcing by line-shaped contrails differ mainly due to the large uncertainty in contrail optical depth. Most contrails are optically thin so that their radiative forcing is roughly proportional to their optical depth and increases with contrail coverage. In recent assessments, the best estimate of mean contrail radiative forcing was significantly reduced, because global climate model simulations pointed at lower optical depth values than earlier studies. We revise these estimates by comparing the probability distribution of contrail optical depth diagnosed with a climate model with the distribution derived from a microphysical, cloud-scale model constrained by satellite observations over the United States. By assuming that the optical depth distribution from the cloud model is more realistic than that from the climate model, and by taking the difference between the observed and simulated optical depth over the United States as globally representative, we quantify uncertainties in the climate model's diagnostic contrail parameterization. Revising the climate model results accordingly increases the global mean radiative forcing estimate for line-shaped contrails by a factor of 3.3, from 3.5 mW/m(2) to 11.6 mW/m(2) for the year 1992. Furthermore, the satellite observations and the cloud model point at higher global mean optical depth of detectable contrails than often assumed in radiative transfer (off-line) studies. Therefore, we correct estimates of contrail radiative forcing from off-line studies as well. We suggest that the global net radiative forcing of line-shaped persistent contrails is in the range 8-20 mW/m(2) for the air traffic in the year 2000.

  2. Detection of jet contrails from satellite images

    Meinert, Dieter

    1994-02-01

    In order to investigate the influence of modern technology on the world climate it is important to have automatic detection methods for man-induced parameters. In this case the influence of jet contrails on the greenhouse effect shall be investigated by means of images from polar orbiting satellites. Current methods of line recognition and amplification cannot distinguish between contrails and rather sharp edges of natural cirrus or noise. They still rely on human control. Through the combination of different methods from cloud physics, image comparison, pattern recognition, and artificial intelligence we try to overcome this handicap. Here we will present the basic methods applied to each image frame, and list preliminary results derived this way.

  3. Properties of Linear Contrails Detected in 2012 Northern Hemisphere MODIS Imagery

    Duda, David P.; Chee, Thad; Khlopenkov, Konstantin; Bedka, Sarah; Spangenberg, Doug; Minnis, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Observation of linear contrail cirrus coverage and retrieval of their optical properties are valuable data for validating atmospheric climate models that represent contrail formation explicitly. These data can reduce our uncertainty of the regional effects of contrail-generated cirrus on global radiative forcing, and thus improve our estimation of the impact of commercial aviation on climate change. We use an automated contrail detection algorithm (CDA) to determine the coverage of linear persistent contrails over the Northern Hemisphere during 2012. The contrail detection algorithm is a modified form of the Mannstein et al. (1999) method, and uses several channels from thermal infrared MODIS data to reduce the occurrence of false positive detections. A set of contrail masks of varying sensitivity is produced to define the potential range of uncertainty in contrail coverage estimated by the CDA. Global aircraft emissions waypoint data provided by FAA allow comparison of detected contrails with commercial aircraft flight tracks. A pixel-level product based on the advected flight tracks defined by the waypoint data and U-V wind component profiles from the NASA GMAO GEOS-4 reanalysis has been developed to assign a confidence of contrail detection for the contrail mask. To account for possible contrail cirrus missed by the CDA, a post-processing method based on the assumption that pixels adjacent to detected linear contrails will have radiative signatures similar to those of the detected contrails is applied to the Northern Hemisphere data. Results from several months of MODIS observations during 2012 will be presented, representing a near-global climatology of contrail coverage. Linear contrail coverage will be compared with coverage estimates determined previously from 2006 MODIS data.

  4. Resistively detected NMR line shapes in a quasi-one-dimensional electron system

    Fauzi, M. H.; Singha, A.; Sahdan, M. F.; Takahashi, M.; Sato, K.; Nagase, K.; Muralidharan, B.; Hirayama, Y.

    2017-06-01

    We observe variation in the resistively detected nuclear magnetic resonance (RDNMR) line shapes in quantum Hall breakdown. The breakdown occurs locally in a gate-defined quantum point contact (QPC) region. Of particular interest is the observation of a dispersive line shape occurring when the bulk two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) set to νb=2 and the QPC filling factor to the vicinity of νQPC=1 , strikingly resemble the dispersive line shape observed on a 2D quantum Hall state. This previously unobserved line shape in a QPC points to a simultaneous occurrence of two hyperfine-mediated spin flip-flop processes within the QPC. Those events give rise to two different sets of nuclei polarized in the opposite direction and positioned at a separate region with different degrees of electronic spin polarization.

  5. Factors controlling contrail cirrus optical depth

    B. Kärcher

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft contrails develop into contrail cirrus by depositional growth and sedimentation of ice particles and horizontal spreading due to wind shear. Factors controlling this development include temperature, ice supersaturation, thickness of ice-supersaturated layers, and vertical gradients in the horizontal wind field. An analytical microphysical cloud model is presented and validated that captures these processes. Many individual contrail cirrus are simulated that develop differently owing to the variability in the controlling factors, resulting in large samples of cloud properties that are statistically analyzed. Contrail cirrus development is studied over the first four hours past formation, similar to the ages of line-shaped contrails that were tracked in satellite imagery on regional scales. On these time scales, contrail cirrus optical depth and microphysical variables exhibit a marked variability, expressed in terms of broad and skewed probability distribution functions. Simulated mean optical depths at a wavelength of 0.55 μm range from 0.05-0.5 and a substantial fraction 20-50% of contrail cirrus stay subvisible (optical depth <0.02, depending on meteorological conditions.

    A detailed analysis based on an observational case study over the continental USA suggests that previous satellite measurements of line-shaped persistent contrails have missed about 89%, 50%, and 11% of contrails with optical depths 0-0.05, 0.05-0.1, and 0.1-0.2, respectively, amounting to 65% of contrail coverage of all optical depths. When comparing observations with simulations and when estimating the contrail cirrus climate impact, not only mean values but also the variability in optical depth and microphysical properties need to be considered.

  6. Spectral Line Shapes. Proceedings

    Zoppi, M.; Ulivi, L.

    1997-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the 13th International Conference on Spectral Line Shapes which was held in Firenze,Italy from June 16-21, 1996. The topics covered a wide range of subjects emphasizing the physical processes associated with the formation of line profiles: high and low density plasma; atoms and molecules in strong laser fields, Dopple-free and ultra-fine spectroscopy; the line shapes generated by the interaction of neutrals, atoms and molecules, where the relavant quantities are single particle properties, and the interaction-induced spectroscopy. There were 131 papers presented at the conference, out of these, 6 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  7. Contrail observations from space using NOAA-AVHRR data

    Mannstein, H. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    The infrared channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard of the weather satellites of the NOAA series allow the detection of contrails. An automated detection scheme is described and tested against computer aided visual classifications by two experts. The algorithm seems to identify contrails within the satellite data with a skill comparable to the human observers. Clusters of contrails within the satellite images are connected to outline regions where the atmospheric properties are favourable for the existence of observable contrails. Air traffic data shows that, over Middle Europe at least, in the main flight levels most of these regions should be marked by detectable contrails. The mean areal coverage of these regions is estimated to be in the range of 10% to 20%, the cloud coverage by detected contrails was 0.9% in 60 AVHRR scenes covering Central Europe. (author) 3 refs.

  8. Do supersonic aircraft avoid contrails?

    A. Stenke

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The impact of a potential future fleet of supersonic aircraft on contrail coverage and contrail radiative forcing is investigated by means of simulations with the general circulation model ECHAM4.L39(DLR including a contrail parameterization. The model simulations consider air traffic inventories of a subsonic fleet and of a combined fleet of sub- and supersonic aircraft for the years 2025 and 2050, respectively. In case of the combined fleet, part of the subsonic fleet is replaced by supersonic aircraft. The combined air traffic scenario reveals a reduction in contrail cover at subsonic cruise levels (10 to 12 km in the northern extratropics, especially over the North Atlantic and North Pacific. At supersonic flight levels (18 to 20 km, contrail formation is mainly restricted to tropical regions. Only in winter is the northern extratropical stratosphere above the 100 hPa level cold enough for the formation of contrails. Total contrail coverage is only marginally affected by the shift in flight altitude. The model simulations indicate a global annual mean contrail cover of 0.372% for the subsonic and 0.366% for the combined fleet in 2050. The simulated contrail radiative forcing is most closely correlated to the total contrail cover, although contrails in the tropical lower stratosphere are found to be optically thinner than contrails in the extratropical upper troposphere. The global annual mean contrail radiative forcing in 2050 (2025 amounts to 24.7 mW m−2 (9.4 mW m−2 for the subsonic fleet and 24.2 mW m−2 (9.3 mW m−2 for the combined fleet. A reduction of the supersonic cruise speed from Mach 2.0 to Mach 1.6 leads to a downward shift in contrail cover, but does not affect global mean total contrail cover and contrail radiative forcing. Hence the partial substitution of subsonic air traffic leads to a shift of contrail occurrence from mid to low latitudes, but the resulting change in

  9. Impact of biofuels on contrail warming

    Caiazzo, Fabio; Agarwal, Akshat; Speth, Raymond L.; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2017-11-01

    Contrails and contrail-cirrus may be the largest source of radiative forcing (RF) attributable to aviation. Biomass-derived alternative jet fuels are a potentially major way to mitigate the climate impacts of aviation by reducing lifecycle CO2 emissions. Given the up to 90% reduction in soot emissions from paraffinic biofuels, the potential for a significant impact on contrail RF due to the reduction in contrail-forming ice nuclei (IN) remains an open question. We simulate contrail formation and evolution to quantify RF over the United States under different emissions scenarios. Replacing conventional jet fuels with paraffinic biofuels generates two competing effects. First, the higher water emissions index results in an increase in contrail occurrence (~ +8%). On the other hand, these contrails are composed of larger diameter crystals (~ +58%) at lower number concentrations (~ -75%), reducing both contrail optical depth (~ -29%) and albedo (~ -32%). The net changes in contrail RF induced by switching to biofuels range from -4% to +18% among a range of assumed ice crystal habits (shapes). In comparison, cleaner burning engines (with no increase in water emissions index) result in changes to net contrail RF ranging between -13% and +5% depending on habit. Thus, we find that even 67% to 75% reductions in aircraft soot emissions are insufficient to substantially reduce warming from contrails, and that the use of biofuels may either increase or decrease contrail warming—contrary to previous expectations of a significant decrease in warming.

  10. Anisotropic Hanle line shape via magnetothermoelectric phenomena

    Das, Kumar; Dejene, Fasil; van Wees, Bart; Vera Marun, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We observe anisotropic Hanle line shape with unequal in-plane and out-of-plane nonlocal signals for spin precession measurements carried out on lateral metallic spin valves with transparent interfaces. The conventional interpretation for this anisotropy corresponds to unequal spin relaxation times

  11. In-situ observations of young contrails – overview and selected results from the CONCERT campaign

    C. Voigt

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Lineshaped contrails were detected with the research aircraft Falcon during the CONCERT – CONtrail and Cirrus ExpeRimenT – campaign in October/November 2008. The Falcon was equipped with a set of instruments to measure the particle size distribution, shape, extinction and chemical composition as well as trace gas mixing ratios of sulfur dioxide (SO2, reactive nitrogen and halogen species (NO, NOy, HNO3, HONO, HCl, ozone (O3 and carbon monoxide (CO. During 12 mission flights over Europe, numerous contrails, cirrus clouds and a volcanic aerosol layer were probed at altitudes between 8.5 and 11.6 km and at temperatures above 213 K. 22 contrails from 11 different aircraft were observed near and below ice saturation. The observed NO mixing ratios, ice crystal and soot number densities are compared to a process based contrail model. On 19 November 2008 the contrail from a CRJ-2 aircraft was penetrated in 10.1 km altitude at a temperature of 221 K. The contrail had mean ice crystal number densities of 125 cm−3 with effective radii reff of 2.6 μm. The presence of particles with r>50 μm in the less than 2 min old contrail suggests that natural cirrus crystals were entrained in the contrail. Mean HONO/NO (HONO/NOy ratios of 0.037 (0.024 and the fuel sulfur conversion efficiency to H2SO4S of 2.9 % observed in the CRJ-2 contrail are in the range of previous measurements in the gaseous aircraft exhaust. On 31 October 2010 aviation NO emissions could have contributed by more than 40% to the regional scale NO levels in the mid-latitude lowest stratosphere. The CONCERT observations help to better quantify the climate impact from contrails and will be used to investigate the chemical processing of trace gases on contrails.

  12. A methodology for in-situ and remote sensing of microphysical and radiative properties of contrails as they evolve into cirrus

    Jones, H. M.; Haywood, J.; Marenco, F.; O'Sullivan, D.; Meyer, J.; Thorpe, R.; Gallagher, M. W.; Krämer, M.; Bower, K. N.; Rädel, G.; Rap, A.; Woolley, A.; Forster, P.; Coe, H.

    2012-09-01

    Contrails and especially their evolution into cirrus-like clouds are thought to have very important effects on local and global radiation budgets, though are generally not well represented in global climate models. Lack of contrail parameterisations is due to the limited availability of in situ contrail measurements which are difficult to obtain. Here we present a methodology for successful sampling and interpretation of contrail microphysical and radiative data using both in situ and remote sensing instrumentation on board the FAAM BAe146 UK research aircraft as part of the COntrails Spreading Into Cirrus (COSIC) study. Forecast models were utilised to determine flight regions suitable for contrail formation and sampling; regions that were both free of cloud but showed a high probability of occurrence of air mass being supersaturated with respect to ice. The FAAM research aircraft, fitted with cloud microphysics probes and remote sensing instruments, formed a distinctive spiral-shaped contrail in the predicted area by flying in an orbit over the same ground position as the wind advected the contrails to the east. Parts of these contrails were sampled during the completion of four orbits, with sampled contrail regions being between 7 and 30 min old. Lidar measurements were useful for in-flight determination of the location and spatial extent of the contrails, and also to report extinction values that agreed well with those calculated from the microphysical data. A shortwave spectrometer was also able to detect the contrails, though the signal was weak due to the dispersion and evaporation of the contrails. Post-flight the UK Met Office NAME III dispersion model was successfully used as a tool for modelling the dispersion of the persistent contrail; determining its location and age, and determining when there was interference from other measured aircraft contrails or when cirrus encroached on the area later in the flight. The persistent contrails were found to

  13. A methodology for in-situ and remote sensing of microphysical and radiative properties of contrails as they evolve into cirrus

    H. M. Jones

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Contrails and especially their evolution into cirrus-like clouds are thought to have very important effects on local and global radiation budgets, though are generally not well represented in global climate models. Lack of contrail parameterisations is due to the limited availability of in situ contrail measurements which are difficult to obtain. Here we present a methodology for successful sampling and interpretation of contrail microphysical and radiative data using both in situ and remote sensing instrumentation on board the FAAM BAe146 UK research aircraft as part of the COntrails Spreading Into Cirrus (COSIC study.

    Forecast models were utilised to determine flight regions suitable for contrail formation and sampling; regions that were both free of cloud but showed a high probability of occurrence of air mass being supersaturated with respect to ice. The FAAM research aircraft, fitted with cloud microphysics probes and remote sensing instruments, formed a distinctive spiral-shaped contrail in the predicted area by flying in an orbit over the same ground position as the wind advected the contrails to the east. Parts of these contrails were sampled during the completion of four orbits, with sampled contrail regions being between 7 and 30 min old. Lidar measurements were useful for in-flight determination of the location and spatial extent of the contrails, and also to report extinction values that agreed well with those calculated from the microphysical data. A shortwave spectrometer was also able to detect the contrails, though the signal was weak due to the dispersion and evaporation of the contrails. Post-flight the UK Met Office NAME III dispersion model was successfully used as a tool for modelling the dispersion of the persistent contrail; determining its location and age, and determining when there was interference from other measured aircraft contrails or when cirrus encroached on the area later in the flight.

    The

  14. Chemical exchange effects in spectral line shapes

    Diaz, M.A.; Veguillas, J.

    1990-01-01

    A theory of spectral-line shapes has been extended to the case in which relaxation broadening may be influenced by reactive interactions. This extension is valid for gaseous systems in the same way it is valid for condensed media, and particularly, for such chemical mechanisms as isomerizations. The dependence of the spectral rate on the chemical exchange rate is clarified. Finally, a discussion concerning the above aspects and their applications has been included. (author)

  15. Autoionization spectral line shapes in dense plasmas

    Rosmej, F.B.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.; Suess, W.; Geissel, M.

    2001-01-01

    The distortion of resonance line shapes due to the accumulation of a large number of satellite transitions is discovered by means of X-ray optical methods with simultaneous high spectral (λ/δλ≅8000) and spatial resolution (δx≅7 μm). Disappearance of the He α resonance line emission near the target surface is observed while Rydberg satellite intensity accumulates near the resonance line position. He β and He γ resonance line shapes are also shown to be seriously affected by opacity, higher-order line emissions from autoionizing states and inhomogeneous spatial emission. Opposite to resonance line emissions the He β satellites originate only from a very narrow spatial interval. New temperature and density diagnostics employing the 1s2131' and 1s3131'-satellites are developed. Moreover, even-J components of the satellite line emissions were resolved in the present high resolution experiments. Line transitions from the autoionizing states 1s2131' are therefore also proposed for space resolved Stark broadening analysis and local high density probing. Theorists are encouraged to provide accurate Stark broadening data for the transitions 1s2131 ' →1s 2 21+hv

  16. Large-eddy simulation of contrails

    Chlond, A [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    A large eddy simulation (LES) model has been used to investigate the role of various external parameters and physical processes in the life-cycle of contrails. The model is applied to conditions that are typical for those under which contrails could be observed, i.e. in an atmosphere which is supersaturated with respect to ice and at a temperature of approximately 230 K or colder. The sensitivity runs indicate that the contrail evolution is controlled primarily by humidity, temperature and static stability of the ambient air and secondarily by the baroclinicity of the atmosphere. Moreover, it turns out that the initial ice particle concentration and radiative processes are of minor importance in the evolution of contrails at least during the 30 minutes simulation period. (author) 9 refs.

  17. Large-eddy simulation of contrails

    Chlond, A. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A large eddy simulation (LES) model has been used to investigate the role of various external parameters and physical processes in the life-cycle of contrails. The model is applied to conditions that are typical for those under which contrails could be observed, i.e. in an atmosphere which is supersaturated with respect to ice and at a temperature of approximately 230 K or colder. The sensitivity runs indicate that the contrail evolution is controlled primarily by humidity, temperature and static stability of the ambient air and secondarily by the baroclinicity of the atmosphere. Moreover, it turns out that the initial ice particle concentration and radiative processes are of minor importance in the evolution of contrails at least during the 30 minutes simulation period. (author) 9 refs.

  18. A numerical simulation of a contrail

    Levkov, L.; Boin, M.; Meinert, D. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Geesthacht (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The formation of a contrail from an aircraft flying near the tropopause is simulated using a three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model including a very complex scheme of parameterized cloud microphysical processes. The model predicted ice concentrations are in very good agreement with data measured during the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE), 1989. Sensitivity simulations were run to determine humidity forcing on the life time of contrails. (author) 4 refs.

  19. A numerical simulation of a contrail

    Levkov, L; Boin, M; Meinert, D [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Geesthacht (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The formation of a contrail from an aircraft flying near the tropopause is simulated using a three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model including a very complex scheme of parameterized cloud microphysical processes. The model predicted ice concentrations are in very good agreement with data measured during the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE), 1989. Sensitivity simulations were run to determine humidity forcing on the life time of contrails. (author) 4 refs.

  20. Spectral Line Shapes in Plasmas and Gases

    Oks, E.; Dalimier, D.; Stamm, R.; Stehle, CH.; Gonzalez, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The subject of spectral line shapes (SLS), a.k.a. spectral line broadening, which embraces both shapes and shifts of spectral lines, is of both fundamental and practical importance. On the fundamental side, the study of the spectral line profiles reveals the underlying atomic and molecular interactions. On the practical side, the spectral line profiles are employed as powerful diagnostic tools for various media, such as neutral gases, technological gas discharges, magnetically confined plasmas for fusion, laser- and Z-pinch-produced plasmas (for fusion and other purposes), astrophysical plasmas (most importantly, solar plasmas), and planetary atmospheres. The research area covered by this special issue includes both the SLS dominated by various electric fields (including electron and ion micro fields in strongly ionized plasmas) and the SLS controlled by neutral particles. In the physical slang, the former is called plasma broadening while the latter is called neutral broadening (of course, the results of neutral broadening apply also to the spectral line broadening in neutral gases)

  1. Remote sensing of contrails and aircraft altered cirrus clouds

    Palikonda, R.; Nguyen, L.; Garber, D.P.; Smith, W.L. Jr [Analytical Services and Materials, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States); Minnis, P.; Young, D.F. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center

    1997-12-31

    Analyses of satellite imagery are used to show that contrails can develop into fully extended cirrus cloud systems. Contrails can be advective on great distances, but would appear to observers as natural cirrus clouds. The conversion of simple contrails into cirrus may help explain the apparent increase of cloudiness over populated areas since the beginning of commercial jet air travel. Statistics describing the typical growth, advection, and lifetime of contrail cirrus is needed to evaluate their effects on climate. (author) 4 refs.

  2. Remote sensing of contrails and aircraft altered cirrus clouds

    Palikonda, R; Nguyen, L; Garber, D P; Smith, Jr, W L [Analytical Services and Materials, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States); Minnis, P; Young, D F [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center

    1998-12-31

    Analyses of satellite imagery are used to show that contrails can develop into fully extended cirrus cloud systems. Contrails can be advective on great distances, but would appear to observers as natural cirrus clouds. The conversion of simple contrails into cirrus may help explain the apparent increase of cloudiness over populated areas since the beginning of commercial jet air travel. Statistics describing the typical growth, advection, and lifetime of contrail cirrus is needed to evaluate their effects on climate. (author) 4 refs.

  3. Contrails and Climate Change: An Investigation of the Role of Aviation-Induced-Cloudiness on the Ireland Climate Using AATSR Imagery

    Whelan, Gillian M.; Cawkwell, Fiona; Mannstein, Hermann; Minnis, Patrick

    2010-12-01

    Contrails, or 'condensation trails', produced in the wake of jet aircraft have been found to have a small but significant global net climate-warming effect [1]. When atmospheric conditions are favorable (i.e. when ambient atmospheric humidity is high and temperature is below a threshold value of typically less than -40oC), contrails can persist for several hours, grow to become several kilometers long and can also trigger additional cirrus- cloud formation as they spread - which can further impact climate! Due to Ireland's proximity to the North Atlantic Flight Corridor, large volumes of high-altitude overflights cross Ireland daily. Contrails are essentially artificial-linear-ice-clouds at a lower temperature than the surrounding atmosphere and so are visible in 1 Km satellite imagery at the 11 and 12 μm wavelengths; but are better detected in the temperature difference image between these two thermal channels. An automated Contrail Detection Algorithm (CDA) is applied to AATSR thermal imagery over Ireland, and the percentage contrail-coverage of each scene determined. Preliminary results, based on 2008 morning and evening AATSR overpasses show a similar annual average contrail-coverage when present of 0.25% and 0.19% respectively, even though air-traffic density is typically several times higher during the morning overpasses. Cases of excessive contrail-coverage, of up to 2.06% have been observed in combination with extensive cirrus-coverage over Ireland. Results from meteorological data indicate more highly favorable atmospheric conditions for contrail formation and persistence in 00h00 and 06h00 radiosonde ascents; which corresponds to a night-time peak in high-altitude flights over Ireland. Furthermore, exceptionally thick contrail-susceptible-atmospheric layers are found in conjunction with cases of excessive satellite-derived- contrail-coverage.

  4. Microphysical properties of contrails and natural cirrus clouds

    Strauss, B; Wendling, P [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The radiative properties of a condensation trail (contrail) are determined by its microphysical properties. Therefore an understanding of the concentration, size distribution, and shapes of the particles is necessary for an estimation of the climatic impact of contrails. In-situ particle measurements by use of an ice replicator are presented for several contrail and cirrus events. Contrail particles aged about 2 minutes show shapes which are nearly spherical. Typical sizes are 5 to 10 {mu}m. Concentration values reach up to the order of 1000 cm{sup -3}. Aged contrail size distributions are within the variability of those found in natural cirrus clouds. (author) 2 refs.

  5. Parametrization of contrails in a comprehensive climate model

    Ponater, M; Brinkop, S; Sausen, R; Schumann, U [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1998-12-31

    A contrail parametrization scheme for a general circulation model (GCM) is presented. Guidelines for its development were that it should be based on the thermodynamic theory of contrail formation and that it should be consistent with the cloud parametrization scheme of the GCM. Results of a six-year test integration indicate reasonable results concerning the spatial and temporal development of both contrail coverage and contrail optical properties. Hence, the scheme forms a promising basis for the quantitative estimation of the contrail climatic impact. (author) 9 refs.

  6. Parametrization of contrails in a comprehensive climate model

    Ponater, M.; Brinkop, S.; Sausen, R.; Schumann, U. [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    A contrail parametrization scheme for a general circulation model (GCM) is presented. Guidelines for its development were that it should be based on the thermodynamic theory of contrail formation and that it should be consistent with the cloud parametrization scheme of the GCM. Results of a six-year test integration indicate reasonable results concerning the spatial and temporal development of both contrail coverage and contrail optical properties. Hence, the scheme forms a promising basis for the quantitative estimation of the contrail climatic impact. (author) 9 refs.

  7. Microphysical properties of contrails and natural cirrus clouds

    Strauss, B.; Wendling, P. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The radiative properties of a condensation trail (contrail) are determined by its microphysical properties. Therefore an understanding of the concentration, size distribution, and shapes of the particles is necessary for an estimation of the climatic impact of contrails. In-situ particle measurements by use of an ice replicator are presented for several contrail and cirrus events. Contrail particles aged about 2 minutes show shapes which are nearly spherical. Typical sizes are 5 to 10 {mu}m. Concentration values reach up to the order of 1000 cm{sup -3}. Aged contrail size distributions are within the variability of those found in natural cirrus clouds. (author) 2 refs.

  8. Calculation of the line shapes of radiators immersed in plasma

    Hayrapetian, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    This work reports the results of theoretical calculations of line shapes of radiators immersed in plasma. The fluctuating electric field of the plasma perturbs the atomic structure of the immersed ions or atoms. The perturbed line shape is an important diagnostic tool for the temperature and density measurements of plasma. The line-shape calculation here is done by first deriving the line-shape expression, then it is shown that the problem is equivalent to calculating the temperature Green's function of the bound electron. The total Hamiltonian of the system includes the atomic, plasma, and atom-plasma parts. The temperature Green's function is calculated perturbatively by expanding in orders of atom-plasma interaction. By solving a Dyson equation, the dressed Green's functions of the bound electrons are obtained. At this point, the line shape is calculated by an analytic continuation from the complex frequency plane to real line. To derive the atomic electron Green's function, the momentum integral in the self-energy is approximated by a Riemann sum. With this approximation, the algebraic form of the line shape is obtained for an undetermined number of terms in the Riemann sum. Numerical calculation of line shape is done by using this result

  9. Modeling of hydrogen Stark line shapes with kinetic theory methods

    Rosato, J.; Capes, H.; Stamm, R.

    2012-12-01

    The unified formalism for Stark line shapes is revisited and extended to non-binary interactions between an emitter and the surrounding perturbers. The accuracy of this theory is examined through comparisons with ab initio numerical simulations.

  10. A universal representation of Rydberg spectral line shapes in plasmas

    Mosse, C.; Calisti, A.; Stamm, R.; Talin, B.; Bureyeva, L.; Lisitsa, V. S.

    2001-01-01

    A universal representation of Rydberg atom line shapes in plasmas is obtained. It bases on analytical formulas for intensity distribution in radiation transitions n→n' between highly excited atomic states with large values of principle quantum numbers n, n'>>1, Δn=n-n'<< n and the frequency fluctuation model (FFM) for account of ion thermal motion effects. The line shapes are presented in a universal manner as functions of plasma temperatures and densities

  11. Measurement of Contrails Using ADS-B Data

    Martin Voráček

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Air transport contributes to climate changes not only by greenhouse gas production but also because of production of contrails. The effect of contrails is less scientifically understood compared to greenhouse gases according to IPCC [3]. In order to be able to research the effect of contrails on the atmosphere, it is necessary to identify their realistic frequency of occurrence and to define the relationship between their occurrence and other factors. The effort to identify and monitor contrails and their dependence on the type of air traffic is the objective of SGS project.

  12. Study of the Auger line shape of polyethylene and diamond

    Dayan, M; Pepper, S V

    1984-03-01

    The KVV Auger electron line shapes of carbon in polyethylene and diamond have been studied. The spectra were obtained in derivative form by electron beam excitation. They were treated by background subtraction, integration and deconvolution to produce the intrinsic Auger line shape. Electron energy loss spectra provided the response function in the deconvolution procedure. The line shape from polyethylene is compared with spectra from linear alkanes and with a previous spectrum of Kelber et al. Both spectra are compared with the self-convolution of their full valence band densities of states and of their p-projected densities. The experimental spectra could not be understood in terms of existing theories. This is so even when correlation effects are qualitatively taken into account according to the theories of Cini and Sawatzky and Lenselink.

  13. Modern quantum kinetic theory and spectral line shapes

    Monchick, L.

    1991-01-01

    The modern quantum kinetic theory of spectral line shapes is outlined and a typical calculation of a Raman scattered line shape described. The distinguishing feature of this calculation is that it was completely ab initio and therefore constituted a test of modern quantum kinetic theory, the state of the art in computing molecular-scattering cross sections, and novel methods of solving kinetic equations. The computation employed a large assortment of tools: group theory, finite-element methods, classic methods of solving coupled sets of ordinary differential equations, graph methods of combining angular momenta, and matrix methods of solving integral equations. Agreement with experimental results was excellent. 13 refs

  14. Ideal Coulomb Plasma Approximation in Line Shape Models: Problematic Issues

    Joel Rosato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In weakly coupled plasmas, it is common to describe the microfield using a Debye model. We examine here an “artificial” ideal one-component plasma with an infinite Debye length, which has been used for the test of line shape codes. We show that the infinite Debye length assumption can lead to a misinterpretation of numerical simulations results, in particular regarding the convergence of calculations. Our discussion is done within an analytical collision operator model developed for hydrogen line shapes in near-impact regimes. When properly employed, this model can serve as a reference for testing the convergence of simulations.

  15. Rules of thumb for the Z line shape

    Beenakker, W.; Berends, F.A.; Marck, S.C. van der

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the theoretical parameters of the Z line shape, such as M Z and Γ Z , and the one photon exchange diagram are related to a set of parameters characterizing the experimental line shape. The latter are the peak height σ max , peak position √S max and half peak positions √S ± . The rules of thumb are accurate within 10 MeV. As a result we obtain approximate formulae which express M Z and Γ Z in the measured √S max and √S + -√S - . (orig.)

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance line-shape analysis and determination of exchange rates

    Rao, B.D.

    1989-01-01

    The fact that chemical exchange processes occur at rates that cover a broad range and produce readily detectable effects on the spectrum is one of the attractive features of high-resolution NMR. The description of these line shapes in the presence of spin-spin coupling requires the density matrix theory which is rather complex. Analysis of the line shapes usually needs computer simulations and is capable of providing reliable information on the exchange rates as well as spectral parameters in the absence of exchange. Simplified procedures, ignoring spin-spin coupling, often result in deviations in these exchange and spectral parameters determined. A step-by-step procedure is detailed in this chapter for setting up the matrices required for computing the line shapes of exchanges involving weakly coupled spin systems on the basis of the density matrix theory without the need for a detailed understanding of the theory. A knowledge of the energy level structure and allowed transitions in the NMR spectra of the individual weakly coupled spin systems is all that is required. The procedure is amenable to numerical computation. The group of illustrative examples chosen to demonstrate the development of the computational tools cover some of the commonly encountered cases of exchange from simple systems to rather complex ones. Such exchanges occur frequently in biological molecules, especially those involving enzyme-substrate complexes. In cases where the experimental line shapes are obtained with respectable precision, and the relevant exchange processes are unambiguously identifiable, the computer simulation method of line-shape analysis is capable of providing useful and incisive information. The example of the 31P exchanges in the adenylate kinase is illustrative of this point

  17. On the climatic impact of contrails

    Strauss, B; Meerkoetter, R; Wissinger, B; Wendling, P [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1998-12-31

    The impact of contrail induced cirrus clouds on regional climate is estimated for atmospheric conditions of Southern Germany that are typical for the months of July and October. This is done by the use of a regionalized one-dimensional radiative convective model (RCM). The influence of an increased ice cloud cover is studied by comparing RCM results using averaged climatological values of cloudiness with those of a case with modified cloudiness. It turns out that a 10% increase in ice cloud cover leads to a surface temperature increase of 1.4 K and 1.2 K for the months of July and October, respectively. (author) 14 refs.

  18. On the climatic impact of contrails

    Strauss, B.; Meerkoetter, R.; Wissinger, B.; Wendling, P. [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    The impact of contrail induced cirrus clouds on regional climate is estimated for atmospheric conditions of Southern Germany that are typical for the months of July and October. This is done by the use of a regionalized one-dimensional radiative convective model (RCM). The influence of an increased ice cloud cover is studied by comparing RCM results using averaged climatological values of cloudiness with those of a case with modified cloudiness. It turns out that a 10% increase in ice cloud cover leads to a surface temperature increase of 1.4 K and 1.2 K for the months of July and October, respectively. (author) 14 refs.

  19. Suitable spectral line shape calculations for inertial confinement plasma diagnosis

    Lambert, D.; Louis-Jacquet, M.

    1982-09-01

    In plasma confinement experiments, the knowledge of the plasma state at the maximum compression time would be of utmost interest. For quite many experiments, this time can correspond to a stationary state during which the X emission conditions for a moderate Z element are maximum. Since this diagnosis mean deals with emission only, we need to get rid of reabsorption problems, since their calculation depends on the use of an ionization-excitation plasma model. That is the reason why we focus our attention onto the aspects of spectroscopic theory which control the low reabsorption line shapes - from high values of n - and more precisely the lesser reabsorbed parts of the line shapes - the wings instead of the center

  20. Laser line shape and spectral density of frequency noise

    Stephan, G.M.; Blin, S.; Besnard, P.; Tam, T.T.; Tetu, M.

    2005-01-01

    Published experimental results show that single-mode laser light is characterized in the microwave range by a frequency noise which essentially includes a white part and a 1/f (flicker) part. We theoretically show that the spectral density (the line shape) which is compatible with these results is a Voigt profile whose Lorentzian part or homogeneous component is linked to the white noise and the Gaussian part to the 1/f noise. We measure semiconductor laser line profiles and verify that they can be fit with Voigt functions. It is also verified that the width of the Lorentzian part varies like 1/P where P is the laser power while the width of the Gaussian part is more of a constant. Finally, we theoretically show from first principles that laser line shapes are also described by Voigt functions where the Lorentzian part is the laser Airy function and the Gaussian part originates from population noise

  1. First observation of the Λ(1405) line shape in electroproduction

    Lu, H. Y.; Schumacher, R. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Harrison, N.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lewis, S.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Martinez, D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moriya, K.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nepali, C. S.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Torayev, B.; Vernarsky, B.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2013-10-01

    We report the first observation of the line shape of the Λ(1405) from electroproduction, and show that it is not a simple Breit-Wigner resonance. Electroproduction of K+Λ(1405) off the proton was studied by using data from CLAS at Jefferson Lab in the range 1.0line shape. In our fits, the line shape corresponds approximately to predictions of a two-pole meson-baryon picture of the Λ(1405), with a lower mass pole near 1368 MeV/c2 and a higher mass pole near 1423 MeV/c2. Furthermore, with increasing photon virtuality the mass distribution shifts toward the higher mass pole.

  2. Aircraft clouds: from chemtrail pseudoscience to the science of contrails

    Mazón Bueso, Jordi; Costa, Marcel; Pino González, David

    2018-01-01

    The most frequent statements and arguments found in pseudoscience websites and forums supporting the existence of so-called aircraft chemtrails can be refuted with a scientific explanation of the processes resulting in the formation of condensation or deposition trails, known as contrails. Thus, the hypothesis that chemtrails exist is disproven by the scientific literature that shows that they are the exact same entity as contrails: They are hydrological phenomena which result from a physical...

  3. Coil extensions improve line shapes by removing field distortions

    Conradi, Mark S.; Altobelli, Stephen A.; McDowell, Andrew F.

    2018-06-01

    The static magnetic susceptibility of the rf coil can substantially distort the field B0 and be a dominant source of line broadening. A scaling argument shows that this may be a particular problem in microcoil NMR. We propose coil extensions to reduce the distortion. The actual rf coil is extended to a much longer overall length by abutted coil segments that do not carry rf current. The result is a long and nearly uniform sheath of copper wire, in terms of the static susceptibility. The line shape improvement is demonstrated at 43.9 MHz and in simulation calculations.

  4. Line shapes of atomic-candle-type Rabi resonances

    Coffer, J.G.; Camparo, J.C.; Sickmiller, B.; Presser, A.

    2002-01-01

    When atoms interact with a phase-modulated field, the probability of finding the atom in the excited-state oscillates at the second harmonic of the modulation frequency, 2ω m . The amplitude of this oscillating probability is a resonant function of the Rabi frequency Ω, and this is termed a β Rabi resonance. In this work, we examine the line shape of the β Rabi resonance both theoretically and experimentally. We find that a small-signal theory of the β-Rabi-resonance condition captures much of the line shape's character, and, in particular, that the resonance's 'line Q' (i.e., 2δΩ 1/2 /Ω) is proportional to the modulation frequency. This result can be applied to the atomic candle, where β Rabi resonances are employed to stabilize field strength. Considering our results in the context of developing an optical atomic candle, we find that a free-running diode laser's intensity noise could be improved by orders of magnitude using the atomic candle concept

  5. PREFACE: XXII International Conference on Spectral Line Shapes 2014

    Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    The 22nd International Conference on Spectral Line Shapes (ICSLS) was convened at The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) at Tullahoma, Tennessee, USA, during June 1 to 6, 2014. A variety of topics of interest to the line shape community were addressed during invited and contributed oral and poster presentations. General categories of the ICSLS 2014 scientific contents included Astrophysics, Biomedical Physics, High and Low Temperature Plasma Physics, Magnetic Fusion Physics, Neutrals Atomic-Molecular-Optical (AMO) Physics, and Applied Physics. Research interests at UTSI and at the Center for Laser Applications (CLA) focus on Applied Physics and Plasma Physics areas such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, spectroscopy with ultra-short light pulses, combustion diagnostics, to name a few. Consequently, the presentations during the conference addressed a variety of these topics. Attendance at the conference included researchers from North America, Africa, Asia and Europe, with an international representation showing 250 authors and co-authors with over 25 different citizenships, and 100 participants at the Conference. Figure 1 shows a photo of Conference attendees. The schedule included 82 contributions, 41 oral and 41 poster presentations. The 29 invited, 12 contributed oral and 41 contributed poster presentations were selected following communication with the international organizing committee members. A smart phone ''app'' was also utilized, thanks to Elsevier, to communicate electronic versions of the posters during the conference. Special thanks go to the members of the international and local committees for their work in organizing the 22nd ICSLS. In addition, thank you notes also go to the peer reviewers for the proceedings. Following the success of the IOP: Journal of Physics Conference Series selected for the 21st ICSLS publication, the proceedings papers report ongoing research activities. Papers submitted amount to 68 in number, or 83% of

  6. Doppler-shifted neutral beam line shape and beam transmission

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Kokatnur, N.; Lagin, L.J.; Newman, R.A.; O'Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.

    1994-04-01

    Analysis of Doppler-shifted Balmer-α line emission from the TFTR neutral beam injection systems has revealed that the line shape is well approximated by the sum of two Gaussians, or, alternatively, by a Lorentzian. For the sum of two Gaussians, the broad portion of the distribution contains 40% of the beam power and has a divergence five times that of the narrow part. Assuming a narrow 1/e- divergence of 1.3 degrees (based on fits to the beam shape on the calorimeter), the broad part has a divergence of 6.9 degrees. The entire line shape is also well approximated by a Lorentzian with a half-maximum divergence of 0.9 degrees. Up to now, fusion neutral beam modelers have assumed a single Gaussian velocity distribution, at the extraction plane, in each direction perpendicular to beam propagation. This predicts a beam transmission efficiency from the ion source to the calorimeter of 97%. Waterflow calorimetry data, however, yield a transmission efficiency of ∼75%, a value in rough agreement with predictions of the Gaussian or Lorentzian models presented here. The broad wing of the two Gaussian distribution also accurately predicts the loss in the neutralizer. An average angle of incidence for beam loss at the exit of the neutralizer is 2.2 degrees, rather than the 4.95 degrees subtended by the center of the ion source. This average angle of incidence, which is used in computing power densities on collimators, is shown to be a function of beam divergence

  7. Experiments on contrail formation from fuels with different sulfur content

    Busen, R; Kuhn, M; Petzold, A; Schroeder, F; Schumann, U [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Baumgardner, D [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Borrmann, S [Mainz Univ. (Germany); Hagen, D; Whitefield, Ph [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Bureau of Mines; Stroem, J [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    A series of both flight tests and ground experiments has been performed to evaluate the role of the sulfur contained in kerosene in condensation trail (contrail) formation processes. The results of the first experiments are compiled briefly. The last SULFUR 4 experiment dealing with the influence of the fuel sulfur content and different appertaining conditions is described in detail. Different sulfur mass fractions lead to different particle size spectra. The number of ice particles in the contrail increases by about a factor of 2 for 3000 ppm instead of 6 ppm sulfur fuel content. (author) 10 refs.

  8. Experiments on contrail formation from fuels with different sulfur content

    Busen, R.; Kuhn, M.; Petzold, A.; Schroeder, F.; Schumann, U. [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Baumgardner, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Borrmann, S. [Mainz Univ. (Germany); Hagen, D.; Whitefield, Ph. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Bureau of Mines; Stroem, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    A series of both flight tests and ground experiments has been performed to evaluate the role of the sulfur contained in kerosene in condensation trail (contrail) formation processes. The results of the first experiments are compiled briefly. The last SULFUR 4 experiment dealing with the influence of the fuel sulfur content and different appertaining conditions is described in detail. Different sulfur mass fractions lead to different particle size spectra. The number of ice particles in the contrail increases by about a factor of 2 for 3000 ppm instead of 6 ppm sulfur fuel content. (author) 10 refs.

  9. The Number of Neutrinos and the Z Line Shape

    Blondel, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The Standard Theory can fit any number of fermion families, as long as the number of leptons and quark families are the same. At the time of the conception of LEP, the number of such families was unknown, and it was feared that the Z resonance would be washed out by decaying into so many families of neutrinos! It took only a few weeks in the fall of 1989 to determine that the number is three. The next six years (from 1990 to 1995) were largely devoted to the accurate determination of the Z line shape, with a precision that outperformed the most optimistic expectations by a factor of 10. The tale of these measurements is a bona fide mystery novel, the precession of electrons being strangely perturbed by natural phenomena, such as tides, rain, hydroelectric power, fast trains, not to mention vertical electrostatic separators. The number hidden in the loops of this treasure hunt was 179, the first estimate of the mass of the top quark; then, once that was found, where predicted, the next number was close to zero...

  10. CdTe reflection anisotropy line shape fitting

    Molina-Contreras, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, an empirical novel plane-wave time dependent ensemble is introduced to fit the RA, the reflectance (R) and the imaginary part of the dielectric function oscillation measured around the E 1 and E 1 + Δ 1 transition region in II-VI semiconductors. By applying the new plane-wave time dependent ensemble to the measured spectrum for a (0 0 1) oriented CdTe undoped commercial wafer, crystallized in a zinc-blende structure, a very good agreement was found between the measured spectrum and the fitting. In addition to this, the reliability of the plane-wave time dependent ensemble was probed, by comparing the results with the calculated fitting in terms of a Fourier series and in terms of a six-order polynomial fit. Our analysis suggests, that the experimental oscillation in the line shape of the RA cannot be fitted with a Fourier series using harmonics multiples of the number which dominates the measured RA spectra in the argument of the plane-wave ensemble.

  11. PREFACE: XXI International Conference on Spectral Line Shapes (ICSLS 2012)

    Devdariani, Alexander Z.

    2012-12-01

    The 21st International Conference on Spectral Line Shapes, ICSLS, was held in the historic main building of St Petersburg State University (St. Petersburg, Russia) on 3-9 June 2012. The event continued the tradition started in 1978 in Meudon Observatory in Paris. Representatives of line shape physics have since met every two years in different locations in Europe and North America. The most recent events were held in St John's, Newfoundland, Canada (2010), Valladolid, Spain (2008), and Auburn, AL (USA). Traditionally, the conferences consider experimental and theoretical issues of studying spectral line shapes, diagnostic utilization of spectral line profiles observed in absorption, emission or scattering of electromagnetic radiation by atoms, molecules, and clusters in different environments, including neutral environments, laboratory low and fusion plasmas, astrophysical conditions, and planetary atmospheres. The Conference was attended by over 100 professionals from Europe, Asia, America, Africa and New Zealand. The conference program was put together in such a way so as to exclude any parallel sessions. Five afternoon sessions featured 19 invited talks and 20 oral contributions, and two evening sessions offered 61 poster presentations, including post-deadline posters. This setup allowed for a relaxed and unhurried discussion of results and facilitated productive networking. The invited talks were selected by recommendation of members of the International Scientific Committee. The Organizers would like to thank all the members of the International Scientific Committee for their proposals on the agenda and their valuable advice. When considering candidates for oral contributions, the organizers took into account the suggestions and preferences of potential conference participants. When selecting the theses of poster presentations, the organizers focused on the topics in line with the theme of the conference and studies with well-formulated results. It must be

  12. Contrails and their impact on shortwave radiation and photovoltaic power production – a regional model study

    S. Gruber

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution regional-scale numerical model was extended by a parameterization that allows for both the generation and the life cycle of contrails and contrail cirrus to be calculated. The life cycle of contrails and contrail cirrus is described by a two-moment cloud microphysical scheme that was extended by a separate contrail ice class for a better representation of the high concentration of small ice crystals that occur in contrails. The basic input data set contains the spatially and temporally highly resolved flight trajectories over Central Europe derived from real-time data. The parameterization provides aircraft-dependent source terms for contrail ice mass and number. A case study was performed to investigate the influence of contrails and contrail cirrus on the shortwave radiative fluxes at the earth's surface. Accounting for contrails produced by aircraft enabled the model to simulate high clouds that were otherwise missing on this day. The effect of these extra clouds was to reduce the incoming shortwave radiation at the surface as well as the production of photovoltaic power by up to 10 %.

  13. Stochastic theory of relaxation and collisional broadening of spectral line shapes

    Faid, K.

    1986-01-01

    A complete stochastic theory of relaxation is developed in terms of a homogeneous equation for the averaged density matrix of a system immersed in a thermal bath. This theory is then used as the basis of a new stochastic approach to the phenomenon of collisional broadening of spectral line shapes. Single-photon and multiphoton processes are studied. The features of a line shape are linked by simple expressions to the statistical properties of a stochastic hermitian Hamiltonian. The ordinary line shape predicted by Kubo's approach is generalized. The present approach predicts broadening as well as asymmetry and shift. A representation of line shapes in multiphoton processes by diagrams is also developed

  14. Electromagnetically induced transparency line shapes for large probe fields and optically thick media

    Pack, M. V.; Camacho, R. M.; Howell, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    We calculate the line shape and linewidths for electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in optically thick, Doppler broadened media (buffer gasses are also considered). In generalizing the definition of the EIT linewidth to optically thick media, we find two different linewidth definitions apply depending on whether the experiment is pulsed or continuous wave (cw). Using the cw definition for the EIT line shape we derive analytic expressions describing the linewidth as a function of optical depth. We also review the EIT line shapes in optically thin media and provide physical arguments for how the line shapes change as a function of various parameters

  15. A diagnostic study of the global coverage by contrails. Pt. 1. Present day climate. Revised version

    Sausen, R.; Gierens, K.; Ponater, M.; Schumann, U.

    1998-03-01

    The global distribution of the contrail formation potential and the contrail cloud coverage are estimated using meteorological analysis data for temperature and humidity (ECMWF re-analyses) and a data base on aircraft fuel consumption. Regions with humidity between ice and liquid saturation and with temperature low enough to let aircraft trigger contrail formation are identified as regions in which persistent contrails may be formed. The frequency with which a region is conditioned for such persistent contrail formation measures the contrail formation potential. The mean contrail cloud coverage is computed by multiplying this frequency with a suitable function of fuel consumption (linear or non-linear). The product is normalized such that the contrail coverage equals the observed value of 0.5% in a domain between 30 W to 30 E, 35 N to 75 N. The results show a large potential for contrail formation in the upper troposphere, in particular in the tropics but also at mid-latitudes. At northern mid-latitudes about 20% of the upper tropospheric air is conditioned to form persistent contrails. Part of this region may be covered by otherwise forming cirrus clouds. When multiplied with fuel consumption of 1992 aviation, large cover by persistent contrail clouds is computed over Europe, the North Atlantic, the continental USA, and south-east Asia. The computed contrail coverage reaches 2% over the USA, and is larger in winter than in summer. The global mean contrail coverage is about 0.11% for linear fuel dependence and the given normalization. The result is only weakly sensitive to the propulsion efficiency of aircraft, but strongly sensitive to aircraft flight altitude. (orig.)

  16. Variability of the contrail radiative forcing due to crystal shape

    Markowicz, K. M.; Witek, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the influence of particles' shape and particles' optical properties on the contrail radiative forcing. Contrail optical properties in the shortwave and longwave range are derived using a ray-tracing geometric method and the discrete dipole approximation method, respectively. Both methods present good correspondence of the single scattering albedo and the asymmetry parameter in a transition range (3-7μm). We compare optical properties defined following simple 10 crystals habits randomly oriented: hexagonal plates, hexagonal columns with different aspect ratio, and spherical. There are substantial differences in single scattering properties between ten crystal models investigated here (e.g. hexagonal columns and plates with different aspect ratios, spherical particles). The single scattering albedo and the asymmetry parameter both vary up to 0.1 between various crystal shapes. Radiative forcing calculations were performed using a model which includes an interface between the state-of-the-art radiative transfer model Fu-Liou and databases containing optical properties of the atmosphere and surface reflectance and emissivity. This interface allows to determine radiative fluxes in the atmosphere and to estimate the contrail radiative forcing for clear- and all-sky (including natural clouds) conditions for various crystal shapes. The Fu-Liou code is fast and therefore it is suitable for computing radiative forcing on a global scale. At the same time it has sufficiently good accuracy for such global applications. A noticeable weakness of the Fu-Liou code is that it does not take into account the 3D radiative effects, e.g. cloud shading and horizontal. Radiative transfer model calculations were performed at horizontal resolution of 5x5 degree and time resolution of 20 min during day and 3 h during night. In order to calculate a geographic distribution of the global and annual mean contrail radiative forcing, the contrail cover must be

  17. Towards a Model Climatology of Relative Humidity in the Upper Troposphere for Estimation of Contrail and Contrail-Induced Cirrus

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Manyin, M.; Ott, L.; Oman, L.; Benson, C.; Pawson, S.; Douglass, A. R.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of contrails and contrail cirrus is very sensitive to the relative humidity of the upper troposphere. To reduce uncertainty in an estimate of the radiative impact of aviation-induced cirrus, a model must therefore be able to reproduce the observed background moisture fields with reasonable and quantifiable fidelity. Here we present an upper tropospheric moisture climatology from a 26-year ensemble of simulations using the GEOS CCM. We compare this free-running model's moisture fields to those obtained from the MLS and AIRS satellite instruments, our most comprehensive observational databases for upper tropospheric water vapor. Published comparisons have shown a substantial wet bias in GEOS-5 assimilated fields with respect to MLS water vapor and ice water content. This tendency is clear as well in the GEOS CCM simulations. The GEOS-5 moist physics in the GEOS CCM uses a saturation adjustment that prevents supersaturation, which is unrealistic when compared to in situ moisture observations from MOZAIC aircraft and balloon sondes as we will show. Further, the large-scale satellite datasets also consistently underestimate super-saturation when compared to the in-situ observations. We place these results in the context of estimates of contrail and contrail cirrus frequency.

  18. Application of positron annihilation line-shape analysis to fatigue damage for nuclear plant materials

    Maeda, N.; Uchida, M.; Ohta, Y.; Yoshida, K.

    1996-01-01

    Positron annihilation line-shape analysis is sufficiently sensitive to detect microstructural defects such as vacancies and dislocations. We are developing a portable positron annihilation system and applying this technique to fatigue damage in type 316 stainless steel and SA508 low alloy steel. The positron annihilation technique was found to be sensitive in the early fatigue life, i.e. up to 10% of the fatigue life, but showed little sensitivity in later stages of the fatigue life in type 316 stainless steel and SA508 low alloy steel. Type 316 stainless steel a higher positron annihilation sensitivity than that of SA508. It was considered that the amount of dislocation density change in the stainless steel was greater than that in the low alloy steel, because the initial microstructure contained a low dislocation density because of the solution heat treatment for the type 316 stainless steel. (orig.)

  19. Effect of resonance line shape on precision measurements of nuclear magnetic resonance shifts

    Kachurin, A.M.; Smelyanskij, A.Ya.

    1986-01-01

    Effect of resonance line shape on the systematic error of precision measurements of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shifts of high resolution (on the center of NMR dispersion line) is analysed. Effect of the device resonance line form-function asymmetry is evaluated; the form-function is determined by configuration of the spectrometer magnetic field and enters the convolution, which describes the resonance line form. It is shown that with the increase of the relaxation line width the form-function effect on the measurement error yields to zero. The form-function effect on measurements and correction of a phase angle of NMR detection is evaluated. The method of semiquantitative evaluation of resonance line and NMR spectrometer parameters, guaranteeing the systematic error of the given infinitesimal, is presented

  20. Analysis of Hα(Dα) Line Shape Xu Wei & Li Yan

    Abstract. The particles energy distribution is derived directly from the Hα(Dα) line shape, which is measured by two sets of OMA. The dissociative excitation of molecular is dominating when the local elec- tron temperature is >10eV. The Dα line shape is also simulated by the Monte–Carlo method, the molecular dissociation ...

  1. Use of Green functions in line shape problems in nuclear Magnetic resonance

    Martin, M.; Moreno, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A method based on the two times Green function formalism is presented. It permits the straightforward determination of the line shape in Magnetic Resonance experiments together with its temperature behavior. Model calculations are made on a two-spin system attached to a one-dimensional rotor obtaining the temperature dependence of its Magnetic Resonance line shape and second moment

  2. Controlling the transmission line shape of molecular t-stubs and potential thermoelectric applications

    Stadler, Robert; Markussen, Troels

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetric line shapes can occur in the transmission function describing electron transport in the vicinity of a minimum caused by quantum interference effects. Such asymmetry can be used to increase the thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions. So far, however, asymmetric line shapes hav...... calculations for a variety of t-stub molecules and also address their suitability for thermoelectric applications....

  3. Contrails over the U.S. and their potential impact on the radiation budget

    Minnis, P [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center; Ayers, J K; Doelling, D R [Analytical Services and Materials, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    A methodology for assessing the contrail impact on the radiation budget is developed to use data characterizing the frequency, areal coverage, optical depth, particle size, and altitude of contrails with observations of cloud and surface properties. The method is tested using various scenarios over the United States to estimate contrail-induced albedo changes based on current aircraft fuel usage statistics. The technique can be used for estimating infrared effects and the impact of future fuel-use rates. (author) 11 refs.

  4. Contrails over the U.S. and their potential impact on the radiation budget

    Minnis, P. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center; Ayers, J.K.; Doelling, D.R. [Analytical Services and Materials, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A methodology for assessing the contrail impact on the radiation budget is developed to use data characterizing the frequency, areal coverage, optical depth, particle size, and altitude of contrails with observations of cloud and surface properties. The method is tested using various scenarios over the United States to estimate contrail-induced albedo changes based on current aircraft fuel usage statistics. The technique can be used for estimating infrared effects and the impact of future fuel-use rates. (author) 11 refs.

  5. Effects of collisions on linear and non-linear spectroscopic line shapes

    Berman, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    A fundamental physical problem is the determination of atom-atom, atom-molecule and molecule-molecule differential and total scattering cross sections. In this work, a technique for studying atomic and molecular collisions using spectroscopic line shape analysis is discussed. Collisions occurring within an atomic or molecular sample influence the sample's absorptive or emissive properties. Consequently the line shapes associated with the linear or non-linear absorption of external fields by an atomic system reflect the collisional processes occurring in the gas. Explicit line shape expressions are derived characterizing linear or saturated absorption by two-or three-level 'active' atoms which are undergoing collisions with perturber atoms. The line shapes may be broadened, shifted, narrowed, or distorted as a result of collisions which may be 'phase-interrupting' or 'velocity-changing' in nature. Systematic line shape studies can be used to obtain information on both the differential and total active atom-perturber scattering cross sections. (Auth.)

  6. Line-shape asymmetry of water vapor absorption lines in the 720-nm wavelength region

    Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1991-01-01

    Spectral line-shape analyses were performed for water vapor lines broadened by argon, oxygen, and xenon in the 720-nm wavelength region. A line-shape asymmetry was observed, which is attributed to statistical dependence or correlation between velocity- and state-changing collisions. The generalized (asymmetric) Galatry profile, which results from the soft-collision profile and includes correlation between velocity- and state-changing collisions, was fitted to the observed line shapes and was found to compare favorably with the observed data. The most prominent asymmetries were observed with xenon as the buffer gas.

  7. Spectral line shape simulation for electron stark-broadening of ion emitters in plasmas

    Dufour, Emmanuelle; Calisti, Annette; Talin, Bernard; Gigosos, Marco A.; Gonzalez, Manuel A.; Dufty, Jim W.

    2002-01-01

    Electron broadening for ions in plasmas is investigated in the framework of a simplified semi-classical model involving an ionic emitter imbedded in an electron gas. A regularized Coulomb potential that removes the divergence at short distances is postulated for the ion-electron interaction. Line shape simulations based on Molecular Dynamics for the ion impurity and the electrons, accounting for all the correlations, are reported. Comparisons with line shapes obtained with a quasi-particle model show expected correlation effects. Through an analysis of the results with the line shape code PPP, it is inferred that the correlation effect results mainly from the microfield dynamic properties

  8. On the regional climatic impact of contrails: microphysical and radiative properties of contrails and natural cirrus clouds

    B. Strauss

    Full Text Available The impact of contrail-induced cirrus clouds on regional climate is estimated for mean atmospheric conditions of southern Germany in the months of July and October. This is done by use of a regionalized one-dimensional radiative convective model (RCM. The influence of an increased ice cloud cover is studied by comparing RCM results representing climatological values with a modified case. In order to study the sensitivity of this effect on the radiative characteristics of the ice cloud, two types of additional ice clouds were modelled: cirrus and contrails, the latter cloud type containing a higher number of smaller and less of the larger cloud particles. Ice cloud parameters are calculated on the basis of a particle size distribution which covers the range from 2 to 2000 µm, taking into consideration recent measurements which show a remarkable amount of particles smaller than 20 µm. It turns out that a 10% increase in ice cloud cover leads to a surface temperature increase in the order of 1K, ranging from 1.1 to 1.2K in July and from 0.8 to 0.9K in October depending on the radiative characteristics of the air-traffic-induced ice clouds. Modelling the current contrail cloud cover which is near 0.5% over Europe yields a surface temperature increase in the order of 0.05K.

  9. On the regional climatic impact of contrails: microphysical and radiative properties of contrails and natural cirrus clouds

    B. Strauss

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of contrail-induced cirrus clouds on regional climate is estimated for mean atmospheric conditions of southern Germany in the months of July and October. This is done by use of a regionalized one-dimensional radiative convective model (RCM. The influence of an increased ice cloud cover is studied by comparing RCM results representing climatological values with a modified case. In order to study the sensitivity of this effect on the radiative characteristics of the ice cloud, two types of additional ice clouds were modelled: cirrus and contrails, the latter cloud type containing a higher number of smaller and less of the larger cloud particles. Ice cloud parameters are calculated on the basis of a particle size distribution which covers the range from 2 to 2000 µm, taking into consideration recent measurements which show a remarkable amount of particles smaller than 20 µm. It turns out that a 10% increase in ice cloud cover leads to a surface temperature increase in the order of 1K, ranging from 1.1 to 1.2K in July and from 0.8 to 0.9K in October depending on the radiative characteristics of the air-traffic-induced ice clouds. Modelling the current contrail cloud cover which is near 0.5% over Europe yields a surface temperature increase in the order of 0.05K.

  10. Influence of thin porous Al2O3 layer on aluminum cathode to the Hα line shape in glow discharge

    Steflekova, V.; Sisovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2009-01-01

    The results of the Balmer alfa line shape study in a plane cathode-hollow anode Grimm discharge with aluminum (Al) cathode covered with thin layer of porous Al 2 O 3 are presented. The comparison with same line profile recorded with pure Al cathode shows lack of excessive Doppler broadened line wings, which are always detected in glow discharge with metal cathode. The effect is explained by the lack of strong electric field in the cathode sheath region, which is missing in the presence of thin oxide layer in, so called, spray discharge.

  11. Regional coverage of contrails from satellite data and their radiative forcing; Regionale Kondensstreifen-Bedeckung aus Satellitendaten und ihr Einfluss auf den Strahlungshaushalt

    Meyer, R.

    2000-07-01

    An operational contrail detection algorithm is applied to day and night overpasses of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). From the classification results the daytime and nighttime coverage by linear shaped contrails over Western Europa is derived. The annual daytime average for the analyzed region of 0.75% shows a strong annual cycle with 1.0% coverage during winter and 0.4% during summer. The day/night ratio reaches the factor 3. Using the radiance contrasts in the 11 {mu}m channel for contrail and adjacent pixels an average visible optical depth for the observed contrails of 0.1 is derived. This leads to an annual mean top of atmosphere radiative forcing by contrails over Central Europe in the range of 0.03 W/m{sup 2} to 0.08 W/m{sup 2}, which is about one magnitude smaller than prior studies suggest. The highest annual mean contrail forcing exceeds 0.12 W/m{sup 2} over Northeastern France, Belgium, Great Britain and Hungary. (orig.) [German] Ein operationelles Kondensstreifen-Erkennungsverfahren wird auf Tag- und Nacht-Ueberfluege des Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) angewandt. Aus den Klassifizierungsergebnissen wird die mittaegliche und naechtliche Bedeckung durch linienhafte Kondensstreifen ueber Westeuropa abgeleitet. Das Jahresmittel der Bedeckung am Tag betraegt 0,75% und zeigt einen ausgepraegten Jahresgang mit 1% im Winter und 0,4% im Sommer, sowie einen starken Tag/Nacht-Unterschied mit einer Amplitude von 3. Mit Hilfe von Strahldichtekontrasten im 11 {mu}m Kanal zwischen Kondensstreifen und benachbarten Pixeln wird fuer die erkannten Kondensstreifen eine durchschnittliche optische Dicke im sichtbaren Spektralbereich von 0,1 abgeschaetzt. Daraus ergibt sich am Oberrand der Atmosphaere ein mittlerer auf Kondensstreifen zurueckzufuehrender Strahlungsantrieb zwischen 0,03 W/m{sup 2} und 0,08 W/m{sup 2}, was eine Groessenordnung unter den Ergebnissen bisheriger Studien liegt. Die hoechsten Jahresmittel mit mehr als 0,12 W

  12. Universal FFM Hydrogen Spectral Line Shapes Applied to Ions and Electrons

    Mossé, C.; Calisti, A.; Ferri, S.; Talin, B.; Bureyeva, L. A.; Lisitsa, V. S.

    2008-10-01

    We present a method for the calculation of hydrogen spectral line shapes based on two combined approaches: Universal Model and FFM procedure. We start with the analytical functions for the intensities of the Stark components of radiative transitions between highly excited atomic states with large values of principal quantum numbers n,n'γ1, with Δn = n-n'≪n for the specific cases of Hn-α line (Δn = 1) and Hn-β line (Δn = 2). The FFM line shape is obtained by averaging on the electric field of the Hooper's field distribution for ion and electron perturber dynamics and by mixing the Stark components with a jumping frequency rate ve (vi) where v = N1/3u (N is electron density and u is the ion or electron thermal velocity). Finally, the total line shape is given by convolution of ion and electron line shapes. Hydrogen line shape calculations for Balmer Hα and Hβ lines are compared to experimental results in low density plasma (Ne˜1016-1017cm-3) and low electron temperature in order of 10 000K. This method relying on analytic expressions permits fast calculation of Hn-α and Hn-β lines of hydrogen and could be used in the study of the Stark broadening of radio recombination lines for high principal quantum number.

  13. Parametric studies of contrail ice particle formation in jet regime using microphysical parcel modeling

    H.-W. Wong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Condensation trails (contrails formed from water vapor emissions behind aircraft engines are the most uncertain components of the aviation impacts on climate change. To gain improved knowledge of contrail and contrail-induced cirrus cloud formation, understanding of contrail ice particle formation immediately after aircraft engines is needed. Despite many efforts spent in modeling the microphysics of ice crystal formation in jet regime (with a plume age <5 s, systematic understanding of parametric effects of variables affecting contrail ice particle formation is still limited. In this work, we apply a microphysical parcel modeling approach to study contrail ice particle formation in near-field aircraft plumes up to 1000 m downstream of an aircraft engine in the soot-rich regime (soot number emission index >1×1015 (kg-fuel−1 at cruise. The effects of dilution history, ion-mediated nucleation, ambient relative humidity, fuel sulfur contents, and initial soot emissions were investigated. Our simulation results suggest that ice particles are mainly formed by water condensation on emitted soot particles. The growth of ice coated soot particles is driven by water vapor emissions in the first 1000 m and by ambient relative humidity afterwards. The presence of chemi-ions does not significantly contribute to the formation of ice particles in the soot-rich regime, and the effect of fuel sulfur contents is small over the range typical of standard jet fuels. The initial properties of soot emissions play the most critical role, and our calculations suggest that higher number concentration and smaller size of contrail particle nuclei may be able to effectively suppress the formation of contrail ice particles. Further modeling and experimental studies are needed to verify if our findings can provide a possible approach for contrail mitigation.

  14. Microphysical and optical properties of contrails and cirrus

    Gayet, J F; Febvre, G [Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferand (France). Lab. de Meteorologie Physique; Brogniez, G [Universite des Sciences et Techniques de Lille, (France). Lab. d` Optique Atmospherique; Wendling, P [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Larsen, H [National Inst. for Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington (New Zealand)

    1998-12-31

    Aircraft contrails have significantly different properties to natural cirrus clouds. Their local and global climate impact cannot be assessed without consideration of these differences. Microphysical data were obtained from the Merlin aircraft equipped with a PMS FSSP-100 for particle spectrum measurements over the 3 {mu}m to 45 {mu}m diameter range; a PMS 2D-C for particle size spectrum and particle shape over the size range from 25 {mu}m to 800 {mu}m and a Johnson-Williams cloud liquid-water probe. Radiative measurements were obtained from a Do228 aircraft which carried the upward looking ALEX-F Lidar operating at a wavelength of 1.06 {mu}m and a Barnes PRT-5 radiometer aligned parallel to the lidar and with a 9 to 11 {mu}m spectral range. The limitation in accuracy of cloud microphysical sensor used in contrail studies are also discussed with subsequent errors on description of cloud radiative properties. (R.P.) 9 refs.

  15. Microphysical and optical properties of contrails and cirrus

    Gayet, J.F.; Febvre, G. [Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferand (France). Lab. de Meteorologie Physique; Brogniez, G. [Universite des Sciences et Techniques de Lille, (France). Lab. d`Optique Atmospherique; Wendling, P. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Larsen, H. [National Inst. for Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington (New Zealand)

    1997-12-31

    Aircraft contrails have significantly different properties to natural cirrus clouds. Their local and global climate impact cannot be assessed without consideration of these differences. Microphysical data were obtained from the Merlin aircraft equipped with a PMS FSSP-100 for particle spectrum measurements over the 3 {mu}m to 45 {mu}m diameter range; a PMS 2D-C for particle size spectrum and particle shape over the size range from 25 {mu}m to 800 {mu}m and a Johnson-Williams cloud liquid-water probe. Radiative measurements were obtained from a Do228 aircraft which carried the upward looking ALEX-F Lidar operating at a wavelength of 1.06 {mu}m and a Barnes PRT-5 radiometer aligned parallel to the lidar and with a 9 to 11 {mu}m spectral range. The limitation in accuracy of cloud microphysical sensor used in contrail studies are also discussed with subsequent errors on description of cloud radiative properties. (R.P.) 9 refs.

  16. Effect of weld line shape on material flow during friction stir welding of aluminum and steel

    Yasui, Toshiaki; Ando, Naoyuki; Morinaka, Shinpei; Mizushima, Hiroki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The effect of weld line shape on material flow during the friction stir welding of aluminum and steel was investigated. The material flow velocity was evaluated with simulated experiments using plasticine as the simulant material. The validity of the simulated experiments was verified by the marker material experiments on aluminum. The circumferential velocity of material around the probe increased with the depth from the weld surface. The effect is significant in cases where the advancing side is located on the outside of curve and those with higher curvature. Thus, there is an influence of weld line shape on material flow

  17. Line Shape Variability in a Sample of AGN with Broad Lines

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We give here a comparative review of the line shape variability in a sample of five type 1 AGNs, those with broad emission lines in their spectra, of the data obtained from the international long-term optical monitoring campaign coordinated by the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy ...

  18. Spectral line shapes in linear absorption and two-dimensional spectroscopy with skewed frequency distributions

    Farag, Marwa H.; Hoenders, Bernhard J.; Knoester, Jasper; Jansen, Thomas L. C.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of Gaussian dynamics on the line shapes in linear absorption and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy is well understood as the second-order cumulant expansion provides exact spectra. Gaussian solvent dynamics can be well analyzed using slope line analysis of two-dimensional

  19. Deterministic Line-Shape Programming of Silicon Nanowires for Extremely Stretchable Springs and Electronics.

    Xue, Zhaoguo; Sun, Mei; Dong, Taige; Tang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yaolong; Wang, Junzhuan; Wei, Xianlong; Yu, Linwei; Chen, Qing; Xu, Jun; Shi, Yi; Chen, Kunji; Roca I Cabarrocas, Pere

    2017-12-13

    Line-shape engineering is a key strategy to endow extra stretchability to 1D silicon nanowires (SiNWs) grown with self-assembly processes. We here demonstrate a deterministic line-shape programming of in-plane SiNWs into extremely stretchable springs or arbitrary 2D patterns with the aid of indium droplets that absorb amorphous Si precursor thin film to produce ultralong c-Si NWs along programmed step edges. A reliable and faithful single run growth of c-SiNWs over turning tracks with different local curvatures has been established, while high resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis reveals a high quality monolike crystallinity in the line-shaped engineered SiNW springs. Excitingly, in situ scanning electron microscopy stretching and current-voltage characterizations also demonstrate a superelastic and robust electric transport carried by the SiNW springs even under large stretching of more than 200%. We suggest that this highly reliable line-shape programming approach holds a strong promise to extend the mature c-Si technology into the development of a new generation of high performance biofriendly and stretchable electronics.

  20. Theory of direct-interband-transition line shapes based on Mori's method

    Sam Nyung Yi; Jai Yon Ryu; Ok Hee Chung; Joung Young Sug; Sang Don Choi; Yeon Choon Chung

    1987-01-01

    A theory of direct interband optical transition in the electron-phonon system is introduced on the basis of the Kubo formalism and by using Mori's method of calculation. The line shape functions are introduced in two different ways and are compared with those obtained by Choi and Chung based on Argyres and Sigel's projection technique

  1. NMRKIN: Simulating line shapes from two-dimensional spectra of proteins upon ligand binding

    Guenther, Ulrich L.; Schaffhausen, Brian

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of the shape of signals in NMR spectra is a powerful tool to study exchange and reaction kinetics. Line shapes in two-dimensional spectra of proteins recorded for titrations with ligands provide information about binding rates observed at individual residues. Here we describe a fast method to simulate a series of line shapes derived from two-dimensional spectra of a protein during a ligand titration. This procedure, which takes the mutual effects of two dimensions into account, has been implemented in MATLAB as an add-on to NMRLab (Guenther et al., 2000). In addition, more complex kinetic models, including sequential and parallel reactions, were simulated to demonstrate common features of more complex line shapes which could be encountered in protein-ligand interactions. As an example of this method, we describe its application to line shapes obtained for a titration of the p85 N-SH2 domain of PI3-kinase with a peptide derived from polyomavirus middle T antigen (MT)

  2. Sensitivity of surface temperature to radiative forcing by contrail cirrus in a radiative-mixing model

    U. Schumann

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Earth's surface temperature sensitivity to radiative forcing (RF by contrail cirrus and the related RF efficacy relative to CO2 are investigated in a one-dimensional idealized model of the atmosphere. The model includes energy transport by shortwave (SW and longwave (LW radiation and by mixing in an otherwise fixed reference atmosphere (no other feedbacks. Mixing includes convective adjustment and turbulent diffusion, where the latter is related to the vertical component of mixing by large-scale eddies. The conceptual study shows that the surface temperature sensitivity to given contrail RF depends strongly on the timescales of energy transport by mixing and radiation. The timescales are derived for steady layered heating (ghost forcing and for a transient contrail cirrus case. The radiative timescales are shortest at the surface and shorter in the troposphere than in the mid-stratosphere. Without mixing, a large part of the energy induced into the upper troposphere by radiation due to contrails or similar disturbances gets lost to space before it can contribute to surface warming. Because of the different radiative forcing at the surface and at top of atmosphere (TOA and different radiative heating rate profiles in the troposphere, the local surface temperature sensitivity to stratosphere-adjusted RF is larger for SW than for LW contrail forcing. Without mixing, the surface energy budget is more important for surface warming than the TOA budget. Hence, surface warming by contrails is smaller than suggested by the net RF at TOA. For zero mixing, cooling by contrails cannot be excluded. This may in part explain low efficacy values for contrails found in previous global circulation model studies. Possible implications of this study are discussed. Since the results of this study are model dependent, they should be tested with a comprehensive climate model in the future.

  3. Towards a contrail climatology from NOAA-satellite images over Europe

    Bakan, S [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Betancor, M [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Meteorologisches Inst.; Gayler, V [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Meteorologisches Inst.; Grassl, H [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Meteorologisches Inst.; [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1993-11-01

    Contrail cloudiness over Europe and the eastern part of the North Atlantic Ocean was analyzed for the two periods Sept. 1979-Dec. 1981 and Sept. 1989-Aug. 1992 by visual inspection of quicklook photographic prints of NOAA/AVHRR infrared images. The averaged contrail cover exhibits maximum values along the transatlantic flight corridor around 50 N (of almost 2%) and over western Europe resulting in 0.5% contrail cloudiness on the average. A strong yearly cycle appears with a maximum (<2%) in spring and summer over the Atlantic and a smaller maximum (<1%) in winter over southwestern Europe. Comparing the two time periods of one decade separation there is a significant decrease in contrail cloudiness over western Europe and a significant increase over the North Atlantic observable between March and July. Contrail cloud cover during daytime is about twice as high as during nighttime. Contrails are preferably found in larger fields of 1000 km diameter which last usually for more than one day. Causes, possible errors and consequences are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Towards a contrail climatology from NOAA-satellite images over Europe

    Bakan, S.; Betancor, M.

    1993-01-01

    Contrail cloudiness over Europe and the eastern part of the North Atlantic Ocean was analyzed for the two periods Sept. 1979-Dec. 1981 and Sept. 1989-Aug. 1992 by visual inspection of quicklook photographic prints of NOAA/AVHRR infrared images. The averaged contrail cover exhibits maximum values along the transatlantic flight corridor around 50 N (of almost 2%) and over western Europe resulting in 0.5% contrail cloudiness on the average. A strong yearly cycle appears with a maximum (<2%) in spring and summer over the Atlantic and a smaller maximum (<1%) in winter over southwestern Europe. Comparing the two time periods of one decade separation there is a significant decrease in contrail cloudiness over western Europe and a significant increase over the North Atlantic observable between March and July. Contrail cloud cover during daytime is about twice as high as during nighttime. Contrails are preferably found in larger fields of 1000 km diameter which last usually for more than one day. Causes, possible errors and consequences are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Resonance line shape, strain and electric potential distributions of composite magnetoelectric sensors

    Martina Gerken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiferroic composite magnetoelectric (ME sensors are based on the elastic coupling of a magnetostrictive phase and a piezoelectric phase. A deformation of the magnetostrictive phase causes strain in the piezoelectric phase and thus an induced voltage. Such sensors may be applied both for static as well as for dynamic magnetic field measurements. Particularly high sensitivities are achieved for operation at a mechanical resonance. Here, the resonance line shape of layered (2-2 composite cantilever ME sensors at the first bending-mode resonance is investigated theoretically. Finite element method (FEM simulations using a linear material model reveal an asymmetric resonance profile and a zero-response frequency for the ME coefficient. Frequency-dependent strain and electric potential distributions inside the magnetoelectric composite are studied for the case of a magnetostrictive-piezoelectric bilayer. It is demonstrated that a positive or a negative voltage may be induced across the piezoelectric layer depending on the position of the neutral plane. The frequency-dependent induced electric potential is investigated for structured cantilevers that exhibit magnetostriction only at specific positions. For static operation an induced voltage is obtained locally at positions with magnetostriction. In addition to this direct effect a resonance-assisted effect is observed for dynamic operation. Magnetostriction in a limited area of the cantilever causes a global vibration of the cantilever. Thus, deformation of the piezoelectric layer and an induced electric potential also occur in areas of the cantilever without magnetostriction. The direct and the resonance-assisted pathway may induce voltages of equal or of opposite sign. The net induced voltage results from the superposition of the two effects. As the resonance-assisted induced voltage changes sign upon passing the resonance frequency, while the direct component is constant, an asymmetric line

  6. Ultrafast method of calculating the dynamic spectral line shapes for integrated modelling of plasmas

    Lisitsa, V.S.

    2009-01-01

    An ultrafast code for spectral line shape calculations is presented to be used in the integrated modelling of plasmas. The code is based on the close analogy between two mechanisms: (i) Dicke narrowing of the Doppler-broadened spectral lines and (ii) transition from static to impact regime in the Stark broadening. The analogy makes it possible to describe the dynamic Stark broadening in terms of an analytical functional of the static line shape. A comparison of new method with the widely used Frequency Fluctuating Method (FFM) developed by the Marseille University group (B. Talin, R. Stamm, et al.) shows good agreement, with the new method being faster than the standard FFM by nearly two orders of magnitude. The method proposed may significantly simplify the radiation transport modeling and opens new possibilities for integrated modeling of the edge and divertor plasma in tokamaks. (author)

  7. Improved Frequency Fluctuation Model for Spectral Line Shape Calculations in Fusion Plasmas

    Ferri, S.; Calisti, A.; Mosse, C.; Talin, B.; Lisitsa, V.

    2010-01-01

    A very fast method to calculate spectral line shapes emitted by plasmas accounting for charge particle dynamics and effects of an external magnetic field is proposed. This method relies on a new formulation of the Frequency Fluctuation Model (FFM), which yields to an expression of the dynamic line profile as a functional of the static distribution function of frequencies. This highly efficient formalism, not limited to hydrogen-like systems, allows to calculate pure Stark and Stark-Zeeman line shapes for a wide range of density, temperature and magnetic field values, which is of importance in plasma physics and astrophysics. Various applications of this method are presented for conditions related to fusion plasmas.

  8. Optical line shape of molecular rings: Influence of correlated nondiagonal disorder

    Barvik, I.; Warns, Ch.; Reineker, P.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the optical properties of molecular rings which are generally influenced by many kinds of static disorder. Recently, Papiz suggested that quasistatic disorder, anticorrelated between neighboring transfer integrals, plays an important role. We simulate such a disorder by slow colored dichotomic Markov processes with long-time constants for the decay of their correlation functions. The colored dichotomic Markov processes leading to transfer integral fluctuations can be uncorrelated, anticorrelated or partially correlated between nearest neighboring transfer integrals in the ring. The optical line shape of the molecular ring is modeled and investigated in dependence on the parameters of the stochastic processes. Conclusions as regards the influence of the correlation on the splitting of the optical line shape, the shift of the optical absorption maximum and the width of the optical line are drawn

  9. Theory of strongly saturated double-resonance line shapes in arbitrary angular momentum states of molecules

    Galbraith, H.W.; Dubs, M.; Steinfeld, J.I.

    1982-01-01

    We calculate the steady-state probe absorption line-shape function for a strongly driven, Zeeman-degenerate molecular system. The probe laser is treated to lowest order while the pump laser is dealt with to all orders. We obtain the probe line shape for the cases of parallel and perpendicular linear polarization of the two lasers. As expected, the effects of M degeneracy, as well as differences due to the relative laser polarizations, are most pronounced when Doppler broadening is not important. However, even in the presence of large Doppler broadening we find a narrowing of the population hole by including the Zeeman degeneracy and a further narrowing if perpendicular laser polarizations are used

  10. The influence of instrumental line shape degradation on NDACC gas retrievals: total column and profile

    Y. Sun

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We simulated instrumental line shape (ILS degradations with respect to typical types of misalignment, and compared their influence on each NDACC (Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change gas. The sensitivities of the total column, the root mean square (rms of the fitting residual, the total random uncertainty, the total systematic uncertainty, the total uncertainty, degrees of freedom for signal (DOFs, and the profile with respect to different levels of ILS degradation for all current standard NDACC gases, i.e. O3, HNO3, HCl, HF, ClONO2, CH4, CO, N2O, C2H6, and HCN, were investigated. The influence of an imperfect ILS on NDACC gases' retrieval was assessed, and the consistency under different meteorological conditions and solar zenith angles (SZAs were examined. The study concluded that the influence of ILS degradation can be approximated by the linear sum of individual modulation efficiency (ME amplitude influence and phase error (PE influence. The PE influence is of secondary importance compared with the ME amplitude. Generally, the stratospheric gases are more sensitive to ILS degradation than the tropospheric gases, and the positive ME influence is larger than the negative ME. For a typical ILS degradation (10 %, the total columns of stratospheric gases O3, HNO3, HCl, HF, and ClONO2 changed by 1.9, 0.7, 4, 3, and 23 %, respectively, while the columns of tropospheric gases CH4, CO, N2O, C2H6, and HCN changed by 0.04, 2.1, 0.2, 1.1, and 0.75 %, respectively. In order to suppress the fractional difference in the total column for ClONO2 and other NDACC gases within 10 and 1 %, respectively, the maximum positive ME degradations for O3, HNO3, HCl, HF, ClONO2, CO, C2H6, and HCN should be less than 6, 15, 5, 5, 5, 5, 9, and 13 %, respectively; the maximum negative ME degradations for O3, HCl, and HF should be less than 6, 12, and 12 %, respectively; the influence of ILS degradation on CH4 and N2O can be regarded as being

  11. Experimental verification of the line-shape distortion in resonance Auger spectra

    Aksela, S.; Kukk, E.; Aksela, H.; Svensson, S.

    1995-01-01

    When the mean excitation energy and the width of a broad photon band are varied the Kr 3d 5/2 -1 5p→4p -2 5p resonance Auger electron lines show strong asymmetry and their average kinetic energies shift. Even extra peaks appear. Our results demonstrate experimentally, for the first time, that the incident photon energy distribution has very crucial importance on the resonance Auger line shape and thus on the reliable data analysis of complicated Auger spectra

  12. Line shape parameters for the H2O-H2 collision system for application to exoplanet and planetary atmospheres

    Renaud, Candice L.; Cleghorn, Kara; Hartmann, Léna; Vispoel, Bastien; Gamache, Robert R.

    2018-05-01

    Water can be detected throughout the universe: in comets, asteroids, dwarf planets, the inner and outer planets in our solar system, cool stars, brown dwarfs, and on many exoplanets. Here the focus is on locations rich in hydrogen gas. To properly study these environments, there is a need for the line shape parameters for H2O transitions in collision with hydrogen. This work presents calculations of the half-width and line shift, made using the Modified Complex Robert-Bonamy (MCRB) formalism, at a number of temperatures. It is shown that this collision system is strongly off-resonance. For such conditions, the atom-atom part of the intermolecular potential dominates the interaction of the radiating and perturbing molecules. The atom-atom parameters were adjusted by fitting the H2O-H2 measurements of Brown and Plymate (1996). Several techniques were used to extract lines for which there is more confidence in the quality of the data. The final potential yields results that agree with the measurements with ∼0.3% difference and a 5.9% standard deviation. Using this potential, MCRB calculations were made for all transitions in the pure rotation, ν2, ν1, and ν3 bands. The structure of the line shape parameters and the temperature dependence of the half-width, as a function of the rotational and vibrational quantum numbers, are discussed. It is shown that the power law model of the T-dependence of the half-width is inadequate over large temperature ranges.

  13. The impact of diurnal variations of air traffic on contrail radiative forcing

    N. Stuber

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We combined high resolution aircraft flight data from the EU Fifth Framework Programme project AERO2k with analysis data from the ECMWF's integrated forecast system to calculate diurnally resolved 3-D contrail cover. We scaled the contrail cover in order to match observational data for the Bakan area (eastern-Atlantic/western-Europe.

    We found that less than 40% of the global distance travelled by aircraft is due to flights during local night time. Yet, due to the cancellation of shortwave and longwave effects during daytime, night time flights contribute a disproportional 60% to the global annual mean forcing. Under clear sky conditions the night flights contribute even more disproportionally at 76%. There are pronounced regional variations in night flying and the associated radiative forcing. Over parts of the North Atlantic flight corridor 75% of air traffic and 84% of the forcing occurs during local night, whereas only 35% of flights are during local night in South-East Asia, yet these contribute 68% of the radiative forcing. In general, regions with a significant local contrail radiative forcing are also regions for which night time flights amount to less than half of the daily total of flights. Therefore, neglecting diurnal variations in air traffic/contrail cover by assuming a diurnal mean contrail cover can over-estimate the global mean radiative forcing by up to 30%.

  14. Variability of contrail formation conditions and the implications for policies to reduce the climate impacts of aviation

    Williams, Victoria; Noland, Robert B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to balance the climate benefits of contrail reduction against the penalties incurred when cruise altitudes are restricted. Altitude restrictions are targeted by selecting, for each 6-h period, the altitude that provides the greatest reduction in contrail for the lowest increase in carbon dioxide emission. Calculations are for western Europe. This paper discusses the variability in contrail formation conditions in the region and presents contrail reductions and carbon dioxide emission increases obtained with this optimised approach, which compare favourably with fixed altitude restrictions. A new method is also developed to estimate contrail fractions within three-dimensional grids. Conclusions discuss potential operational issues associated with a varying altitude restriction policy. (Author)

  15. Ground-based mobile scanning LIDAR for remote sensing of contrails

    F. Homburg

    Full Text Available Air traffic is a source of trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Contrails readily form from water vapor exhausts under favorable meteorological conditions. Since contrails are ice crystal clouds like natural cirrus clouds, they bear a greenhouse potential which has to be investigated. The IFU has built a scanning lidar system employing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser as the emitter and a 52-cm diameter telescope as the receiver. Signals are processed in several channels to investigate depolarization and wavelength dependencies of the light backscattered from ice crystals. These investigations are aimed at the formation and life cycles of contrails, their optical properties, and their climatological consequences in areas of dense air traffic. The experimental lidar setup is described and a sample measurement is shown.

  16. Ground-based mobile scanning LIDAR for remote sensing of contrails

    V. Freudenthaler

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available Air traffic is a source of trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Contrails readily form from water vapor exhausts under favorable meteorological conditions. Since contrails are ice crystal clouds like natural cirrus clouds, they bear a greenhouse potential which has to be investigated. The IFU has built a scanning lidar system employing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser as the emitter and a 52-cm diameter telescope as the receiver. Signals are processed in several channels to investigate depolarization and wavelength dependencies of the light backscattered from ice crystals. These investigations are aimed at the formation and life cycles of contrails, their optical properties, and their climatological consequences in areas of dense air traffic. The experimental lidar setup is described and a sample measurement is shown.

  17. Carbon balance of China constrained by CONTRAIL aircraft CO2 measurements

    Jiang, F.; Wang, H. M.; Chen, J. M.; Machida, T.; Zhou, L. X.; Ju, W. M.; Matsueda, H.; Sawa, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Terrestrial carbon dioxide (CO2) flux estimates in China using atmospheric inversion method are beset with considerable uncertainties because very few atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements are available. In order to improve these estimates, nested atmospheric CO2 inversion during 2002-2008 is performed in this study using passenger aircraft-based CO2 measurements over Eurasia from the Comprehensive Observation Network for Trace gases by Airliner (CONTRAIL) project. The inversion system includes 43 regions with a focus on China, and is based on the Bayesian synthesis approach and the TM5 transport model. The terrestrial ecosystem carbon flux modeled by the Boreal Ecosystems Productivity Simulator (BEPS) model and the ocean exchange simulated by the OPA-PISCES-T model are considered as the prior fluxes. The impacts of CONTRAIL CO2 data on inverted China terrestrial carbon fluxes are quantified, the improvement of the inverted fluxes after adding CONTRAIL CO2 data are rationed against climate factors and evaluated by comparing the simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations with three independent surface CO2 measurements in China. Results show that with the addition of CONTRAIL CO2 data, the inverted carbon sink in China increases while those in South and Southeast Asia decrease. Meanwhile, the posterior uncertainties over these regions are all reduced (2-12%). CONTRAIL CO2 data also have a large effect on the inter-annual variation of carbon sinks in China, leading to a better correlation between the carbon sink and the annual mean climate factors. Evaluations against the CO2 measurements at three sites in China also show that the CONTRAIL CO2 measurements may have improved the inversion results.

  18. Line Shape Modeling for the Diagnostic of the Electron Density in a Corona Discharge

    Joël Rosato

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of spectra observed in a corona discharge designed for the study of dielectrics in electrical engineering. The medium is a gas of helium and the discharge was performed at the vicinity of a tip electrode under high voltage. The shape of helium lines is dominated by the Stark broadening due to the plasma microfield. Using a computer simulation method, we examine the sensitivity of the He 492 nm line shape to the electron density. Our results indicate the possibility of a density diagnostic based on passive spectroscopy. The influence of collisional broadening due to interactions between the emitters and neutrals is discussed.

  19. Noodles and stars allow a precise and efficient calculation of the Z-line shape and the polarization asymmetry

    Jung-Choon Im, C.

    1990-01-01

    We give a pedagogical introduction to the star functions and the Noodle method. The Z-line shape and the polarization asymmetry at SLC/LEP can be evaluated elegantly and efficiently using the star functions and the Noodle method

  20. Determination of edge plasma parameters by a genetic algorithm analysis of spectral line shapes

    Marandet, Y.; Genesio, P.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Koubiti, M.; Stamm, R.; Capes, H.; Guirlet, R.

    2003-01-01

    Comparing an experimental and a theoretical line shape can be achieved by a genetic algorithm (GA) based on an analogy to the mechanisms of natural selection. Such an algorithm is able to deal with complex non-linear models, and can avoid local minima. We have used this optimization tool in the context of edge plasma spectroscopy, for a determination of the temperatures and fractions of the various populations of neutral deuterium emitting the D α line in 2 configurations of Tore-Supra: ergodic divertor and toroidal pumped limiter. Using the GA fit, the neutral emitters are separated into up to 4 populations which can be identified as resulting from molecular dissociation reactions, charge exchange, or reflection. In all the edge plasmas studied, a significant fraction of neutrals emit in the line wings, leading to neutrals with a temperature up to a few hundreds eV if a Gaussian line shape is assumed. This conclusion could be modified if the line wing exhibits a non Gaussian behavior

  1. Bibliography on atomic line shapes and shifts (June 1975 through June 1978). Interim report

    Fuhr, J.R.; Miller, B.J.; Martin, G.A.

    1978-12-01

    This is the third supplement to the NBS Special Publication 366, Bibliography on Atomic Line Shapes and Shifts (1889 through March 1972). It contains about 600 references and covers the literature from June 1975 through June 1978. As before, the bibliography contains five major parts: (1) All general interest papers are catalogued according to the broadening mechanisms (and, further, according to special topics under several of the mechanisms) and as to whether the work is a general theory, a general review, a table of profiles or parameters, a comment on existing work, a study of general experimental measurement techniques, or an experimental effort of general importance. Also included are selected papers on important applications of line broadening and on miscellaneous topics relating to atomic spectral line shapes and shifts. (2) In Part 2 all papers containing numerical data are ordered as to element, ionization stage, and broadening mechanism (in the case of foreign gas broadening the perturbing species are listed), and it is indicated whether the data are experimentally or theoretically derived. (3) While in the two preceding parts of the bibliography the references are listed for brevity by identification numbers only, in Part 3 all references are listed completely by journal, authors, and title and are generally arranged by year of publication and alphabetically by authors' names within the year. (4) This section contains a list of all authors and their papers. (5) A final section provides corrections or additions to the second supplement to the original bibliography

  2. Determination of edge plasma parameters by a genetic algorithm analysis of spectral line shapes

    Marandet, Y.; Genesio, P.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Koubiti, M.; Stamm, R. [Universite de Provence (PIIM), Centre de Saint-Jerome, 13 - Marseille (France); Capes, H.; Guirlet, R. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2003-07-01

    Comparing an experimental and a theoretical line shape can be achieved by a genetic algorithm (GA) based on an analogy to the mechanisms of natural selection. Such an algorithm is able to deal with complex non-linear models, and can avoid local minima. We have used this optimization tool in the context of edge plasma spectroscopy, for a determination of the temperatures and fractions of the various populations of neutral deuterium emitting the D{sub {alpha}} line in 2 configurations of Tore-Supra: ergodic divertor and toroidal pumped limiter. Using the GA fit, the neutral emitters are separated into up to 4 populations which can be identified as resulting from molecular dissociation reactions, charge exchange, or reflection. In all the edge plasmas studied, a significant fraction of neutrals emit in the line wings, leading to neutrals with a temperature up to a few hundreds eV if a Gaussian line shape is assumed. This conclusion could be modified if the line wing exhibits a non Gaussian behavior.

  3. Precision Measurement of the Energies and Line Shapes of Antiprotonic Lyman and Balmer Transitions From Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes

    2002-01-01

    % PS207 \\\\ \\\\ For the study of the antiproton-proton and antiproton-nuclear spin-spin and spin-orbital interaction at threshold a high resolution measurement is proposed of the line shapes and energy shifts of antiprotonic K$\\alpha$ and L$\\alpha$ transitions of hydrogen and helium isotopes. The intense LEAR beam, stopped in the cyclotron trap at low gas pressure, provides a unique~X-ray~source with sufficient brightness. Charge coupled devices with their excellent background rejection and energy resolution allow a precise determination of the strong shifts and widths of the 1s hyperfine states of protonium, in addition the detection of the $\\bar{p}$D K$\\alpha$ transition should be possible. A focussing crystal spectrometer with a resolution $\\Delta$E/E of about l0$ ^- ^{4} $, which is superior in the accuracy of the energy determination by two orders of magnitude as compared to the present detection methods, will be used to measure the energies of the L$\\alpha$ transitions. This permits a first direct measure...

  4. A Linear Programming Approach to the Development of Contrail Reduction Strategies Satisfying Operationally Feasible Constraints

    Wei, Peng; Sridhar, Banavar; Chen, Neil Yi-Nan; Sun, Dengfent

    2012-01-01

    A class of strategies has been proposed to reduce contrail formation in the United States airspace. A 3D grid based on weather data and the cruising altitude level of aircraft is adjusted to avoid the persistent contrail potential area with the consideration to fuel-efficiency. In this paper, the authors introduce a contrail avoidance strategy on 3D grid by considering additional operationally feasible constraints from an air traffic controller's aspect. First, shifting too many aircraft to the same cruising level will make the miles-in-trail at this level smaller than the safety separation threshold. Furthermore, the high density of aircraft at one cruising level may exceed the workload for the traffic controller. Therefore, in our new model we restrict the number of total aircraft at each level. Second, the aircraft count variation for successive intervals cannot be too drastic since the workload to manage climbing/descending aircraft is much larger than managing cruising aircraft. The contrail reduction is formulated as an integer-programming problem and the problem is shown to have the property of total unimodularity. Solving the corresponding relaxed linear programming with the simplex method provides an optimal and integral solution to the problem. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the methodology.

  5. Intercomparison of radiative forcing calculations of stratospheric water vapour and contrails

    Myhre, Gunnar [Dept. of Geosciences, Univ. of Oslo (Norway); Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo (Norway); Kvalevaag, Maria [Dept. of Geosciences, Univ. of Oslo (Norway); Raedel, Gaby; Cook, Jolene; Shine, Keith P. [Dept. of Meteorology, Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom); Clark, Hannah [CNRM/GAME Meteo France, Toulouse (France); Lab. d' Aerologie, Univ. de Toulouse (France); Karcher, Fernand [CNRM/GAME Meteo France, Toulouse (France); Markowicz, Krzysztof; Kardas, Aleksandra; Wolkenberg, Paulina [Inst. of Geophysics, Univ. of Warsaw (Poland); Balkanski, Yves [LSCE/IPSL, Lab. CEA-CNRS-UVSQ (France); Ponater, Michael [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft und Raumfahrt (DLR), Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Forster, Piers; Rap, Alexandru [School of Earth and Environment, Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom); Leon, Ruben Rodriguez de [Manchester Metropolitan Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    Seven groups have participated in an intercomparison study of calculations of radiative forcing (RF) due to stratospheric water vapour (SWV) and contrails. a combination of detailed radiative transfer schemes and codes for global-scale calculations have been used, as well as a combination of idealized simulations and more realistic global-scale changes in stratospheric water vapour and contrails. Detailed line-by-line codes agree within about 15% for longwave (LW) and shortwave (SW) RF, except in one case where the difference is 30%. Since the LW and SW RF due to contrails and SWV changes are of opposite sign, the differences between the models seen in the individual LW and SW components can be either compensated or strengthened in the net RF. and thus in relative terms uncertainties are much larger for the net RF. Some of the models used for global-scale simulations of changes in SWV and contrails differ substantially in RF from the more detailed radiative transfer schemes. For the global-scale calculations we use a method of weighting the results to calculate a best estimate based on their performance compared to the more detailed radiative transfer schemes in the idealized simulations. (orig.)

  6. Contrail Cirrus Forecasts for the ML-CIRRUS Experiment and Some Comparison Results

    Schumann, Ulrich; Graf, Kaspar; Bugliaro, Luca; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Giez, Andreas; Jurkat, Tina; Kaufmann, Stefan; Krämer, Martina; Minikin, Andreas; Schäfler, Andreas; Voigt, Christiane; Wirth, Martin; Zahn, Andreas; Ziereis, Helmut

    2015-04-01

    Model simulations with the contrail cirrus prediction model CoCiP driven by numerical weather prediction (NWP) data provided from the European Centre for Medium Range Forecasts (ECMWF) and global aircraft waypoint data show a mean computed cover (for optical depth larger than 0.1) of 0.23% globally, and 5.4% over mid Europe (Schumann and Graf, JGR, 2013). The computed mean longwave radiative forcing (RF) reaches 3 W m-2 over mid Europe (10°W-20°E and 40°N-55°N), and 0.13 W m-2 globally. The global net RF is about 40-60% smaller because of compensating shortwave cooling induced by contrails during daytime. The results depend on several model details such as the number of ice particles forming from aircraft soot emissions, the contrail plume dispersion, ice particle sedimentation etc., all influencing contrail life time and their optical properties. The quantitative results depend also strongly on ambient relative humidity, vertical motion and on ice water content of other cirrus predicted by the NWP model. In order to test and possibly improve this and other contrail models, high-quality observations are needed to which multi-parameter model output can be compared. The Mid-Latitude Cirrus Experiment ML-CIRRUS was performed (see C. Voigt et al., this conference) with a suite of in-situ and Lidar instruments for airborne measurements on the research aircraft HALO. Before and during the mission, CoCiP was run daily to provide 3-days forecasts of contrail cover using operational ECMWF forecasts and historical traffic data. CoCiP forecast output was made available in an internet tool twice a day for experiment planning. The one-day and two-day contrail forecasts often showed only small differences. Still, most recent forecasts and detailed satellite observations results were transmitted via satellite link to the crew for onboard campaign optimization. After the campaign, a data base of realistic air traffic data has been setup from various sources, and CoCiP was

  7. ZEST: A Fast Code for Simulating Zeeman-Stark Line-Shape Functions

    Franck Gilleron

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the ZEST code, dedicated to the calculation of line shapes broadened by Zeeman and Stark effects. As concerns the Stark effect, the model is based on the Standard Lineshape Theory in which ions are treated in the quasi-static approximation, whereas the effects of electrons are represented by weak collisions in the framework of a binary collision relaxation theory. A static magnetic field may be taken into account in the radiator Hamiltonian in the dipole approximation, which leads to additional Zeeman splitting patterns. Ion dynamics effects are implemented using the fast Frequency-Fluctuation Model. For fast calculations, the static ion microfield distribution in the plasma is evaluated using analytic fits of Monte-Carlo simulations, which depend only on the ion-ion coupling parameter and the electron-ion screening factor.

  8. Effects of self-similar correlations on the spectral line shape in the neutral gas

    Kharintsev, S.S.; Salakhov, M.Kh.

    2001-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of the influence of self-similar correlations on the Doppler and pressure broadening within the non-equilibrium Boltzmann gas. The diffuse model for the thermal motion of the radiator and the self-similar mechanism of interference of scalar perturbations for phase shifts of an atomic oscillator are developed. It is shown that taking into account self-similar correlation in a description of the spectral line shape allows one to explain, on the one hand, the additional spectral line Dicke-narrowing in the Doppler regime, and, on the other hand, the asymmetry in wings of the spectral line in a high pressure region

  9. Mode-dependent dispersion in Raman line shapes: Observation and implications from ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    Umapathy, S.; Mallick, B.; Lakshmanna, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy (URLS) enables one to obtain the vibrational structural information of molecular systems including fluorescent materials. URLS, a nonlinear process analog to stimulated Raman gain, involves a narrow bandwidth picosecond Raman pump pulse and a femtosecond broadband white light continuum. Under nonresonant condition, the Raman response appears as a negative (loss) signal, whereas, on resonance with the electronic transition the line shape changes from a negative to a positive through a dispersive form. The intensities observed and thus, the Franck-Condon activity (coordinate dependent), are sensitive to the wavelength of the white light corresponding to a particular Raman frequency with respect to the Raman pump pulse wavelength, i.e., there is a mode-dependent response in URLS.

  10. X-ray spectral line shapes for the excimer-laser-produced high density plasma diagnostics

    Magunov, A.; Faenov, A.; Skobelev, I.; Pikuz, T.; Batani, D.; Milani, M.; Conti, A.; Masini, A.; Costato, M.; Pozzi, A.; Turcu, E.; Allot, R.; Lisi, N.; Koenig, M.; Benuzzi, A.; Flora, F.; Letardi, T.; Palladino, L.; Reale, A.

    1997-01-01

    The time and space-integrated emission spectra measurements have been performed in plasma produced by 308 nm wavelength XeCl laser radiation (I L =(4-10)·10 12 W/cm 2 , τ=10 ns) and by 248 nm wavelength KrF laser pulse train radiation (I L =5·10 15 W/cm 2 , τ=7 ps, 16 pulses in train) on CF n plane target. The lines' shapes and intensities modeling of Lyman series and He-like ion resonance series of fluorine up to n=7 by fitting experimental data shows the considerable difference of plasma formation features for these two sets of the laser pulse parameters

  11. Measured signatures of low energy, physical sputtering in the line shape of neutral carbon emission

    Brooks, N.H. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States)]. E-mail: brooks@fusion.gat.com; Isler, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Whyte, D.G. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Fenstermacher, M.E. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Groebner, R.J. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Stangeby, P.C. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto, M3H 5T6 (Canada); Heidbrink, W.W. [University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Jackson, G.L. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Mahdavi, M.A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); West, W.P. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    The most important mechanisms for introducing carbon into the DIII-D divertors [J.L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42 (2002) 614] are physical and chemical sputtering. Previous investigations have indicated that operating conditions where one or the other of these is dominant can be distinguished by using CD and C{sub 2} emissions to infer C I influxes from dissociation of hydrocarbons and comparing to measured C I influxes. The present work extends these results through detailed analysis of the C I spectral line shapes. In general, it is found that the profiles are actually asymmetric and have shifted peaks. These features are interpreted as originating from a combination of an anisotropic velocity distribution from physical sputtering (the Thompson model) and an isotropic distribution from molecular dissociation. The present study utilizes pure helium plasmas to benchmark C I spectral profiles arising from physical sputtering alone.

  12. Raman study of pressure effects on frequencies and isotropic line shapes in liquid acetone

    Schindler, W.; Sharko, P.T.; Jonas, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Raman line shape of the symmetric C = O stretching band at 1710 cm -1 has been measured in liquid acetone as a function of pressure from 1 bar to 4 kbar over the temperature range from -25 to 50 0 C. The experimental data obtained show several unusual features. First, there is a frequency difference of about 7 cm -1 between the polarized and depolarized components. Sceond, the isotropic linewidth GAMMA/sub iso/ decreases with increasing density, in contrast to the opposite trend usually found in other liquids. Third, the second moment M 2 (V) of the isotropic band appears to decrease with increasing density. The consideration of the experimental linewidth and frequency data leads to a conclusion that intermolecular dipole--dipole coupling between polar acetone molecules are responsible for the observed unusual behavior of , GAMMA/sub iso/, and M 2

  13. Dependency of non-homogeneity energy dispersion on absorbance line-shape of luminescent polymers

    Silva, Marcelo Castanheira da, E-mail: mar_castanheira@yahoo.com.br [Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Natureza, Universidade Federal do Acre, CP 500, 69915-900 Rio Branco, AC (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, CP 593, 38400-902 Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Santos Silva, H.; Silva, R.A.; Marletta, Alexandre [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, CP 593, 38400-902 Uberlândia, MG (Brazil)

    2013-01-16

    In this paper, we study the importance of the non-homogeneity energy dispersion on absorption line-shape of luminescent polymers. The optical transition probability was calculated based on the molecular exciton model, Franck–Condon states, Gaussian distribution of non-entangled chains with conjugate degree n, semi-empirical parameterization of energy gap, electric dipole moment, and electron-vibrational mode coupling. Based on the approach of the energy gap functional dependence 1/n, the inclusion of the non-homogeneity energy dispersion 1/n{sup 2} is essential to obtain good experimental data agreement, mainly, where the absorption spectra display peaks width of about 65 meV. For unresolved absorption spectra, such as those observed for a large number of conjugated polymers processed via spin-coating technique, for example, the non-homogeneity energy dispersion parameterization is not significant. Results were supported by the application of the model for poly (p-phenylene vinylene) films.

  14. Line shape and thermal Kinetics analysis of the Fe2+ -band in Brazilian Green beryl

    Isotani, S.; Furtado, W.; Antonini, R.; Dias, O.L.

    1988-03-01

    The optical absorption spectra study through isothermal treatments of the σ- and Π-polarized bands of Fe 2+ -band is reported. It was shown a linear correlation between these bands through thermal treatments. Irradiation with γ-rays from 60 Co, showed the decrease of this band. The line shape analysis and the discussions lend us to assign the Π- and σ-polarized bands to Fe 2+ ions in the structural channels with and without neighbour water molecules, respectively. The kinetics analysis through a ''bimolecular-like'' model gives untrapping parameter with Arrhenius behavior. The retrapping and recombination parameters showed a behavior proportional to T 1/2 - T 1/2 o which were explained from free electron distribution of velocities and minimum untrapped electron energy due to a potential barrier of the trap. The kinetics cut-off temperature, T 0 , agrees with the previous experimental observation. (author) [pt

  15. Basic Diagnosis and Prediction of Persistent Contrail Occurrence using High-resolution Numerical Weather Analyses/Forecasts and Logistic Regression. Part II: Evaluation of Sample Models

    Duda, David P.; Minnis, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that probabilistic forecasting may be a useful method for predicting persistent contrail formation. A probabilistic forecast to accurately predict contrail formation over the contiguous United States (CONUS) is created by using meteorological data based on hourly meteorological analyses from the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) and from the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) as well as GOES water vapor channel measurements, combined with surface and satellite observations of contrails. Two groups of logistic models were created. The first group of models (SURFACE models) is based on surface-based contrail observations supplemented with satellite observations of contrail occurrence. The second group of models (OUTBREAK models) is derived from a selected subgroup of satellite-based observations of widespread persistent contrails. The mean accuracies for both the SURFACE and OUTBREAK models typically exceeded 75 percent when based on the RUC or ARPS analysis data, but decreased when the logistic models were derived from ARPS forecast data.

  16. Linear headache: a recurrent unilateral head pain circumscribed in a line-shaped area.

    Wang, Yu; Tian, Miao-Miao; Wang, Xian-Hong; Zhu, Xiao-Qun; Liu, Ying; Lu, Ya-Nan; Pan, Qing-Qing

    2014-06-26

    A headache circumscribed in a line-shaped area but not confined to the territory of one particular nerve had ever been described in Epicrania Fugax (EF) of which the head pain is moving and ultrashort. In a 25-month period from Feb 2012 to Mar 2014, we encountered 12 patients with a paroxysmal motionless head pain restricted in a linear trajectory. The head pain trajectory was similar to that of EF, but its all other features obviously different from those of EF. We named this distinctive but undescribed type of headache linear headache (LH). A detailed clinical feature of the headache was obtained in all cases to differentiate with EF, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) and cranial neuralgia. Similarities and differences in clinical features were compared between LH and migraine. The twelve LH patients (mean age 43.9 ± 12.2) complained of a recurrent, moderate to severe, distending (n = 9), pressure-like (n = 3) or pulsating (n = 3) pain within a strictly unilateral line-shaped area. The painful line is distributed from occipital or occipitocervical region to the ipsilateral eye (n = 5), forehead (n = 6) or parietal region (n = 1). The pain line has a trajecory similar to that of EF but no characteristics of moving. The headache duration would be ranged from five minutes to three days, but usually from half day to one day in most cases (n = 8). Six patients had the accompaniment of nausea with or without vomiting, and two patients had the accompaniment of ipsilateral dizziness. The attacks could be either spontaneous (n = 10) or triggered by noise, depression and resting after physical activity (n = 1), or by stress and staying up late (n = 1). The frequency of attacks was variable. The patients had well response to flunarizine, sodium valproate and amitriptyline but not to carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine. LH is different from EF, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) and cranial neuralgia, but it had couple of features similar to that of migraine. The

  17. A far wing line shape theory and its application to the foreign-broadened water continuum absorption. III

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The far wing line shape theory developed previously and applied to the calculation of the continuum absorption of pure water vapor is extended to foreign-broadened continua. Explicit results are presented for H2O-N2 and H2O-CO2 in the frequency range from 0 to 10,000/cm. For H2O-N2 the positive and negative resonant frequency average line shape functions and absorption coefficients are computed for a number of temperatures between 296 and 430 K for comparison with available laboratory data. In general the agreement is very good.

  18. Calculation of Resonance Interaction Effects Using a Rational Approximation to the Symmetric Resonance Line Shape Function

    Haeggblom, H.

    1968-08-01

    The method of calculating the resonance interaction effect by series expansions has been studied. Starting from the assumption that the neutron flux in a homogeneous mixture is inversely proportional to the total cross section, the expression for the flux can be simplified by series expansions. Two types of expansions are investigated and it is shown that only one of them is generally applicable. It is also shown that this expansion gives sufficient accuracy if the approximate resonance line shape function is reasonably representative. An investigation is made of the approximation of the resonance shape function with a Gaussian function which in some cases has been used to calculate the interaction effect. It is shown that this approximation is not sufficiently accurate in all cases which can occur in practice. Then, a rational approximation is introduced which in the first order approximation gives the same order of accuracy as a practically exact shape function. The integrations can be made analytically in the complex plane and the method is therefore very fast compared to purely numerical integrations. The method can be applied both to statistically correlated and uncorrelated resonances

  19. FPSPH DFPSPF, Line Shape Function for Doppler Broadened Resonance Cross-Sections Calculation

    Ribon, P.

    1982-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: In the computation of Doppler- broadened resonance cross sections, use is made of the symmetric and anti-symmetric line shape functions. These functions usually denoted as Psi and Phi (Psi and Chi in Anglo-Saxon formalism) are defined in terms of the real and imaginary parts of the error function for complex arguments. They are the product of the convolution of a Gaussian function with the symmetric and anti-symmetric Breit-Wigner functions, respectively. FPSPH and DFPSPH compute these functions. 2 - Method of solution: For (1+x 2 ) > 20 Beta 2 , the calculation is based upon the asymptotic expansion: Psi+(i*Phi) = 1/(1-ix)*(1-t+3t 2 -3.5t 3 +3.5+7t 4 ---), with: t = 1/(2z 2 ); z = (1-ix)/Beta. The half-plane (Beta,x) is split in several parts, and use is made of PADE approximants. For 1 + x 2 2 , the calculation is based upon the relation with the erf function: Psi + i*Phi = SQRT(Pi)/Beta*(e (z 2 ) )*(1-erf(z)) (z = (1-ix)/Beta, and erf(z) being calculated from its analytic expansion: erf(z) = 2/SQRT(Pi)*z*e (-z 2 ) *(1+z 2 /3+z 4 /(3*5) + z 6 /(3*5*7)+---). PADE approximants are used to compute the expansion and e z 2

  20. Calculation of Resonance Interaction Effects Using a Rational Approximation to the Symmetric Resonance Line Shape Function

    Haeggblom, H

    1968-08-15

    The method of calculating the resonance interaction effect by series expansions has been studied. Starting from the assumption that the neutron flux in a homogeneous mixture is inversely proportional to the total cross section, the expression for the flux can be simplified by series expansions. Two types of expansions are investigated and it is shown that only one of them is generally applicable. It is also shown that this expansion gives sufficient accuracy if the approximate resonance line shape function is reasonably representative. An investigation is made of the approximation of the resonance shape function with a Gaussian function which in some cases has been used to calculate the interaction effect. It is shown that this approximation is not sufficiently accurate in all cases which can occur in practice. Then, a rational approximation is introduced which in the first order approximation gives the same order of accuracy as a practically exact shape function. The integrations can be made analytically in the complex plane and the method is therefore very fast compared to purely numerical integrations. The method can be applied both to statistically correlated and uncorrelated resonances.

  1. On low-dimensional models at NMR line shape analysis in nanomaterial systems

    Kucherov, M. M.; Falaleev, O. V.

    2018-03-01

    We present a model of localized spin dynamics at room temperature for the low-dimensional solid-state spin system, which contains small ensembles of magnetic nuclei (N ~ 40). The standard spin Hamiltonian (XXZ model) is the sum of the Zeeman term in a strong external magnetic field and the magnetic dipole interaction secular term. The 19F spins in a single crystal of fluorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3F] have often been used to approximate a one-dimensional spin system. If the constant external field is parallel to the c axis, the 3D 19F system may be treated as a collection of many identical spin chains. When considering the longitudinal part of the secular term, we suggest that transverse component of a spin in a certain site rotates in a constant local magnetic field. This field changes if the spin jumps to another site. On return, this spin continues to rotate in the former field. Then we expand the density matrix in a set of eigenoperators of the Zeeman Hamiltonian. A system of coupled differential equations for the expansion coefficients then solved by straightforward numerical methods, and the fluorine NMR line shapes of fluorapatite for different chain lengths are calculated.

  2. First application of the spectral difference method for lifetime measurements of doppler attenuated line shapes

    Duckwitz, Hannah [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Koeln Univ. (Germany); Petkov, Pavel [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2016-07-01

    In this new approach to lifetime measurements via Doppler attenuated line shapes, the spectra of a feeding f and a deexciting transition d of the level of interest are used to determine the lifetime without any lineshape analysis of the feeding transition (direct or indirect). Similarly to the DDC method, the decay function λ{sub d}n{sub d}(t) of the deexciting transition is determined. The feeding of the level is included via the spectral difference of the two successive decays. Consequently, the determined lifetime is the real lifetime. After transforming both transitions into the same energy region, their spectral difference D(v{sub θ}) = S{sub d}(v{sub θ})-S{sub f}(v{sub θ}) = ∫{sub 0}{sup ∞}(∂P{sub θ}(t,v{sub θ}))/(∂t)n{sub d}(t) dt, is solved for n{sub d}(t). Dividing n{sub d}(t) by the decay function λ{sub d}n{sub d}(t) should yield a constant τ value for the level lifetime as a function of the time t. After the development and test of the procedure in 2015, it is now applied for the first time. Two level lifetimes are determined in {sup 86}Sr for the 2{sup +}{sub 2} and the 2{sup +}{sub 3} levels.

  3. In situ observations of contrail micro-physics and implications for their radiative impact

    Poellot, M R [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States); Arnott, W P; Hallett, J [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.

    1998-12-31

    Increasing levels of air traffic have raised concerns about the potential effects of aircraft exhaust on the climate. Current knowledge is expanded by examining in situ data from 21 contrails sampled at altitudes of 9.3 - 12.5 km and temperatures of -47 deg C to -66 deg C. The airborne equipment allowed measurements of particles as small as 2 {mu}m in diameter, which have not previously been reported. The microphysical characteristics of the contrails, which occurred in both clear and cloudy air, are presented and compared with natural cirrus properties. Computations of the wavelength-dependent radiative properties of the sampled particle distributions are also presented and compared with laboratory measurements. Finally, implications of these findings for climatic assessment are discussed. (R.P.) 9 refs.

  4. A modelling study of the effects of different CCN on contrail formation

    Gleitsmann, G; Zellner, R [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie

    1998-12-31

    The formation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the jet regime of a B747 airliner at cruise has been investigated by modelling calculations using the BOAT model. Both homogeneous condensation of H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-mixtures and heterogeneous deposition of H{sub 2}O on soot surfaces activated by H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} were taken into account. Whereas the heterogeneous condensation leads to particles with average diameters of about 1.3 {mu}m, the homogeneously condensed H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} particles are much smaller ({<=} 7 nm) and do not contribute to visible contrail formation. Nevertheless, they contribute to the atmospheric background aerosol. Using different SO{sub 2} emission indices, it is concluded that the contrail onset is essentially independent of this quantity and depends mainly on ambient temperature and soot activation kinetics. (author) 15 refs.

  5. A modelling study of the effects of different CCN on contrail formation

    Gleitsmann, G.; Zellner, R. [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie

    1997-12-31

    The formation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the jet regime of a B747 airliner at cruise has been investigated by modelling calculations using the BOAT model. Both homogeneous condensation of H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-mixtures and heterogeneous deposition of H{sub 2}O on soot surfaces activated by H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} were taken into account. Whereas the heterogeneous condensation leads to particles with average diameters of about 1.3 {mu}m, the homogeneously condensed H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} particles are much smaller ({<=} 7 nm) and do not contribute to visible contrail formation. Nevertheless, they contribute to the atmospheric background aerosol. Using different SO{sub 2} emission indices, it is concluded that the contrail onset is essentially independent of this quantity and depends mainly on ambient temperature and soot activation kinetics. (author) 15 refs.

  6. In situ observations of contrail micro-physics and implications for their radiative impact

    Poellot, M.R. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States); Arnott, W.P.; Hallett, J. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.

    1997-12-31

    Increasing levels of air traffic have raised concerns about the potential effects of aircraft exhaust on the climate. Current knowledge is expanded by examining in situ data from 21 contrails sampled at altitudes of 9.3 - 12.5 km and temperatures of -47 deg C to -66 deg C. The airborne equipment allowed measurements of particles as small as 2 {mu}m in diameter, which have not previously been reported. The microphysical characteristics of the contrails, which occurred in both clear and cloudy air, are presented and compared with natural cirrus properties. Computations of the wavelength-dependent radiative properties of the sampled particle distributions are also presented and compared with laboratory measurements. Finally, implications of these findings for climatic assessment are discussed. (R.P.) 9 refs.

  7. Numerical simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition – Part 2: Impact of initial ice crystal number, radiation, stratification, secondary nucleation and layer depth

    S. Unterstrasser

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition were performed with an LES model. In Part 1 the impact of relative humidity, temperature and vertical wind shear was explored in a detailed parametric study. Here, we study atmospheric parameters like stratification and depth of the supersaturated layer and processes which may affect the contrail evolution. We consider contrails in various radiation scenarios herein defined by the season, time of day and the presence of lower-level cloudiness which controls the radiance incident on the contrail layer. Under suitable conditions, controlled by the radiation scenario and stratification, radiative heating lifts the contrail-cirrus and prolongs its lifetime. The potential of contrail-driven secondary nucleation is investigated. We consider homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation of preactivated soot cores released from sublimated contrail ice crystals. In our model the contrail dynamics triggered by radiative heating does not suffice to force homogeneous freezing of ambient liquid aerosol particles. Furthermore, our model results suggest that heterogeneous nucleation of preactivated soot cores is unimportant. Contrail evolution is not controlled by the depth of the supersaturated layer as long as it exceeds roughly 500 m. Deep fallstreaks however need thicker layers. A variation of the initial ice crystal number is effective during the whole evolution of a contrail. A cut of the soot particle emission by two orders of magnitude can reduce the contrail timescale by one hour and the optical thickness by a factor of 5. Hence future engines with lower soot particle emissions could potentially lead to a reduction of the climate impact of aviation.

  8. Measurement of the $\\Sigma \\pi$ photoproduction line shapes near the $\\Lambda(1405)$

    Moriya, K; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Aghasyan, M; Anderson, M D; Anefalos Pereira, S; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Bellis, M; Biselli, A S; Bono, J; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Crede, V; D& #x27; Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Sanctis, E; De Vita, R; Deur, A; Dey, B; Djalali, C; Doughty, R; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; El Fassi, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Fersch, R; Fleming, J A; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Harrison, N; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Ho, D; Holtrop, M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jo, H S; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Khertarpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, A; Kubarovsky, V; Kuleshov, S V; Kvaltine, N D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I.J. D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McCracken, M; McKinnon, B; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mirazita, M; Mineeva, T; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R A; Munevar, E; Munoz Camacho, C; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Nepali, C S; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Pappalardo, L L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Phelps, E; Phillips, J J; Pisano, S; Pivnyuk, N; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Protopopescu, D; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatio, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Seder, E; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, E S; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, S; Taylor, C E; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S; Torayev, B; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vlassov, A V; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P

    2013-03-01

    The reaction {gamma} + p -> K{sup +} + {Sigma} + {p}i was used to determine the invariant mass distributions or "line shapes" of the {Sigma}{sup +} {pi}{sup -}, {Sigma}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} and {Sigma}{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0} final states, from threshold at 1328 MeV/c^2 through the mass range of the {Lambda}(1405) and the {Lambda}(1520). The measurements were made with the CLAS system at Jefferson Lab using tagged real photons, for center-of-mass energies 1.95 < W < 2.85 GeV. The three mass distributions differ strongly in the vicinity of the I=0 {Lambda}(1405), indicating the presence of substantial I=1 strength in the reaction. Background contributions to the data from the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) and from K* {Sigma} production were studied and shown to have negligible influence. To separate the isospin amplitudes, Breit-Wigner model fits were made that included channel-coupling distortions due to the Nkbar threshold. A best fit to all the data was obtained after including a phenomenological I=1, J{sup P} = 1/2{sup -} amplitude with a centroid at 1394\\pm20 MeV/c^2 and a second I=1 amplitude at 1413\\pm10 MeV/c^2. The centroid of the I=0 {Lambda}(1405) strength was found at the {Sigma} {pi} threshold, with the observed shape determined largely by channel-coupling, leading to an apparent overall peak near 1405 MeV/c^2.

  9. Welcome to the 21st International Conference on Spectral Line Shapes

    2012-12-01

    organizing committee of the conference has not forgotten about the cultural and tourism significance of the host city, with Hermitage and the Russian Museum, memorial museums of Pushkin and Dostoevsky, Mariinsky and Mikhailovsky Theaters being only a few of the many places to visit. Early June is the time of white nights, the best time to visit the environs of St. Petersburg with its many imperial palaces and parks, and attend multiple music and theater festivals. This is just the right time to take a break from physics overall and spectral line shapes in particular. On behalf of the Rector's Office let me wish the Conference every success, and do not forget to take some time out to enjoy your visit. Welcome! Professor N G Skvortsov Vice-Rector for Research St. Petersburg University

  10. Revisiting Vertical Models To Simulate the Line Shape of Electronic Spectra Adopting Cartesian and Internal Coordinates.

    Cerezo, Javier; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2016-10-11

    Vertical models for the simulation of spectroscopic line shapes expand the potential energy surface (PES) of the final state around the equilibrium geometry of the initial state. These models provide, in principle, a better approximation of the region of the band maximum. At variance, adiabatic models expand each PES around its own minimum. In the harmonic approximation, when the minimum energy structures of the two electronic states are connected by large structural displacements, adiabatic models can breakdown and are outperformed by vertical models. However, the practical application of vertical models faces the issues related to the necessity to perform a frequency analysis at a nonstationary point. In this contribution we revisit vertical models in harmonic approximation adopting both Cartesian (x) and valence internal curvilinear coordinates (s). We show that when x coordinates are used, the vibrational analysis at nonstationary points leads to a deficient description of low-frequency modes, for which spurious imaginary frequencies may even appear. This issue is solved when s coordinates are adopted. It is however necessary to account for the second derivative of s with respect to x, which here we compute analytically. We compare the performance of the vertical model in the s-frame with respect to adiabatic models and previously proposed vertical models in x- or Q 1 -frame, where Q 1 are the normal coordinates of the initial state computed as combination of Cartesian coordinates. We show that for rigid molecules the vertical approach in the s-frame provides a description of the final state very close to the adiabatic picture. For sizable displacements it is a solid alternative to adiabatic models, and it is not affected by the issues of vertical models in x- and Q 1 -frames, which mainly arise when temperature effects are included. In principle the G matrix depends on s, and this creates nonorthogonality problems of the Duschinsky matrix connecting the normal

  11. High-resolution measurements and multichannel quantum defect analysis of spectral line shapes of autoionizing Rydberg series

    Ueda, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    Spectral line shapes for autoionizing Rydberg series are briefly reviewed within the framework of multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT). Recent high-resolution measurements and MQDT analysis for the spectra line shapes are reviewed for the mp 5 ( 2 P 1/2 )ns ' and nd ' J=1 odd spectra of the Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms (m=3,4,5 for Ar, Kr, and Xe) and the 3p 5 ( 2 P 1/2 )nd ' J=2 and 3 odd spectra of Ar*3p 5 4p excited atoms. Some results are also discussed for the Ca 4p( 2 P 1/2,3/2 )ns and nd J=1 odd spectrum and the Ba 5d( 2 P 5/2 )nd J=1 odd spectrum

  12. Precise predictions of H2O line shapes over a wide pressure range using simulations corrected by a single measurement

    Ngo, N. H.; Nguyen, H. T.; Tran, H.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we show that precise predictions of the shapes of H2O rovibrational lines broadened by N2, over a wide pressure range, can be made using simulations corrected by a single measurement. For that, we use the partially-correlated speed-dependent Keilson-Storer (pcsdKS) model whose parameters are deduced from molecular dynamics simulations and semi-classical calculations. This model takes into account the collision-induced velocity-changes effects, the speed dependences of the collisional line width and shift as well as the correlation between velocity and internal-state changes. For each considered transition, the model is corrected by using a parameter deduced from its broadening coefficient measured for a single pressure. The corrected-pcsdKS model is then used to simulate spectra for a wide pressure range. Direct comparisons of the corrected-pcsdKS calculated and measured spectra of 5 rovibrational lines of H2O for various pressures, from 0.1 to 1.2 atm, show very good agreements. Their maximum differences are in most cases well below 1%, much smaller than residuals obtained when fitting the measurements with the Voigt line shape. This shows that the present procedure can be used to predict H2O line shapes for various pressure conditions and thus the simulated spectra can be used to deduce the refined line-shape parameters to complete spectroscopic databases, in the absence of relevant experimental values.

  13. Line width and line shape analysis in the inductively coupled plasma by high resolution Fourier transform spectrometry

    Faires, L.M.; Palmer, B.A.; Brault, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    High resolution Fourier transform spectrometry has been used to perform line width and line shape analysis of eighty-one iron I emision lines in the spectral range 290 to 390nm originating in the normal analytical zone of an inductively coupled plasma. Computer programs using non-linear least squares fitting techniques for line shape analysis were applied to the fully resolved spectra to determine Gaussian and Lorentzian components of the total observed line width. The effect of noise in the spectrum on the precision of the line fitting technique was assessed, and the importance of signal to noise ratio for line shape analysis is discussed. Translational (Doppler) temperatures were calculated from the Gaussian components of the line width and were found to be on the order of 6300 0 K. The excitation temperature of iron I was also determined from the same spectral data by the spectroscopic slope method based on the Einstein-Boltzmann expression for spectral intensity and was found to be on the order of 4700 0 K. 31 references

  14. Alternative-Fuel Effects on Contrails & Cruise Emissions (ACCESS-2) Flight Experiment

    Anderson, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Although the emission performance of gas-turbine engines burning renewable aviation fuels have been thoroughly documented in recent ground-based studies, there is still great uncertainty regarding how the fuels effect aircraft exhaust composition and contrail formation at cruise altitudes. To fill this information gap, the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate sponsored the ACCESS flight series to make detailed measurements of trace gases, aerosols and ice particles in the near-field behind the NASA DC-8 aircraft as it burned either standard petroleum-based fuel of varying sulfur content or a 50:50 blend of standard fuel and a hydro-treated esters and fatty acid (HEFA) jet fuel produced from camelina plant oil. ACCESS 1, conducted in spring 2013 near Palmdale CA, focused on refining flight plans and sampling techniques and used the instrumented NASA Langley HU-25 aircraft to document DC-8 emissions and contrails on five separate flights of approx.2 hour duration. ACCESS 2, conducted from Palmdale in May 2014, engaged partners from the Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) and National Research Council-Canada to provide additional scientific expertise and sampling aircraft (Falcon 20 and CT-133, respectively) with more extensive trace gas, particle, or air motion measurement capability. Eight, muliti-aircraft research flights of 2 to 4 hour duration were conducted to document the emissions and contrail properties of the DC-8 as it 1) burned low sulfur Jet A, high sulfur Jet A or low sulfur Jet A/HEFA blend, 2) flew at altitudes between 6 and 11 km, and 3) operated its engines at three different fuel flow rates. This presentation further describes the ACCESS flight experiments, examines fuel type and thrust setting impacts on engine emissions, and compares cruise-altitude observations with similar data acquired in ground tests.

  15. Kinetics of contrail particles formation and heterogeneous reactions on such particles

    Kogan, M.N.; Butkovsky, A.V.; Erofeev, A.I.; Freedlender, O.G.; Makashev, N.K. [Central Aerohydrodynamic Inst., Zhukovsky (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The research of impact of aircraft emissions upon the atmosphere is very complex and difficult problem. More than two decades of intensive investigations of the problem of ozone decay do not permit to make definite conclusions. Many important problems still remain unsolved in the aircraft/atmosphere interaction: engine, nozzle, jet, jet/vortex system interaction, vortex breakdown, contrail formation, meso-scale and global processes, their effects on climate. The particles formation and heterogeneous reactions play an important role in some of these processes. These problems are discussed. (author) 11 refs.

  16. Kinetics of contrail particles formation and heterogeneous reactions on such particles

    Kogan, M N; Butkovsky, A V; Erofeev, A I; Freedlender, O G; Makashev, N K [Central Aerohydrodynamic Inst., Zhukovsky (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    The research of impact of aircraft emissions upon the atmosphere is very complex and difficult problem. More than two decades of intensive investigations of the problem of ozone decay do not permit to make definite conclusions. Many important problems still remain unsolved in the aircraft/atmosphere interaction: engine, nozzle, jet, jet/vortex system interaction, vortex breakdown, contrail formation, meso-scale and global processes, their effects on climate. The particles formation and heterogeneous reactions play an important role in some of these processes. These problems are discussed. (author) 11 refs.

  17. Spatial and optical parameters of contrails in the vortex and dispersion regime determined by means of a ground-based scanning lidar

    Freudenthaler, V; Homburg, F; Jaeger, H [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung (IFU), Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The spatial growth of individual condensation trails (contrails) of commercial aircrafts in the time range from 15 s to 60 min behind the aircraft is investigated by means of a ground-based scanning backscatter lidar. The growth in width is mainly governed by wind shear and varies between 18 m/min and 140 m/min. The growth of the cross-section varies between 3500 m{sup 2}/min and 25000 m{sup 2}/min. These values are in agreement with results of model calculations and former field measurements. The vertical growth is often limited by boundaries of the humid layer at flight level, but values up to 18 m/min were observed. Optical parameters like depolarization, optical depth and lidar ratio, i.e. the extinction-to-backscatter ratio, have been retrieved from the measurements at a wavelength of 532 nm. The linear depolarization rises from values as low as 0.06 for a young contrail (10 s old) to values around 0.5, typical for aged contrails. The latter indicates the transition from non-crystalline to crystalline particles in persistent contrails within a few minutes. The scatter of depolarization values measured in individual contrails is narrow, independent of the contrails age, and suggests a rather uniform growth of the particles inside a contrail. (author) 18 refs.

  18. Basic Diagnosis and Prediction of Persistent Contrail Occurrence using High-resolution Numerical Weather Analyses/Forecasts and Logistic Regression. Part I: Effects of Random Error

    Duda, David P.; Minnis, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Straightforward application of the Schmidt-Appleman contrail formation criteria to diagnose persistent contrail occurrence from numerical weather prediction data is hindered by significant bias errors in the upper tropospheric humidity. Logistic models of contrail occurrence have been proposed to overcome this problem, but basic questions remain about how random measurement error may affect their accuracy. A set of 5000 synthetic contrail observations is created to study the effects of random error in these probabilistic models. The simulated observations are based on distributions of temperature, humidity, and vertical velocity derived from Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) weather analyses. The logistic models created from the simulated observations were evaluated using two common statistical measures of model accuracy, the percent correct (PC) and the Hanssen-Kuipers discriminant (HKD). To convert the probabilistic results of the logistic models into a dichotomous yes/no choice suitable for the statistical measures, two critical probability thresholds are considered. The HKD scores are higher when the climatological frequency of contrail occurrence is used as the critical threshold, while the PC scores are higher when the critical probability threshold is 0.5. For both thresholds, typical random errors in temperature, relative humidity, and vertical velocity are found to be small enough to allow for accurate logistic models of contrail occurrence. The accuracy of the models developed from synthetic data is over 85 percent for both the prediction of contrail occurrence and non-occurrence, although in practice, larger errors would be anticipated.

  19. Spatial and optical parameters of contrails in the vortex and dispersion regime determined by means of a ground-based scanning lidar

    Freudenthaler, V.; Homburg, F.; Jaeger, H. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung (IFU), Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The spatial growth of individual condensation trails (contrails) of commercial aircrafts in the time range from 15 s to 60 min behind the aircraft is investigated by means of a ground-based scanning backscatter lidar. The growth in width is mainly governed by wind shear and varies between 18 m/min and 140 m/min. The growth of the cross-section varies between 3500 m{sup 2}/min and 25000 m{sup 2}/min. These values are in agreement with results of model calculations and former field measurements. The vertical growth is often limited by boundaries of the humid layer at flight level, but values up to 18 m/min were observed. Optical parameters like depolarization, optical depth and lidar ratio, i.e. the extinction-to-backscatter ratio, have been retrieved from the measurements at a wavelength of 532 nm. The linear depolarization rises from values as low as 0.06 for a young contrail (10 s old) to values around 0.5, typical for aged contrails. The latter indicates the transition from non-crystalline to crystalline particles in persistent contrails within a few minutes. The scatter of depolarization values measured in individual contrails is narrow, independent of the contrails age, and suggests a rather uniform growth of the particles inside a contrail. (author) 18 refs.

  20. An EPR line shape study of anisotropic rotational reorientation and slow tumbling in liquid and frozen jojoba oil

    Hwang, J. S.; Al-Rashid, W. A.

    Spin probe investigation of jojoba oil was carried out by electron paramagnetic rresonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The spin probe used was 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone- N-oxide. The EPR line shape studies were carried out in the lower temperature range of 192 to 275 K to test the applicability of the stochastic Liouville theory in the simulation of EPR line shapes where earlier relaxation theories do not apply. In an earlier study, this system was analysed by employing rotational diffusion at the fast-motional region. The results show that PD-Tempone exhibits asymmetric rotational diffusion with N = 3.3 at an axis z'= Y in the plane of the molecule and perpendicular to the NO bond direction. In this investigation we have extended the temperature range to lower temperatures and observed slow tumbling EPR spectra. It is shown that the stochastic Liouville method can be used to simulate all but two of the experimentally observed EPR spectra in the slow-motional region and details of the slow-motional line shape are sensitive to the anisotropy of rotation and showed good agreement for a moderate jump model. From the computer simulation of EPR line shapes it is found that the information obtained on τ R, and N in the motional-narrowing region can be extrapolated into the slow-tumbling region. It is also found that ln (τ R) is linear in 1/ T in the temperature range studied and the resulting activation energy for rotation is 51 kJ/mol. The two EPR spectra at 240 and 231 K were found to exhibit the effects of anisotropic viscosity observed by B IRELL for nitroxides oriented in tubular cavities in inclusion crystals in which the molecule is free to rotate about the long axis but with its rotation hindered about the other two axes because of the cavity geometry. These results proved that the slow-tumbling spectra were very sensitive to the effects of anisotropy in the viscosity.

  1. Investigating the structural origin of trpzip2 temperature dependent unfolding fluorescence line shape based on a Markov state model simulation.

    Song, Jian; Gao, Fang; Cui, Raymond Z; Shuang, Feng; Liang, Wanzhen; Huang, Xuhui; Zhuang, Wei

    2012-10-25

    Vibrationally resolved fluorescence spectra of the β-hairpin trpzip2 peptide at two temperatures as well as during a T-jump unfolding process are simulated on the basis of a combination of Markov state models and quantum chemistry schemes. The broad asymmetric spectral line shape feature is reproduced by considering the exciton-phonon couplings. The temperature dependent red shift observed in the experiment has been attributed to the state population changes of specific chromophores. Through further theoretical study, it is found that both the environment's electric field and the chromophores' geometry distortions are responsible for tryptophan fluorescence shift.

  2. Improvement of the instrumental line shape of X-ray spectrometers with Si(Li) - detectors

    Berdikov, V.V.; Zajtsev, E.A.; Iokhin, B.S.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility of decreasing the background of the X-ray spectrometer detector using the rise-time pulse selection method was investigated. Si(Li)-detectors of 10 and 25 mm 2 square were investigated. Spectrometer channel was composed of ORTEC-472 amplifier and ULTIMA/2 multichannel analyzer on the base of NOVA-3 minicomputer. The energy resolution was equal to 300 eV on 14 KeV line. The pulses of detection allowing were transmitted to analog-to-digital converter. The detection was allowed if front photopeak square) were measured at 17.4, 20.3 and 59.6 keV. 4-6-fold decrease of X-factor was obtained without any loss of detection efficiency. The combination of the method with collimation of radiation in the centre of the detector gives an extremely low value of X-factor which agress with theretical estimations

  3. Line shape and ray trace calculations in saturated X-ray lasers: Application to Ni-like silver

    Benredjem, D.; Guilbaud, O.; Moeller, C.; Klisnick, A.; Ros, D.; Dubau, J.; Calisti, A.; Talin, B.

    2006-01-01

    Longitudinal coherence length in X-ray lasers depends strongly on the shape of the amplified line. We have modelled an experiment performed at the LULI facility of Ecole Polytechnique. The experiment was devoted to the study of the temporal (longitudinal) coherence of the transient Ni-like silver 4d-4p transition X-ray laser at 13.9 nm. Accurate line shape calculations using PPP, a spectral line shape code, confirm that the Voigt profile is a good approximation for this X-ray laser line. This allows us to extensively use the Voigt shape in conditions where the amplifier, i.e. the plasma produced by the interaction of a high intensity laser with a slab target, is neither stationary nor homogeneous. Our calculations involve a ray trace code which is a post-processor to the hydrodynamic simulation EHYBRID. As the effect of saturation is important for the level populations and gains we include the interaction between the amplified beam and the medium using the Maxwell-Bloch formalism. While the FWHM of the spontaneous emission profile is ∼10 mA, the amplified X-ray line exhibits gain narrowing leading to the smaller width ∼3 mA. Comparison with experiment is discussed

  4. Second-order quadrupolar line shapes under molecular dynamics: An additional transition in the extremely fast regime.

    Hung, Ivan; Wu, Gang; Gan, Zhehong

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for probing molecular dynamics. For the classic case of two-site exchange, NMR spectra go through the transition from exchange broadening through coalescence and then motional narrowing as the exchange rate increases passing through the difference between the resonance frequencies of the two sites. For central-transition spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei in solids, line shape change due to molecular dynamics occurs in two stages. The first stage occurs when the exchange rate is comparable to the second-order quadrupolar interaction. The second spectral transition comes at a faster exchange rate which approaches the Larmor frequency and generally reduces the isotropic quadrupolar shift. Such a two-stage transition phenomenon is unique to half-integer quadrupolar nuclei. A quantum mechanical formalism in full Liouville space is presented to explain the physical origin of the two-stage phenomenon and for use in spectral simulations. Variable-temperature 17 O NMR of solid NaNO 3 in which the NO 3 - ion undergoes 3-fold jumps confirms the two-stage transition process. The spectra of NaNO 3 acquired in the temperature range of 173-413K agree well with simulations using the quantum mechanical formalism. The rate constants for the 3-fold NO 3 - ion jumps span eight orders of magnitude (10 2 -10 10 s -1 ) covering both transitions of the dynamic 17 O line shape. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A simple framework for assessing the trade-off between the climate impact of aviation carbon dioxide emissions and contrails for a single flight

    A Irvine, E; J Hoskins, B; P Shine, K

    2014-01-01

    Persistent contrails are an important climate impact of aviation which could potentially be reduced by re-routing aircraft to avoid contrailing; however this generally increases both the flight length and its corresponding CO 2 emissions. Here, we provide a simple framework to assess the trade-off between the climate impact of CO 2 emissions and contrails for a single flight, in terms of the absolute global warming potential and absolute global temperature potential metrics for time horizons of 20, 50 and 100 years. We use the framework to illustrate the maximum extra distance (with no altitude changes) that can be added to a flight and still reduce its overall climate impact. Small aircraft can fly up to four times further to avoid contrailing than large aircraft. The results have a strong dependence on the applied metric and time horizon. Applying a conservative estimate of the uncertainty in the contrail radiative forcing and climate efficacy leads to a factor of 20 difference in the maximum extra distance that could be flown to avoid a contrail. The impact of re-routing on other climatically-important aviation emissions could also be considered in this framework. (letters)

  6. Study of semiconductor valence plasmon line shapes via electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope

    Kundmann, M.K.

    1988-11-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra of the semiconductors Si, AlAs, GaAs, InAs, InP, and Ge are examined in detail in the regime of outer-shell and plasmon energy losses (0--100eV). Particular emphasis is placed on modeling and analyzing the shapes of the bulk valence plasmon lines. A line shape model based on early work by Froehlich is derived and compared to single-scattering probability distributions extracted from the measured spectra. Model and data are found to be in excellent agreement, thus pointing the way to systematic characterization of the plasmon component of EELS spectra. The model is applied to three separate investigations. 82 refs

  7. Probing Aircraft Flight Test Hazard Mitigation for the Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails & Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) Research Team

    Kelly, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails & Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) Project Integration Manager requested in July 2012 that the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) form a team to independently assess aircraft structural failure hazards associated with the ACCESS experiment and to identify potential flight test hazard mitigations to ensure flight safety. The ACCESS Project Integration Manager subsequently requested that the assessment scope be focused predominantly on structural failure risks to the aircraft empennage raft empennage.

  8. Simulation of excitonic optical line shapes of cyclic oligomers - models for basic units of photosynthetic antenna systems: Transfer integral versus local energy fluctuations with dichotomic coloured noise

    Barvik, I.; Reineker, P.; Warns, C.; Neidlinger, T.

    1995-08-01

    For Frenkel excitons moving on cyclic and linear molecular chains modeling in part photosynthetic antenna systems we investigate the influence of dynamic and static disorder on their optical line shapes. The dynamic disorder describes the influence of vibrational degrees of freedom and is taken into account by fluctuations of the transfer matrix element between neighbouring molecules. The fluctuations are represented by dichotomic Markov processes with coloured noise. We obtain a closed set of equations of motion for the correlation functions determining the optical line shape which is solved exactly. The line shapes are discussed for various sets of the model parameters and arrangements of molecules and their dipole moments. (author). 63 refs, 10 figs

  9. Laboratory and modeling studies on the effects of water and soot emissions and ambient conditions on the properties of contrail ice particles in the jet regime

    H.-W. Wong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Contrails and contrail-induced cirrus clouds are identified as the most uncertain components in determining aviation impacts on global climate change. Parameters affecting contrail ice particle formation immediately after the engine exit plane (< 5 s in plume age may be critical to ice particle properties used in large-scale models predicting contrail radiative forcing. Despite this, detailed understanding of these parametric effects is still limited. In this paper, we present results from recent laboratory and modeling studies conducted to investigate the effects of water and soot emissions and ambient conditions on near-field formation of contrail ice particles and ice particle properties. The Particle Aerosol Laboratory (PAL at the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Aerodyne microphysical parcel model for contrail ice particle formation were employed. Our studies show that exhaust water concentration has a significant impact on contrail ice particle formation and properties. When soot particles were introduced, ice particle formation was observed only when exhaust water concentration was above a critical level. When no soot or sulfuric acid was introduced, no ice particle formation was observed, suggesting that ice particle formation from homogeneous nucleation followed by homogeneous freezing of liquid water was unfavorable. Soot particles were found to compete for water vapor condensation, and higher soot concentrations emitted into the chamber resulted in smaller ice particles being formed. Chamber conditions corresponding to higher cruising altitudes were found to favor ice particle formation. The microphysical model captures trends of particle extinction measurements well, but discrepancies between the model and the optical particle counter measurements exist as the model predicts narrower ice particle size distributions and ice particle sizes nearly a factor of two larger than measured. These discrepancies are likely due to particle

  10. First line shape analysis and spectroscopic parameters for the ν11 band of 12C2H4

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami

    2016-08-11

    An accurate knowledge of line intensities, collisional broadening coefficients and narrowing parameters is necessary for the interpretation of high-resolution infrared spectra of the Earth and other planetary atmospheres. One of the most promising spectral domains for (C2H4)-C-12 monitoring in such environments is located near the 336 gm window, through its v(11) C-H stretching mode. In this paper, we report an extensive study in which we precisely determine spectroscopic parameters of (C2H4)-C-12 v(11) band at 297 +/- 1 K, using a narrow Difference-Frequency-Generation (DFG) laser with 10(-4) cm(-1) resolution. Absorption measurements were performed in the 2975-2980 cm(-1) spectral window to investigate 32 lines corresponding to where, J\\'ka\\',kc\\'<- Jka,kc, 5 <= J <= 7; 0.5 <= K-a <= 6 and 1 <= K-c <= 14. Spectroscopic parameters are retrieved using either Voigt or appropriate Galatry profile to simulate the measured (C2H4)-C-12 line shape. Line intensities along with self-broadening coefficients are reported for all lines. Narrowing coefficients for each isolated line are also derived. To our knowledge, the current study reports the first extensive spectroscopic parameter measurements of the (C2H4)-C-12 v(11) band in the 2975-2980 cm(-1) range. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Intrinsic line shape of electromagnetic radiation from a stack of intrinsic Josephson junctions synchronized by an internal cavity resonance

    Koshelev, Alexei

    2013-03-01

    Stacks of intrinsic Josephson-junctions are realized in mesas fabricated out of layered superconducting single crystals, such as Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 (BSCCO). Synchronization of phase oscillations in different junctions can be facilitated by the coupling to the internal cavity mode leading to powerful and coherent electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz frequency range. An important characteristic of this radiation is the shape of the emission line. A finite line width appears due to different noise sources leading to phase diffusion. We investigated the intrinsic line shape caused by the thermal noise for a mesa fabricated on the top of a BSCCO single crystal. In the ideal case of fully synchronized stack the finite line width is coming from two main contributions, the quasiparticle-current noise inside the mesa and the fluctuating radiation in the base crystal. We compute both contributions and conclude that for realistic mesa's parameters the second mechanism typically dominates. The role of the cavity quality factor in the emission line spectrum is clarified. Analytical results were verified by numerical simulations. In real mesa structures part of the stack may not be synchronized and chaotic dynamics of unsynchronized junctions may determine the real line width. Work supported by UChicago Argonne, LLC, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  12. Influence of Projection Operator on Oxygen Line Shapes and its effect on Rosseland-Mean Opacity in Stellar Interiors

    Gomez, Thomas; Nagayama, Taisukue; Kilcrease, David; Hansen, Stephanie; Montgomery, Mike; Winget, Don

    2018-01-01

    The Rosseland-Mean opacity (RMO) is an important quantity in determining radiation transport through stars. The solar-convection-zone boundary predicted by the standard solar model disagrees with helioseismology measurements by many sigma; a 14% increase in the RMO would resolve this discrepancy. Experiments at Sandia National Laboratories are now measuring iron opacity at solar-interior conditions, and significant discrepancies are already observed. Highly-ionized oxygen is one of the dominant contributions to the RMO. The strongest line, Lyman alpha, is at the peak of the Rosseland weighting function. The accuracy of line-broadening calculations has been called into question due to various experimental results and comparisons between theory. We have developed an ab-initio calculation to explore different physical effects, our current focus is treating penetrating collisions explicitly. The equation of motion used to calculate line shapes within the relaxation and unified theories includes a projection operator, which performs an average over plasma electron states; this is neglected due to past calculations approximate treatment of penetrations. We now include this projection term explicitly, which results in a significant broadening of spectral lines from highly-charged ions (low-Z elements are not much affected). The additional broadening raises the O Ly-alpha wing opacity by a factor of 5; we examine the consequences of this additional broadening on the Rosseland mean.

  13. New insight into hydration and aging mechanisms of paper by the line shape analysis of proton NMR spectra

    Mallamace, D.; Vasi, S.; Missori, M.; Corsaro, C.

    2016-01-01

    The action of water within biological systems is strictly linked either with their physical chemical properties and with their functions. Cellulose is one of the most studied biopolymers due to its biological importance and its wide use in manufactured products. Among them, paper is mainly constituted by an almost equimolar ratio of cellulose and water. Therefore the study of the behavior of water within pristine and aged paper samples can help to shed light on the degradation mechanisms that irremediably act over time and spoil paper. In this work we present Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments on modern paper samples made of pure cellulose not aged and artificially aged as well as on ancient paper samples made in 1413 in Perpignan (France). The line shape parameters of the proton NMR spectra were studied as a function of the hydration content. Results indicate that water in aged samples is progressively involved in the hydration of the byproducts of cellulose degradation. This enhances the degradation process itself through the progressive consumption of the cellulose amorphous regions.

  14. First line shape analysis and spectroscopic parameters for the ν11 band of 12C2H4

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Mantzaras, John; Benilan, Yves; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    An accurate knowledge of line intensities, collisional broadening coefficients and narrowing parameters is necessary for the interpretation of high-resolution infrared spectra of the Earth and other planetary atmospheres. One of the most promising spectral domains for (C2H4)-C-12 monitoring in such environments is located near the 336 gm window, through its v(11) C-H stretching mode. In this paper, we report an extensive study in which we precisely determine spectroscopic parameters of (C2H4)-C-12 v(11) band at 297 +/- 1 K, using a narrow Difference-Frequency-Generation (DFG) laser with 10(-4) cm(-1) resolution. Absorption measurements were performed in the 2975-2980 cm(-1) spectral window to investigate 32 lines corresponding to where, J'ka',kc'<- Jka,kc, 5 <= J <= 7; 0.5 <= K-a <= 6 and 1 <= K-c <= 14. Spectroscopic parameters are retrieved using either Voigt or appropriate Galatry profile to simulate the measured (C2H4)-C-12 line shape. Line intensities along with self-broadening coefficients are reported for all lines. Narrowing coefficients for each isolated line are also derived. To our knowledge, the current study reports the first extensive spectroscopic parameter measurements of the (C2H4)-C-12 v(11) band in the 2975-2980 cm(-1) range. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modulating the line shape of magnetoconductance by varying the charge injection in polymer light-emitting diodes

    Nidya Chitraningrum

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We fabricate the phenyl-substituted poly(p-phenylene vinylene copolymer (super yellow, SY-PPV-based polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs with different device architectures to modulate the injection of opposite charge carriers and investigate the corresponding magnetoconductance (MC responses. At the first glance, we find that all PLEDs exhibit the positive MC responses. By applying the mathematical analysis to fit the curves with two empirical equations of a non-Lorentzian and a Lorentzian function, we are able to extract the hidden negative MC component from the positive MC curve. We attribute the growth of the negative MC component to the reduced interaction of the triplet excitons with charges to generate the free charge carriers as modulated by the applied magnetic field, known as the triplet exciton-charge reaction, by analyzing MC responses for PLEDs of the charge-unbalanced and hole-blocking device configurations. The negative MC component causes the broadening of the line shape in MC curves.

  16. The line shape analysis of electron spectroscopy spectra by the artifical intelligence methods for identification of C sp.sup.2./sup./sp.sup.3./sup. bonds

    Lesiak, B.; Zemek, Josef; Jiříček, Petr; Stobinski, L.; Jozwik, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 247, 11-12 (2010), s. 2838-2842 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * temperature functionalization * electron spectroscopy * line shape analysis Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.344, year: 2010

  17. Calculation of the vibrational linewidth and line shape of Raman spectra using the relaxation function : I. method and application to nitrogen

    Kooi, M.E.; Smit, F.; Michels, J.P.J.; Schouten, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The spectral line shape of the fundamental vibration of nitrogen is calculated from molecular dynamics simulations by determining the Fourier transform of the relaxation function. It has been applied to the fluid phase at various pressures and temperatures, and to solid d-N2. The validity of the

  18. In-situ observations of interstitial aerosol particles and cloud residues found in contrails

    Stroem, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1997-12-31

    In spring 1994 a series of flights were conducted in cirrus clouds and contrails over southern Germany. One of the aims of this campaign was to study the phase partitioning of aerosols and water in these clouds. To achieve this separation of particles two complementary sampling probes were mounted on the research aircraft Falcon. These are the Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI) or super-micrometer inlet, and the interstitial inlet or submicrometer inlet. The CVI is a device that inertially separates cloud elements larger than a certain aerodynamic size from the surrounding atmosphere into a warm, dry and particle free air. Assuming that each cloud element leaves behind only one residue particle, these measurements yield an equivalent number concentration for cloud particles having an aerodynamic diameter larger than the lower cut size of the CVI. The size distribution of the sampled aerosol and residual particles between 0.1 to 3.5 {mu}m diameter was measured by a PMS PCASP (Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer) working alternatively on both inlets. The gas-phase water vapor content was measured by a cryogenic frost point mirror. (R.P.) 4 refs.

  19. In-situ observations of interstitial aerosol particles and cloud residues found in contrails

    Stroem, J [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1998-12-31

    In spring 1994 a series of flights were conducted in cirrus clouds and contrails over southern Germany. One of the aims of this campaign was to study the phase partitioning of aerosols and water in these clouds. To achieve this separation of particles two complementary sampling probes were mounted on the research aircraft Falcon. These are the Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI) or super-micrometer inlet, and the interstitial inlet or submicrometer inlet. The CVI is a device that inertially separates cloud elements larger than a certain aerodynamic size from the surrounding atmosphere into a warm, dry and particle free air. Assuming that each cloud element leaves behind only one residue particle, these measurements yield an equivalent number concentration for cloud particles having an aerodynamic diameter larger than the lower cut size of the CVI. The size distribution of the sampled aerosol and residual particles between 0.1 to 3.5 {mu}m diameter was measured by a PMS PCASP (Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer) working alternatively on both inlets. The gas-phase water vapor content was measured by a cryogenic frost point mirror. (R.P.) 4 refs.

  20. Spectral Line Shapes in the ν_3 Q Branch of ^{12}CH_4 Near 3.3 μm

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Gamache, Robert R.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Sams, Robert L.

    2017-06-01

    Detailed knowledge of spectroscopic parameters for prominent Q branches of methane is necessary for interpretation and modeling of high resolution infrared spectra of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres. We have measured air-broadened line shape parameters in the Q branch of ^{12}CH_4 in the ν_3 fundamental band for a large number of transitions in the 3000 to 3023 cm^{-1} region by analyzing 13 room-temperature laboratory absorption spectra. Twelve of these spectra were recorded with 0.01 cm^{-1} resolution using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) of the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak, and one higher-resolution (˜0.0011 cm^{-1}) low pressure (˜1 Torr) spectrum of methane was obtained using the Bruker IFS 120HR FTS at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, WA. The air-broadened spectra were recorded using various absorption cells with path lengths of 5, 20, 25, and 150 cm, total sample pressures between 50 and 500 Torr, and CH_4 volume mixing ratios of 0.01 or less. All 13 spectra were fit simultaneously covering the 3000-3023 cm^{-1} spectral region using a multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique to retrieve accurate line positions, absolute intensities, Lorentz air-broadened widths and pressure-shift coefficients. Line mixing using the off-diagonal relaxation matrix element formalism was measured for a number of pairs of transitions for the CH_4-air collisional system. The results will be compared to values reported in the literature. D. C. Benner, C. P. Rinsland, V. Malathy Devi, M. A. H. Smith, D. Atkins, JQSRT 53 (1995) 705-721. A. Levy, N. Lacome, C. Chackerian, Collisional line mixing, in Spectroscopy of the Earth's Atmosphere and Interstellar Medium, Academic Press, Inc., Boston (1992) 261-337.

  1. Extrapolation of contrail investigations by LIDAR to larger scale measurements. Analysis and calibration of CCD camera and satellite images

    Sussmann, R.; Homburg, F.; Freudenthaler, V.; Jaeger, H. [Frauenhofer Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The CCD image of a persistent contrail and the coincident LIDAR measurement are presented. To extrapolate the LIDAR derived optical thickness to the video field of view an anisotropy correction and calibration has to be performed. Observed bright halo components result from highly regular oriented hexagonal crystals with sizes of 200 {mu}m-2 mm. This explained by measured ambient humidities below the formation threshold of natural cirrus. Optical thickness from LIDAR shows significant discrepancies to the result from coincident NOAA-14 data. Errors result from anisotropy correction and parameterized relations between AVHRR channels and optical properties. (author) 28 refs.

  2. Line-Shape Code Comparison through Modeling and Fitting of Experimental Spectra of the C ii 723-nm Line Emitted by the Ablation Cloud of a Carbon Pellet

    Mohammed Koubiti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Various codes of line-shape modeling are compared to each other through the profile of the C ii 723-nm line for typical plasma conditions encountered in the ablation clouds of carbon pellets, injected in magnetic fusion devices. Calculations were performed for a single electron density of 1017 cm−3 and two plasma temperatures (T = 2 and 4 eV. Ion and electron temperatures were assumed to be equal (Te = Ti = T. The magnetic field, B, was set equal to either to zero or 4 T. Comparisons between the line-shape modeling codes and two experimental spectra of the C ii 723-nm line, measured perpendicularly to the B-field in the Large Helical Device (LHD using linear polarizers, are also discussed.

  3. Line shapes and time dynamics of the Förster resonances between two Rydberg atoms in a time-varying electric field

    Yakshina, E. A.

    2016-10-21

    The observation of the Stark-tuned Förster resonances between Rydberg atoms excited by narrowband cw laser radiation requires usage of a Stark-switching technique in order to excite the atoms first in a fixed electric field and then to induce the interactions in a varied electric field, which is scanned across the Förster resonance. In our experiments with a few cold Rb Rydberg atoms, we have found that the transients at the edges of the electric pulses strongly affect the line shapes of the Förster resonances, since the population transfer at the resonances occurs on a time scale of ∼100 ns, which is comparable with the duration of the transients. For example, a short-term ringing at a certain frequency causes additional radio-frequency-assisted Förster resonances, while nonsharp edges lead to asymmetry. The intentional application of the radio-frequency field induces transitions between collective states, whose line shape depends on the interaction strengths and time. Spatial averaging over the atom positions in a single interaction volume yields a cusped line shape of the Förster resonance. We present a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis of the line shape and time dynamics of the Stark-tuned Förster resonances Rb(nP3/2)+Rb(nP3/2)→Rb(nS1/2)+Rb([n+1]S1/2) for two Rb Rydberg atoms interacting in a time-varying electric field.

  4. Line shapes and time dynamics of the Förster resonances between two Rydberg atoms in a time-varying electric field

    Yakshina, E. A.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Entin, V. M.; Andreeva, C.; Cinins, A.; Markovski, A.; Iftikhar, Z.; Ekers, Aigars; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2016-01-01

    The observation of the Stark-tuned Förster resonances between Rydberg atoms excited by narrowband cw laser radiation requires usage of a Stark-switching technique in order to excite the atoms first in a fixed electric field and then to induce the interactions in a varied electric field, which is scanned across the Förster resonance. In our experiments with a few cold Rb Rydberg atoms, we have found that the transients at the edges of the electric pulses strongly affect the line shapes of the Förster resonances, since the population transfer at the resonances occurs on a time scale of ∼100 ns, which is comparable with the duration of the transients. For example, a short-term ringing at a certain frequency causes additional radio-frequency-assisted Förster resonances, while nonsharp edges lead to asymmetry. The intentional application of the radio-frequency field induces transitions between collective states, whose line shape depends on the interaction strengths and time. Spatial averaging over the atom positions in a single interaction volume yields a cusped line shape of the Förster resonance. We present a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis of the line shape and time dynamics of the Stark-tuned Förster resonances Rb(nP3/2)+Rb(nP3/2)→Rb(nS1/2)+Rb([n+1]S1/2) for two Rb Rydberg atoms interacting in a time-varying electric field.

  5. Disentangling the role of the Y(4260) in e+e- →D*Dbar* and Ds* Dbars* via line shape studies

    Xue, Si-Run; Jing, Hao-Jie; Guo, Feng-Kun; Zhao, Qiang

    2018-04-01

    Whether the Y (4260) can couple to open charm channels has been a crucial issue for understanding its nature. The available experimental data suggest that the cross section line shapes of exclusive processes in e+e- annihilations have nontrivial structures around the mass region of the Y (4260). As part of a series of studies of the Y (4260) as mainly a D bar D1 (2420) + c . c . molecular state, we show that the partial widths of the Y (4260) to the two-body open charm channels of e+e- →D*Dbar* and Ds* D bars* are much smaller than that to D bar D* π + c . c . . The line shapes measured by the Belle Collaboration for these two channels can be well described by the vector charmonium states ψ (4040), ψ (4160) and ψ (4415) together with the Y (4260). It turns out that the interference of the Y (4260) with the other charmonia produces a dip around 4.22 GeV in the e+e- →D*Dbar* cross section line shape. The data also show an evidence for the strong coupling of the Y (4260) to the DDbar1 (2420), in line with the expectation in the hadronic molecular scenario for the Y (4260).

  6. First observation of the Λ(1405) line shape in electroproduction

    Lu, H. Y.; Schumacher, R. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D’Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Harrison, N.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lewis, S.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Martinez, D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moriya, K.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nepali, C. S.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Torayev, B.; Vernarsky, B.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2013-10-01

    We report the first observation of the line shape of the Λ ( 1405 ) from electroproduction, and show that it is not a simple Breit-Wigner resonance. Electroproduction of K + Λ ( 1405 ) off the proton was studied by using data from CLAS at Jefferson Lab in the range 1.0 < Q 2 < 3.0 (GeV/ c ) 2 . The analysis utilized the decay channels Σ + π - of the Λ ( 1405 ) and p π 0 of the Σ + . Neither the standard Particle Data Group resonance parameters, nor free parameters fitting to a single Breit-Wigner resonance represent the line shape. In our fits, the line shape corresponds approximately to predictions of a two-pole meson-baryon picture of the Λ ( 1405 ) , with a lower mass pole near 1368 MeV/ c 2 and a higher mass pole near 1423 MeV/ c 2 . Furthermore, with increasing photon virtuality the mass distribution shifts toward the higher mass pole.

  7. Detailed single-crystal EPR line shape measurements for the single-molecule magnets Fe8Br and Mn12-acetate

    Hill, S.; Maccagnano, S.; Park, Kyungwha; Achey, R. M.; North, J. M.; Dalal, N. S.

    2002-06-01

    It is shown that our multi-high-frequency (40-200 GHz) resonant cavity technique yields distortion-free high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra for single-crystal samples of the uniaxial and biaxial spin S=10 single-molecule magnets (SMM's) [Mn12O12(CH3COO)16(H2O)4].2CH3COOH.4H2O and [Fe8O2(OH)12(tacn)6]Br8.9H2O. The observed line shapes exhibit a pronounced dependence on temperature, magnetic field, and the spin quantum numbers (MS values) associated with the levels involved in the transitions. Measurements at many frequencies allow us to separate various contributions to the EPR linewidths, including significant D strain, g strain, and broadening due to the random dipolar fields of neighboring molecules. We also identify asymmetry in some of the EPR line shapes for Fe8 and a previously unobserved fine structure to some of the EPR lines for both the Fe8 and Mn12 systems. These findings prove relevant to the mechanism of quantum tunneling of magnetization in these SMM's.

  8. What are the intensities and line-shapes of the twenty four polarization terms in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy?

    Niu, Kai; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2015-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is conventionally described by just one diagram/term where the three electric field interactions act on the ket side in a Feynman dual time-line diagram in a specific time order of pump, Stokes and probe pulses. In theory, however, any third-order nonlinear spectroscopy with three different electric fields interacting with a molecule can be described by forty eight diagrams/terms. They reduce to just 24 diagrams/terms if we treat the time ordering of the electric field interactions on the ket independently of those on the bra, i.e. the ket and bra wave packets evolve independently. The twenty four polarization terms can be calculated in the multidimensional, separable harmonic oscillator model to obtain the intensities and line-shapes. It is shown that in fs/ps CARS, for the two cases of off-resonance CARS in toluene and resonance CARS in rhodamine 6G, where we use a fs pump pulse, a fs Stokes pulse and a ps probe pulse, we obtain sharp vibrational lines in four of the polarization terms where the pump and Stokes pulses can create a vibrational coherence on the ground electronic state, while the spectral line-shapes of the other twenty terms are broad and featureless. The conventional CARS term with sharp vibrational lines is the dominant term, with intensity at least one order of magnitude larger than the other terms

  9. What are the intensities and line-shapes of the twenty four polarization terms in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy?

    Niu, Kai [School of Science, Tianjin University of Technology and Education, Tianjin, 300222 (China); Lee, Soo-Y., E-mail: sooying@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Physics & Applied Physics, and Division of Chemistry & Biological Chemistry, School of Physical & Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2015-12-15

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is conventionally described by just one diagram/term where the three electric field interactions act on the ket side in a Feynman dual time-line diagram in a specific time order of pump, Stokes and probe pulses. In theory, however, any third-order nonlinear spectroscopy with three different electric fields interacting with a molecule can be described by forty eight diagrams/terms. They reduce to just 24 diagrams/terms if we treat the time ordering of the electric field interactions on the ket independently of those on the bra, i.e. the ket and bra wave packets evolve independently. The twenty four polarization terms can be calculated in the multidimensional, separable harmonic oscillator model to obtain the intensities and line-shapes. It is shown that in fs/ps CARS, for the two cases of off-resonance CARS in toluene and resonance CARS in rhodamine 6G, where we use a fs pump pulse, a fs Stokes pulse and a ps probe pulse, we obtain sharp vibrational lines in four of the polarization terms where the pump and Stokes pulses can create a vibrational coherence on the ground electronic state, while the spectral line-shapes of the other twenty terms are broad and featureless. The conventional CARS term with sharp vibrational lines is the dominant term, with intensity at least one order of magnitude larger than the other terms.

  10. What are the intensities and line-shapes of the twenty four polarization terms in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy?

    Niu, Kai; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2015-12-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is conventionally described by just one diagram/term where the three electric field interactions act on the ket side in a Feynman dual time-line diagram in a specific time order of pump, Stokes and probe pulses. In theory, however, any third-order nonlinear spectroscopy with three different electric fields interacting with a molecule can be described by forty eight diagrams/terms. They reduce to just 24 diagrams/terms if we treat the time ordering of the electric field interactions on the ket independently of those on the bra, i.e. the ket and bra wave packets evolve independently. The twenty four polarization terms can be calculated in the multidimensional, separable harmonic oscillator model to obtain the intensities and line-shapes. It is shown that in fs/ps CARS, for the two cases of off-resonance CARS in toluene and resonance CARS in rhodamine 6G, where we use a fs pump pulse, a fs Stokes pulse and a ps probe pulse, we obtain sharp vibrational lines in four of the polarization terms where the pump and Stokes pulses can create a vibrational coherence on the ground electronic state, while the spectral line-shapes of the other twenty terms are broad and featureless. The conventional CARS term with sharp vibrational lines is the dominant term, with intensity at least one order of magnitude larger than the other terms.

  11. The effect of, within the sphere confined, particle diffusion on the line shape of incoherent cold neutron scattering spectra

    Cvikl, B.; Dahlborg, U.; Calvo-Dahlborg, M.

    1999-01-01

    Based upon the model of particles diffusion within the sphere of partially absorbing boundaries, the possibilities of the detection, by the incoherent cold neutron scattering method, of particle precipitation on the boundary walls, has been investigated. The calculated scattering law as a function of the boundary absorption properties exhibits distinct characteristic which might, under favorable conditions, make such an experimental attempt feasible.(author)

  12. The line shape of the Ortho-II superstructure reflection in YBa2Cu3O6.5

    Schleger, P.; Hadfield, R.; Casalta, H.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron and synchrotron x-ray measurements of the Ortho-II superstructure reflections on a high quality single crystal of YBa2Cu3O6.5 revealed that the intrinsic line shape is a Lorentzian to the power 5/2. It is argued that such a line shape implies late-stage domain coarsening of a quenched...... system ordering in three dimensions (d=3) with a two component order parameter (n=2)....

  13. The scavenging of the precursors of the solvated electrons fom the positron lifetime spectroscopy and the Doppler broadening of annihilation line shape technique

    Abbe, J.C.; Duplatre, G.; Maddock, A.G.; Haessler, A.

    1979-01-01

    The electron scavenging properties in water of two series of solutes are investigated, using the positron as a probe. For a better interpretation of the data, both the lifetime specroscopy and the Doppler broadening of annihilation line shape technique are used. All solutes inhibit the positronium (Ps) formation, by the scavenging of electron. The first series consists of the halate ions, that should follow the Hunt linear relation between the rate constant for reaction with the solvated electrons, ksub(e - sub(aq)+S) and that for its precursors(s), 1/C 37 . The Ps inhibition constants, k, are 0.14, 1.44 and 3.45M -1 for ClO 3 - , BrO 3 - and IO 3 - respectively. This sequence is quantitatively consistent with that of the respective ksub(e - sub(aq)+S). The second series includes the SeO 4 -- , Te(OH) 6 and BrO 4 - species, and the Ps inhibition constants are 5.62, 10.5 and 14.3 respectively. Theses values are much higher than expected from the ksub(e - sub(aq)+S) constants, on basis of the Hunt relation, in agreement with previous results from pulse radiolysis experiments

  14. Probing Aircraft Flight Test Hazard Mitigation for the Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) Research Team . Volume 2; Appendices

    Kelly, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) Project Integration Manager requested in July 2012 that the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) form a team to independently assess aircraft structural failure hazards associated with the ACCESS experiment and to identify potential flight test hazard mitigations to ensure flight safety. The ACCESS Project Integration Manager subsequently requested that the assessment scope be focused predominantly on structural failure risks to the aircraft empennage (horizontal and vertical tail). This report contains the Appendices to Volume I.

  15. Mechanism of the reactions 14N(d,p)15N and 14N(d,n)15O by Doppler shift line shape method

    Abdel-Moneim, A.M.

    1976-06-01

    In this investigation the total and the differential absolute cross sections of the 14 N(d,p) 15 N reaction leading to excited states at 7.3, 8.3 and 9.05 MeV levels in 15 N and the 14 N(d,n) 15 O reaction leading to the 6.79 MeV level in 15 O, have been studied over the energy range from 0.5 MeV to 3 MeV. Doppler shift line shape method as well as γ-ray yield measurements have been used. The absolute cross sections are determined relative to the known 14 N(p,p) elastic differential cross sections. A comparison with previously determined values for the same reactions at selected energies shows good agreement in angular distribution as well as in absolute values. The total cross section for the d,p reaction shows a general energy dependence which is typical for direct reactions, but with minor contribution from compound nucleus formation at certain energy ranges. For the 14 N(d,n) 15 N reaction, the method applied is unique, since it allows the differential cross section to be studied all the way down to the threshold energy of deuterons at 2 MeV, with a detectorsystem efficiency which is constant over the entire range of neutron energies. The larger part of the energy range that has been investigated is dominated by a resonance at 2.55 π+ 0.05 MeV deuteron energy and a halfwidth depending on the amount of contribution from the direct reaction of the order of 200-400 keV. (JIW)

  16. Evidence for an anisotropic contact shift. Proton NMR study of line shapes in uranocene and (C5H5)3UCl powders

    McGarvey, B.R.; Nagy, S.

    1987-01-01

    The proton NMR spectra of solid powders of uranocene and (C 5 H 5 ) 3 UCl were measured from 90 to 298 K. The line shapes of both systems became increasingly anisotropic as the temperature was lowered. The cyclooctatetraene rings in uranocene were found to be rotating at a frequency greater than 100 kHz down to 90 K. The (C 5 H 5 ) 3 UCl molecules were found to be reorienting rapidly above 220 K, but below 140 K the NMR spectra were characteristic of a rigid lattice with no rotation of the cyclopentadienyl rings. The spectra of both compounds could be simulated by assuming an axial paramagnetic shift tensor and an orientation-dependent line width. Comparison of the experimental shift tensor with that calculated for a point dipolar interaction revealed a large and very anisotropic paramagnetic shift for uranocene due to unpaired spin transferred into the ligand orbitals. The shift was large when the magnetic field was along the 8-fold symmetry axis of the molecule and nearly zero perpendicular to the axis. It appears conclusive that the contact shift in uranocene is not isotropic at all. A similar anisotropy in the contact shift associated with the cyclopentadienyl rings is evident also in the results for (C 5 H 5 )UCl. The average solid-state shift of uranocene agreed with the solution shift, within experimental error, but the solid state shift of (C 5 H 5 ) 3 UCl was 42 ppm greater than the solution shift at 298 K, indicating a difference in molecular geometry between the crystalline state and solution. 32 references, 8 figures, 3 tables

  17. Development of a high resolution, high sensitivity cylindrical crystal spectrometer for line shape diagnostics of x-rays emitted from hot plasmas. Progress report, August 1, 1977--July 31, 1978

    Taylor, P.O.; Schnopper, H.

    1978-05-01

    This report oulines progress towards development of a high resolution, high throughput, curved crystal spectrometer suitable for line shape diagnostics of x-rays emitted from hot plasmas. The instrument is designed to interface with the MIT Tokamak (Alcator) with the initial aim of studying the prominent MoL lines which occur in the x-ray spectrum. However, it will have the versatility to function over an energy range of at least 1.5 keV to 7 keV allowing determination of temperature, charge state and density distributions for important impurity ions. The spectrometer employs a large, cylindrically bent crystal which focuses the dispersed x-rays along the cylinder axis where they are recorded by a position sensitive proportional counter. Thus, a wide energy range of the spectrum can be recorded simultaneously and sensitively from a short duration plasma. Computer control of data acquisition and analysis will allow real-time diagnostics

  18. Status of thorium cycle nuclear data evaluations: Comparison of cross-section line shapes of JENDL-3 and ENDF-B-VI files for 230Th, 232Th, 231Pa, 233Pa, 232U, 233U and 234U

    Ganesan, S.; McLaughlin, P.K.

    1992-02-01

    Since 1990, one of the most interesting developments in the field of nuclear data for nuclear technology applications is that several new evaluated data files have been finalized and made available to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for distribution to its Member States. Improved evaluated nuclear data libraries such as ENDF/B-VI from the United States and JENDL-3 from Japan were developed over a period of 10-15 years. This report is not an evaluation of the evaluations. The report as presented here gives a first look at the cross section line shapes of the isotopes that are important to the thorium fuel cycle derived from the two recently evaluated data files: JENDL-3 and ENDF/B-VI. The basic evaluated data files JENDL-3 and ENDF/B-VI were point-processed successfully using the codes LINEAR and RECENT. The point data were multigrouped in three different group structures using the GROUPIE code. Graphs of intercomparisons of cross section line shapes of JENDL-3 and ENDF/B-VI are presented in this paper for the following isotopes of major interest to studies of the thorium fuel cycle: 230 Th, 232 Th, 231 Pa, 233 Pa, 232 U, 233 U and 234 U. Comparisons between JENDL-3 and ENDF/B-VI which were performed at the point and group levels show large discrepancies in various cross sections. We conclude this report with a general remark that it is necessary to perform sensitivity studies to assess the impacts of the discrepancies between the two different sets of data on calculated reactor design and safety parameters of specific reactor systems and, based on the results of such sensitivity studies, to undertake new tasks of evaluations. (author). 2 refs, 245 figs, 8 tabs

  19. A Survey of the Scattering Characteristics and Detection of Aircraft Wake Vortices

    Li Jianbing

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft wake vortex is a pair of strong counter-rotating vortices and has attracted considerable attention in various fields including aviation safety and atmospheric physics. The characteristics and detection of wake vortex act as the basis for both behavior prediction as well as hazard assessment. This paper provides a short survey of the characteristics and detection researches. Initially, the wake vortex is classified as clear-air wake vortex (i.e., wake turbulence and contrail and precipitation wake vortex (i.e., under rainy, foggy or snowy condition. Subsequently, the dynamics and scattering are introduced, and the main verdicts are: the radar (radio detection and ranging scattering of wake vortex is relatively weak under clear air conditions, but the Lidar (Light detection and ranging scattering is appreciable owing to the presence of particles such as aerosols. Wake vortices under precipitation conditions and contrails possess relatively good radar reflectivity owing the strong scattering characteristics of precipitation droplets and ice crystals. Furthermore, we have introduced a joint detection scheme of Lidar and radar for wake vortex along with parameter-retrieval algorithms. Finally, we have presented our conclusions and intended future research.

  20. Nature of mixed symmetry 2+ states in 94Mo from high resolution electron and proton scattering and line shape of the first excited 1/2+ state in 9Be

    Burda, Oleksiy

    2007-07-01

    The present work contains two parts. The first one is devoted to the investigation of mixed-symmetry structure in 94 Mo and the second one to the astrophysical relevant line shape of the first excited 1/2 + state in 9 Be. In the first part of the thesis the nature of one- and two-phonon symmetric and mixed-symmetric 2 + states in 94 Mo is investigated with high-resolution inelastic electron and proton scattering experiments in a combined analysis. The (e,e') experiments were carried out at the 169 magnetic spectrometer at the S-DALINAC. Data were taken at a beam energy E e=70 MeV and scattering angles Θ e =93 -165 . In dispersion-matching mode an energy resolution Δ E =30-45 keV (full width at half maximum) was achieved. The (p,p') measurements were performed at iThemba LABS, South Africa, using a K600 magnetic spectrometer at a proton energy E p=200 MeV and scattering angles Θ p =4.5 -26 . Typical energy resolutions were Δ E ≅35 keV. The combined analysis reveals a dominant one-phonon structure of the transitions to the first and third 2 + states, as well as an isovector character of the transition to the one-phonon mixed-symmetric state within the valence shell. Quantitatively consistent estimates of the one-phonon admixtures are obtained from both experimental probes when two-step contributions to the proton scattering cross sections are taken into account. In the second part of the thesis the line shape of the first excited 1/2 + state in 9 Be is studied. Spectra of the 9 Be(e,e') reaction were measured at the S-DALINAC at an electron energy E e=73 MeV and scattering angles of 93 and 141 with high energy resolution up to excitation energies E x =8 MeV. The form factor of the first excited state has been extracted from the data. The astrophysical relevant 9 Be(γ,n) cross sections have been extracted from the (e,e') data. The resonance parameters of the first excited 1/2 + state in 9 Be are derived in a one-level R-matrix approximation. The deduced

  1. Nature of mixed symmetry 2{sup +} states in {sup 94}Mo from high resolution electron and proton scattering and line shape of the first excited 1/2{sup +} state in {sup 9}Be

    Burda, Oleksiy

    2007-07-15

    The present work contains two parts. The first one is devoted to the investigation of mixed-symmetry structure in {sup 94}Mo and the second one to the astrophysical relevant line shape of the first excited 1/2{sup +} state in {sup 9}Be. In the first part of the thesis the nature of one- and two-phonon symmetric and mixed-symmetric 2{sup +} states in {sup 94}Mo is investigated with high-resolution inelastic electron and proton scattering experiments in a combined analysis. The (e,e') experiments were carried out at the 169 magnetic spectrometer at the S-DALINAC. Data were taken at a beam energy E e=70 MeV and scattering angles {theta}{sub e}=93 -165 . In dispersion-matching mode an energy resolution {delta}{sub E}=30-45 keV (full width at half maximum) was achieved. The (p,p') measurements were performed at iThemba LABS, South Africa, using a K600 magnetic spectrometer at a proton energy E p=200 MeV and scattering angles {theta}{sub p}=4.5 -26 . Typical energy resolutions were {delta}{sub E}{approx_equal}35 keV. The combined analysis reveals a dominant one-phonon structure of the transitions to the first and third 2{sup +} states, as well as an isovector character of the transition to the one-phonon mixed-symmetric state within the valence shell. Quantitatively consistent estimates of the one-phonon admixtures are obtained from both experimental probes when two-step contributions to the proton scattering cross sections are taken into account. In the second part of the thesis the line shape of the first excited 1/2{sup +} state in {sup 9}Be is studied. Spectra of the {sup 9}Be(e,e') reaction were measured at the S-DALINAC at an electron energy E e=73 MeV and scattering angles of 93 and 141 with high energy resolution up to excitation energies E{sub x}=8 MeV. The form factor of the first excited state has been extracted from the data. The astrophysical relevant {sup 9}Be({gamma},n) cross sections have been extracted from the (e,e') data. The

  2. Development of a high resolution cylindrical crystal spectrometer for line shape and spectral diagnostics of x-rays emitted from - hot - plasmas. Final report, June 1, 1976-December 31, 1983

    Kaellne, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    The development, installation and evaluation of a high resolution X-ray spectroscopic diagnostics are reported. The approach has been to optimize spectrometer throughput to enable single shot plasma diagnostics with good time resolution and to ensure sufficient energy resolution to allow line profile analysis. These goals have been achieved using a new X-ray geometry combined with a new position sensitive X-ray detector. These diagnostics have been used at Alcator C to detect X-ray emission of highly ionized impurity elements as well as argon seed elements specially introduced into the plasma for this diagnostic. Temporally resolved ion temperature profiles have been obtained from the recorded X-ray spectra simultaneously with other plasma parameters such as electron temperature, ionization temperature and ionization stage distribution. Radial profiles have also been measured. The developed X-ray diagnostics thus serve as a major multiparameter probe of the central core of the plasma with complementary informtion on radial profiles

  3. Linewidths and line shapes in the vicinity of graphene

    Bhattacharyya, Pallavi; Sebastian, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that graphene, by virtue of its pi-cloud delocalization, has a continuum of electronic energy states and thus behaves nearly like a metal. Instances involving quenching of electronic energy excitation in fluorophores placed in the proximity of graphene sheets are well documented. In this paper, we perform theoretical investigations on the broadening of vibrational and electronic transitions in the vicinity of graphene. We find that for CO vibrations in the vicinity of undoped graphene, the broadening at a distance of 5 Å is ∼0.008 cm −1 (κ ~ =2, κ ~ being the effective dielectric constant). In comparison, for electronic transitions, the linewidth is much larger, being of the order of several cm −1 . Also, if the transition dipole were parallel to the graphene sheet, the linewidth would be reduced to half the value for the case where it is perpendicular, an observation which should be easy to check experimentally for electronic transitions. This should be observable for the f − f transitions (which are rather narrow) of Lanthanide complexes placed within a distance of a few nanometers from a graphene sheet. Further the linewidth would have a (distance) −4 dependence as one varies the distance from graphene

  4. A precision measurement of the Z0-line shape

    Schmitt, B.

    1996-01-01

    A precise measurement of the cross section of the process e + e - → hadrons at energies around the Z 0 -resonance is performed. The aim is to achieve a systematic error of 0.1%. Data recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP during the years 1990 to 1994 are used. To achieve a small systematic luminosity error the OPAL detector was upgraded with a new luminosity monitor. The new luminosity detector, the luminosity measurement, and the selection of multi hadronic events is described in detail. The measured hadronic cross sections together with the leptonic cross sections are used to determine the mass and the width of the Z 0 -boson. The partial widths are used for a precision test of the standard model. (orig.)

  5. The natural line shape of the giant dipole resonance

    Gordon, E.F.; Pitthan, R.

    1977-01-01

    Investigation of photoabsorption experiments in the spherical nucleus 141 Pr, the quasispherical dynamically deformed 197 Au, and the statically deformed 165 Ho showed that the function which describes best the energy dependence of the reduced transition probability is given by the Breit-Wigner form rather than the Lorentz form. However, the form of the resulting measured cross section is approximately of the Lorentz type. The dependence of the giant resonance width GAMMA on the excitation energy was also investigated, and found to be less than 1% per MeV if one considered the known isovector E2 resonance above the giant dipole resonance. Best fit values of the reduced transition probabilities for the three nuclei are given and compared to (e,e') results. (Auth.)

  6. Spectral Ly{alpha}, Ly{beta}, and H{alpha} line shapes for the H atom in the presence of a magnetic field in a plasma; Profils des raies spectrales Ly{alpha}, Ly{beta}, et H{alpha} de l'atome H en presence d'un champ magnetique dans un plasma

    Nguyen, H; Herman, L [Laboratoire de Recherches Physiques, Faculte des sciences, 9 Quai Saint Bernard, 75 - Paris (France); Drawin, H W [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-02-15

    This report contains numerical data of the line shapes of Ly{alpha}, Ly{beta}, and H{alpha} for the following parameters: 1. 10{sup 2} {<=} H [gauss] {<=} 1.2. 10{sup 5} 1. 10{sup 15}{<=} N [cm{sup -3}] {<=} 1. 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} 1. 10{sup 4} {<=} T [deg. K] {<=} 4. 10{sup 4} where H = magnetic field strength, K = density of plasma ions, T = electron temperature. (authors) [French] Dans ce rapport, on donne les valeurs numeriques des contours des raies spectrales Ly{alpha}, Ly{beta}, et H{alpha} pour les valeurs suivantes des parametres H, N et T 1. 10{sup 2} {<=} H [gauss] {<=} 1.2. 10{sup 5} 1. 10{sup 15}{<=} N [cm{sup -3}] {<=} 1. 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} 1. 10{sup 4} {<=} T [deg. K] {<=} 4. 10{sup 4} ou H intensite du champ magnetique, N = densite des ions, T = temperature electronique. (auteurs)

  7. Diode Laser Detection of Greenhouse Gases in the Near-Infrared Region by Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy: Pressure Dependence of the Detection Sensitivity

    Takashi Asakawa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the pressure dependence of the detection sensitivity of CO2, N2O and CH4 using wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS with distributed feed-back diode lasers in the near infrared region. The spectral line shapes and the background noise of the second harmonics (2f detection of the WMS were analyzed theoretically. We determined the optimum pressure conditions in the detection of CO2, N2O and CH4, by taking into consideration the background noise in the WMS. At the optimum total pressure for the detection of CO2, N2O and CH4, the limits of detection in the present system were determined.

  8. Electrical detection of magnetization dynamics via spin rectification effects

    Harder, Michael, E-mail: michael.harder@umanitoba.ca; Gui, Yongsheng, E-mail: ysgui@physics.umanitoba.ca; Hu, Can-Ming, E-mail: hu@physics.umanitoba.ca

    2016-11-23

    The purpose of this article is to review the current status of a frontier in dynamic spintronics and contemporary magnetism, in which much progress has been made in the past decade, based on the creation of a variety of micro and nanostructured devices that enable electrical detection of magnetization dynamics. The primary focus is on the physics of spin rectification effects, which are well suited for studying magnetization dynamics and spin transport in a variety of magnetic materials and spintronic devices. Intended to be intelligible to a broad audience, the paper begins with a pedagogical introduction, comparing the methods of electrical detection of charge and spin dynamics in semiconductors and magnetic materials respectively. After that it provides a comprehensive account of the theoretical study of both the angular dependence and line shape of electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), which is summarized in a handbook format easy to be used for analysing experimental data. We then review and examine the similarity and differences of various spin rectification effects found in ferromagnetic films, magnetic bilayers and magnetic tunnel junctions, including a discussion of how to properly distinguish spin rectification from the spin pumping/inverse spin Hall effect generated voltage. After this we review the broad applications of rectification effects for studying spin waves, nonlinear dynamics, domain wall dynamics, spin current, and microwave imaging. We also discuss spin rectification in ferromagnetic semiconductors. The paper concludes with both historical and future perspectives, by summarizing and comparing three generations of FMR spectroscopy which have been developed for studying magnetization dynamics.

  9. The Influence of Chemi-Ionization and Recombination Processes on Spectral Line Shapes in Stellar Atmospheres

    Mihajlov Anatolij A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemi-ionization processes in atom - Rydberg atom collisions, as well as the corresponding chemi-recombination processes, are considered as factors of influence on the atom exited-state populations in weakly ionized layers of stellar atmospheres. The presented results are related to the photospheres of the Sun and some M red dwarfs, as well as weakly ionized layers of DB white dwarf atmospheres. It has been found that the mentioned chemi-ionization and recombination processes dominate over the concurrent electron-atom and electron-ion ionization and recombination processes in all parts of the considered stellar atmospheres. The obtained results demonstrate the fact that the considered processes must have significant influence on the optical properties of stellar atmospheres. It is shown that these processes and their importance for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE modeling of the solar atmospheres should be investigated further.

  10. Potential Energy Curves and Associated Line Shape of Alkali-Metal and Noble-Gas Interactions

    2014-10-20

    work. The ab initio calculations for M + Ng molecular combina- tions are reported and discussed in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 discusses both pedagogical ...mass of the noble-gas atom decreases. These barriers at R = rb are accompanied by shallow wells at R = rmin2 and, together with the shallow wells

  11. Jupiter's Deep Cloud Structure Revealed Using Keck Observations of Spectrally Resolved Line Shapes

    Bjoraker, G. L.; Wong, M.H.; de Pater, I.; Adamkovics, M.

    2015-01-01

    Technique: We present a method to determine the pressure at which significant cloud opacity is present between 2 and 6 bars on Jupiter. We use: a) the strength of a Fraunhofer absorption line in a zone to determine the ratio of reflected sunlight to thermal emission, and b) pressure- broadened line profiles of deuterated methane (CH3D) at 4.66 meters to determine the location of clouds. We use radiative transfer models to constrain the altitude region of both the solar and thermal components of Jupiter's 5-meter spectrum. Results: For nearly all latitudes on Jupiter the thermal component is large enough to constrain the deep cloud structure even when upper clouds are present. We find that Hot Spots, belts, and high latitudes have broader line profiles than do zones. Radiative transfer models show that Hot Spots in the North and South Equatorial Belts (NEB, SEB) typically do not have opaque clouds at pressures greater than 2 bars. The South Tropical Zone (STZ) at 32 degrees South has an opaque cloud top between 4 and 5 bars. From thermochemical models this must be a water cloud. We measured the variation of the equivalent width of CH3D with latitude for comparison with Jupiter's belt-zone structure. We also constrained the vertical profile of H2O in an SEB Hot Spot and in the STZ. The Hot Spot is very dry for a probability less than 4.5 bars and then follows the H2O profile observed by the Galileo Probe. The STZ has a saturated H2O profile above its cloud top between 4 and 5 bars.

  12. Thickness periodicity in the auger line shape from epitaxial (111)Cu films

    Namba, Y; Vook, R W; Chao, S S

    1981-01-01

    The 61 eV MMM Cu Auger line doublet was recorded in the derivative mode as a function of thickness for epitaxial (111)Cu films approximately 1500 angstrom thick. The overlap of the doublet lines makes it possible to define a measure of the doublet profile called the ''R-factor'' as a ratio of the peak-to-peak heights of the small overlap oscillation to that of the major oscillation. To within the experimental error, it was found that the R-factor varies with a periodicity of approximately one monoatomic layer as the film thickens. Since these films grow by a layer growth mechaniism, the surface topography varies periodically with the number of monolayers deposited, going from a smooth to a rough to a smooth, etc. surface. It is believed that the occurrence of such a periodicity implies that there is a difference in the electronic structure at the surface of the flat areas of the film from that at the edges of monolayer high, flat islands. The amplitude of the oscillation in R is interpreted to be a measure of the relative amounts of edge area compared to flat area. These results show that it is possible to use Auger electron spectroscopy to monitor surface topography and the electronic structure changes that accompany the topographical changes occurring when epitaxial films grow by a layer growth mechanism.

  13. Auger line shape changes in epitaxial (111)Pd/(111)Cu films

    Chao, S S; Knabbe, E A; Vook, R W

    1980-01-01

    Epitaxial Pd films ranging in thickness from a few tenths of a monolayer up to many monolayers were formed on (111)Cu substrate films at room temperature under uhv conditions. The growth of these Pd films was monitored in situ by Auger electron spectroscopy. The line profiles of the Cu MMM (61 eV) and Pd MVV (329 eV) AES doublets varied significantly with the amount of Pd deposited. A new measure of the AES doublet line profile, called the R-factor, was defined. A graph of R/sub Pd/ versus Pd film thickness shows a sharp decline with increasing thickness. Superimposed on the major trends is a cyclical variation. A corresponding periodicity in R/sub Cu/ was observed for the Cu MMM (61 eV) AES doublet. The results suggest that the R-factor provides a direct measure of changes in the electronic structures of the overgrowth and substrate films as the former thickens by a layer-growth mechanism.

  14. Temperature Dependent Rubidium Helium Line Shapes and Fine Structure Mixing Rates

    2015-09-01

    tube biased at 1,275 V exhibited a dark signal bias of 4-6 nA with noise fluctuation of 0.04 nA, as monitored on a Keithley model 386 picoammeter with...Journal of Physical Chemistry, 74(1):187–196, 1970. [79] Wu, Sheldon SQ, Thomas F Soules , Ralph H Page, Scott C Mitchell, V Keith Kanz, and Raymond J...Society for Optics and Photonics, 2008. [80] Wu, Sheldon SQ, Thomas F Soules , Ralph H Page, Scott C Mitchell, V Keith Kanz, and Raymond J Beach

  15. Temperature Dependent Rubidium-Helium Line Shapes and Fine Structure Mixing Rates

    2015-09-17

    tube biased at 1,275 V exhibited a dark signal bias of 4-6 nA with noise fluctuation of 0.04 nA, as monitored on a Keithley model 386 picoammeter with...Journal of Physical Chemistry, 74(1):187–196, 1970. [79] Wu, Sheldon SQ, Thomas F Soules , Ralph H Page, Scott C Mitchell, V Keith Kanz, and Raymond J...Society for Optics and Photonics, 2008. [80] Wu, Sheldon SQ, Thomas F Soules , Ralph H Page, Scott C Mitchell, V Keith Kanz, and Raymond J Beach

  16. Line shape of magnetic excitations in singlet-ground-state systems

    Bak, P.

    1976-08-01

    The excitation spectrum in a paramagnetic singlet doublet system is calculated using a diagrammatic expansion technique, and the theoretical predictions are compared with experiments on praseodymium. The theory gives an accurate description of the dramatic temperature dependence of the energies and lineshapes for the exciton modes

  17. Resonant infiltration of an opal: Reflection line shape and contribution from in-depth regions.

    Maurin, Isabelle; Bloch, Daniel

    2015-06-21

    We analyze the resonant variation of the optical reflection on an infiltrated artificial opal made of transparent nanospheres. The resonant infiltration is considered as a perturbation in the frame of a previously described one-dimensional model based upon a stratified effective index. We show that for a thin slice of resonant medium, the resonant response oscillates with the position of this slice. We derive that for adequate conditions of incidence angle, this spatially oscillating behavior matches the geometrical periodicity of the opal and hence the related density of resonant infiltration. Close to these matching conditions, the resonant response of the global infiltration varies sharply in amplitude and shape with the incidence angle and polarization. The corresponding resonant reflection originates from a rather deep infiltration, up to several wavelengths or layers of spheres. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the present predictions and our previous observations on an opal infiltrated with a resonant vapor.

  18. Fourier X-ray line shape analysis of lattice defects from a single reflection

    Misra, N.K.; Bhanumurthy, K.

    1981-01-01

    A method of single reflection Fourier analysis has been described considering the fact that the rms strain (averaged over a distance) is not independent of averaging distance. Following the procedure of N.K. Misra and T.B. Ghosh (1976) and considering the initial slopes of dAsub(L)/dL against L curves, (Asub(L) is the Lsub(th) order Fourier coefficient) the effective size of the coherently diffracting domains and the rms strain in them are determined. The results of this analysis for pure Ti and Ag-3.55% Ga, Ag-15% In and Cu-12.46% Ge alloys compare fairly well with those obtained from different multiple reflections techniques. (author)

  19. On the line-shape analysis of Compton profiles and its application to neutron scattering

    Romanelli, G.; Krzystyniak, M.

    2016-01-01

    Analytical properties of Compton profiles are used in order to simplify the analysis of neutron Compton scattering experiments. In particular, the possibility to fit the difference of Compton profiles is discussed as a way to greatly decrease the level of complexity of the data treatment, making the analysis easier, faster and more robust. In the context of the novel method proposed, two mathematical models describing the shapes of differenced Compton profiles are discussed: the simple Gaussian approximation for harmonic and isotropic local potential, and an analytical Gauss–Hermite expansion for an anharmonic or anisotropic potential. The method is applied to data collected by VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS neutron and muon pulsed source (UK) on Copper and Aluminium samples at ambient and low temperatures. - Highlights: • A new method to analyse neutron Compton scattering data is presented. • The method allows many corrections on the experimental data to be avoided. • The number of needed fitting parameters is drastically reduced using the new method. • Mass-selective analysis is facilitated with parametric studies benefiting the most. • Observables linked to anisotropic momentum distribution are obtained analytically.

  20. Photon and spin dependence of the resonance line shape in the strong coupling regime

    Miyashita, Seiji; Shirai, Tatsuhiko; Mori, Takashi; De Raedt, Hans; Bertaina, Sylvain; Chiorescu, Irinel

    2012-01-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of a spin ensemble coupled to cavity photons. Recently, related experimental results have been reported, showing the existence of the strong coupling regime in such systems. We study the eigenenergy distribution of the multi-spin system (following the Tavis-Cummings

  1. Line-shape theory and molecular dynamics in collision-induced light scattering

    Balucani, U.; Tognetti, V.; Vallauri, R.

    1979-01-01

    Molecular-dynamics studies in argon at 148 amagats are presented for gaining information on the dynamical properties responsible for the depolarized light scattering from simple fluids. The total and pair-correlation functions are computed within the simple dipole--induced-dipole model of polarizability anisotropy. The pair spectral shape is derived. These results are compared with a theoretical analysis based on a continued-fraction approach. The necessary frequency moments are calculated both in the low-density limit and taking into account first-order density corrections, and compared with the molecular-dynamics data. The agreement between the theoretical spectra and molecular-dynamics data shows the validity of the memory-function approach. The comparison with the real experimental results allows one to test the relevant physical contributions to the polarizability anisotropy

  2. Memory function approach to the line shape problem in collision-induced light scattering

    Balucani, U.; Tognetti, V.; Vallauri, R.

    1980-01-01

    This article mainly deals with the problem of the shape of the spectrum due to interacting pairs of atoms at low and moderate densities. A memory function approach is used which permits to obtain in a consistent way the shape of the scattered spectrum. In order to obtain 'exact' time correlation functions and spectral shapes, molecular-dynamics 'experiments' in Lennard-Jones argon at two different densities were also performed. The dipole-induced dipole (DID) polarizabilities have been used to ascertain the validity of the theoretical approach in a well-defined physical model. The theoretical shapes and correlation functions can be then directly compared with computer simulations. Finally, a comparison with the data of real experiments clarifies the relevance of other-than-DID polarizability mechanisms as far as the spectrum is concerned. (KBE)

  3. A monolithic constant-fraction discriminator using distributed R-C delay-line shaping

    Simpson, M.L.; Young, G.R.; Xu, M.

    1995-01-01

    A monolithic, CMOS, constant-fraction discriminator (CFD) was fabricated in the Orbit Semiconductor, 1.2 μ N-well process. This circuit uses an on-chip, distributed, R-C delay-line to realize the constant-fraction shaping. The delay-line is constructed from a narrow, 500-μ serpentine layer of polysilicon above a wide, grounded, second layer of polysilicon. This R-C delay-line generates about 1.1 ns of delay for 5 ns risetime signals with a slope degradation of only ≅ 15% and an amplitude reduction of about 6.1%. The CFD also features an automatic walk adjustment. The entire circuit, including the delay line, has a 200 μ pitch and is 950 μ long. The walk for a 5 ns risetime signal was measured as ± 100 ps over the 100:1 dynamic range from -15 mV to -1.5 mV. to -1.5 V. The CFD consumes 15 mW

  4. Measurement of the Σπ photoproduction line shapes near the Λ(1405)

    Moriya, K.; Schumacher, R. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bellis, M.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Sanctis, E.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Fleming, J. A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McCracken, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mineeva, T.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nasseripour, R.; Nepali, C. S.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, S.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Weygand, D. P.; Williams, M.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2013-03-01

    The reaction γ+p→K++Σ+π was used to determine the invariant mass distributions or “line shapes” of the Σ+π-, Σ-π+, and Σ0π0 final states, from threshold at 1328 MeV/c2 through the mass range of the Λ(1405) and the Λ(1520). The measurements were made with the CLAS system at Jefferson Lab using tagged real photons, for center-of-mass energies 1.95

  5. Calorimetric low-temperature detectors on semiconductor base for the energy-resolving detection of heavy ions

    Kienlin, A. von.

    1994-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis for the first time calorimetric low-temperature detectors for the energy-resolving detection of heavy ions were developed and successfully applied. Constructed were two different detector types, which work both with a semiconductor thermistor. The temperature increasement effected by a particle incidence is read out. In the first detector type the thermistor was simutaneously used as absorber. The thickness of the germanium crystals was sufficient in order to stop the studied heavy ions completely. In the second type, a composed calorimeter, a sapphire crystal, which was glued on a germanium thermistor, served as absorber for the incident heavy ions. The working point of the calorimeter lies in the temperature range (1.2-4.2 K), which is reachable with a pumped 4 He cryostat. The temperatur increasement of the calorimeter amounts after the incidence of a single α particle about 20-30 μK and that after a heavy ion incidence up to some mK. An absolute energy resolution of 400-500 keV was reached. In nine beam times the calorimeters were irradiated by heavy ions ( 20 Ne, 40 Ar, 136 Xe, 208 Pb, 209 Bi) of different energies (3.6 MeV/nucleon< E<12.5 MeV/nucleon) elastically scattered from gold foils. In the pulse height spectra of the first detector type relatively broad, complex-structurated line shapes were observed. By systematic measurements dependences of the complex line structures on operational parameters of the detector, the detector temperature, and the position of the incident particle could be detected. Together with the results of further experiments a possible interpretation of these phenomena is presented. Contrarily to the complex line structures of the pure germanium thermistor the line shapes in the pulse height spectra, which were taken up in a composite germanium/sapphire calorimeter, are narrow and Gauss-shaped

  6. Detection of interstellar (C-13)N toward Zeta Ophiuchi

    Crane, P.; Hegyi, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of a diffuse interstellar cloud toward Zeta Oph, obtained with resolution 100,000-150,000 near the 3874.608-A R(0) line of (C-12)N using a coude echelle spectrograph on the 1.4-m telescope at ESO during 1984 and 1985, are reported. Data from 54 20-min runs were fitted to Gaussian line shapes using the line center, depth, and width of the R(0) and R(1) lines of (C-12)N and the line center and depth of the R(0) line of (C-13)N as fitting parameters. The (C-13)N R(0) line, with equivalent width 0.190 + or - 0.020 mA, was detected 173.7 + or - 0.8 mA to the red of (C-12)N R(0); the corresponding isotope abundance ratio, (C-12)N/(C-13)N = 47.3 + 5.5 or -4.4, is shown to be in good agreement with previous measurements for CH(+) (Hawkins et al., 1985). 13 references

  7. True Detective

    Gajhede, Andreas; Westmark, [No Value; Bantoulidis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the HBO’s television-series True Detective, a 2014 crime drama, attempting to point out the central elements of detective-fiction, to be found in its narrative. True Detective narrative is a heavy text with a number of references from various well-known, non-adjacent texts within the field of weird fiction, horror fiction and detective fiction. Therefore, the case study of this research will focus on narratological and literary analysis, in order to discover the predominan...

  8. Harmonic detection of magnetic resonance for sensitivity improvement of optical atomic magnetometers

    Ranjbaran, M. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehranchi, M.M., E-mail: teranchi@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hamidi, S.M. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalkhali, S.M.H. [Physics Department, Kharazmi University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Highly sensitive atomic magnetometers use optically detected magnetic resonance of atomic spins to measure extremely weak magnetic field changes. The magnetometer sensitivity is directly proportional to the ratio of intensity to line-shape of the resonance signal. To obtain narrower resonance signal, we implemented harmonic detection of magnetic resonance method in M{sub x} configuration. The nonlinear spin polarization dynamics in detection of the higher harmonics were employed in phenomenological Bloch equations. The measured and simulated harmonic components of the resonance signals in frequency domain yielded significantly narrower line-width accompanying much improved sensitivity. Our results confirm the sensitivity improvement by a factor of two in optical atomic magnetometer via second harmonic signal which can open a new insight in the weak magnetic field measurement system design. - Highlights: • Highly sensitive atomic magnetometers have been used to measure weak magentic filed. • To obtain narrower resonance signal, we impalnted harmonic detection of magnetic resonance. • The nonlinear spin polarization dynamics in detetion of the higher harmonics were imployed.

  9. Optimizing detectability

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    HPLC is useful for trace and ultratrace analyses of a variety of compounds. For most applications, HPLC is useful for determinations in the nanogram-to-microgram range; however, detection limits of a picogram or less have been demonstrated in certain cases. These determinations require state-of-the-art capability; several examples of such determinations are provided in this chapter. As mentioned before, to detect and/or analyze low quantities of a given analyte at submicrogram or ultratrace levels, it is necessary to optimize the whole separation system, including the quantity and type of sample, sample preparation, HPLC equipment, chromatographic conditions (including column), choice of detector, and quantitation techniques. A limited discussion is provided here for optimization based on theoretical considerations, chromatographic conditions, detector selection, and miscellaneous approaches to detectability optimization. 59 refs

  10. Detection block

    Bezak, A.

    1987-01-01

    A diagram is given of a detection block used for monitoring burnup of nuclear reactor fuel. A shielding block is an important part of the detection block. It stabilizes the fuel assembly in the fixing hole in front of a collimator where a suitable gamma beam is defined for gamma spectrometry determination of fuel burnup. The detector case and a neutron source case are placed on opposite sides of the fixing hole. For neutron measurement for which the water in the tank is used as a moderator, the neutron detector-fuel assembly configuration is selected such that neutrons from spontaneous fission and neutrons induced with the neutron source can both be measured. The patented design of the detection block permits longitudinal travel and rotation of the fuel assembly to any position, and thus more reliable determination of nuclear fuel burnup. (E.S.). 1 fig

  11. Detection device

    Smith, J.E.

    1981-02-27

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  12. Animal Detectives

    Mulvey, Bridget; Warnock, Carly

    2015-01-01

    During a two-week inquiry-based 5E learning cycle unit, children made observations and inferences to guide their explorations of animal traits and habitats (Bybee 2014). The children became "animal detectives" by studying a live-feed webcam and digital images of wolves in their natural habitat, reading books and online sources about…

  13. Malware Detection

    Christodorescu, Mihai; Maughan, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Shared resources, such as the internet, have created a highly interconnected cyber-infrastructure. Many malicious attacks on critical infrastructures are achieved by malicious code or malware, such as viruses and worms. This book captures the research in the area of malicious code detection, prevention and mitigation.

  14. Particle detection

    Charpak, G.

    2000-01-01

    In this article G.Charpak presents the principles on which particle detection is based. Particle accelerators are becoming more and more powerful and require new detectors able to track the right particle in a huge flux of particles. The gigantic size of detectors in high energy physics is often due to the necessity of getting a long enough trajectory in a magnetic field in order to deduce from the curvature an accurate account of impulses in the reaction. (A.C.)

  15. Entanglement detection

    Guehne, Otfried [Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Osterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Technikerstrasse 21A, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Institut fuer theoretische Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: otfried.guehne@uibk.ac.at; Toth, Geza [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country, P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Ikerbasque-Basque Foundation for Science, Alameda Urquijo 36, E-48011 Bilbao (Spain); ICFO-Institute of Photonic Sciences, Mediterranean Technology Park, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2009-04-15

    How can one prove that a given quantum state is entangled? In this paper we review different methods that have been proposed for entanglement detection. We first explain the basic elements of entanglement theory for two or more particles and then entanglement verification procedures such as Bell inequalities, entanglement witnesses, the determination of nonlinear properties of a quantum state via measurements on several copies, and spin squeezing inequalities. An emphasis is given to the theory and application of entanglement witnesses. We also discuss several experiments, where some of the presented methods have been implemented.

  16. Edge Detection,

    1985-09-01

    PROJECT. T ASK0 Artificial Inteligence Laboratory AREA It WORK UNIT NUMBERS V 545 Technology Square ( Cambridge, HA 02139 I I* CONTOOL1LIN@4OFFICE NAME...ARD-A1t62 62 EDGE DETECTION(U) NASSACNUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE 1/1 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAB E C HILDRETH SEP 85 AI-M-8 N99SI4-8S-C-6595...used to carry out this analysis. cce~iO a N) ’.~" D LI’BL. P p ------------ Sj. t i MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY i ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

  17. Smoke detection

    Warmack, Robert J. Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A.; Frank, Steven Shane

    2017-10-17

    Various apparatus and methods for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a method of training a classifier for a smoke detector comprises inputting sensor data from a plurality of tests into a processor. The sensor data is processed to generate derived signal data corresponding to the test data for respective tests. The derived signal data is assigned into categories comprising at least one fire group and at least one non-fire group. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) training is performed by the processor. The derived signal data and the assigned categories for the derived signal data are inputs to the LDA training. The output of the LDA training is stored in a computer readable medium, such as in a smoke detector that uses LDA to determine, based on the training, whether present conditions indicate the existence of a fire.

  18. Signal detection

    Tholomier, M.

    1985-01-01

    In a scanning electron microscope, whatever is the measured signal, the same set is found: incident beam, sample, signal detection, signal amplification. The resulting signal is used to control the spot luminosity with the observer cathodoscope. This is synchronized with the beam scanning on the sample; on the cathodoscope, the image in secondary electrons, backscattered electrons,... of the sample surface is reconstituted. The best compromise must be found between a register time low enough to remove eventual variations (under the incident beam) of the nature of the observed phenomenon, and a good spatial resolution of the image and a signal-to-noise ratio high enough. The noise is one of the basic limitations of the scanning electron microscope performance. The whose measurement line must be optimized to reduce it [fr

  19. Remote detection device and detection method therefor

    Kogure, Sumio; Yoshida, Yoji; Matsuo, Takashiro; Takehara, Hidetoshi; Kojima, Shinsaku.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a non-destructive detection device for collectively, efficiently and effectively conducting maintenance and detection for confirming the integrity of a nuclear reactor by way of a shielding member for shielding radiation rays generated from an objective portion to be detected. Namely, devices for direct visual detection using an under water TV camera as a sensor, an eddy current detection using a coil as a sensor and each magnetic powder flow detection are integrated and applied collectively. Specifically, the visual detection by using the TV camera and the eddy current flaw detection are adopted together. The flaw detection with magnetic powder is applied as a means for confirming the results of the two kinds of detections by other method. With such procedures, detection techniques using respective specific theories are combined thereby enabling to enhance the accuracy for the evaluation of the detection. (I.S.)

  20. Contraband detection

    Gozzani, T.

    1995-01-01

    Inspecting incoming cargo for drugs, explosives and other contraband would quickly overwhelm inspection agencies even if a small percentage of the cargoes were manually searched. Now a new accelerator-based inspection system using pulsed fast neutron analysis (PFNA) allows automated inspection of loaded cargo containers and trucks. A collimated pulsed beam of fast neutrons, scanned over the side of a cargo container as it passes, excites the nuclei of common elements in bulk materials. The primary signals of interest for contraband are gammaray emissions following inelastic scattering of the fast neutrons from carbon and oxygen. Direct imaging of the contents of the material by time-of-flight analysis identifies the position of the interactions, while gamma-ray spectroscopy identifies the elemental gamma rays. The ratio of elements or other combinations of the elemental signatures are used to identify contraband - a high carbon-to-oxygen ratio, for example, is characteristic of drugs. The system incorporates gamma ray detectors, and analogue and digital processors sort the pulses for position and elemental information. Detection algorithms produce three-dimensional images of possible concealed contraband. From these images the inspector can identify suspicious objects within the cargo container

  1. Contraband detection

    Gozzani, T. [Science Applications International Corporation, Santa Clara (United States)

    1995-07-15

    Inspecting incoming cargo for drugs, explosives and other contraband would quickly overwhelm inspection agencies even if a small percentage of the cargoes were manually searched. Now a new accelerator-based inspection system using pulsed fast neutron analysis (PFNA) allows automated inspection of loaded cargo containers and trucks. A collimated pulsed beam of fast neutrons, scanned over the side of a cargo container as it passes, excites the nuclei of common elements in bulk materials. The primary signals of interest for contraband are gammaray emissions following inelastic scattering of the fast neutrons from carbon and oxygen. Direct imaging of the contents of the material by time-of-flight analysis identifies the position of the interactions, while gamma-ray spectroscopy identifies the elemental gamma rays. The ratio of elements or other combinations of the elemental signatures are used to identify contraband - a high carbon-to-oxygen ratio, for example, is characteristic of drugs. The system incorporates gamma ray detectors, and analogue and digital processors sort the pulses for position and elemental information. Detection algorithms produce three-dimensional images of possible concealed contraband. From these images the inspector can identify suspicious objects within the cargo container.

  2. Electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance in ferromagnet/n-GaAs heterostructures by tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance

    Liu, C.; Boyko, Y.; Geppert, C. C.; Christie, K. D.; Stecklein, G.; Crowell, P. A., E-mail: crowell@physics.umn.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Patel, S. J. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Palmstrøm, C. J. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-11-24

    We observe a dc voltage peak at ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in samples consisting of a single ferromagnetic (FM) layer grown epitaxially on the n-GaAs (001) surface. The FMR peak is detected as an interfacial voltage with a symmetric line shape and is present in samples based on various FM/n-GaAs heterostructures, including Co{sub 2}MnSi/n-GaAs, Co{sub 2}FeSi/n-GaAs, and Fe/n-GaAs. We show that the interface bias voltage dependence of the FMR signal is identical to that of the tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) over most of the bias range. Furthermore, we show how the precessing magnetization yields a dc FMR signal through the TAMR effect and how the TAMR phenomenon can be used to predict the angular dependence of the FMR signal. This TAMR-induced FMR peak can be observed under conditions where no spin accumulation is present and no spin-polarized current flows in the semiconductor.

  3. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-05

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor.

  4. Space Detectives

    Tyszka, Steph; Saraiva, Jose; Doran, Rosa

    2017-04-01

    NUCLIO is a Portuguese non-profit organization with a strong record of investing in science education and outreach. We have developed and implemented many activities mostly directed to a young audience, in a bid to awaken and reinforce the interest that young people devote to Astronomy and all things spatial. In this framework, we have created a week-long program called Space Detectives, supported by the Municipality of Cascais, based on a story-line that provided a number of challenges and opportunities for learning matters as diverse as the electro-magnetic spectrum, means of communication, space travel, the martian environment, coding and robotics. We report on the first session that took place in December 2016. We had as participants several kids aged 9 to 12, with a mixed background in terms of interest in the sciences. Their response varied from enthusiastic to somewhat less interested, depending on the nature of the subject and the way it was presented - a reaction not necessarily related to its complexity. This week was taken as something of a trial run, in preparation for the European Commission- funded project "Stories of Tomorrow", to be implemented in schools. The individual activities and the way they were related to the story-line, as well as the smooth transition from one to the next, were subject to an analysis that will allow for improvements in the next installments of this program. We believe this is an excellent approach to the goals of using Space and Astronomy as an anchor for generating and keeping interest in the scientific areas, and of finding new and richer ways of learning.

  5. Supra-molecular structure of TGBC* phases studied by means of Deuterium NMR line-shape analysis

    Domenici, V.; Veracini, C.A.; Hamplová, Věra; Kašpar, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 495, č. 11 (2008), s. 133-144 ISSN 1542-1406 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : banana -shaped * deuterium NMR * magnetic field * rod-like * smectic * twist grain boundary Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.537, year: 2008

  6. Properties of laser-produced GaAs plasmas measured from highly resolved X-ray line shapes and ratios

    Seely, J. F.; Fein, J.; Manuel, M.; Keiter, P.; Drake, P.; Kuranz, C.; Belancourt, Patrick; Ralchenko, Yu.; Hudson, L.; Feldman, U.

    2018-03-01

    The properties of hot, dense plasmas generated by the irradiation of GaAs targets by the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were determined by the analysis of high resolution K shell spectra in the 9 keV to 11 keV range. The laser parameters, such as relatively long pulse duration and large focal spot, were chosen to produce a steady-state plasma with minimal edge gradients, and the time-integrated spectra were compared to non-LTE steady state spectrum simulations using the FLYCHK and NOMAD codes. The bulk plasma streaming velocity was measured from the energy shifts of the Ga He-like transitions and Li-like dielectronic satellites. The electron density and the electron energy distribution, both the thermal and the hot non-thermal components, were determined from the spectral line ratios. After accounting for the spectral line broadening contributions, the plasma turbulent motion was measured from the residual line widths. The ionization balance was determined from the ratios of the He-like through F-like spectral features. The detailed comparison of the experimental Ga spectrum and the spectrum simulated by the FLYCHK code indicates two significant discrepancies, the transition energy of a Li-like dielectronic satellite (designated t) and the calculated intensity of a He-like line (x), that should lead to improvements in the kinetics codes used to simulate the X-ray spectra from highly-charged ions.

  7. FIRST DETECTION OF NEAR-INFRARED LINE EMISSION FROM ORGANICS IN YOUNG CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    Mandell, Avi M.; Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo [Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bast, Jeanette; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Blake, Geoffrey A. [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, MS 150-21, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Salyk, Colette, E-mail: Avi.Mandell@nasa.gov [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    We present an analysis of high-resolution spectroscopy of several bright T Tauri stars using the CRIRES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope and NIRSPEC spectrograph on the Keck Telescope, revealing the first detections of emission from HCN and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in circumstellar disks at near-infrared wavelengths. Using advanced data reduction techniques, we achieve a dynamic range with respect to the disk continuum of {approx}500 at 3 {mu}m, revealing multiple emission features of H{sub 2}O, OH, HCN, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. We also present stringent upper limits for two other molecules thought to be abundant in the inner disk, CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}. Line profiles for the different detected molecules are broad but centrally peaked in most cases, even for disks with previously determined inclinations of greater than 20 Degree-Sign , suggesting that the emission has both a Keplerian and non-Keplerian component as observed previously for CO emission. We apply two different modeling strategies to constrain the molecular abundances and temperatures: we use a simplified single-temperature local thermal equilibrium (LTE) slab model with a Gaussian line profile to make line identifications and determine a best-fit temperature and initial abundance ratios, and we compare these values with constraints derived from a detailed disk radiative transfer model assuming LTE excitation but utilizing a realistic temperature and density structure. Abundance ratios from both sets of models are consistent with each other and consistent with expected values from theoretical chemical models, and analysis of the line shapes suggests that the molecular emission originates from within a narrow region in the inner disk (R < 1 AU).

  8. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  9. Detection of Terahertz Radiation

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for detecting terahertz radiation, a camera device, and a method for detecting terahertz radiation.......The present invention relates to a system for detecting terahertz radiation, a camera device, and a method for detecting terahertz radiation....

  10. Portable modular detection system

    Brennan, James S [Rodeo, CA; Singh, Anup [Danville, CA; Throckmorton, Daniel J [Tracy, CA; Stamps, James F [Livermore, CA

    2009-10-13

    Disclosed herein are portable and modular detection devices and systems for detecting electromagnetic radiation, such as fluorescence, from an analyte which comprises at least one optical element removably attached to at least one alignment rail. Also disclosed are modular detection devices and systems having an integrated lock-in amplifier and spatial filter and assay methods using the portable and modular detection devices.

  11. Outlier detection using autoencoders

    Lyudchik, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Outlier detection is a crucial part of any data analysis applications. The goal of outlier detection is to separate a core of regular observations from some polluting ones, called “outliers”. We propose an outlier detection method using deep autoencoder. In our research the invented method was applied to detect outlier points in the MNIST dataset of handwriting digits. The experimental results show that the proposed method has a potential to be used for anomaly detection.

  12. Revolution in Detection Affairs

    Stern W.

    2013-11-02

    The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms.

  13. Lighting detectives forum

    Bülow, Katja; Skindbjerg Kristensen, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    Belysning for boligområder var emnet for lighting detectives forum, der blev afholdt i Stockholm i august 2003.......Belysning for boligområder var emnet for lighting detectives forum, der blev afholdt i Stockholm i august 2003....

  14. Unobtrusive Deception Detection

    Elkins, Aaron; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Pantic, Maja; Burgoon, Judee; Calvo, Rafael; D' Mello, Sidney; Gratch, Jonathan; Kappas, Arvid

    In response to national security needs and human deception detection limitations paired with advances in sensor and computing technology research into automated deception detection has increased in recent years. These technologies rely on psychological and communication theories of deception to

  15. Security, Fraud Detection

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Secure. Secure. Server – Intruder prevention/detection; Network – Encryption, PKI; Client - Secure. Fraud detection based on audit trails. Automatic alerts like credit-card alerts based on suspicious patterns.

  16. Interior intrusion detection systems

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Matter, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Dry, B. (BE, Inc., Barnwell, SC (United States))

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing interior intrusion detection systems. Interior intrusion sensors are discussed according to their primary application: boundary-penetration detection, volumetric detection, and point protection. Information necessary for implementation of an effective interior intrusion detection system is presented, including principles of operation, performance characteristics and guidelines for design, procurement, installation, testing, and maintenance. A glossary of sensor data terms is included. 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Interior intrusion detection systems

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Matter, J.C.; Dry, B.

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing interior intrusion detection systems. Interior intrusion sensors are discussed according to their primary application: boundary-penetration detection, volumetric detection, and point protection. Information necessary for implementation of an effective interior intrusion detection system is presented, including principles of operation, performance characteristics and guidelines for design, procurement, installation, testing, and maintenance. A glossary of sensor data terms is included. 36 figs., 6 tabs

  18. SQL injection detection system

    Vargonas, Vytautas

    2017-01-01

    SQL injection detection system Programmers do not always ensure security of developed systems. That is why it is important to look for solutions outside being reliant on developers. In this work SQL injection detection system is proposed. The system analyzes HTTP request parameters and detects intrusions. It is based on unsupervised machine learning. Trained by regular request data system detects outlier user parameters. Since training is not reliant on previous knowledge of SQL injections, t...

  19. Autonomous Forest Fire Detection

    Breejen, E. den; Breuers, M.; Cremer, F.; Kemp, R.A.W.; Roos, M.; Schutte, K.; Vries, J.S. de

    1998-01-01

    Forest fire detection is a very important issue in the pre-suppression process. Timely detection allows the suppression units to reach the fire in its initial stages and this will reduce the suppression costs considerably. The autonomous forest fire detection principle is based on temporal contrast

  20. Sodium outleakage detection

    Casselman, C.

    1979-01-01

    Effective detection of outleakage from sodium facilities permits timely intervention capable of limiting the consequences of such leakage. Two types of detection systems are described: local and overall detection. The use of two independent systems in sodium facilities is recommended. (author)

  1. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...... by that enzyme...

  2. Aerial Radiation Detection

    Quam, W. M.

    1999-01-01

    An airborne system designed for the detection of radioactive sources on the soil surface from an aircraft normally senses gamma rays emitted by the source. Gamma rays have the longest path length (least attenuation) through the air of any of the common radioactive emissions and will thus permit source detection at large distances. A secondary benefit from gamma rays detection if that nearly all radioactive isotopes can be identified by the spectrum of gammas emitted. Major gaseous emissions from fuel processing plants emit gammas that may be detected and identified. Some types of special nuclear material also emit neutrons which are also useful for detection at a distance

  3. Properties of individual contrails: a compilation of observations and some comparisons

    U. Schumann

    2017-01-01

    1015 kg−1. The dependence of the data on the observation methods is discussed. We find no obvious indication for significant contributions from spurious particles resulting from shattering of ice crystals on the microphysical probes.

  4. Adding a dimension to the infrared spectra of interfaces using heterodyne detected 2D sum-frequency generation (HD 2D SFG) spectroscopy.

    Xiong, Wei; Laaser, Jennifer E; Mehlenbacher, Randy D; Zanni, Martin T

    2011-12-27

    In the last ten years, two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy has become an important technique for studying molecular structures and dynamics. We report the implementation of heterodyne detected two-dimensional sum-frequency generation (HD 2D SFG) spectroscopy, which is the analog of 2D infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, but is selective to noncentrosymmetric systems such as interfaces. We implement the technique using mid-IR pulse shaping, which enables rapid scanning, phase cycling, and automatic phasing. Absorptive spectra are obtained, that have the highest frequency resolution possible, from which we extract the rephasing and nonrephasing signals that are sometimes preferred. Using this technique, we measure the vibrational mode of CO adsorbed on a polycrystalline Pt surface. The 2D spectrum reveals a significant inhomogenous contribution to the spectral line shape, which is quantified by simulations. This observation indicates that the surface conformation and environment of CO molecules is more complicated than the simple "atop" configuration assumed in previous work. Our method can be straightforwardly incorporated into many existing SFG spectrometers. The technique enables one to quantify inhomogeneity, vibrational couplings, spectral diffusion, chemical exchange, and many other properties analogous to 2D IR spectroscopy, but specifically for interfaces.

  5. Acoustic leak detection and ultrasonic crack detection

    Kupperman, D.S.; Claytor, T.N.; Groenwald, R.

    1983-10-01

    A program is under way to assess the effectiveness of current and proposed techniques for acoustic leak detection (ALD) in reactor coolant systems. An ALD facility has been constructed and tests have begun on five laboratory-grown cracks (three fatigue and two thermal-fatigue and two field-induced IGSCC specimens. After ultrasonic testing revealed cracks in the Georgia Power Co. HATCH-1 BWR recirculation header, the utility installed an ALD system. Data from HATCH-1 have given an indication of the background noise level at a BWR recirculation header sweepolet weld. The HATCH leak detection system was tested to determine the sensitivity and dynamic range. Other background data have been acquired at the Watts Bar Nuclear Reactor in Tennessee. An ANL waveguide system, including transducer and electronics, was installed and tested on an accumulator safety injection pipe. The possibility of using ultrasonic wave scattering patterns to discriminate between IGSCCs and geometric reflectors has been explored. Thirteen reflectors (field IGSCCs, graphite wool IGSCCs, weld roots, and slits) were examined. Work with cast stainless steel (SS) included sound velocity and attenuation in isotropic and anisotropic cast SS. Reducing anisotropy does not help reduce attenuation in large-grained material. Large artificial flaws (e.g., a 1-cm-deep notch with a 4-cm path) could not be detected in isotropic centrifugally cast SS (1 to 2-mm grains) by longitudinal or shear waves at frequencies of 1 MHz or greater, but could be detected with 0.5-MHz shear waves. 13 figures

  6. Intrusion detection system elements

    Eaton, M.J.; Mangan, D.L.

    1980-09-01

    This report highlights elements required for an intrusion detection system and discusses problems which can be encountered in attempting to make the elements effective. Topics discussed include: sensors, both for exterior detection and interior detection; alarm assessment systems, with the discussion focused on video assessment; and alarm reporting systems, including alarm communication systems and dislay/console considerations. Guidance on careful planning and design of a new or to-be-improved system is presented

  7. Introduction to detection systems

    Larsen, Jan

    Presentation of the information processing pipleline for detection including discussing of various issues and the use of mathematical modeling. A simple example of detection a signal in noise illustrated that simple modeling outperforms human visual and auditory perception. Particiants are going...... to discuss issues in detection which is followed by an auditory object recognition exercise. The results of the exercise and its relation to issues in the information processing pipleline is also discussed....

  8. Fuel failure detection device

    Katagiri, Masaki.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the SN ratio in the detection. Constitution: Improved precipitator method is provided. Scintillation detectors of a same function are provided respectively by each one before and after a gas reservoir for depositing fission products in the cover gas to detecting wires. The outputs from the two detectors (output from the wire not deposited with the fission products and the output from the wire after deposition) are compared to eliminate background noises resulted from not-decayed nucleides. A subtraction circuit is provided for the elimination. Since the background noises of the detecting wire can thus be measured and corrected on every detection, the SN ratio can be increased. (Ikeda, J.)

  9. Intrusion detection sensors

    Williams, J.D.

    1978-07-01

    Intrusion detection sensors are an integral part of most physical security systems. Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Safeguards and Security, Sandia Laboratories has conducted a survey of available intrusion detection sensors and has tested a number of different sensors. An overview of these sensors is provided. This overview includes (1) the operating principles of each type of sensor, (2) unique sensor characteristics, (3) desired sensor improvements which must be considered in planning an intrusion detection system, and (4) the site characteristics which affect the performance of both exterior and interior sensors. Techniques which have been developed to evaluate various intrusion detection sensors are also discussed

  10. Detection of ionized foods

    Beerens, H.

    1986-01-01

    Irradiated foods and feed might be identified with two kinds of tests: 1. biochemical: detection of specific products are not yet available 2. microbiological: when a microbial species dissapears from a sample of food i.e. it is not detectable after enrichment (for instance Coliforms in hamburgers) it is likely that the sample has been ionized [fr

  11. Semiconductor radiation detection systems

    2010-01-01

    Covers research in semiconductor detector and integrated circuit design in the context of medical imaging using ionizing radiation. This book explores other applications of semiconductor radiation detection systems in security applications such as luggage scanning, dirty bomb detection and border control.

  12. Fraud detection tools

    Katerina Hawlova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to introduce to readers the topic of fraud management – detection of fraudulent behaviour. The article is divided into two parts. The first part presents what is meant by fraud and fraudulent behaviour. In the second part a case study dealing with fraudulent behaviour detection in the procurement area is introduced.

  13. Science detects the forgeries

    Fleming, S.

    1975-01-01

    The range of laboratory authentication techniques now available for the detection of art fakes is reviewed. In particular the use of neutron activation analysis, x-ray fluorescence analysis and lead isotope analysis, are considered. The underlying principles of these three methods are explained and examples of their use in detecting forgeries of paintings, coins, bronzes etc. are given. (U.K.)

  14. Supernova neutrino detection

    Selvi, M.

    2005-01-01

    Neutrinos emitted during a supernova core collapse represent a unique feature to study both stellar and neutrino properties. After discussing the details of the neutrino emission in the star and the effect of neutrino oscillations on the expected neutrino fluxes at Earth, a review of the detection techniques is presented in this paper, with particular attention to the problem of electron neutrino detection

  15. Detecting Illicit Nuclear Materials

    Kouzes, Richard T.

    2005-01-01

    The threat that weapons of mass destruction might enter the United States has led to a number of efforts for the detection and interdiction of nuclear, radiological, chemical, and biological weapons at our borders. There have been multiple deployments of instrumentation to detect radiation signatures to interdict radiological material, including weapons and weapons material worldwide

  16. Water level detection pipeline

    Koshikawa, Yukinobu; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niizato, Masaru; Takagi, Masahiro

    1998-01-01

    In the present invention, water levels of a feedwater heater and a drain tank in a nuclear power plant are detected at high accuracy. Detection pipeline headers connected to the upper and lower portions of a feedwater heater or a drain tank are connected with each other. The connection line is branched at appropriate two positions and an upper detection pipeline and a lower detection pipeline are connected thereto, and a gauge entrance valve is disposed to each of the detection pipelines. A diaphragm of a pressure difference generator is connected to a flange formed to the end portion. When detecting the change of water level in the feedwater heater or the drain tank as a change of pressure difference, gauge entrance valves on the exit side of the upper and lower detection pipelines are connected by a connection pipe. The gauge entrance valve is closed, a tube is connected to the lower detection pipe to inject water to the diaphragm of the pressure difference generator passing through the connection pipe thereby enabling to calibrate the pressure difference generator. The accuracy of the calibration of instruments is improved and workability thereof upon flange maintenance is also improved. (I.S.)

  17. Failed fuel detection device

    Sudo, Takayuki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable early and sure detection of failed fuels by automatically changing the alarm set value depending on the operation states of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: Gaseous fission products released into coolants are transferred further into cover gases and then introduced through a pipeway to a failed fuel detector. The cover gases introduced from the pipeway to the pipeway or chamber within the detection device are detected by a radiation detector for the radiation dose of the gaseous fission products contained therein. The detected value is converted and amplified as a signal and inputted to a comparator. While on the other hand, a signal corresponding to the reactor power is converted by an alarm setter into a set value and inputted to the comparator. In such a structure, early and sure detection can be made for the fuel failures. (Yoshino, Y.)

  18. Detecting nuclear warheads

    Fetter, S.; Frolov, V.A.; Prilutsky, O.F.; Rodionov, S.N.; Sagdeev, R.Z.; Miller, M.

    1992-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, all nuclear weapons contain at least several kilograms of fissile material - material that can sustain a chain reaction. Such material provides the energy for fission explosives such as those that destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki; it is also used in the fission trigger modern thermonuclear weapons. The two fissile materials used in US and Soviet warheads are weapon grade uranium (WgU) and weapon-grade plutonium (WgPu). Fissile materials are radioactive; they are very dense and absorb certain radiations very well; and they can be fissioned. This paper reports on the two basic ways to detect fissile material: passive detection of the radiation emitted by its radioactive decay, or active detection involving either radiographing (x-raying) an object with neutrons or high-energy photons and detecting particles emitted by the resulting induced fissions. Passive detection is the preferred technique for verification purposes because of its simplicity and safety

  19. Flaw detection device

    Sasahara, Toshihiko

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for detecting welded portions of a reactor pressure vessel. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a casing to be disposed on the surface to be detected, (2) a probe driving means loaded to the casing, (3) a probe driven along the surface to be detected and (4) a pressure reduction means for keeping the hollow portion in the casing to an evacuated atmosphere. The casing comprises a flexible suction edge to be tightly in contact with the surface to be tested for maintaining the air tight state, (6) a guide wheel for moving the casing along the surface to be tested and (7) a handle for performing transferring operation. The flaw detection device thus constituted has following features. The working efficiency upon conducting detection is improved. The influence of the weight of the device on the detection is small. The device can be applied on the surface of a nonmagnetic material. The efficiency for the flaw detection can be improved. (I.S.)

  20. Pressure detection device

    Fuji, Akira.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a pressure detection device having a function of preventing discharge of reactor water in pipelines to the outside of a system when a pipeline for detecting pressure to be connected to a reactor is failed. Namely, a fluid pressure detector is disposed at the downstream of the detection pipeline. A cylindrical member having a shrinkable inner diameter is disposed to the outer circumference at the upstream. A cylindrical member having an outer diameter substantially equal to the inner diameter of the detection pipeline is disposed while restricting the movement of the detection pipeline in the inner circumferential direction. Then, it fasten the detection pipeline from the outside upon failure of the pipeline thereby enabling to suppress the flow rate of the fluid in the detection pipeline. In addition, a shape memory alloy which shrinks upon elevation of temperature is used for the cylindrical member. Then, the discharge of the fluid can be prevented automatically upon rupture of the pipeline. (I.S.)

  1. RE-VISIT OF HST FUV OBSERVATIONS OF THE HOT-JUPITER SYSTEM HD 209458: NO Si iii DETECTION AND THE NEED FOR COS TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS

    Ballester, G. E.; Ben-Jaffel, L.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of O i atoms and C ii ions in the upper atmosphere of HD 209458b, made with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) using the G140L grating, showed that these heavy species fill an area comparable to the planet’s Roche lobe. The derived ∼10% transit absorption depths require super-thermal processes and/or supersolar abundances. From subsequent Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) observations, C ii absorption was reported with tentative velocity signatures, and absorption by Si iii ions was also claimed in disagreement with a negative STIS G140L detection. Here, we revisit the COS data set showing a severe limitation in the published results from having contrasted the in-transit spectrum against a stellar spectrum averaged from separate observations, at planetary phases 0.27, 0.72, and 0.49. We find variable stellar Si iii and C ii emissions that were significantly depressed not only during transit but also at phase 0.27 compared to phases 0.72 and 0.49. Their respective off-transit 7.5% and 3.1% flux variations are large compared to their reported 8.2 ± 1.4% and 7.8 ± 1.3% transit absorptions. Significant variations also appear in the stellar line shapes, questioning reported velocity signatures. We furthermore present archive STIS G140M transit data consistent with no Si iii absorption, with a negative result of 1.7 ± 18.7 including ∼15% variability. Silicon may still be present at lower ionization states, in parallel with the recent detection of extended magnesium, as Mg i atoms. In this frame, the firm detection of O i and C ii implying solar or supersolar abundances contradicts the recent inference of potential 20–125× subsolar metallicity for HD 209458b

  2. RE-VISIT OF HST FUV OBSERVATIONS OF THE HOT-JUPITER SYSTEM HD 209458: NO Si iii DETECTION AND THE NEED FOR COS TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS

    Ballester, G. E. [University of Arizona, Dept. of Planetary Sciences, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, 1541 E University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721-0063 (United States); Ben-Jaffel, L., E-mail: gilda@lpl.arizona.edu, E-mail: bjaffel@iap.fr [UPMC Univ. Paris 06, UMR7095, Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2015-05-10

    The discovery of O i atoms and C ii ions in the upper atmosphere of HD 209458b, made with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) using the G140L grating, showed that these heavy species fill an area comparable to the planet’s Roche lobe. The derived ∼10% transit absorption depths require super-thermal processes and/or supersolar abundances. From subsequent Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) observations, C ii absorption was reported with tentative velocity signatures, and absorption by Si iii ions was also claimed in disagreement with a negative STIS G140L detection. Here, we revisit the COS data set showing a severe limitation in the published results from having contrasted the in-transit spectrum against a stellar spectrum averaged from separate observations, at planetary phases 0.27, 0.72, and 0.49. We find variable stellar Si iii and C ii emissions that were significantly depressed not only during transit but also at phase 0.27 compared to phases 0.72 and 0.49. Their respective off-transit 7.5% and 3.1% flux variations are large compared to their reported 8.2 ± 1.4% and 7.8 ± 1.3% transit absorptions. Significant variations also appear in the stellar line shapes, questioning reported velocity signatures. We furthermore present archive STIS G140M transit data consistent with no Si iii absorption, with a negative result of 1.7 ± 18.7 including ∼15% variability. Silicon may still be present at lower ionization states, in parallel with the recent detection of extended magnesium, as Mg i atoms. In this frame, the firm detection of O i and C ii implying solar or supersolar abundances contradicts the recent inference of potential 20–125× subsolar metallicity for HD 209458b.

  3. Analogue MIMO Detection

    McNamara Darren

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we propose an analogue receiver that can perform turbo detection in MIMO systems. We present the case for a receiver that is built from nonlinear analogue devices, which perform detection in a "free-flow" network (no notion of iterations. This contribution can be viewed as an extension of analogue turbo decoder concepts to include MIMO detection. These first analogue implementations report reductions of few orders of magnitude in the number of required transistors and in consumed energy, and the same order of improvement in processing speed. It is anticipated that such analogue MIMO decoder could bring about the same advantages, when compared to traditional digital implementations.

  4. System Detects Vibrational Instabilities

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Sustained vibrations at two critical frequencies trigger diagnostic response or shutdown. Vibration-analyzing electronic system detects instabilities of combustion in rocket engine. Controls pulse-mode firing of engine and identifies vibrations above threshold amplitude at 5.9 and/or 12kHz. Adapted to other detection and/or control schemes involving simultaneous real-time detection of signals above or below preset amplitudes at two or more specified frequencies. Potential applications include rotating machinery and encoders and decoders in security systems.

  5. Detection of bilingual plagiarism

    Frank Zamora R.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a computational algorithm for text alignment in the task of automatically detecting bilingual plagiarism is proposed. The method of detecting bilingual plagiarism uses machine translation services, in order to have the documents in question a base language, and apply techniques of monolingual plagiarism. The algorithm was tested with The corpus belonging to the International Competition Plagiarism 2013, with the objective of evaluating the step of detecting monolingual plagiarism. Besides it’s experimented with the collection of texts EUROPARL, a collection of documents pertaining to the meeting the European Parliament, specifically it´s to English and Spanish documents.

  6. Social Network Change Detection

    McCulloh, Ian A; Carley, Kathleen M

    2008-01-01

    ... between group members. The ability to systematically, statistically, effectively and efficiently detect these changes has the potential to enable the anticipation of change, provide early warning of change, and enable...

  7. Gas detection system

    Allan, C.J.; Bayly, J.G.

    1975-01-01

    The gas detection system provides for the effective detection of gas leaks over a large area. It includes a laser which has a laser line corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. A He-Xe laser scans a number of retroreflectors which are strategically located around a D 2 O plant to detect H 2 S leaks. The reflected beam is focused by a telescope, filtered, and passed into an infrared detector. The laser may be made to emit two frequencies, one of which corresponds with an H 2 S absorption line; or it may be modulated on and off the H 2 S absorption line. The relative amplitude of the absorbed light will be a measure of the H 2 S present

  8. Tracers Detect Aquifer Contamination

    Enfield, Carl

    1995-01-01

    The EPA's National Laboratory (NRMRL) at Ada, OK, along with the University of Florida and the University of Texas, have developed a tracer procedure to detect the amount of contamination in aquifer formations...

  9. Anomaly Detection in Sequences

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We present a set of novel algorithms which we call sequenceMiner, that detect and characterize anomalies in large sets of high-dimensional symbol sequences that...

  10. Face Detection and Recognition

    Jain, Anil K

    2004-01-01

    .... Specifically, the report addresses the problem of detecting faces in color images in the presence of various lighting conditions and complex backgrounds as well as recognizing faces under variations...

  11. Sulphur hexafluoride gas detection

    Stolper, R

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This poster describes the development process of an electro-optical based solution for detecting and locating SF6 gas leaks at gas insulated switch gear. The principal technologies that were researched are explained with their advantages...

  12. Scaling up Copy Detection

    Li, Xian; Dong, Xin Luna; Lyons, Kenneth B.; Meng, Weiyi; Srivastava, Divesh

    2015-01-01

    Recent research shows that copying is prevalent for Deep-Web data and considering copying can significantly improve truth finding from conflicting values. However, existing copy detection techniques do not scale for large sizes and numbers of data sources, so truth finding can be slowed down by one to two orders of magnitude compared with the corresponding techniques that do not consider copying. In this paper, we study {\\em how to improve scalability of copy detection on structured data}. Ou...

  13. Sensor for metal detection

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2014-06-26

    NOVELTY - The sensor has a microfluidic flow channel that is provided with an inlet port, an outlet port, and a detection chamber. The detection chamber is provided with a group of sensing electrodes (4) having a working electrode (8), a counter electrode (9), and a reference electrode (10). A flow sensor is configured to measure flow in the channel. A temperature sensor (6) is configured to measure temperature in the channel (3). An electrical connection is configured to connect the sensor to a sensing device. USE - Sensor for detecting metal such as toxic metal in sample such as clinical sample such as stool, saliva, sputum, bronchial lavage, urine, vaginal swab, nasal swab, biopsy, tissue, tears, breath, blood, serum, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, peritoneal fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, joint fluid, and amniotic fluid, water sample, food sample, air sample, and soil sample (all claimed). ADVANTAGE - The sensor for use with the portable analytical instrument is configured for detection of metalsin samples. The sensor can provide the excellent solution for on-site metal detection, including heavy metal detection. The sensors can provide significant advantages in higher throughput, lower cost, at the same time being less labor intensive and less dependent on individual skills. The disposable design of the sensor, the enhanced reliability and repeatability of measurements can be obtained. The sensors can be widely applied in various industries. DETAILED DESCRIPTION - INDEPENDENT CLAIMS are included for the following: (1) a system for detecting metal in sample; and (2) a method for using sensor for detecting metal in sample. DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING(S) - The drawing shows a schematic view of the sensor prototype. Channel (3) Sensing electrodes (4) Temperature sensor (6) Working electrode (8) Counter electrode (9) Reference electrode (10)

  14. Supervised / unsupervised change detection

    de Alwis Pitts, Dilkushi; De Vecchi, Daniele; Harb, Mostapha; So, Emily; Dell'Acqua, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this deliverable is to provide an overview of the state of the art in change detection techniques and a critique of what could be programmed to derive SENSUM products. It is the product of the collaboration between UCAM and EUCENTRE. The document includes as a necessary requirement a discussion about a proposed technique for co-registration. Since change detection techniques require an assessment of a series of images and the basic process involves comparing and contrasting the sim...

  15. Pipeline Leak Detection Techniques

    Chis, Timur

    2009-01-01

    Leak detection systems range from simple, visual line walking and checking ones to complex arrangements of hard-ware and software. No one method is universally applicable and operating requirements dictate which method is the most cost effective. The aim of the paper is to review the basic techniques of leak detection that are currently in use. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed and some indications of applicability are outlined.

  16. Pipeline Leak Detection Techniques

    Timur Chis, Ph.D., Dipl.Eng.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leak detection systems range from simple, visual line walking and checking ones to complex arrangements of hard-ware and software. No one method is universally applicable and operating requirements dictate which method is the most cost effective. The aim of the paper is to review the basic techniques of leak detection that are currently in use. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed and some indications of applicability are outlined.

  17. Lead Poison Detection

    1976-01-01

    With NASA contracts, Whittaker Corporations Space Science division has developed an electro-optical instrument to mass screen for lead poisoning. Device is portable and detects protoporphyrin in whole blood. Free corpuscular porphyrins occur as an early effect of lead ingestion. Also detects lead in urine used to confirm blood tests. Test is inexpensive and can be applied by relatively unskilled personnel. Similar Whittaker fluorometry device called "drug screen" can measure morphine and quinine in urine much faster and cheaper than other methods.

  18. Detecting analogies unconsciously

    Thomas Peter Reber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Analogies may arise from the conscious detection of similarities between a present and a past situation. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we tested whether young volunteers would detect analogies unconsciously between a current supraliminal (visible and a past subliminal (invisible situation. The subliminal encoding of the past situation precludes awareness of analogy detection in the current situation. First, participants encoded subliminal pairs of unrelated words in either one or nine encoding trials. Later, they judged the semantic fit of supraliminally presented new words that either retained a previously encoded semantic relation (‘analog’ or not (‘broken analog’. Words in analogs versus broken analogs were judged closer semantically, which reflects unconscious analogy detection. Hippocampal activity associated with subliminal encoding correlated with the behavioral measure of unconscious analogy detection. Analogs versus broken analogs were processed with reduced prefrontal but enhanced medial temporal activity. We conclude that analogous episodes can be detected even unconsciously drawing on the episodic memory network.

  19. Abnormal sound detection device

    Yamada, Izumi; Matsui, Yuji.

    1995-01-01

    Only components synchronized with rotation of pumps are sampled from detected acoustic sounds, to judge the presence or absence of abnormality based on the magnitude of the synchronized components. A synchronized component sampling means can remove resonance sounds and other acoustic sounds generated at a synchronously with the rotation based on the knowledge that generated acoustic components in a normal state are a sort of resonance sounds and are not precisely synchronized with the number of rotation. On the other hand, abnormal sounds of a rotating body are often caused by compulsory force accompanying the rotation as a generation source, and the abnormal sounds can be detected by extracting only the rotation-synchronized components. Since components of normal acoustic sounds generated at present are discriminated from the detected sounds, reduction of the abnormal sounds due to a signal processing can be avoided and, as a result, abnormal sound detection sensitivity can be improved. Further, since it is adapted to discriminate the occurrence of the abnormal sound from the actually detected sounds, the other frequency components which are forecast but not generated actually are not removed, so that it is further effective for the improvement of detection sensitivity. (N.H.)

  20. Phenomenon detection device

    Suzuki, Yasuo.

    1994-01-01

    Detection signals for a specific phenomenon outputted from any of detectors are distributed by way of half mirrors and inputted to a logic discrimination circuit by way of a photoelectric convertor. The photoelectric convertor detects the quantity of light corresponding to the optical signals from more than two detectors which detected the phenomenon, and outputs detection signals to the logic discrimination circuit. If the phenomenon is detected, since both inputs turn ON in the logic discrimination circuit in accordance with the predetermined logical sum, the occurrence of a specific phenomenon is detected. Thus, an optical system substantially comprises half mirrors, reflection mirrors and photoelectric convertor in combination provides a logic circuit. Since the circuit which transmits signals of the detectors is constituted with an optical system using the half mirrors, the number of parts constituting the logic circuit can greatly be saved. In addition, since the optical system comprises mirrors or half mirrors which have been used so far, they can be used, once assembled, quasipermanently, and the reliability can be enhanced greatly. (N.H.)

  1. Moving Sources Detection System

    Coulon, Romain; Kondrasovs, Vladimir; Boudergui, Karim; Normand, Stephane

    2013-06-01

    To monitor radioactivity passing through a pipe or in a given container such as a train or a truck, radiation detection systems are commonly employed. These detectors could be used in a network set along the source track to increase the overall detection efficiency. However detection methods are based on counting statistics analysis. The method usually implemented consists in trigging an alarm when an individual signal rises over a threshold initially estimated in regards to the natural background signal. The detection efficiency is then proportional to the number of detectors in use, due to the fact that each sensor is taken as a standalone sensor. A new approach is presented in this paper taking into account the temporal periodicity of the signals taken by all distributed sensors as a whole. This detection method is not based only on counting statistics but also on the temporal series analysis aspect. Therefore, a specific algorithm is then developed in our lab for this kind of applications and shows a significant improvement, especially in terms of detection efficiency and false alarms reduction. We also plan on extracting information from the source vector. This paper presents the theoretical approach and some preliminary results obtain in our laboratory. (authors)

  2. The necessity of recognizing all events in x-ray detection

    Papp, T.; Maxwell, J.A.; Papp, A.T.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In our work in studying properties of inner shell ionization, we stumbled upon the problems that the basic parameters of x-ray physics have a large and unexplainable scatter. If we look deep into the problems many of them contradict simple logic, elemental arithmetic, even parity and angular conservation laws. We have identified that the main source of the problems, other than the human factor, is rooted in the signal processing electronics. To overcome these problems, we have developed a fully digital signal processor, which not only has excellent resolution and line shape but also allows proper accounting. It is achieved by processing all events and separating them into two or more spectra, maximum sixteen, where the first spectrum is the accepted or good spectrum and the second spectrum is the rejected spectrum. Depending on the request of the analysis further spectra can be generated to supply all the information needed for the analysis. It is not enough to know that an event was rejected, and increment the input counter, it is necessary to know, what why and when it happened, whether it was a noise, noisy or disturbed event, or an event, and any pile up combination of them, accounting properly as input and at the dead time as well. This can be determined from the spectra of properly processed rejected events. We will demonstrate that the direct comparison of the results of the detector simulation model with a partial spectrum, what the various signal recognition and discrimination methods of the signal processor have created, is ambiguous. We will present the difference between pile up and sum peaks, demonstrate the proper accounting of pile up, dead time and what compromises are made in general to warrant the good resolution. We will demonstrate why it is mandatory to recognize all the events, how to interpret the rejected spectrum, what advantage it has in training the industrial analyst, and how it reduces the demands for human expertise in x

  3. Proximity detection system underground

    Denis Kent [Mine Site Technologies (Australia)

    2008-04-15

    Mine Site Technologies (MST) with the support ACARP and Xstrata Coal NSW, as well as assistance from Centennial Coal, has developed a Proximity Detection System to proof of concept stage as per plan. The basic aim of the project was to develop a system to reduce the risk of the people coming into contact with vehicles in an uncontrolled manner (i.e. being 'run over'). The potential to extend the developed technology into other areas, such as controls for vehicle-vehicle collisions and restricting access of vehicle or people into certain zones (e.g. non FLP vehicles into Hazardous Zones/ERZ) was also assessed. The project leveraged off MST's existing Intellectual Property and experience gained with our ImPact TRACKER tagging technology, allowing the development to be fast tracked. The basic concept developed uses active RFID Tags worn by miners underground to be detected by vehicle mounted Readers. These Readers in turn provide outputs that can be used to alert a driver (e.g. by light and/or audible alarm) that a person (Tag) approaching within their vicinity. The prototype/test kit developed proved the concept and technology, the four main components being: Active RFID Tags to send out signals for detection by vehicle mounted receivers; Receiver electronics to detect RFID Tags approaching within the vicinity of the unit to create a long range detection system (60 m to 120 m); A transmitting/exciter device to enable inner detection zone (within 5 m to 20 m); and A software/hardware device to process & log incoming Tags reads and create certain outputs. Tests undertaken in the laboratory and at a number of mine sites, confirmed the technology path taken could form the basis of a reliable Proximity Detection/Alert System.

  4. Single particle detecting telescope system

    Yamamoto, I.; Tomiyama, T.; Iga, Y.; Komatsubara, T.; Kanada, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Wada, T.; Furukawa, S.

    1981-01-01

    We constructed the single particle detecting telescope system for detecting a fractionally charged particle. The telescope consists of position detecting counters, wall-less multi-cell chambers, single detecting circuits and microcomputer system as data I/0 processor. Especially, a frequency of double particle is compared the case of the single particle detecting with the case of an ordinary measurement

  5. Proactive malware detection

    Gloster, Jonathan; Diep, Michael; Dredden, David; Mix, Matthew; Olsen, Mark; Price, Brian; Steil, Betty

    2014-06-01

    Small-to-medium sized businesses lack resources to deploy and manage high-end advanced solutions to deter sophisticated threats from well-funded adversaries, but evidence shows that these types of businesses are becoming key targets. As malicious code and network attacks become more sophisticated, classic signature-based virus and malware detection methods are less effective. To augment the current malware methods of detection, we developed a proactive approach to detect emerging malware threats using open source tools and intelligence to discover patterns and behaviors of malicious attacks and adversaries. Technical and analytical skills are combined to track adversarial behavior, methods and techniques. We established a controlled (separated domain) network to identify, monitor, and track malware behavior to increase understanding of the methods and techniques used by cyber adversaries. We created a suite of tools that observe the network and system performance looking for anomalies that may be caused by malware. The toolset collects information from open-source tools and provides meaningful indicators that the system was under or has been attacked. When malware is discovered, we analyzed and reverse engineered it to determine how it could be detected and prevented. Results have shown that with minimum resources, cost effective capabilities can be developed to detect abnormal behavior that may indicate malicious software.

  6. π0 detection system

    Suzuki, Yoichiro

    1977-01-01

    A π-zero meson detection system used for the measurement of charge exchange reaction is described. The detection of π-zero is made by observing the coincidence events of two gamma-ray emission following the decay of π-zero meson. The angles of the emitted gamma-rays are detected with a wire spark chamber system, and the energies of the gamma-rays are measured with hodoscope type lead glass Cherenkov counters. In front of the π-zero counter system, a lead converter is set, and the incident gamma-rays convert to electron positron pairs, which can be detected with the wire spark chambers. The system is a multi-track detection system. The high voltage pulser of the wire spark chamber system is a charge line thyratron pulser, and the chamber itself is a transmission line type. Read-out can be made by a mag-line system. Wave forms and efficiencies were measured. The three-track efficiency was about 90% by the condenser method and 95% by the charge line method. (Kato, T.)

  7. Solar system fault detection

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  8. Detecting dark matter

    Dixon, Roger L.

    2000-01-01

    Dark matter is one of the most pressing problems in modern cosmology and particle physic research. This talk will motivate the existence of dark matter by reviewing the main experimental evidence for its existence, the rotation curves of galaxies and the motions of galaxies about one another. It will then go on to review the corroborating theoretical motivations before combining all the supporting evidence to explore some of the possibilities for dark matter along with its expected properties. This will lay the ground work for dark matter detection. A number of differing techniques are being developed and used to detect dark matter. These will be briefly discussed before the focus turns to cryogenic detection techniques. Finally, some preliminary results and expectations will be given for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment

  9. Coolant leakage detection device

    Ito, Takao.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To surely detect the coolant leakage at a time when the leakage amount is still low in the intra-reactor inlet pipeway of FBR type reactor. Constitution: Outside of the intra-reactor inlet piping for introducing coolants at low temperature into a reactor core, an outer closure pipe is furnished. The upper end of the outer closure pipe opens above the liquid level of the coolants in the reactor, and a thermocouple is inserted to the opening of the upper end. In such a structure, if the coolants in the in-reactor piping should leak to the outer closure pipe, coolants over-flows from the opening thereof, at which the thermocouple detects the temperature of the coolants at a low temperature, thereby enabling to detect the leakage of the coolants at a time when it is still low. (Kamimura, M.)

  10. Detection of colorectal neoplasia

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Christensen, Ib J; Rasmussen, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Serological biomarkers may be an option for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study assessed eight cancer-associated protein biomarkers in plasma from subjects undergoing first time ever colonoscopy due to symptoms attributable to colorectal neoplasia. Plasma AFP, CA19-9, CEA...... value was 18% and the negative predictive value was 97%. Combinations of serological protein biomarkers provided a significant identification of subjects with high risk of the presence of colorectal neoplasia. The present set of biomarkers could become important adjunct in early detection of CRC....

  11. Spear Phishing Attack Detection

    2011-03-24

    be sufficiently evaded by encrypting the malware. A similar approach is used by Kolter et al. in [KoM04] and later in [KoM06], where they used data...MeM11] [Mes08] [MKK07] [Off10] [RaS02] [Rep09] J. Z. Kolter and M. A. Maloof. ―Learning to detect...York: ACM, 2004. J. Z. Kolter and M. A. Maloof. ―Learning to detect and classify malicious executables in the Wild,‖ The Journal of Machine Learning

  12. Quantitative secondary electron detection

    Agrawal, Jyoti; Joy, David C.; Nayak, Subuhadarshi

    2018-05-08

    Quantitative Secondary Electron Detection (QSED) using the array of solid state devices (SSD) based electron-counters enable critical dimension metrology measurements in materials such as semiconductors, nanomaterials, and biological samples (FIG. 3). Methods and devices effect a quantitative detection of secondary electrons with the array of solid state detectors comprising a number of solid state detectors. An array senses the number of secondary electrons with a plurality of solid state detectors, counting the number of secondary electrons with a time to digital converter circuit in counter mode.

  13. Luminescence detection of shellfish

    Sanderson, D.C.W.; Carmichael, L.A.; Spencer, J.Q.; Naylor, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre (SURRC) has been active in the development and application of luminescence techniques in the detection of irradiated foods, in support of UK legislation. Thermoluminescence (TL), photostimulated luminescence (PSL) and photo-transfer luminescence (PTTL) are radiation-specific phenomena which arise due to energy stored by trapped charge carriers following irradiation. The energy released following stimulation is accompanied by detectable luminescence. The TL method involves preparation of pure silicate extracts from the sample and subsequent TL analysis, whereas PSL uses stimulation by electromagnetic radiation (visible, or near visible wavelengths) thus avoiding heating the sample. (author)

  14. Detection of pulmonary nodules

    Vanzulli, A.; Zanello, A.; DelMaschio, M.; Paesano, P.; Panizza, P.; DelMaschio, A.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have prospectively studied 203 pulmonary nodules in 91 patients, selected by CT (gold standard), with both subtraction digital radiography (SDR) and conventional plain film. Subtracted images were obtained by using copper filter inserted between two photostimulable imaging plates. Five radiologists randomly analyzed all conventional and subtracted images. The authors calculated sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for both conventional radiography and SDR. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were calculated by plotting the number of nodules detected with different degrees of confidence. SDR detected 12% more nodules than conventional radiography. ROC curves demonstrated that the level of confidence was better for SDR (P <.05)

  15. Ultrasensitive leak detection

    Winkelman, C.R.; Davidson, H.G.

    1978-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop a method of detecting leaks to a sensitivity of 1.0 x 10 -13 std/cm 3 /s in vacuum devices and to develop a qualifiable standard leak to provide system calibration at this leak rate. The development work demonstrated that minimum detectable leak rates of 6.5 x 10 -14 std/cm 3 /s and 5.5 x 10 -15 std/cm 3 /s are possible for respective analog and digital measurement modes

  16. Remote detection of electronic devices

    Judd, Stephen L [Los Alamos, NM; Fortgang, Clifford M [Los Alamos, NM; Guenther, David C [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-09-25

    An apparatus and method for detecting solid-state electronic devices are described. Non-linear junction detection techniques are combined with spread-spectrum encoding and cross correlation to increase the range and sensitivity of the non-linear junction detection and to permit the determination of the distances of the detected electronics. Nonlinear elements are detected by transmitting a signal at a chosen frequency and detecting higher harmonic signals that are returned from responding devices.

  17. Leak detection method

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a method for removing nuclear fuel elements from a fabrication building while at the same time testing the fuel elements for leaks without releasing contaminants from the fabrication building or from the fuel elements. The vacuum source used, leak detecting mechanism and fuel element fabrication building are specified to withstand environmental hazards. (UK)

  18. Activation analysis. Detection limits

    Revel, G.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical data and limits of detection related to the four irradiation modes, often used in activation analysis (reactor neutrons, 14 MeV neutrons, photon gamma and charged particles) are presented here. The technical presentation of the activation analysis is detailed in the paper P 2565 of Techniques de l'Ingenieur. (A.L.B.)

  19. Changing change detection

    Kyllingsbæk, Søren; Bundesen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    The change detection paradigm is a popular way of measuring visual short-term memory capacity. Using the paradigm, researchers have found evidence for a capacity of about four independent visual objects, confirming classic estimates that were based on the number of items that could be reported...

  20. Automatic detection of laughter

    Truong, K.P.; Leeuwen, D.A. van

    2005-01-01

    In the context of detecting ‘paralinguistic events’ with the aim to make classification of the speaker’s emotional state possible, a detector was developed for one of the most obvious ‘paralinguistic events’, namely laughter. Gaussian Mixture Models were trained with Perceptual Linear Prediction

  1. Emotion detection from text

    Ramalingam, V. V.; Pandian, A.; Jaiswal, Abhijeet; Bhatia, Nikhar

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a novel method based on concept of Machine Learning for Emotion Detection using various algorithms of Support Vector Machine and major emotions described are linked to the Word-Net for enhanced accuracy. The approach proposed plays a promising role to augment the Artificial Intelligence in the near future and could be vital in optimization of Human-Machine Interface.

  2. Detective fiction and the

    Tienie01

    2006-06-15

    Jun 15, 2006 ... tionalist agenda, then the third wave concerns reformulating healthy community ... In real life, no doubt, the best detectives are the professional police, but .... Marple – the ever-observant, intelligent and intuitive elderly, amateur detec- ..... tive, promoting alternative social models for the community at large.

  3. Readers as research detectives

    Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2009-01-01

    all trials should be posted on a public website. This would also make it much easier to detect errors and flaws in publications, and it would allow many research projects to be performed without collecting new data. The prevailing culture of secrecy and ownership to data is not in the best interests...

  4. Crack detection '86

    1986-01-01

    The participants of the conference heard 36 papers of which 13 were incorporated in INIS. The incorporated papers deal with the quality control of the equipment of nuclear power plants, with technical specifications and possibilities of diverse crack detection devices, as well as with personnel training for nondestructive materials testing. (E.S.)

  5. Crack detecting method

    Narita, Michiko; Aida, Shigekazu

    1998-01-01

    A penetration liquid or a slow drying penetration liquid prepared by mixing a penetration liquid and a slow drying liquid is filled to the inside of an artificial crack formed to a member to be detected such as of boiler power generation facilities and nuclear power facilities. A developing liquid is applied to the periphery of the artificial crack on the surface of a member to be detected. As the slow-drying liquid, an oil having a viscosity of 56 is preferably used. Loads are applied repeatedly to the member to be detected, and when a crack is caused to the artificial crack, the permeation liquid penetrates into the crack. The penetration liquid penetrated into the crack is developed by the developing liquid previously coated to the periphery of the artificial crack of the surface of the member to be detected. When a crack is caused, since the crack is developed clearly even if it is a small opening, the crack can be recognized visually reliably. (I.N.)

  6. Antigen detection systems

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  7. Remote Voice Detection System

    Blackmon, Fletcher A

    2007-01-01

    A device and system to remotely detect vocalizations of speech. The skin located on the throat region of a speaking person or a reflective layer on the skin on the throat region vibrates in response to vocalizations of speech by the person...

  8. Failed fuel detection device

    Doi, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention concerns a failed fuel detection device for a nuclear reactor, such as an FBR type reactor, using electroconductive coolants. A sampling port is disposed at the upper portion of the fuel assembly so as to cover the assembly, so that coolants in the fuel assembly are sampled to improve a device for detecting fuel failure. That is, when coolants in the fuel assembly are sampled from the sampling port, the flow of electroconductive coolants in an sampling tube is detected by a flowmeter, to control an electromagnetic pump. The flow of electroconductive coolants is stopped against the waterhead pressure and dynamic pressure of the conductive coolants, and a predetermined amount of the coolants is pumped up to the sampling tank. Gas is supplied to the pumped up coolants so that fissile products are transferred from the coolants to a gas phase. Radiation in the gas in a gas recycling system is measured to detect presence of fuel failure. (I.S.)

  9. Automated asteroseismic peak detections

    García Saravia Ortiz de Montellano, Andrés; Hekker, S.; Themeßl, N.

    2018-05-01

    Space observatories such as Kepler have provided data that can potentially revolutionize our understanding of stars. Through detailed asteroseismic analyses we are capable of determining fundamental stellar parameters and reveal the stellar internal structure with unprecedented accuracy. However, such detailed analyses, known as peak bagging, have so far been obtained for only a small percentage of the observed stars while most of the scientific potential of the available data remains unexplored. One of the major challenges in peak bagging is identifying how many solar-like oscillation modes are visible in a power density spectrum. Identification of oscillation modes is usually done by visual inspection that is time-consuming and has a degree of subjectivity. Here, we present a peak-detection algorithm especially suited for the detection of solar-like oscillations. It reliably characterizes the solar-like oscillations in a power density spectrum and estimates their parameters without human intervention. Furthermore, we provide a metric to characterize the false positive and false negative rates to provide further information about the reliability of a detected oscillation mode or the significance of a lack of detected oscillation modes. The algorithm presented here opens the possibility for detailed and automated peak bagging of the thousands of solar-like oscillators observed by Kepler.

  10. Neutron detection technique

    Oblath, N.S.; Poon, A.W.P.

    2000-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has the ability to measure the total flux of all active flavors of neutrinos using the neutral current reaction, whose signature is a neutron. By comparing the rates of the neutral current reaction to the charged current reaction, which only detects electron neutrinos, one can test the neutrino oscillation hypothesis independent of solar models. It is necessary to understand the neutron detection efficiency of the detector to make use of the neutral current reaction. This report demonstrates a coincidence technique to identify neutrons emitted from the 252 Cf neutron calibration source. The source releases on average four neutrons when a 252 Cf nucleus spontaneously fissions. Each neutron is detected as a separate event when the neutron is captured by a deuteron, releasing a gamma ray of approximately 6.25 MeV. This gamma ray is in turn detected by the photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. By investigating the time and spatial separation between neutron-like events, it is possible to obtain a pure sample of neutrons for calibration study. Preliminary results of the technique applied to two calibration runs are presented

  11. H2 region detection

    Comte, G.

    1978-01-01

    The now classical technique of detection of HII regions is by means of photography and/or interferometry through narrow-band interference filters, with a large aperture ratio of the imaging optics. It enables the detailed study of the spiral structure and the repartition of ionized gas in our Galaxy as well as in the external galaxies [fr

  12. Focused detection logging technique

    Turcotte, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    In accordance with an illustrative embodiment of the present invention, a method and apparatus is disclosed for determining a characteristic of the media surrounding a borehole by emitting gamma radiation in at least one tightly collimated beam toward an earth formation adjacent a borehole, by detecting from a plurality of tightly collimated paths that are focused at a zone of intersection with and aligned to intersect with each emitted beam the gamma radiation scattered by the interaction of the emitted gamma radiation and the media at the zones of intersection, by misaligning the emitted beams and the tightly collimated paths to prevent their intersection, by detecting gamma radiation scattered by the interaction of the emitted gamma radiation and the media with the emitted beams and the tightly collimated paths misaligned and by determining from the detected gamma radiation a media characteristic. In one embodiment, the detection collimater used is formed of a material that is essentially opaque to gamma radiation at the energies of interest and includes a plurality of passageways that are spherically focused at a zone of intersection with one of the emitted beams of gamma radiation and that are arranged in a number of surfaces that are curved to be azimuthally symmetrical about the axis of the intersected beam. 14 figures

  13. Detecting the brachyspina mutation

    2012-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for the detection of a bovine that is affected by or carrier of brachyspina. It is based on the identification of a 3.3 Kb deletion in the bovine FANCI gene that is shown to cause the brachyspina syndrome. The present invention provides methods and uses for deter...

  14. Detection and counting systems

    Abreu, M.A.N. de

    1976-01-01

    Detection devices based on gaseous ionization are analysed, such as: electroscopes ionization chambers, proportional counters and Geiger-Mueller counters. Scintillation methods are also commented. A revision of the basic concepts in electronics is done and the main equipment for counting is detailed. In the study of gama spectrometry, scintillation and semiconductor detectors are analysed [pt

  15. "Utilizing" signal detection theory.

    Lynn, Spencer K; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2014-09-01

    What do inferring what a person is thinking or feeling, judging a defendant's guilt, and navigating a dimly lit room have in common? They involve perceptual uncertainty (e.g., a scowling face might indicate anger or concentration, for which different responses are appropriate) and behavioral risk (e.g., a cost to making the wrong response). Signal detection theory describes these types of decisions. In this tutorial, we show how incorporating the economic concept of utility allows signal detection theory to serve as a model of optimal decision making, going beyond its common use as an analytic method. This utility approach to signal detection theory clarifies otherwise enigmatic influences of perceptual uncertainty on measures of decision-making performance (accuracy and optimality) and on behavior (an inverse relationship between bias magnitude and sensitivity optimizes utility). A "utilized" signal detection theory offers the possibility of expanding the phenomena that can be understood within a decision-making framework. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Automatic EEG spike detection.

    Harner, Richard

    2009-10-01

    Since the 1970s advances in science and technology during each succeeding decade have renewed the expectation of efficient, reliable automatic epileptiform spike detection (AESD). But even when reinforced with better, faster tools, clinically reliable unsupervised spike detection remains beyond our reach. Expert-selected spike parameters were the first and still most widely used for AESD. Thresholds for amplitude, duration, sharpness, rise-time, fall-time, after-coming slow waves, background frequency, and more have been used. It is still unclear which of these wave parameters are essential, beyond peak-peak amplitude and duration. Wavelet parameters are very appropriate to AESD but need to be combined with other parameters to achieve desired levels of spike detection efficiency. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and expert-system methods may have reached peak efficiency. Support Vector Machine (SVM) technology focuses on outliers rather than centroids of spike and nonspike data clusters and should improve AESD efficiency. An exemplary spike/nonspike database is suggested as a tool for assessing parameters and methods for AESD and is available in CSV or Matlab formats from the author at brainvue@gmail.com. Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) is presented as a graphic method for finding better spike parameters and for the step-wise evaluation of the spike detection process.

  17. New fire detection technology

    Caceres Vinagre, F.J.

    1995-01-01

    Fire detection methods and systems have advanced rapidly in recent years. In practice, there are two categories of fire detection system: conventional, collective identification, and addressable, individual identification. Hybrid systems are also used. Most Spanish nuclear power plants are equipped with the first type, as they were the only types available when the plants were built. Individual identification systems have been a radical change and have opened up new possibilities for nuclear power plants not available using conventional systems. Conventional systems provide no indication of the exact provenance of the fire-alarm signal, which could even come from different rooms. When a new generation detector initiates an alarm, it identifies itself, and the location of the fire, explicity. Faculty detectors can be located and counted, for fast, efficient replacement, or recording if replacement is not necessary immediately. In the past HALON was used in situations that required an extinguishing agent that was clean for people and equipment such as electrical panels, and in control rooms. Now that it is no longer available, faster detection techniques have had to be developed, to avoid the need for generalized extinction or inadequate extinguishing agents. This presentation analyses the new detection technology, and the ways it is being applied to typical cases in nuclear power plants. (Author)

  18. Detection symmetry and asymmetry

    du Buf, J.M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were performed on the detection symmetry and asymmetry of incremental and decremental disks, as a function of both disk diameter and duration. It was found that, for a background luminance of 300cd.m-2, thresholds of dynamic (briefly presented) foveal disks are symmetrical for all

  19. Global Disease Detectives

    2010-09-21

    This podcast documents U.S. efforts to prevent, detect, and control emerging infectious diseases, such as SARS and pandemic influenza.  Created: 9/21/2010 by CDC Center for Global Health.   Date Released: 9/21/2010.

  20. Verbal lie detection

    Vrij, Aldert; Taylor, Paul J.; Picornell, Isabel; Oxburgh, Gavin; Myklebust, Trond; Grant, Tim; Milne, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we discuss verbal lie detection and will argue that speech content can be revealing about deception. Starting with a section discussing the, in our view, myth that non-verbal behaviour would be more revealing about deception than speech, we then provide an overview of verbal lie

  1. Ultrasonic leak detection

    Murphy, R.V.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning ultrasonic microphone was used to detect the presence and locate the sources of hydraulic noises in piping systems in a reactor environment. The intensity changes of the noises correspond to changes of flow conditions within the system caused by throttled valves, flow rate changes, and leaks. (author)

  2. CDC Disease Detective Camp

    The CDC Disease Detective Camp gives rising high school juniors and seniors exposure to key aspects of the CDC, including basic epidemiology, infectious and chronic disease tracking, public health law, and outbreak investigations. The camp also helps students explore careers in public health.

  3. Factors affecting the line-shape of the EPR signal of high-spin Fe(III) in soybean lipoxygenase-1

    Slappendel, S.; Aasa, R.; Malmström, B.G.; Verhagen, J.; Veldink, G.A.; Vliegenthart, J.F.G.

    1982-01-01

    The yellow form of soybean lipoxygenase-1 (linoleate:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.13.11.12), obtained upon addition of one molar equivalent of acid (13--HPOD) to the native enzyme, shows a complex EPR signal around g 6 which results from contributions of different high-spin Fe(III) species with

  4. Effects of diffusion and surface interactions on the line shape of electron paramagnetic resonances in the presence of a magnetic field gradient

    Schaden, M.; Zhao, K. F.; Wu, Z.

    2007-01-01

    In an evanescent wave magnetometer the Zeeman polarization is probed at micrometer to submicrometer distances from the cell surface. The electron paramagnetic resonance lines of an evanescent wave magnetometer in the presence of a magnetic field gradient exhibit edge enhancement seen previously in nuclear magnetic resonance lines. We present a theoretical model that describes quantitatively the shape of the magnetic resonance lines of an evanescent wave magnetometer under a wide range of experimental conditions. It accounts for diffusion broadening in the presence of a magnetic field gradient as well as interactions of spin polarized Rb atoms with the coated Pyrex glass surfaces. Depending on the field gradient, cell thickness, and buffer gas pressure, the resonance line may have the form of a single asymmetric peak or two peaks localized near the front and back surfaces in frequency space. The double-peaked response depends on average characteristics of the surface interactions. Its shape is sensitive to the dwell time, relaxation probability, and average phase shift of adsorbed spin polarized Rb atoms

  5. Unusual Dispersion and Line Shape of the Superconducting State Spectra of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    Norman, M.R.; Ding, H.; Campuzano, J.C.; Takeuchi, T.; Ding, H.; Campuzano, J.C.; Takeuchi, T.; Randeria, M.; Yokoya, T.; Takahashi, T.; Mochiku, T.; Kadowaki, K.; Kadowaki, K.

    1997-01-01

    Photoemission spectra of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ below T c show two features near the (π,0) point of the zone: a sharp peak at low energy and a higher binding energy hump. We find that the sharp peak persists at low energy even as one moves towards (0,0), while the broad hump shows significant dispersion which correlates well with the normal state dispersion. We argue that these features are naturally explained by the interaction of electrons with a sharp mode which appears only below T c , and speculate that the latter may be related to the resonance seen in recent neutron data. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  6. Measurement and computations of line shape parameters for the 12201 ← 03301, 11101 ← 10002 and 12201 ← 11102 self-broadened CO2 Q-branches

    Al Mashwood, Abdullah; Predoi-Cross, Adriana; Devi, V. Malathy; Rozario, Hoimonti; Billinghurst, Brant

    2018-06-01

    Pure CO2 spectra recorded at room temperature and different pressures (0.2-140 Torr) have been analyzed with the help of a fitting routine that takes into account asymmetries arising in the spectral lines due to pressure induced effects such as line mixing. The fitting procedure used in this study allows one to adjust the ro-vibrational constants for the band rather than fitting for individual line parameters. These constrained parameters greatly reduce the measurement uncertainties and allow us to observe the behavior of the weak lines corresponding to high J quantum numbers. We have also calculated line mixing parameters using approximations based on exponential nature of the energy difference between ground and upper vibrational states involved in the ro-vibrational band transitions. The calculated results show good agreement when compared with the experimentally determined parameters.

  7. Real-time UV-visible spectroscopy analysis of purple membrane-polyacrylamide film formation taking into account Fano line shapes and scattering.

    Gomariz, María; Blaya, Salvador; Acebal, Pablo; Carretero, Luis

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally analyze the formation of thick Purple Membrane (PM) polyacrylamide (PA) films by means of optical spectroscopy by considering the absorption of bacteriorhodopsin and scattering. We have applied semiclassical quantum mechanical techniques for the calculation of absorption spectra by taking into account the Fano effects on the ground state of bacteriorhodopsin. A model of the formation of PM-polyacrylamide films has been proposed based on the growth of polymeric chains around purple membrane. Experimentally, the temporal evolution of the polymerization process of acrylamide has been studied as function of the pH solution, obtaining a good correspondence to the proposed model. Thus, due to the formation of intermediate bacteriorhodopsin-doped nanogel, by controlling the polymerization process, an alternative methodology for the synthesis of bacteriorhodopsin-doped nanogels can be provided.

  8. Resonances in photoabsorption: Predissociation line shapes in the 3pπD1Π+u ← Χ1Σg+ system in H2

    Mezei, J. Zs.; Schneider, I. F.; Glass-Maujean, M.; Jungen, Ch.

    2014-01-01

    The predissociation of the 3pπD 1 Π u + ,v≥3,N=1, N = 2, and N = 3 levels of diatomic hydrogen is calculated by ab initio multichannel quantum defect theory combined with a R-matrix type approach that accounts for interfering predissociation and autoionization. The theory yields absorption line widths and shapes that are in good agreement with those observed in the high-resolution synchrotron vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectra obtained by Dickenson et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 133, 144317 (2010)] at the DESIRS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron. The theory predicts further that many of the D state resonances with v ⩾ 6 exhibit a complex fine structure which cannot be modeled by the Fano profile formula and which has not yet been observed experimentally

  9. Modelling the line shape of very low energy peaks of positron beam induced secondary electrons measured using a time of flight spectrometer

    Fairchild, A J; Chirayath, V A; Gladen, R W; Chrysler, M D; Koymen, A R; Weiss, A H

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present results of numerical modelling of the University of Texas at Arlington’s time of flight positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectrometer (UTA TOF-PAES) using SIMION® 8.1 Ion and Electron Optics Simulator. The time of flight (TOF) spectrometer measures the energy of electrons emitted from the surface of a sample as a result of the interaction of low energy positrons with the sample surface. We have used SIMION® 8.1 to calculate the times of flight spectra of electrons leaving the sample surface with energies and angles dispersed according to distribution functions chosen to model the positron induced electron emission process and have thus obtained an estimate of the true electron energy distribution. The simulated TOF distribution was convolved with a Gaussian timing resolution function and compared to the experimental distribution. The broadening observed in the simulated TOF spectra was found to be consistent with that observed in the experimental secondary electron spectra of Cu generated as a result of positrons incident with energy 1.5 eV to 901 eV, when a timing resolution of 2.3 ns was assumed. (paper)

  10. Initial daytime and nighttime SOFDI observations of thermospheric winds from Fabry-Perot Doppler shift measurements of the 630-nm OI line-shape profile

    A. J. Gerrard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present both night and day thermospheric wind observations made with the Second-generation, Optimized, Fabry-Perot Doppler Imager (SOFDI, a novel triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI designed to make 24-h measurements of thermospheric winds from OI 630-nm emission. These results were obtained from the northeastern United States and from under the magnetic equator at Huancayo, Peru and demonstrate the current instrument capability for measurements of Doppler shifts for either night or day. We found the uncertainties in the measurements agree with expected values based upon forward modeling calculations; nighttime wind components having an uncertainty of ~20-m s−1 at 30-min resolution and daytime wind components having an uncertainty of ~70-m s−1 at 20-min resolution. The nighttime uncertainties are typically larger than those seen with traditional single-etalon FPIs, which occur at the cost of being able to achieve daytime measurements. The thermospheric wind measurements from Huancayo replicate recently reported CHAMP zonal winds and are in disagreement with current empirical wind climatologies. In addition, we discuss the incorporation of how multiple point heads in the SOFDI instrument will allow for unique studies of gravity wave activity in future measurements.

  11. Assessing the Accuracy and Reliability of Root Crack and Fracture Detection in Teeth Using Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transform (SWIFT) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Schuurmans, Tyler J.

    -delineated, high-signal (bright/white) line shape(s) that must be visible on multiple contiguous image slices. The line shape(s) must present as: single entities, or parallel pairs in close proximity, or pairs in close proximity exhibiting convergence or divergence extending from the external boundary of the tooth to the pulpal cavity. Intra-rater reliability for MRI was fair-to-almost perfect (kappa = 0.38-1.00) and for CBCT was moderate-to-almost perfect (kappa = 0.66-1.00). Inter-rater reliability for MRI was fair (kappa = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.10-0.31; p advantages of increased contrast and absence of artifact from radio-dense materials in MRI, comparable measures of sensitivity and specificity (in relation to CBCT) suggest quality MRI improvements are needed, specifically in image acquisition and post-processing parameters. Given the early stage of technology development and multiple available pathways to optimize MR imaging of teeth, there may be a use for SWIFT MRI in detecting cracks and fractures in teeth.

  12. Seismic detection of tornadoes

    Tatom, F. B.

    1993-01-01

    Tornadoes represent the most violent of all forms of atmospheric storms, each year resulting in hundreds of millions of dollars in property damage and approximately one hundred fatalities. In recent years, considerable success has been achieved in detecting tornadic storms by means of Doppler radar. However, radar systems cannot determine when a tornado is actually in contact with the ground, expect possibly at extremely close range. At the present time, human observation is the only truly reliable way of knowing that a tornado is actually on the ground. However, considerable evidence exists indicating that a tornado in contact with the ground produces a significant seismic signal. If such signals are generated, the seismic detection and warning of an imminent tornado can become a distinct possibility. 

  13. Fissile materials detection

    Dumesnil, P.

    1977-03-01

    Description is given of three types of apparatus intended for controlling fossile materials in view of avoiding their diversion or preventing said products to be mixed to less dangerous radioactive wastes. The gantry-type apparatus is intended for the detection of small masses of fissile materials moving through a crossing place; the neutron gantry consists of helium 3 detectors of the type 150NH100, located inside polyethylene blocks; as for the gamma gantry, it consists of two large plastic scintillators integrated to the vertical legs of said gantry. The second apparatus is a high-efficiency detector intended for controlling Pu inside waste casks. It can detect 10mg of Pu inside a 100 liters drum for one minute counting. The third apparatus intended for persons and things monitoring is still on study. Such as the gantries it is based on sampled measurement of the background noise [fr

  14. Street light detection

    2017-01-01

    Disclosed is a method, a vehicle and a system for measuring light from one or more outdoor lamps on a road, the system comprising a number of light sensors configured to be arranged in a fixed position relative to a vehicle, where at least a first part of the light sensors is configured...... for measuring light from the one or more outdoor lamps, wherein at least a second part of the light sensors comprises at least two light sensors configured for detecting the angle which the light from the one or more outdoor lamps arrives at in the second part of the light sensors; a processing unit configured...... for calculating the position relative to the vehicle of the one or more outdoor lamps based on the detected angle which the light arrives in, and wherein the processing unit is configured for calculating the light on the road based on the light measured in the fixed position relative to the vehicle and based...

  15. The IASI detection chain

    Nicol, Patrick; Fleury, Joel; Le Naour, Claire; Bernard, Frédéric

    2017-11-01

    IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) is an infrared atmospheric sounder. It will provide meteorologist and scientific community with atmospheric spectra. The instrument is composed of a Fourier transform spectrometer and an associated infrared imager. The presentation will describe the spectrometer detection chain architecture, composed by three different detectors cooled in a passive cryo-cooler (so called CBS : Cold Box Subsystem) and associated analog electronics up to digital conversion. It will mainly focus on design choices with regards to environment constraints, implemented technologies, and associated performances. CNES is leading the IASI program in collaboration with EUMETSAT. The instrument Prime is ALCATEL SPACE responsible, notably, of the detection chain architecture. SAGEM SA provides the detector package (so called CAU : Cold Acquisition Unit).

  16. Bayesian community detection

    Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel N

    2012-01-01

    Many networks of scientific interest naturally decompose into clusters or communities with comparatively fewer external than internal links; however, current Bayesian models of network communities do not exert this intuitive notion of communities. We formulate a nonparametric Bayesian model...... for community detection consistent with an intuitive definition of communities and present a Markov chain Monte Carlo procedure for inferring the community structure. A Matlab toolbox with the proposed inference procedure is available for download. On synthetic and real networks, our model detects communities...... consistent with ground truth, and on real networks, it outperforms existing approaches in predicting missing links. This suggests that community structure is an important structural property of networks that should be explicitly modeled....

  17. Handbook for Language Detectives

    Bryanne, Ulla; Bruntt, Karen Scheel Lassen

    Handbook for Language Detectives gives a thorough presentation of English grammar and discusses how to teach grammar. The book unveils to the readers, who will be working as grammar detectives, the fascinating world of language. It does not only deal with "traditional grammar" but also discusses...... what different grammatical structures mean (semantics) and how they influence the level of style (pragmatics). Grammar should not be taught as a separate discipline; it can and should be integrated in communicative language teaching. The book gives you innovative and valuable ideas of how this can...... be done. The book serves a double purpose: - English grammar and language usage at bachelor level from a functional linguistic point of view. - How to teach English grammar within a communicative approach. The book is mainly intended for Danish student teachers of English, but anyone else interested...

  18. Rate based failure detection

    Johnson, Brett Emery Trabun; Gamage, Thoshitha Thanushka; Bakken, David Edward

    2018-01-02

    This disclosure describes, in part, a system management component and failure detection component for use in a power grid data network to identify anomalies within the network and systematically adjust the quality of service of data published by publishers and subscribed to by subscribers within the network. In one implementation, subscribers may identify a desired data rate, a minimum acceptable data rate, desired latency, minimum acceptable latency and a priority for each subscription. The failure detection component may identify an anomaly within the network and a source of the anomaly. Based on the identified anomaly, data rates and or data paths may be adjusted in real-time to ensure that the power grid data network does not become overloaded and/or fail.

  19. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (ppneumothorax states (pPneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (pPneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  20. Gas Detection for Experiments

    Hay, D

    2001-01-01

    Flammable gases are often used in detectors for physics experiments. The storage, distribution and manipulation of such flammable gases present several safety hazards. As most flammable gases cannot be detected by human senses, specific well-placed gas detection systems must be installed. Following a request from the user group and in collaboration with CERN safety officers, risk analyses are performed. An external contractor, who needs to receive detailed user requirements from CERN, performs the installations. The contract is passed on a guaranteed results basis. Co-ordination between all the CERN groups and verification of the technical installation is done by ST/AA/AS. This paper describes and focuses on the structured methodology applied to implement such installations based on goal directed project management techniques (GDPM). This useful supervision tool suited to small to medium sized projects facilitates the task of co-ordinating numerous activities to achieve a completely functional system.

  1. Sherlock Holmes: scientific detective.

    Snyder, Laura J

    2004-09-01

    Sherlock Holmes was intended by his creator, Arthur Conan Doyle, to be a 'scientific detective'. Conan Doyle criticized his predecessor Edgar Allan Poe for giving his creation - Inspector Dupin - only the 'illusion' of scientific method. Conan Doyle believed that he had succeeded where Poe had failed; thus, he has Watson remark that Holmes has 'brought detection as near an exact science as it will ever be brought into the world.' By examining Holmes' methods, it becomes clear that Conan Doyle modelled them on certain images of science that were popular in mid- to late-19th century Britain. Contrary to a common view, it is also evident that rather than being responsible for the invention of forensic science, the creation of Holmes was influenced by the early development of it.

  2. Detection of algorithmic trading

    Bogoev, Dimitar; Karam, Arzé

    2017-10-01

    We develop a new approach to reflect the behavior of algorithmic traders. Specifically, we provide an analytical and tractable way to infer patterns of quote volatility and price momentum consistent with different types of strategies employed by algorithmic traders, and we propose two ratios to quantify these patterns. Quote volatility ratio is based on the rate of oscillation of the best ask and best bid quotes over an extremely short period of time; whereas price momentum ratio is based on identifying patterns of rapid upward or downward movement in prices. The two ratios are evaluated across several asset classes. We further run a two-stage Artificial Neural Network experiment on the quote volatility ratio; the first stage is used to detect the quote volatility patterns resulting from algorithmic activity, while the second is used to validate the quality of signal detection provided by our measure.

  3. Cell Phone Detection Techniques

    Pratt, Richard M.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Puzycki, David J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Good, Morris S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2007-10-01

    A team composed of Rick Pratt, Dave Puczyki, Kyle Bunch, Ryan Slaugh, Morris Good, and Doug McMakin teamed together to attempt to exploit cellular telephone features and detect if a person was carrying a cellular telephone into a Limited Area. The cell phone’s electromagnetic properties were measured, analyzed, and tested in over 10 different ways to determine if an exploitable signature exists. The method that appears to have the most potential for success without adding an external tag is to measure the RF spectrum, not in the cell phone band, but between 240 and 400MHz. Figures 1- 7 show the detected signal levels from cell phones from three different manufacturers.

  4. Idaho Explosives Detection System

    Reber, Edward L.; Blackwood, Larry G.; Edwards, Andrew J.; Jewell, J. Keith; Rohde, Kenneth W.; Seabury, Edward H.; Klinger, Jeffery B.

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho Explosives Detection System was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks potentially carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-min measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004

  5. Idaho Explosives Detection System

    Reber, Edward L. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States)]. E-mail: reber@inel.gov; Blackwood, Larry G. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Edwards, Andrew J. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Jewell, J. Keith [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Rohde, Kenneth W. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Seabury, Edward H. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States); Klinger, Jeffery B. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Freemont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2114 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    The Idaho Explosives Detection System was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks potentially carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-min measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004.

  6. Chaos detection and predictability

    Gottwald, Georg; Laskar, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing chaoticity from regularity in deterministic dynamical systems and specifying the subspace of the phase space in which instabilities are expected to occur is of utmost importance in as disparate areas as astronomy, particle physics and climate dynamics.   To address these issues there exists a plethora of methods for chaos detection and predictability. The most commonly employed technique for investigating chaotic dynamics, i.e. the computation of Lyapunov exponents, however, may suffer a number of problems and drawbacks, for example when applied to noisy experimental data.   In the last two decades, several novel methods have been developed for the fast and reliable determination of the regular or chaotic nature of orbits, aimed at overcoming the shortcomings of more traditional techniques. This set of lecture notes and tutorial reviews serves as an introduction to and overview of modern chaos detection and predictability techniques for graduate students and non-specialists.   The book cover...

  7. Solar neutrino detection

    Miramonti, Lino

    2009-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, neutrinos where conceived as a way to test the validity of the solar models which tell us that stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. The first measurement of the neutrino flux, in 1968 in the Homestake mine in South Dakota, detected only one third of the expected value, originating what has been known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Different experiments were built in order to understand the origin of this discrepancy. Now we know that neutrinos undergo oscillation phenomenon changing their nature traveling from the core of the Sun to our detectors. In the work the 40 year long saga of the neutrino detection is presented; from the first proposals to test the solar models to last real time measurements of the low energy part of the neutrino spectrum.

  8. Detection of pump degradation

    Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W.

    1995-08-01

    This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented

  9. Abscess detection with radionuclides

    Alavi, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide studies may aid in the diagnosis and localization of intra-abdominal infections. Despite the introduction of new radiographic and ultrasound methods, there are several clinical situations in which radionuclide scans have proved useful. Those include detection of postoperative intra-abdominal abscess, evaluation of liver abscess, differentiation between pancreatic pseudocyst or abscess, evaluation of fever of unknown origin, and evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease. Each clinical situation is discussed separately here

  10. Shunt detection and measurement

    Grossman, W.

    1986-01-01

    Detection, localization, and quantification of intracardiac shunts are an integral part of the hemodynamic evaluation of patients with congenital heart disease. In most cases, an intracardiac shunt is suspected on the basis of the clinical evaluation of the patient prior to catheterization. However, there are several circumstances in which data obtained at catheterization should alert the cardiologist to look for a shunt that previously had not been suspected

  11. Radar detection of Vesta

    Ostro, S.J.; Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.); Campbell, D.B.; Pettengill, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta was detected on November 6, 1979 with the Arecibo Observatory's S-band (12.6-cm-wavelength) radar. The echo power spectrum, received in the circular polarization opposite to that transmitted, yields a radar cross section of (0.2 + or - 0.1)pi a-squared, for a 272 km. The data are too noisy to permit derivation of Vesta's rotation period

  12. Aspects of leak detection

    Chivers, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    A requirement of a Leak before Break safety case is that the leakage from the through wall crack be detected prior to any growth leading to unacceptable failure. This paper sets out to review some recent developments in this field. It does not set out to be a comprehensive guide to all of the methods available. The discussion concentrates on acoustic emission and how the techniques can be qualified and deployed on operational plant

  13. Deception Detection in Videos

    Wu, Zhe; Singh, Bharat; Davis, Larry S.; Subrahmanian, V. S.

    2017-01-01

    We present a system for covert automated deception detection in real-life courtroom trial videos. We study the importance of different modalities like vision, audio and text for this task. On the vision side, our system uses classifiers trained on low level video features which predict human micro-expressions. We show that predictions of high-level micro-expressions can be used as features for deception prediction. Surprisingly, IDT (Improved Dense Trajectory) features which have been widely ...

  14. Aspects of leak detection

    Chivers, T.C. [Berkeley Technology Centre, Glos (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    A requirement of a Leak before Break safety case is that the leakage from the through wall crack be detected prior to any growth leading to unacceptable failure. This paper sets out to review some recent developments in this field. It does not set out to be a comprehensive guide to all of the methods available. The discussion concentrates on acoustic emission and how the techniques can be qualified and deployed on operational plant.

  15. Detection of pump degradation

    Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W. [and others

    1995-08-01

    This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented.

  16. Biomolecular detection device

    Huo, Qisheng [Albuquerque, NM; Liu, Jun [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-10-21

    A device for detecting and measuring the concentration of biomolecules in solution, utilizing a conducting electrode in contact with a solution containing target biomolecules, with a film with controllable pore size distribution characteristics applied to at least one surface of the conducting electrode. The film is functionalized with probe molecules that chemically interact with the target biomolecules at the film surface, blocking indicator molecules present in solution from diffusing from the solution to the electrode, thereby changing the electrochemical response of the electrode.

  17. Security From Detection (Vehicles)

    2011-02-24

    Tester ( TVT ) or other TOP 02-2-615A 24 February 2011 5 similar device. Color vision can be assessed using the seven Ishihara Pseudo...Isochromatic plates usually contained in the TVT . b. Personnel chosen as observers for aural detectability tests must also have hearing ability...Test Test Measurement Diagnostic Equipment TOP Test Operations Procedure TVT Titmus® Vision Tester USMC United States Marine Corps

  18. Online deforestation detection

    Diaz, Emiliano

    2017-01-01

    Deforestation detection using satellite images can make an important contribution to forest management. Current approaches can be broadly divided into those that compare two images taken at similar periods of the year and those that monitor changes by using multiple images taken during the growing season. The CMFDA algorithm described in Zhu et al. (2012) is an algorithm that builds on the latter category by implementing a year-long, continuous, time-series based approach to monitoring images...

  19. Asynchrony Detection in Amblyopes

    Pi-Chun Huang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Amblyopia is a developmental abnormality of visual cortex. Although amblyopes experience perceptual deficits in spatial vision tasks, they have less temporal sensitivity loss. We investigated whether their temporal synchrony sensitivity is impaired. In experiment 1, four Gaussian blobs, located at the top, bottom, left, and right of a presentation screen, were flickering in 3 Hz and one of them was flickering in out-of-phase fashion in time. Participants needed to tell which blob was different from the other three and contrast threshold of the blobs was measured to determine the synchrony detection threshold. We found the thresholds were not correlated with the contrast thresholds for detecting the flickering blobs, suggesting synchrony detection and temporal detection threshold are processed by different mechanisms. In experiment 2, synchrony thresholds were measured as participants' ability to tell if one of the four high contrast Gaussian blobs was flickering asynchronously in time. Three temporal frequencies (1, 2, and 3 Hz and two element separations (1.25 and 5 deg were compared. We found that the amblyopic group exhibited a deficit only for the 1.25 deg element separation in amblyopic eye but was normal for the other configurations compared to controlled participants. It suggests amblyopes have deficits in temporal processing but only for foveal vision. We also found the sensitivity for the non-strabismic anismetropia group is reduced for all three temporal frequencies whereas for the strabismic anisometropia group it was reduced at 3Hz only, suggesting the impairment in temporal synchrony might be different for different types of amblyopia.

  20. CDC Disease Detective Camp

    2010-08-02

    The CDC Disease Detective Camp gives rising high school juniors and seniors exposure to key aspects of the CDC, including basic epidemiology, infectious and chronic disease tracking, public health law, and outbreak investigations. The camp also helps students explore careers in public health.  Created: 8/2/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/2/2010.

  1. Remote detection system

    Nixon, K.V.; France, S.W.; Garcia, C.; Hastings, R.D.

    1981-05-01

    A newly designed remote detection system has been developed at Los Alamos that allows the collection of high-resolution gamma-ray spectra and neutron data from a remote location. The system consists of the remote unit and a command unit. The remote unit collects data in a potentially hostile environment while the operator controls the unit by either radio or wire link from a safe position. Both units are battery powered and are housed in metal carrying cases

  2. Dark matter detection - II

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the mysterious missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of today's particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world-wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  3. Nonlinear Multiantenna Detection Methods

    Chen Sheng

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear detection technique designed for multiple-antenna assisted receivers employed in space-division multiple-access systems is investigated. We derive the optimal solution of the nonlinear spatial-processing assisted receiver for binary phase shift keying signalling, which we refer to as the Bayesian detector. It is shown that this optimal Bayesian receiver significantly outperforms the standard linear beamforming assisted receiver in terms of a reduced bit error rate, at the expense of an increased complexity, while the achievable system capacity is substantially enhanced with the advent of employing nonlinear detection. Specifically, when the spatial separation expressed in terms of the angle of arrival between the desired and interfering signals is below a certain threshold, a linear beamformer would fail to separate them, while a nonlinear detection assisted receiver is still capable of performing adequately. The adaptive implementation of the optimal Bayesian detector can be realized using a radial basis function network. Two techniques are presented for constructing block-data-based adaptive nonlinear multiple-antenna assisted receivers. One of them is based on the relevance vector machine invoked for classification, while the other on the orthogonal forward selection procedure combined with the Fisher ratio class-separability measure. A recursive sample-by-sample adaptation procedure is also proposed for training nonlinear detectors based on an amalgam of enhanced -means clustering techniques and the recursive least squares algorithm.

  4. Protein detection using biobarcodes.

    Müller, Uwe R

    2006-10-01

    Over the past 50 years the development of assays for the detection of protein analytes has been driven by continuing demands for higher levels of sensitivity and multiplexing. The result has been a progression of sandwich-type immunoassays, starting with simple radioisotopic, colorimetric, or fluorescent labeling systems to include various enzymatic or nanostructure-based signal amplification schemes, with a concomitant sensitivity increase of over 1 million fold. Multiplexing of samples and tests has been enabled by microplate and microarray platforms, respectively, or lately by various molecular barcoding systems. Two different platforms have emerged as the current front-runners by combining a nucleic acid amplification step with the standard two-sided immunoassay. In both, the captured protein analyte is replaced by a multiplicity of oligonucleotides that serve as surrogate targets. One of these platforms employs DNA or RNA polymerases for the amplification step, while detection is by fluorescence. The other is based on gold nanoparticles for both amplification as well as detection. The latter technology, now termed Biobarcode, is completely enzyme-free and offers potentially much higher multiplexing power.

  5. Dark matter detection - I

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the mysterious missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of today's particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world-wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  6. Dark matter detection - III

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of todays particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the Universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the Universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world- wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  7. SUERC AMS ion detection

    Maden, C.; Anastasi, P.A.F.; Dougans, A.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.; Kitchen, R.; Klody, G.; Schnabel, C.; Sundquist, M.; Vanner, K.; Xu, S.

    2007-01-01

    In a short time Be, C, Al, Cl, Ca and I accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) have been established on the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC) 5 MV pelletron system at the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC). While summarising the present performance of the system, this report will focus on the details of ion detection, which sample materials are used and the analytical procedures employed for each individual species during routine analysis. All rare isotope detection is with a single flexible detector and ion event analysis system, but switching of analysed species typically requires a detector reconfiguration. Configurations for routine 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl, 41 Ca and 129 I detection have been established and will be presented here. Notably, there has proven to be sufficient suppression of the isobaric interferences of 36 Cl and 41 Ca in the 5+ charge state using an argon gas stripper at a terminal voltage of 5.0 MV to allow for routine analysis of these isotopes

  8. Gas Flow Detection System

    Moss, Thomas; Ihlefeld, Curtis; Slack, Barry

    2010-01-01

    This system provides a portable means to detect gas flow through a thin-walled tube without breaking into the tubing system. The flow detection system was specifically designed to detect flow through two parallel branches of a manifold with only one inlet and outlet, and is a means for verifying a space shuttle program requirement that saves time and reduces the risk of flight hardware damage compared to the current means of requirement verification. The prototype Purge Vent and Drain Window Cavity Conditioning System (PVD WCCS) Flow Detection System consists of a heater and a temperature-sensing thermistor attached to a piece of Velcro to be attached to each branch of a WCCS manifold for the duration of the requirement verification test. The heaters and thermistors are connected to a shielded cable and then to an electronics enclosure, which contains the power supplies, relays, and circuit board to provide power, signal conditioning, and control. The electronics enclosure is then connected to a commercial data acquisition box to provide analog to digital conversion as well as digital control. This data acquisition box is then connected to a commercial laptop running a custom application created using National Instruments LabVIEW. The operation of the PVD WCCS Flow Detection System consists of first attaching a heater/thermistor assembly to each of the two branches of one manifold while there is no flow through the manifold. Next, the software application running on the laptop is used to turn on the heaters and to monitor the manifold branch temperatures. When the system has reached thermal equilibrium, the software application s graphical user interface (GUI) will indicate that the branch temperatures are stable. The operator can then physically open the flow control valve to initiate the test flow of gaseous nitrogen (GN2) through the manifold. Next, the software user interface will be monitored for stable temperature indications when the system is again at

  9. Detection of the neutrino

    Reines, F.

    1989-01-01

    Using the nuclear bomb developed at Los Alamos as an intense source of neutrinos, the author aimed to build a detector suitable to observe this newly predicted particle for the first time during his work there in the early 1950s. He chose to work on the reaction of beta decay inversion. The discovery of organic liquid scintillation counters brought the possibility of neutrino detection one place closer. Delayed coincidence between positron and neutron capture pulses were planned as a way to eliminate background signals. Experiments finally went ahead using nuclear reactors rather than bombs and was successful although many problems with shielding, and the sheer scale of the apparatus were encountered. (UK)

  10. SIP threats detection system

    Vozňák, Miroslav; Řezáč, Filip

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with detection of threats in IP telephony, the authors developed a penetration testing system that is able to check up the level of protection from security threats in IP telephony. The SIP server is a key komponent of VoIP infrastructure and often becomes the aim of attacks and providers have to ensure the appropriate level of security. We have developed web-based penetration system which is able to check the SIP server if can face to the most common attacks.The d...

  11. High Speed Edge Detection

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  12. Traffic Light Detection

    Philipsen, Mark Philip; Jensen, Morten Bornø; Møgelmose, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Traffic light recognition (TLR) is an integral part of any intelligent vehicle, which must function in the existing infrastructure. Pedestrian and sign detection have recently seen great improvements due to the introduction of learning based detectors using integral channel features. A similar push...... database is collected based on footage from US roads. The database consists of both test and training data, totaling 46,418 frames and 112,971 annotated traffic lights, captured in continuous sequences under a varying light and weather conditions. The learning based detector achieves an AUC of 0.4 and 0...

  13. Detecting flaws in welds

    Woodacre, A.; Lawton, H.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus and a method for detecting flaws in welds in a workpiece, the portion of the workpiece containing the weld is maintained at a constant temperature and the weld is scanned by an infra red detector. The weld is then scanned again with the workpiece in contact with a cooling probe to produce a steeper temperature gradient across the weld. Comparison of the signals produced by each scan reveals the existence of defects in the welds. The signals may be displayed on an oscilloscope and the display may be observed by a TV camera and recorded on videotape. (UK)

  14. Opaque cloud detection

    Roskovensky, John K [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-01-20

    A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

  15. Counterbalanced radiation detection system

    Platz, W.

    1987-01-01

    A counterbalanced radiation detection system is described comprising: (a) a stand; (b) a first radiation detector; (c) a first radiation detector arm means for tiltably connecting the first radiation detector with the stand; (d) a second radiation detector; (e) a second radiation detector arm means for tiltably connecting the second radiation detector with the stand, whereby the tilting angles of the radiation detector arm means define a distance between the radiation detectors; and (f) a torque transforming means connected between the first and second radiation detector arm means for transforming the torque created by one of the radiation detectors in a sense opposed to the torque created by the other radiation detector

  16. Detecting C Program Vulnerabilities

    Anton, Ermakov; Natalia, Kushik

    2011-01-01

    C/C++ language is widely used for developing tools in various applications, in particular, software tools for critical systems are often written in C language. Therefore, the security of such software should be thoroughly tested, i.e., the absence of vulnerabilities has to be confirmed. When detecting C program vulnerabilities static source code analysis can be used. In this paper, we present a short survey of existing software tools for such analysis and show that for some kinds of C code vu...

  17. Novelty detection in dermatological images

    Maletti, Gabriela Mariel

    2003-01-01

    The problem of novelty detection is considered for at set of dermatological image data. Different points of view are analyzed in detail. First, novelty detection is treated as a contextual classification problem. Different learning phases can be detected when the sample size is increased. The det......The problem of novelty detection is considered for at set of dermatological image data. Different points of view are analyzed in detail. First, novelty detection is treated as a contextual classification problem. Different learning phases can be detected when the sample size is increased...

  18. Revolution in nuclear detection affairs

    Stern, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms

  19. Failed fuel detection device

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Hayashida, Yoshihisa; Niidome, Jiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent intrusion of background neutrons to neutron detectors thereby improve the S/N ratio of the detectors in the failed fuel detection device of LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: Neutrons from the reactor core pass through the gaps around the penetration holes in which the primary pipeways pass through the concrete shielding walls and pass through the gaps between the thermal shielding members and the neutron moderating shielding members of the failed fuel detection device and then intrude into the neutron detectors. In view of the above, inner neutron moderating shielding members and movable or resilient neutron shielding members are disposed to the inside of the neutron moderating shielding member. Graphite or carbon hydrides such as paraffin or synthetic resin with a large neutron moderation effect are used as the outer moderating shielding member and materials such as boron or carbon are used for the inner members. As a result, the background neutrons are shielded by the inner neutron moderating shielding members and the resilient neutron shielding members, by which the S/N ratio of the neutron detectors can be increased to 2 - 4 times. (Moriyama, K.)

  20. Detection of interstellar methylcyanoacetylene

    Broten, N.W.; MacLeod, J.M.; Avery, L.W.; Irvine, W.M.; Hoeglund, B.; Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson

    1984-01-01

    A new interstellar molecule, methylcyanoacetylene (CH 3 C 3 N), has been detected in the molecular cloud TMC-1. The J = 8 → 7, J = 7 → 6, J = 6 → 5, and J = 5 → 4 transitions have been observed. For the first three of these, both the K = 0 and K = 1 components are present, while for J = 5 → 4, only the K = 0 line has been detected. The observed frequencies were calculated by assuming a value of radial velocity V/sub lSR/ = 5.8 km s -1 for TMC-1, typical of other molecules in the cloud. All Observed frequencies are within 10 kHz of the calculated frequencies, which are based on the 1982 laboratory constants of Moises et al., so the identification is secure. The lines are broadened by hyperfine splitting, and the J = 5 → 4, K = 0 transition shows incipient resolution into three hyperfine components. The rotational temperature determined from these observations is quite low, with 2.7 K 12 cm -2

  1. What value, detection limits

    Currie, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    Specific approaches and applications of LLD's to nuclear and ''nuclear-related'' measurements are presented in connection with work undertaken for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency. In this work, special attention was given to assumptions and potential error sources, as well as to different types of analysis. For the former, the authors considered random and systematic error associated with the blank and the calibration and sample preparation processes, as well as issues relating to the nature of the random error distributions. Analysis types considered included continuous monitoring, ''simple counting'' involving scalar quantities, and spectrum fitting involving data vectors. The investigation of data matrices and multivariate analysis is also described. The most important conclusions derived from this study are: that there is a significant lack of communication and compatibility resulting from diverse terminology and conceptual bases - including no-basis ''ad hoc'' definitions; that the distinction between detection decisions and detection limits is frequently lost sight of; and that quite erroneous LOD estimates follow from inadequate consideration of the actual variability of the blank, and systematic error associated with the blank, the calibration-recovery factor, matrix effects, and ''black box'' data reduction models

  2. Detecting underabundant neutralinos

    Badziak, Marcin; Olechowski, Marek; Pokorski, Stefan; Sakurai, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    The electroweak sector may play a crucial role in discovering supersymmetry. We systematically investigate the patterns of the MSSM-like electroweakinos, when the neutralino relic abundance $\\Omega_\\chi h^2\\leq 0.12$, that is, also admitting for multi-component Dark Matter, in a broad range of the parameter space. We find that for a very large range of parameters the Direct Detection experiments are/will be sensitive to underabundant neutralinos, in spite of the strong rescaling of the flux factor. The second general conclusion is that the bound $\\Omega_\\chi h^2\\leq 0.12$ together with the LUX (XENON1T) limits for the neutralino spin independent scattering cross sections constrain the electroweakino spectrum so that the mass differences between the NLSP and the LSP are smaller than 40 (10) GeV, respectively, with important implications for the collider searches. The future Direct Detection experiments and the high luminosity LHC run will probe almost the entire range of the LSP and NLSP mass spectrum that is ...

  3. Ferret Workflow Anomaly Detection System

    Smith, Timothy J; Bryant, Stephany

    2005-01-01

    The Ferret workflow anomaly detection system project 2003-2004 has provided validation and anomaly detection in accredited workflows in secure knowledge management systems through the use of continuous, automated audits...

  4. Detecting deviating behaviors without models

    Lu, X.; Fahland, D.; van den Biggelaar, F.J.H.M.; van der Aalst, W.M.P.; Reichert, M.; Reijers, H.A.

    2016-01-01

    Deviation detection is a set of techniques that identify deviations from normative processes in real process executions. These diagnostics are used to derive recommendations for improving business processes. Existing detection techniques identify deviations either only on the process instance level

  5. Multi-lane detection based on multiple vanishing points detection

    Li, Chuanxiang; Nie, Yiming; Dai, Bin; Wu, Tao

    2015-03-01

    Lane detection plays a significant role in Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) for intelligent vehicles. In this paper we present a multi-lane detection method based on multiple vanishing points detection. A new multi-lane model assumes that a single lane, which has two approximately parallel boundaries, may not parallel to others on road plane. Non-parallel lanes associate with different vanishing points. A biological plausibility model is used to detect multiple vanishing points and fit lane model. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect both parallel lanes and non-parallel lanes.

  6. Nucleic acid detection system and method for detecting influenza

    Cai, Hong; Song, Jian

    2015-03-17

    The invention provides a rapid, sensitive and specific nucleic acid detection system which utilizes isothermal nucleic acid amplification in combination with a lateral flow chromatographic device, or DNA dipstick, for DNA-hybridization detection. The system of the invention requires no complex instrumentation or electronic hardware, and provides a low cost nucleic acid detection system suitable for highly sensitive pathogen detection. Hybridization to single-stranded DNA amplification products using the system of the invention provides a sensitive and specific means by which assays can be multiplexed for the detection of multiple target sequences.

  7. HARDWARE TROJAN IDENTIFICATION AND DETECTION

    Samer Moein; Fayez Gebali; T. Aaron Gulliver; Abdulrahman Alkandari

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The majority of techniques developed to detect hardware trojans are based on specific attributes. Further, the ad hoc approaches employed to design methods for trojan detection are largely ineffective. Hardware trojans have a number of attributes which can be used to systematically develop detection techniques. Based on this concept, a detailed examination of current trojan detection techniques and the characteristics of existing hardware trojans is presented. This is used to dev...

  8. Microcontroller based driver alertness detection systems to detect drowsiness

    Adenin, Hasibah; Zahari, Rahimi; Lim, Tiong Hoo

    2018-04-01

    The advancement of embedded system for detecting and preventing drowsiness in a vehicle is a major challenge for road traffic accident systems. To prevent drowsiness while driving, it is necessary to have an alert system that can detect a decline in driver concentration and send a signal to the driver. Studies have shown that traffc accidents usually occur when the driver is distracted while driving. In this paper, we have reviewed a number of detection systems to monitor the concentration of a car driver and propose a portable Driver Alertness Detection System (DADS) to determine the level of concentration of the driver based on pixelated coloration detection technique using facial recognition. A portable camera will be placed at the front visor to capture facial expression and the eye activities. We evaluate DADS using 26 participants and have achieved 100% detection rate with good lighting condition and a low detection rate at night.

  9. Radioimmunological detection of parathormone

    Klueber, S.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of the principle of competitive displacement of standard or proband hormone from the antibody by 125 I-labelled hormone, the structure of a radioimmunological PTH assay for humans is presented. In agreement with the pathophysiological knowledge gained during the last few years, i.e. that the C-terminal residual fragment-produced partly in the gland and partly by peripheral splitting of the total molecule secreted - circulates longer than the 1-34 N fragment containing the biologically active region, the C assay showed clearly increased hormone levels (more than 1 ng eq/ml) in the peripheral venous blood of HPT patients while the N assay showed a strong overlap of normal and HPT sera. The detection limit of 100pg eq/ml for both systems did not permit a discrimination between normal and reduced serum levels. (orig.) [de

  10. Early detection of psychosis

    Larsen, Tor Ketil; Melle, Ingrid; Auestad, B.

    2011-01-01

    Background During the last decades we have seen a new focus on early treatment of psychosis. Several reviews have shown that duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is correlated to better outcome. However, it is still unknown whether early treatment will lead to a better long-term outcome....... This study reports the effects of reducing DUP on 5-year course and outcome. Method During 1997–2000 a total of 281 consecutive patients aged >17 years with first episode non-affective psychosis were recruited, of which 192 participated in the 5-year follow-up. A comprehensive early detection (ED) programme...... and cognitive factors and for global assessment of functioning for social functioning at 5-year follow-up. The ED group also had more contacts with friends. Regression analysis did not find that these differences could be explained by confounders. Conclusions Early treatment had positive effects on clinical...

  11. Arc fault detection system

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  12. Failed fuel detection method

    Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumu.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To detect failed fuel element in a reactor with high precision by measuring the radioactivity concentrations for more than one nuclides of fission products ( 131 I and 132 I, for example) contained in each sample of coolant in fuel channel. Method: The radioactivity concentrations in the sampled coolant are obtained from gamma spectra measured by a pulse height analyser after suitable cooling periods according to the half-lives of the fission products to be measured. The first measurement for 132 I is made in two hours after sampling, and the second for 131 I is started one day after the sampling. Fuel element corresponding to the high radioactivity concentrations for both 131 I and 132 I is expected with certainty to have failed

  13. Detection of diamonds

    Hansen, J.O.; Blondeel, E.J.G.; Taylor, G.T.

    1991-01-01

    Diamond particles are distinguished from non-diamond, associated particles on the basis of their higher refractive index. The particles are brought to a specific location, typically in a stream of water flowing full in a vertical duct, and a beam of collimated electromagnetic radiation is directed at them. An array of radiation detectors is provided to detect refracted and/or reflected radiation. The array is so configured that the responses of the detectors, considered collectively, will be indicative of the presence of a diamond when a diamond is in fact present. However, when a particle having a substantially lower refractive index is present, the responses of the detectors will not be so indicative. The diamond and non-diamond particles can subsequently be sorted from one another

  14. Biological Threats Detection Technologies

    Bartoszcze, M.

    2007-01-01

    Among many decisive factors, which can have the influence on the possibility of decreases the results of use biological agents should be mentioned obligatory: rapid detection and identification of biological factor used, the proper preventive treatment and the medical management. The aims of identification: to identify the factor used, to estimate the area of contamination, to evaluate the possible countermeasure efforts (antibiotics, disinfectants) and to assess the effectiveness of the decontamination efforts (decontamination of the persons, equipment, buildings, environment etc.). The objects of identification are: bacteria and bacteria's spores, viruses, toxins and genetically modified factors. The present technologies are divided into: based on PCR techniques (ABI PRISM, APSIS, BIOVERIS, RAPID), immuno (BADD, RAMP, SMART) PCR and immuno techniques (APDS, LUMINEX) and others (BDS2, LUNASCAN, MALDI). The selected technologies assigned to field conditions, mobile and stationary laboratories will be presented.(author)

  15. Radiation detection system

    Haeuszer, F.A.

    1976-01-01

    A circuit is disclosed that detects radiation transients and provides a clamping signal in response to each transient. The clamping signal is present from the time the transient rises above a given threshold level and for a known duration thereafter. The system includes radiation sensors, a blocking oscillator that generates a pulse in response to each sensor signal, and an output pulse duration control circuit. The oscillator pulses are fed simultaneously to the output pulse duration control circuit and to an OR gate, the output of which comprises the system output. The output pulse duration is controlled by the time required to magnetize a magnetic core to saturation in first one direction and then the other

  16. Online Community Transition Detection

    Tan, Biying; Zhu, Feida; Qu, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    communities over time. How to automatically detect the online community transitions of individual users is a research problem of immense practical value yet with great technical challenges. In this paper, we propose an algorithm based on the Minimum Description Length (MDL) principle to trace the evolution......Mining user behavior patterns in social networks is of great importance in user behavior analysis, targeted marketing, churn prediction and other applications. However, less effort has been made to study the evolution of user behavior in social communities. In particular, users join and leave...... of community transition of individual users, adaptive to the noisy behavior. Experiments on real data sets demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of our proposed method....

  17. Malware detection and analysis

    Chiang, Ken; Lloyd, Levi; Crussell, Jonathan; Sanders, Benjamin; Erickson, Jeremy Lee; Fritz, David Jakob

    2016-03-22

    Embodiments of the invention describe systems and methods for malicious software detection and analysis. A binary executable comprising obfuscated malware on a host device may be received, and incident data indicating a time when the binary executable was received and identifying processes operating on the host device may be recorded. The binary executable is analyzed via a scalable plurality of execution environments, including one or more non-virtual execution environments and one or more virtual execution environments, to generate runtime data and deobfuscation data attributable to the binary executable. At least some of the runtime data and deobfuscation data attributable to the binary executable is stored in a shared database, while at least some of the incident data is stored in a private, non-shared database.

  18. Counterbalanced radiation detection device

    Platz, W.

    1986-01-01

    A counterbalanced radiation detection device is described which consists of: (a) a base; (b) a radiation detector having a known weight; (c) means connected with the radiation detector and the base for positioning the radiation detector in different heights with respect to the base; (d) electronic component means movably mounted on the base for counterbalancing the weight of the radiation detector; (e) means connected with the electronic component means and the radiation detector positioning means for positioning the electronic component means in different heights with respect to the base opposite to the heights of the radiation detector; (f) means connected with the radiation detector and the base for shifting the radiation detector horizontally with respect to the base; and (g) means connected with the electronic component means and the radiation detector shifting means for shifting the electronic component means horizontally with respect to the base in opposite direction to shifting of the radiation detector

  19. Arc fault detection system

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  20. Automated asteroseismic peak detections

    de Montellano, Andres Garcia Saravia Ortiz; Hekker, S.; Themessl, N.

    2018-01-01

    Space observatories such as Kepler have provided data that can potentially revolutionize our understanding of stars. Through detailed asteroseismic analyses we are capable of determining fundamental stellar parameters and reveal the stellar internal structure with unprecedented accuracy. However......, such detailed analyses, known as peak bagging, have so far been obtained for only a small percentage of the observed stars while most of the scientific potential of the available data remains unexplored. One of the major challenges in peak bagging is identifying how many solar-like oscillation modes are visible...... of detected oscillation modes. The algorithm presented here opens the possibility for detailed and automated peak bagging of the thousands of solar-like oscillators observed by Kepler....

  1. Strategies of Life Detection

    Botta, Oliver; Gomez-Elvira, Javier; Javaux, Emmanuelle; Selsis, Franck; Summons, Roger

    2008-01-01

    The search for life outside the Earth has been one of mankind's most challenging quests. We have reached a level of technology that allows for initial steps toward thorough scientific investigation. The aim of this workshop was to take an interdisciplinary look at the signatures that would be indicative of past or present life on another planet and compare them to biosignatures on Earth. The purpose of the workshop was also to discuss state-of-the-art in-situ instruments that are envisioned to search for these signatures in the exploration of the solar system, as well as the discussion of concepts descriptive of the search for habitable planets around other stars. This book is intended to provide a reference to scientists and instrument developers working in the field of in-situ and remote life detection. It can also be used as an interdisciplinary introduction for students and post-doctoral researchers entering this new and exciting field.

  2. Detection of gas leakage

    Thornberg, Steven M; Brown, Jason

    2015-02-17

    A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as a device, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), provides a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement. The PPM is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr) using a venturi pump, perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

  3. Detection of diffusible substances

    Warembourg, M [Lille-1 Univ., 59 - Villeneuve-d' Ascq (France)

    1976-12-01

    The different steps of a radioautographic technique for the detection of diffusible substances are described. Using this radioautographic method, the topographic distribution of estradiol-concentrating neurons was studied in the nervous system and pituitary of the ovariectomized mouse and guinea-pig. A relatively good morphological preservation of structures can be ascertained on sections from unfixed, unembedded tissues prepared at low temperatures and kept-under relatively low humidity. The translocation or extraction of diffusible substances is avoided by directly mounting of frozen sections on dried photographic emulsion. Since no solvent is used, this technique excludes the major sources of diffusion artifacts and permits to be in favourable conditions for the localization of diffusible substances.

  4. Detection of gas leakage

    Thornberg, Steven [Peralta, NM; Brown, Jason [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-06-19

    A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as an apparatus, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), that is a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement, where the invention is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr), perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

  5. Detection of anomalous events

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Laska, Jason A.; Bridges, Robert A.

    2016-06-07

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low-probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The anomaly detector provides for comparability of disparate sources of data (e.g., network flow data and firewall logs.) Additionally, the anomaly detector allows for regulatability, meaning that the algorithm can be user configurable to adjust a number of false alerts. The anomaly detector can be used for a variety of probability density functions, including normal Gaussian distributions, irregular distributions, as well as functions associated with continuous or discrete variables.

  6. Digital quadrature phase detection

    Smith, J.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1992-05-26

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency or phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention. 6 figs.

  7. Detection of elliptical contours

    Blokland, J.A.K.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation describes the quantitation of myocardial perfusion defects in planar thallium-201 scintigrams. To be able to quantify the distribution of 201 Tl in the myocardium as imaged by the scintigram, accurate delineation of the target object is a prerequisite. The distribution of the radionuclide within the contour of the left ventricle can be described by application of circumferential profiles. By comparing the computed circumferential profile with those of normal subjects, humans with no evidence of coronary artery disease, segments of the left ventricle with decreased bloodflow can be detected. In practice there is no real standard to compare with, and due to noise and biological variations, it is not always possible to make a definite decision regarding the presence of a defect in the distribution of the radionuclide. The value and limitations of the developed quantification procedure are discussed. Some future developments are suggested. 108 refs.; 57 figs.; 5 tabs

  8. Suicide bomber detection

    Alexander, Naomi; Callejero, Carlos; Fiore, Franco; Gómez, Ignacio; Gonzalo, Ramón; Enríquez de Luna, Álvaro; Ederra, Iñigo; Palacios, Inés

    2009-05-01

    The chance of suicide bomber attacks against troops in the Theatre of Operations is currently quite high. Most of the time checkpoints and compound gates are not equipped with the appropriate equipment to screen for potential suicide bombers. The ultimate solution would be to be able to perform stand-off screening under various weather conditions whilst avoiding contact between Force Protection personnel and potential suicide bombers. Radiation in the millimeterwave and the lower Terahertz range, having the useful property of being able to penetrate clothing in addition to fog and rain, makes it a clear candidate for imaging in this situation. A study has been made simulating real case scenarios to test practical detection performance and stand-off distances at a range of frequencies in this band, the results of which will be presented.

  9. Detecting drugs at customs

    Hibbert, D.B.

    1999-01-01

    The principle of measuring ions by their drift times at atmospheric pressure is not new, but it has been only recently that ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been realised as a powerful method of identifying certain molecules of importance at low concentrations. The impetus has arisen initially from the desire of the military to detect chemical warfare agents in the field but more recently has been taken up by police and customs services to monitor drugs of abuse and explosives. The Australian Customs Service (Border Technology) has purchased a number of IM spectrometers and has installed them in all international ports and airports. The first cases of persons apprehended for importation of controlled substances with evidence from IMS have appeared in the courts and the legal system is coming to terms with this new forensic tool. Ion mobility spectrometry may be thought of as time of flight mass spectrometry at atmospheric pressure. The presence of gas gives the possibility of a number of ion-molecule reactions, and the time taken to traverse drift tubes of a few centimetres at a field of typically 25 kV m -1 is around 10-20 ms. Ions are generated by a 63 Ni source, which ionises the carrier gas (dry air), which in turn ionises the injected analyte. Detection limits in the low ppb range are found for many substances. Details of sample collection, sensitivity and limitations of the ion mobility spectrometry are given. Extensions to IMS include the use of Fourier Transform method, electro spray and neural networks

  10. Radiographic detection of IGSCC

    Schonberg, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    One of the most troubling problems which the Nuclear Industry faces is Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking on BWR reactors. The detection and repair of pipe welds exhibiting possible flaws can easily exceed $100,000,000.00 (one hundred million dollars) per reactor, if a complete pipe replacement is necessary. Most of the detection work has involved use of ultrasonics to locate and in some cases approximate flaw depth. In Service inspection (ISI) of primary nuclear piping by means of radiography has not been possible in most cases because of the presence of relatively high background dose rates. Neither Iridium 192 or Cobalt 60 can be used for small wall pipe thicker than approximately 5 cm where background radiation exceeds 1 R/hr and the distance is about 1 meter F.F.D. through double wall water filled pipe. The other problem is meeting code requirements for penetrameter sensitivity with the large source size of a Cobalt source such as a 100 curies unit. Development of the MINAC, a highly portable high energy X-ray source, makes field radiography possible on thick section piping. Radiography through total steel thicknesses of up to 300 mm has been done with a 45 minute exposure with an F.F.D. of 1.6 meters. The delivered dose to the film was 2.0 Rads and produced a film density of 2.5 on Kodak AA film. Feasibility of use of the 4 MeV MINAC for high quality film radiography has been established. The focal spot size is 1.7 mm which assures good resolution even where short F.F.D.s are employed

  11. Early Detection Of Cancer

    V B Bhatnagar

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available Farly detection of cancer is based upon three fundamental assumptions, firstly that the trea'ment of benign and precancerous lesions reduces the incidence of cancer, secondly, that the treatment of in situ cancers is conducive to total cure and thirdly that early diagnosis and management of invasive cancer ensures be.ter survival. When patient seeks medical advice for vague symptoms, which could however be due to a possible malignant tumour at a particular site, the alert clinician should investigate the patient immediately to exclude cancer. At this stage cancer is usually not significantly advanced. Currently the U. I. C. C. (International Union for Cancer Control} is studying the epidemiology of cancers in various countries The importance of this is two folds : Firstly by focussing attention on a section of population vulnerable to a particular cancer an early detection is facilitated Secondly by changing the causative factors responsible to a particular cancer, the incidence of that cancer can be reduced e. g. reduction in lung cancer following campaigns against ciguette smoking and reductioi in breast cancer after campaigns for advocating breast feeding of infants, lowering fat consumption and encouraging self palpation of breast regularly. Indeed early diagnosis of cancer implies diagnosis of cancer in almost a symptomatic stage It involves motiva’ion of the population towards acquisitio : of knowledge, attitude and practice.. Epidemiologies and clinicians should be able to recognise high risk cases exposed to particular neoplasia and knowledge of alarming symptoms should be pro- pogated for wide publicity through common available media and means. Probable cases should have regular clhrcal examination periodically and relevant investigations including radiological, imaging techniques and Bio-Chemical examination should be undertaken as and when desired Suspicious lesions should be investigated by specific tests including smear cytology

  12. Supersymmetric dark matter: Indirect detection

    Bergstroem, L.

    2000-01-01

    Dark matter detection experiments are improving to the point where they can detect or restrict the primary particle physics candidates for non baryonic dark matter. The methods for detection are usually categorized as direct, i.e., searching for signals caused by passage of dark matter particles in terrestrial detectors, or indirect. Indirect detection methods include searching for antimatter and gamma rays, in particular gamma ray lines, in cosmic rays and high-energy neutrinos from the centre of the Earth or Sun caused by accretion and annihilation of dark matter particles. A review is given of recent progress in indirect detection, both on the theoretical and experimental side

  13. Statistical theory of signal detection

    Helstrom, Carl Wilhelm; Costrell, L; Kandiah, K

    1968-01-01

    Statistical Theory of Signal Detection, Second Edition provides an elementary introduction to the theory of statistical testing of hypotheses that is related to the detection of signals in radar and communications technology. This book presents a comprehensive survey of digital communication systems. Organized into 11 chapters, this edition begins with an overview of the theory of signal detection and the typical detection problem. This text then examines the goals of the detection system, which are defined through an analogy with the testing of statistical hypotheses. Other chapters consider

  14. Detection Range of Airborne Magnetometers in Magnetic Anomaly Detection

    Chengjing Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Airborne magnetometers are utilized for the small-range search, precise positioning, and identification of the ferromagnetic properties of underwater targets. As an important performance parameter of sensors, the detection range of airborne magnetometers is commonly set as a fixed value in references regardless of the influences of environment noise, target magnetic properties, and platform features in a classical model to detect airborne magnetic anomalies. As a consequence, deviation in detection ability analysis is observed. In this study, a novel detection range model is proposed on the basis of classic detection range models of airborne magnetometers. In this model, probability distribution is applied, and the magnetic properties of targets and the environment noise properties of a moving submarine are considered. The detection range model is also constructed by considering the distribution of the moving submarine during detection. A cell-averaging greatest-of-constant false alarm rate test method is also used to calculate the detection range of the model at a desired false alarm rate. The detection range model is then used to establish typical submarine search probabilistic models. Results show that the model can be used to evaluate not only the effects of ambient magnetic noise but also the moving and geomagnetic features of the target and airborne detection platform. The model can also be utilized to display the actual operating range of sensor systems.

  15. Detection of cryptic species

    Cockburn, A.F.; Jensen, T.; Seawright, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Morphologically similar cryptic species are common in insects. In Anopheles mosquitoes morphologically described species are complexes of cryptic species. Cryptic species are of great practical importance for two reasons: first, one or more species of the complex might not be a pest and control efforts directed at the complex as a whole would therefore be partly wasted; and second, genetic (and perhaps biological) control strategies directed against one species of the complex would not affect other species of the complex. At least one SIT effort has failed because the released sterile insect were of a different species and therefore did not mate with the wild insects being targeted. We use a multidisciplinary approach for detection of cryptic species complexes, focusing first on identifying variability in wild populations using RFLPs of mitochondrial and ribosomal RNA genes (mtDNA and rDNA); followed by confirmation using a variety of other techniques. For rapid identification of wild individuals of field collections, we use a DNA dot blot assay. DNA probes can be isolated by differential screening, however we are currently focusing on the sequencing of the rDNA extragenic spacers. These regions are repeated several hundred times per genome in mosquitoes and evolve rapidly. Molecular drive tends to keen the individual genes homogeneous within a species. (author)

  16. Detection of cryptic species

    Cockburn, A F; Jensen, T; Seawright, J A [United States Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Medical and Veterinary Entomology Research Lab., Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Morphologically similar cryptic species are common in insects. In Anopheles mosquitoes morphologically described species are complexes of cryptic species. Cryptic species are of great practical importance for two reasons: first, one or more species of the complex might not be a pest and control efforts directed at the complex as a whole would therefore be partly wasted; and second, genetic (and perhaps biological) control strategies directed against one species of the complex would not affect other species of the complex. At least one SIT effort has failed because the released sterile insect were of a different species and therefore did not mate with the wild insects being targeted. We use a multidisciplinary approach for detection of cryptic species complexes, focusing first on identifying variability in wild populations using RFLPs of mitochondrial and ribosomal RNA genes (mtDNA and rDNA); followed by confirmation using a variety of other techniques. For rapid identification of wild individuals of field collections, we use a DNA dot blot assay. DNA probes can be isolated by differential screening, however we are currently focusing on the sequencing of the rDNA extragenic spacers. These regions are repeated several hundred times per genome in mosquitoes and evolve rapidly. Molecular drive tends to keen the individual genes homogeneous within a species. (author). 11 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs.

  17. Multiple symbol differential detection

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Simon, Marvin K. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A differential detection technique for multiple phase shift keying (MPSK) signals is provided which uses a multiple symbol observation interval on the basis of which a joint decision is made regarding the phase of the received symbols. In accordance with the invention, a first difference phase is created between first and second received symbols. Next, the first difference phase is correlated with the possible values thereof to provide a first plurality of intermediate output signals. A second difference phase is next created between second and third received symbols. The second difference phase is correlated with plural possible values thereof to provide a second plurality of intermediate output signals. Next, a third difference phase is created between the first and third symbols. The third difference phase is correlated with plural possible values thereof to provide a third plurality of intermediate output signals. Each of the first plurality of intermediate outputs are combined with each of the second plurality of intermediate outputs and each of the third plurality of intermediate outputs to provide a plurality of possible output values. Finally, a joint decision is made by choosing from the plurality of possible output values the value which represents the best combined correlation of the first, second and third difference values with the possible values thereof.

  18. Detection of pump degradation

    Casada, D.

    1994-01-01

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous spectral vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition: advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed

  19. Detection of pump degradation

    Casada, D.

    1995-01-01

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous special vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Pump head and flow rate are also monitored, per code requirements. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition; advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed

  20. Coolant leakage detecting device

    Yamauchi, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Katsunori; Ishihara, Yoshinao.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention judges an amount of leakage of primary coolants of a PWR power plant at high speed. Namely, a mass of coolants contained in a pressurizer, a volume controlling tank and loop regions is obtained based on a preset relational formula and signals of each of process amount, summed up to determine the total mass of coolants for every period of time. The amount of leakage for every period of time is calculated by a formula of Karman's filter based on the total mass of the primary coolants for every predetermined period of time, and displays it on CRT. The Karman's filter is formed on every formula for several kinds of states formed based on the preset amount of the leakage, to calculate forecasting values for every mass of coolants. An adaptable probability for every preset leakage amount is determined based on the difference between the forecast value and the observed value and the scattering thereof. The adaptable probability is compared with a predetermined threshold value, which is displayed on the CRT. This device enables earlier detection of leakage and identification of minute leakage amount as compared with the prior device. (I.S.)

  1. Temporal Cyber Attack Detection.

    Ingram, Joey Burton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Draelos, Timothy J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Galiardi, Meghan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Doak, Justin E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Rigorous characterization of the performance and generalization ability of cyber defense systems is extremely difficult, making it hard to gauge uncertainty, and thus, confidence. This difficulty largely stems from a lack of labeled attack data that fully explores the potential adversarial space. Currently, performance of cyber defense systems is typically evaluated in a qualitative manner by manually inspecting the results of the system on live data and adjusting as needed. Additionally, machine learning has shown promise in deriving models that automatically learn indicators of compromise that are more robust than analyst-derived detectors. However, to generate these models, most algorithms require large amounts of labeled data (i.e., examples of attacks). Algorithms that do not require annotated data to derive models are similarly at a disadvantage, because labeled data is still necessary when evaluating performance. In this work, we explore the use of temporal generative models to learn cyber attack graph representations and automatically generate data for experimentation and evaluation. Training and evaluating cyber systems and machine learning models requires significant, annotated data, which is typically collected and labeled by hand for one-off experiments. Automatically generating such data helps derive/evaluate detection models and ensures reproducibility of results. Experimentally, we demonstrate the efficacy of generative sequence analysis techniques on learning the structure of attack graphs, based on a realistic example. These derived models can then be used to generate more data. Additionally, we provide a roadmap for future research efforts in this area.

  2. MUSIC algorithms for rebar detection

    Solimene, Raffaele; Leone, Giovanni; Dell’Aversano, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The MUSIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) algorithm is employed to detect and localize an unknown number of scattering objects which are small in size as compared to the wavelength. The ensemble of objects to be detected consists of both strong and weak scatterers. This represents a scattering environment challenging for detection purposes as strong scatterers tend to mask the weak ones. Consequently, the detection of more weakly scattering objects is not always guaranteed and can be completely impaired when the noise corrupting data is of a relatively high level. To overcome this drawback, here a new technique is proposed, starting from the idea of applying a two-stage MUSIC algorithm. In the first stage strong scatterers are detected. Then, information concerning their number and location is employed in the second stage focusing only on the weak scatterers. The role of an adequate scattering model is emphasized to improve drastically detection performance in realistic scenarios. (paper)

  3. THE APPROACHING TRAIN DETECTION ALGORITHM

    S. V. Bibikov

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with detection algorithm for rail vibroacoustic waves caused by approaching train on the background of increased noise. The urgency of algorithm development for train detection in view of increased rail noise, when railway lines are close to roads or road intersections is justified. The algorithm is based on the method of weak signals detection in a noisy environment. The information statistics ultimate expression is adjusted. We present the results of algorithm research and t...

  4. Decentralised firewall for malware detection

    Raje, Saurabh; Vaderia, Shyamal; Wilson, Neil; Panigrahi, Rudrakh

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the design and development of a decentralized firewall system powered by a novel malware detection engine. The firewall is built using blockchain technology. The detection engine aims to classify Portable Executable (PE) files as malicious or benign. File classification is carried out using a deep belief neural network (DBN) as the detection engine. Our approach is to model the files as grayscale images and use the DBN to classify those images into the aforementioned two ...

  5. Detection of signals in noise

    McDonough, Robert N

    1995-01-01

    The Second Edition is an updated revision to the authors highly successful and widely used introduction to the principles and application of the statistical theory of signal detection. This book emphasizes those theories that have been found to be particularly useful in practice including principles applied to detection problems encountered in digital communications, radar, and sonar.Detection processing based upon the fast Fourier transform

  6. Subband Energy Detection in Passive Array Processing

    Bono, Michael

    2000-01-01

    ...), which includes both Subband Peak Energy Detection (SPED) and Subband Extrema Energy Detection (SEED). It will be shown that SED has several performance advantages over Conventional Energy Detection...

  7. Change Detection in Social Networks

    McCulloh, Ian; Webb, Matthew; Graham, John; Carley, Kathleen; Horn, Daniel B

    2008-01-01

    .... This project proposes a new method for detecting change in social networks over time, by applying a cumulative sum statistical process control statistic to normally distributed network measures...

  8. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    Lao, Dong

    2017-05-14

    This thesis presents a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves, at some unknown time, differently than the “background” motion, which can be induced from camera motion. The goal of proposed method is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Since motion estimation can be unreliable between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Observing more frames before declaring a detection may lead to a more accurate detection and segmentation, since more motion may be observed leading to a stronger motion cue. However, this leads to greater delay. The proposed method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms, defined as declarations of detection before the object moves or incorrect or inaccurate segmentation at the detection time. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  9. Measurement and detection of radiation

    Tsoulfanidis, Nicholas; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2011-01-01

    .... With the miniaturization of equipment, increased speed of electronic components, and more sophisticated software, radiation detection systems are now more productively used in many disciplines...

  10. Dark matter and its detection

    Bi Xiaojun; Qin Bo

    2011-01-01

    We first explain the concept of dark matter,then review the history of its discovery and the evidence of its existence. We describe our understanding of the nature of dark matter particles, the popular dark matter models,and why the weakly interacting massive particles (called WIMPs) are the most attractive candidates for dark matter. Then we introduce the three methods of dark matter detection: colliders, direct detection and indirect detection. Finally, we review the recent development of dark matter detection, including the new results from DAMA, CoGent, PAMELA, ATIC and Fermi. (authors)

  11. Detection of signals in noise

    Whalen, Anthony D; Declaris, Nicholas

    1971-01-01

    Detection of Signals in Noise serves as an introduction to the principles and applications of the statistical theory of signal detection. The book discusses probability and random processes; narrowband signals, their complex representation, and their properties described with the aid of the Hilbert transform; and Gaussian-derived processes. The text also describes the application of hypothesis testing for the detection of signals and the fundamentals required for statistical detection of signals in noise. Problem exercises, references, and a supplementary bibliography are included after each c

  12. Adaptive filtering and change detection

    Gustafsson, Fredrik

    2003-01-01

    Adaptive filtering is a classical branch of digital signal processing (DSP). Industrial interest in adaptive filtering grows continuously with the increase in computer performance that allows ever more conplex algorithms to be run in real-time. Change detection is a type of adaptive filtering for non-stationary signals and is also the basic tool in fault detection and diagnosis. Often considered as separate subjects Adaptive Filtering and Change Detection bridges a gap in the literature with a unified treatment of these areas, emphasizing that change detection is a natural extensi

  13. Eu-Detect: An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in ...

    Supplementary figure 1. Plots depicting the classification accuracy of Eu-Detect with various combinations of. 'cumulative sequence count' (40K, 50K, 60K, 70K, 80K) and 'coverage threshold' (20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%,. 80%). While blue bars represent Eu-Detect's average classification accuracy with eukaryotic ...

  14. In-plane object detection : detection algorithms and visibility problems

    Jovanovic, N.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of devices today incorporate some form of detection of objects and people in a given environment. Various detection technologies have been developed over the years, as a response to many different demands. The devices such as video surveillance systems, scanners, touch screens and

  15. Fusion of Heterogeneous Intrusion Detection Systems for Network Attack Detection

    Jayakumar Kaliappan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An intrusion detection system (IDS helps to identify different types of attacks in general, and the detection rate will be higher for some specific category of attacks. This paper is designed on the idea that each IDS is efficient in detecting a specific type of attack. In proposed Multiple IDS Unit (MIU, there are five IDS units, and each IDS follows a unique algorithm to detect attacks. The feature selection is done with the help of genetic algorithm. The selected features of the input traffic are passed on to the MIU for processing. The decision from each IDS is termed as local decision. The fusion unit inside the MIU processes all the local decisions with the help of majority voting rule and makes the final decision. The proposed system shows a very good improvement in detection rate and reduces the false alarm rate.

  16. Detecting suicidality on Twitter

    Bridianne O'Dea

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Twitter is increasingly investigated as a means of detecting mental health status, including depression and suicidality, in the population. However, validated and reliable methods are not yet fully established. This study aimed to examine whether the level of concern for a suicide-related post on Twitter could be determined based solely on the content of the post, as judged by human coders and then replicated by machine learning. From 18th February 2014 to 23rd April 2014, Twitter was monitored for a series of suicide-related phrases and terms using the public Application Program Interface (API. Matching tweets were stored in a data annotation tool developed by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO. During this time, 14,701 suicide-related tweets were collected: 14% were randomly (n = 2000 selected and divided into two equal sets (Set A and B for coding by human researchers. Overall, 14% of suicide-related tweets were classified as ‘strongly concerning’, with the majority coded as ‘possibly concerning’ (56% and the remainder (29% considered ‘safe to ignore’. The overall agreement rate among the human coders was 76% (average κ = 0.55. Machine learning processes were subsequently applied to assess whether a ‘strongly concerning’ tweet could be identified automatically. The computer classifier correctly identified 80% of ‘strongly concerning’ tweets and showed increasing gains in accuracy; however, future improvements are necessary as a plateau was not reached as the amount of data increased. The current study demonstrated that it is possible to distinguish the level of concern among suicide-related tweets, using both human coders and an automatic machine classifier. Importantly, the machine classifier replicated the accuracy of the human coders. The findings confirmed that Twitter is used by individuals to express suicidality and that such posts evoked a level of concern that warranted

  17. Control rod position detection device

    Akita, Haruo; Ogiwara, Sakae.

    1996-01-01

    The device of the present invention is used in a back-up shut down system of an LMFBR type reactor which is easy for maintenance, has high reliability and can recognize the position of control rods accurately. Namely, a permanent magnet is disposed to a control rod extension tube connected to the lower portion of the control rod. The detector guide tube is disposed in the vicinity of the control rod extension tube. A detector having a detection coil is inserted into a detector tube. With such constitution, the control rod can be detected at one position using the following method. (1) the movement of the magnetic field of the permanent magnet is detected by the detection coil. (2) a plurality of grooves are formed on the control rod extension tube, and the movement of the grooves is detected. In addition, the detection coil is inserted into the detector guide tube, and the signals from the detection coil are inputted to a signal processing circuit disposed at the outside of the reactor vessel using an MI cable to enable the maintenance of the detector. Further, if the detector comprises a detection coil and an excitation coil, the position of a dropped control rod can be recognized at a plurality of points. (I.S.)

  18. Candida infections : detection and epidemiology

    Borst, A. (Annemarie)

    2002-01-01

    Despite the fact that the yeast Candida is the number 4 cause of bloodstream infections in the United States and ranks number 8 in Europe, adequate detection methods are lacking. Furthermore, relatively little is known about the epidemiology of Candida. Our aim was to improve the detection and

  19. Learning to Detect Traffic Signs

    Møgelmose, Andreas; Trivedi, Mohan M.; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the performance of sign detection based on synthetic training data to the performance of detection based on real-world training images. Viola-Jones detectors are created for 4 different traffic signs with both synthetic and real data, and varying numbers of training samples. T...

  20. Tumor detection using feature extraction

    Sankar, A.S.; Amudhavalli, N.; Sivakolundu, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    The assistance system for brain tumor detection helps the doctor to analyse the brain tumor in MRI image and help to make decision. The manual detection system takes 3 -5 hours time to analyse the tumor. Doctors are in a position to analyze the tumor faster and make a correct decision with an assistance system

  1. Data Mining for Intrusion Detection

    Singhal, Anoop; Jajodia, Sushil

    Data Mining Techniques have been successfully applied in many different fields including marketing, manufacturing, fraud detection and network management. Over the past years there is a lot of interest in security technologies such as intrusion detection, cryptography, authentication and firewalls. This chapter discusses the application of Data Mining techniques to computer security. Conclusions are drawn and directions for future research are suggested.

  2. Decoupling Object Detection and Categorization

    Mack, Michael L.; Palmeri, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether there exists a behavioral dependency between object detection and categorization. Previous work (Grill-Spector & Kanwisher, 2005) suggests that object detection and basic-level categorization may be the very same perceptual mechanism: As objects are parsed from the background they are categorized at the basic level. In…

  3. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    Lao, Dong; Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2017-01-01

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon

  4. A Voltage Quality Detection Method

    Chen, Zhe; Wei, Mu

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a voltage quality detection method based on a phase-locked loop (PLL) technique. The technique can detect the voltage magnitude and phase angle of each individual phase under both normal and fault power system conditions. The proposed method has the potential to evaluate various...

  5. Caries detection in dental radiographs

    Dunn, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Caries, or the decay of teeth are difficult to automatically detect in dental radiographs because of the small area of the image that is occupied by the decay. Images of dental radiographs has distinct regions of homogeneous gray levels, and therefore naturally lead to a segmentation based automatic caries detection algorithm. This paper describes a method for caries detection based on a multiclass, area independent thresholding and segmenting scheme. This multiclass thresholding algorithm is an extension of the uniform error threshold, an area independent, distribution free thresholding method used for images of only two classes of objects. The authors first consider the problem of caries detection and the image features that characterize the presence of caries. Next, the uniform error threshold is reviewed, and the general multiclass uniform error threshold algorithm is presented. This algorithm is used to automatically detect caries in dental radiographs

  6. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    Lao, Dong

    2017-11-09

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  7. Rapid deployment intrusion detection system

    Graham, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    A rapidly deployable security system is one that provides intrusion detection, assessment, communications, and annunciation capabilities; is easy to install and configure; can be rapidly deployed, and is reusable. A rapidly deployable intrusion detection system (RADIDS) has many potential applications within the DOE Complex: back-up protection for failed zones in a perimeter intrusion detection and assessment system, intrusion detection and assessment capabilities in temporary locations, protection of assets during Complex reconfiguration, and protection in hazardous locations, protection of assets during Complex reconfiguration, and protection in hazardous locations. Many DOE user-need documents have indicated an interest in a rapidly deployable intrusion detection system. The purpose of the RADIDS project is to design, develop, and implement such a system. 2 figs

  8. The detection of criticality accidents

    Prigent, R.; Renard, C.

    It is necessary to shield the personnel from the radiological consequences of a criticality accident. In the past ten years the study programmes have highlighted fresh data which have led to new thinking on the detection philosophy and as a consequence the design of detection equipment. Concurrently, new recommendations have been drawn up by the Safety Criticality Committee. The new detection equipment was developed by the CEA on the basis of the CRAC and SILENE experiments. Its industrialization was entrusted to the Intertechnique Company and the first network installed dates back to 1976. An examination is made of the problem of accident detection, dealing in turn with detection, the characteristics of the equipment and the installation rules. To clarify the various points discussed, a parallel has been drawn between the equipment existing up to 1975 and the new generation developed since then [fr

  9. Ion detection in mass spectrometry

    Bolbach, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    This course aims at providing some elements for a better understanding of ion detectors used in mass spectrometers, of their operations, and of their limitations. A first part addresses the functions and properties of an ideal detector, how to detect ions in gas phase, and particle detectors and ion detectors used in mass spectrometry. The second part proposes an overview of currently used detectors with respect to their operation principle: detection from the ion charge (Faraday cylinder), detection by inductive effects (FTICR, Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance), and detection by secondary electron emission. The third part discusses the specificities of secondary electron emission. The fourth one addresses operating modes and parameters related to detectors. The sixth part proposes a prospective view on future detectors by addressing the following issues: cryo-detector, inductive effect and charge detectors, ion detection and nano materials

  10. Particle detection systems and methods

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2010-05-11

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons and neutrons. In one implementation, a particle detection system employs a plurality of drift cells, which can be for example sealed gas-filled drift tubes, arranged on sides of a volume to be scanned to track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons. The drift cells can include a neutron sensitive medium to enable concurrent counting of neutrons. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold, uranium, plutonium, and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can concurrently detect any unshielded neutron sources occupying the volume from neutrons emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift cells can be used to also detect gamma rays. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  11. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    Lao, Dong

    2017-01-08

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  12. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    Lao, Dong; Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2017-01-01

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  13. Track-before-detect procedures for detection of extended object

    Fan, Ling; Zhang, Xiaoling; Shi, Jun

    2011-12-01

    In this article, we present a particle filter (PF)-based track-before-detect (PF TBD) procedure for detection of extended objects whose shape is modeled by an ellipse. By incorporating of an existence variable and the target shape parameters into the state vector, the proposed algorithm performs joint estimation of the target presence/absence, trajectory and shape parameters under unknown nuisance parameters (target power and noise variance). Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has good detection and tracking capabilities for extended objects.

  14. Track-before-detect procedures for detection of extended object

    Fan Ling

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, we present a particle filter (PF-based track-before-detect (PF TBD procedure for detection of extended objects whose shape is modeled by an ellipse. By incorporating of an existence variable and the target shape parameters into the state vector, the proposed algorithm performs joint estimation of the target presence/absence, trajectory and shape parameters under unknown nuisance parameters (target power and noise variance. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has good detection and tracking capabilities for extended objects.

  15. Enhancing the detection of edges and non-differentiable points in an NMR spectrum using delayed-acquisition

    Gong, Zhaoyuan; Walls, Jamie D.

    2018-02-01

    Delayed-acquisition, which is a common technique for improving spectral resolution in Fourier transform based spectroscopies, typically relies upon differences in T2 relaxation rates that are often due to underlying differences in dynamics and/or complexities of the spin systems being studied. After an acquisition delay, the broad signals from fast T2 -relaxing species are more suppressed relative to the sharp signals from slow T2 -relaxing species. In this paper, an alternative source of differential "dephasing" under delayed-acquisition is demonstrated that is based solely upon the mathematical properties of the line shape and is independent of the underlying spin dynamics and/or complexity. Signals associated with frequencies where the line shape either changes sharply and/or is non-differentiable at some finite order dephase at a much slower rate than those signals associated with frequencies where the line shape is smooth. Experiments employing delayed-acquisition to study interfaces in biphasic samples, to measure spatially-dependent longitudinal relaxation, and to highlight sharp features in NMR spectra are presented.

  16. Neutrons detection by scintillation; Detection de neutrons par scintillations

    Giraudon, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-01-15

    The absence of charge of neutrons and their elevated penetration power make difficult their detection. Techniques vary otherwise with the energy of the particle. The author proposes the realization of a scintillation detector with a big volume of liquid scintillator and containing boron for the detection of slowing-down neutrons in the domain of intermediate energies from 1 to 10{sup 5} eV about. (M.B.) [French] L'absence de charge du neutron et son pouvoir de penetration eleve rendent difficile sa detection. Les techniques par ailleurs varient avec l'energie de cette particule. L'auteur propose la realisation d'un detecteur a scintillations comprenant un grand volume de scintillateur liquide et contenant du bore pour la detection des neutrons en ralentissement dans le domaine des energies intermediaires de 1 a 10{sup 5} eV environ. (M.B.)

  17. Potential fire detection based on Kalman-driven change detection

    Van Den Bergh, F

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A new active fire event detection algorithm for data collected with the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) sensor, based on the extended Kalman filter, is introduced. Instead of using the observed temperatures of the spatial...

  18. Neutrons detection by scintillation; Detection de neutrons par scintillations

    Giraudon, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-01-15

    The absence of charge of neutrons and their elevated penetration power make difficult their detection. Techniques vary otherwise with the energy of the particle. The author proposes the realization of a scintillation detector with a big volume of liquid scintillator and containing boron for the detection of slowing-down neutrons in the domain of intermediate energies from 1 to 10{sup 5} eV about. (M.B.) [French] L'absence de charge du neutron et son pouvoir de penetration eleve rendent difficile sa detection. Les techniques par ailleurs varient avec l'energie de cette particule. L'auteur propose la realisation d'un detecteur a scintillations comprenant un grand volume de scintillateur liquide et contenant du bore pour la detection des neutrons en ralentissement dans le domaine des energies intermediaires de 1 a 10{sup 5} eV environ. (M.B.)

  19. Energy conservation using face detection

    Deotale, Nilesh T.; Kalbande, Dhananjay R.; Mishra, Akassh A.

    2011-10-01

    Computerized Face Detection, is concerned with the difficult task of converting a video signal of a person to written text. It has several applications like face recognition, simultaneous multiple face processing, biometrics, security, video surveillance, human computer interface, image database management, digital cameras use face detection for autofocus, selecting regions of interest in photo slideshows that use a pan-and-scale and The Present Paper deals with energy conservation using face detection. Automating the process to a computer requires the use of various image processing techniques. There are various methods that can be used for Face Detection such as Contour tracking methods, Template matching, Controlled background, Model based, Motion based and color based. Basically, the video of the subject are converted into images are further selected manually for processing. However, several factors like poor illumination, movement of face, viewpoint-dependent Physical appearance, Acquisition geometry, Imaging conditions, Compression artifacts makes Face detection difficult. This paper reports an algorithm for conservation of energy using face detection for various devices. The present paper suggests Energy Conservation can be done by Detecting the Face and reducing the brightness of complete image and then adjusting the brightness of the particular area of an image where the face is located using histogram equalization.

  20. Robotic Detection of Marine Litter Using Deep Visual Detection Models

    Fulton, Michael; Hong, Jungseok; Islam, Md Jahidul; Sattar, Junaed

    2018-01-01

    Trash deposits in aquatic environments have a destructive effect on marine ecosystems and pose a long-term economic and environmental threat. Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) could very well contribute to the solution of this problem by finding and eventually removing trash. A step towards this goal is the successful detection of trash in underwater environments. This paper evaluates a number of deep-learning algorithms to the task of visually detecting trash in realistic underwater envi...

  1. An environmental monitoring detection system

    Leli Yuniarsari; Istofa; Sukandar

    2015-01-01

    Is part of radiation detection of the nuclear facilities engineering activities within nuclear facilities. The system comprised of gamma-ray radiation detector and weather detection which includes anemometer to detect the wind direction and speed, as well as rain gauge to measure the rainfall in a period of time. Data acquisition of the output is processed by Arduino Uno system which transformed the data into a particular standard and then displayed online in the website. The radiation detection system uses gamma-ray detector of NaI(Tl) and GM which convert the radiation detected into electric pulse to be fed into a pre-amp and amplifier and modified into square pulse. The weather detection system on the other hand works based on switch principle. For example, the wind with a certain speed could turn on a switch in the system and produce a voltage or pulse which can be measured. This value will then be interpreted as the wind direction and speed. Likewise for the rainfall gauge, the volume of water entering the bucket will turn the switch on, at the same time producing 1 pulse. The result of the experiment shows that for radiation detection system the output is a square pulse 4 volts by using detector NaI(Tl) and 4.4 volts by using detector GM. For weather detection system, basically was able to detect the wind direction, wind speed and rainfall just to find out further research is needed accuracy and the results compared with the standard tools available in BMKG. (author)

  2. Robust Adaptable Video Copy Detection

    Assent, Ira; Kremer, Hardy

    2009-01-01

    in contrast). Our query processing combines filtering and indexing structures for efficient multistep computation of video copies under this model. We show that our model successfully identifies altered video copies and does so more reliably than existing models.......Video copy detection should be capable of identifying video copies subject to alterations e.g. in video contrast or frame rates. We propose a video copy detection scheme that allows for adaptable detection of videos that are altered temporally (e.g. frame rate change) and/or visually (e.g. change...

  3. System for detecting nuclear explosions

    Rawls, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting underground nuclear explosions is described that is comprised of an antenna located in the dielectric substance of a deep waveguide in the earth and adapted to detect low frequency electromagnetic waves generated by a nuclear explosion, the deep waveguide comprising the high conductivity upper sedimentary layers of the earth, the dielectric basement rock, and a high conductivity layer of basement rock due to the increased temperature thereof at great depths, and means for receiving the electromagnetic waves detected by said antenna means

  4. Microconductometric Detection of Bacterial Contamination

    Sarra EL ICHI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Several approaches can be used for the electrochemical detection of bacterial contamination. Their performance can be assessed by the ability to detect bacteria at very low concentrations within a short-time response. We have already demonstrated that a conductometric biosensor based on interdigitated thin-film electrodes is adapted to detect bacteria in clinical samples like serum and compatible with microfluidic fabrication. The type of interdigitated microelectrodes influences the performance of the biosensor. This was shown by the results obtained in this work. A magnetic-nanoparticles based immunosensor was designed using gold screen-printed electrodes. The immunosensor was able to specifically detect E. coli in the range of 1-103 CFU mL-1. The new transducer offered a larger active sensing surface with a lower cost and a robust material. Accuracy of the conductance value was enhanced by differential measurements. The immunosensor is compatible with a microfluidic system.

  5. Research on driver fatigue detection

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Zhong; Ouyang, Chao

    2018-03-01

    Driver fatigue is one of the main causes of frequent traffic accidents. In this case, driver fatigue detection system has very important significance in avoiding traffic accidents. This paper presents a real-time method based on fusion of multiple facial features, including eye closure, yawn and head movement. The eye state is classified as being open or closed by a linear SVM classifier trained using HOG features of the detected eye. The mouth state is determined according to the width-height ratio of the mouth. The head movement is detected by head pitch angle calculated by facial landmark. The driver's fatigue state can be reasoned by the model trained by above features. According to experimental results, drive fatigue detection obtains an excellent performance. It indicates that the developed method is valuable for the application of avoiding traffic accidents caused by driver's fatigue.

  6. Standoff Detection Technology Evaluation Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Standoff Detection Technology Evaluation facility is the only one of its kind in the country and allows researchers to release a known amount of material while...

  7. Marfan's Syndrome: Detection and Management.

    Cantwell, John D.

    1986-01-01

    Marfan's Syndrome, a disorder of connective tissue, has gained increased attention since the death of volleyball star Flo Hyman. This article reviews the disease and discusses methods of detection and management. (Author/MT)

  8. Trends In Android Malware Detection

    Kaveh Shaerpour

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes different Android malware detection techniques from several research papers, some of these techniques are novel while others bring a new perspective to the research work done in the past. The techniques are of various kinds ranging from detection using host based frameworks and static analysis of executable to feature extraction and behavioral patterns. Each paper is reviewed extensively and the core features of each technique are highlighted and contrasted with the others. The challenges faced during the development of such techniques are also discussed along with the future prospects for Android malware detection. The findings of the review have been well documented in this paper to aid those making an effort to research in the area of Android malware detection by understanding the current scenario and developments that have happened in the field thus far.

  9. Detection Limits for Nanoscale Biosensors

    Sheehan, Paul E; Whitman, Lloyd J

    2005-01-01

    We examine through analytical calculations and finite element simulations how the detection efficiency of disk and wire-like biosensors in unmixed fluids varies with size from the micrometer to nanometer scales...

  10. Measurement and detection of radiation

    Tsoulfanidis, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    This is an update of the standard textbook for the field of radiation measurement. It includes illustrative examples and new problems. The research and applications of nuclear instrumentation have grown substantially since publication of the previous editions. With the miniaturization of equipment, increased speed of electronic components, and more sophisticated software, radiation detection systems are now more productively used in many disciplines, including nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, and nuclear medicine. Continuing in the tradition of its bestselling predecessors, "Measurement and Detection of Radiation, Third Edition" illustrates the fundamentals of nuclear interactions and radiation detection with a multitude of examples and problems. It offers a clearly written, accessible introduction to nuclear instrumentation concepts. The following are new to the third edition: a new chapter on the latest applications of radiation detection, covering nuclear medicine, dosimetry, health physics, no...

  11. Nanotechnology for Early Cancer Detection

    Joon Won Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vast numbers of studies and developments in the nanotechnology area have been conducted and many nanomaterials have been utilized to detect cancers at early stages. Nanomaterials have unique physical, optical and electrical properties that have proven to be very useful in sensing. Quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, gold nanowires and many other materials have been developed over the years, alongside the discovery of a wide range of biomarkers to lower the detection limit of cancer biomarkers. Proteins, antibody fragments, DNA fragments, and RNA fragments are the base of cancer biomarkers and have been used as targets in cancer detection and monitoring. It is highly anticipated that in the near future, we might be able to detect cancer at a very early stage, providing a much higher chance of treatment.

  12. Leak detection : Principles and practice

    Rama Rao, V.V.K.

    1981-01-01

    Principles of leak detection are explained and various aspects of leak detection techniques and leak detectors are reviewed. The review covers: units for leaks and leak tightness, classification of leaks, timing of leak testing, designing for ease of leak testing of any job, methods of leak detection, their ranges of application and limitations, leak detectors, response time of leak test, minimum detectable concentration of search gas during leak tests, and validity of leak tests. Helium mass spectrometer type leak detector and technique are described in detail. Recent improvements in leak detectors and techniques, particularly mass spectrometer leak detectors using gases other than helium (e.g. hydrogen, argon) are also covered in the review. (M.G.B.)

  13. Novelty Detection via Answer Updating

    Li, Xiaoyan; Croft, W. B

    2004-01-01

    .... Specifically, we explore the use of question-answering techniques for novelty detection. New information is defined as new/previously unseen answers to questions representing a user's information need...

  14. Predictive coding in Agency Detection

    Andersen, Marc Malmdorf

    2017-01-01

    Agency detection is a central concept in the cognitive science of religion (CSR). Experimental studies, however, have so far failed to lend support to some of the most common predictions that follow from current theories on agency detection. In this article, I argue that predictive coding, a highly...... promising new framework for understanding perception and action, may solve pending theoretical inconsistencies in agency detection research, account for the puzzling experimental findings mentioned above, and provide hypotheses for future experimental testing. Predictive coding explains how the brain......, unbeknownst to consciousness, engages in sophisticated Bayesian statistics in an effort to constantly predict the hidden causes of sensory input. My fundamental argument is that most false positives in agency detection can be seen as the result of top-down interference in a Bayesian system generating high...

  15. Resonance detection of Moessbauer radiation

    Morozov, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The resonance detection method as compared with the usual method of registering Moessbauer spectra has a number of advantages, one of which is the increase of resolution of the Moessbauer spectrum. The method is based on the modulation of a secondary radiation of a converter tuned in the resonance with the Moessbauer gamma-quantum source. The resonance detection method with account of supression, secondary radiation outgoing from the converter is investigated. The converter represents a substrate enriched by the Moessbauer isotope placed either inside the gas counter, or coupled with any other detecting device. Analytical expressions for Moessbauer spectrum parameters: effect, area and width of the spectral line are derived. It is shown that the joint application of usual and resonance detection methods for registering the Moessbauer spectrum allows one to determine parameters of the source, converter and the investigated absorber

  16. The detection of gravitational waves

    Barish, Barry C

    1996-01-01

    General Relativity predicts the emission of gravitanional waves whenever compact concentrations of energy change shape. This could occur in a variety of astrophysical phenomena. For example, the coalescence of binary systems such as a pair of neutron stars or black holes emit gravitanional waves that propagate through space at the speed of light, and in principle, can be directly detected on the earth's surface. This lecture series will review the possible sources of gravitanional waves and the various approaches toward detection, with special emphasis on long baseline interferometer detectors. The Laser Interferometer Gravitanional Wave Observatory (LIGO) is being constructed with a goal to detect these waves and then to use them as a new tool to explore and study the Universe. The sources of gravitanional waves and techniques for detection will be presented, as well as the status and prospects for the LIGO project.

  17. Low level photoneutron detection equipment

    Ji Changsong; Zhang Yuqin; Li Yuansui

    1991-01-01

    A low level photoneutron detection equipment has been developed. The photoneutrons produced by interaction of 226 Ra gamma quanta and deutron (D) target are detected with n-n discrimination detector made up of 3 He proportional counter array. The D-content information in the target can be obtained from the measured photoneutron counts. The equipment developed is mainly used for nondestructive D-content measurement of D-devices

  18. Ferromagnetic Objects Magnetovision Detection System.

    Nowicki, Michał; Szewczyk, Roman

    2013-12-02

    This paper presents the application of a weak magnetic fields magnetovision scanning system for detection of dangerous ferromagnetic objects. A measurement system was developed and built to study the magnetic field vector distributions. The measurements of the Earth's field distortions caused by various ferromagnetic objects were carried out. The ability for passive detection of hidden or buried dangerous objects and the determination of their location was demonstrated.

  19. Community Detection for Large Graphs

    Peng, Chengbin

    2014-05-04

    Many real world networks have inherent community structures, including social networks, transportation networks, biological networks, etc. For large scale networks with millions or billions of nodes in real-world applications, accelerating current community detection algorithms is in demand, and we present two approaches to tackle this issue -A K-core based framework that can accelerate existing community detection algorithms significantly; -A parallel inference algorithm via stochastic block models that can distribute the workload.

  20. Ferromagnetic Objects Magnetovision Detection System

    Michał Nowicki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of a weak magnetic fields magnetovision scanning system for detection of dangerous ferromagnetic objects. A measurement system was developed and built to study the magnetic field vector distributions. The measurements of the Earth’s field distortions caused by various ferromagnetic objects were carried out. The ability for passive detection of hidden or buried dangerous objects and the determination of their location was demonstrated.

  1. Contraband detection with fast neutrons

    Buffler, Andy E-mail: abuffler@science.uct.ac.za

    2004-11-01

    Recent terror events and the increase in the trade of illicit drugs have fuelled the exploration of the use of fast neutrons as probes for the detection of hidden contraband, especially explosives, in packages ranging in size from small mail items to cargo containers. The various approaches using fast neutrons for contraband detection, presently under development, are reviewed. The role that a neutron system might play in the non-intrusive interrogation of airline luggage is discussed.

  2. Psychoacoustics and Passive Sonar Detection

    1974-09-09

    not matched to the signal duration. This simple physical model provides a faiily credible replica of the detection performance of the ear, under...al., 1956; Veniar, 1958; Swets, Shipley, McKey und Gree^., 1959; Creelman , 1960; Green, 1961; and Gundy, 1961). In general, the experiments first...Acoust. Soc. Am. 3_7. 1064, (1965). 5. CD. Creelman , "Detection of Signals of Uncertain Frequency", J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 32, 805, (1960). 6. J.P

  3. Static Decoupling in fault detection

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    An algebraic approach is given for a design of a static residual weighting factor in connection with fault detection. A complete parameterization is given of the weighting factor which will minimize a given performance index......An algebraic approach is given for a design of a static residual weighting factor in connection with fault detection. A complete parameterization is given of the weighting factor which will minimize a given performance index...

  4. Materials science for nuclear detection

    Peurrung, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    The increasing importance of nuclear detection technology has led to a variety of research efforts that seek to accelerate the discovery and development of useful new radiation detection materials. These efforts aim to improve our understanding of how these materials perform, develop formalized discovery tools, and enable rapid and effective performance characterization. We provide an overview of these efforts along with an introduction to the history, physics, and taxonomy of radiation detec...

  5. Integrated multisensor perimeter detection systems

    Kent, P. J.; Fretwell, P.; Barrett, D. J.; Faulkner, D. A.

    2007-10-01

    The report describes the results of a multi-year programme of research aimed at the development of an integrated multi-sensor perimeter detection system capable of being deployed at an operational site. The research was driven by end user requirements in protective security, particularly in threat detection and assessment, where effective capability was either not available or prohibitively expensive. Novel video analytics have been designed to provide robust detection of pedestrians in clutter while new radar detection and tracking algorithms provide wide area day/night surveillance. A modular integrated architecture based on commercially available components has been developed. A graphical user interface allows intuitive interaction and visualisation with the sensors. The fusion of video, radar and other sensor data provides the basis of a threat detection capability for real life conditions. The system was designed to be modular and extendable in order to accommodate future and legacy surveillance sensors. The current sensor mix includes stereoscopic video cameras, mmWave ground movement radar, CCTV and a commercially available perimeter detection cable. The paper outlines the development of the system and describes the lessons learnt after deployment in a pilot trial.

  6. Multi-Sensor Mud Detection

    Rankin, Arturo L.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2010-01-01

    Robust mud detection is a critical perception requirement for Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) autonomous offroad navigation. A military UGV stuck in a mud body during a mission may have to be sacrificed or rescued, both of which are unattractive options. There are several characteristics of mud that may be detectable with appropriate UGV-mounted sensors. For example, mud only occurs on the ground surface, is cooler than surrounding dry soil during the daytime under nominal weather conditions, is generally darker than surrounding dry soil in visible imagery, and is highly polarized. However, none of these cues are definitive on their own. Dry soil also occurs on the ground surface, shadows, snow, ice, and water can also be cooler than surrounding dry soil, shadows are also darker than surrounding dry soil in visible imagery, and cars, water, and some vegetation are also highly polarized. Shadows, snow, ice, water, cars, and vegetation can all be disambiguated from mud by using a suite of sensors that span multiple bands in the electromagnetic spectrum. Because there are military operations when it is imperative for UGV's to operate without emitting strong, detectable electromagnetic signals, passive sensors are desirable. JPL has developed a daytime mud detection capability using multiple passive imaging sensors. Cues for mud from multiple passive imaging sensors are fused into a single mud detection image using a rule base, and the resultant mud detection is localized in a terrain map using range data generated from a stereo pair of color cameras.

  7. Hanle Detection for Optical Clocks

    Xiaogang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard.

  8. Long-Range Neutron Detection

    Peurrung, A.J.; Stromswold, D.C.; Hansen, R.R.; Reeder, P.L.; Barnett, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron detector designed for detecting neutron sources at distances of 50 to 100 m has been constructed and tested. This detector has a large surface area (1 m 2 ) to enhance detection efficiency, and it contains a collimator and shielding to achieve direction sensitivity and reduce background. An unusual feature of the detector is that it contains no added moderator, such as polyethylene, to moderate fast neutrons before they reach the 3 He detector. As a result, the detector is sensitive mainly to thermal neutrons. The moderator-free design reduces the weight of the detector, making it more portable, and it also aids in achieving directional sensitivity and background reduction. Test results show that moderated fission-neutron sources of strength about 3 x 10 5 n/s can be detected at a distance out to 70 m in a counting time of 1000 s. The best angular resolution of the detector is obtained at distances of 30 m or less. As the separation .distance between the source and detector increases, the contribution of scattered neutrons to the measured signal increases with a resultant decrease in the ability to detect the direction to a distant source. Applications for which the long-range detector appears to be suitable include detecting remote neutron sources (including sources in moving vehicles) and monitoring neutron storage vaults for the intrusion of humans and the effects they make on the detected neutron signal. Also, the detector can be used to measure waste for the presence of transuranic material in the presence of high gamma-ray background. A test with a neutron source (3 x 10 5 n/s) in a vehicle showed that the detector could readily measure an increase in count rate at a distance of 10 m for vehicle speeds up to 35 mph (the highest speed tested). These results. indicate that the source should be detectable at this distance at speeds up to 55 mph

  9. Biosensors for plant pathogen detection.

    Khater, Mohga; de la Escosura-Muñiz, Alfredo; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-07-15

    Infectious plant diseases are caused by pathogenic microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses, viroids, phytoplasma and nematodes. Worldwide, plant pathogen infections are among main factors limiting crop productivity and increasing economic losses. Plant pathogen detection is important as first step to manage a plant disease in greenhouses, field conditions and at the country boarders. Current immunological techniques used to detect pathogens in plant include enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and direct tissue blot immunoassays (DTBIA). DNA-based techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real time PCR (RT-PCR) and dot blot hybridization have also been proposed for pathogen identification and detection. However these methodologies are time-consuming and require complex instruments, being not suitable for in-situ analysis. Consequently, there is strong interest for developing new biosensing systems for early detection of plant diseases with high sensitivity and specificity at the point-of-care. In this context, we revise here the recent advancement in the development of advantageous biosensing systems for plant pathogen detection based on both antibody and DNA receptors. The use of different nanomaterials such as nanochannels and metallic nanoparticles for the development of innovative and sensitive biosensing systems for the detection of pathogens (i.e. bacteria and viruses) at the point-of-care is also shown. Plastic and paper-based platforms have been used for this purpose, offering cheap and easy-to-use really integrated sensing systems for rapid on-site detection. Beside devices developed at research and development level a brief revision of commercially available kits is also included in this review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ghost imaging with bucket detection and point detection

    Zhang, De-Jian; Yin, Rao; Wang, Tong-Biao; Liao, Qing-Hua; Li, Hong-Guo; Liao, Qinghong; Liu, Jiang-Tao

    2018-04-01

    We experimentally investigate ghost imaging with bucket detection and point detection in which three types of illuminating sources are applied: (a) pseudo-thermal light source; (b) amplitude modulated true thermal light source; (c) amplitude modulated laser source. Experimental results show that the quality of ghost images reconstructed with true thermal light or laser beam is insensitive to the usage of bucket or point detector, however, the quality of ghost images reconstructed with pseudo-thermal light in bucket detector case is better than that in point detector case. Our theoretical analysis shows that the reason for this is due to the first order transverse coherence of the illuminating source.

  11. Method of detecting failed fuels

    Ishizaki, Hideaki; Suzumura, Takeshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the settlement of the temperature of an adequate filling high temperature pure water by detecting the outlet temperature of a high temperature pure water filling tube to a fuel assembly to control the heating of the pure water and detecting the failed fuel due to the sampling of the pure water. Method: A temperature sensor is provided at a water tube connected to a sipping cap for filling high temperature pure water to detect the temperature of the high temperature pure water at the outlet of the tube, and the temperature is confirmed by a temperature indicator. A heater is controlled on the basis of this confirmation, an adequate high temperature pure water is filled in the fuel assembly, and the pure water is replaced with coolant. Then, it is sampled to settle the adequate temperature of the high temperature coolant used for detecting the failure of the fuel assembly. As a result, the sipping effect does not decrease, and the failed fuel can be precisely detected. (Yoshihara, H.)

  12. Gear Tooth Wear Detection Algorithm

    Delgado, Irebert R.

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-based condition indicators continue to be developed for Health Usage Monitoring of rotorcraft gearboxes. Testing performed at NASA Glenn Research Center have shown correlations between specific condition indicators and specific types of gear wear. To speed up the detection and analysis of gear teeth, an image detection program based on the Viola-Jones algorithm was trained to automatically detect spiral bevel gear wear pitting. The detector was tested using a training set of gear wear pictures and a blind set of gear wear pictures. The detector accuracy for the training set was 75 percent while the accuracy for the blind set was 15 percent. Further improvements on the accuracy of the detector are required but preliminary results have shown its ability to automatically detect gear tooth wear. The trained detector would be used to quickly evaluate a set of gear or pinion pictures for pits, spalls, or abrasive wear. The results could then be used to correlate with vibration or oil debris data. In general, the program could be retrained to detect features of interest from pictures of a component taken over a period of time.

  13. Molecular Detection of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Fluit, Ad C.; Visser, Maarten R.; Schmitz, Franz-Josef

    2001-01-01

    The determination of antimicrobial susceptibility of a clinical isolate, especially with increasing resistance, is often crucial for the optimal antimicrobial therapy of infected patients. Nucleic acid-based assays for the detection of resistance may offer advantages over phenotypic assays. Examples are the detection of the methicillin resistance-encoding mecA gene in staphylococci, rifampin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the spread of resistance determinants across the globe. However, molecular assays for the detection of resistance have a number of limitations. New resistance mechanisms may be missed, and in some cases the number of different genes makes generating an assay too costly to compete with phenotypic assays. In addition, proper quality control for molecular assays poses a problem for many laboratories, and this results in questionable results at best. The development of new molecular techniques, e.g., PCR using molecular beacons and DNA chips, expands the possibilities for monitoring resistance. Although molecular techniques for the detection of antimicrobial resistance clearly are winning a place in routine diagnostics, phenotypic assays are still the method of choice for most resistance determinations. In this review, we describe the applications of molecular techniques for the detection of antimicrobial resistance and the current state of the art. PMID:11585788

  14. Signal analysis for failure detection

    Parpaglione, M.C.; Perez, L.V.; Rubio, D.A.; Czibener, D.; D'Attellis, C.E.; Brudny, P.I.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Several methods for analysis of acoustic emission signals are presented. They are mainly oriented to detection of changes in noisy signals and characterization of higher amplitude discrete pulses or bursts. The aim was to relate changes and events with failure, crack or wear in materials, being the final goal to obtain automatic means of detecting such changes and/or events. Performance evaluation was made using both simulated and laboratory test signals. The methods being presented are the following: 1. Application of the Hopfield Neural Network (NN) model for classifying faults in pipes and detecting wear of a bearing. 2. Application of the Kohonnen and Back Propagation Neural Network model for the same problem. 3. Application of Kalman filtering to determine time occurrence of bursts. 4. Application of a bank of Kalman filters (KF) for failure detection in pipes. 5. Study of amplitude distribution of signals for detecting changes in their shape. 6. Application of the entropy distance to measure differences between signals. (author). 10 refs, 11 figs

  15. Analog electronics for radiation detection

    2016-01-01

    Analog Electronics for Radiation Detection showcases the latest advances in readout electronics for particle, or radiation, detectors. Featuring chapters written by international experts in their respective fields, this authoritative text: Defines the main design parameters of front-end circuitry developed in microelectronics technologies Explains the basis for the use of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors for the detection of charged particles and other non-consumer applications Delivers an in-depth review of analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), evaluating the pros and cons of ADCs integrated at the pixel, column, and per-chip levels Describes incremental sigma delta ADCs, time-to-digital converter (TDC) architectures, and digital pulse-processing techniques complementary to analog processing Examines the fundamental parameters and front-end types associated with silicon photomultipliers used for single visible-light photon detection Discusses pixel sensors ...

  16. Optimal dynamic detection of explosives

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcgrane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greenfield, Margo T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, R J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rabitz, Herschel A [PRINCETON UNIV; Roslund, J [PRINCETON UNIV

    2009-01-01

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off distances, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring optimal dynamic detection to exploit the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity of explosives signatures while reducing the influence of noise and the signals from background interferents in the field (increase selectivity). These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal nonlinear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe sub-pulses. With sufficient bandwidth, the technique is capable of intrinsically providing orthogonal broad spectral information for data fusion, all from a single optimal pulse.

  17. Photoacoustic Imaging in Oxygen Detection

    Fei Cao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen level, including blood oxygen saturation (sO2 and tissue oxygen partial pressure (pO2, are crucial physiological parameters in life science. This paper reviews the importance of these two parameters and the detection methods for them, focusing on the application of photoacoustic imaging in this scenario. sO2 is traditionally detected with optical spectra-based methods, and has recently been proven uniquely efficient by using photoacoustic methods. pO2, on the other hand, is typically detected by PET, MRI, or pure optical approaches, yet with limited spatial resolution, imaging frame rate, or penetration depth. Great potential has also been demonstrated by employing photoacoustic imaging to overcome the existing limitations of the aforementioned techniques.

  18. Detection of Weather Radar Clutter

    Bøvith, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    classification and use a range of different techniques and input data. The first method uses external information from multispectral satellite images to detect clutter. The information in the visual, near-infrared, and infrared parts of the spectrum can be used to distinguish between cloud and cloud-free areas......Weather radars provide valuable information on precipitation in the atmosphere but due to the way radars work, not only precipitation is observed by the weather radar. Weather radar clutter, echoes from non-precipitating targets, occur frequently in the data, resulting in lowered data quality....... Especially in the application of weather radar data in quantitative precipitation estimation and forecasting a high data quality is important. Clutter detection is one of the key components in achieving this goal. This thesis presents three methods for detection of clutter. The methods use supervised...

  19. Detecting and combating malicious email

    Ryan, Julie JCH

    2014-01-01

    Malicious email is, simply put, email with a malicious purpose. The malicious purpose could be fraud, theft, espionage, or malware injection. The processes by which email execute the malicious activity vary widely, from fully manual (e.g. human-directed) to fully automated. One example of a malicious email is one that contains an attachment which the recipient is directed to open. When the attachment is opened, malicious software is installed on the recipient's computer. Because malicious email can vary so broadly in form and function, automated detection is only marginally helpful. The education of all users to detect potential malicious email is important to containing the threat and limiting the damage. It is increasingly necessary for all email users to understand how to recognize and combat malicious email. Detecting and Combating Malicious Email describes the different types of malicious email, shows how to differentiate malicious email from benign email, and suggest protective strategies for both perso...

  20. Automated detection of retinal disease.

    Helmchen, Lorens A; Lehmann, Harold P; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2014-11-01

    Nearly 4 in 10 Americans with diabetes currently fail to undergo recommended annual retinal exams, resulting in tens of thousands of cases of blindness that could have been prevented. Advances in automated retinal disease detection could greatly reduce the burden of labor-intensive dilated retinal examinations by ophthalmologists and optometrists and deliver diagnostic services at lower cost. As the current availability of ophthalmologists and optometrists is inadequate to screen all patients at risk every year, automated screening systems deployed in primary care settings and even in patients' homes could fill the current gap in supply. Expanding screens to all patients at risk by switching to automated detection systems would in turn yield significantly higher rates of detecting and treating diabetic retinopathy per dilated retinal examination. Fewer diabetic patients would develop complications such as blindness, while ophthalmologists could focus on more complex cases.