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Sample records for line substorm model

  1. Toward a unified model of substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Fukui, K.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.

    2017-12-01

    Numerous models of substorms have been proposed so far, and they are roughly divided into two categories, i.e., the outside-in category that is represented by the near-Earth neutral line (NENL) model and the inside-out category represented by the current disruption model or the ballooning instability model. Controversies have been raised for many years over the validity of those models. However, in recent years we have obtained important clues to solve this long-standing issue by analyzing THEMIS probe data for substorms and pseudo-substorms separately. [Fukui et al., 2017] The key is the plasma pressure in the equatorial region, and it was about 1.3 times higher in substorms, than the pseudo-substorm in the region between X -7 and -8 Re. However, no difference was found beyond X -10 Re. Therefore, the spatial gradient of the plasma pressure in the region of X -7.5 Re must be a necessary condition for the occurrence of substorm. Abrupt earthward flows originated from the catapult current sheet relaxation and subsequent magnetic reconnection at the NENL just prior to the onset is a common signature for both substorm and pseudo-substorm, which seems to be essentially a result of the tearing instability in the magnetotail. [Uchino and Machida, 2015] The subsequent earthward flows must initiate some instability, quite likely the ballooning instability around the flow braking region. Substorms do not occur only with the magnetic reconnection. If there is enough plasma pressure gradient, the system can develop into a substorm. Otherwise, it will end up with a pseudo-substorm. We emphasize that both NENL model and the ballooning instability model are partially correct but incomplete, and the true model of substorm can be constructed by synthesizing multiple models of substorm including at least these two models.

  2. Modelling substorm chorus events in terms of dispersive azimuthal drift

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    A. B. Collier

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Substorm Chorus Event (SCE is a radio phenomenon observed on the ground after the onset of the substorm expansion phase. It consists of a band of VLF chorus with rising upper and lower cutoff frequencies. These emissions are thought to result from Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between whistler mode waves and energetic electrons which drift into a ground station's field of view from an injection site around midnight. The increasing frequency of the emission envelope has been attributed to the combined effects of energy dispersion due to gradient and curvature drifts, and the modification of resonance conditions and variation of the half-gyrofrequency cutoff resulting from the radial component of the ExB drift.

    line-height: 20px;"> A model is presented which accounts for the observed features of the SCE in terms of the growth rate of whistler mode waves due to anisotropy in the electron distribution. This model provides an explanation for the increasing frequency of the SCE lower cutoff, as well as reproducing the general frequency-time signature of the event. In addition, the results place some restrictions on the injected particle source distribution which might lead to a SCE.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (Wave-particle interaction – Magnetospheric physics (Plasma waves and instabilities; Storms and substorms

  3. Modeling of plasma-sheet convection: implications for substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    An answer is suggested to the question of why plasma and magnetic energy accumulate in the Earth's magnetotail to be released in sporadic events, namely substorms. It is shown that the idea of steady convection is inconsistent with the idea of slow, approximately lossless, plasma convection in a long, closed-field-line region that extends into a long magnetotail, such as occurs during Earthward convection in the Earth's plasma sheet. This inconsistency is argued generally and demonstrated specifically using several quantitative models of the Earth's magnetospheric magnetic field. These results suggest that plasma-sheet convection is necessarily time dependent. If flux tubes are to convect adiabatically earthward, the confining magnetic pressure in the tail lobes must increase with time, and the magnetotail must evolve into a more stretched configuration. Eventually, the magnetosphere must find some way to release plasma from inner-plasma-sheet flux tubes. This suggests an obvious role for the magnetospheric substorm in the convection process. To probe this process further, a two-dimensional, self-consistent, quasi-static convection model was developed. This model self consistently includes a dipole field and can reasonably account for the effects of inner-magnetospheric shielding

  4. A comparison of the probability distribution of observed substorm magnitude with that predicted by a minimal substorm model

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    S. K. Morley

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We compare the probability distributions of substorm magnetic bay magnitudes from observations and a minimal substorm model. The observed distribution was derived previously and independently using the IL index from the IMAGE magnetometer network. The model distribution is derived from a synthetic AL index time series created using real solar wind data and a minimal substorm model, which was previously shown to reproduce observed substorm waiting times. There are two free parameters in the model which scale the contributions to AL from the directly-driven DP2 electrojet and loading-unloading DP1 electrojet, respectively. In a limited region of the 2-D parameter space of the model, the probability distribution of modelled substorm bay magnitudes is not significantly different to the observed distribution. The ranges of the two parameters giving acceptable (95% confidence level agreement are consistent with expectations using results from other studies. The approximately linear relationship between the two free parameters over these ranges implies that the substorm magnitude simply scales linearly with the solar wind power input at the time of substorm onset.

  5. Multiscale empirical modeling of the geomagnetic field: From storms to substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, G. K.; Sitnov, M. I.; Korth, H.; Gkioulidou, M.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Merkin, V. G.

    2017-12-01

    An advanced version of the TS07D empirical geomagnetic field model, herein called SST17, is used to model the global picture of the geomagnetic field and its characteristic variations on both storm and substorm scales. The new SST17 model uses two regular expansions describing the equatorial currents with each having distinctly different scales, one corresponding to a thick and one to a thin current sheet relative to the thermal ion gyroradius. These expansions have an arbitrary distribution of currents in the equatorial plane that is constrained only by magnetometer data. This multi-scale description allows one to reproduce the current sheet thinning during the growth phase. Additionaly, the model uses a flexible description of field-aligned currents that reproduces their spiral structure at low altitudes and provides a continuous transition from region 1 to region 2 current systems. The empirical picture of substorms is obtained by combining magnetometer data from Geotail, THEMIS, Van Allen Probes, Cluster II, Polar, IMP-8, GOES 8, 9, 10 and 12 and then binning this data based on similar values of the auroral index AL, its time derivative and the integral of the solar wind electric field parameter (from ACE, Wind, and IMP-8) in time over substorm scales. The performance of the model is demonstrated for several events, including the 3 July 2012 substorm, which had multi-probe coverage and a series of substorms during the March 2008 storm. It is shown that the AL binning helps reproduce dipolarization signatures in the northward magnetic field Bz, while the solar wind electric field integral allows one to capture the current sheet thinning during the growth phase. The model allows one to trace the substorm dipolarization from the tail to the inner magnetosphere where the dipolarization of strongly stretched tail field lines causes a redistribution of the tail current resulting in an enhancement of the partial ring current in the premidnight sector.

  6. Remote sensing of a near-Earth neutral line during the 5 October 2000 substorm

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    D. Nagata

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examined the continuous motions of a near-Earth neutral line during the recovery phase of the 5 October 2000 substorm. Estimation was based on the PSBL ion beam model proposed by Onsager (1991 and the Geotail observations. Estimated distances from the Earth ranged from 20 to 60 RE and retreated tailward at velocities of 250 and 300 km/s. This event initiated with the arrival of solar wind discontinuity. Simultaneous observations of electromagnetic field and electrons indicate the existence of earthward propagating waves associated with field-aligned currents. Based on these observations, we suggest that the source of the PSBL ion beams was the retreating near-Earth neutral line formed by the compression of the magnetosphere. Two scenarios of near-Earth neutral line motion in the tail dynamics are also proposed. One is the formation of plural neutral lines to create a long plasmoid. The other is the oscillation of one neutral line between the near-Earth region and the mid-tail stagnant plasmoid.

  7. Modelling substorm chorus events in terms of dispersive azimuthal drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Collier

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Substorm Chorus Event (SCE is a radio phenomenon observed on the ground after the onset of the substorm expansion phase. It consists of a band of VLF chorus with rising upper and lower cutoff frequencies. These emissions are thought to result from Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between whistler mode waves and energetic electrons which drift into a ground station's field of view from an injection site around midnight. The increasing frequency of the emission envelope has been attributed to the combined effects of energy dispersion due to gradient and curvature drifts, and the modification of resonance conditions and variation of the half-gyrofrequency cutoff resulting from the radial component of the ExB drift. A model is presented which accounts for the observed features of the SCE in terms of the growth rate of whistler mode waves due to anisotropy in the electron distribution. This model provides an explanation for the increasing frequency of the SCE lower cutoff, as well as reproducing the general frequency-time signature of the event. In addition, the results place some restrictions on the injected particle source distribution which might lead to a SCE. Key words. Space plasma physics (Wave-particle interaction – Magnetospheric physics (Plasma waves and instabilities; Storms and substorms

  8. EEJ and EIA variations during modeling substorms with different onset moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, V. V.; Klimenko, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the simulations of four modeling substorms with different moment of substorm onset at 00:00 UT, 06:00 UT, 12:00 UT, and 18:00 UT for spring equinoctial conditions in solar activity minimum. Such investigation provides opportunity to examine the longitudinal dependence of ionospheric response to geomagnetic substorms. Model runs were performed using modified Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP). We analyzed GSM TIP simulated global distributions of foF2, low latitude electric field and ionospheric currents at geomagnetic equator and their disturbances at different UT moments substorms. We considered in more detail the variations in equatorial ionization anomaly, equatorial electrojet and counter equatorial electrojet during substorms. It is shown that: (1) the effects in EIA, EEJ and CEJ strongly depend on the substorm onset moment; (2) disturbances in equatorial zonal current density during substorm has significant longitudinal dependence; (3) the observed controversy on the equatorial ionospheric electric field signature of substorms can depend on the substorm onset moments, i.e., on the longitudinal variability in parameters of the thermosphere-ionosphere system.

  9. On the threshold for triggering substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivelson, M.G.; California Univ., Los Angeles, CA; Hughes, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Many features of substorms are satisfactorily described by a phenomenological model in which the substorm onset is related to the formation of a neutral line within the plasma sheet close to the Earth. However, the model does not account for the fact that the amount of tail stress released in different substorms is highly variable and that the intensity of global substorm-related signatures can differ greatly. Here we propose that the level of stress at which the substorm expansion starts is controlled by the tail field geometry and remark that the field line curvature required for the formation of a near-Earth neutral line is already present when the dipole is tilted towards or away from the Sun. Assuming that substorms are most readily initiated when the tail field geometry is favourable, we develop a new interpretation of the aspects of the annual and diurnal variation of the level of geomagnetic activity that are independent of the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field. We attribute the variations to the ''bent tail'' (BT) effect. We believe that the BT effect provides a more reasonable interpretation of the observed modulations than does the previously-proposed Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism. The BT effect leads to predictions regarding annual and diurnal signatures of substorm occurrence frequency and magnitude that can be tested. (author)

  10. Recent advances in magnetospheric substorm research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairfield, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    More than two decades of magnetospheric exploration have led to a reasonably clear morphological picture of geomagnetic substorms, which is often summarized in terms of the near-Earth neutral line (NENL) model of substorms. Although this qualitative theory is quite comprehensive and explains a great many observations, it is hard pressed to explain both recent observations of consistently earthward flow within 19 R E and also the prompt onset of magnetic turbulence at 8 R E at the time of substorm onset. Other theories have recently been proposed which tend to be more quantitative, but which explain a more limited number of substorm observations. The challenge seems to be to understand the essential physics of these various quantitative theories and integrate them into a large structure such as is provided by the near-Earth neutral line model. (author)

  11. Ionospheric effects of magnetospheric substorms during SUNDIAL and their modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharova, E.E.; Kishcha, P.V.; Shashun'kina, V.M.; Telegin, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Ionospheric effects of substorms are considered using the networks of the vertical probing stations during SUNDIAL periods. Calculations of electron concentration distribution and comparison of calculation results with experimental data are conducted on the basis of the developed technique of simulation of large-scale internal gravitational wave effects

  12. Statistical visualization of the Earth's magnetotail based on Geotail data and the implied substorm model

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    S. Machida

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the temporal and spatial development of the near-Earth magnetotail during substorms based on multi-dimensional superposed-epoch analysis of Geotail data. The start time of the auroral break-up (t=0 of each substorm was determined from auroral data obtained by the Polar and IMAGE spacecraft. The key parameters derived from the plasma, magnetic-field, and electric-field data from Geotail were sorted by their meridional X(GSM–Z(proxy coordinates.

    The results show that the Poynting flux toward the plasma-sheet center starts at least 10 min before the substorm onset, and is further enhanced at X~−12 RE (Earth radii around 4 min before the onset. Simultaneously, large-amplitude fluctuations occurred, and earthward flows in the central plasma sheet between X~−11 RE and X~−19 RE and a duskward flow around X=−10 RE were enhanced. The total pressure starts to decrease around X=−16 RE about 4 min before the onset of the substorm. After the substorm onset, a notable dipolarization is observed and tailward flows commence, characterised by southward magnetic fields in the form of a plasmoid.

    We confirm various observable-parameter variations based on or predicted by the relevant substorm models; however, none of these can explain our results perfectly. Therefore, we propose a catapult (slingshot current-sheet relaxation model, in which an earthward convective flow produced by catapult current-sheet relaxation and a converted duskward flow near the Earth are enhanced through flow braking around 4 min before the substorm onset. These flows induce a ballooning instability or other instabilities, causing the observed current disruption. The formation of the magnetic neutral line is a natural consequence of the present model, because the relaxation of a highly stretched

  13. Problem of simulating the Earth's induction effects in modeling polar magnetic substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mareschal, M.

    1976-01-01

    A major problem encountered in trying to model the current system associated with a polar magnetic substorm from ground-based magnetic observations is the difficulty of adequately evaluating the earth's induction effects. Two methods for simulating these effects are reviewed here. Method 1 simply reduces the earth to a perfect conductor and leads to very simple field equations. Method 2 considers the earth as a ''horizontally'' layered body of finite conductivity but requires a large amount of computational time. The performances of both methods are compared when the substorm current system can be approximated by an infinitely long electrojet flowing over a flat earth. In this case it appears that for most substorm modeling problems it is sufficient to treat the earth as a perfect conductor. The depth of this perfect conductor below the earth's surface should be selected in function of the source frequency content

  14. Particle and field signatures of substorms in the near magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.

    1983-01-01

    The near-earth magnetotail (10 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 20 R/sub E/) portion of the terrestrial magnetosphere is very likely the region in which magnetospheric substorms are initiated and it is in this location that substorm-related magnetic reconnection appears to occur. An observational advantage compared to other astrophysical regions is that the near magnetotail can be nearly continuously monitored by spacecraft that are relatively fixed in location. Observations of magnetic fields and plasma distribution functions in the neartail reveal a very regular and predictable sequence of variation in association with substorms. These data, considered in a global context, provide very strong evidence for the neutral line substorm model and, thus, for the regular occurrence of magnetic reconnection in the near-earth magnetotail during substorms

  15. Substorm onset location and dipole tilt angle

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    J. Wanliss

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available From an initial data set of over 200 substorms we have studied a subset of 30 magnetospheric substorms close to magnetic midnight to investigate, in a statistical fashion, the source region of the auroral arc that brightens at the onset of expansive phase. This arc is usually identified as the ionospheric signature of the expansive phase onset that occurs in the magnetotail. All the substorm onsets were identified via ground-based magnetometer and photometer data from the CANOPUS array. Various Tsyganenko global magnetic field models were used to map magnetic field lines from the location of the onset arc out to its greatest radial distance in the magnetotail. The results appear to favour the current disruption model of substorms since the average onset location has an average of 14.1 Earth radii (RE and is therefore more consistent with theories that place the onset location in the inner magnetotail. For the narrow range of tilts available our modeling indicates the parameter that appears to strongly influence the location of the substorm onset is the dipole tilt angle; as tilt becomes less negative onsets occur further downtail.

  16. Magnetospheric substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondoh, Tadanori

    1974-01-01

    The results of observation of electric field, magnetic field, high energy particles, plasma and aurora on the ground and with artificial satellites during magnetospheric substorm are reviewed, and the problems are mentioned. A new image of magnetospheric substorm is described. The whole description is divided into eight parts. The first part describes the ionospheric electric current and plasma convection accompanying magnetospheric substorm. The variation of geomagnetism during the magnetospheric substorm, the ionospheric equivalent current during the growth and expansion period of substorm, and the relationship between the high energy proton flux of equatorial zone current and peripheral plasma density are illustrated. The second part describes auroral storm. The time variation of aurora observed with a whole sky camera is illustrated. The third part describes the structure of magnetosphere tail. The variation of electron spectrum parameters when the inner edge of plasma sheet passes is illustrated. The fourth part describes the auroral zone of the plasma sheet. The fifth part describes the magnetospheric substorm in magnetosphere tail. The sixth part describes the electric connection of magnetosphere with high latitudinal ionosphere. The seventh part describes interplanet magnetic field and magnetospheric substorm. The eighth part is summary. The ''SC- triggered bay'' accompanied by rapid decrease of X- or H-component occurred frequently immediately after SC in the night side of auroral zone when the rapidstart type magnetic storm at mid- and low-latitudes occurred. The correlation between the Dsub(st) at low latitude and the DS at high latitude during magnetic storm should be reexamined. (Iwakiri, K.)

  17. Substorms in the earth's magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetospheres are plasma regions of large scale in space dominated by magnetic field effects. The earth, and many planets in our solar system, are known to have magnetospheric regions around them. Magnetospheric substorms represent the intense, rapid dissipation of energy that has been extracted from the solar wind and stored temporarily in the terrestrial magnetotail. In this paper a widely, but not universally, accepted model of substorms is described. The energy budgets, time scales, and conversion efficiencies for substorms are presented. The primary forms of substorm energy dissipation are given along with the average levels of the dissipation. Aspects of particle acceleration and precipitation, Joule heating mechanisms, ring current formation, and plasmoid escape are illustrated based on in situ observations taken from the large available data base. A brief description is given of possible analogues of substorm-like behavior in other astrophysical systems. 27 references, 12 figures

  18. Electron precipitation morphology and plasma sheet dynamics: ground and magnetotail studies of the magnetospheric substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pytte, T.

    1976-12-01

    The main results of some recent studies of the magnetospheric substorm are summarised and discussed in view of the fundamental role of magnetospheric convection. The substorm growth phase is described in terms of a temporary imbalance between the rates of magnetic field-line merging on the dayside, and reconnection on the nightside, of the magnetosphere following a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field. Some new understanding of the possible causal relationship between growth-phase and expansion-phase phenomena is provided through studies of multiple-onset substorms, during which substorm expansions are observed to occur at intervals of 10-15 min. Detailed observations have revealed new features of the radial and azimuthal dynamics of these substorms that are not consistent with recent models proposed by Akasofu and by Rostoker and his co-workers. It is shown that the behaviour of the near-earth plasma sheet early in a substorm cannot be inferred from measurements at larger distances (e.g., in the Vela satellite orbits), and that the triggering of a substorm expansion may well be directly related to pre-substorm thinning of the near-earth plasma sheet, even though the most significant thinning in the tailward region may occur at the onset, and therefore appears to be an effect rather than a cause of triggering. Initial results from studies of a new type of magnetospheric activity, characterised by strong auroral-zone bay activity but no other indications of substorm expansions, are shown to be consistent with current models of the growth and expansion phases of substorms and of substorm triggering. (JIW)

  19. Substorm associated radar auroral surges: a statistical study and possible generation model

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    B. A. Shand

    Full Text Available Substorm-associated radar auroral surges (SARAS are a short lived (15–90 minutes and spatially localised (~5° of latitude perturbation of the plasma convection pattern observed within the auroral E-region. The understanding of such phenomena has important ramifications for the investigation of the larger scale plasma convection and ultimately the coupling of the solar wind, magnetosphere and ionosphere system. A statistical investigation is undertaken of SARAS, observed by the Sweden And Britain Radar Experiment (SABRE, in order to provide a more extensive examination of the local time occurrence and propagation characteristics of the events. The statistical analysis has determined a local time occurrence of observations between 1420 MLT and 2200 MLT with a maximum occurrence centred around 1700 MLT. The propagation velocity of the SARAS feature through the SABRE field of view was found to be predominately L-shell aligned with a velocity centred around 1750 m s–1 and within the range 500 m s–1 and 3500 m s–1. This comprehensive examination of the SARAS provides the opportunity to discuss, qualitatively, a possible generation mechanism for SARAS based on a proposed model for the production of a similar phenomenon referred to as sub-auroral ion drifts (SAIDs. The results of the comparison suggests that SARAS may result from a similar geophysical mechanism to that which produces SAID events, but probably occurs at a different time in the evolution of the event.

    Key words. Substorms · Auroral surges · Plasma con-vection · Sub-auroral ion drifts

  20. Relationship between substorms and storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, Y.

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to deduce a plausible working model of the relationship between magnetospheric substorms and storms, recent relevant studies of various processes occurring during disturbed periods are integrated along with some theoretical suggestions. It has been shown that the main phase of geomagnetic storms is associated with the successive occurrence of intense substorms and with the sustained southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). However, these relations are only qualitatively understood, and thus basic questions remain unanswered involving the hypothesis whether a magnetic storm is a non-linear (or linear) superposition of intense substorms, each of which constitutes an elementary storm, or the main phase of magnetic storms occurs as a result of the intense southward IMF which enhances magnetospheric convection and increases occurrence probability of substorms. (Auth.)

  1. Substorms - Future of magnetospheric substorm-storm research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akasofu, S.I.

    1989-01-01

    Seven approaches and/or areas of magnetospheric substorm and storm science which should be emphasized in future research are briefly discussed. They are: the combining of groups of researchers who study magnetic storms and substorms in terms of magnetic reconnection with those that do not, the possible use of a magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling model to merge the groups, the development of improved input-output relationships, the complementing of satellite and ground-based observations, the need for global imaging of the magnetosphere, the complementing of observations with computer simulations, and the need to study the causes of changes in the north-south component of the IMF. 36 refs

  2. Force Balance and Substorm Effects in the Magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Richard L.; Larson, Douglas J.; Kontodinas, Ioannis D.; Ball, Bryan M.

    1997-01-01

    A model of the quiet time middle magnetotail is developed using a consistent orbit tracing technique. The momentum equation is used to calculate geocentric solar magnetospheric components of the particle and electromagnetic forces throughout the current sheet. Ions generate the dominant x and z force components. Electron and ion forces almost cancel in the y direction because the two species drift earthward at comparable speeds. The force viewpoint is applied to a study of some substorm processes. Generation of the rapid flows seen during substorm injection and bursty bulk flow events implies substantial force imbalances. The formation of a substorm diversion loop is one cause of changes in the magnetic field and therefore in the electromagnetic force. It is found that larger forces are produced when the cross-tail current is diverted to the ionosphere than would be produced if the entire tail current system simply decreased. Plasma is accelerated while the forces are unbalanced resulting in field lines within a diversion loop becoming more dipolar. Field lines become more stretched and the plasma sheet becomes thinner outside a diversion loop. Mechanisms that require thin current sheets to produce current disruption then can create additional diversion loops in the newly thinned regions. This process may be important during multiple expansion substorms and in differentiating pseudoexpansions from full substorms. It is found that the tail field model used here can be generated by a variety of particle distribution functions. However, for a given energy distribution the mixture of particle mirror or reflection points is constrained by the consistency requirement. The study of uniqueness also leads to the development of a technique to select guiding center electrons that will produce charge neutrality all along a flux tube containing nonguiding center ions without the imposition of a parallel electric field.

  3. Advances in magnetospheric storm and substorm research: 1989-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairfield, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms represent the magnetospheric response to fast solar wind and unusually large southward interplanetary magnetic fields that are caused by solar processes and resulting dynamics in the interplanetary medium. The solar wind/magnetosphere interaction is, however, more commonly studied via smaller, more common, magnetospheric substorms. Accumulating evidence suggests that two separate magnetospheric current systems are important during magnetospheric substorms. Currents directly driven by the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction produce magnetic field variations that make important contributions to the AE index but have little relation to the many effects traditionally associated with sudden substorm onsets. Currents driven by energy unloaded from the magnetotail form the nightside current wedge and are associated with onset effects such as auroral breakup, field dipolarization, and particle acceleration. Observations are gradually leading to a coherent picture of the interrelations among these various onset phenomena, but their cause remains a controversial question. The abrupt nature of substorm onsets suggests a magnetospheric instability, but doubt remains as to its nature and place of origin. Measurements increasingly suggest the region of 7-10 R E near midnight as the likely point of origin, but it is not clear that the long-popular tearing mode can go unstable this close to the Earth, where it may be stabilized by a small northward field component. Also the tailward flows that would be expected tailward of a near-Earth neutral line are seldom seen inside of 19 R E . The changing magnetic field configuration during substorms means that existing static models cannot be used to map phenomena between the magnetosphere and the ground at these interesting times

  4. Observed tail current systems associated with bursty bulk flows and auroral streamers during a period of multiple substorms

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    C. Forsyth

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a multi-instrument study of a substorm bursty bulk flow (BBF and auroral streamer. During a substorm on 25 August 2003, which was one of a series of substorms that occurred between 00:00 and 05:00 UT, the Cluster spacecraft encountered a BBF event travelling Earthwards and duskwards with a velocity of ~500 km s−1 some nine minutes after the onset of the substorm. Coincident with this event the IMAGE spacecraft detected an auroral streamer in the substorm auroral bulge in the Southern Hemisphere near the footpoints of the Cluster spacecraft. Using FluxGate Magnetometer (FGM data from the four Cluster spacecraft, we determine the field-aligned currents in the BBF, using the curlometer technique, to have been ~5 mA km−2. When projected into the ionosphere, these currents give ionospheric field-aligned currents of ~18 A km−2, which is comparable with previously observed ionospheric field-aligned currents associated with BBFs and auroral streamers. The observations of the BBF are consistent with the plasma "bubble" model of Chen and Wolf (1993. Furthermore, we show that the observations of the BBF are consistent with the creation of the BBF by the reconnection of open field lines Earthward of a substorm associated near-Earth neutral line.

  5. Observed tail current systems associated with bursty bulk flows and auroral streamers during a period of multiple substorms

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    C. Forsyth

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a multi-instrument study of a substorm bursty bulk flow (BBF and auroral streamer. During a substorm on 25 August 2003, which was one of a series of substorms that occurred between 00:00 and 05:00 UT, the Cluster spacecraft encountered a BBF event travelling Earthwards and duskwards with a velocity of ~500 km s−1 some nine minutes after the onset of the substorm. Coincident with this event the IMAGE spacecraft detected an auroral streamer in the substorm auroral bulge in the Southern Hemisphere near the footpoints of the Cluster spacecraft. Using FluxGate Magnetometer (FGM data from the four Cluster spacecraft, we determine the field-aligned currents in the BBF, using the curlometer technique, to have been ~5 mA km−2. When projected into the ionosphere, these currents give ionospheric field-aligned currents of ~18 A km−2, which is comparable with previously observed ionospheric field-aligned currents associated with BBFs and auroral streamers. The observations of the BBF are consistent with the plasma "bubble" model of Chen and Wolf (1993. Furthermore, we show that the observations of the BBF are consistent with the creation of the BBF by the reconnection of open field lines Earthward of a substorm associated near-Earth neutral line.

  6. Energetic particle beams in the plasma sheet boundary layer following substorm expansion - Simultaneous near-earth and distant tail observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholer, M.; Baker, D. N.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Galvin, A. B.; Klecker, B.; Terasawa, T.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of ions and electron beams in the near-earth and deep magnetotail following the onset of substorm are analyzed in terms of the substorm neutral line model. The observations were collected on March 20, 1983 with ISSE 1 and 3. Energy fluxes and intensity-time profiles of protons and electrons are studied. The data reveal that the reconnection at the near-earth neutral line produces ions and electrons for the plasma sheet boundary layer. The maximum electric potential along the neutral line is evaluated.

  7. The Study of Non-Linear Acceleration of Particles during Substorms Using Multi-Scale Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    2011-01-01

    To understand particle acceleration during magnetospheric substorms we must consider the problem on multple scales ranging from the large scale changes in the entire magnetosphere to the microphysics of wave particle interactions. In this paper we present two examples that demonstrate the complexity of substorm particle acceleration and its multi-scale nature. The first substorm provided us with an excellent example of ion acceleration. On March 1, 2008 four THEMIS spacecraft were in a line extending from 8 R E to 23 R E in the magnetotail during a very large substorm during which ions were accelerated to >500 keV. We used a combination of a global magnetohydrodynamic and large scale kinetic simulations to model the ion acceleration and found that the ions gained energy by non-adiabatic trajectories across the substorm electric field in a narrow region extending across the magnetotail between x = -10 R E and x = -15 R E . In this strip called the 'wall region' the ions move rapidly in azimuth and gain 100s of keV. In the second example we studied the acceleration of electrons associated with a pair of dipolarization fronts during a substorm on February 15, 2008. During this substorm three THEMIS spacecraft were grouped in the near-Earth magnetotail (x ∼-10 R E ) and observed electron acceleration of >100 keV accompanied by intense plasma waves. We used the MHD simulations and analytic theory to show that adiabatic motion (betatron and Fermi acceleration) was insufficient to account for the electron acceleration and that kinetic processes associated with the plasma waves were important.

  8. Studies of Westward Electrojets and Field-Aligned Currents in the Magnetotail During Substorms: Implications for Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Harlan E.

    1996-01-01

    discrete features in the context of the global picture. We reported on our initial study at national and international meetings and published the results of our predictions of the low-altitude signatures of the plasma sheet. In addition, the PI was invited to contribute a publication to the so-called 'Great Debate in Space Physics' series that is a feature of EOS. The topic was on the nature of magnetospheric substorms. Specific questions of the when and where a substorm occurs and the connection between the auroral and magnetospheric components were discussed in that paper. This paper therefore was derived exclusively from the research supported by this grant. Attachment: Empirical modeling of the quite time nightside magnetosphere.' 'CRRES observations of particle flux dropout event.' The what, where, when, and why of magnetospheric substorm triggers'. and 'Low altitude signature of the plasma sheet: model prediction of local time dependence'.

  9. Estimates of magnetic flux, and energy balance in the plasma sheet during substorm expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Pulkkinen, Tuija

    1996-01-01

    The energy and magnetic flux budgets of the magnetotail plasma sheet during substorm expansion are investigated. The possible mechanisms that change the energy content of the closed field line region which contains all the major dissipation mechanisms of relevance during substorms, are considered. The compression of the plasma sheet mechanism and the diffusion mechanism are considered and excluded. It is concluded that the magnetic reconnection mechanism can accomplish the required transport. Data-based empirical magnetic field models are used to investigate the magnetic flux transport required to account for the observed magnetic field dipolarizations in the inner magnetosphere. It is found that the magnetic flux permeating the current sheet is typically insufficient to supply the required magnetic flux. It is concluded that no major substorm-type magnetospheric reconfiguration is possible in the absence of magnetic reconnection.

  10. Conditions for substorm onset by the fast reconnection mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ugai

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The fast reconnection mechanism, involving slow shocks and Alfvénic fast plasma jets, is most responsible for the explosive conversion of magnetic energy associated with geomagnetic substorms and solar flares. In this paper, the spontaneous fast reconnection model is applied to well-known phenomena of substorms. When the east-west width of the tail current sheet becomes 3–4 times larger than its north-south thickness, the fast reconnection mechanism can fully be established, which may lead to substorm onset. The resulting Alfvénic jet can exactly explain, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the in-situ satellite observations of the traveling compression regions (TCRs associated with large-scale plasmoids propagating down the tail. Also, the earthward fast reconnection jet causes drastic magnetic field dipolarization, so that the sheet current ahead of the magnetic loop of closed field lines suddenly turns its direction toward the loop footpoint and a large-scale current wedge is formed according to the growth of field-aligned currents. It is demonstrated that an MHD generator arises ahead of the magnetic loop and drives the current wedge to distinctly enhance the current density in a pair of thin layers of the loop footpoint, giving rise to drastic heating in the form of two ribbons.

  11. Multi-event study of high-latitude thermospheric wind variations at substorm onset with a Fabry-Perot interferometer at Tromsoe, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Shiokawa, K.; Oyama, S. I.; Otsuka, Y.

    2017-12-01

    We studied the high-latitude thermospheric wind variations near the onset time of isolated substorms. Substorm-related energy input from the magnetosphere to the polar ionosphere modifies the high-latitude ionosphere and thermosphere. For the first time, this study showed the characteristics of high-latitude thermospheric wind variations at the substorm onset. We also investigated the possibility of these wind variations as a potential trigger of substorm onset by modifying the ionospheric current system (Kan, 1993). A Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) at Tromsoe, Norway provided wind measurements estimated from Doppler shift of both red-line (630.0 nm for the F region) and green-line (557.7 nm for the E region) emissions of aurora and airglow. We used seven-year data sets obtained from 2009 to 2015 with a time resolution of 13 min. We first identified the onset times of local isolated substorms using ground-based magnetometer data obtained at the Tromsoe and Bear Island stations, which belongs to the IMAGE magnetometer chain. We obtained 4 red-line events and 5 green-line events taken place at different local times. For all these events, the peak locations of westward ionospheric currents identified by the ground-based magnetometer chain were located at the poleward side of Tromsoe. Then, we calculated two weighted averages of wind velocities for 30 min around the onset time and 30 min after the onset time of substorms. We evaluated differences between these two weighted averages to estimate the strength of wind changes. The observed wind changes at these substorm onsets were less than 49 m/s (26 m/s) for red-line (green-line) events, which are much smaller than the typical plasma convection speed. This indicates that the plasma motion caused by substorm-induced thermospheric winds through ion-neutral collisions is a minor effect as the driver of high-latitude plasma convection, as well as the triggering of substorm onset. We discuss possible causes of these

  12. Polar cap deflation during magnetospheric substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J. J.; Siscoe, G. L.; Heelis, R. A.; Winningham, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    The expanding/contracting polar cap model has been used to simulate DE-2 ion drift data during substorms as determined using the AL index. Of the 39 cases modeled, 57 percent required the opening of a nightside gap which maps to where reconnection occurs in the tail; 75 percent of the 16 recovery phase cases required a nightside gap, while only 29 percent of the 17 expansion phase cases required a nightside gap. On the basis of this result, it is concluded that if a nightside gap implies tail reconnection, then reconnection probably occurs after expansion phase onset and continues throughout most of the recovery phase of a substorm.

  13. Geotail observations of plasma sheet ion composition over 16 years: On variations of average plasma ion mass and O+ triggering substorm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosé, M.; Ieda, A.; Christon, S. P.

    2009-07-01

    We examined long-term variations of ion composition in the plasma sheet, using energetic (9.4-212.1 keV/e) ion flux data obtained by the suprathermal ion composition spectrometer (STICS) sensor of the energetic particle and ion composition (EPIC) instrument on board the Geotail spacecraft. EPIC/STICS observations are available from 17 October 1992 for more than 16 years, covering the declining phase of solar cycle 22, all of solar cycle 23, and the early phase of solar cycle 24. This unprecedented long-term data set revealed that (1) the He+/H+ and O+/H+ flux ratios in the plasma sheet were dependent on the F10.7 index; (2) the F10.7 index dependence is stronger for O+/H+ than He+/H+; (3) the O+/H+ flux ratio is also weakly correlated with the ΣKp index; and (4) the He2+/H+ flux ratio in the plasma sheet appeared to show no long-term trend. From these results, we derived empirical equations related to plasma sheet ion composition and the F10.7 index and estimated that the average plasma ion mass changes from ˜1.1 amu during solar minimum to ˜2.8 amu during solar maximum. In such a case, the Alfvén velocity during solar maximum decreases to ˜60% of the solar minimum value. Thus, physical processes in the plasma sheet are considered to be much different between solar minimum and solar maximum. We also compared long-term variation of the plasma sheet ion composition with that of the substorm occurrence rate, which is evaluated by the number of Pi2 pulsations. No correlation or negative correlation was found between them. This result contradicts the O+ triggering substorm model, in which heavy ions in the plasma sheet increase the growth rate of the linear ion tearing mode and play an important role in localization and initiation of substorms. In contrast, O+ ions in the plasma sheet may prevent occurrence of substorms.

  14. Substorm morphology of >100 keV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundblad, J.Aa.; Soeraas, F.; Aarsnes, K.

    1978-06-01

    The latitudinal morphology of >100 keV protons at different local times has been studied as a function of substorm activity Acharacteristic pattern has been found: During quiet times there is an isotropic zone centered around 67 0 near midnight, but located on higher latitudes towards dusk and dawn. This zone moves slightly equatorward during the substorm growth phase. During the expansive phase the precipitation spreads poleward apparently to approximately 71 0 near midnight. The protons are precipitated over a large local time interval on the night side, but the most intense fluxes are found in the pre-midnight sector. A further poleward expansion, to more than 75 0 near midnight, seems to take place late in the substorm. Away from midnight the expansion reaches even higher latitudes. During the recovery phase the intensity of the expanded region decreases gradually; the poleward boundary is almost stationary if the interplanetary magnetic field has a northward component and no further substorm activity takes place. Mainly protons with energy below approximately 500 keV are precipitated in the expanded region. On the dayside no increase in the precipitation rates is found during substorm expansion, but late in the substorm an enhanced precipitation is found, covering several degrees of latitude. The low-latitude anisotropic precipitation zone is remarkably stable during substorms. A schematic model is presented and discussed in relation to earlier results. (Auth.)

  15. A joint Cluster and ground-based instruments study of two magnetospheric substorm events on 1 September 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Draper

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a coordinated ground- and space-based multi-instrument study of two magnetospheric substorm events that occurred on 1 September 2002, during the interval from 18:00 UT to 24:00 UT. Data from the Cluster and Polar spacecraft are considered in combination with ground-based magnetometer and HF radar data. During the first substorm event the Cluster spacecraft, which were in the Northern Hemisphere lobe, are to the west of the main region affected by the expansion phase. Nevertheless, substorm signatures are seen by Cluster at 18:25 UT (just after the expansion phase onset as seen on the ground at 18:23 UT, despite the ~5 RE} distance of the spacecraft from the plasma sheet. The Cluster spacecraft then encounter an earthward-moving diamagnetic cavity at 19:10 UT, having just entered the plasma sheet boundary layer. The second substorm expansion phase is preceded by pseudobreakups at 22:40 and 22:56 UT, at which time thinning of the near-Earth, L=6.6, plasma sheet occurs. The expansion phase onset at 23:05 UT is seen simultaneously in the ground magnetic field, in the magnetotail and at Polar's near-Earth position. The response in the ionospheric flows occurs one minute later. The second substorm better fits the near-Earth neutral line model for substorm onset than the cross-field current instability model. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetosphereionosphere interactions; Magnetic reconnection; Auroral phenomenon

  16. Substorms during different storm phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available After the deep solar minimum at the end of the solar cycle 23, a small magnetic storm occurred on 20–26 January 2010. The Dst (disturbance storm time index reached the minimum of −38 nT on 20 January and the prolonged recovery that followed the main phase that lasted for about 6 days. In this study, we concentrate on three substorms that took place (1 just prior to the storm, (2 during the main phase of the storm, and (3 at the end of the recovery of the storm. We analyse the solar wind conditions from the solar wind monitoring spacecraft, the duration and intensity of the substorm events as well as the behaviour of the electrojet currents from the ground magnetometer measurements. We compare the precipitation characteristics of the three substorms. The results show that the F-region electron density enhancements and dominant green and red auroral emission of the substorm activity during the storm recovery resembles average isolated substorm precipitation. However, the energy dissipated, even at the very end of a prolonged storm recovery, is very large compared to the typical energy content of isolated substorms. In the case studied here, the dissipation of the excess energy is observed over a 3-h long period of several consecutive substorm intensifications. Our findings suggest that the substorm energy dissipation varies between the storm phases.

  17. Correlated observations of several auroral substorms on February 17, 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hones, E.W. Jr.; Akasofu, S.; Wolcott, J.H.; Bame, S.J.; Fairfield, D.H.; Meng, C.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to correlate in detail auroral activity with the corresponding disturbances in the magnetotail. The auroral data were recorded by optical instruments aboard an airplane flying over the Arctic Ocean along the Alaska meridian and by the Alaska meridian chain of all-sky cameras. The corresponding magnetotail observations were made by various instruments on Vela 6A and Imp 5; the interplanetary magnetic field was monitored concurrently by Explorer 35 (Imp E). Three successive substorms were observed on February 17, 1971. Each substorm was readily identified by the classical auroral and magnetic signatures which accompanied its onset. The observed variations of plasma and magnetic field in the magnetotail were consistent with the idea that a neutral line formed in the range approx.-12 R/subE/>X/subS//subM/>-18 R/subE/ at the onset of each substorm expansive phase and then moved tailward past X/subS//subM/=-18 R/subE/ some tens of minutes afterward. The Z component of the tail magnetic field decreased rather steadily for a period of 1--21/2 hours after each substorm and until the onset of the next expansive phase, reaching a minimum value just before each onset. This taillike development of the field is more appropriately regarded as the normal evolutionary pattern of variation between substorms than as a 'growth phase' preceding each substorm

  18. Development of the Near-Earth Magnetotail and the Auroral Arc Associated with Substorm Onset: Evidence for a New Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Y.; Hiraki, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Ieda, A.; Machida, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the time sequence of the development of the near-Earth magnetotail and the auroral arc associated with a substorm onset, using the data from the THEMIS spacecraft and ground-based observatories at high temporal and spatial resolutions. We discuss four steps of the auroral development, linking them to magnetotail changes: the auroral fading, the initial brightening of an auroral onset arc, the enhancement of the wave-like structure, and the poleward expansion. A case study shows that near-Earth magnetic reconnection began at X~-17 RE at least ~3 min before the auroral initial brightening and ~1 min before the auroral fading. Ionospheric large-scale convection also became enhanced just before the auroral fading and before the auroral initial brightening. Then low-frequency waves were amplified in the plasma sheet at X~-10 RE, with the pressure increase due to the arrival of the earthward flow from the near-Earth reconnection site ~20 s before the enhancement of the auroral wave-like structure. Finally, the dipolarization began ~30 s before the auroral poleward expansion. On the basis of the present observations, we suggest that near-Earth magnetic reconnection plays two roles in the substorm triggering. First, it generates a fast earthward flow and Alfvén waves. When the Alfvén waves which propagate much faster than the fast flow reach the ionosphere, large-scale ionospheric convection is enhanced, leading to the auroral initial brightening and subsequent gradual growth of the auroral wave-like structure. Second, when the reconnection-initiated fast flow reaches the near-Earth magnetotail, it promotes rapid growth of an instability, such as the ballooning instability, and the auroral wave-like structure is further enhanced. When the instability grows sufficiently, the dipolarization and the auroral poleward expansion are initiated.

  19. The convection electric field in auroral substorms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) electric field and ion drift data are used in a statistical study of the ionospheric convection electric field in bulge-type auroral substorms. Thirty-one individual DE 2 substorm crossings were carefully selected and organized by the use of global auroral images obtained...... this database enabled us to compile a model of the ionospheric convection electric field. The characteristics of the premidnight convection reversal show a pronounced local time dependency. Far west of the surge it is a fairly well defined point reversal or convection shear. Approaching the surge and within...... the surge it is a region of weak electric fields increasing in width toward midnight that separates regions of equatorward and poleward electric fields. Therefore we adopt the term Harang region rather than the Harang discontinuity for the premidnight convection reversal. A relatively narrow convection...

  20. Dynamics of the 1054 UT March 22, 1979, substorm event: CDAW 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPherron, R.L.; Manka, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The physical processes involved in the transfer of energy from the solar wind to the magnetosphere, and release associated with substorms, have been examined in a sequence of Coordinated Data Analysis Workshops (CDAW 6). Magnetic storms of March 22 and 31, 1979, were chosen to study the problem, using a data base from 13 spacecraft and about 130 ground-based magnetometers. This paper describes the March 22 storm, in particular the large, isolated substorm at 1054 UT which followed an interval of magnetic calm. We summarize the observations in the solar wind, in various regions of the magnetosphre, and at the ground, synthesizing these observations into a description of the substorn development. We then give our interpretation of these observations and test their consistency with the reconnection model. The substorm appears to have been generated by a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field associated with a current sheet crossing. Models of ionospheric currents derived from ground data show the substorm had three phases of development. During the first phase, a two-celled convection current system developed in the polar cap as synchronous spacecraft on the nightside recorded an increasingly tailike field and the ISEE measurements show that the near-earth plasma sheet thinned. In the second phase, possibly triggered by sudden changes in the solar wind, a one-celled current system was added to the first, enhancing the westward electrojet. During this phase the synchronous orbit field became more dipolar, and the plasma sheet magnetic field turned strongly southward as rapid tailward flow developed soon after expansion onset, suggesting that a neutral line formed in the near-earth plasma sheet with subsequent plasmoid ejection

  1. The effect of nonlinear ionospheric conductivity enhancement on magnetospheric substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Spencer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the effect of enhanced ionospheric conductivity into a low-order, physics-based nonlinear model of the nightside magnetosphere called WINDMI. The model uses solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF parameters from the ACE satellite located at the L1 point to predict substorm growth, onset, expansion and recovery measured by the AL index roughly 50–60 min in advance. The dynamics introduced by the conductivity enhancement into the model behavior is described, and illustrated through using synthetically constructed solar wind parameters as input. We use the new model to analyze two well-documented isolated substorms: one that occurred on 31 July 1997 from Aksnes et al. (2002, and another on 13 April 2000 from Huang et al. (2004. These two substorms have a common feature in that the solar wind driver sharply decreases in the early part of the recovery phase, and that neither of them are triggered by northward turning of the IMF Bz. By controlling the model parameters such that the onset time of the substorm is closely adhered to, the westward auroral electrojet peaks during substorm expansion are qualitatively reproduced. Furthermore, the electrojet recovers more slowly with enhanced conductivity playing a role, which explains the data more accurately.

  2. EISCAT observations of unusual flows in the morning sector associated with weak substorm activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Fox

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available A discussion is given of plasma flows in the dawn and nightside high-latitude ionospheric regions during substorms occurring on a contracted auroral oval, as observed using the EISCAT CP-4-A experiment. Supporting data from the PACE radar, Greenland magnetometer chain, SAMNET magnetometers and geostationary satellites are compared to the EISCAT observations. On 4 October 1989 a weak substorm with initial expansion phase onset signatures at 0030 UT, resulted in the convection reversal boundary observed by EISCAT (at ~0415 MLT contracting rapidly poleward, causing a band of elevated ionospheric ion temperatures and a localised plasma density depletion. This polar cap contraction event is shown to be associated with various substorm signatures; Pi2 pulsations at mid-latitudes, magnetic bays in the midnight sector and particle injections at geosynchronous orbit. A similar event was observed on the following day around 0230 UT (~0515 MLT with the unusual and significant difference that two convection reversals were observed, both contracting poleward. We show that this feature is not an ionospheric signature of two active reconnection neutral lines as predicted by the near-Earth neutral model before the plasmoid is "pinched off", and present two alternative explanations in terms of (1 viscous and lobe circulation cells and (2 polar cap contraction during northward IMF. The voltage associated with the anti-sunward flow between the reversals reaches a maximum of 13 kV during the substorm expansion phase. This suggests it to be associated with the polar cap contraction and caused by the reconnection of open flux in the geomagnetic tail which has mimicked "viscous-like" momentum transfer across the magnetopause.

  3. EISCAT observations of unusual flows in the morning sector associated with weak substorm activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Fox

    Full Text Available A discussion is given of plasma flows in the dawn and nightside high-latitude ionospheric regions during substorms occurring on a contracted auroral oval, as observed using the EISCAT CP-4-A experiment. Supporting data from the PACE radar, Greenland magnetometer chain, SAMNET magnetometers and geostationary satellites are compared to the EISCAT observations. On 4 October 1989 a weak substorm with initial expansion phase onset signatures at 0030 UT, resulted in the convection reversal boundary observed by EISCAT (at ~0415 MLT contracting rapidly poleward, causing a band of elevated ionospheric ion temperatures and a localised plasma density depletion. This polar cap contraction event is shown to be associated with various substorm signatures; Pi2 pulsations at mid-latitudes, magnetic bays in the midnight sector and particle injections at geosynchronous orbit. A similar event was observed on the following day around 0230 UT (~0515 MLT with the unusual and significant difference that two convection reversals were observed, both contracting poleward. We show that this feature is not an ionospheric signature of two active reconnection neutral lines as predicted by the near-Earth neutral model before the plasmoid is "pinched off", and present two alternative explanations in terms of (1 viscous and lobe circulation cells and (2 polar cap contraction during northward IMF. The voltage associated with the anti-sunward flow between the reversals reaches a maximum of 13 kV during the substorm expansion phase. This suggests it to be associated with the polar cap contraction and caused by the reconnection of open flux in the geomagnetic tail which has mimicked "viscous-like" momentum transfer across the magnetopause.

  4. Method to locate the polar cap boundary in the nightside ionosphere and application to a substorm event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Aikio

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a new method to be used for the polar cap boundary (PCB determination in the nightside ionosphere by using the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR field-aligned measurements by the 42-m antenna and southward directed low-elevation measurements by the ESR 32 m antenna or northward directed low-elevation measurements by the EISCAT VHF radar at Tromsø. The method is based on increased electron temperature (Te caused by precipitating particles on closed field lines. Since the Svalbard field-aligned measurement provides the reference polar cap Te height profile, the method can be utilised only when the PCB is located between Svalbard and the mainland. Comparison with the Polar UVI images shows that the radar-based method is generally in agreement with the PAE (poleward auroral emission boundary from Polar UVI. The new technique to map the polar cap boundary was applied to a substorm event on 6 November 2002. Simultaneous measurements by the MIRACLE magnetometers enabled us to put the PCB location in the framework of ionospheric electrojets. During the substorm growth phase, the polar cap expands and the region of the westward electrojet shifts gradually more apart from the PCB. The substorm onset takes place deep within the region of closed magnetic field region, separated by about 6–7° in latitude from the PCB in the ionosphere. We interpret the observations in the framework of the near-Earth neutral line (NENL model of substorms. After the substorm onset, the reconnection at the NENL reaches within 3 min the open-closed field line boundary and then the PCB moves poleward together with the poleward boundary of the substorm current wedge. The poleward expansion occurs in the form of individual bursts, which are separated by 2–10 min, indicating that the reconnection in the magnetotail neutral line is impulsive. The poleward expansions of the PCB are followed by latitude dispersed intensifications in the westward electrojet

  5. Solar wind and substorm excitation of the wavy current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Forsyth

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Following a solar wind pressure pulse on 3 August 2001, GOES 8, GOES 10, Cluster and Polar observed dipolarizations of the magnetic field, accompanied by an eastward expansion of the aurora observed by IMAGE, indicating the occurrence of two substorms. Prior to the first substorm, the motion of the plasma sheet with respect to Cluster was in the ZGSM direction. Observations following the substorms show the occurrence of current sheet waves moving predominantly in the −YGSM direction. Following the second substorm, the current sheet waves caused multiple current sheet crossings of the Cluster spacecraft, previously studied by Zhang et al. (2002. We further this study to show that the velocity of the current sheet waves was similar to the expansion velocity of the substorm aurora and the expansion of the dipolarization regions in the magnetotail. Furthermore, we compare these results with the current sheet wave models of Golovchanskaya and Maltsev (2005 and Erkaev et al. (2008. We find that the Erkaev et al. (2008 model gives the best fit to the observations.

  6. Solar wind and substorm excitation of the wavy current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Forsyth

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Following a solar wind pressure pulse on 3 August 2001, GOES 8, GOES 10, Cluster and Polar observed dipolarizations of the magnetic field, accompanied by an eastward expansion of the aurora observed by IMAGE, indicating the occurrence of two substorms. Prior to the first substorm, the motion of the plasma sheet with respect to Cluster was in the ZGSM direction. Observations following the substorms show the occurrence of current sheet waves moving predominantly in the −YGSM direction. Following the second substorm, the current sheet waves caused multiple current sheet crossings of the Cluster spacecraft, previously studied by Zhang et al. (2002. We further this study to show that the velocity of the current sheet waves was similar to the expansion velocity of the substorm aurora and the expansion of the dipolarization regions in the magnetotail. Furthermore, we compare these results with the current sheet wave models of Golovchanskaya and Maltsev (2005 and Erkaev et al. (2008. We find that the Erkaev et al. (2008 model gives the best fit to the observations.

  7. Plasma sheet behavior during substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hones, E.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Auroral or magnetic substorms are periods of enhanced auroral and geomagnetic activity lasting one to a few hours that signify increased dissipation of energy from the magnetosphere to the earth. Data acquired during the past decade from satellites in the near-earth sector of the magnetotail have suggested that during a substorm part of the plasma sheet is severed from earth by magnetic reconnection, forming a plasmoid, i.e., a body of plasma and closed magnetic loops, that flows out of the tail into the solar wind, thus returning plasma and energy that have earlier been accumulated from the solar wind. Very recently this picture has been dramatically confirmed by observations, with the ISEE 3 spacecraft in the magnetotail 220 R/sub E/ from earth, of plasmoids passing that location in clear delayed response to substorms. It now appears that plasmoid release is a fundamental process whereby the magnetosphere gives up excess stored energy and plasma, much like comets are seen to do, and that the phenomena of the substorm seen at earth are a by-product of that fundamental process

  8. Main Ionospheric Trough and Equatorial Ionization Anomaly During Substorms With the Different UT Onset Moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Bryukhanov, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    In the given work the numerical calculation results of ionospheric effects of four modeling substorms which have begun in 00, 06, 12 and 18 UT are presented. Calculations are executed on the basis of Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP), developed in WD IZMIRAN, added by the new block of calculation of electric fields in the ionosphere of the Earth for vernal equinox conditions in the minimum of solar activity. In calculations we considered superposition of magnetospheric convection electric field (at set potential differences through polar caps and field aligned currents of the second zone with taking into account of particle precipitation) and dynamo field generated by thermospheric winds without taking into account the tides. It is shown, that in the given statement of problem the substorms cause strong positive disturbances in F-region of ionosphere in night sector. Negative disturbances are much less and arise, mainly, at night in the middle and low latitudes. During substorms longitudinal extent of main ionospheric trough increases. The substorm beginning in 18 UT, causes negative disturbances in high latitudes except for a southern polar cap. Besides there is "stratification" of the main ionospheric trough. As a result in southern hemisphere the additional high-latitude trough which is absent in quiet conditions is formed. "Stratification" of the main ionospheric trough occurs in northern hemisphere at 6 hours after the beginning of the substorm. These "stratifications" are consequence non-stationary magnetospheric convection. Distinction between these events consists that "stratification" in a southern hemisphere occurs in active phase of substorm, and in northern hemisphere in recovery phase. During a substorm beginning in 00 UT, foF2 increases in all northern polar cap. Positive disturbances of foF2 in the equatorial anomaly region cause all presented substorms, except for a substorm beginning in 18 UT

  9. Electron dynamics during substorm dipolarization in Mercury's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine the nonlinear dynamics of electrons during the expansion phase of substorms at Mercury using test particle simulations. A simple model of magnetic field line dipolarization is designed by rescaling a magnetic field model of the Earth's magnetosphere. The results of the simulations demonstrate that electrons may be subjected to significant energization on the time scale (several seconds of the magnetic field reconfiguration. In a similar manner to ions in the near-Earth's magnetosphere, it is shown that low-energy (up to several tens of eV electrons may not conserve the second adiabatic invariant during dipolarization, which leads to clusters of bouncing particles in the innermost magnetotail. On the other hand, it is found that, because of the stretching of the magnetic field lines, high-energy electrons (several keVs and above do not behave adiabatically and possibly experience meandering (Speiser-type motion around the midplane. We show that dipolarization of the magnetic field lines may be responsible for significant, though transient, (a few seconds precipitation of energetic (several keVs electrons onto the planet's surface. Prominent injections of energetic trapped electrons toward the planet are also obtained as a result of dipolarization. These injections, however, do not exhibit short-lived temporal modulations, as observed by Mariner-10, which thus appear to follow from a different mechanism than a simple convection surge.

  10. The energetic ion substorm injection boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.E.; Sibeck, D.G.; McEntire, R.W.; Krimigis, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    The substorm injection boundary model has enjoyed considerable success in explaining plasma signatures in the near-geosynchronous region. However, the injection boundary has remained primarily a phenomenological model. In this paper the authors examine 167 dispersionless energetic ion injections which were observed by AMPTE CCE. The radial and local time distribution of the events as a function of Kp is qualitatively similar to that envisioned in the injection boundary model of Mauk and McIlwain (1974). They argue that particles observed during dispersionless injections are locally energized during the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet. Therefore they identify the injection boundary, as derived from the spatial distribution of dispersionless injections, with the earthward edge of the region of the magnetotail which undergoes current sheet disruption during the substorm expansion phase. The authors show that this qualitative model for the generation of the injection boundary can provide an explanation for the dispersionless nature, the double spiral shape, and the Kp dependence of the boundary

  11. Seasonal and Temporal Variations of Field-Aligned Currents and Ground Magnetic Deflections During Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, C.; Shortt, M.; Coxon, J. C.; Rae, I. J.; Freeman, M. P.; Kalmoni, N. M. E.; Jackman, C. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Milan, S. E.; Burrell, A. G.

    2018-04-01

    Field-aligned currents (FACs), also known as Birkeland currents, are the agents by which energy and momentum are transferred to the ionosphere from the magnetosphere and solar wind. This coupling is enhanced at substorm onset through the formation of the substorm current wedge. Using FAC data from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment and substorm expansion phase onsets identified using the Substorm Onsets and Phases from Indices of the Electrojet technique, we examine the Northern Hemisphere FACs in all local time sectors with respect to substorm onset and subdivided by season. Our results show that while there is a strong seasonal dependence on the underlying FACs, the increase in FACs following substorm onset only varies by 10% with season, with substorms increasing the hemispheric FACs by 420 kA on average. Over an hour prior to substorm onset, the dayside currents in the postnoon quadrant increase linearly, whereas the nightside currents show a linear increase starting 20-30 min before onset. After onset, the nightside Region 1, Region 2, and nonlocally closed currents and the SuperMAG AL (SML) index follow the Weimer (1994, https://doi.org/10.1029/93JA02721) model with the same time constants in each season. These results contrast earlier contradictory studies that indicate that substorms are either longer in the summer or decay faster in the summer. Our results imply that, on average, substorm FACs do not change with season but that their relative impact on the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system does due to the changes in the underlying currents.

  12. Multipoint observations of a small substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.E.; Luehr, H.; Anderson, B.J.; Newell, P.T.; McEntire, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the authors present multipoint observations of a small substorm which occurred just after 0110 UT on April 25, 1985. The observations were made by spacecraft (AMPTE CCE, AMPTE IRM, DMSP F6, and DMSP F7), ground auroral stations (EISCAT magnetometer cross, Syowa, Narssarssuaq, Great Whale River, and Fort Churchill), and mid-latitude stations (Furstenfeldbruck, Toledo, and Argentine Island). These data provide them with a broad range of observations, including the latitudinal extent of the polar cap, visual identification of substorm aurorae and the magnetic perturbations produced directly beneath them, in situ magnetic field and energetic particle observations of the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet, and observations concerning the spatial expansion of the current disruption region from two radially aligned spacecraft. The DMSP data indicate that the event took place during a period when the polar cap was relatively contracted, yet the disruption of the current sheet was observed by CCE at 8.56 R E . They have been able to infer a considerable amount of detail concerning the structure and westward expansion of the auroral features associated with the event, and they show that those auroral surges were located more than 10 degree equatorward of the boundary between open and closed field lines. Moreover, they present evidence that the current sheet disruption observed by CCE in the neutral sheet was located on field lines which mapped to the westward traveling surge observed directly overhead of the ground station at Syowa. Furthermore, the observations strongly imply that disruption of the cross-tail current began in the near-Earth region and that it had a component of expansion which was radially antisunward

  13. Plasmasheet boundary electric fields during substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, A.

    1985-01-01

    Electric field data from the ISEE-1 and GEOS-2 satellites have been studied during two substorms when ISEE-1 was in a favourable position in the magneto-tail and GEOS-2 was in the afternoon/evening sector of the geostationary orbit. Both electric field measurements were carried out with spherical double probes, separately by 73.5 m on ISEE-1, and 42 m on GEOS-2. In one case GEOS-2, in the afternoon sector, detected an increase of the dawn-to-dusk electric field during plasmasheet thinning and approximately 10 minutes prior to a substorm expansion. At the time of this expansion ISEE-1 was most likely near an X-line, on the Earthward side and detected Earthward antiE x antiB velocities, in excess of 500 km s -1 . In another example ISEE-1 was most likely near an X-line, on the tailward side, and observed tailward antiE x antiB velocities which were followed, 5-20 minutes later, by characteristic oscillating electric fields (time scales of 10s-30s) on GEOS-2 near 23 local time. Such signatures have on many occasions been connected with observations of westward travelling surges near the GEOS-2 conjugated area in Scandinavia. The ISEE-1 observations of large-dawn-to-dusk electric fields were concentrated to the outer boundary of the plasmasheet, and in the case of the westward travelling surge. GEOS-2 was most likely at the inner, Earthward edge of the plasmasheet. Time delays between ISEE-1 and GEOS-2 indicate a propagation velocity comparable to the antiE x antiB velocity

  14. Current understanding of magnetic storms: Storm-substorm relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, Y.; Gonzalez, W.D.; Baumjohann, W.; Daglis, I.A.; Grande, M.; Joselyn, J.A.; Singer, H.J.; McPherron, R.L.; Phillips, J.L.; Reeves, E.G.; Rostoker, G.; Sharma, A.S.; Tsurutani, B.T.

    1998-01-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the current understanding of the storm/substorm relationship by clearing up a considerable amount of controversy and by addressing the question of how solar wind energy is deposited into and is dissipated in the constituent elements that are critical to magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during magnetic storms. (1) Four mechanisms are identified and discussed as the primary causes of enhanced electric fields in the interplanetary medium responsible for geomagnetic storms. It is pointed out that in reality, these four mechanisms, which are not mutually exclusive, but interdependent, interact differently from event to event. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are found to be the primary phenomena responsible for the main phase of geomagnetic storms. The other two mechanisms, i.e., HILDCAA (high-intensity, long-duration, continuous auroral electrojet activity) and the so-called Russell-McPherron effect, work to make the ICME and CIR phenomena more geoeffective. The solar cycle dependence of the various sources in creating magnetic storms has yet to be quantitatively understood. (2) A serious controversy exists as to whether the successive occurrence of intense substorms plays a direct role in the energization of ring current particles or whether the enhanced electric field associated with southward IMF enhances the effect of substorm expansions. While most of the Dst variance during magnetic storms can be solely reproduced by changes in the large-scale electric field in the solar wind and the residuals are uncorrelated with substorms, recent satellite observations of the ring current constituents during the main phase of magnetic storms show the importance of ionospheric ions. This implies that ionospheric ions, which are associated with the frequent occurrence of intense substorms, are accelerated upward along magnetic field lines, contributing to the energy density of the

  15. Substorm-related thermospheric density and wind disturbances derived from CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ritter

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The input of energy and momentum from the magnetosphere is most efficiently coupled into the high latitude ionosphere-thermosphere. The phenomenon we are focusing on here is the magnetospheric substorm. This paper presents substorm related observations of the thermosphere derived from the CHAMP satellite. With its sensitive accelerometer the satellite can measure the air density and zonal winds. Based on a large number of substorm events the average high and low latitude thermospheric response to substorm onsets was deduced. During magnetic substorms the thermospheric density is enhanced first at high latitudes. Then the disturbance travels at an average speed of 650 m/s to lower latitudes, and 3–4 h later the bulge reaches the equator on the night side. Under the influence of the Coriolis force the travelling atmospheric disturbance (TAD is deflected westward. In accordance with present-day atmospheric models the disturbance zonal wind velocities during substorms are close to zero near the equator before midnight and attain moderate westward velocities after midnight. In general, the wind system is only weakly perturbed (Δvy<20 m/s by substorms.

  16. Observations of the Ionospheric Response to a Weak Substorm Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, A.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Ohtani, S.; Nikoukar, R.; Forte, B.

    2015-12-01

    We present observations of substorm onset at Tromsø, Norway. This event was unusually well observed by ground magnetometers, incoherent scatter radar, satellites, an allsky camera and a scintillation monitor in the vicinity of the onset location. At onset, ground magnetometer observations indicate the formation of a westward electrojet above Tromsø and, at the same location, allsky camera images show an arc brightening and moving poleward. Satellite observations are consistent with an onset location at Tromsø, followed by a westward surge of dipolarization. Two features of the ionospheric response are observed by the incoherent scatter radar at Tromsø: 1) At onset, ion drift velocities reduce sharply from 100-400 m/s to roughly zero, consistent with a field-aligned potential drop shielding the ionosphere from magnetospheric convection. 2) There is a two-stage enhancement of the westward electrojet, with each stage directly preceded by an increase of ionization. Both these features are consistent with the theory that the inner magnetosphere acts neither as a current nor a voltage generator during substorm onset. Figure shows EISCAT observations of line-of-sight ion drifts, electron and ion temperatures. There is a transition from ExB drift, indicated by a decrease in ion velocity in panel (a), to electron precipitation indicated by increased electron temperatures in panel (b). Substorm onset occurs at the transition time, around 20:02:30 UT.

  17. Near-earth Thin Current Sheets and Birkeland Currents during Substorm Growth Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorin Zaharia; Cheng, C.Z.

    2003-01-01

    Two important phenomena observed during the magnetospheric substorm growth phase are modeled: the formation of a near-Earth (|X| ∼ 9 R E ) thin cross-tail current sheet, as well as the equatorward shift of the ionospheric Birkeland currents. Our study is performed by solving the 3-D force-balance equation with realistic boundary conditions and pressure distributions. The results show a cross-tail current sheet with large current (J φ ∼ 10 nA/m 2 ) and very high plasma β (β ∼ 40) between 7 and 10 R E . The obtained region-1 and region-2 Birkeland currents, formed on closed field lines due to pressure gradients, move equatorward and become more intense (J parallel max ∼ 3 (micro)A/m 2 ) compared to quiet times. Both results are in agreement with substorm growth phase observations. Our results also predict that the cross-tail current sheet maps into the ionosphere in the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents

  18. Variations in the polar cap area during two substorm cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This study employs observations from several sources to determine the location of the polar cap boundary, or open/closed field line boundary, at all local times, allowing the amount of open flux in the magnetosphere to be quantified. These data sources include global auroral images from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI instrument on board the Polar spacecraft, SuperDARN HF radar measurements of the convection flow, and low altitude particle measurements from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA satellites, and the Fast Auroral SnapshoT (FAST spacecraft. Changes in the open flux content of the magnetosphere are related to the rate of magnetic reconnection occurring at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail, allowing us to estimate the day- and nightside reconnection voltages during two substorm cycles. Specifically, increases in the polar cap area are found to be consistent with open flux being created when the IMF is oriented southwards and low-latitude magnetopause reconnection is ongoing, and decreases in area correspond to open flux being destroyed at substorm breakup. The polar cap area can continue to decrease for 100 min following the onset of substorm breakup, continuing even after substorm-associated auroral features have died away. An estimate of the dayside reconnection voltage, determined from plasma drift measurements in the ionosphere, indicates that reconnection can take place at all local times along the dayside portion of the polar cap boundary, and hence presumably across the majority of the dayside magnetopause. The observation of ionospheric signatures of bursty reconnection over a wide extent of local times supports this finding.Key words. Ionosphere (plasma convection; polar ionosphere – Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics

  19. Comparison of Echo 7 field line length measurements to magnetospheric model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemzek, R.J.; Winckler, J.R.; Malcolm, P.R.

    1992-01-01

    The Echo 7 sounding rocket experiment injected electron beams on central tail field lines near L = 6.5. Numerous injections returned to the payload as conjugate echoes after mirroring in the southern hemisphere. The authors compare field line lengths calculated from measured conjugate echo bounce times and energies to predictions made by integrating electron trajectories through various magnetospheric models: the Olson-Pfitzer Quiet and Dynamic models and the Tsyganenko-Usmanov model. Although Kp at launch was 3-, quiet time magnetic models est fit the echo measurements. Geosynchronous satellite magnetometer measurements near the Echo 7 field lies during the flight were best modeled by the Olson-Pfitzer Dynamic Model and the Tsyganenko-Usmanov model for Kp = 3. The discrepancy between the models that best fit the Echo 7 data and those that fit the satellite data was most likely due to uncertainties in the small-scale configuration of the magnetospheric models. The field line length measured by the conjugate echoes showed some temporal variation in the magnetic field, also indicated by the satellite magnetometers. This demonstrates the utility an Echo-style experiment could have in substorm studies

  20. Evolution of the dispersionless injection boundary associated with substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sarris

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available One manifestation of energetic particle acceleration during magnetospheric substorms is the sudden appearance of particle injections into the inner magnetosphere, often observed near geosynchronous orbit. Injections that show simultaneous flux increases in all energy ranges of a detector are called dispersionless injections, and are most often observed in a narrow region around local midnight. In these events it is assumed that the satellite is located close to or inside the region where acceleration and/or transport processes are taking place, called the injection region. We present a study of the location, extent and temporal evolution of the injection region, based on simulation results of a model of the expansion of the electric and magnetic fields associated with a substorm. The model simulates the fields during a substorm onset with an electric field and consistent magnetic field pulse that propagates towards the Earth with a decreasing speed. Our simulation shows that the dispersionless injection boundary can be considered coincident with the leading edge of the pulse field, which transports particles toward the Earth across a certain range of local time. Under the same model field, the dispersionless injection boundary shifts eastward for electrons and westward for protons, consistent with the observation results deduced from statistical analysis of multiple spacecraft measurements.

  1. From the Solar Wind to the Magnetospheric Substorm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.A. Ponomarev; P.A. Sedykh; O.V. Mager

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives a brief outline of the progression from the first substorm model developed in Ref.[4] and [8] based on Kennel's ideas[3], to the present views about the mechanism by which solar wind kinetic energy is converted to electromagnetic energy at the Bow Shock and by which this energy is transferred to the magnetosphere in the form of current; about the transformation of the energy of this current to gas kinetic energy of convecting plasma tubes, and, finally, the back transformation of gas kinetic energy to electromagnetic energy in secondary magnetospheric MHD generators. The questions of the formation of the magnetospheric convection system, the nature of substorm break-up, and of the matching of currents in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system are discussed.

  2. Polar cap contraction and expansion during a period of substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikio, Anita; Pitkänen, Timo; Honkonen, Ilja; Palmroth, Minna; Amm, Olaf

    We have studied the variations in the polar cap area and related parameters during a period of four substorms on February 18, 2004, following an extended quiet period. The measurements were obtained by the EISCAT incoherent scatter radars, MIRACLE magnetometers, Geotail and solar wind satellites. In addition, the event is modeled by the GUMICS-4 MHD simulation. By using the measured and modeled data, the dayside and nightside reconnection voltages are calculated. The results show a good general agreement in the polar cap boundary (PCB) location as estimated by the EISCAT radars and the GUMICS simulation. Deviations are found, too, like shorter durations of expansion phases in the simulation. Geotail measurements of the inclination angle of the magnetic field in the tail (Xgsm= -22 Re) agree with the PCB latitude variations measured by EISCAT at a different MLT. We conclude that a large polar cap corresponds to a stretched tail configuration in the near-Earth tail and a small polar cap to a more dipolar configuration. The substorm onsets took place during southward IMF. A specific feature is that the substorm expansion phases were not associated with significant contractions of the polar cap. Even though nightside reconnection voltages started to increase during expansion phases, maximum closure of open flux took place in the recovery phases. We shortly discuss implications of the observation to the definition of the recovery phase.

  3. The expansive phase of magnetospheric substorms 2. The response at synchronous altitude of particles of different energy ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostoker, G.; Kisabeth, J.L.; Sharp, R.D.; Shelley, E.G.

    1975-01-01

    Several previous studies have shown that there are variations in the energetic particle populations at synchronous orbit during periods of substorm activity; however, in these investigations the precise location of the satellite with respect to the longitudinal regime experiencing expansion phase activity has been unknown. In this paper, data from the Lockheed particle detectors on ATS 5 in synchronous orbit and from the meridian line of magnetometers operated by the University of Alberta are correlated for periods of substorm activity where the position of the satellite with respect to the expansion phase regime is known. It is found that changes in the nature of the energetic particle signatures at ATS 5 are correlated with changes in the auroral electrojet structure during the development of the substorm expansive phase. In particular, it is found that marked increases in the fluxes of the energetic particles showing no dispersion among the energy channels occur only when the satellite is on field lines which map to the poleward border of the substorm-intensified westward electrojet. It is further found that when the satellite is on field lines which penetrate the heart of the substorm westward electrojet, one only observes steady high fluxes of energetic particles, and there are no sharp well-defined changes in fluxes associated with continuing impulsive intensifications of the electrojet at its poleward border. It is concluded that the substorm disturbance typically begins at a given latitude and propagates poleward steps and that energetic electron enhancements are observed at ATS 5 when the poleward border of the electrojet intensifies in the latitude range of the ATS field line foot. This fact permits the mapping of field lines in the geographic equatorial plane to the earth's surface at specific instants during the substorm expansion phase

  4. Inductive electric fields in the magnetotail and their relation to auroral and substorm phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellinen, R.J.; Heikkila, W.J.

    1982-11-01

    The paper reviews the importance of inductive electric fields in explaining different magnetospheric and auroral phenomena during moderately and highly distrubed conditions. Quiet-time particle energization and temporal development of the tail structure during the substorm growth phase are explained by the presence of a large-scale elctrostatic field directed from dawn to dusk over the magentotail. Conservation of the first adiabatic invariant in the neutral sheet with a small value of the gradient in the magnetic field implies that the longitudical energy increases at each crossing of the neutral sheet. At a certain moment, this may result in a rapid local growth of the current and in an instability that triggers the onset. During the growth phase energy is stored in the magnetic field, since the energy density in the electric field is negligible compared to that of the magnetic field. An analytical model is described in which the characteristic observations of a substorm onset are taken into account. One major feature is that the triggering is confined to a small local time sector. During moderate disturbances, the induction fields in the magnetotail are stronger by at least one order of magnitude than the average cross-tail field. Temporal development of the disturbed area results in X- and O-type neutral lines. Particles near to these neutral lines are energized to over 1 MeV energies within a few seconds, due to an effective combination of linear and betatron acceleration. The rotational property of the induction field promotes energization in a restricted area wiht dimensions equivalent to a few Earth's radii. The model also predicts the existence of highly localized cable-type field-aligned currents appearing on the eastern and western edges of the expanding auroral bulge

  5. Neural Network Substorm Identification: Enabling TREx Sensor Web Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaddock, D.; Spanswick, E.; Arnason, K. M.; Donovan, E.; Liang, J.; Ahmad, S.; Jackel, B. J.

    2017-12-01

    Transition Region Explorer (TREx) is a ground-based sensor web of optical and radio instruments that is presently being deployed across central Canada. The project consists of an array of co-located blue-line, full-colour, and near-infrared all-sky imagers, imaging riometers, proton aurora spectrographs, and GNSS systems. A key goal of the TREx project is to create the world's first (artificial) intelligent sensor web for remote sensing space weather. The sensor web will autonomously control and coordinate instrument operations in real-time. To accomplish this, we will use real-time in-line analytics of TREx and other data to dynamically switch between operational modes. An operating mode could be, for example, to have a blue-line imager gather data at a one or two orders of magnitude higher cadence than it operates for its `baseline' mode. The software decision to increase the imaging cadence would be in response to an anticipated increase in auroral activity or other programmatic requirements. Our first test for TREx's sensor web technologies is to develop the capacity to autonomously alter the TREx operating mode prior to a substorm expansion phase onset. In this paper, we present our neural network analysis of historical optical and riometer data and our ability to predict an optical onset. We explore the preliminary insights into using a neural network to pick out trends and features which it deems are similar among substorms.

  6. The role of substorms in the formation of the ring current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostoker, G.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the formation of the terrestrial ring current is accompanied by strong substorm expansive phase activity in the auroral oval. While large amplitude substorm activity seems to be a prerequisite for ring current formation to take place, it has long been puzzling as to why some large amplitude substorm activity in the auroral oval is not associated with significant ring current development. In this paper I shall outline the basis for the renovated boundary layer dynamics model of magnetospheric substorms showing how the onset of the substorm expansive phase can be associated with a sudden decrease in shielding space charge in the region of the near-Earth plasma sheet threaded by Region 2 field-aligned currents. I shall suggest that an episode of sufficiently large southward IMF lasting over a sufficiently lengthy period of time can lead to a sequence of substorm expansive phases, each one being initiated closer to the Earth than the previous one. Each expansive phase is attributed to a sudden decrease in radially localized cross-tail current (viz. a decrease in shielding space charge) and with each onset the inner edge of the plasma sheet moves inward. The inductive electric field associated with each crosstail current decrease is responsible for the acceleration of already energetic particles to energies of significance for ring current formation. Only when the inner edge of the crosstail current is sufficiently close to the Earth do the acceleration processes associated with substorm onset produce a long lived ring current. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  7. What is the Relationship between the Solar Wind and Storms/Substorms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1999-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) carried past the Earth by the solar wind has long been known to be the principal quantity that controls geomagnetic storms and substorms. Intervals of strong southward IMF with durations of at least a significant fraction of a day produce storms, while more typical, shorter intervals of less-intense southward fields produce substorms. The strong, long-duration southward fields are generally associated with coronal mass ejections and magnetic clouds or else they are produced by interplanetary dynamics initiated by fast solar wind flows that compress preexisting southward fields. Smaller, short-duration southward fields that occur on most days are related to long period waves, turbulence, or random variations in the IMF. Southward IMF enhances dayside reconnection between the IMF and the Earth's dipole with the reconnected field lines supplementing open field lines of the geomagnetic tail and producing an expanded polar cap and increased tail energy. Although the frequent storage of solar wind energy and its release during substorms is the most common mode of solar wind/magnetosphere interaction, under certain circumstances, steady southward IMF seems to produce intervals of relatively steady magnetosphere convection without substorms. During these latter times, the inner magnetosphere remains in a stressed tail-like state while the more distant magnetotail has larger northward field and more dipolar-like field lines. Recent evidence suggests that enhanced magnetosphere particle densities associated with enhanced solar wind densities allow more particles to be accelerated for the ring current, thus creating larger storms.

  8. Some problems associated with the inversion of polar magnetic substorm data recorded at the Earth's surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mareschal, M.

    1975-01-01

    The major thrust of this dissertation was to test an original method for resolving the current system associated with polar magnetic substorms from ground based magnetic observations. This method is based on a general technique of inversion reviewed by Wiggins in 1972 and appears to give quite satisfactory results, at least, when the current system considered is simulated by a three-dimensional current system consisting of field-aligned currents flowing down to the ionosphere, westward in the ionosphere, and back up again to the magnetosphere. Conclusions suggest that, for the purpose of inverting polar magnetic substorm data with the use of the three-dimensional model of current, the Earth's induction effects can be simulated by introducing a perfectly conducting layer inside the Earth. However, the depth of this equivalent conductor should be allowed to vary with the source frequency as the substorm develops with time. To determine how satisfactorily each model parameter could be expected to be resolved during the process of inversion, a study of the magnetic disturbance variations under specific parameter variations was then performed. The results of that study were encouraging enough to foster the inversion of an actual polar magnetic substorm data, the event of June 15, 1970. Despite the success of the enterprise, it seems reasonable to suggest that the technique of inversion should be further tested before being systematically used to resolve polar magnetic substorms

  9. Simultaneous observation of auroral substorm onset in Polar satellite global images and ground-based all-sky images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieda, Akimasa; Kauristie, Kirsti; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Miyashita, Yukinaga; Frey, Harald U.; Juusola, Liisa; Whiter, Daniel; Nosé, Masahito; Fillingim, Matthew O.; Honary, Farideh; Rogers, Neil C.; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Miura, Tsubasa; Kawashima, Takahiro; Machida, Shinobu

    2018-05-01

    Substorm onset has originally been defined as a longitudinally extended sudden auroral brightening (Akasofu initial brightening: AIB) followed a few minutes later by an auroral poleward expansion in ground-based all-sky images (ASIs). In contrast, such clearly marked two-stage development has not been evident in satellite-based global images (GIs). Instead, substorm onsets have been identified as localized sudden brightenings that expand immediately poleward. To resolve these differences, optical substorm onset signatures in GIs and ASIs are compared in this study for a substorm that occurred on December 7, 1999. For this substorm, the Polar satellite ultraviolet global imager was operated with a fixed-filter (170 nm) mode, enabling a higher time resolution (37 s) than usual to resolve the possible two-stage development. These data were compared with 20-s resolution green-line (557.7 nm) ASIs at Muonio in Finland. The ASIs revealed the AIB at 2124:50 UT and the subsequent poleward expansion at 2127:50 UT, whereas the GIs revealed only an onset brightening that started at 2127:49 UT. Thus, the onset in the GIs was delayed relative to the AIB and in fact agreed with the poleward expansion in the ASIs. The fact that the AIB was not evident in the GIs may be attributed to the limited spatial resolution of GIs for thin auroral arc brightenings. The implications of these results for the definition of substorm onset are discussed herein.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Sub-keV ring current ions as the tracer of substorm injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yamauchi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the energy-latitude dispersed sub-keV trapped ions inside the ring current region, the so-called wedge-like dispersions structure, were statistically studied using Viking satellite data. Probabilities with/without these signatures at various local times in the dayside are obtained in terms of different time-lags from the substorm activity monitored by the AE index. The structure appears in the early morning sector within a few hours after the substorm, and it slowly propagates eastward while decaying with a time scale of several hours. The result qualitatively confirmed the previous model that the wedge-like dispersions are originated from past substorm-related plasma injections into the nightside ring current region, and that the dispersion is formed when these injected plasma slowly moves eastward to the dayside by the drift motion (E×B (eastward, grad-<|B| (westward, and curvature (westward drifts. However, the appearance of the structure is twice or three times faster than the model prediction, and some structure reaches even to the evening sector. The results indicate that the start location of the drift is not as far as midnight and that the drift speed is slightly faster than the model prediction. The former means that the substorm-related increase of hot plasma in the ring current region shifts or extends to the early morning sector for large substorms, and the latter means that the substantial electric field driving the sub-keV ion drift is slightly different from the model field. We also detected the evacuating effect starting right after the substorm (or storm onset. The electric field imposed in the dayside magnetosphere seems to remove the remainder of trapped ions.

  11. Assembly line performance and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Arun B.; Sunnapwar, Vivek K.

    2017-09-01

    Automobile sector forms the backbone of manufacturing sector. Vehicle assembly line is important section in automobile plant where repetitive tasks are performed one after another at different workstations. In this thesis, a methodology is proposed to reduce cycle time and time loss due to important factors like equipment failure, shortage of inventory, absenteeism, set-up, material handling, rejection and fatigue to improve output within given cost constraints. Various relationships between these factors, corresponding cost and output are established by scientific approach. This methodology is validated in three different vehicle assembly plants. Proposed methodology may help practitioners to optimize the assembly line using lean techniques.

  12. The response of ionospheric convection in the polar cap to substorm activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lester

    Full Text Available We report multi-instrument observations during an isolated substorm on 17 October 1989. The EISCAT radar operated in the SP-UK-POLI mode measuring ionospheric convection at latitudes 71°λ-78°λ. SAMNET and the EISCAT Magnetometer Cross provide information on the timing of substorm expansion phase onset and subsequent intensifications, as well as the location of the field aligned and ionospheric currents associated with the substorm current wedge. IMP-8 magnetic field data are also included. Evidence of a substorm growth phase is provided by the equatorward motion of a flow reversal boundary across the EISCAT radar field of view at 2130 MLT, following a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. We infer that the polar cap expanded as a result of the addition of open magnetic flux to the tail lobes during this interval. The flow reversal boundary, which is a lower limit to the polar cap boundary, reached an invariant latitude equatorward of 71°λ by the time of the expansion phase onset. A westward electrojet, centred at 65.4°λ, occurred at the onset of the expansion phase. This electrojet subsequently moved poleward to a maximum of 68.1°λ at 2000 UT and also widened. During the expansion phase, there is evidence of bursts of plasma flow which are spatially localised at longitudes within the substorm current wedge and which occurred well poleward of the westward electrojet. We conclude that the substorm onset region in the ionosphere, defined by the westward electrojet, mapped to a part of the tail radially earthward of the boundary between open and closed magnetic flux, the "distant" neutral line. Thus the substorm was not initiated at the distant neutral line, although there is evidence that it remained active during the expansion phase. It is not obvious whether the electrojet mapped to a near-Earth neutral line, but at its most poleward, the expanded electrojet does not reach the estimated latitude of the polar cap

  13. Pulsations of Energetic Electron Pulsations In Association With Substorm Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åsnes, A.; Stadsnes, J.; Bjordal, J.; Østgaard, N.; Haaland, S.; Rosenberg, T. J.; Detrick, D. L.

    The Polar Ionospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment (PIXIE) is giving detailed images of the energetic electron precipitation when the POLAR satellite is near perigee over the Antarctica. In this area the PIXIE images have a spatial resolution of the order of 100 km, and a temporal resolution of 10 s can be obtained. In this paper we present the results of a study focusing on the onset and expansion of a substorm occuring on July 24, 1998. In this event we observe strong modulations of the energetic electron precipitation with period around 1 minute following substorm onset. The pulsations were restricted to a narrow magnetic local time sector in the pre-midnight region, about 0.5 hours wide, and showed movement towards higher latitudes and earlier lo- cal times. The event will be discussed in context of measurements from ground sta- tions and satellites in geosynchronous orbit. Precipitation of energetic electrons will be compared with VLF/ELF ground measurements. Features in the energetic elec- tron precipitation will be mapped to the magnetospheric equatorial plane by field line tracing.

  14. Space climate implications from substorm frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, P. T.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Mitchell, E. J.

    2013-10-01

    solar wind impacting the Earth varies over a wide range of time scales, driving a corresponding range of geomagnetic activity. Past work has strongly indicated that the rate of merging on the frontside magnetosphere is the most important predictor for magnetospheric activity, especially over a few hours. However, the magnetosphere exhibits variations on other time scales, including UT, seasonal, and solar cycle variations. Much of this geomagnetic variation cannot be reasonably attributed to changes in the solar wind driving—that is, it is not created by the original Russell-McPherron effect or any generalization thereof. In this paper we examine the solar cycle, seasonal, and diurnal effects based upon the frequency of substorm onsets, using a data set of 53,000 substorm onsets. These were identified through the SuperMAG collaboration and span three decades with continuous coverage. Solar cycle variations include a profound minimum in 2009 (448 substorms) and peak in 2003 (3727). The magnitude of this variation (a factor of 8.3) is not explained through variations in estimators of the frontside merging rate (such as dΦMP/dt), even when the more detailed probability distribution functions are examined. Instead, v, or better, n1/2v2 seems to be implicated in the dramatic difference between active and quiet years, even beyond the role of velocity in modulating merging. Moreover, we find that although most substorms are preceded by flux loading (78.5% are above the mean and 83.8% above median solar wind driving), a high solar wind v is almost as important (68.3% above mean, 74.8% above median). This and other evidence suggest that either v or n1/2v2 (but probably not p) plays a strong secondary role in substorm onset. As for the seasonal and diurnal effects, the elliptical nature of the Earth's orbit, which is closest to the Sun in January, leads to a larger solar wind driving (measured by Bs, vBs, or dΦMP/dt) in November, as is confirmed by 22 years of solar wind

  15. Variations in the polar cap area during intervals of substorm activity on 20-21 March 1990 deduced from AMIE convection patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Taylor

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behaviour of the northern polar cap area is studied employing Northern Hemisphere electric potential patterns derived by the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE procedure. The rate of change in area of the polar cap, which can be defined as the region of magnetospheric field lines open to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF, has been calculated during two intervals when the IMF had an approximately constant southward component (1100–2200 UT, 20 March 1990 and 1300–2100 UT, 21 March 1990. The estimates of the polar cap area are based on the approximation of the polar cap boundary by the flow reversal boundary. The change in the polar cap area is then compared to the predicted expansion rate based on a simple application of Faraday\\'s Law. Furthermore, timings of magnetospheric substorms are also related to changes in the polar cap area. Once the convection electric field reconfigures following a southward turning of the IMF, the growth rate of the observed polar cap boundary is consistent with that predicted by Faraday\\'s Law. A delay of typically 20 min to 50 min is observed between a substorm expansion phase onset and a reduction in the polar cap area. Such a delay is consistent with a synthesis between the near Earth neutral line and current disruption models of magnetospheric substorms in which the dipolarisation in the magnetotail may act as a trigger for reconnection. These delays may represent a propagation time between near geosynchronous orbit dipolarisation and subsequent reconnection further down tail. We estimate, from these delays, that the neutral X line occurs between ~35RE and ~75RE downstream in the tail.

  16. Electron dynamics during substorm dipolarization in Mercury's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine the nonlinear dynamics of electrons during the expansion phase of substorms at Mercury using test particle simulations. A simple model of magnetic field line dipolarization is designed by rescaling a magnetic field model of the Earth's magnetosphere. The results of the simulations demonstrate that electrons may be subjected to significant energization on the time scale (several seconds of the magnetic field reconfiguration. In a similar manner to ions in the near-Earth's magnetosphere, it is shown that low-energy (up to several tens of eV electrons may not conserve the second adiabatic invariant during dipolarization, which leads to clusters of bouncing particles in the innermost magnetotail. On the other hand, it is found that, because of the stretching of the magnetic field lines, high-energy electrons (several keVs and above do not behave adiabatically and possibly experience meandering (Speiser-type motion around the midplane. We show that dipolarization of the magnetic field lines may be responsible for significant, though transient, (a few seconds precipitation of energetic (several keVs electrons onto the planet's surface. Prominent injections of energetic trapped electrons toward the planet are also obtained as a result of dipolarization. These injections, however, do not exhibit short-lived temporal modulations, as observed by Mariner-10, which thus appear to follow from a different mechanism than a simple convection surge.

  17. Fluid-line math model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandelman, A.; Nelson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Simplified mathematical model simulates large hydraulic systems on either analog or digital computers. Models of pumps, servoactuators, reservoirs, accumulators, and valves are connected generating systems containing six hundred elements.

  18. Digital Model of Railway Electric Traction Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rachana; Mahajan, Priya; Kumar, Parmod

    2017-08-01

    The characteristic impedance and propagation constant define the behavior of signal propagation over the transmission lines. The digital model for railway traction lines which includes railway tracks is developed, using curve fitting technique in MATLAB. The sensitivity of this model has been computed with respect to frequency. The digital sensitivity values are compared with the values of analog sensitivity. The developed model is useful for digital protection, integrated operation, control and planning of the system.

  19. Substorms in the Inner Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Contel, O.; Perraut, S.; Roux, A.; Pellat, R.; Korth, A.

    Thin Current Sheets (TCS) are regularly formed prior to substorm breakup, even in the near-Earth plasma sheet, as close as the geostationary orbit. A self-consistent kinetic theory describing the response of the plasma sheet to an electromagnetic perturbation is given. This perturbation corresponds to an external forcing, for instance caused by the solar wind (not an internal instability). The equilibrium of the configuration of this TCS in the presence of a time varying perturbation is shown to produce a strong parallel thermal anisotropy (T∥ > T⊺) of energetic electrons and ions (E>50keV) as well as an enhanced diamagnetic current carried by low energy ions (Ecurrents tend to enhance the confinement of this current sheet near the magnetic equator. These results are compared with data gathered by GEOS-2 at the geostationary orbit, where the magnetic signatures of TCS, and parallel anisotropies are regularly observed prior to breakup. By ensuring quasi-neutrality everywhere we find, when low frequency electromagnetic perturbations are applied, that although the magnetic field line remains an equipotential to the lowest order in Te/Ti, a field-aligned potential drop exists to the next order in (Te/Ti). Thus the development of a TCS implies the formation of a field-aligned potential drop (~= few hundred volts) to ensure the quasi-neutrality everywhere. For an earthward directed pressure gradient, a field-aligned electric field, directed towards the ionosphere, is obtained, on the western edge of the perturbation (i.e. western edge of the current sheet). Thus field aligned beams of electrons are expected to flow towards the equatorial region on the western edge of the current sheet. We study the stability of these electron beams and show that they are unstable to ``High Frequency'' (HF) waves. These ``HF'' waves are regularly observed at frequencies of the order of the proton gyrofrequency (fH+) just before, or at breakup. The amplitude of these HF waves is so

  20. Physics of Substorm Growth Phase, Onset, and Dipolarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.Z. Cheng

    2003-10-22

    A new scenario of substorm growth phase, onset, and depolarization during expansion phase and the corresponding physical processes are presented. During the growth phase, as a result of enhanced plasma convection, the plasma pressure and its gradient are continued to be enhanced over the quiet-time values in the plasma sheet. Toward the late growth phase, a strong cross-tail current sheet is formed in the near-Earth plasma sheet region, where a local magnetic well is formed, the plasma beta can reach a local maximum with value larger than 50 and the cross-tail current density can be enhanced to over 10nA/m{sup 2} as obtained from 3D quasi-static magnetospheric equilibrium solutions for the growth phase. The most unstable kinetic ballooning instabilities (KBI) are expected to be located in the tailward side of the strong cross-tail current sheet region. The field lines in the most unstable KBI region map to the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents in the ionosphere, which is consistent with the observed initial brightening location of the breakup arc in the intense proton precipitation region. The KBI explains the AMPTE/CCE observations that a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50-75 seconds is excited about 2-3 minutes prior to substorm onset and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the onset of current disruption (or current reduction). At the current disruption onset higher frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic field fluctuations form a strong turbulent state. Plasma transport takes place due to the strong turbulence to relax the ambient plasma pressure profile so that the plasma pressure and current density are reduced and the ambient magnetic field intensity increases by more than a factor of 2 in the high-beta(sub)eq region and the field line geometry recovers from tail-like to dipole-like dipolarization.

  1. Physics of Substorm Growth Phase, Onset, and Dipolarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    2003-01-01

    A new scenario of substorm growth phase, onset, and depolarization during expansion phase and the corresponding physical processes are presented. During the growth phase, as a result of enhanced plasma convection, the plasma pressure and its gradient are continued to be enhanced over the quiet-time values in the plasma sheet. Toward the late growth phase, a strong cross-tail current sheet is formed in the near-Earth plasma sheet region, where a local magnetic well is formed, the plasma beta can reach a local maximum with value larger than 50 and the cross-tail current density can be enhanced to over 10nA/m 2 as obtained from 3D quasi-static magnetospheric equilibrium solutions for the growth phase. The most unstable kinetic ballooning instabilities (KBI) are expected to be located in the tailward side of the strong cross-tail current sheet region. The field lines in the most unstable KBI region map to the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents in the ionosphere, which is consistent with the observed initial brightening location of the breakup arc in the intense proton precipitation region. The KBI explains the AMPTE/CCE observations that a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50-75 seconds is excited about 2-3 minutes prior to substorm onset and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the onset of current disruption (or current reduction). At the current disruption onset higher frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic field fluctuations form a strong turbulent state. Plasma transport takes place due to the strong turbulence to relax the ambient plasma pressure profile so that the plasma pressure and current density are reduced and the ambient magnetic field intensity increases by more than a factor of 2 in the high-beta(sub)eq region and the field line geometry recovers from tail-like to dipole-like dipolarization

  2. Auroral kilometric radiation and magnetospheric substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Akira; Oya, Hiroshi

    1980-01-01

    The auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) and its relation to the development of the magnetospheric substorm have been studied based on the data obtained by JIKIKEN (EXOS-B) satellite. The occurrence of AKR is closely correlated to the intense UHR emission outside the plasmapause at the satellite position; the evidence clearly suggests that the development of the field aligned current system is associated with AKR generated at the upward current region and with the UHR emission at the downward current region. The drifting plasma due to the electric field that is generated in the magnetosphere at the moment of the magnetospheric substorm is derived from the frequency change of the plasma waves. The enhancement of the westward electric field in the duskside magnetosphere is detected simultaneously with the appearence of AKR. The altitude of the center of the AKR source region varies with intimate relation to the substorm activity suggesting that the generation of AKR is taking place in the region where the polar ionosphere and the magnetosphere are predominantly coupling through the precipitating or up going particles. From the fine structure of the dynamic spectra of AKR, it is suggested that the source of AKR might be closely related to the double layer type electric field along the magnetic field. (author)

  3. Irregular HF radio propagation on a subauroral path during magnetospheric substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Blagoveshchensky

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the main ionospheric trough, sporadic structures, gradients and inhomogeneities of the subpolar ionosphere during substorms on the signal amplitude, azimuthal angles of arrival, and propagation modes for the radio path Ottawa (Canada-St. Petersburg (Russia was considered. This subauroral path with the length of about 6600 km has approximately an east-west orientation. The main goals are to carry out numerical modeling of radio propagation for the path and to compare the model calculations with experimental results. Wave absorption and effects of focusing and divergence of rays were taken into consideration in the radio wave modeling process. The following basic results were obtained: The signal amplitude increases by 20–30 dB 1–1.5 h before the substorm expansion phase onset. At the same time the signal azimuth deviates towards north of the great circle arc for the propagation path. Compared with quiet periods there are effects due to irregularities and gradients in the area of the polar edge of the main ionospheric trough on the passing signals. Propagation mechanisms also change during substorms. The growth of signal amplitude before the substorm can be physically explained by both a decrease of the F2-layer ionization and a growth of the F2-layer height that leads to a decrease of the signal field divergence and to a drop of the collision frequency. Ionospheric gradients are also important. This increase of signal level prior to a substorm could be used for forecasting of space weather disturbed conditions.

  4. Overhead distribution line models for harmonics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal, M.; Xu, W.; Dommel, H.W.

    1994-01-01

    Carson's formulae and Maxwell's potential coefficients are used for calculating the per unit length series impedances and shunt capacitances of the overhead lines. The per unit length values are then used for building the models, nominal pi-circuit, and equivalent pi-circuit at the harmonic frequencies. This paper studies the accuracy of these models for presenting the overhead distribution lines in steady-state harmonic solutions at frequencies up to 5 kHz. The models are verified with a field test on a 25 kV distribution line and the sensitivity of the models to ground resistivity, skin effect, and multiple grounding is reported.

  5. Modeling and interpretation of line observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamp Inga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Models for the interpretation of line observations from protoplanetary disks are summarized. The spectrum ranges from 1D LTE slab models to 2D thermo-chemical radiative transfer models and their use depends largely on the type/nature of observational data that is analyzed. I discuss the various types of observational data and their interpretation in the context of disk physical and chemical properties. The most simple spatially and spectral unresolved data are line fluxes, which can be interpreted using so-called Boltzmann diagrams. The interpretation is often tricky due to optical depth and non-LTE effects and requires care. Line profiles contain kinematic information and thus indirectly the spatial origin of the emission. Using series of line profiles, we can for example deduce radial temperature gradients in disks (CO pure rotational ladder. Spectro-astrometry of e.g. CO ro-vibrational line profiles probes the disk structure in the 1–30 AU region, where planet formation through core accretion should be most efficient. Spatially and spectrally resolved line images from (submm interferometers are the richest datasets we have to date and they enable us to unravel exciting details of the radial and vertical disk structure such as winds and asymmetries.

  6. Search for an onset mechanism that operates for both CMEs and substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Siscoe

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Substorms and coronal mass ejections have been cited as the most accessible examples of the explosive energy conversion phenomenon that seems to characterize one of the behavior modes of cosmic plasmas. This paper addresses the question of whether these two examples – substorms and CMEs – support or otherwise the idea that explosive energy conversion is the result of a single process operating in different places and under different conditions. As a candidate mechanism that might be common to both substorms and CMEs we use the Forbes catastrophe model for CMEs because before testing it appears to have the potential, suitably modified, to operate also for substorms. The essence of the FCM is a sudden onset of an imbalance of the forces acting on an incipient CME. The imbalance of forces causes the CME to start to rise. Beneath the rising CME conditions develop that favor the onset of magnetic reconnection which then releases the CME and assists its expulsion. Thus the signature of the FCM is a temporally ordered sequence in which there is first the appearance of force imbalance which leads to upward (or outward motion of the CME which leads to magnetic reconnection under it which expedites rapid expulsion. We look for the FCM signature in the output of two global magnetospheric MHD simulations that produce substorm-like events. We find the ordered sequence of events as stated but with a significant difference: there is no plasmoid prior to the onset of rapid reconnection, that is, there is no counterpart to the incipient CME on which an imbalance of forces acts to initiate the action in the FCM. If this result – that rapid tailward motion precedes the rapid reconnection of substorm expansion – is ultimately verified by other studies, it suggests that a description of the cause of substorm expansion should identify the cause of the preceding rapid tailward motion, since this leads necessarily to rapid reconnection, whatever the

  7. Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling During a Geomagnetic Substorm on March 1, 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coster, A. J.; Hampton, D. L.; Sazykin, S. Y.; Wolf, R.; Huba, J.; Varney, R. H.; Reimer, A.; Lynch, K. A.; Samara, M.; Michell, R.

    2017-12-01

    On March 1, 2017, at approximately 10 UT, magnetometers at Ft Yukon and Poker Flat in Alaska measured the classic signature of an auroral substorm: a rapid decrease in the northward component of the magnetic field. Nearby, a camera at Venetie Alaska captured intensive visual brightening of multiple auroral arcs at approximately the same time. Our data and model analysis focuses on this time period. We are taking advantage of the extensive instrumentation that was in place in Northern Alaska on this date due to the ISINGLASS rocket campaign. Although no rockets were flown on March 1, 2017, this substorm was monitored at Poker by the three-filter all-sky survey and at Venetie by three all-sky cameras running simultaneously with each filtered for a different wavelength. Our analysis includes co-incidental high precision GNSS receiver data providing total electron content (TEC) measurements during the overhead auroral arcs. The receiver at Venetie also monitored L-band scintillation. In addition, the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter radar captured the rapid ionization enhancement in the 100-200 km region across multiple beams looking to the north of Poker. The timing of these events between the multiple sites is closely monitored, and inferences of the propagation of this event are described. The available SuperDARN data from this time period indicates this substorm happened at about the same time within the Harang discontinuity. This event presented an unprecedented opportunity to observe occurrence and development of a substorm with a combination of ground-based remote sensing instruments. To support our interpretation of the data, we present first simulations of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupled system during a substorm with the self-consistently coupled SAMI/RCM code.

  8. Effects of substorms on the stormtime ring current index Dst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rostoker

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available There has been some discussion in recent times regarding whether or not substorm expansive phase activity plays any role of importance in the formation of the stormtime ring current. I explore this question using the Kp index as a proxy for substorm expansive phase activity and the Dst index as a proxy for symmetric ring current strength. I find that increases in Dst are mildly related to the strength of substorm expansive phase activity during the development of the storm main phase. More surprisingly, I find that the strength of Dst during the storm recovery phase is positively correlated with the strength of substorm expansive phase activity. This result has an important bearing on the question of how much the Dst index reflects activity other than that of the stormtime symmetric ring current strength for which it is supposed to be a proxy.Key words: Ionosphere (electric fields and currents - Magnetospheric physics (current systems; storms and substorms

  9. Effects of substorms on the stormtime ring current index Dst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rostoker

    Full Text Available There has been some discussion in recent times regarding whether or not substorm expansive phase activity plays any role of importance in the formation of the stormtime ring current. I explore this question using the Kp index as a proxy for substorm expansive phase activity and the Dst index as a proxy for symmetric ring current strength. I find that increases in Dst are mildly related to the strength of substorm expansive phase activity during the development of the storm main phase. More surprisingly, I find that the strength of Dst during the storm recovery phase is positively correlated with the strength of substorm expansive phase activity. This result has an important bearing on the question of how much the Dst index reflects activity other than that of the stormtime symmetric ring current strength for which it is supposed to be a proxy.Key words: Ionosphere (electric fields and currents - Magnetospheric physics (current systems; storms and substorms

  10. Excitation of twin-vortex flow in the nightside high-latitude ionosphere during an isolated substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grocott

    Full Text Available We present SuperDARN radar observations of the ionospheric flow during a well-observed high-latitude substorm which occurred during steady northward IMF conditions on 2 December 1999. These data clearly demonstrate the excitation of large-scale flow associated with the substorm expansion phase, with enhanced equatorward flows being observed in the pre-midnight local time sector of the expansion phase auroral bulge and westward electrojet, and enhanced return sunward flows being present at local times on either side, extending into the dayside sector. The flow pattern excited was thus of twin-vortex form, with foci located at either end of the substorm auroral bulge, as imaged by the Polar VIS UV imager. Estimated total transpolar voltages were ~40 kV prior to expansion phase onset, grew to ~80 kV over a ~15 min interval during the expansion phase, and then decayed to ~35 kV over ~10 min during recovery. The excitation of the large-scale flow pattern resulted in the development of magnetic disturbances which extended well outside of the region directly disturbed by the substorm, depending upon the change in the flow and the local ionospheric conductivity. It is estimated that the nightside reconnection rate averaged over the 24-min interval of the substorm was ~65– 75 kV, compared with continuing dayside reconnection rates of ~30–45 kV. The net closure of open flux during the sub-storm was thus ~0.4–0.6 × 108 Wb, representing ~15–20% of the open flux present at onset, and corresponding to an overall contraction of the open-closed field line boundary by ~1° latitude.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; plasma convection

  11. Statistical Model Checking for Product Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ter Beek, Maurice H.; Legay, Axel; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    average cost of products (in terms of the attributes of the products’ features) and the probability of features to be (un)installed at runtime. The product lines must be modelled in QFLan, which extends the probabilistic feature-oriented language PFLan with novel quantitative constraints among features...

  12. Effects of interplanetary magnetic field and magnetospheric substorm variations on the dayside aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandholt, P. E.; Egeland, A.; Lybekk, B.; Deehr, C. S.; Sivjee, G. G.; Romick, G. J.

    1983-11-01

    Photometric auroral observations and geomagnetic measurements obtained simultaneously on the dayside in Norway and the nightside in the USSR, Alaska, and Canada are combined with ISEE-1 and 3 data on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) to study the relative importance of substorm perturbations and IMF in determining dayside auroral (DA) motion. Ten events from December, 1978, and January and December, 1979, are characterized, the data are presented in tables, illustrated with charts and graphs, and summarized. The equatorward and poleward motion of the DA is correlated with the growth and decay of DP2-mode geomagnetic disturbances and changes in the north-south component of the IMF. Discrete DA forms appear in a region of sunward-convecting field lines. A detailed model of DA motion is developed which explains these phenomena as the result of a direct global response of the magnetospheric electromagnetic state to the solar-wind magnetic field. Using the model, the potential drop, Pedersen current, and Joule heat-dissipation rate of the polar-cap ionosphere are estimated as 125 kV, 800,000 A, and 100 GW, respectively.

  13. Spatial variations in the suprathermal ion distributions during substorms in the plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistler, L.M.; Moebius, E.; Klecker, B.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F.M.; Hamilton, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    Using data from AMPTE IRM and AMPTE CCE, the authors have determined the pre- and post-injection suprathermal energy spectra for the ion species H + , O + , He + , and He ++ for six events in which substorm-associated particle injections are observed in both the near-Earth plasma sheet and farther down the tail. They find similar spectral changes in both locations, with the spectra becoming harder with the injection. Post-injection, the flux decreases exponentially with radial distance. Approximately the same gradient is observed in all species. In addition, they find that although the O + /H + and the He ++ /H + ratios increase with energy per charge, the ratios are approximately the same at the same energy per charge at the two spacecraft. The observations are difficult to explain either with a model in which the ions are accelerated at a neutral line and transported toward Earth or with a model in which the ions are accelerated in the near-Earth region by current disruption/diversion and transported down the tail. In either case, the ions would have to be transported throughout the tail without much energization or deenergization in order to explain the energy per charge correlations. Further, earthward transport without energization would not lead to the observed radial gradient. A combination of these acceleration mechanisms, a disturbance that propagates throughout the plasma sheet, or a more global mechanism may explain the observations

  14. Local time dependences of electron flux changes during substorms derived from mulit-satellite observation at synchronous orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, T.

    1982-01-01

    Energetic electron (energy higher than 2 MeV) observation by a synchronous satellite chain (which consists of GOES 2, GOES 3, and GMS covering the local time extent of approximately 10 hr) have been used to study the large-scale characteristics of the dynamic behavior in the near-earth magnetosphere for substorms, in which low-latitude positive bay aspects are clearly seen in the ground magnetic data. Simultaneous multi-satellite observations have clearly demonstrated the local time dependence of electron flux changes during substorms and the longitudinal extent of electron flux variations. Before a ground substorm onset the energetic electron flux decreases in a wide longitudinal region of the nighttime and the flux decrease is seen even on the afternoonside. For the flux behavior associated with the onset of the substorm expansion phase, there exists a demarcation line, the LT position of which can be represented as LT = 24.3-1.5 K/sub p/. The flux shows a recovery to a normal level east of the demarcation line, and it shows a decrease west of the demarcation line. The region of the flux decrease during the expansion phase is restricted, and it is observed mainly on the afternoonside. The afternoonside flux decrease has a different characteristic from the nightside flux decrease preceding the expansion phase. The nighside flux decrease-recovery sequence is observed in a wide region of more than 6 hr in the nighttime and the center of this variation exists in the premidnight region. It should be noted that the afternoonside flux decrease is not observed for every substorm and the nightside signature noted that the afternoonside flux sometimes becomes a dominent feature even on the afternoonside

  15. Special Issue the 12th International Conference on Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Kazuo; Fok, Mei-Ching; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The 12th International Conference on Substorms (ICS-12) was held at the Ise-Shima Royal Hotel in Shima, Japan, on November 10-14, 2014. There were 125 attendees including 68 from foreign countries. The ICS has been held every 2 years since 1992 to discuss substorms, which are fundamental global-scale disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere. The year 2014 marked the 50th anniversary of the first publication about substorms (Akasofu 1964). The conference included three tutorial lecturers (Profs. S.-I. Akasofu, V. Angelopoulous, and D. Baker), as well as many international scientists, to discuss substorm processes in the tail, their Interactions with the inner magnetosphere and the ionosphere, substorm currents and their dynamics and energetics, the role of MagnetoHydroDynamics (MHD) and kinetic instabilities, storm-substorm relationships, ULFELFVLF waves, and non-Earth substorm-like features. Prof. Akasofu also gave an evening talk about the history of auroral research since the nineteenth century with photographs that inspired and intrigued the young scientists and students in attendance.

  16. The reason for magnetospheric substorms and solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkila, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    It has been proposed that magnetospheric substorms and solar flares are a result of the same mechanism. In our view this mechanism is connected with the escape, or attempted escape, of energized plasma from a region of closed magnetic field lines bounded by a magnetic bottle. In the case of the Earth, it must be plasma that is a able to maintain a discrete auroral arc, and we propose that the cross-tail current connected to the arc is filamentary in nature to provide the field-aligned current sheet above the arc. A localized meander of such an intense current filament could be caused by a tearing instability in the neutral sheet. Such a meander will cause an inductive electric field opposing the current change everywhere. In trying to reduce the component of the induction electric field parallel to the magnetic field lines, the plasma must enhance the transverse or cross-tail component; this action leads to eruptive behavior, in agreement with tearing theories. This enhanced induction electric field will cause a discharge along the magnetic neutral line at the apex of the magnetic arches, constituting an impulsive acceleration of all charged particles originally near the neutral line. The products of this phase then undergo betatron acceleration for a second phase. This discharge eventually reduces the electric field along the neutral line, and thereafter the enclosed magnetic flux through the neutral line remains nearly constant. The result is a plasmoid that has definite identity; its buoyancy leads to its escape. The auroral breakup (and solar flare) is the complex plasma response to the changing electromagnetic field. (orig.)

  17. Radial expansion of the tail current disruption during substorms: A new approach to the substorm onset region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtani, S.; Kokubun, S.; Russell, C.T.

    1992-01-01

    The substorm onset region and the radial development of the tail current disruption are examined from a new viewpoint. The reconfiguration of the magnetotail field at substorm onset can be understood in terms of a sudden decrease (disruption) in tail current intensity. The north-south component (B Z ) is very sensitive to whether the spacecraft position is earthward or tailward of the disruption region, while the change in Sun-Earth component (B X ) is most sensitive to the change in tail current intensity near the spacecraft. If the current disruption starts in a localized range of radial distance and expands radially, a distinctive phase relationship between the changes in B X and B Z is expected to be observed. This phase relationship depends on whether the current disruption starts on the earthward side or the tailward side of the spacecraft. Thus it is possible to infer the direction of the radial expansion of the current disruption from magnetic field data of a single spacecraft. This method is applied to ISEE observations of a tail reconfiguration event that occurred on March 6, 1979. The phase relationship indicates that eh disruption region expanded tailward from the earthward side of the spacecraft during the event. This model prediction is consistent with the time lag of magnetic signatures observed by the two ISEE spacecraft. The expansion velocity is estimated at 2 R E /min (∼200 km/s) for this event. Furthermore, it is found that the observed magnetic signatures can be reproduced to a good approximation by a simple geometrical model of the current disruption. The method is used statistically for 13 events selected from the ISEE magnetometer data. It is found that the current disruption usually starts in the near-Earth magnetotail (|X| E ) and often within 15 R E of the Earth

  18. Plasma sheet fast flows and auroral dynamics during substorm: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Borodkova

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Interball-1 observations of a substorm development in the mid-tail on 16 December 1998 are compared with the auroral dynamics obtained from the Polar UV imager. Using these data, the relationship between plasma flow directions in the tail and the location of the auroral activation is examined. Main attention is given to tailward and earth-ward plasma flows, interpreted as signatures of a Near Earth Neutral Line (NENL. It is unambiguously shown that in the mid-plasma sheet the flows were directed tailward when the auroral bulge developed equatorward of the spacecraft ionospheric footprint. On the contrary, when active auroras moved poleward of the Interball-1 projection, earthward fast flow bursts were observed. This confirms the concept that the NENL (or flow reversal region is the source of auroras forming the poleward edge of the auroral bulge. The observed earthward flow bursts have all typical signatures of Bursty Bulk Flows (BBFs, described by Angelopolous et al. (1992. These BBFs are related to substorm activations starting at the poleward edge of the expanded auroral bulge. We interpret the BBFs as a result of reconnection pulses occurring tail-ward of Interball-1. In addition, some non-typically observed phenomena were detected in the plasma sheet during this substorm: (i tailward/earthward flows were superimposed on a very strong duskward flow, and (ii wavy structures of both magnetic field and plasma density were registered. The latter observation is probably linked to the filamentary structure of the current sheet.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; plasma sheet; storms and substorms

  19. Physical processes for the onset of magnetospheric substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.R.; Akasofu, S-I.; Lee, L.C.

    1980-01-01

    There are at least three important advances in observational as well as theoretical understanding of substorm processes during the last several years; they are: (i) the 'V-shaped' potential structure for auroral acceleration, (ii) deflation as the cause of thinning of the distant plasma sheet, and (iii) interruption and subsequent diversion of the cross-tail current during the expansive phase of magnetospheric substorms. A possible chain of processes is suggested, including (i), (ii) and (iii) as vital parts, which leads to substorm onset. (Auth.)

  20. Counterstreaming ions as evidence of magnetic reconnection in the recovery phase of substorms at the kinetic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Tsugunobu; Nakamura, Masao; Shinohara, Iku; Fujimoto, Masaki; Saito, Yoshifumi; Mukai, Toshifumi

    2002-01-01

    Counterstreaming ions embedded in hot isotropic ions are found at the front of fast earthward plasma flows in the recovery phase of substorms in the Earth's magnetotail. The counterstreaming ions are present only when the northward component of the magnetic field increases in the equatorial plane. Hybrid simulations of magnetic reconnection have been carried out. It is found that counterstreaming ions form in the leading edge of jetting plasmas produced with magnetic reconnection, where the magnetic field lines pile up due to the pre-existing stationary plasmas. These counterstreaming ions originate from cold ions on the northern and southern tail lobe field lines, and earthward transport of the reconnected field lines makes these cold ions flow into the equatorial plane. The present observations provide strong evidence of magnetic reconnection in the recovery phase of substorms at the kinetic level

  1. What Might We Learn About Magnetospheric Substorms at the Earth from the MESSENGER Measurements at Mercury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Satellite observations at the Earth, supported by theory and modeling, have established a close connection between the episodes of intense magnetospheric convection termed substorms and the occurrence of magnetic reconnection. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause results in strong energy input to the magnetosphere. This energy can either be stored or used immediately to power the magnetospheric convection that produces the phenomena that collectively define the 'substorm.' However, many aspects of magnetic reconnection and the dynamic response of the coupled solar wind - magnetosphere - ionosphere system at the Earth during substorms remain poorly understood. For example, the rate of magnetic reconnection is thought to be proportional to the local Alfven speed, but the limited range of changes in this solar wind parameter at 1 AU have made it difficult to detect its influence over energy input to the Earth's magnetosphere. In addition, the electrical conductance of the ionosphere and how it changes in response to auroral charged particle precipitation are hypothesized to play a critical role in the development of substorms, but the nature of this electrodynamic interaction remain difficult to deduce from Earth observations alone. The amount of energy the terrestrial magnetosphere can store in its tail, the duration of the storage, and the trigger(s) for its dissipation are all thought to be determined by not only the microphysics of the cross-tail current layer, but also the properties of the coupled magnetosphere - ionosphere system. Again, the separation of microphysics effects from system response has proved very difficult using measurements taken only at the Earth. If MESSENGER'S charged particle and magnetic field measurements confirm the occurrence of terrestrial-style substorms in Mercury's miniature magnetosphere, then it may be possible to determine how magnetospheric convection, field-aligned currents, charged particle acceleration

  2. Nuclear magnetohydrodynamic EMP, solar storms, and substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitz, M.; Meliopoulous, A.P.S.; Glytsis, E.N.

    1992-01-01

    In addition to a fast electromagnetic pulse (EMP), a high altitude nuclear burst produces a relatively slow magnetohydrodynamic EMP (MHD EMP), whose effects are like those from solar storm geomagnetically induced currents (SS-GIC). The MHD EMP electric field E approx-lt 10 - 1 V/m and lasts approx-lt 10 2 sec, whereas for solar storms E approx-gt 10 - 2 V/m and lasts approx-gt 10 3 sec. Although the solar storm electric field is lower than MHD EMP, the solar storm effects are generally greater due to their much longer duration. Substorms produce much smaller effects than SS-GIC, but occur much more frequently. This paper describes the physics of such geomagnetic disturbances and analyzes their effects

  3. Quantitative simulation of a magnetospheric substorm 3. Plasmaspheric electric fields and evolution of the plasmapause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiro, R.W.; Harel, M.; Wolf, R.A.; Reiff, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    Results of the Rice University substorm simulation have been used to investigate the penetration of substorm-associated electric fields into the plasmasphere. Near 4 R/sub E/ in the equatorial plane, our time dependent electric field model is characterized by eastward components in the dusk-midnight local time sector and westward components after midnight. Except for a small region just before dusk, the model predicts eastward electric field components throughout the daytime sector. The characteristic radial component is directed inward at all local times except for a small region just after dawn. These results compare favorably with available whistler and incoherent-scatter radar measurements obtained during magnetically disturbed periods. By assuming an initial plasmapause shape and by followig the computed E> x B> drift trajectories of plasma flux tubes from that initial boundary we have examined the short term evolution of the plasmapause during the substorm-like event of September 19, 1976. We find that narrow filamentary tails can be drawn out from the plasmasphere near dusk within hours of substorm onset. These tail-like appendages to the plasmasphere subsequently drift rapidly from the dusk sector toward the daytime magnetopause. Investigation of the large-scale time dependent flow of plasma in the evening sector indicates that some mid-latitude plasma flux tubes that drift eastward past the dusk terminator reverse their motion between dusk and midnight and begin to drift westward toward dusk. Such time dependent changes in flow trajectories may be related to the formation of F region ionization troughs

  4. Storm/substorm signatures in the outer belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korth, A.; Friedel, R.H.W.; Mouikis, C.; Fennell, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    The response of the ring current region is compared for periods of storm and substorm activity, with an attempt to isolate the contributions of both processes. The authors investigate CRRES particle data in an overview format that allows the display of long-term variations of the outer radiation belt. They compare the evolution of the ring current population to indicators of storm (Dst) and substorm (AE) activity and examine compositional changes. Substorm activity leads to the intensification of the ring current at higher L (L ∼ 6) and lower ring current energies compared to storms (L ∼ 4). The O + /H + ratio during substorms remains low, near 10%, but is much enhanced during storms (can exceed 100%). They conclude that repeated substorms with an AE ∼ 900 nT lead to a ΔDst of ∼ 30 nT, but do not contribute to Dst during storm main phase as substorm injections do not form a symmetric ring current during such disturbed times

  5. Substorms and polar cap convection: the 10 January 2004 interplanetary CME case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Andalsvik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion-contraction model of Dungey cell plasma convection has two different convection sources, i.e. reconnections at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail. The spatial-temporal structure of the nightside source is not yet well understood. In this study we shall identify temporal variations in the winter polar cap convection structure during substorm activity under steady interplanetary conditions. Substorm activity (electrojets and particle precipitations is monitored by excellent ground-satellite DMSP F15 conjunctions in the dusk-premidnight sector. We take advantage of the wide latitudinal coverage of the IMAGE chain of ground magnetometers in Svalbard – Scandinavia – Russia for the purpose of monitoring magnetic deflections associated with polar cap convection and substorm electrojets. These are augmented by direct observations of polar cap convection derived from SuperDARN radars and cross-track ion drift observations during traversals of polar cap along the dusk-dawn meridian by spacecraft DMSP F13. The interval we study is characterized by moderate, stable forcing of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system (EKL = 4.0–4.5 mV m−1; cross polar cap potential (CPCP, Φ (Boyle = 115 kV during Earth passage of an interplanetary CME (ICME, choosing an 4-h interval where the magnetic field pointed continuously south-west (Bz By By polarity of the ICME magnetic field, a clear indication of a nightside source.

  6. Dynamics of the outer radiation belts and their links with the polar substorms and the injection of hot plasma at the geostationary orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvaud, J.A.; Winckler, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the results obtained aboard geostationary satellites and on the ground, in the auroral zone, on the dynamic changes in the outer radiation belts and their link with the time development of auroral forms during magnetospheric substorms. The measurements of high-energy particles, plasma, and magnetic induction at 6.6 Rsub(E) in the local midnight sector indicate the existence of a pre-expansion phase in substorms during which the outer belts move toward the Earth under the effect of the modification in the topology of the local magnetic induction. The pre-expansion phase coincides with an increase in the AE index, suggesting a direct link between the electrojet and the currents flowing across the tail of the magnetosphere. It also coincides in the auroral zone with the intensification and movement of the quiet arc system toward the equator. The phase is invariably terminated at the beginning of the expansion of the substorm by the break-up of the auroral arcs and the injection of hot plasma at the geostationary orbit near local midnight under the action of the induced electric field associated with the collapse of the geomagnetic field force lines. The study of the data, event by event, shows the complexity of phenomena which may be involved during the pre-expansion phase particularly with the possible presence of pseudo-substorms or aborted (minor) substorms which do not modify the general evolution described above [fr

  7. Random defect lines in conformal minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeng, M.; Ludwig, A.W.W.

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the effect of adding quenched disorder along a defect line in the 2D conformal minimal models using replicas. The disorder is realized by a random applied magnetic field in the Ising model, by fluctuations in the ferromagnetic bond coupling in the tricritical Ising model and tricritical three-state Potts model (the phi 12 operator), etc. We find that for the Ising model, the defect renormalizes to two decoupled half-planes without disorder, but that for all other models, the defect renormalizes to a disorder-dominated fixed point. Its critical properties are studied with an expansion in ε∝1/m for the mth Virasoro minimal model. The decay exponents X N =((N)/(2))1-((9(3N-4))/(4(m+1) 2 ))+O((3)/(m+1)) 3 of the Nth moment of the two-point function of phi 12 along the defect are obtained to 2-loop order, exhibiting multifractal behavior. This leads to a typical decay exponent X typ =((1)/(2))1+((9)/((m+1) 2 ))+O((3)/(m+1)) 3 . One-point functions are seen to have a non-self-averaging amplitude. The boundary entropy is larger than that of the pure system by order 1/m 3 . As a byproduct of our calculations, we also obtain to 2-loop order the exponent X-tilde N =N1-((2)/(9π 2 ))(3N-4)(q-2) 2 +O(q-2) 3 of the Nth moment of the energy operator in the q-state Potts model with bulk bond disorder

  8. The Structured Intuitive Model for Product Line Economics (SIMPLE)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clements, Paul C; McGregor, John D; Cohen, Sholom G

    2005-01-01

    .... This report presents the Structured Intuitive Model of Product Line Economics (SIMPLE), a general-purpose business model that supports the estimation of the costs and benefits in a product line development organization...

  9. Tip vortices in the actuator line model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis; Meneveau, Charles

    2017-11-01

    The actuator line model (ALM) is a widely used tool to represent the wind turbine blades in computational fluid dynamics without the need to resolve the full geometry of the blades. The ALM can be optimized to represent the `correct' aerodynamics of the blades by choosing an appropriate smearing length scale ɛ. This appropriate length scale creates a tip vortex which induces a downwash near the tip of the blade. A theoretical frame-work is used to establish a solution to the induced velocity created by a tip vortex as a function of the smearing length scale ɛ. A correction is presented which allows the use of a non-optimal smearing length scale but still provides the downwash which would be induced using the optimal length scale. Thanks to the National Science Foundation (NSF) who provided financial support for this research via Grants IGERT 0801471, IIA-1243482 (the WINDINSPIRE project) and ECCS-1230788.

  10. On flares, substorms and the theory of impulsive flux transfer events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratenahl, A.; Baum, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    Solar flares and magnetospheric substorms are discussed in the context of a general theory of impulsive flux transfer events (IFTE). IFTE theory, derived from laboratory observations in the Double Inverse Pinch Device (DIPD), provides a quantitative extension of 'neutral sheet' theories to include nonsteady field line reconnection. Current flow along the reconnection line increases with magnetic flux storage. When flux build-up exceeds the level corresponding to a critical limit on the current, instabilities induce a sudden transition in the mode of conduction. The resulting IFTE, indifferent to the specific modes and instabilities involved, is the more energetic, the lower the initial resistivity. It is the more violent, the greater the resulting resistivity increase and the faster its growth. Violent events can develop very large voltage transients along the reconnection line. Persistent build-up promoting conditions produce relaxation oscillations in the quantity of flux and energy stored (build-up-IFTE cycles). It is difficult to avoid the conclusion: flares and substorms are examples of IFTE. (Auth.)

  11. Reduction in plasmaspheric hiss wave amplitudes during a substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Yuan, Z.; Yu, X.; Deng, X.; Tang, R.; Chen, Z.; Zhou, M.; Huang, S.

    2017-12-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is an important plasma wave in controlling the overall structure and dynamics of radiation belt electrons, so the distribution and generation mechanism of plasmaspheric hiss waves is worthy of study. Previous studies have found that the amplitude of plasmaspheric hiss waves tends to increase as substorm activity increases. In this study, through analysis of a hiss event observed by the Van Allen Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), it is found that the intensity of plasmaspheric hiss waves at magnetic local time (MLT) > 1300 (L≈5) is reduced or even disappears during a substorm. After calculating energetic electron trajectories, we suggest that this is because electrons are prevented from entering the plasmasphere at MLT > 1300 (L≈5) by the stronger convection electric field during the substorm. The calculations are consistent with direct observations from the RBSP satellites. The results highlight the significant and complex variability of plasmaspheric hiss waves. The amplitude of these waves on the dayside is not necessarily positively correlated with substorm activity, as negative correlations may be observed on the afternoon side during a substorm.

  12. A physical mechanism producing suprathermal populations and initiating substorms in the Earth's magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We suggest a candidate physical mechanism, combining there dimensional structure and temporal development, which is potentially able to produce suprathermal populations and cross-tail current disruptions in the Earth's plasma sheet. At the core of the proposed process is the "akis" structure; in a thin current sheet (TCS the stretched (tail-like magnetic field lines locally terminate into a sharp tip around the tail midplane. At this sharp tip of the TCS, ions become non-adiabatic, while a percentage of electrons are accumulated and trapped: The strong and transient electrostatic electric fields established along the magnetic field lines produce suprathermal populations. In parallel, the tip structure is associated with field aligned and mutually attracted parallel filamentary currents which progressively become more intense and inevitably the structure collapses, and so does the local TCS. The mechanism is observationally based on elementary, almost autonomous and spatiotemporal entities that correspond each to a local thinning/dipolarization pair having duration of ~1 min. Energetic proton and electron populations do not occur simultaneously, and we infer that they are separately accelerated at local thinnings and dipolarizations, respectively. In one example energetic particles are accelerated without any dB/dt variation and before the substorm expansion phase onset. A particular effort is undertaken demonstrating that the proposed acceleration mechanism may explain the plasma sheet ratio Ti/Te≈7. All our inferences are checked by the highest resolution datasets obtained by the Geotail Energetic Particles and Ion Composition (EPIC instrument. The energetic particles are used as the best diagnostics for the accelerating source. Near Earth (X≈10 RE selected events support our basic concept. The proposed mechanism seems to reveal a fundamental building block of the substorm phenomenon and may be the basic process/structure, which is now

  13. Magnetospheric processes preceding the onset of an isolated substorm: A case study of the March 31, 1978, substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, A.; Kamide, Y.

    1983-01-01

    We examined in detail the effect of a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the state of the magnetosphere, taking advantage of the availability of the data from IMS magnetometer meridian chains and from several spacecraft. A clear onset substorm occurred on March 31, 1978, when the magnetometer stations were located in the midnight to morning sector and the spacecraft were near the equatorial plane of the nightside magnetosphere. The onset time of the substorm expansion phase could be determined unambiguously in terms of both ground-based magnetic and auroral signatures, and there was an interval lasting about 1 hour between the IMF southward turning and this onset. In this intervening interval the ionospheric current system of the DP 2 type developed. This enhancement of the ionospheric current was driven directly by the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. The onset of the expansion phase was then associated with the decrease in the magnetic field energy density in the tail, providing evidence that the substorm energy was supplied by the release (unloading) of energy from the tail. It is most likely that substorm energy dissipated in the auroral ionosphere throughout this relatively isolated and simple event was supplied by two components, 'directly driven' and 'loading-unloading,' the relative importance of which varied depending on the different substorm phases

  14. Influence of the IMF azimuthal component on magnetospheric substorm dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troshichev, O.A.; Kotikov, A.L.; Bolotinskaya, B.D.; Andrezen, V.G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of the IMF azimuthal component on magnetospheric substorm dynamics has been studied on the basis of five-minute average values of the IMF B y and B z components and the AL index. The results obtained from case studies and from superposed epoch analysis show the dependence of substorm dynamics on the azimuthal component: the reversal of B y from positive to negative increases the activity with minimum delay time, while the opposite reversal either does not change or only slightly changes the activity level. This effect is more evident in winter. The reversal of the IMF vertical component from south to north after an interval of sustained southward IMF statistically gives rise to magnetic activity, too but this growth is less intense than that produced by the B y negative turning. The role of both vertical and azimuthal IMF components must be considered in future studies of substorm triggering mechanisms. (author)

  15. Direct observations of blob deformation during a substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ishida

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric blobs are localized plasma density enhancements, which are mainly produced by the transportation process of plasma. To understand the deformation process of a blob, observations of plasma parameters with good spatial–temporal resolution are desirable. Thus, we conducted the European Incoherent Scatter radar observations with high-speed meridional scans (60–80 s during October and December 2013, and observed the temporal evolution of a blob during a substorm on 4 December 2013. This paper is the first report of direct observations of blob deformation during a substorm. The blob deformation arose from an enhanced plasma flow shear during the substorm expansion phase, and then the blob split into two smaller-scale blobs, whose scale sizes were more than ~100 km in latitude. Our analysis indicates that the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability and dissociative recombination could have deformed the blob structure.

  16. Pc5 waves generated by substorm injection: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Zolotukhina

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the spectral-polarized characteristics of Pc5 ULF waves observed on 17 September 2000 after the 03:20:25 UT substorm onset with the satellites GOES 8 and 10 located east and west of the onset location. In the course of the event, the wave polarization changed from mixed (between toroidal and poloidal to poloidal, and then to mixed again. The hodogram of magnetic field oscillations rotated counterclockwise at GOES 8, and clockwise at GOES 10. It is suggested that the satellites detected the waves generated by the substorm injected clouds of the charged particles drifting in the magnetosphere in the opposite azimuthal directions: GOES 8 (located east of the substorm onset detected the wave generated by an electron cloud, and GOES 10 (west of the onset detected the wave generated by a positive ion cloud. This interpretation is confirmed by the energetic particles data recorded by LANL satellites.

  17. Modeling operational behavior of a disassembly line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilkaya, Elif A.; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we present a dynamic kanban (pull) system specifically developed for disassembly lines. This type of kanban system is much more complex than the traditional kanban system used in assembly lines. For instance, unlike the assembly line where the external demand occurs only at the last station, the demands in the disassembly case also occur at any of the intermittent stations. The reason is that as a product moves on the disassembly line, various parts are disassembled at every station and accumulated at that station. Therefore, there are as many demand sources as there are number of parts. We consider a case example involving the end-of-life products. Based on the precedence relationships and other criteria such as hazardous properties of the parts, we balance the disassembly line. The results of the disassembly line-balancing problem (DLBP) are used as input to the proposed dynamic kanban system for disassembly line (DKSDL). We compare the performance of the DKSDL to the modified kanban system for disassembly line (MKSDL), which was previously introduced by the authors. We show, via simulation, that the DKSDL is far superior to MKSDL considered.

  18. Properties of 3-dimensional line location models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimberg, Jack; Juel, Henrik; Schöbel, Anita

    2002-01-01

    We consider the problem of locating a line with respect to some existing facilities in 3-dimensional space, such that the sum of weighted distances between the line and the facilities is minimized. Measuring distance using the l\\_p norm is discussed, along with the special cases of Euclidean...

  19. Estimation of electric fields and currents from International Magnetospheric Study magnetometer data for the CDAW 6 intervals: Implications for substorm dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, Y.; Baumjohann, W.

    1985-01-01

    Using a recently developed numerical scheme combined with International Magnetospheric Study magnetometer data and the Rice University Ionospheric conductivity model as input, the global distribution of the key ionospheric parameters is estimated for the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) 6 intervals. These outputs include ionospheric electric fields and currents, field-aligned currents and Joule heat production rate at high latitudes, and are compiled in the form of a color movie film, which demonstrates dynamics of substorm changes of the three-dimensional current system as well as of the associated potential pattern. The present paper gives, on the basis of the space-time distribution of the key parameters, the substorm time frame that can be referenced to in terms of the substorm phases when discussing some other magnetospheric and ionospheric records. The distinction between ''substorm expansion'' and ''enhanced convection'' current systems is presented on the basis of the conventional equivalent current and potential patterns and ''true'' ionospheric currents. Although the auroral electrojets flow rather contiguously throughout the dark sector, there are several separate source regions of Joule heating from the electrojet currents. This indicates that the relative importance of the ionospheric conductivity and the electric field in the ionospheric currents varies considerably depending upon latitude and local time. A possible difference in the generation mechanisms of isolated and continuous substorm activity is also discussed to some extent in the light of the two CDAW 6 intervals

  20. Comparison of the Mercury and earth magnetospheres - electron measurements and substorm time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christon, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    The present search for similarities between earth and Mercury plasma electron distribution and large-scale dynamics notes that both spectral shapes are similar to a kappa-distribution. A model distribution of this type which incorporates convective flow is used to simulate the observed plasma electron spectral variations near the Mariner 10-Mercury 1 A event; convection appears to be stronger before, rather than during, the A event, in contradiction to the Baker (1986) convective injection model for Mercury's two relativistic electron flux enhancements. Mercury's postmidnight energetic electron B and B-prime events seem to be multiple onsets in the course of a substorm. 65 references

  1. Auroral Substorms: Search for Processes Causing the Expansion Phase in Terms of the Electric Current Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasofu, Syun-Ichi

    2017-10-01

    Auroral substorms are mostly manifestations of dissipative processes of electromagnetic energy. Thus, we consider a sequence of processes consisting of the power supply (dynamo), transmission (currents/circuits) and dissipations (auroral substorms-the end product), namely the electric current line approach. This work confirms quantitatively that after accumulating magnetic energy during the growth phase, the magnetosphere unloads the stored magnetic energy impulsively in order to stabilize itself. This work is based on our result that substorms are caused by two current systems, the directly driven (DD) current system and the unloading system (UL). The most crucial finding in this work is the identification of the UL (unloading) current system which is responsible for the expansion phase. A very tentative sequence of the processes leading to the expansion phase (the generation of the UL current system) is suggested for future discussions. (1) The solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo enhances significantly the plasma sheet current when its power is increased above 10^{18} erg/s (10^{11} w). (2) The magnetosphere accumulates magnetic energy during the growth phase, because the ionosphere cannot dissipate the increasing power because of a low conductivity. As a result, the magnetosphere is inflated, accumulating magnetic energy. (3) When the power reaches 3-5× 10^{18} erg/s (3-5× 10^{11} w) for about one hour and the stored magnetic energy reaches 3-5×10^{22} ergs (10^{15} J), the magnetosphere begins to develop perturbations caused by current instabilities (the current density {≈}3× 10^{-12} A/cm2 and the total current {≈}106 A at 6 Re). As a result, the plasma sheet current is reduced. (4) The magnetosphere is thus deflated. The current reduction causes partial B/partial t > 0 in the main body of the magnetosphere, producing an earthward electric field. As it is transmitted to the ionosphere, it becomes equatorward-directed electric field which drives both

  2. An elastic-plastic contact model for line contact structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haibin; Zhao, Yingtao; He, Zhifeng; Zhang, Ruinan; Ma, Shaopeng

    2018-06-01

    Although numerical simulation tools are now very powerful, the development of analytical models is very important for the prediction of the mechanical behaviour of line contact structures for deeply understanding contact problems and engineering applications. For the line contact structures widely used in the engineering field, few analytical models are available for predicting the mechanical behaviour when the structures deform plastically, as the classic Hertz's theory would be invalid. Thus, the present study proposed an elastic-plastic model for line contact structures based on the understanding of the yield mechanism. A mathematical expression describing the global relationship between load history and contact width evolution of line contact structures was obtained. The proposed model was verified through an actual line contact test and a corresponding numerical simulation. The results confirmed that this model can be used to accurately predict the elastic-plastic mechanical behaviour of a line contact structure.

  3. IMF BY dependence of the extent of substorm westward electrojet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Auroral ground magnetogram signatures near .... The bottom panel shows the. Sym-H ... coordinate system for the event depicted in figure 1(a). ... ring current build-up at the substorm onset sug- ... tem with the polarity of IMF BY was first shown.

  4. Height-integrated conductivity in auroral substorms. 1. Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    to select substorms which display a typical bulge-type auroral emission pattern and to organize the position of individual DE 2 passes with respect to key features in the emission pattern. The Hall and Pedersen conductances are calculated from electron precipitation data obtained by the low altitude plasma...

  5. Pseudobreakup and substorm growth phase in the ionosphere and magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinin, H.E.J.; Pellinen, R.J.; Pulkkinen, T.I.; Lopez, R.E.; Baker, D.N.; Boesinger, T.

    1993-01-01

    The authors present space and ground based observations made during the growth phase and the onset of a substorm on August 31, 1986. Roughly 20 minutes after the var-epsilon parameter at the magnetopause had exceeded 10 11 W, the AMPTE Charge Composition Explorer spacecraft observed an increase in energetic particle fluxes consistent with magnetic field depolarization. The craft was close to magnetic midnight at a geocentric distance of 8.7R E . The event had the initial signature of a substorm onset, but it did not lead to a full-scale substorm expansion based on several ground based observations. There were no large particle injection events at geostationary orbit. After another 20 minutes the event did enter a normal substorm expansion phase. The authors interpret the initial activation as a open-quotes pseudobreakupclose quotes. They correlate observations made by spacecraft in the near-Earth plasma sheet, with ground based observations of the ionospheric development from magnetometer and electric field measurements from the STARE radar. The strength and the consequences are concluded to be the main differences of pseudobreakups and ordinary breakups

  6. Kinky heliospheric current sheet: Cause of CDAW-6 substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurutani, B.T.; Russell, C.T.; King, J.H.; Zwickl, R.D.; Lin, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    Two magnetospheric substorms and the intensification of the second are caused by interplanetary magnetic field and ram pressure changes associated with a kinky heliospheric current sheet (KHCS). The responsible interplanetary features occur in a highly compressed region between a solar flare-associated shock wave and the cold driver gas. The possibity that the interplanetary structure is a ''magnetic cloud'' is ruled out

  7. A kinky heliospheric current sheet - Cause of CDAW-6 substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Russell, C. T.; King, J. H.; Zwickl, R. D.; Lin, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    Two magnetospheric substorms and the intensification of the second are caused by interplanetary magnetic field and ram pressure changes associated with a kinky heliospheric current sheet (KHCS). The responsible interplanetary features occur in a highly compressed region between a solar flare-associated shock wave and the cold driver gas. The possibility that the interplanetary structure is a 'magnetic cloud' is ruled out.

  8. Two types of magnetospheric ELF chorus and their substorm dependences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurutani, B.T.; Smith, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    Extremely low frequency (10--1500 Hz) magnetospheric chorus has been analyzed to investigate a possible dependence on substorms. Care was taken to separate effects from temporal effects by analyzing an entire year of data acquired by the Ogo 5 search coil magnetometer. A major finding of the study of spatial dependences is that chorus occurs principally in two magnetic latitude regions. Equatorial chorus is detected near the equator, and high-latitude chorus is found at magnetic latitudes above 15 0 . When chorus in these two regions is analyzed separately, substorm dependences become apparent. Comparisons with AE indicate that equatorial chorus occurs primarily during substorms. High-latitude chorus is not strongly dependent on AE and often occurs during intervals of prolonged quiet with AE 0 , a region where cyclotron resonance is most efficient. The L value of maximum chorus occurrence increases from 5--8 postmidnight to 7--11 postdawn, a dependence which is consistent with generation by electrons which have undergone drift shell splitting. Delay times between substorms and the onset of equatorial chorus are consistent with a gradient drift of approx.25-keV electrons. Equatorial postmidnight chorus and postdawn chorus have similar occurrence rates and wave intensities. The maximum chorus ocurrence rates are 54% postmidnight and 56% postdawn

  9. Streaming reversal of energetic particles in the magnetetail during a substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, A.T.Y.; Williams, D.J.; Eastman, T.E.; Frank, L.A.; Akasofu, S.

    1984-01-01

    Reversal from tailward streaming to earthward streaming of energetic ions at 0.29--0.50 MeV during a substorm on February 3, 1978, is studied with measurements of energetic particles, plasma, and magnetic field from that IMP 8 spacecraft near the dusk flank of the magnetotail. Four new features emerge when high time resolution data are examined in detail. The times of reversal from tailward to earthward streaming of energetic ions and from tailward to earthward plasma flow do not coincide. Second, the velocity distribution in the tailward flowing plasma has a cresent shape, whereas the velocity distribution in the earthward flowing plasma has a crescent shape, whereas the velocity distribution in the earthward flowing plasma resembles a convecting Maxwellian. Third, tailward streaming of energetic ions is sometime detected in northward magnetic field regions and conversely, earthward streaming in southward field environments. Fourth, energetic ions scattering earthward are occasionally present in conjunction with a strong tailward streaming population in the same energy range. These new features suggest that the streaming reversal of energetic ions and the plasma flow reversal in this event are due to the spacecraft traversing different plasma regions during the substorm-associated configurational change of the plasma sheet and the magnetotail and is unrelated to the motion of an acceleration region such as an X type neutral line moving past the spacecraft

  10. Tornado risk model for transmission line design

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Milford, RV

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available is in combination with ice loading. The wind load used in most codes of practice and design recommendations for transmission line design have until recently been based almost exclusively on large-scale wind storms, which may include severe storms such as hurricanes...

  11. Actuator Line Modeling of Wind Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels

    2009-01-01

    This thesis contains a comprehensive 3D Navier-Stokes computational study of the characteristics of wakes of wind turbines operating in various flow conditions including interacting wakes between a row of turbines. The computations were carried out using the actuator line technique combined...

  12. Generation mechanism of L-value dependence of oxygen flux enhancements during substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Ohtani, S.; Gkioulidou, M.; Takahashi, K.; Kistler, L. M.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument measures charged particles with an energy range from ~eV to ~ tens of keV. The observation shows that the energy flux of the particles increases inside the geosynchronous orbit during substorms. For some night-side events around the apogee, the energy flux of O+ ion enhances below ~10 keV at lower L shell, whereas the flux below ~8 keV sharply decreases at higher L shells. This structure of L-energy spectrogram of flux is observed only for the O+ ions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the generation mechanism of the structure by using numerical simulations. We utilized the global MHD simulation developed by Tanaka et al (2010, JGR) to simulate the electric and magnetic fields during substorms. We performed test particle simulation under the electric and magnetic fields by applying the same model introduced by Nakayama et al. (2015, JGR). In the test particle simulation each test particle carries the real number of particles in accordance with the Liouville theorem. Using the real number of particles, we reconstructed 6-dimensional phase space density and differential flux of O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere. We obtained the following results. (1) Just after the substorm onset, the dawn-to-dusk electric field is enhanced to ~ 20 mV/m in the night side tail region at L > 7. (2) The O+ ions are accelerated and transported to the inner region (L > ~5.5) by the large-amplitude electric field. (3) The reconstructed L-energy spectrogram shows a similar structure to the Van Allen Probes observation. (4) The difference in the flux enhancement between at lower L shell and higher L shells is due to two distinct acceleration processes: adiabatic and non-adiabatic. We will discuss the relationship between the particle acceleration and the structure of L-energy spectrogram of flux enhancement in detail.

  13. LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minas Bakalchev

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The perception of elements in a system often creates their interdependence, interconditionality, and suppression. The lines from a basic geometrical element have become the model of a reductive world based on isolation according to certain criteria such as function, structure, and social organization. Their traces are experienced in the contemporary world as fragments or ruins of a system of domination of an assumed hierarchical unity. How can one release oneself from such dependence or determinism? How can the lines become less “systematic” and forms more autonomous, and less reductive? How is a form released from modernistic determinism on the new controversial ground? How can these elements or forms of representation become forms of action in the present complex world? In this paper, the meaning of lines through the ideas of Le Corbusier, Leonidov, Picasso, and Hitchcock is presented. Spatial research was made through a series of examples arising from the projects of the architectural studio “Residential Transformations”, which was a backbone for mapping the possibilities ranging from playfulness to exactness, as tactics of transformation in the different contexts of the contemporary world.

  14. Simulation of the interchange instability in a magnetospheric substorm site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Mingalev

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We perform modeling of the interchange instability driven by longitudinal pressure asymmetry in the region of the pressure buildup that forms in the inner magnetosphere at the substorm growth phase. The simulation refers to the dawnward side of the Harang discontinuity and times after Bz IMF turning northward. The solution for the equilibrium state indicates tailward flows associated with vortices, which is in agreement with a previous finding of Ashour-Abdalla et al. (1999, 2002. We show that in the regions of equilibrium field-aligned currents (FACs, small initial perturbations in pVγ (p is the isotropic plasma pressure, V is the unit magnetic flux tube volume, γ=5/3 the adiabatic exponent, set up as ripples inclined to azimuth, grow in time. For the background FAC of ~10-6 A/m2, the linear growth rate of the instability is ~6 min. Starting from the 12th min of evolution, the perturbations exhibit nonlinear deformations, develop undulations and front steepening. An interesting peculiarity in the distribution of the associated small-scale FACs is that they become asymmetric with time. Specifically, the downward currents are more localised, reaching densities up to 15×10-6 A/m2 at the nonlinear stage. The upward FACs are more dispersed. When large enough, these currents are likely to produce the aurora. We also run our simulation for the initial perturbations of large transverse scales in order to demonstrate that the interchange instability can be responsible for pressure and cross-tail current spatial variations of great extent.

  15. Superposed epoch analysis of O+ auroral outflow during sawtooth events and substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrouzi, N.; Kistler, L. M.; Lund, E. J.; Cai, X.

    2017-12-01

    Sawtooth events are repeated injection of energetic particles at geosynchronous orbit. Studies have shown that 94% of sawtooth events occurred during magnetic storm times. The main factor that causes a sawtooth event is still an open question. Simulations have suggested that heavy ions like O+ may play a role in triggering the injections. One of the sources of the O+ in the Earth's magnetosphere is the nightside aurora. O+ ions coming from the nightside auroral region have direct access to the near-earth magnetotail. A model (Brambles et al. 2013) for interplanetary coronal mass ejection driven sawtooth events found that nightside O+ outflow caused the subsequent teeth of the sawtooth event through a feedback mechanism. This work is a superposed epoch analysis to test whether the observed auroral outflow supports this model. Using FAST spacecraft data from 1997-2007, we examine the auroral O+ outflow as a function of time relative to an injection onset. Then we determine whether the profile of outflow flux of O+ during sawtooth events is different from the outflow observed during isolated substorms. The auroral region boundaries are estimated using the method of (Andersson et al. 2004). Subsequently the O+ outflow flux inside these boundaries are calculated and binned as a function of superposed epoch time for substorms and sawtooth "teeth". In this way, we will determine if sawtooth events do in fact have greater O+ outflow, and if that outflow is predominantly from the nightside, as suggested by the model results.

  16. Dependence of Substorm Evolution on Solar Wind Condition: Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyoshikawa, N.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2017-12-01

    A substorm is one of the remarkable disturbances occurring in the magnetosphere. It is known that the substorm occurs frequently when IMF is southward and solar wind speed is high. However, the physical process to determine substorm scale is not well understood. We reproduced substorms by using global MHD simulation, calculated auroral electrojet (ionospheric Hall current) flowing in the ionosphere to investigate the dependence of substorm evolution on solar wind condition. Solar wind speed of 372.4 km/s and IMF Bz of 5.0 nT were imposed to, obtain the quasi-stationary state of the magnetosphere. Then the solar wind parameters were changed as a step function. For the solar wind speed, we assumed 300 km/s, 500 km/s and 700 km/s. For IMF, we assumed -1.0 nT, -3.0 nT, -5.0 nT, -7.0 nT and -9.0 nT. In total, 15 simulation runs were performed. In order to objectively evaluate the substorm, the onset was identified with the method based on the one proposed by Newell et al. (2011). This method uses the SME index that is an extension of the AE index. In this study, the geomagnetic variation induced by the ionospheric Hall current was obtained every 1 degree from the magnetic latitude 40 degrees to 80 degrees and in every 0.5 hours in the magnetic region direction. The upper and the lower envelopes of the geomagnetic variation are regarded as SMU index and SML index, respectively. The larger the solar wind speed, the larger the southward IMF, the more the onset tends to be faster. This tendency is consistent with the onset occurrence probability indicated by Newell et al. (2016). Moreover, the minimum value of the SML index within 30 minutes from the beginning of the onset tends to decrease with the solar wind speed and the magnitude of the southward IMF. A rapid decrease of the SML index can be explained by a rapid increase in the field-aligned currents flowing in and out of the nightside ionosphere. This means that electromagnetic energies flowing into the ionosphere

  17. Vortex-line fluctuations in model high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Teitel, S.

    1993-01-01

    We carry out Monte Carlo simulations of the uniformly frustrated three-dimensional XY model, as a model for vortex-line fluctuations in a high-T c superconductor in an external magnetic field. A density of vortex lines of f=1/25 is considered. We find two sharp phase transitions. The low-T superconducting phase is an ordered vortex-line lattice. The high-T normal phase is a vortex-line liquid, with much entangling, cutting, and loop excitations. An intermediate phase is found, which is characterized as a vortex-line liquid of disentangled, approximately straight, lines. In this phase, the system displays superconducting properties in the direction parallel to the magnetic field, but normal behavior in planes perpendicular to the field. A detailed analysis of the vortex structure function is carried out

  18. Multipoint Observations of Energetic Particle Injections and Substorm Activity During a Conjunction Between Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Clemmons, J. H.; Jaynes, A. N.; Leonard, T.; Baker, D. N.; Cohen, I. J.; Gkioulidou, M.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mauk, B. H.; Gabrielse, C.; Angelopoulos, V.; Strangeway, R. J.; Kletzing, C. A.; Le Contel, O.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Reeves, G. D.

    2017-11-01

    This study examines multipoint observations during a conjunction between Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Van Allen Probes on 7 April 2016 in which a series of energetic particle injections occurred. With complementary data from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, Geotail, and Los Alamos National Laboratory spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit (16 spacecraft in total), we develop new insights on the nature of energetic particle injections associated with substorm activity. Despite this case involving only weak substorm activity (maximum AE energy wave activity is also established from Van Allen Probes and MMS. Drift mapping using a simplified magnetic field model provides estimates of the dispersionless injection boundary locations as a function of universal time, magnetic local time, and L shell. The analysis reveals that at least five electron injections, which were localized in magnetic local time, preceded a larger injection of both electrons and ions across nearly the entire nightside of the magnetosphere near geosynchronous orbit. The larger ion and electron injection did not penetrate to L < 6.6, but several of the smaller electron injections penetrated to L < 6.6. Due to the discrepancy between the number, penetration depth, and complexity of electron versus ion injections, this event presents challenges to the current conceptual models of energetic particle injections.

  19. Using Quartile-Quartile Lines as Linear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the notion of the quartile-quartile line as an alternative to the regression line and the median-median line to produce a linear model based on a set of data. It is based on using the first and third quartiles of a set of (x, y) data. Dynamic spreadsheets are used as exploratory tools to compare the different approaches and…

  20. A universal calculation model for the controlled electric transmission line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zivzivadze, O.; Zivzivadze, L.

    2009-01-01

    Difficulties associated with the development of calculation models are analyzed, and the ways of resolution of these problems are given. A version of the equivalent circuit as a six-pole network, the parameters of which do not depend on the angle of shift Θ between the voltage vectors of circuits is offered. The interrelation between the parameters of the equivalent circuit and the transmission constants of the line was determined. A universal calculation model for the controlled electric transmission line was elaborated. The model allows calculating the stationary modes of lines of such classes at any angle of shift Θ between the circuits. (author)

  1. Spontaneous and trigger-associated substorms compared: Electrodynamic parameters in the polar ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Ming; Zhang, Bei-Chen; Kamide, Y.; Wu, Zhen-Sen; Hu, Ze-Jun; Yang, Hui-Gen

    2011-01-01

    An attempt is made to study the difference, if any, between the response of the polar ionosphere to spontaneous substorms and that to trigger-associated substorms in terms of electrodynamic parameters including ionospheric current vectors, the electric potential, and the current function. The results show that, in the first approximation, the ionospheric parameters for the two types of substorms are quite similar. It is therefore conceived that spontaneous substorms are not very different from trigger-associated substorms in the development of substorm processes in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. We demonstrate, however, that spontaneous substorms seem to have a more clearly identifiable growth phase, whereas trigger-associated substorms have a more powerful unloading process. Changes in the current intensity and the electric potential drop across the polar cap in the recovery phase are also quite different from each other. Both the current intensity and the cross-polar cap potential drop show a larger decrease in the recovery phase of trigger-associated substorms, but the potential drop decreases only slightly and the currents in the late morning sector are still strong for spontaneous substorms. We interpret these findings as an indication of the relative importance of the unloading process and the directly driven process in conjunction with the north-south polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field. There still exists a strong directly driven process in the recovery phase of spontaneous substorms. For trigger-associated substorms, however, both the directly driven process and the unloading process become weak after the peak time.

  2. Line impedance estimation using model based identification technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciobotaru, Mihai; Agelidis, Vassilios; Teodorescu, Remus

    2011-01-01

    The estimation of the line impedance can be used by the control of numerous grid-connected systems, such as active filters, islanding detection techniques, non-linear current controllers, detection of the on/off grid operation mode. Therefore, estimating the line impedance can add extra functions...... into the operation of the grid-connected power converters. This paper describes a quasi passive method for estimating the line impedance of the distribution electricity network. The method uses the model based identification technique to obtain the resistive and inductive parts of the line impedance. The quasi...

  3. Computer-simulation movie of ionospheric electric fields and currents for a magnetospheric substorm life cycle. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, Y.; Matsushita, S.

    1980-07-01

    Numerical solution of the current conservation equation gives the distributions of electric fields and currents in the global ionosphere produced by the field-aligned currents. By altering ionospheric conductivity distributions as well as the field-aligned current densities and configurations to simulate a magnetospheric substorm life cycle, which is assumed to last for five hours, various patterns of electric fields and currents are computed for every 30-second interval in the life cycle. The simulated results are compiled in the form of a color movie, where variations of electric equi-potential curves are the first sequence, electric current-vector changes are the second, and fluctuations of the electric current system are the third. The movie compresses real time by a factor of 1/180, taking 1.7 minutes of running time for one sequence. One of the most striking features of this simulation is the clear demonstration of rapid and large scale interactions between the auroral zone and middle-low latitudes during the substorm sequences. This technical note provides an outline of the numerical scheme and world-wide contour maps of the electric potential, ionospheric current vectors, and the equivalent ionospheric current system at 5-minute intervals as an aid in viewing the movie and to further detailed study of the 'model' substorms

  4. Two satellite study of substorm expansion near geosynchronous orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ø. Holter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available During several time intervals in 1979–1980 the satellites GEOS-2 and SCATHA were situated relatively close on the nightside of the Earth at geosynchronous distances. Several substorm events were identified during these periods. The event considered in this paper was recorded on 22 May 1979, when the satellites were separated by less than 30min in local time around 21:00 LT. The observed 45 to 60 s delay of magnetic signatures observed at the two s/c indicates a westward expansion of ~7.7°/min. At the two s/c, the magnetic signatures are, in particular for the azimuthal magnetic field components, quite different. At GEOS-2, being close to the magnetic equator, the dominant feature is a dipolarization with a weak field-aligned current signature corresponding to a symmetric current which cancels at the equator. On SCATHA, however, being close to the current sheet boundary, the azimuthal magnetic field indicates a strong field-aligned Birkeland current structure. On both s/c the first indication of an approaching substorm was an increase in the high energy ion flux followed by a reduction in the flux intensity of energetic electrons and a further tailward stretching of the magnetic field, starting ~2min before the onset of the magnetic field dipolarization. The tailward stretching, the observed variations of the magnetic field components, and the subsequent dipolarization are interpreted in terms of an azimuthally tilted field-aligned current system passing the s/c on the tailward side from east to west. The westward expansion and dipolarization observed at the two s/c are consistent with the propagation of a Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. The increased radial ion flux corresponds to the ExB-drift due to the substorm associated electric field.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms; plasma waves and instabilities; current systems

  5. Cluster observation of plasma flow reversal in the magnetotail during a substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Y. Lui

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate in detail a reversal of plasma flow from tailward to earthward detected by Cluster at the downstream distance of ~19 RE in the midnight sector of the magnetotail on 22 August 2001. This flow reversal was accompanied by a sign reversal of the Bz component and occurred during the late substorm expansion phase as revealed by simultaneous global view of auroral activity from IMAGE. We examine the associated Hall current system signature, current density, electric field, Lorentz force, and current dissipation/dynamo term, the last two parameters being new features that have not been studied previously for plasma flow reversals. It is found that (1 there was no clear quadrupole Hall current system signature organized by the flow reversal time, (2 the x-component of the Lorentz force did not change sign while the other two did, (3 the timing sequence of flow reversal from the Cluster configuration did not match tailward motion of a single plasma flow source, (4 the electric field was occasionally dawnward, producing a dynamo effect, and (5 the electric field was occasionally larger at the high-latitude plasma sheet than near the neutral sheet. These observations are consistent with the current disruption model for substorms in which these disturbances are due to shifting dominance of multiple current disruption sites and turbulence at the observing location.

  6. Energization of the Ring Current through Convection of Substorm Enhancements of the Plasma Sheet Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, A.; Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, C.; Spence, H. E.; Henderson, M. G.; Matsui, H.

    2017-12-01

    It has been shown that electric field strength and night-side plasma sheet density are the two best predictors of the adiabatic energy gain of the ring current during geomagnetic storms (Liemohn and Khazanov, 2005). While H+ dominates the ring current during quiet times, O+ can contribute substantially during geomagnetic storms. Substorm activity provides a mechanism to enhance the energy density of O+ in the plasma sheet during geomagnetic storms, which is then convected adiabatically into the inner-magnetosphere. Using the Van Allen Probes data in the the plasma sheet source region (defined as L>5.5 during storms) and the inner magnetosphere, along with LANL-GEO data to identify substorm injection times, we show that adiabatic convection of O+ enhancements in the source region can explain the observed enhancements in the inner magnetosphere. We use the UNH-IMEF electric field model to calculate drift times from the source region to the inner magnetosphere to test whether enhancements in the inner-magnetosphere can be explained by dipolarization driven enhancements in the plasma sheet source hours before.

  7. Cluster observation of plasma flow reversal in the magnetotail during a substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Y. Lui

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate in detail a reversal of plasma flow from tailward to earthward detected by Cluster at the downstream distance of ~19 RE in the midnight sector of the magnetotail on 22 August 2001. This flow reversal was accompanied by a sign reversal of the Bz component and occurred during the late substorm expansion phase as revealed by simultaneous global view of auroral activity from IMAGE. We examine the associated Hall current system signature, current density, electric field, Lorentz force, and current dissipation/dynamo term, the last two parameters being new features that have not been studied previously for plasma flow reversals. It is found that (1 there was no clear quadrupole Hall current system signature organized by the flow reversal time, (2 the x-component of the Lorentz force did not change sign while the other two did, (3 the timing sequence of flow reversal from the Cluster configuration did not match tailward motion of a single plasma flow source, (4 the electric field was occasionally dawnward, producing a dynamo effect, and (5 the electric field was occasionally larger at the high-latitude plasma sheet than near the neutral sheet. These observations are consistent with the current disruption model for substorms in which these disturbances are due to shifting dominance of multiple current disruption sites and turbulence at the observing location.

  8. Ionospheric effect of the magnetospheric substorms at middle latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cander, Lj.R.; Dominici, P.; Zolesi, B.

    1988-01-01

    A study is made of the F2-layer effect of magnetospheric substorms over the Mediterranean area using data from several ionospheric stations for selected events in the current sunspot cycle 21. The night-time enhancements in the critical frequency of the F2-layer (f 0 F2) and the total electron content (TEC) have been found with both premidnight and postmidnight f 0 F2 peaks and a subsequent decrease in the minimum virtual height of the F region (h'F). It is found that the enhancements occur through the nights under steady geomagnetic conditions and that the time at which it is seen at Rome and Grocka ionospheric stations is progressively earlier as geomagnetic activity increases. It has been further shown that this type of the f 0 F2 night-time increases is not always accompanied by an increase in TEC, although the reverse holds true during the nights of increased substorm activity. The fact that the considerable variability in f 0 F2, TEC and h'F at the onset of the substorm expansion are preceded by the ionospheric dynamics associated with these observations can be very useful in the identification of precursor indicative of short-term variations of ionospheric propagation conditions

  9. Magnetosphere energetics during substorm events IMP 8 and Geotail observations

    CERN Document Server

    Belehaki, A

    2001-01-01

    Magnetospheric energetics during substorm events is studied in this paper. Three events were selected, a weak substorm, a large isolated one and finally a prolonged period of substorm activity with multiple intensifications. It is assumed that the energy, that entered the magnetosphere due to electromagnetic coupling with the solar wind, is described by the epsilon parameter, proposed by Perreault and Akasofu (1978). High resolution, magnetic field and plasma data from the MGF and LEP experiments on board Geotail were analyzed to determine the timing of plasmoid release, its dimensions, its convection velocity and finally the energy carried by each plasmoid. Plasmoids were defined as structures with rotating magnetic fields and enhanced total pressure. Tailward plasmoid bulk speed in the distant tail varied from 350 to 750 km/s. Their dimensions in the X/sub GSM/ direction was found to be from 4.5 to 28 R/sub E/, and their duration did not exceed 5 min. The average energy carried by each plasmoid in the dista...

  10. Theory and Circuit Model for Lossy Coaxial Transmission Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genoni, T. C.; Anderson, C. N.; Clark, R. E.; Gansz-Torres, J.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, Dale Robert

    2017-04-01

    The theory of signal propagation in lossy coaxial transmission lines is revisited and new approximate analytic formulas for the line impedance and attenuation are derived. The accuracy of these formulas from DC to 100 GHz is demonstrated by comparison to numerical solutions of the exact field equations. Based on this analysis, a new circuit model is described which accurately reproduces the line response over the entire frequency range. Circuit model calculations are in excellent agreement with the numerical and analytic results, and with finite-difference-time-domain simulations which resolve the skindepths of the conducting walls.

  11. Line-broadened quasilinear burst model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Wong, H.V.; Fitzpatrick, J.

    1995-07-01

    A quasilinear model is developed to produce realistic self-consistent saturation levels when modes do not overlap, and give self-consistent diffusion and wave evolution when modes do overlap. Both regimes give steady or pulsating behavior in weakly driven systems with classical relaxation and background dissipation present. An avalanche response is demonstrated: wave momentum release caused by the overlap of closely spaced modes can produce mode overlap of more widely spaced modes (a domino effect) or the growth of modes which would be stable in systems unaffected by the closely-spaced modes' diffusion. Detailed analysis and calculations are performed for the bump-on-tail instability, and extension of the method to more general problems is briefly discussed

  12. Relevance of southward magnetic fields in the neutral sheet to anisotropic distribution of energetic electrons and substorm activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, A.T.Y.; Meng, C.

    1979-01-01

    The implications of southward magnetic fields at the magnetotail neutral sheet to the development of streaming anisotropy of energetic electrons and magnetospheric substorm activity are examined. Magnetic field and energetic particle measurements from the Imp 6 spacecraft, the AE index, and global auroral images from DMSP spacecraft are utilized in this study. Criteria are developed to identify events of southward magnetic fields at the neutral sheet which imply the presence of X-type magnetic neutral lines. Several features of the observations suggest that the southward magnetic fields and the implied X-type neutral lines are associated with magnetic bubbles in the neutral sheet region. It is found that the signatures of magnetic bubbles are sometimes detected in association with tailward streaming and flux enhancement of energetic electrons (47 keV< E<350keV). A cigar-shaped anisotropy in the energetic electron distribution is frequently but not always observed before the onset of tailward streaming of energetic electrons. The tailward streaming is magnetic field-aligned and occurs in the form of bursts, suggestic electrons. The tailward streaming is magnetic field-aligned and occurs in the form of bursts, suggesting that the generating process is activated somewhat quasi-periodically and is not in a steady state. Signatures of magnetic bubbles are also detected without any substantial enhancement or detectable tailward streaming of energetic electrons. By comparing Imp 6 observations with the AW index and global auroral images from DMSP spacecraft. It is found that signatures of magnetic bubbles in the neutral sheet are observed during substorms as well as during quiet geomagnetic conditions, indicating that magnetic bubbles are intrinsic features of the neutral sheet in the magnetotail regardless of substorm activity

  13. A mathematical model for camera calibration based on straight lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. G. Tommaselli

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In other to facilitate the automation of camera calibration process, a mathematical model using straight lines was developed, which is based on the equivalent planes mathematical model. Parameter estimation of the developed model is achieved by the Least Squares Method with Conditions and Observations. The same method of adjustment was used to implement camera calibration with bundles, which is based on points. Experiments using simulated and real data have shown that the developed model based on straight lines gives results comparable to the conventional method with points. Details concerning the mathematical development of the model and experiments with simulated and real data will be presented and the results with both methods of camera calibration, with straight lines and with points, will be compared.

  14. Initiating Events Modeling for On-Line Risk Monitoring Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, Z.; Mikulicic, V.

    1998-01-01

    In order to make on-line risk monitoring application of Probabilistic Risk Assessment more complete and realistic, a special attention need to be dedicated to initiating events modeling. Two different issues are of special importance: one is how to model initiating events frequency according to current plant configuration (equipment alignment and out of service status) and operating condition (weather and various activities), and the second is how to preserve dependencies between initiating events model and rest of PRA model. First, the paper will discuss how initiating events can be treated in on-line risk monitoring application. Second, practical example of initiating events modeling in EPRI's Equipment Out of Service on-line monitoring tool will be presented. Gains from application and possible improvements will be discussed in conclusion. (author)

  15. Nebular Continuum and Line Emission in Stellar Population Synthesis Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byler, Nell; Dalcanton, Julianne J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Conroy, Charlie; Johnson, Benjamin D., E-mail: ebyler@astro.washington.edu [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Accounting for nebular emission when modeling galaxy spectral energy distributions (SEDs) is important, as both line and continuum emissions can contribute significantly to the total observed flux. In this work, we present a new nebular emission model integrated within the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis code that computes the line and continuum emission for complex stellar populations using the photoionization code Cloudy. The self-consistent coupling of the nebular emission to the matched ionizing spectrum produces emission line intensities that correctly scale with the stellar population as a function of age and metallicity. This more complete model of galaxy SEDs will improve estimates of global gas properties derived with diagnostic diagrams, star formation rates based on H α , and physical properties derived from broadband photometry. Our models agree well with results from other photoionization models and are able to reproduce observed emission from H ii regions and star-forming galaxies. Our models show improved agreement with the observed H ii regions in the Ne iii/O ii plane and show satisfactory agreement with He ii emission from z = 2 galaxies, when including rotating stellar models. Models including post-asymptotic giant branch stars are able to reproduce line ratios consistent with low-ionization emission regions. The models are integrated into current versions of FSPS and include self-consistent nebular emission predictions for MIST and Padova+Geneva evolutionary tracks.

  16. Multikanban model for disassembly line with demand fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udomsawat, Gun; Gupta, Surendra M.; Al-Turki, Yousef A. Y.

    2004-02-01

    In recent years, the continuous growth in consumer waste and dwindling natural resources has seriously threatened the environment. Realizing this, several countries have passed regulations that force manufacturers not only to manufacture environmentally conscious products, but also to take back their used products from consumers so that the components and materials recovered from the products may be reused and/or recycled. Disassembly plays an important role in product recovery. A disassembly line is perhaps the most suitable setting for disassembly of products in large quantities. Because a disassembly line has a tendency to generate excessive inventory, employing a kanban system can reduce the inventory level and let the system run more efficiently. A disassembly line is quite different from an assembly line. For example, not only can the demand arrive at the last station, it can also arrive at any of the other stations in the system. The demand for a component on the disassembly line could fluctuate widely. In fact, there are many other complicating matters that need to be considered to implement the concept of kanbans in such an environment. In this paper, we discuss the complications that are unique to a disassembly line. We discuss the complications in utilizing the conventional production control mechanisms in a disassembly line setting. We then show how to overcome them by implementing kanbans in a disassembly line setting with demand fluctuation and introduce the concept of multi-kanban mechanism. We demonstrate its effectiveness using a simulation model. An example is presented to illustrate the concept.

  17. Transmission Delay Modeling of Packet Communication over Digital Subscriber Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Vodrazka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Certain multimedia and voice services, such as VoIP, IPTV, etc., are significantly delay sensitive and their performance is influenced by the overall transmission delay and its variance. One of the most common solutions used in access networks are xDSL lines, especially ADSL2+ or VDSL2. Although these subscriber lines also use packet communication, there are several differences and mechanisms, which influence their resulting delay. Their delay characteristics are also dependent on the individual settings of each xDSL provider, therefore we decided to investigate this area for typical commercially available lines in Czech Republic. Based on the measured values and experiments with real ADSL2+ lines we also developed a potential modeling method, which is presented in this article as well. The parameters for packet jitter based on the generalized Pareto distribution were modeled.

  18. Constructing Poverty Lines in Croatia Using Kakwani’s Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinko Škare

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new model for defining the poverty line as a possible candidate for the construction of a new official poverty line in Croatia. The model, based on Kakwani’s (2010 approach (nutrition-based anchor, uses consumer theory as the basis for defining food and non-food poverty lines. In Croatia, various alternative poverty indicators have been developed to define the official poverty line. To ensure international comparability and consistency, the poverty threshold expressed in local currency by applying the exchange rate of currencies’ purchasing power (PPP is expressed in international dollars. It is important to ensure implementation of redistributive policies, maximization of market efficiency, and increased social justice. All this policy goals and instruments heavily depend on efficient and precise poverty measurement methods.

  19. Analytical Model for High Impedance Fault Analysis in Transmission Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maximov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A high impedance fault (HIF normally occurs when an overhead power line physically breaks and falls to the ground. Such faults are difficult to detect because they often draw small currents which cannot be detected by conventional overcurrent protection. Furthermore, an electric arc accompanies HIFs, resulting in fire hazard, damage to electrical devices, and risk with human life. This paper presents an analytical model to analyze the interaction between the electric arc associated to HIFs and a transmission line. A joint analytical solution to the wave equation for a transmission line and a nonlinear equation for the arc model is presented. The analytical model is validated by means of comparisons between measured and calculated results. Several cases of study are presented which support the foundation and accuracy of the proposed model.

  20. Ideal Coulomb Plasma Approximation in Line Shape Models: Problematic Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Rosato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In weakly coupled plasmas, it is common to describe the microfield using a Debye model. We examine here an “artificial” ideal one-component plasma with an infinite Debye length, which has been used for the test of line shape codes. We show that the infinite Debye length assumption can lead to a misinterpretation of numerical simulations results, in particular regarding the convergence of calculations. Our discussion is done within an analytical collision operator model developed for hydrogen line shapes in near-impact regimes. When properly employed, this model can serve as a reference for testing the convergence of simulations.

  1. Polyakov lines in Yang-Mills matrix models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austing, Peter; Wheater, John F.; Vernizzi, Graziano

    2003-01-01

    We study the Polyakov line in Yang-Mills matrix models, which include the IKKT model of IIB string theory. For the gauge group SU(2) we give the exact formulae in the form of integral representations which are convenient for finding the asymptotic behaviour. For the SU(N) bosonic models we prove upper bounds which decay as a power law at large momentum p. We argue that these capture the full asymptotic behaviour. We also indicate how to extend the results to some correlation functions of Polyakov lines. (author)

  2. A statistical relationship between the geosynchronous magnetic field and substorm electrojet magnitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.E.; Rosenvinge, T. von

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the authors examine the relationship between geosynchronous magnetic field variations during substorms measured by GOES 5 and the auroral electrojet as measured by AE and Poste de la Baleine. As in previous studies, the authors find that the more taillike the field prior to the local onset, the greater the dipolarization of the field during the substorm. They also find that the greater the deviation of the field from a dipolar configuration, the larger the change in AE during the event. This implies that stronger cross-tail currents prior to the substorm are associated with larger substorm-associated westward electrojets and thus more intense substorms. Previous work has shown that in order to produce the observed taillike fields at geosynchronous altitude, the intense cross-tail current that builds up during the growth phase must be localized in the near-Earth (≤ 10 R E ) region. Since the westward electrojet is the ionospheric leg of the substorm current wedge, this result implies that the substorm-associated westward electrojet is drawn from the near-Earth region. In fact, the authors find that most of the current diversion occurs in the near-Earth magnetotail. Furthermore, they estimate that a diversion about half of the near-Earth cross-tail current can account for the current in the northern and southern westward electrojets associated with the substorm current wedge. 25 refs., 9 figs

  3. Grounding line transient response in marine ice sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Drouet

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine ice-sheet stability is mostly controlled by the dynamics of the grounding line, i.e. the junction between the grounded ice sheet and the floating ice shelf. Grounding line migration has been investigated within the framework of MISMIP (Marine Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project, which mainly aimed at investigating steady state solutions. Here we focus on transient behaviour, executing short-term simulations (200 yr of a steady ice sheet perturbed by the release of the buttressing restraint exerted by the ice shelf on the grounded ice upstream. The transient grounding line behaviour of four different flowline ice-sheet models has been compared. The models differ in the physics implemented (full Stokes and shallow shelf approximation, the numerical approach, as well as the grounding line treatment. Their overall response to the loss of buttressing is found to be broadly consistent in terms of grounding line position, rate of surface elevation change and surface velocity. However, still small differences appear for these latter variables, and they can lead to large discrepancies (> 100% observed in terms of ice sheet contribution to sea level when cumulated over time. Despite the recent important improvements of marine ice-sheet models in their ability to compute steady state configurations, our results question the capacity of these models to compute short-term reliable sea-level rise projections.

  4. Comparison of Transmission Line Methods for Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William; Atkinson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method (a first order model), and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices. Keywords: Surface Acoustic Wave, SAW, transmission line models, Impulse Response Method.

  5. Rigorous theoretical derivation of lumped models to transmission line systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jixiang

    2012-01-01

    By virtue of the negative electric parameter concept, i.e. negative lumped resistance, inductance, conductance and capacitance (N-RLGC), the lumped equivalent models of transmission line systems, including the circuit model, two-port π-network and T-network, are given. We start from the N-segment-ladder-like equivalent networks composed distributed parameters, and achieve the input impedance in the form of a continued fraction. Utilizing the continued fraction theory, the expressions of input impedance are obtained under three kinds of extreme cases, i.e. the load impedances are equal to zero, infinity and characteristic impedance, respectively. When the number of segment N is limited to infinity, they are transformed to lumped elements. Comparison between the distributed model and lumped model of transmission lines, the expression of tanh γd, which is the key term in the transmission line equations, are obtained by RLGC, furthermore, according to input admittance, admittance matrix and ABCD matrix of transmission lines, the lumped equivalent circuit models, π-networks and T-networks have been given. The models are verified in the frequency and time domain, respectively, showing that the models are accurate and efficient. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  6. Magnetic islands in the near geomagnetic tail and its implications for the mechanism of 1054 UT CDAW 6 substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, N.; Walker, R. J.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Kivelson, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    During the 1054 UT CDAW 6 substorm event, two ISEE spacecraft observed dynamic changes in the magnetic field and in the flux of energetic particles in the near-earth plasma sheet. In the substorm growth phase, the magnetic field at both ISEE spacecraft became tail-like. Following expansion phase onset, two small scale magnetic islands were observed moving tailward at a velocity of about 580 km/s. The passage of these two magnetic islands was coincident with bursts of tailward streaming energetic particles. The length of the magnetic loops was estimated to have been about 2 to 3 earth radii while the height of the loops was less than 0.5 earth radii. The magnetic islands were produced by multipoint reconnection processes in the near tail plasma sheet which may have been associated with the formation of the near-earth neutral line and the subsequent formation of a large scale plasmoid. The near-earth neutral line retreated tailward later in the expansion phase, as suggested by the reversal of the streaming of energetic particles.

  7. Some Results On The Modelling Of TSS Manufacturing Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel MÎNZU

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the modelling of a particular class of manufacturing lines, governed by a decentralised control strategy so that they balance themselves. Such lines are known as “bucket brigades” and also as “TSS lines”, after their first implementation, at Toyota, in the 70’s. A first study of their behaviour was based upon modelling as stochastic dynamic systems, which emphasised, in the frame of the so-called “Normative Model”, a sufficient condition for self-balancing, that means for autonomous functioning at a steady production rate (stationary behaviour. Under some particular conditions, a simulation analysis of TSS lines could be made on non-linear block diagrams, showing that the state trajectories are piecewise continuous in between occurrences of certain discrete events, which determine their discontinuity. TSS lines may therefore be modelled as hybrid dynamic systems, more specific, with autonomous switching and autonomous impulses (jumps. A stability analysis of such manufacturing lines is allowed by modelling them as hybrid dynamic systems with discontinuous motions.

  8. Generation of intensity covariations of the oxygen green and red lines in the nightglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, K.; Takeuchi, I.; Kato, Y.; Aoyama, I.

    1984-02-01

    The cause of intensity covariations of the oxygen green and red lines is studied. Intensity covariations are compared with the auroral-electrojet-activity index AE, the substorm Pi2, and the magnetogram. It is suggested that intensity covariations or double-intensity maxima of the red line occur in association with intense auroral substorms, and that they are the direct experimental evidences of Testud's theory (1973).

  9. Aspect-Oriented Model-Driven Software Product Line Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groher, Iris; Voelter, Markus

    Software product line engineering aims to reduce development time, effort, cost, and complexity by taking advantage of the commonality within a portfolio of similar products. The effectiveness of a software product line approach directly depends on how well feature variability within the portfolio is implemented and managed throughout the development lifecycle, from early analysis through maintenance and evolution. This article presents an approach that facilitates variability implementation, management, and tracing by integrating model-driven and aspect-oriented software development. Features are separated in models and composed of aspect-oriented composition techniques on model level. Model transformations support the transition from problem to solution space models. Aspect-oriented techniques enable the explicit expression and modularization of variability on model, template, and code level. The presented concepts are illustrated with a case study of a home automation system.

  10. Integrated on-line accelerator modeling at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowling, B.A.; Shoaee, H.; Van Zeijts, J.; Witherspoon, S.; Watson, W.

    1995-01-01

    An on-line accelerator modeling facility is currently under development at CEBAF. The model server, which is integrated with the EPICS control system, provides coupled and 2nd-order matrices for the entire accelerator, and forms the foundation for automated model- based control and diagnostic applications. Four types of machine models are provided, including design, golden or certified, live, and scratch or simulated model. Provisions are also made for the use of multiple lattice modeling programs such as DIMAD, PARMELA, and TLIE. Design and implementation details are discussed. 2 refs., 4 figs

  11. Statistical study of high-latitude plasma flow during magnetospheric substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Provan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available We have utilised the near-global imaging capabilities of the Northern Hemisphere SuperDARN radars, to perform a statistical superposed epoch analysis of high-latitude plasma flows during magnetospheric substorms. The study involved 67 substorms, identified using the IMAGE FUV space-borne auroral imager. A substorm co-ordinate system was developed, centred on the magnetic local time and magnetic latitude of substorm onset determined from the auroral images. The plasma flow vectors from all 67 intervals were combined, creating global statistical plasma flow patterns and backscatter occurrence statistics during the substorm growth and expansion phases. The commencement of the substorm growth phase was clearly observed in the radar data 18-20min before substorm onset, with an increase in the anti-sunward component of the plasma velocity flowing across dawn sector of the polar cap and a peak in the dawn-to-dusk transpolar voltage. Nightside backscatter moved to lower latitudes as the growth phase progressed. At substorm onset a flow suppression region was observed on the nightside, with fast flows surrounding the suppressed flow region. The dawn-to-dusk transpolar voltage increased from ~40kV just before substorm onset to ~75kV 12min after onset. The low-latitude return flow started to increase at substorm onset and continued to increase until 8min after onset. The velocity flowing across the polar-cap peaked 12-14min after onset. This increase in the flux of the polar cap and the excitation of large-scale plasma flow occurred even though the IMF Bz component was increasing (becoming less negative during most of this time. This study is the first to statistically prove that nightside reconnection creates magnetic flux and excites high-latitude plasma flow in a similar way to dayside reconnection and that dayside and nightside reconnection, are two separate time-dependent processes.

  12. Distribution of O+ ions in the plasma sheet and locations of substorm onsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Y.; Christon, S. P.; Frey, H. U.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    2010-09-01

    We discuss the effect of O+ ions on substorm onsets by examining the relation between the substorm onset location and the distribution of the O+/H+ number density ratio before the onset in the various regions within the plasma sheet (-8 RE > XGSM > -32 RE). We use 9-212 keV/e ion flux data observed by Geotail/Energetic Particles and Ion Composition (EPIC)/Suprathermal Ion Composition Spectrometer (STICS) instrument and the IMAGE/Far Ultra-Violet (FUV) substorm onset list presented by Frey et al. [Frey, H. U., S. B. Mende, V. Angelopoulos, and E. F. Donovan (2004), Substorm onset observations by IMAGE-FUV, J. Geophys. Res., 109, A10304, doi:10.1029/2004JA010607]. The results are summarized as follows. Substorm onsets, which we identify by auroral initial brightenings, are likely to occur in the more dusk-(dawn-)ward region when the O+/H+ number density ratio is high in the dusk (dawn) side. This property is observed only in the near-Earth plasma sheet (at -8 RE > XGSM > -14 RE). The above-mentioned property holds in each of two groups: substorm events due to internal instability of the magnetosphere (i.e., internally triggered substorms) and events due to external changes in the solar wind or the interplanetary magnetic field (i.e., externally triggered substorms). Thus, we conclude that the substorm onset location depends on the density of O+ ions in the near-Earth plasma sheet prior to onset, whether the substorm is triggered internally or externally.

  13. Understanding Mammalian Germ Line Development with In Vitro Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Arroyo, Ana M; Míguez-Forján, Jose M; Remohí, Jose; Pellicer, Antonio; Medrano, Jose V

    2015-09-15

    Germ line development is crucial in organisms with sexual reproduction to complete their life cycle. In mammals, knowledge about germ line development is based mainly on the mouse model, in which genetic and epigenetic events are well described. However, little is known about how germ line development is orchestrated in humans, especially in the earliest stages. New findings derived from human in vitro models to obtain germ cells can shed light on these questions. This comprehensive review summarizes the current knowledge about mammalian germ line development, emphasizing the state of the art obtained from in vitro models for germ cell-like cell derivation. Current knowledge of the pluripotency cycle and germ cell specification has allowed different in vitro strategies to obtain germ cells with proven functionality in mouse models. Several reports during the last 10 years show that in vitro germ cell derivation with proven functionality to generate a healthy offspring is possible in mice. However, differences in the embryo development and pluripotency potential between human and mouse make it difficult to extrapolate these results. Further efforts on both human and mouse in vitro models to obtain germ cells from pluripotent stem cells may help to elucidate how human physiological events take place; therefore, therapeutic strategies can also be considered.

  14. Drift-shell splitting of energetic ions injected at pseudo-substorm onsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, K.; Anderson, B.J.; Ohtani, S.; Reeves, G.D.; Takahashi, S.; Sarris, T.E.; Mursula, K.

    1997-01-01

    One feature of a magnetospheric substorm is the injection of energetic particles into closed drift orbits. Injections are routinely observed by geosynchronous satellites and have been used to identify the occurrence of substorms and the local time of particle energization. In this study we examine pitch angle distributions of ion injections in the 50-to 300-keV energy range observed by the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE) satellite, hereinafter CCE. In a dipole field, all pitch angles follow the same drift shell, but the day night asymmetry of the magnetospheric magnetic field introduces a pitch angle dependence in particle drift orbits, so that particles with different pitch angles disperse radially as they drift. The effect is known as drift-shell splitting. For satellite observations near noon at a fixed geocentric distance, the guiding center orbits of ions detected at small pitch angles intersect the midnight meridian at larger geocentric distances than do ions with near-90 degree pitch angles. The ion pitch angle distributions detected on the dayside therefore provide information about the radial distance of the nightside acceleration region. We apply this principle to study ion injection events observed on September 17 - 18, 1984, in association with pseudo-substorm onsets. CCE was at 13 hours local time near its apogee (8.8R E ) and observed a series of ion flux enhancements. Energy dispersion of the timing of the flux increases assures that they are due to injections on the nightside. The flux increases were observed only at pitch angles from 0 degree to 60 degree. We calculate drift orbits of protons using the Tsyganenko 89c magnetic field model and find that the drift orbits for 60 degree pitch angle protons observed at the satellite pass through midnight at 9R E , well outside of geostationary orbit, indicating that the ion injections occurred tailward of 9R E . Energetic ion data from geostationary

  15. Photoionization Modeling and the K Lines of Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, T. R.; Palmeri, P.; Bautista, M. A.; Mendoza, C.; Krolik, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the efficiency of iron K line emission and iron K absorption in photoionized models using a new set of atomic data. These data are more comprehensive than those previously applied to the modeling of iron K lines from photoionized gases, and allow us to systematically examine the behavior of the properties of line emission and absorption as a function of the ionization parameter, density and column density of model constant density clouds. We show that, for example, the net fluorescence yield for the highly charged ions is sensitive to the level population distribution produced by photoionization, and these yields are generally smaller than those predicted assuming the population is according to statistical weight. We demonstrate that the effects of the many strongly damped resonances below the K ionization thresholds conspire to smear the edge, thereby potentially affecting the astrophysical interpretation of absorption features in the 7-9 keV energy band. We show that the centroid of the ensemble of K(alpha) lines, the K(beta) energy, and the ratio of the K(alpha(sub 1)) to K(alpha(sub 2)) components are all diagnostics of the ionization parameter of our model slabs.

  16. Resilient organizations: matrix model and service line management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Judith A

    2005-09-01

    Resilient organizations modify structures to meet the demands of the marketplace. The author describes a structure that enables multihospital organizations to innovate and rapidly adapt to changes. Service line management within a matrix model is an evolving organizational structure for complex systems in which nurses are pivotal members.

  17. Modeling sludge accumulation rates in lined pit latrines in slum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yvonne

    should include geo-physical characterization of soil and drainage of pit latrine sites so as ... Key words: Faecal, sludge accumulation rates, slum areas, lined pit latrines. .... Value and its unit Source .... overall quality of the models had to be assessed by validation on ..... Sanitation partnership series: Bringing pit emptying out.

  18. Pressure changes in the plasma sheet during substorm injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistler, L.M.; Moebuis, E.; Baumjohann, W.; Paschmann, G.; Hamilton, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have determined the particle pressure and total pressure as a function of radial distance in the plasma sheet for periods before and after the onset of substorm-associated ion enhancements over the radial range 7-19 R E . They have chosen events occurring during times of increasing magnetospheric activity, as determined by an increasing AE index, in which a sudden increase, or injection, of energetic particle flux is observed. During these events the particle energy of maximum contribution to the pressure increases from about 12 to about 27 keV. In addition, the particle pressure increases, and the magnetic pressure decreases, with the total pressure only changing slightly. For radial distances of less than 10 R E the total pressure tends to increase with the injection, while outside 10 R E it tends to decrease or remain the same. Because the fraction of the pressure due to particles has increased and higher energies are contributing to the pressure, a radial gradient is evident in the postinjection, but not preinjection, flux measurements. These observations show that the simulations appearance of energetic particles and changes in the magnetic field results naturally from pressure balance and does not necessarily indicate that the local changing field is accelerating the particles. The changes in the total pressure outside 10 R E are consistent with previous measurements of pressure changes at substorm onset and can be understood in terms of the unloading of energy in the magnetotail and the resulting change in the magnetic field configuration

  19. Can Substorm Particle Acceleration Be Applied to Solar Flares?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, J. [Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Battaglia, M. [Institute of 4D Technologies, School of Engineering, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, CH-5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Fletcher, L. [University of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hesse, M. [Birkeland Centre for Space Science, Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, NO-5007 Bergen (Norway); Neukirch, T., E-mail: jbirn@lanl.gov [University of St. Andrews, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-20

    Using test particle studies in the electromagnetic fields of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of magnetic reconnection, we study the energization of charged particles in the context of the standard two-ribbon flare picture in analogy to the standard magnetospheric substorm paradigm. In particular, we investigate the effects of the collapsing field (“collapsing magnetic trap”) below a reconnection site, which has been demonstrated to be the major acceleration mechanism that causes energetic particle acceleration and injections observed in Earth’s magnetotail associated with substorms and other impulsive events. We contrast an initially force-free, high-shear field (low beta) with low and moderate shear, finite-pressure (high-beta) arcade structures, where beta represents the ratio between gas (plasma) and magnetic pressure. We demonstrate that the energization affects large numbers of particles, but the acceleration is modest in the presence of a significant shear field. Without incorporating loss mechanisms, the effect on particles at different energies is similar, akin to adiabatic heating, and thus is not a likely mechanism to generate a power-law tail onto a (heated or not heated) Maxwellian velocity distribution.

  20. Towards Product Lining Model-Driven Development Code Generators

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Alexander; Rumpe, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    A code generator systematically transforms compact models to detailed code. Today, code generation is regarded as an integral part of model-driven development (MDD). Despite its relevance, the development of code generators is an inherently complex task and common methodologies and architectures are lacking. Additionally, reuse and extension of existing code generators only exist on individual parts. A systematic development and reuse based on a code generator product line is still in its inf...

  1. Updating parameters of the chicken processing line model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurowicka, Dorota; Nauta, Maarten; Jozwiak, Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    A mathematical model of chicken processing that quantitatively describes the transmission of Campylobacter on chicken carcasses from slaughter to chicken meat product has been developed in Nauta et al. (2005). This model was quantified with expert judgment. Recent availability of data allows...... updating parameters of the model to better describe processes observed in slaughterhouses. We propose Bayesian updating as a suitable technique to update expert judgment with microbiological data. Berrang and Dickens’s data are used to demonstrate performance of this method in updating parameters...... of the chicken processing line model....

  2. SABRE observations of structured ionospheric flows during substorm expansion phase onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Bradshaw

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available The irregularity velocity patterns observed by the SABRE coherent radar at substorm expansion phase onset, which is identified by magnetometer observations of Pi2 pulsations, are occasionally highly structured. In all the examples of structured velocity patterns examined, the SABRE viewing area is located at longitudes within the inferred substorm current wedge. Three types of structured velocity regime are apparent depending on the level of magnetic activity and the position of the radar viewing area relative to the substorm enhanced currents and the Pi2 pulsation generation region. Firstly, vortex-like velocity patterns are observed and these may be caused by the field-aligned currents associated with the substorm current wedge. Secondly, regions of equatorward velocity are also observed at times of substorm expansion phase onset moving longitudinally across the SABRE viewing area. The longitudinal movement is usually westward although an example of eastward motion has been observed. The phase velocity of these regions of equatorward flow is typically 1-3 km s-1. The observed equatorward velocities occur at the poleward edge or poleward of the background convection velocities observed by SABRE. These equatorward velocities may be related to the westward travelling surge and to the expansion (eastwards as well as westwards of the brightening arc region at substorm onset. Thirdly, the flow rotates equatorward within the field of view but does not then appear to move longitudinally. These equatorward velocities may relate to the earthward surge of plasma from the magnetotail at substorm onset.

  3. Characteristics of the development of the westward electrojet during the expansive phase of magnetospheric substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiens, R.G.; Rostoker, G.

    1975-01-01

    By use of high-, mid-, and low-latitude magnetograms it is concluded that the westward expansion of the substorm westward electrojet is not continuous but takes place as a series of discrete steps or jumps. The substorm is pictured as consisting of the sequential development of a series of westward electrojets, which we have labeled a 'substorm sequence.' The westward electrojets develop in succession at intervals of about 10 min in such a way that each new electrojet appears to the northwest of the previous one. Associated with the westward jumps of substorm activity are enhancements in the growth rate of a ring or cross-tail current. These enhancements are concurrent with the onset of the westward electrojets and occur to the west of that sector which is presently undergoing its initial onset of substorm activity. Each substorm intensification is accompanied by a response in the adjacent sector to the west, consistent with the signatures of growth suggested by McPherron (1972) and Iijima and Nagata (1972). We suggest that growth may be stimulated by the same mechanism which triggers the expansion phase and that the energy responsible for ensuing substorm intensifications in the evening sector is made available in this fashion

  4. Self-Consistent Dynamical Model of the Broad Line Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerny, Bozena [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Li, Yan-Rong [Key Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Sredzinska, Justyna; Hryniewicz, Krzysztof [Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Panda, Swayam [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Wildy, Conor [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Karas, Vladimir, E-mail: bcz@cft.edu.pl [Astronomical Institute, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-22

    We develop a self-consistent description of the Broad Line Region based on the concept of a failed wind powered by radiation pressure acting on a dusty accretion disk atmosphere in Keplerian motion. The material raised high above the disk is illuminated, dust evaporates, and the matter falls back toward the disk. This material is the source of emission lines. The model predicts the inner and outer radius of the region, the cloud dynamics under the dust radiation pressure and, subsequently, the gravitational field of the central black hole, which results in asymmetry between the rise and fall. Knowledge of the dynamics allows us to predict the shapes of the emission lines as functions of the basic parameters of an active nucleus: black hole mass, accretion rate, black hole spin (or accretion efficiency) and the viewing angle with respect to the symmetry axis. Here we show preliminary results based on analytical approximations to the cloud motion.

  5. Self-Consistent Dynamical Model of the Broad Line Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozena Czerny

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We develop a self-consistent description of the Broad Line Region based on the concept of a failed wind powered by radiation pressure acting on a dusty accretion disk atmosphere in Keplerian motion. The material raised high above the disk is illuminated, dust evaporates, and the matter falls back toward the disk. This material is the source of emission lines. The model predicts the inner and outer radius of the region, the cloud dynamics under the dust radiation pressure and, subsequently, the gravitational field of the central black hole, which results in asymmetry between the rise and fall. Knowledge of the dynamics allows us to predict the shapes of the emission lines as functions of the basic parameters of an active nucleus: black hole mass, accretion rate, black hole spin (or accretion efficiency and the viewing angle with respect to the symmetry axis. Here we show preliminary results based on analytical approximations to the cloud motion.

  6. NASA's THEMIS Mission: Multipoint Observations of Substorms, the Foreshock, and the Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Angelopoulos, V.; Kuznetsova, M.; Glabmeier, K.-H.; McFadden. J. P.

    2008-01-01

    From launch on February 17 through the repositioning to final orbits that began in September 2007, the five-spacecraft of the THEMIS mission operated nominally in nearly identical 14.6 RE apogee near-equatorial orbits. On March 23, while aligned from east to west in the duskside magnetotail, the spacecraft observed two substorm sequences in fast survey mode. Timing the motion of these signatures served as an early proof of concept for the main phase of the mission: particle injection and dipolarization signatures propagated duskward from one probe to another, as did auroral intensifications seen by the dedicated array of ground-based observatories. During the summer of 2007, the spacecraft were on the dayside, where the three inner spacecraft (C, D, E) were separated by 100-500 km and the two outer probes (B, -4) by 5,000 - 10,000 km. Here the THEMIS probes repeatedly encountered the magnetopause and bow shock, dissecting flux transfer events (FTEs), determining the instantaneous width of the low-latitude boundary layer, and simultaneously observing hot flow anomalies upstream and downstream from the bow shock at the moment of their inception. From January to March 2008, the spacecraft were in the Earths magnetotail with apogees of 31.0, 19.5, 11.8 (2) and 10.0 RE corresponding to periods of 4, 2, and 1 days. Radial alignments once each four days offered an opportunity to pinpoint when and where substorms begin. This talk reviews THEMIS discoveries to date, with an emphasis on model-data comparisons of FTE characteristics

  7. Relation of field-aligned currents measured by AMPERE project to solar wind and substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherron, R. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Chu, X.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic perturbations measured in the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) by the Iridium constellation of spacecraft have been processed to obtain the time history of field-aligned currents (FAC) connecting the magnetosphere to the ionosphere. We find that the strength of these currents is closely related to the strength of the solar wind driver defined as a running average of the previous three hours of the optimum AL (auroral lower) coupling function. The relation is well represented by a saturation model I = A*S*Ss/(S+Ss) with I the current strength in mega Amps, S the driver strength in mV/m, Ss the saturation value of 7.78 mV/m, and A = 2.55 scales the relation to units of current. We also find that in general the upward current on the nightside increases with each substorm expansion onset defined by a combination of the SuperMag SML (SuperMag AL) and midlatitude positive bay (MPB) onset lists. A superposed epoch analysis using 700 onsets in 2010 shows the following: solar wind coupling peaks at expansion onset; dayside outward current starts to increase one hour before onset while nightside outward current starts suddenly at onset; nightside outward current reaches a peak at 28 minutes as do SML and MPB indices; FAC, SML, and MPB respectively take 1, 2, and 3 hours to decay to background. The data indicate that the substorm current wedge is superposed on a pre-existing field-aligned current system and that the location and properties of the current wedge can be studied with the AMPERE data.

  8. Substorm Occurrence and Intensity Associated With Three Types of Solar Wind Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kan; Sotirelis, Thomas; Richardson, Ian

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the characteristics of substorms that occurred during three distinct types of solar wind: coronal mass ejection (CME) associated, high-speed streams (HSS), and slow solar wind (SSW). A total number of 53,468 geomagnetic substorm onsets from 1983 to 2009 is used and sorted by the three solar wind types. It is found that the probability density function (PDF) of the intersubstorm time can be fitted by the combination of a dominant power law with an exponential cutoff component and a minor lognormal component, implying that substorms are associated with two distinctly different dynamical processes corresponding, perhaps, to the "externally driven" and "internally driven" processes, respectively. We compare substorm frequency and intensity associated with the three types of solar wind. It is found that the intersubstorm time is the longest during SSW and shortest during CME intervals. The averaged intersubstorm time for the internally driven substorms is 3.13, 3.15, and 7.96 h for CME, HSS, and SSW, respectively. The substorm intensity PDFs, as represented by the peak value of |SML| (the generalization of AL), can be fitted by two lognormal distribution functions. The averaged substorm intensity for either component is largest for CME (292 and 674 nT) and smallest for SSW (265 and 434 nT). We argue that the externally driven substorms are more intense than those driven internally. We conclude that the dynamical process of substorms is controlled mainly by the direct solar wind-magnetosphere coupling, whereas the internally driven process only plays a very modest minor role.

  9. The effect of magnetic substorms on near-ground atmospheric current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Belova

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Ionosphere-magnetosphere disturbances at high latitudes, e.g. magnetic substorms, are accompanied by energetic particle precipitation and strong variations of the ionospheric electric fields and currents. These might reasonably be expected to modify the local atmospheric electric circuit. We have analysed air-earth vertical currents (AECs measured by a long wire antenna at Esrange, northern Sweden during 35 geomagnetic substorms. Using superposed epoch analysis we compare the air-earth current variations during the 3 h before and after the time of the magnetic X-component minimum with those for corresponding local times on 35 days without substorms. After elimination of the average daily variation we can conclude that the effect of substorms on AEC is small but distinguishable. It is speculated that the AEC increases observed during about 2 h prior to the geomagnetic X-component minimum, are due to enhancement of the ionospheric electric field. During the subsequent 2 h of the substorm recovery phase, the difference between "substorm" and "quiet" atmospheric currents decreases. The amplitude of this "substorm" variation of AEC is estimated to be less than 50% of the amplitude of the diurnal variation in AEC during the same time interval. The statistical significance of this result was confirmed using the Van der Waerden X-test. This method was further used to show that the average air-earth current and its fluctuations increase during late expansion and early recovery phases of substorms.Key words: Ionosphere (electric fields and currents · Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (atmospheric electricity

  10. A multipoint study of a substorm occurring on 7 December, 1992, and its theoretical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, N.J.; Cowley, S.W.H.; Davda, V.N.

    1999-01-01

    On 7 December 1992, a moderate substorm was observed by a variety of satellites and ground-based instruments. Ionospheric flows were monitored near dusk by the Goose Bay HF radar and near midnight by the EISCAT radar. The observed flows are compared here with magnetometer observations by the IMAGE...... a subsequent substorm intensification 25 min after the initial onset. After this time, the substorm auroral bulge in the nightside hours propagated well poleward of the pre-existing convection reversal boundary, and strong flow perturbations were observed by the Goose Bay radar, indicative of flows driven...

  11. Self-consistent quasi-static radial transport during the substorm growth phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Contel, O.; Pellat, R.; Roux, A.

    2000-06-01

    We develop a self-consistent description of the slowly changing magnetic configuration of the near-Earth plasma sheet (NEPS) during substorm growth phase. This new approach is valid for quasi-static fluctuations ωcurrent. The quasi-neutrality condition (QNC) is solved via an expansion in the small parameter Te/Ti (Te/Ti is the ratio between the electronic and ionic temperatures). To the lowest order in Te/Ti, we find that the enforcement of QNC implies the presence of a global electrostatic potential which is constant for a given magnetic field line but varies across the magnetic field. The corresponding electric field shields the effect of the inductive component of the electric field, thereby producing a partial reduction of the motion that would correspond to the inductive electric field. Furthermore, we show that enforcing the QNC implies a field-aligned potential drop which is computed to the next order in Te/Ti in a companion paper [Le Contel et al., this issue]. In the present paper, we show that the direction of the azimuthal electric field varies along the field line, thus the equatorial electric field cannot be mapped onto the ionosphere. Furthermore during the growth phase, the (total) azimuthal electric field is directed eastward, close to the equator, and westward, off-equator. Thus large equatorial pitch angle particles drift tailward, whereas small pitch angle particles drift earthward.

  12. An emission-line model for AM Herculis systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrario, L.; Tuohy, I.R.; Wickramasinghe, D.T.; Australian National Univ., Canberra)

    1989-01-01

    The optical spectra of the AM Herculis binaries are characterized by extremely complex emission lines whose profiles can be resolved into at least three components which are formed in different regions of the accretion stream leading from the companion star toward the magnetic white dwarf. A theoretical model is presented for the radial velocity and velocity dispersion of the broad emission line component assuming that it originates mainly in the gas which is diverted out of the orbital plane and funneled onto the white dwarf surface along magnetic field lines. The model is used to locate the line-forming region in three AM Her variables: E1405-451, CW 1103+254, and EXO 033319-2554.2, using as constraints the radial velocity and velocity dispersion data. The analyses of these systems show that the material is threaded by the magnetic field in a very azimuthally extended coupling region located 0.5-0.75 of the way between the white dwarf and the inner Lagrange point. 36 refs

  13. The complex sine-Gordon model on a half line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzamtzis, Georgios

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis, we study the complex sine-Gordon model on a half line. The model in the bulk is an integrable (1+1) dimensional field theory which is U(1) gauge invariant and comprises a generalisation of the sine-Gordon theory. It accepts soliton and breather solutions. By introducing suitably selected boundary conditions we may consider the model on a half line. Through such conditions the model can be shown to remain integrable and various aspects of the boundary theory can be examined. The first chapter serves as a brief introduction to some basic concepts of integrability and soliton solutions. As an example of an integrable system with soliton solutions, the sine-Gordon model is presented both in the bulk and on a half line. These results will serve as a useful guide for the model at hand. The introduction finishes with a brief overview of the two methods that will be used on the fourth chapter in order to obtain the quantum spectrum of the boundary complex sine-Gordon model. In the second chapter the model is properly introduced along with a brief literature review. Different realisations of the model and their connexions are discussed. The vacuum of the theory is investigated. Soliton solutions are given and a discussion on the existence of breathers follows. Finally the collapse of breather solutions to single solitons is demonstrated and the chapter concludes with a different approach to the breather problem. In the third chapter, we construct the lowest conserved currents and through them we find suitable boundary conditions that allow for their conservation in the presence of a boundary. The boundary term is added to the Lagrangian and the vacuum is reexamined in the half line case. The reflection process of solitons from the boundary is studied and the time-delay is calculated. Finally we address the existence of boundary-bound states. In the fourth chapter we study the quantum complex sine-Gordon model. We begin with a brief overview of the theory in

  14. Modeling of environmentally induced transients within satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, N. John; Barbay, Gordon J.; Jones, Michael R.; Viswanathan, R.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is described that allows an estimation of possible spacecraft charging hazards. This technique, called SCREENS (spacecraft response to environments of space), utilizes the NASA charging analyzer program (NASCAP) to estimate the electrical stress locations and the charge stored in the dielectric coatings due to spacecraft encounter with a geomagnetic substorm environment. This information can then be used to determine the response of the spacecraft electrical system to a surface discharge by means of lumped element models. The coupling into the electronics is assumed to be due to magnetic linkage from the transient currents flowing as a result of the discharge transient. The behavior of a spinning spacecraft encountering a severe substorm is predicted using this technique. It is found that systems are potentially vulnerable to upset if transient signals enter through the ground lines.

  15. Study on Tower Models for EHV Transmission Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Bao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightning outage accident is one of the main factors that threat seriously the safe and reliable operation of power system. So it is very important to establish reasonable transmission tower model and evaluate the impulse response characteristic of lightning wave traveling on the transmission tower properly for determining reliable lightning protection performance. With the help of Electromagnetic Transient Program (EMTP, six 500kV tower models are built. Aiming at one line to one transformer operating mode of 500kV substation, the intruding wave overvoltage under different tower models is calculated. The effect of tower model on intruding overvoltage has been studied. The results show that different tower models can result in great differences to the calculation results. Hence, reasonable selection of the tower model in the calculation of back- strike intruding wave is very important.

  16. Evaluation of burst pressure prediction models for line pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xian-Kui; Leis, Brian N.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of burst pressure plays a central role in engineering design and integrity assessment of oil and gas pipelines. Theoretical and empirical solutions for such prediction are evaluated in this paper relative to a burst pressure database comprising more than 100 tests covering a variety of pipeline steel grades and pipe sizes. Solutions considered include three based on plasticity theory for the end-capped, thin-walled, defect-free line pipe subjected to internal pressure in terms of the Tresca, von Mises, and ZL (or Zhu-Leis) criteria, one based on a cylindrical instability stress (CIS) concept, and a large group of analytical and empirical models previously evaluated by Law and Bowie (International Journal of Pressure Vessels and Piping, 84, 2007: 487–492). It is found that these models can be categorized into either a Tresca-family or a von Mises-family of solutions, except for those due to Margetson and Zhu-Leis models. The viability of predictions is measured via statistical analyses in terms of a mean error and its standard deviation. Consistent with an independent parallel evaluation using another large database, the Zhu-Leis solution is found best for predicting burst pressure, including consideration of strain hardening effects, while the Tresca strength solutions including Barlow, Maximum shear stress, Turner, and the ASME boiler code provide reasonably good predictions for the class of line-pipe steels with intermediate strain hardening response. - Highlights: ► This paper evaluates different burst pressure prediction models for line pipes. ► The existing models are categorized into two major groups of Tresca and von Mises solutions. ► Prediction quality of each model is assessed statistically using a large full-scale burst test database. ► The Zhu-Leis solution is identified as the best predictive model.

  17. Evaluation of burst pressure prediction models for line pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xian-Kui, E-mail: zhux@battelle.org [Battelle Memorial Institute, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States); Leis, Brian N. [Battelle Memorial Institute, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Accurate prediction of burst pressure plays a central role in engineering design and integrity assessment of oil and gas pipelines. Theoretical and empirical solutions for such prediction are evaluated in this paper relative to a burst pressure database comprising more than 100 tests covering a variety of pipeline steel grades and pipe sizes. Solutions considered include three based on plasticity theory for the end-capped, thin-walled, defect-free line pipe subjected to internal pressure in terms of the Tresca, von Mises, and ZL (or Zhu-Leis) criteria, one based on a cylindrical instability stress (CIS) concept, and a large group of analytical and empirical models previously evaluated by Law and Bowie (International Journal of Pressure Vessels and Piping, 84, 2007: 487-492). It is found that these models can be categorized into either a Tresca-family or a von Mises-family of solutions, except for those due to Margetson and Zhu-Leis models. The viability of predictions is measured via statistical analyses in terms of a mean error and its standard deviation. Consistent with an independent parallel evaluation using another large database, the Zhu-Leis solution is found best for predicting burst pressure, including consideration of strain hardening effects, while the Tresca strength solutions including Barlow, Maximum shear stress, Turner, and the ASME boiler code provide reasonably good predictions for the class of line-pipe steels with intermediate strain hardening response. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper evaluates different burst pressure prediction models for line pipes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The existing models are categorized into two major groups of Tresca and von Mises solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prediction quality of each model is assessed statistically using a large full-scale burst test database. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Zhu-Leis solution is identified as the best predictive model.

  18. A modelling approach for railway overhead line equipment asset management

    OpenAIRE

    Kilsby, Paul; Remenyte-Prescott, Rasa; Andrews, John

    2017-01-01

    The Overhead Line Equipment (OLE) is a critical sub-system of the 25kV AC overhead railway electrification system. If OLE asset management strategies can be evaluated using a whole lifecycle cost analysis that considers degradation processes and maintenance activities of the OLE components, the investment required to deliver the level of performance desired by railway customers and regulators can be based on evidence from the analysis results. A High Level Petri Net (HLPN) model, proposed in ...

  19. Mathematical modeling of agricultural fires beneath high voltage transmission lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zohri, Emad H.; Shafey, Hamdy M.; Abdel-Salam, M.; Ahmed, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for agricultural fires based on a multi-phase formulation. The model includes dehydration and pyrolysis of agricultural fuel and pyrolysis products. The model considers a homogeneous distribution of the agricultural solid fuel particles, interacting with the gas flow via source terms. These terms include: drag forces, production of water vapour and pyrolysis products, radiative and convective heat exchange. A multi-phase radiative transfer equation for absorbing-emitting medium is considered to account for the radiative heat exchange between the gas and solid phases of the fire. The main outputs of the present model are most important to study the influence of agricultural fire occurring beneath high voltage transmission lines. The agricultural fire causes a flashover due to the ambient temperature rise and soot accumulation on the insulator of these transmission lines. Numerical results of the present model are obtained for flat grassland fires to study the effects of wind velocity, solid fuel moisture content and ignition length on some selected fire outputs. These outputs include the temperature, velocity, soot volume fraction fields of the gas phase, together with fire propagation rate and flame geometry. The numerical results are compared to the available experimental work in the literature. -- Research highlights: → The model is sensitive to the initial condition of the ignition length affecting the fire propagation rate and width. → The model predicts the effects of both the wind velocity and the fuel moisture content on fire propagation rate, in agreement with the available experimental work in the literature. → The model shows that both the wind velocity and the fuel moisture content are important factors affecting the fire plume thickness, location, and inclination. → The model is able to visualize the flame geometry through tracing radiative heat rates exceeding a threshold value for flame visibility (60 k

  20. Neural network prediction of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit during the storm recovery phase: effects of recurring substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fukata

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available During the recovery phase of geomagnetic storms, the flux of relativistic (>2 MeV electrons at geosynchronous orbits is enhanced. This enhancement reaches a level that can cause devastating damage to instruments on satellites. To predict these temporal variations, we have developed neural network models that predict the flux for the period 1–12 h ahead. The electron-flux data obtained during storms, from the Space Environment Monitor on board a Geostationary Meteorological Satellite, were used to construct the model. Various combinations of the input parameters AL, SAL, Dst and SDst were tested (where S denotes the summation from the time of the minimum Dst. It was found that the model, including SAL as one of the input parameters, can provide some measure of relativistic electron-flux prediction at geosynchronous orbit during the recovery phase. We suggest from this result that the relativistic electron-flux enhancement during the recovery phase is associated with recurring substorms after Dst minimum and their accumulation effect.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, trapped; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; storms and substorms

  1. Global properties of the magnetosphere during a substorm growth phase: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Higbie, P.R.; Belian, R.D.; Stauning, P.

    1981-01-01

    At approximately 0100 UT on December 29, 1976, a large injection of energetic (>30 keV) particles was observed by Los Alamos instrumentation onboard spacecraft 1976--059 (35 0 W longitude) at geostationary orbit. This injection was closely associated with the onset of a major substorm (also at 0100 UT) identified by sharp negative bays in the H components of magnetic records at Leirvogur (22 0 W) and Narssarssuaq (45 0 W) and by the occurrence of a positive H component bay at 0100 UT in the mid-latitude magnetogram record at M'Bour (17 0 W). This substorm expansion onset (and concomitant particle injection) was preceded (between 2330 and 0100 UT) by a pronounced 'stretching' of the magnetic field at synchronous orbit into a taillike configuration and by a development of highly cigarlike (field-aligned) electron distributions at geostationary orbit that we have in the past identified with the substorm growth phase. Of principal importance in this case are two other auxiliary data sets. The first is a well-timed set of DMSP auroral images taken during the course of the growth and expansion phases of the substorm. The images before and during the growth (cigar) phase, including one auroral zone crossing at approx.0050 UT, show quiet aurora with no observable substorm activity in the visible polar region. The second relevant data set is a broad set of riometer data from 13 separate stations in three general meridians (west coast Greenland, east coast Greenland, and northern Scandinavia) from magnetic latitudes of approx.65 0 to approx.90 0 . The riometer data also show clearly that there was no measurable substorm activity anywhere, either in longitude or latitude, as the magnetosphere developed its very stressed, growth-phase configuration prior to substorm expansion onset. These results support the concept of a storage of energy (growth phase) prior to its rapid release at substorm onset

  2. Comparing the line broadened quasilinear model to Vlasov code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghantous, K.; Berk, H. L.; Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2014-01-01

    The Line Broadened Quasilinear (LBQ) model is revisited to study its predicted saturation level as compared with predictions of a Vlasov solver BOT [Lilley et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 195003 (2009) and M. Lilley, BOT Manual. The parametric dependencies of the model are modified to achieve more accuracy compared to the results of the Vlasov solver both in regards to a mode amplitude's time evolution to a saturated state and its final steady state amplitude in the parameter space of the model's applicability. However, the regions of stability as predicted by LBQ model and BOT are found to significantly differ from each other. The solutions of the BOT simulations are found to have a larger region of instability than the LBQ simulations

  3. Comparing the line broadened quasilinear model to Vlasov code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghantous, K. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Berk, H. L. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas, 2100 San Jacinto Blvd, Austin, Texas 78712-1047 (United States); Gorelenkov, N. N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The Line Broadened Quasilinear (LBQ) model is revisited to study its predicted saturation level as compared with predictions of a Vlasov solver BOT [Lilley et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 195003 (2009) and M. Lilley, BOT Manual. The parametric dependencies of the model are modified to achieve more accuracy compared to the results of the Vlasov solver both in regards to a mode amplitude's time evolution to a saturated state and its final steady state amplitude in the parameter space of the model's applicability. However, the regions of stability as predicted by LBQ model and BOT are found to significantly differ from each other. The solutions of the BOT simulations are found to have a larger region of instability than the LBQ simulations.

  4. Comparing the line broadened quasilinear model to Vlasov code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghantous, K.; Berk, H. L.; Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2014-03-01

    The Line Broadened Quasilinear (LBQ) model is revisited to study its predicted saturation level as compared with predictions of a Vlasov solver BOT [Lilley et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 195003 (2009) and M. Lilley, BOT Manual. The parametric dependencies of the model are modified to achieve more accuracy compared to the results of the Vlasov solver both in regards to a mode amplitude's time evolution to a saturated state and its final steady state amplitude in the parameter space of the model's applicability. However, the regions of stability as predicted by LBQ model and BOT are found to significantly differ from each other. The solutions of the BOT simulations are found to have a larger region of instability than the LBQ simulations.

  5. A possible case of radially antisunward propagating substorm onset in the near-earth magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.E.; McEntire, R.W.; Potemra, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    It is generally thought that the local effects associated with substorm onset in the near-Earth magnetotail (R '' E ) have a component of propagation which is radially earthward. This study presents a case during which it is possible that the local effects of substorm onset propagated radially antisunward. We examine energetic ion and magnetic field data and energetic particle data from the geosynchronous satellite 1982-019 during a period of weak substorm activity on 11 June 1985. Although the effects of this event on the ground were very weak, the substorm had a dramatic effect on at least one portion of the near-Earth magnetotail. During the period of interest the spacecraft were in an unusually close radial alignment. The data show that phenomena which we associate with the local effects of substorm onset began at or near geosynchronous before they were observed at the station (R = 8.8R E ). We believe that this event is best explained by a near-Earth disruption of the cross-tail current sheet and the consequent formation of a substorm current wedge, and that this process had a component of expansion antisunward down the tail. (author)

  6. Contribution of storm time substorms to the prompt electric field disturbances in the equatorial ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, Debrup; Chakrabarty, D.; Sekar, R.; Reeves, G. D.

    2017-01-01

    This study tries to bring out the fact that storm time substorms can compete and at times significantly contribute to the geomagnetically disturbed time prompt penetration electric field effects on low and equatorial latitudes. Observations of unusual equatorial plasma drift data from Jicamarca Unattended Long-term Investigations of the Ionosphere and Atmosphere during two space weather events show that substorms can induce both eastward and westward penetration electric fields under steady southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF B z ) conditions. During the first event on 2 January 2005, the enhancement of the daytime eastward electric field over Jicamarca due to substorm is found to be comparable with the Sq and interplanetary electric field (IEFy) generated electric fields combined. During the second event on 19 August 2006, the substorm is seen to weaken the daytime eastward field thereby inducing a westward field in spite of the absence of northward turning of IMF B z (overshielding). The westward electric field perturbation in the absence of any overshielding events is observationally sparse and contrary to the earlier results. Further, the substorm-induced field is found to be strong enough to compete or almost nullify the effects of storm time IEFy fields. This study also shows quantitatively that at times substorm contribution to the disturbed time prompt electric fields can be significant and thus should be taken into consideration in evaluating penetration events over low latitudes.

  7. Plasma and magnetic field variations in the distant magnetotail associated with near-earth substorm effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Mccomas, D. J.; Zwickl, R. D.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Examination of many individual event periods in the ISEE 3 deep-tail data set has suggested that magnetospheric substorms produce a characteristic pattern of effects in the distant magnetotail. During the growth, or tail-energy-storage phase of substorms, the magnetotail appears to grow diametrically in size, often by many earth radii. Subsequently, after the substorm expansive phase onset at earth, the distant tail undergoes a sequence of plasma, field, and energetic-particle variations as large-scale plasmoids move rapidly down the tail following their disconnection from the near-earth plasma sheet. ISEE 3 data are appropriate for the study of these effects since the spacecraft remained fixed within the nominal tail location for long periods. Using newly available auroral electrojet indices (AE and AL) and Geo particle data to time substorm onsets at earth, superposed epoch analyses of ISEE 3 and near-earth data prior to, and following, substorm expansive phase onsets have been performed. These analyses quantify and extend substantially the understanding of the deep-tail pattern of response to global substorm-induced dynamical effects.

  8. Modeling stretched solitary waves along magnetic field lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Muschietti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A model is presented for a new type of fast solitary waves which is observed in downward current regions of the auroral zone. The three-dimensional, coherent structures are electrostatic, have a positive potential, and move along the magnetic field lines with speeds on the order of the electron drift. Their parallel potential profile is flattened and cannot fit to the Gaussian shape used in previous work. We develop a detailed BGK model which includes a flattened potential and an assumed cylindrical symmetry around a centric magnetic field line. The model envisions concentric shells of trapped electrons slowly drifting azimuthally while bouncing back and forth in the parallel direction. The electron dynamics is analysed in terms of three basic motions that occur on different time scales characterized by the cyclotron frequency We , the bounce frequency wb , and the azimuthal drift frequency wg. The ordering We >> wb >> wg is required. Self-consistent distribution functions are calculated in terms of approximate constants of motion. Constraints on the parameters characterizing the amplitude and shape of the stretched solitary wave are discussed.

  9. Twisted sigma-model solitons on the quantum projective line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Giovanni

    2018-04-01

    On the configuration space of projections in a noncommutative algebra, and for an automorphism of the algebra, we use a twisted Hochschild cocycle for an action functional and a twisted cyclic cocycle for a topological term. The latter is Hochschild-cohomologous to the former and positivity in twisted Hochschild cohomology results into a lower bound for the action functional. While the equations for the critical points are rather involved, the use of the positivity and the bound by the topological term lead to self-duality equations (thus yielding twisted noncommutative sigma-model solitons, or instantons). We present explicit nontrivial solutions on the quantum projective line.

  10. Implications of the 1100 UT March 22, 1979 CDAW 6 substorm event for the role of magnetic reconnection in the geomagnetic tail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.A.; Baker, D.N.; McPherron, R.L.; Lennartsson, W.

    1983-01-01

    The event of March 22, 1979 has been the object of a concentrated study effort as a part of the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop activity designated CDAW-6. Energetic electron and magnetic field measurements from a set of four satellites aligned from 6.6 to 13 R/sub E/ at the 0200 LT meridian at the time of the magnetospheric substorm event of 1100 UT are presented. These data are used to show that a magnetic X-line formed spontaneously in the vicinity of 7 R/sub E/ in response to a steady build-up of magnetic stress in the geomagnetic tail

  11. Molecular Line Survey of CRL618 and Complete Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, J. R.; Cernicharo, J.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Phillips, T. G.

    We present a complete survey and model of the emission from the C-rich protoplanetary nebula CRL 618 at the frequencies accessible with the IRAM-30m telescope (80.25-115.75 GHz, 131.25-179.25 GHz, and 204.25-275.25 GHz) and some results of still on-going observations at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (280-360 GHz). Although the number of lines detected is large (several hundreds), the number of chemical species from which they arise is rather small. In fact, lines from cyanopolyynes HC3N and HC5N dominate by far the long-wave spectrum of CRL618, with detection of numerous vibrationally excited states and isotopic substituted species. Most of detected species exhibit P-Cygni profiles at the lowest frequencies (3 mm window), and they evolve to pure emission as frequency increases. This fact can only be explained by the behavior of the continuum emission arising from the inner ultracompact HII region and surrounding dust. The data set itself has been used to characterize the continuum emission by averaging all the continuum measurements during the time span of the survey (~8 years). The physical parameters of the different gas regions have been established by studying the large number of detected cyanopolyynes lines. Using these constraints, the abundances of many other species relative to HC3N could also be determined and a general model, that reproduce the whole data set at a very detailed level of agreement, could be built. 1. Introduction The motivation to perform the complete millimeter line survey presented here with the IRAM-30m telescope has been to gather the most complete information on the molecular content in one particular stage (protoplanetary nebula, PPNe) of stellar evolution from the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) to Planetary Nebulae (PN), of which CRL618 is the best example. Its chemical richness and its complex morphology are now very well known. Detailed chemical models for this object have been developed (Cernicharo 2004) indicating the

  12. Lossy transmission line model of hydrofractured well dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patzek, T.W. [Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); De, A. [Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The real-time detection of hydrofracture growth is crucial to the successful operation of water, CO{sub 2} or steam injection wells in low-permeability reservoirs and to the prevention of subsidence and well failure. In this paper, we describe propagation of very low frequency (1-10 to 100 Hz) Stoneley waves in a fluid-filled wellbore and their interactions with the fundamental wave mode in a vertical hydrofracture. We demonstrate that Stoneley-wave loses energy to the fracture and the energy transfer from the wellbore to the fracture opening is most efficient in soft rocks. We conclude that placing the wave source and receivers beneath the injection packer provides the most efficient means of hydrofracture monitoring. We then present the lossy transmission line model of wellbore and fracture for the detection and characterization of fracture state and volume. We show that this model captures the wellbore and fracture geometry, the physical properties of injected fluid and the wellbore-fracture system dynamics. The model is then compared with experimentally measured well responses. The simulated responses are in good agreement with published experimental data from several water injection wells with depths ranging from 1000 ft to 9000 ft. Hence, we conclude that the transmission line model of water injectors adequately captures wellbore and fracture dynamics. Using an extensive data set for the South Belridge Diatomite waterfloods, we demonstrate that even for very shallow wells the fracture size and state can be adequately recognized at wellhead. Finally, we simulate the effects of hydrofracture extension on the transient response to a pulse signal generated at wellhead. We show that hydrofracture extensions can indeed be detected by monitoring the wellhead pressure at sufficiently low frequencies.

  13. A simulation study of particle energization observed by THEMIS spacecraft during a substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Bosqued, Jean-Michel; El-Alaoui, Mostafa; Peroomian, Vahe; Zhou, Meng; Richard, Robert; Walker, Raymond; Runov, Andrei; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2009-09-01

    Energetic ions with hundreds of keV energy are frequently observed in the near-Earth tail during magnetospheric substorms. We examined the sources and acceleration of ions during a magnetospheric substorm on 1 March 2008 by using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) and Cluster observations and numerical simulations. Four of the THEMIS spacecraft were aligned at yGSM = 6 RE during a very large substorm (AE = 1200) while the Cluster spacecraft were located about 5 RE above the auroral ionosphere. For 2 h before the substorm, Cluster observed ionospheric oxygen flowing out into the magnetosphere. After substorm onset the THEMIS P3 and P4 spacecraft located in the near-Earth tail (xGSM = -9 RE and -8 RE, respectively) observed large fluxes of energetic ions up to 500 keV. We used calculations of millions of ions of solar wind and ionospheric origin in the time-dependent electric and magnetic fields from a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of this event to study the source of these ions and their acceleration. The simulation did a good job of reproducing the particle observations. Both solar wind protons and ionospheric oxygen were accelerated by nonadiabatic motion across large (>˜5 mV/m) total electric fields (both potential and induced). The acceleration occurred in the "wall" region of the near-Earth tail where nonadiabatic motion dominates over convection and the particles move rapidly across the tail. The acceleration occurred mostly in regions with large electric fields and nonadiabatic motion. There was relatively little acceleration in regions with large electric fields and adiabatic motion or small electric fields and nonadiabatic motion. Prior to substorm onset, ionospheric ions were a significant contributor to the cross-tail current, but after onset, solar wind ions become more dominant.

  14. Energy storage and dissipation in the magnetotail during substorms. 2. MHD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinolfson, R.S.; Winglee, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors present a global MHD simulation of the magnetotail in an effort to study magnetic storm development. They address the question of energy storage in the current sheet in the early phases of storm growth, which previous simulations have not shown. They address this problem by dealing with the variation of the resistivity throughout the magnetosphere. They argue that MHD theory should provide a suitable representation to this problem on a global scale, even if it does not handle all details adequately. For their simulation they use three different forms for the resistivity. First is a uniform and constant resistivity. Second is a resistivity proportional to the current density, which is related to argument that resistivity is driven by wave-particle interactions which should be strongest in regions where the current is the greatest. Thirdly is a model where the resistivity varies with the magnetic field strength, which was suggested by previous results from particle simulations of the same problem. The simulation then gives approximately the same response of the magnetosphere for all three of the models. Each results in the formation and ejection of plasmoids, but the energy stored in the magnetotail, the timing of substorm onset in relation to the appearance of a southward interplanetary magnetic field, and the speed of ejection of the plasmoids formed differ with the resistivity models

  15. An analysis model of the secondary tunnel lining considering ground-primary support-secondary lining interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seong-Ho; Chang, Seok-Bue [Yooshin Engineering Corporation, Seoul(Korea); Lee, Sang-Duk [Ajou University, Suwon(Korea)

    2002-06-30

    It is the common practice to over design the reinforcement for the secondary tunnel lining due to the lack of rational insight into the ground loosening loads, and due to the conservative application of the empirical design methods. The main loads of the secondary lining are the ground loosening loads and the ground water pressure, and the ground load is critical in the reinforcement design of the secondary lining in the case of drained tunnel. If the external load is absent around a tunnel. the reasons of the load for secondary tunnel lining are the deterioration of the primary supports such as shotcrete, steel rib, and rock bolts. Accordingly, the analysis method considering the ground-primary supports-secondary lining interaction should be required for the rational design of the secondary tunnel lining. In this paper, the interaction was conceptually described by the simple mass-spring model and the load transfer from the ground and primary supports to the secondary lining is showed by the ground-primary supports-secondary lining reaction curves for the theoretical solution of a circular tunnel, And also, the application of this proposed model to numerical analysis is verified in order to check the potential for the tunnel with the complex analysis conditions. (author). 8 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  16. On-Line Core Thermal-Hydraulic Model Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, Wang Kee; Chun, Tae Hyun; Oh, Dong Seok; Shin, Chang Hwan; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Seo, Kyung Won

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this project is to implement a fast-running 4-channel based code CETOP-D in an advanced reactor core protection calculator system(RCOPS). The part required for the on-line calculation of DNBR were extracted from the source of the CETOP-D code based on analysis of the CETOP-D code. The CETOP-D code was revised to maintain the input and output variables which are the same as in CPC DNBR module. Since the DNBR module performs a complex calculation, it is divided into sub-modules per major calculation step. The functional design requirements for the DNBR module is documented and the values of the database(DB) constants were decided. This project also developed a Fortran module(BEST) of the RCOPS Fortran Simulator and a computer code RCOPS-SDNBR to independently calculate DNBR. A test was also conducted to verify the functional design and DB of thermal-hydraulic model which is necessary to calculate the DNBR on-line in RCOPS. The DNBR margin is expected to increase by 2%-3% once the CETOP-D code is used to calculate the RCOPS DNBR. It should be noted that the final DNBR margin improvement could be determined in the future based on overall uncertainty analysis of the RCOPS

  17. On-Line Core Thermal-Hydraulic Model Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Wang Kee; Chun, Tae Hyun; Oh, Dong Seok; Shin, Chang Hwan; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Seo, Kyung Won

    2007-02-15

    The objective of this project is to implement a fast-running 4-channel based code CETOP-D in an advanced reactor core protection calculator system(RCOPS). The part required for the on-line calculation of DNBR were extracted from the source of the CETOP-D code based on analysis of the CETOP-D code. The CETOP-D code was revised to maintain the input and output variables which are the same as in CPC DNBR module. Since the DNBR module performs a complex calculation, it is divided into sub-modules per major calculation step. The functional design requirements for the DNBR module is documented and the values of the database(DB) constants were decided. This project also developed a Fortran module(BEST) of the RCOPS Fortran Simulator and a computer code RCOPS-SDNBR to independently calculate DNBR. A test was also conducted to verify the functional design and DB of thermal-hydraulic model which is necessary to calculate the DNBR on-line in RCOPS. The DNBR margin is expected to increase by 2%-3% once the CETOP-D code is used to calculate the RCOPS DNBR. It should be noted that the final DNBR margin improvement could be determined in the future based on overall uncertainty analysis of the RCOPS.

  18. A new tectonic model for the Cameroon Line, Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, C.; Regnoult, J.-M.; Déruelle, B.; Robineau, B.

    1987-10-01

    The Cameroon Line, a major geological feature in Central Africa, has been considered successively as a series of horsts and grabens, a continental rift and a mega-shear zone. It is marked out by about 60 anorogenic complexes and a dozen volcanic centres, all of which have alkaline affinity. Remote sensing allows us recognition of the main lineament trends: N70°, N-S, N135° and E-W, while autocorrelation analysis reveals a major fault zone striking N30° in western Cameroon and N15° in the northern region. A mega left-lateral shear zone is the model that best accounts for the fracture pattern and associated features such as linear and circular structures alignment of subvolcanic complexes, syntectonic leucogranites marking out older shear zones and vein dykes. The N70° Adamawa fault zone, a Pan-African fracture reworked during Albian-Aptian times, is the only shear zone of continental scale that could have initiated "en echelon" mega-tension gashes within the Cameroon Line during a Cainozoic left-lateral transcurrent movement.

  19. Nonadiabatic heating of the central plasma sheet at substorm onset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.Y.; Frank, L.A.; Rostoker, G.; Fennell, J.; Mitchell, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Heating events in the plasma sheet boundary layer and central plasma sheet are found to occur at the onset of expansive phase activity. The main effect is a dramatic increase in plasma temperature, coincident with a partial dipolarization of the magnetic field. Fluxes of energetic particles increase without dispersion during these events which occur at all radial distances up to 23 R E , the apogee of the ISEIE spacecraft. A major difference between these heating events and those observed at geosynchronous distances lies in the heating mechanism which is nonadiabatic beyond 10 R E but may be adiabatic closer to Earth. The energy required to account for the increase in plasma thermal energy is comparable with that required for Joule heating of the ionosphere. The plasma sheet must be considered as a major sink in the energy balance of substorm. The authors estimate lobe magnetic pressures during these events. Changes in lobe pressure are generally not correlated with onsets or intensifications of expansive phase activity

  20. Energy transfer by magnetopause reconnection and the substorm parameter epsilon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Alarcon, W.D.; Gonzalez, A.L.C. de.

    1983-01-01

    An expression for the magnetopause reconnection power based on the dawn-dusk component of the reconnection electric field, that reduces to the substorm parameter epsilon for the limit that involves equal geomagnetic (B sub(G)) and magnetosheath (B sub(M)) magnetic field amplitudes at the magnetopause, is contrasted with the expression based on the whole reconnection electric field vector obtained by Gonzalez. The correlation examples of this report show that this (more general) expression for the reconnection power seems to correlate with the empirical dissipation parameter U sub(T) from Akasofu, with slightly better correlation coefficients than those obtained from similar correlations between the parameter epsilon and U sub(T). Thus, these (better) correlations show up for the more familiar values of the ratio B sub(G) / B sub(M) > 1. Nevertheless, the (expected) relatively small difference that seems to exist between these correlation coefficients suggests that, for practical purposes, the parameter epsilon could be used as well (instead of the more general expression) in similar correlation studies due to its impler format. On the other hand, studies that refer mainly to the difference in the magnitudes of epsilon and of the more general expression are expected to give results with less negligible differences. (Author) [pt

  1. Numerical modelling of multimode fibre-optic communication lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidelnikov, O S; Fedoruk, M P [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sygletos, S; Ferreira, F [Aston University, England, Birmingham, B4 7ET (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-31

    The results of numerical modelling of nonlinear propagation of an optical signal in multimode fibres with a small differential group delay are presented. It is found that the dependence of the error vector magnitude (EVM) on the differential group delay can be reduced by increasing the number of ADC samples per symbol in the numerical implementation of the differential group delay compensation algorithm in the receiver. The possibility of using multimode fibres with a small differential group delay for data transmission in modern digital communication systems is demonstrated. It is shown that with increasing number of modes the strong coupling regime provides a lower EVM level than the weak coupling one. (fibre-optic communication lines)

  2. Validation of community models: 3. Tracing field lines in heliospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeice, Peter; Elliott, Brian; Acebal, Ariel

    2011-10-01

    Forecasting hazardous gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) bursts at Earth requires accurately modeling field line connections between Earth and the locations of coronal or interplanetary shocks that accelerate the particles. We test the accuracy of field lines reconstructed using four different models of the ambient coronal and inner heliospheric magnetic field, through which these shocks must propagate, including the coupled Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)/ENLIL model. Evaluating the WSA/ENLIL model performance is important since it is the most sophisticated model currently available to space weather forecasters which can model interplanetary coronal mass ejections and, when coupled with particle acceleration and transport models, will provide a complete model for gradual SEP bursts. Previous studies using a simpler Archimedean spiral approach above 2.5 solar radii have reported poor performance. We test the accuracy of the model field lines connecting Earth to the Sun at the onset times of 15 impulsive SEP bursts, comparing the foot points of these field lines with the locations of surface events believed to be responsible for the SEP bursts. We find the WSA/ENLIL model performance is no better than the simplest spiral model, and the principal source of error is the model's inability to reproduce sufficient low-latitude open flux. This may be due to the model's use of static synoptic magnetograms, which fail to account for transient activity in the low corona, during which reconnection events believed to initiate the SEP acceleration may contribute short-lived open flux at low latitudes. Time-dependent coronal models incorporating these transient events may be needed to significantly improve Earth/Sun field line forecasting.

  3. Performance Analysis of GFDL's GCM Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model on GPU and MIC Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, R.; Paynter, D.; Jones, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    Due to their relatively low computational cost, radiative transfer models in global climate models (GCMs) run on traditional CPU architectures generally consist of shortwave and longwave parameterizations over a small number of wavelength bands. With the rise of newer GPU and MIC architectures, however, the performance of high resolution line-by-line radiative transfer models may soon approach those of the physical parameterizations currently employed in GCMs. Here we present an analysis of the current performance of a new line-by-line radiative transfer model currently under development at GFDL. Although originally designed to specifically exploit GPU architectures through the use of CUDA, the radiative transfer model has recently been extended to include OpenMP in an effort to also effectively target MIC architectures such as Intel's Xeon Phi. Using input data provided by the upcoming Radiative Forcing Model Intercomparison Project (RFMIP, as part of CMIP 6), we compare model results and performance data for various model configurations and spectral resolutions run on both GPU and Intel Knights Landing architectures to analogous runs of the standard Oxford Reference Forward Model on traditional CPUs.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Probabilistic Models of Software Product Lines with Statistical Model Checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ter Beek, Maurice H.; Legay, Axel; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the suitability of statistical model checking techniques for analysing quantitative properties of software product line models with probabilistic aspects. For this purpose, we enrich the feature-oriented language FLAN with action rates, which specify the likelihood of exhibiting pa...

  5. Expansion of Collisional Radiative Model for Helium line ratio spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinquegrani, David; Cooper, Chris; Forest, Cary; Milhone, Jason; Munoz-Borges, Jorge; Schmitz, Oliver; Unterberg, Ezekial

    2015-11-01

    Helium line ratio spectroscopy is a powerful technique of active plasma edge spectroscopy. It enables reconstruction of plasma edge parameters like electron density and temperature by use of suitable Collisional Radiative Models (CRM). An established approach is successful at moderate plasma densities (~1018m-3 range) and temperature (30-300eV), taking recombination and charge exchange to be negligible. The goal of this work is to experimentally explore limitations of this approach to CRM. For basic validation the Madison Plasma Dynamo eXperiment (MPDX) will be used. MPDX offers a very uniform plasma and spherical symmetry at low temperature (5-20 eV) and low density (1016 -1017m-3) . Initial data from MPDX shows a deviation in CRM results when compared to Langmuir probe data. This discrepancy points to the importance of recombination effects. The validated model is applied to first time measurement of electron density and temperature in front of an ICRH antenna at the TEXTOR tokamak. These measurements are important to understand RF coupling and PMI physics at the antenna limiters. Work supported in part by start up funds of the Department of Engineering Physics at the UW - Madison, USA and NSF CAREER award PHY-1455210.

  6. Substorm processes in the magnetotail - Comments on 'On hot tenuous plasmas, fireballs, and boundary layers in the earth's magnetotail' by L. A. Frank, K. L. Ackerson, and R. P. Lepping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hones, E. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Various theories regarding the magnetotail are reviewed and discussed. These include the work of Dungey (1961) and Eastman et al., (1976) regarding the generation of the magnetotail, Frank et al., (1976) concerning the so-called magnetotail fireball and its characteristics, and Hones et al., (1976 and 1976a) on the formation of a neutral line across the near-earth plasma sheet near the substorm onset. A detailed discussion of a fireball encounter during 0900-1400 UT in April 1974 is presented, noting plasma and magnetic phenomena observed, and magnetic records from the earth. A critique is made by Hones of the interpretation of this fireball made by Frank et al. In an accompanying reply, Frank et al. comment on the observations made by Hones, with attention to the most evident discrepancy between the two theories, i.e., the generation of large closed magnetic loops in the plasma sheet during magnetic substorms.

  7. CORRECTION OF FAULTY LINES IN MUSCLE MODEL, TO BE USED IN 3D BUILDING NETWORK CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Karas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the usage of MUSCLE (Multidirectional Scanning for Line Extraction Model for automatic generation of 3D networks in CityGML format (from raster floor plans. MUSCLE (Multidirectional Scanning for Line Extraction Model is a conversion method which was developed to vectorize the straight lines through the raster images including floor plans, maps for GIS, architectural drawings, and machine plans. The model allows user to define specific criteria which are crucial for acquiring the vectorization process. Unlike traditional vectorization process, this model generates straight lines based on a line thinning algorithm, without performing line following-chain coding and vector reduction stages. In this method the nearly vertical lines were obtained by scanning the images horizontally, while the nearly horizontal lines were obtained by scanning the images vertically. In a case where two or more consecutive lines are nearly horizontal or nearly vertical, raster data become unmanageable and the process generates wrongly vectorized lines. In this situation, to obtain the precise lines, the image with the wrongly vectorized lines is diagonally scanned. By using MUSCLE model, the network models are topologically structured in CityGML format. After the generation process, it is possible to perform 3D network analysis based on these models. Then, by using the software that was designed based on the generated models, a geodatabase of the models could be established. This paper presents the correction application in MUSCLE and explains 3D network construction in detail.

  8. Design process and modeling studies of SSRL beam line wunder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachrach, R.Z.; Bringans, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    SSRL Beam Line Wunder will be the first soft X-ray energy range synchrotron radiation beam line specifically designed to exploit the unique aspects of periodic insertion devices in the wiggler-undulator (wunder) regime. Aspects of the development of this beam line are described in this paper and in particular, we discuss the design methodology adopted and emphasize the joint optical, thermal and mechanical optimization studies that were required. (orig.)

  9. Integrated model for line balancing with workstation inventory management

    OpenAIRE

    Dilip Roy; Debdip khan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we address the optimization of an integrated line balancing process with workstation inventory management. While doing so, we have studied the interconnection between line balancing and its conversion process. Almost each and every moderate to large manufacturing industry depends on a long and integrated supply chain, consisting of inbound logistic, conversion process and outbound logistic. In this sense an approach addresses a very general problem of integrated line balancing....

  10. PC index as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere: Development of magnetic substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshichev, O. A.; Podorozhkina, N. A.; Sormakov, D. A.; Janzhura, A. S.

    2014-08-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) index has been approved by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA XXII Assembly, Merida, Mexico, 2013) as a new index of magnetic activity. The PC index can be considered to be a proxy of the solar wind energy that enters the magnetosphere. This distinguishes PC from AL and Dst indices that are more related to the dissipation of energy through auroral currents or storage of energy in the ring current during magnetic substorms or storms. The association of the PC index with the direct coupling of the solar wind energy into the magnetosphere is based upon analysis of the relationship of PC with parameters in the solar wind, on the one hand, and correlation between the time series of PC and the AL index (substorm development), on the other hand. This paper (the first of a series) provides the results of statistical investigations that demonstrate a strong correlation between the behavior of PC and the development of magnetic substorms. Substorms are classified as isolated and expanded. We found that (1) substorms are preceded by growth in the RS index, (2) sudden substorm expansion onsets are related to "leap" or "reverse" signatures in the PC index which are indicative of a sharp increase in the PC growth rate, (3) substorms start to develop when PC exceeds a threshold level 1.5 ± 0.5 mV/m irrespective of the length of the substorm growth phase, and (4) there is a linear relation between the intensity of substorms and PC for all substorm events.

  11. Multiscale Modeling of Point and Line Defects in Cubic Lattices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, P. W; Clayton, J. D

    2007-01-01

    .... This multiscale theory explicitly captures heterogeneity in microscopic atomic motion in crystalline materials, attributed, for example, to the presence of various point and line lattice defects...

  12. Streaming energetic electrons in earth's magnetotail - Evidence for substorm-associated magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieber, J. W.; Stone, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    This letter reports the results of a systematic study of streaming greater than 200 keV electrons observed in the magnetotail with the Caltech Electron/Isotope Spectrometers aboard IMP-7 and IMP-8. A clear statistical association of streaming events with southward magnetic fields, often of steep inclination, and with substorms as evidenced by the AE index is demonstrated. These results support the interpretation that streaming energetic electrons are indicative of substorm-associated magnetic reconnection in the near-earth plasma sheet.

  13. Prediction of high-energy (> 0.3 MeV) substorm-related magnetospheric particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Belian, R.D.; Higbie, P.R.; Hones, E.W. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements both at 6.6 R/sub E/ and in the plasma sheet (greater than or equal to 18 R/sub E/) show that high energy substorm-accelerated particles occur preferentially when the solar wind speed (V/sub sw/) is high. Virtually no > 0.3 MeV protons, for example, are observed in association with substorms that occur when V/sub sw/ is 700 km/sec. These results suggest that realtime monitoring of interplanetary conditions could allow simple, effective prediction of high energy magnetospheric particle disturbances. 7 references

  14. Modeling a multivariable reactor and on-line model predictive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D W; Yu, D L

    2005-10-01

    A nonlinear first principle model is developed for a laboratory-scaled multivariable chemical reactor rig in this paper and the on-line model predictive control (MPC) is implemented to the rig. The reactor has three variables-temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen with nonlinear dynamics-and is therefore used as a pilot system for the biochemical industry. A nonlinear discrete-time model is derived for each of the three output variables and their model parameters are estimated from the real data using an adaptive optimization method. The developed model is used in a nonlinear MPC scheme. An accurate multistep-ahead prediction is obtained for MPC, where the extended Kalman filter is used to estimate system unknown states. The on-line control is implemented and a satisfactory tracking performance is achieved. The MPC is compared with three decentralized PID controllers and the advantage of the nonlinear MPC over the PID is clearly shown.

  15. Parameters of 1-4 mHz (Pc5/Pi3) ULF pulsations during the intervals preceding non-triggered substorms at high geomagnetic latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosikova, Nataliya; Yagova, Nadezda; Baddeley, Lisa; Kozyreva, Olga; Lorentzen, Dag; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav

    2017-04-01

    One of the important questions for understanding substorm generation is the possible existence of specific pre-substorm variations of plasma, particles and electromagnetic field parameters. In this case analyzing of isolated non-triggered substorms (i.e. substorms that occur under quiet geomagnetic conditions without any visible triggers in IMF or SW) gives benefits for investigation of processes of substorm preparation. It was shown in previous studies that during a few hours preceding a non-triggered isolated substorm, coherent geomagnetic and aurroral luminosity pulsations are observed. Moreover, PSD, amplitudes of geomagnetic fluctuations in Pc5/Pi3 (1-4 mHz) frequency range and some spectral parameters differ from those registered on days without substorms. In present work this sort of pulsations has been studied in details. Features of longitudinal and latitudinal profiles are presented. Possible correlation with ULF disturbances in IMF and SW as well as in the magnetotail/magnetosheath are discussed.

  16. IUE observations of Si and C lines and comparison with non-LTE models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Classical model atmosphere techniques are applied to analyze IUE spectra, and to determine abundances, effective temperatures and gravities. Measurements of the equivalent widths and other properties of the line profiles of 24 photospheric lines of Si II, Si III, Si IV, C II, C III and C IV are presented in the range of 1175-1725 A for seven B and two O stars. Observed line profiles are compared with theoretical profiles computed using non-LTE theory and models, and using line-blanketed model atmospheres. Agreement is reasonably good, although strong lines are calculated to be systematically stronger than those observed, while the reverse occurs for weak lines, and empirical profiles have smaller wings than theoretical profiles. It is concluded that the present theory of line formation when used with solar abundances, represents fairly well observed UV photospheric lines of silicon and carbon ions in the atmospheres of main sequence stars of types B5-O9.

  17. Modeling of hydrogen Stark line shapes with kinetic theory methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, J.; Capes, H.; Stamm, R.

    2012-12-01

    The unified formalism for Stark line shapes is revisited and extended to non-binary interactions between an emitter and the surrounding perturbers. The accuracy of this theory is examined through comparisons with ab initio numerical simulations.

  18. Role of heavy ionospheric ions in the localization of substorm disturbances on March 22, 1979: CDAW 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Fritz, T.A.; Lennartsson, W.; Wilken, B.; Kroehl, H.W.; Birn, J.

    1985-01-01

    Extensive ground-based arrays of magnetometers and numerous satellite platforms in the outer magnetosphere have established that two separate substorm expansion onsets occurred on March 22, 1979. The first of these occurred at 1055 UT and is demonstrated to be localized in the 0200--0300 LT sector. Concurrent plasma sheet ion composition measurements are used to show that the growth and expansion phase of this substorm occurred while the outer magnetosphere was composed dominantly of solar wind (H + and He ++ ) plasmas. The 1055 UT substorm greatly perturbed and altered the ion composition of the plasma in the outer magnetosphere such that the second substorm expansion onset (1436 UT) occurred while the outer magnetospheric plasmas were dominantly of ionospheric (O + ) origin. The 1436 UT substorm is shown to have a component of the westward electrojet localized further westward in local time relative to the first substorm. These results are a consistent, well-documented example of the possible important role of heavy ions in the localization and initiation of plasma sheet instabilities during substorms

  19. Low altitude observations of the energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt during isolated substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, L.; Venkatesan, D.; Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD; Meng, C.I.

    1985-01-01

    The low energy (1-20 keV) detector registering particles onboard the polar-orbiting low altitude (approx. 850 km) DMSP-F2 and -F3 satellites also records high energy electrons penetrating the detector walls. Thus the dynamics of this electron population at L=3.5 can be studied during isolated periods of magnetospheric substorms identified by the indices of auroral electrojet (AE), geomagnetic (Ksub(p)) and ring current (Dsub(st)). Temporal changes in the electron flux during the substorms are observed to be an additional contribution riding over the top of the pre-storm (or geomagnetically quiet-time) electron population; the duration of the interval of intensity variations is observed to be about the same as that of the enhancement of the AE index. This indicates the temporal response of the outer radiation belt to the substorm activity, since the observation was made in the ''horns'' of the outer radiation belt. The observed enhanced radiation at low altitude may associate with the instantaneous increase and/or dumping of the outer radiation belt energetic electrons during each isolated substorm activity. (author)

  20. In situ spatiotemporal measurements of the detailed azimuthal substructure of the substorm current wedge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsyth, C.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Rae, I. J.

    2014-01-01

    perigee passes of the Cluster 1 and 4 spacecraft during a substorm on 15 January 2010, in conjunction with ground-based observations, to examine the spatial structuring and temporal variability of the SCW. At this time, the spacecraft traveled east-west azimuthally above the auroral region. We show...

  1. Genomic prediction based on data from three layer lines using non-linear regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Heyun; Windig, Jack J; Vereijken, Addie; Calus, Mario P L

    2014-11-06

    Most studies on genomic prediction with reference populations that include multiple lines or breeds have used linear models. Data heterogeneity due to using multiple populations may conflict with model assumptions used in linear regression methods. In an attempt to alleviate potential discrepancies between assumptions of linear models and multi-population data, two types of alternative models were used: (1) a multi-trait genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP) model that modelled trait by line combinations as separate but correlated traits and (2) non-linear models based on kernel learning. These models were compared to conventional linear models for genomic prediction for two lines of brown layer hens (B1 and B2) and one line of white hens (W1). The three lines each had 1004 to 1023 training and 238 to 240 validation animals. Prediction accuracy was evaluated by estimating the correlation between observed phenotypes and predicted breeding values. When the training dataset included only data from the evaluated line, non-linear models yielded at best a similar accuracy as linear models. In some cases, when adding a distantly related line, the linear models showed a slight decrease in performance, while non-linear models generally showed no change in accuracy. When only information from a closely related line was used for training, linear models and non-linear radial basis function (RBF) kernel models performed similarly. The multi-trait GBLUP model took advantage of the estimated genetic correlations between the lines. Combining linear and non-linear models improved the accuracy of multi-line genomic prediction. Linear models and non-linear RBF models performed very similarly for genomic prediction, despite the expectation that non-linear models could deal better with the heterogeneous multi-population data. This heterogeneity of the data can be overcome by modelling trait by line combinations as separate but correlated traits, which avoids the occasional

  2. Substorm and magnetosphere characteristic scales inferred from the SuperMAG auroral electrojet indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, P. T.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    A generalization of the traditional 12-station auroral electrojet (AE) index to include more than 100 magnetometer stations, SME, is an excellent predictor of global auroral power (AP), even at high cadence (1 min). We use this index, and a database of more than 53,000 substorms derived from it, covering 1980-2009, to investigate time and energy scales in the magnetosphere, during substorms and otherwise. We find, contrary to common opinion, that substorms do not have a preferred recurrence rate but instead have two distinct dynamic regimes, each following a power law. The number of substorms recurring after a time Δt, N(Δt), varies as Δt-1.19 for short times (3 hours). Other evidence also shows these distinct regimes for the magnetosphere, including a break in the power law spectra for SME at about 3 hours. The time between two consecutive substorms is only weakly correlated (r = 0.18 for isolated and r = 0.06 for recurrent) with the time until the next, suggesting quasiperiodicity is not common. However, substorms do have a preferred size, with the typical peak SME magnitude reaching 400-600 nT, but with a mean of 656 nT, corresponding to a bit less than 40 GW AP. More surprisingly, another characteristic scale exists in the magnetosphere, namely, a peak in the SME distribution around 61 nT, corresponding to about 5 GW precipitating AP. The dominant form of auroral precipitation is diffuse aurora; thus, these values are properties of the magnetotail thermal electron distribution. The characteristic 5 GW value specifically represents a preferred minimum below which the magnetotail rarely drops. The magnetotail experiences continuous loss by precipitation, so the existence of a preferred minimum implies driving that rarely disappears altogether. Finally, the distribution of SME values across all times, in accordance with earlier work on AE, is best fit by the sum of two distributions, each normal in log(SME). The lower distribution (with a 40% weighting

  3. Simultaneous Remote Observations of Intense Reconnection Effects by DMSP and MMS Spacecraft During a Storm Time Substorm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsani, A; Nakamura, R; Sergeev, V A; Baumjohann, W; Owen, C J; Petrukovich, A A; Yao, Z; Nakamura, T K M; Kubyshkina, M V; Sotirelis, T; Burch, J L; Genestreti, K J; Vörös, Z; Andriopoulou, M; Gershman, D J; Avanov, L A; Magnes, W; Russell, C T; Plaschke, F; Khotyaintsev, Y V; Giles, B L; Coffey, V N; Dorelli, J C; Strangeway, R J; Torbert, R B; Lindqvist, P-A; Ergun, R

    2017-11-01

    During a magnetic storm on 23 June 2015, several very intense substorms took place, with signatures observed by multiple spacecraft including DMSP and Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS). At the time of interest, DMSP F18 crossed inbound through a poleward expanding auroral bulge boundary at 23.5 h magnetic local time (MLT), while MMS was located duskward of 22 h MLT during an inward crossing of the expanding plasma sheet boundary. The two spacecraft observed a consistent set of signatures as they simultaneously crossed the reconnection separatrix layer during this very intense reconnection event. These include (1) energy dispersion of the energetic ions and electrons traveling earthward, accompanied with high electron energies in the vicinity of the separatrix; (2) energy dispersion of polar rain electrons, with a high-energy cutoff; and (3) intense inward convection of the magnetic field lines at the MMS location. The high temporal resolution measurements by MMS provide unprecedented observations of the outermost electron boundary layer. We discuss the relevance of the energy dispersion of the electrons, and their pitch angle distribution, to the spatial and temporal evolution of the boundary layer. The results indicate that the underlying magnetotail magnetic reconnection process was an intrinsically impulsive and the active X-line was located relatively close to the Earth, approximately at 16-18 R E .

  4. Secondary beam line phase space measurement and modeling at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, R.; Harrison, J.; Macek, R.; Sanders, G.

    1979-01-01

    Hardware and software have been developed for precision on-line measurement and fitting of secondary beam line phase space parameters. A system consisting of three MWPC planes for measuring particle trajectories, in coincidence with a time-of-flight telescope and a range telescope for particle identification, has been interfaced to a computer. Software has been developed for on-line track reconstruction, application of experimental cuts, and fitting of two-dimensional phase space ellipses for each particle species. The measured distributions have been found to agree well with the predictions of the Monte Carlo program DECAY TURTLE. The fitted phase space ellipses are a useful input to optimization routines, such as TRANSPORT, used to search for superior tunes. Application of this system to the LAMPF Stopped Muon Channel is described

  5. Towards a synthesis of substorm electrodynamics: HF radar and auroral observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grocott

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available At 08:35 UT on 21 November 2004, the onset of an interval of substorm activity was captured in the southern hemisphere by the Far UltraViolet (FUV instrument on board the IMAGE spacecraft. This was accompanied by the onset of Pi2 activity and subsequent magnetic bays, evident in ground magnetic data from both hemispheres. Further intensifications were then observed in both the auroral and ground magnetic data over the following ~3 h. During this interval the fields-of-view of the two southern hemisphere Tasman International Geospace Enviroment Radars (TIGER moved through the evening sector towards midnight. Whilst initially low, the amount of backscatter from TIGER increased considerably during the early stages of the expansion phase such that by ~09:20 UT an enhanced dusk flow cell was clearly evident. During the expansion phase the equatorward portion of this flow cell developed into a narrow high-speed flow channel, indicative of the auroral and sub-auroral flows identified in previous studies (e.g. Freeman et al., 1992; Parkinson et al., 2003. At the same time, higher latitude transient flow features were observed and as the interval progressed the flow reversal region and Harang discontinuity became very well defined. Overall, this study has enabled the spatial and temporal development of many different elements of the substorm process to be resolved and placed within a simple conceptual framework of magnetospheric convection. Specifically, the detailed observations of ionospheric flows have illustrated the complex interplay between substorm electric fields and associated auroral dynamics. They have helped define the distinct nature of different substorm current systems such as the traditional substorm current wedge and the more equatorward currents associated with polarisation electric fields. Additionally, they have revealed a radar signature of nightside reconnection which provides the promise of quantifying nightside reconnection in a

  6. Integrated model for line balancing with workstation inventory management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Roy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address the optimization of an integrated line balancing process with workstation inventory management. While doing so, we have studied the interconnection between line balancing and its conversion process. Almost each and every moderate to large manufacturing industry depends on a long and integrated supply chain, consisting of inbound logistic, conversion process and outbound logistic. In this sense an approach addresses a very general problem of integrated line balancing. Research works reported in the literature so far mainly deals with minimization of cost for inbound and outbound logistic subsystems. In most of the cases conversion process has been ignored. We suggest a generic approach for linking the balancing of the line of production in the conversion area with the customers’ rate of demand in the market and for configuring the related stock chambers. Thus, the main aim of this paper is to translate the underlying problem in the form of mixed nonlinear programming problem and design the optimum supply chain so that the total inventory cost and the cost of balancing loss of the conversion process is jointly minimized and ideal cycle time of the production process is determined along with ideal sizes of the stock chambers. A numerical example has been added to demonstrate the suitability of our approach.

  7. Prescribed wind shear modelling with the actuator line technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Troldborg, Niels

    2007-01-01

    A method for prescribing arbitrary steady atmospheric wind shear profiles combined with CFD is presented. The method is furthermore combined with the actuator line technique governing the aerodynamic loads on a wind turbine. Computation are carried out on a wind turbine exposed to a representative...

  8. Mixed Modeling of a SAW Delay Line Using VHDL-AMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2006-01-01

    To aid in the development of SAW sensors for aerospace applications we have created a model of a SAW Delay line using VHDL. The model implements the Impulse Response method to calculate the frequency response, impedance, and insertion loss. The model includes optimization for the number of finger pairs in the IDTs and for the aperture height. This paper presents the model and the results from the model for a SAW delay line design.

  9. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines...... based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted...... for inhibition of cell growth may provide leads for the development of efficient cancer treatment strategies....

  10. Heterotic line bundle models on elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau three-folds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andreas P.; Brodie, Callum R.; Lukas, Andre

    2018-04-01

    We analyze heterotic line bundle models on elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau three-folds over weak Fano bases. In order to facilitate Wilson line breaking to the standard model group, we focus on elliptically fibered three-folds with a second section and a freely-acting involution. Specifically, we consider toric weak Fano surfaces as base manifolds and identify six such manifolds with the required properties. The requisite mathematical tools for the construction of line bundle models on these spaces, including the calculation of line bundle cohomology, are developed. A computer scan leads to more than 400 line bundle models with the right number of families and an SU(5) GUT group which could descend to standard-like models after taking the ℤ2 quotient. A common and surprising feature of these models is the presence of a large number of vector-like states.

  11. Line profile studies of hydrodynamical models of cometary compact H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Feng-Yao; Zhu, Qing-Feng

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the evolution of cometary H II regions based on several champagne flow models and bow shock models, and calculate the profiles of the [Ne II] fine-structure line at 12.81 μm, the H30α recombination line and the [Ne III] fine-structure line at 15.55 μm for these models at different inclinations of 0°, 30° and 60°. We find that the profiles in the bow shock models are generally different from those in the champagne flow models, but the profiles in the bow shock models with lower stellar velocity (≤ 5 km s −1 ) are similar to those in the champagne flow models. In champagne flow models, both the velocity of peak flux and the flux weighted central velocities of all three lines point outward from molecular clouds. In bow shock models, the directions of these velocities depend on the speed of stars. The central velocities of these lines are consistent with the stellar motion in the high stellar speed cases, but they are opposite directions from the stellar motion in the low speed cases. We notice that the line profiles from the slit along the symmetrical axis of the projected 2D image of these models are useful for distinguishing bow shock models from champagne flow models. It is also confirmed by the calculation that the flux weighted central velocity and the line luminosity of the [Ne III] line can be estimated from the [Ne II] line and the H30α line. (paper)

  12. CUTLASS HF radar observations of high-latitude azimuthally propagating vortical currents in the nightside ionosphere during magnetospheric substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Wild

    Full Text Available High-time resolution CUTLASS observations and ground-based magnetometers have been employed to study the occurrence of vortical flow structures propagating through the high-latitude ionosphere during magnetospheric substorms. Fast-moving flow vortices (~800 m s-1 associated with Hall currents flowing around upward directed field-aligned currents are frequently observed propagating at high speed (~1 km s-1 azimuthally away from the region of the ionosphere associated with the location of the substorm expansion phase onset. Furthermore, a statistical analysis drawn from over 1000 h of high-time resolution, nightside radar data has enabled the characterisation of the bulk properties of these vortical flow systems. Their occurrence with respect to substorm phase has been investigated and a possible generation mechanism has been suggested.

    Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; electric fields and currents · Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms

  13. Recent developments in the line-by-line modeling of outgoing longwave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehler, S.A.; Engeln, A. von; Brocard, E.; John, V.O.; Kuhn, T.; Eriksson, P.

    2006-01-01

    High frequency resolution radiative transfer model calculations with the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) were used to simulate the clear-sky outgoing longwave radiative flux (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere. Compared to earlier calculations by Clough and coworkers the model used a spherical atmosphere instead of a plane parallel atmosphere, updated spectroscopic parameters from HITRAN, and updated continuum parameterizations from Mlawer and coworkers. These modifications lead to a reduction in simulated OLR by approximately 4.1%, the largest part, approximately 2.5%, being due to the absence of the plane parallel approximation. As a simple application of the new model, the sensitivity of OLR to changes in humidity, carbon dioxide concentration, and temperature were investigated for different cloud-free atmospheric scenarios. It was found that for the tropical scenario a 20% change in humidity has a larger impact than a doubling of the carbon dioxide concentration. The sensitive altitude region for temperature and humidity changes is the entire free troposphere, including the upper troposphere where humidity data quality is poor

  14. A distributed parameter model of transmission line transformer for high voltage nanosecond pulse generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangtao; Zhao, Zheng; Li, Longjie; He, Jiaxin; Li, Chenjie; Wang, Yifeng; Su, Can

    2017-09-01

    A transmission line transformer has potential advantages for nanosecond pulse generation including excellent frequency response and no leakage inductance. The wave propagation process in a secondary mode line is indispensable due to an obvious inside transient electromagnetic transition in this scenario. The equivalent model of the transmission line transformer is crucial for predicting the output waveform and evaluating the effects of magnetic cores on output performance. However, traditional lumped parameter models are not sufficient for nanosecond pulse generation due to the natural neglect of wave propagations in secondary mode lines based on a lumped parameter assumption. In this paper, a distributed parameter model of transmission line transformer was established to investigate wave propagation in the secondary mode line and its influential factors through theoretical analysis and experimental verification. The wave propagation discontinuity in the secondary mode line induced by magnetic cores is emphasized. Characteristics of the magnetic core under a nanosecond pulse were obtained by experiments. Distribution and formation of the secondary mode current were determined for revealing essential wave propagation processes in secondary mode lines. The output waveform and efficiency were found to be affected dramatically by wave propagation discontinuity in secondary mode lines induced by magnetic cores. The proposed distributed parameter model was proved more suitable for nanosecond pulse generation in aspects of secondary mode current, output efficiency, and output waveform. In depth, comprehension of underlying mechanisms and a broader view of the working principle of the transmission line transformer for nanosecond pulse generation can be obtained through this research.

  15. Multi-scale modelling of supercapacitors: From molecular simulations to a transmission line model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pean, C.; Rotenberg, B.; Simon, P.; Salanne, M.

    2016-09-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of a typical nanoporous-carbon based supercapacitor. The organic electrolyte consists in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium and hexafluorophosphate ions dissolved in acetonitrile. We simulate systems at equilibrium, for various applied voltages. This allows us to determine the relevant thermodynamic (capacitance) and transport (in-pore resistivities) properties. These quantities are then injected in a transmission line model for testing its ability to predict the charging properties of the device. The results from this macroscopic model are in good agreement with non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, which validates its use for interpreting electrochemical impedance experiments.

  16. The Effects of Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Changes on the Substorm Auroras and Energetic Electron Injections on 24 August 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L. Y.; Wang, Z. Q.

    2018-01-01

    After the passage of an interplanetary (IP) shock at 06:13 UT on 24 August 2005, the enhancement (>6 nPa) of solar wind dynamic pressure and the southward turning of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) cause the earthward movement of dayside magnetopause and the drift loss of energetic particles near geosynchronous orbit. The persistent electron drift loss makes the geosynchronous satellites cannot observe the substorm electron injection phenomenon during the two substorm expansion phases (06:57-07:39 UT) on that day. Behind the IP shock, the fluctuations ( 0.5-3 nPa) of solar wind dynamic pressure not only alter the dayside auroral brightness but also cause the entire auroral oval to swing in the day-night direction. However, there is no Pi2 pulsation in the nightside auroral oval during the substorm growth phase from 06:13 to 06:57 UT. During the subsequent two substorm expansion phases, the substorm expansion activities cause the nightside aurora oval brightening from substorm onset site to higher latitudes, and meanwhile, the enhancement (decline) of solar wind dynamic pressure makes the nightside auroral oval move toward the magnetic equator (the magnetic pole). These observations demonstrate that solar wind dynamic pressure changes and substorm expansion activities can jointly control the luminosity and location of the nightside auroral oval when the internal and external disturbances occur simultaneously. During the impact of a strong IP shock, the earthward movement of dayside magnetopause probably causes the disappearance of the substorm electron injections near geosynchronous orbit.

  17. Non-LTE profiles of the Al I autoionization lines. [for solar model atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, G. D.; Jefferies, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    A non-LTE formulation is given for the transfer of radiation in the autoionizing lines of neutral aluminum at 1932 and 1936 A through both the Bilderberg and Harvard-Smithsonian model atmospheres. Numerical solutions for the common source function of these lines and their theoretical line profiles are calculated and compared with the corresponding LTE profiles. The results show that the non-LTE profiles provide a better match with the observations. They also indicate that the continuous opacity of the standard solar models should be increased in this wavelength region if the center-limb variations of observed and theoretical profiles of these lines are to be in reasonable agreement.

  18. Effect of splitting a mixed-model line on shortening the line length under open- and closed-boundary working area settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Donghao; Matsuura, Haruki; Asada, Akiko

    2017-04-01

    Some automobile factories have segmented mixed-model production lines into shorter sub-lines according to part group, such as engine, trim, and powertrain. The effects of splitting a line into sub-lines have been reported from the standpoints of worker motivation, productivity improvement, and autonomy based on risk spreading. There has been no mention of the possibility of shortening the line length by altering the product sequence using sub-lines. The purpose of the present paper is to determine the conditions under which sub-lines reduce the line length and the degree to which the line length may be shortened. The line lengths for a non-split line and a line that has been split into sub-lines are compared using three methods for determining the working area, the standard closed boundary, the optimized open boundary, and real-life constant-length stations. The results are discussed by analyzing the upper and lower bounds of the line length. Based on these results, a procedure for deciding whether or not to split a production line is proposed.

  19. Analysis of the type II robotic mixed-model assembly line balancing problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çil, Zeynel Abidin; Mete, Süleyman; Ağpak, Kürşad

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing trend towards using robots in production systems. Robots are used in different areas such as packaging, transportation, loading/unloading and especially assembly lines. One important step in taking advantage of robots on the assembly line is considering them while balancing the line. On the other hand, market conditions have increased the importance of mixed-model assembly lines. Therefore, in this article, the robotic mixed-model assembly line balancing problem is studied. The aim of this study is to develop a new efficient heuristic algorithm based on beam search in order to minimize the sum of cycle times over all models. In addition, mathematical models of the problem are presented for comparison. The proposed heuristic is tested on benchmark problems and compared with the optimal solutions. The results show that the algorithm is very competitive and is a promising tool for further research.

  20. Dynamic Model for the Z Accelerator Vacuum Section Based on Transmission Line Code%Dynamic Model for the Z Accelerator Vacuum Section Based on Transmission Line Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    呼义翔; 雷天时; 吴撼宇; 郭宁; 韩娟娟; 邱爱慈; 王亮平; 黄涛; 丛培天; 张信军; 李岩; 曾正中; 孙铁平

    2011-01-01

    The transmission-line-circuit model of the Z accelerator, developed originally by W. A. STYGAR, P. A. CORCORAN, et al., is revised. The revised model uses different calculations for the electron loss and flow impedance in the magnetically insulated transmission line system of the Z accelerator before and after magnetic insulation is established. By including electron pressure and zero electric field at the cathode, a closed set of equations is obtained at each time step, and dynamic shunt resistance (used to represent any electron loss to the anode) and flow impedance are solved, which have been incorporated into the transmission line code for simulations of the vacuum section in the Z accelerator. Finally, the results are discussed in comparison with earlier findings to show the effectiveness and limitations of the model.

  1. Spreading Speed of Magnetopause Reconnection X-Lines Using Ground-Satellite Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ying; Walsh, Brian M.; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Ruohoniemi, J. Michael; McWilliams, Kathryn A.; Nishitani, Nozomu

    2018-01-01

    Conceptual and numerical models predict that magnetic reconnection starts at a localized region and then spreads out of the reconnection plane. At the Earth's magnetopause this spreading would occur primarily in local time along the boundary. Different simulations have found the spreading to occur at different speeds such as the Alfvén speed and speed of the current carriers. We use conjugate Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft and Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar measurements to observationally determine the X-line spreading speed at the magnetopause. THEMIS probes the reconnection parameters locally, and SuperDARN tracks the reconnection development remotely. Spreading speeds under different magnetopause boundary conditions are obtained and compared with model predictions. We find that while spreading under weak guide field could be explained by either the current carriers or the Alfvén waves, spreading under strong guide field is consistent only with the current carriers.

  2. On-line control models for the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Helm, R.H.; Lee, M.J.; Woodley, M.D.

    1983-03-01

    Models for computer control of the SLAC three-kilometer linear accelerator and damping rings have been developed as part of the control system for the Stanford Linear Collider. Some of these models have been tested experimentally and implemented in the control program for routine linac operations. This paper will describe the development and implementation of these models, as well as some of the operational results

  3. On the synthesis of resonance lines in dynamical models of structured hot-star winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puls, J.; Owocki, S. P.; Fullerton, A. W.

    1993-01-01

    We examine basic issues involved in synthesizing resonance-line profiles from 1-D, dynamical models of highly structured hot-star winds. Although these models exhibit extensive variations in density as well as velocity, the density scale length is still typically much greater than the Sobolev length. The line transfer is thus treated using a Sobolev approach, as generalized by Rybicki & Hummer (1978) to take proper account of the multiple Sobolev resonances arising from the nonmonotonic velocity field. The resulting reduced-lambda-matrix equation describing nonlocal coupling of the source function is solved by iteration, and line profiles are then derived from formal solution integration using this source function. Two more approximate methods that instead use either a stationary or a structured, local source function yield qualitatively similar line-profiles, but are found to violate photon conservation by 10% or more. The full results suggest that such models may indeed be able to reproduce naturally some of the qualitative properties long noted in observed UV line profiles, such as discrete absorption components in unsaturated lines, or the blue-edge variability in saturated lines. However, these particular models do not yet produce the black absorption troughs commonly observed in saturated lines, and it seems that this and other important discrepancies (e.g., in acceleration time scale of absorption components) may require development of more complete models that include rotation and other 2-D and/or 3-D effects.

  4. Electron spectra over discrete auroras as measured by the Substorm-GEOS rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandahl, I.; Eliasson, L.; Lundin, R.

    1980-01-01

    Results from the first two Substorm-GEOS rockets are presented. These rockets, as well as the third one, were launched from ESRANGE on January 27, 1979 into different substorm phases. The first rocket went into an active pre-breakup evening arc and the second one into a breakup close to magnetic midnight. Electron spectra of downcoming particles measured by a narrow energy bandwidth detector show very narrow energy peaks as soon as the integral energy fluxes are high. These peaks always show populations of two different characteristic energies above the peak energy. One of the populations has properties similar to those found in the boundary layer plasma and the other one seems to be of plasma sheet origin. The plasma sheet like population is also seen where there are no signs of energy peaks, for example equatorward of the arc. The boundary layer plasma is exclusively connected with the signatures of acceleration. (Auth.)

  5. A statistical study of magnetic field magnitude changes during substorms in the near earth tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, R. E.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Mcentire, R. W.; Potemra, T. A.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Using AMPTE/CCE data taken in 1985 and 1986 when the CCE apogee (8.8 earth radii) was within 4.5 hours of midnight, 167 injection events in the near-earth magnetotail have been cataloged. These events are exactly or nearly dispersionless on a 72-sec time scale from 25 keV to 285 keV. The changes in the field magnitude are found to be consistent with the expected effects of the diversion/disruption of the cross-tail current during a substorm, and the latitudinal position of the current sheet is highly variable within the orbit of CCE. The local time variation of the magnetic-field changes implies that the substorm current wedge is composed of longitudinally broad Birkeland currents.

  6. Sounding-rocket experiments for detailed studies of magnetospheric substorm phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuedemann, W.; Wilhelm, K.

    1975-01-01

    Many of the substorm effects occur at or near the auroral oval in the upper atmosphere and can thus be studied by sounding-rocket experiments. As emphasis should be laid on understanding the physical processes, close co-ordination with other study programmes is of great importance. This co-ordination can best be accomplished within the framework of the ''International Magnetospheric Study 1976-1978''

  7. Aspects of magnetosphere–ionosphere coupling in sawtooth substorms: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sandholt

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In a case study we report on repetitive substorm activity during storm time which was excited during Earth passage of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME on 18 August 2003. Applying a combination of magnetosphere and ground observations during a favourable multi-spacecraft configuration in the plasma sheet (GOES-10 at geostationary altitude and in the tail lobes (Geotail and Cluster-1, we monitor the temporal–spatial evolution of basic elements of the substorm current system. Emphasis is placed on activations of the large-scale substorm current wedge (SCW, spanning the 21:00–03:00 MLT sector of the near-Earth plasma sheet (GOES-10 data during the interval 06:00–12:00 UT, and magnetic perturbations in the tail lobes in relation to ground observations of auroral electrojets and convection in the polar cap ionosphere. The joint ground–satellite observations are interpreted in terms of sequential intensifications and expansions of the outer and inner current loops of the SCW and their respective associations with the westward electrojet centred near midnight (24:00 MLT and the eastward electrojet observed at 14:00–15:00 MLT. Combined magnetic field observations across the tail lobe from Cluster and Geotail allow us to make estimates of enhancements of the cross-polar-cap potential (CPCP amounting to ≈ 30–60 kV (lower limits, corresponding to monotonic increases of the PCN index by 1.5 to 3 mV m−1 from inductive electric field coupling in the magnetosphere–ionosphere (M–I system during the initial transient phase of the substorm expansion.

  8. Energetic electron injections and dipolarization events in Mercury's magnetotail: Substorm dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, R. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; Imber, S.; Baker, D. N.; Lawrence, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Despite its small size, Mercury's terrestrial-like magnetosphere experiences brief, yet intense, substorm intervals characterized by features similar to at Earth: loading/unloading of the tail lobes with open magnetic flux, dipolarization of the magnetic field at the inner edge of the plasma sheet, and, the focus of this presentation, energetic electron injection. We use the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer's high-time resolution (10 ms) energetic electron measurements to determine the relationship between substorm activity and energetic electron injections coincident with dipolarization fronts in the magnetotail. These dipolarizations were detected on the basis of their rapid ( 2 s) increase in the northward component of the tail magnetic field (ΔBz 30 nT), which typically persists for 10 s. We estimate the typical flow channel to be 0.15 RM, planetary convection speed of 750 km/s, cross-tail potential drop of 7 kV, and flux transport of 0.08 MWb for each dipolarization event, suggesting multiple simultaneous and sequential dipolarizations are required to unload the >1 MWb of magnetic flux typically returned to the dayside magnetosphere during a substorm interval. Indeed, while we observe most dipolarization-injections to be isolated or in small chains of events (i.e., 1-3 events), intervals of sawtooth-like injections with >20 sequential events are also present. The typical separation between dipolarization-injection events is 10 s. Magnetotail dipolarization, in addition to being a powerful source of electron acceleration, also plays a significant role in the substorm process at Mercury.

  9. Substorm topology in the ionosphere and magnetosphere during a flux rope event in the magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available On 13 August 2002, at ~23:00 UT, about 10 min after a substorm intensification, Cluster observes a flux rope in the central magnetotail, followed by a localised fast flow event about oneminute later. Associated with the flux rope event, a traveling compression region (TCR is seen by those Cluster spacecraft which reside in the lobe. In the conjugate ionospheric region in Northern Scandinavia, the MIRACLE network observes the ionospheric equivalent currents, and the electron densities and electric fields are measured by the EISCAT radar along a meridional scanning profile. Further, the auroral evolution is observed with the Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC on the IMAGE satellite. We compare in detail the substorm evolution as observed in the ionosphere and in the magnetosphere, and examine whether topological correspondences to the flux rope event exist in the ionospheric signatures. The large-scale mapping of both the location and the direction of the flux rope to the ionosphere shows an excellent correspondence to a lens-shaped region of an auroral emission minimum. This region is bracketed by an auroral region equatorward of it which was preexisting to the substorm intensification, and a substorm-related auroral region poleward of it. It is characterised by reduced ionospheric conductances with respect to its environment, and downward field-aligned current (FAC observed both in the magnetosphere and in the ionosphere. As determined from the ionospheric data, this downward FAC area is moving eastward with a speed of ~2 km s-1, in good agreement with the mapped plasma bulk velocity measured at the Cluster satellite closest to that area. Further southwestward to this leading downward FAC area, a trailing upward FAC area is observed that moves eastward with the same speed. The direction of the ionospheric electric field permits a current closure between these two FAC areas through the ionosphere. We speculate that these FAC areas may correspond to

  10. Sausage mode instability of thin current sheets as a cause of magnetospheric substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Büchner

    Full Text Available Observations have shown that, prior to substorm explosions, thin current sheets are formed in the plasma sheet of the Earth's magnetotail. This provokes the question, to what extent current-sheet thinning and substorm onsets are physically, maybe even causally, related. To answer this question, one has to understand the plasma stability of thin current sheets. Kinetic effects must be taken into account since particle scales are reached in the course of tail current-sheet thinning. We present the results of theoretical investigations of the stability of thin current sheets and about the most unstable mode of their decay. Our conclusions are based upon a non-local linear dispersion analysis of a cross-magnetic field instability of Harris-type current sheets. We found that a sausage-mode bulk current instability starts after a sheet has thinned down to the ion inertial length. We also present the results of three-dimensional electromagnetic PIC-code simulations carried out for mass ratios up to Mi / me=64. They verify the linearly predicted properties of the sausage mode decay of thin current sheets in the parameter range of interest.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms · Space plasma physics (magnetic reconnection

  11. SAID/SAPS Revisited: A Causal Relation to the Substorm Current Wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, E. V.

    2017-12-01

    We present multi-spacecraft observations of enhanced flow/electric field channels in the inner magnetosphere and conjugate subauroral ionosphere, i.e., subauroral polarization streams (SAPS) near dusk and subauroral ion drifts (SAID) near midnight. The channels collocate with ring current (RC) injections lagging the onset of substorms by a few to ˜20 minutes, i.e., significantly shorter than the gradient-curvature drift time of tens of keV ions. The time lag is of the order of the propagation time of reconnection-injected hot plasma jets to the premidnight plasmasphere and the substorm current wedge (SCW) to dusk. The observations confirm and expand on the previous results on the SAID features that negate the paradigm of voltage and current generators. Fast-time duskside SAPS/RC injections appear intimately related to a two-loop circuit of the substorm current wedge (SCW2L). We suggest that the poleward electric field inherent in the SCW2L circuit, which demands closure of the Region 1- and Region 2-sense field-aligned currents via meridional currents, is the ultimate cause of fast RC injections and SAPS on the duskside.

  12. Low-Frequency Waves in the Near-Earth Magnetotail before Substorm Expansion Onsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Y.; Saito, M. H.; Hiraki, Y.; Machida, S.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection and dipolarization, which occur in the near-Earth magnetotail just before substorm expansion onsets, are important processes for the substorm triggering. To understand the triggering of these processes, we have investigated low-frequency waves that were observed in the near-Earth magnetotail before onsets, by performing statistical analysis based on Geotail observations and case studies based on multi-point THEMIS and Geotail observations. Here we focused our examination on ~10 min interval before onsets. We find that small-amplitude Alfven and slow-mode magnetosonic waves with a period of ~1 to 2 min continuously exist for more than 10 min before onsets. Such waves are seen not only in the initial dipolarization region but also midway between the magnetic reconnection and initial dipolarization regions. It seems that the amplitudes of the waves are larger in the off-equator plasma sheet and the plasma sheet boundary layer than at the magnetic equator and in the lobe. After onsets the waves considerably amplify in the plasma sheet. These results may imply that instabilities already begin to grow gradually in a wide region during the substorm growth phase, while their explosive growth begins in localized regions just before onsets.

  13. Photoionization modeling of the LWS fine-structure lines in IR bright galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyapal, S.; Luhman, M. L.; Fischer, J.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Wolfire, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    The long wavelength spectrometer (LWS) fine structure line spectra from infrared luminous galaxies were modeled using stellar evolutionary synthesis models combined with photoionization and photodissociation region models. The calculations were carried out by using the computational code CLOUDY. Starburst and active galactic nuclei models are presented. The effects of dust in the ionized region are examined.

  14. Implementation of the frequency dependent line model in a real-time power system simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Iracheta-Cortez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is described the implementation of the frequency-dependent line model (FD-Line in a real-time digital power system simulator. The main goal with such development is to describe a general procedure to incorporate new realistic models of power system components in modern real-time simulators based on the Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP. In this procedure are described, firstly, the steps to obtain the time domain solution of the differential equations that models the electromagnetic behavior in multi-phase transmission lines with frequency dependent parameters. After, the algorithmic solution of the FD-Line model is implemented in Simulink environment, through an S-function programmed in C language, for running off-line simulations of electromagnetic transients. This implementation allows the free assembling of the FD Line model with any element of the Power System Blockset library and also, it can be used to build any network topology. The main advantage of having a power network built in Simulink is that can be executed in real-time by means of the commercial eMEGAsim simulator. Finally, several simulation cases are presented to validate the accuracy and the real-time performance of the FD-Line model.

  15. Animal Models of Congenital Cardiomyopathies Associated With Mutations in Z-Line Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    The cardiac Z-line at the boundary between sarcomeres is a multiprotein complex connecting the contractile apparatus with the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The Z-line is important for efficient force generation and transmission as well as the maintenance of structural stability and integrity. Furthermore, it is a nodal point for intracellular signaling, in particular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. Mutations in various genes encoding Z-line proteins have been associated with different cardiomyopathies, including dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction, and mutations even within the same gene can cause widely different pathologies. Animal models have contributed to a great advancement in the understanding of the physiological function of Z-line proteins and the pathways leading from mutations in Z-line proteins to cardiomyopathy, although genotype-phenotype prediction remains a great challenge. This review presents an overview of the currently available animal models for Z-line and Z-line associated proteins involved in human cardiomyopathies with special emphasis on knock-in and transgenic mouse models recapitulating the clinical phenotypes of human cardiomyopathy patients carrying mutations in Z-line proteins. Pros and cons of mouse models will be discussed and a future outlook will be given. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 38-52, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. SLC beam line error analysis using a model-based expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.; Kleban, S.

    1988-02-01

    Commissioning particle beam line is usually a very time-consuming and labor-intensive task for accelerator physicists. To aid in commissioning, we developed a model-based expert system that identifies error-free regions, as well as localizing beam line errors. This paper will give examples of the use of our system for the SLC commissioning. 8 refs., 5 figs

  17. Analyze On-line Star Economy Basing on Models of Entrepreneurship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡志豪

    2016-01-01

    The outstanding performance of the On-line Star Economy is bound up with social media and promotion by fans, stimulating a new round of consumption upgrading and capital tendency. There is no denying that the On-line Star Economy may be the fortuitous outcome of the times. But the fact remains it can be analyzed rationally using Models of Entrepreneurship.

  18. CRLH Transmission Lines for Telecommunications: Fast and Effective Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A different parameter extraction approach based on zero immittances for composite right/left-handed (CRLH structure is presented. For lossless unit cell equivalent circuit model, LC parameters of series and parallel branches are extracted according to series resonance frequency and parallel resonance frequency, respectively. This approach can be applied to symmetric and unbalanced CRLH structures. The parameter extraction procedure is provided and validated by T-type unit cell model. The responses of distributed prototype and extracted equivalent LC circuit model are in good agreement. The equivalent circuit modeling can improve the degree of freedom in the CRLH TLs design. This parameter extraction method provides an effective and straightforward way in CRLH metamaterials design and applications in telecommunication systems.

  19. Click Spam Prevention Model for On-Line Advertisement

    OpenAIRE

    Zingirian, Nicola; Benini, Michele

    2018-01-01

    This paper shows a vulnerability of the pay-per-click accounting of Google Ads and proposes a statistical tradeoff-based approach to manage this vulnerability. The result of this paper is a model to calculate the overhead cost per click necessary to protect the subscribers and a simple algorithm to implement this protection. Simulations validate the correctness of the model and the economical applicability.

  20. Lamplighter model of a random copolymer adsorption on a line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.I. Nazarov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a model of an AB-diblock random copolymer sequential self-packaging with local quenched interactions on a one-dimensional infinite sticky substrate. It is assumed that the A-A and B-B contacts are favorable, while A-B are not. The position of a newly added monomer is selected in view of the local contact energy minimization. The model demonstrates a self-organization behavior with the nontrivial dependence of the total energy, E (the number of unfavorable contacts, on the number of chain monomers, N: E ~ N^3/4 for quenched random equally probable distribution of A- and B-monomers along the chain. The model is treated by mapping it onto the "lamplighter" random walk and the diffusion-controlled chemical reaction of X+X → 0 type with the subdiffusive motion of reagents.

  1. On-line photolithography modeling using spectrophotometry and Prolith/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, Herbert L.; Beacham, Jeanne E.

    1994-05-01

    Spectrophotometry has been applied to optimizing photolithography processes in semiconductor manufacturing. For many years thin film measurement systems have been used in manufacturing for controlling film deposition processes. The combination of film thickness mapping with photolithography modeling has expanded the applications of this technology. Experimental measurements of dose-to-clear, the minimum light exposure dose required to fully develop a photoresist, are described. It is shown how dose-to-clear and photoresist contrast may be determined rapidly and conveniently from measurements of a dose exposure matrix on a monitor wafer. Such experimental measurements may underestimate the dose-to- clear because of thickness variations of the photoresist and underlying layers on the product wafer. Online modeling of the photolithographic process together with film thickness maps of the entire wafer can overcome this problem. Such modeling also provides maps of dose-to- clear and resist linewidth that can be used to estimate and optimize yield.

  2. Quasilinear Line Broadened Model for Energetic Particle Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghantous, Katy; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Berk, Herbert

    2011-10-01

    We present a self-consistent quasi-linear model that describes wave-particle interaction in toroidal geometry and computes fast ion transport during TAE mode evolution. The model bridges the gap between single mode resonances, where it predicts the analytically expected saturation levels, and the case of multiple modes overlapping, where particles diffuse across phase space. Results are presented in the large aspect ratio limit where analytic expressions are used for Fourier harmonics of the power exchange between waves and particles, . Implemention of a more realistic mode structure calculated by NOVAK code are also presented. This work is funded by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Line and lattice networks under deterministic interference models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goseling, Jasper; Gastpar, Michael; Weber, Jos H.

    Capacity bounds are compared for four different deterministic models of wireless networks, representing four different ways of handling broadcast and superposition in the physical layer. In particular, the transport capacity under a multiple unicast traffic pattern is studied for a 1-D network of

  4. On-line Bayesian model updating for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetta, Roberto; Broggi, Matteo; Huchet, Quentin; Patelli, Edoardo

    2018-03-01

    Fatigue induced cracks is a dangerous failure mechanism which affects mechanical components subject to alternating load cycles. System health monitoring should be adopted to identify cracks which can jeopardise the structure. Real-time damage detection may fail in the identification of the cracks due to different sources of uncertainty which have been poorly assessed or even fully neglected. In this paper, a novel efficient and robust procedure is used for the detection of cracks locations and lengths in mechanical components. A Bayesian model updating framework is employed, which allows accounting for relevant sources of uncertainty. The idea underpinning the approach is to identify the most probable crack consistent with the experimental measurements. To tackle the computational cost of the Bayesian approach an emulator is adopted for replacing the computationally costly Finite Element model. To improve the overall robustness of the procedure, different numerical likelihoods, measurement noises and imprecision in the value of model parameters are analysed and their effects quantified. The accuracy of the stochastic updating and the efficiency of the numerical procedure are discussed. An experimental aluminium frame and on a numerical model of a typical car suspension arm are used to demonstrate the applicability of the approach.

  5. Electrostatic solitary waves in current layers: from Cluster observations during a super-substorm to beam experiments at the LAPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, J. S.; Chen, L.-J.; Santolík, O.; Grimald, S.; Lavraud, B.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Lefebvre, B.; Fazakerley, A.; Lakhina, G. S.; Ghosh, S. S.; Grison, B.; Décréau, P. M. E.; Gurnett, D. A.; Torbert, R.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Dandouras, I.; Lucek, E.

    2009-06-01

    Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs) have been observed by several spacecraft in the current layers of Earth's magnetosphere since 1982. ESWs are manifested as isolated pulses (one wave period) in the high time resolution waveform data obtained on these spacecraft. They are thus nonlinear structures generated out of nonlinear instabilities and processes. We report the first observations of ESWs associated with the onset of a super-substorm that occurred on 24 August 2005 while the Cluster spacecraft were located in the magnetotail at around 18-19 RE and moving northward from the plasma sheet to the lobes. These ESWs were detected in the waveform data of the WBD plasma wave receiver on three of the Cluster spacecraft. The majority of the ESWs were detected about 5 min after the super-substorm onset during which time 1) the PEACE electron instrument detected significant field-aligned electron fluxes from a few 100 eV to 3.5 keV, 2) the EDI instrument detected bursts of field-aligned electron currents, 3) the FGM instrument detected substantial magnetic fluctuations and the presence of Alfvén waves, 4) the STAFF experiment detected broadband electric and magnetic waves, ion cyclotron waves and whistler mode waves, and 5) CIS detected nearly comparable densities of H+ and O+ ions and a large tailward H+ velocity. We compare the characteristics of the ESWs observed during this event to those created in the laboratory at the University of California-Los Angeles Plasma Device (LAPD) with an electron beam. We find that the time durations of both space and LAPD ESWs are only slightly larger than the respective local electron plasma periods, indicating that electron, and not ion, dynamics are responsible for generation of the ESWs. We have discussed possible mechanisms for generating the ESWs in space, including the beam and kinetic Buneman type instabilities and the acoustic instabilities. Future studies will examine these mechanisms in more detail using the space

  6. Electrostatic solitary waves in current layers: from Cluster observations during a super-substorm to beam experiments at the LAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Pickett

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs have been observed by several spacecraft in the current layers of Earth's magnetosphere since 1982. ESWs are manifested as isolated pulses (one wave period in the high time resolution waveform data obtained on these spacecraft. They are thus nonlinear structures generated out of nonlinear instabilities and processes. We report the first observations of ESWs associated with the onset of a super-substorm that occurred on 24 August 2005 while the Cluster spacecraft were located in the magnetotail at around 18–19 RE and moving northward from the plasma sheet to the lobes. These ESWs were detected in the waveform data of the WBD plasma wave receiver on three of the Cluster spacecraft. The majority of the ESWs were detected about 5 min after the super-substorm onset during which time 1 the PEACE electron instrument detected significant field-aligned electron fluxes from a few 100 eV to 3.5 keV, 2 the EDI instrument detected bursts of field-aligned electron currents, 3 the FGM instrument detected substantial magnetic fluctuations and the presence of Alfvén waves, 4 the STAFF experiment detected broadband electric and magnetic waves, ion cyclotron waves and whistler mode waves, and 5 CIS detected nearly comparable densities of H+ and O+ ions and a large tailward H+ velocity. We compare the characteristics of the ESWs observed during this event to those created in the laboratory at the University of California-Los Angeles Plasma Device (LAPD with an electron beam. We find that the time durations of both space and LAPD ESWs are only slightly larger than the respective local electron plasma periods, indicating that electron, and not ion, dynamics are responsible for generation of the ESWs. We have discussed possible mechanisms for generating the ESWs in space, including the beam and kinetic Buneman type instabilities and the acoustic instabilities. Future studies will examine these mechanisms in

  7. MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF POWER CONSUMPTION FOR SOME OIL PIPE-LINE SECTIONS WITH POOR OPERATIONAL STABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Kolesnik

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical model of power consumption for technologically completed and non-completed oil pipe-line sections with poor operational stability has been developed on the basis of daily indices concerning oil transportation regimes. The model permits to take into account tendencies in power consumption under various time prediction cycles and ranges of oil freight turnover, changes in the bulk and characteristics of the transported oil, configuration and design parameters of oil pipe-line.

  8. Optical modeling of fiber organic photovoltaic structures using a transmission line method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshonas, N; Stathopoulos, N A; O'Connor, B T; Bedeloglu, A Celik; Savaidis, S P; Vasiliadis, S

    2017-12-01

    An optical model has been developed and evaluated for the calculation of the external quantum efficiency of cylindrical fiber photovoltaic structures. The model is based on the transmission line theory and has been applied on single and bulk heterojunction fiber-photovoltaic cells. Using this model, optimum design characteristics have been proposed for both configurations, and comparison with experimental results has been assessed.

  9. The fermion content of the Standard Model from a simple world-line theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfield, Paul, E-mail: P.R.W.Mansfield@durham.ac.uk

    2015-04-09

    We describe a simple model that automatically generates the sum over gauge group representations and chiralities of a single generation of fermions in the Standard Model, augmented by a sterile neutrino. The model is a modification of the world-line approach to chiral fermions.

  10. Multidirectional Scanning Model, MUSCLE, to Vectorize Raster Images with Straight Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Baz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new model, MUSCLE (Multidirectional Scanning for Line Extraction, for automatic vectorization of raster images with straight lines. The algorithm of the model implements the line thinning and the simple neighborhood methods to perform vectorization. The model allows users to define specified criteria which are crucial for acquiring the vectorization process. In this model, various raster images can be vectorized such as township plans, maps, architectural drawings, and machine plans. The algorithm of the model was developed by implementing an appropriate computer programming and tested on a basic application. Results, verified by using two well known vectorization programs (WinTopo and Scan2CAD, indicated that the model can successfully vectorize the specified raster data quickly and accurately.

  11. The 1-way on-line coupled atmospheric chemistry model system MECO(n – Part 2: On-line coupling with the Multi-Model-Driver (MMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kerkweg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new, highly flexible model system for the seamless dynamical down-scaling of meteorological and chemical processes from the global to the meso-γ scale is presented. A global model and a cascade of an arbitrary number of limited-area model instances run concurrently in the same parallel environment, in which the coarser grained instances provide the boundary data for the finer grained instances. Thus, disk-space intensive and time consuming intermediate and pre-processing steps are entirely avoided and the time interpolation errors of common off-line nesting approaches are minimised. More specifically, the regional model COSMO of the German Weather Service (DWD is nested on-line into the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 within the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy framework. ECHAM5 and COSMO have previously been equipped with the MESSy infrastructure, implying that the same process formulations (MESSy submodels are available for both models. This guarantees the highest degree of achievable consistency, between both, the meteorological and chemical conditions at the domain boundaries of the nested limited-area model, and between the process formulations on all scales.

    The on-line nesting of the different models is established by a client-server approach with the newly developed Multi-Model-Driver (MMD, an additional component of the MESSy infrastructure. With MMD an arbitrary number of model instances can be run concurrently within the same message passing interface (MPI environment, the respective coarser model (either global or regional is the server for the nested finer (regional client model, i.e. it provides the data required to calculate the initial and boundary fields to the client model. On-line nesting means that the coupled (client-server models exchange their data via the computer memory, in contrast to the data exchange via files on disk in common off-line nesting approaches. MMD consists of a library

  12. Design, Modeling and Control of a Biped Line-Walking Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludan Wang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is the design and analysis of a biped line walking robot for inspection of power transmission lines. With a novel mechanism the centroid of the robot can be concentrated on the axis of hip joint to minimize the drive torque of the hip joint. The mechanical structure of the robot is discussed, as well as forward kinematics. Dynamic model is established in this paper to analyze the inverse kinematics for motion planning. The line-walking cycle of the line-walking robot is composed of a single-support phase and a double-support phase. Locomotion of the line-walking robot is discussed in details and the obstacle-navigation process is planed according to the structure of power transmission line. To fulfill the demands of line-walking, a control system and trajectories generation method are designed for the prototype of the line-walking robot. The feasibility of this concept is then confirmed by performing experiments with a simulated line environment.

  13. Magnetic field drift shell splitting: Cause of unusual dayside particle pitch angle distributions during storms and substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibeck, D.G.; McEntire, R.W.; Lui, A.T.Y.; Lopez, R.E.; Krimigis, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    We present a magnetic field drift shell--splitting model for the unusual butterfly and head-and-shoulder energetic (E>25 keV) particle pitch angle distributions (PADs) which appear deep within the dayside magnetosphere during the course of storms and substorms. Drift shell splitting separates the high and low pitch angle particles in nightside injections as they move to the dayside magnetosphere, so that the higher pitch angle particles move radially away from Earth. Consequently, butterfly PADs with a surplus of low pitch angle particles form on the inner edge of the injection, but head-and-shoulder PADs with a surplus of high pitch angle particles from on the outer edge. A similar process removes high pitch angle particles from the inner dayside magnetosphere during storms, leaving the remaining lower pitch angle particles to form butterfly PADs on the inner edge of the ring current. A detailed case and statistical study of CCE/MEPA observations, as well as a review of previous work, shows most examples of unusual PADs to be consistent with the model. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  14. On enhancing on-line collaboration using fuzzy logic modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leontios J. Hadjileontiadis

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Web-based collaboration calls for professional skills and competences to the benefit of the quality of the collaboration and its output. Within this framework, educational virtual environments may provide a means for training upon these skills and in particular the collaborative ones. On the basis of the existing technological means such training may be enhanced even more. Designing considerations towards this direction include the close follow-up of the collaborative activity and provision of support grounded upon a pedagogical background. To this vein, a fuzzy logic-based expert system, namely Collaboration/Reflection-Fuzzy Inference System (C/R-FIS, is presented in this paper. By means of interconnected FISs, the C/R-FIS expert system automatically evaluates the collaborative activity of two peers, during their asynchronous, written, web-based collaboration. This information is used for the provision of adaptive support to peers during their collaboration, towards equilibrium of their collaborative activity. In particular, this enhanced formative feedback aims at diminishing the possible dissonance between the individual collaborative skills by challenging self-adjustment procedures. The proposed model extents the evaluation system of a web-based collaborative tool namely Lin2k, which has served as a test-bed for the C/R-FIS experimental use. Results from its experimental use have proved the potentiality of the proposed model to significantly contribute to the enhancement of the collaborative activity and its transferability to other collaborative learning contexts, such as medicine, environmental engineering, law, and music education.

  15. Empirical Analysis and Modeling of Stop-Line Crossing Time and Speed at Signalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshuang Tang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In China, a flashing green (FG indication of 3 s followed by a yellow (Y indication of 3 s is commonly applied to end the green phase at signalized intersections. Stop-line crossing behavior of drivers during such a phase transition period significantly influences safety performance of signalized intersections. The objective of this study is thus to empirically analyze and model drivers’ stop-line crossing time and speed in response to the specific phase transition period of FG and Y. High-resolution trajectories for 1465 vehicles were collected at three rural high-speed intersections with a speed limit of 80 km/h and two urban intersections with a speed limit of 50 km/h in Shanghai. With the vehicle trajectory data, statistical analyses were performed to look into the general characteristics of stop-line crossing time and speed at the two types of intersections. A multinomial logit model and a multiple linear regression model were then developed to predict the stop-line crossing patterns and speeds respectively. It was found that the percentage of stop-line crossings during the Y interval is remarkably higher and the stop-line crossing time is approximately 0.7 s longer at the urban intersections, as compared with the rural intersections. In addition, approaching speed and distance to the stop-line at the onset of FG as well as area type significantly affect the percentages of stop-line crossings during the FG and Y intervals. Vehicle type and stop-line crossing pattern were found to significantly influence the stop-line crossing speed, in addition to the above factors. The red-light-running seems to occur more frequently at the large intersections with a long cycle length.

  16. In vitro radiosensitivity of six human cell lines. A comparative study with different statistical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertil, B.; Deschavanne, P.J.; Lachet, B.; Malaise, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    The intrinsic radiosensitivity of human cell lines (five tumor and one nontransformed fibroblastic) was studied in vitro. The survival curves were fitted by the single-hit multitarget, the two-hit multitarget, the single-hit multitarget with initial slope, and the quadratic models. The accuracy of the experimental results permitted evaluation of the various fittings. Both a statistical test (comparison of variances left unexplained by the four models) and a biological consideration (check for independence of the fitted parameters vis-a-vis the portion of the survival curve in question) were carried out. The quadratic model came out best with each of them. It described the low-dose effects satisfactorily, revealing a single-hit lethal component. This finding and the fact that the six survival curves displayed a continuous curvature ruled out the adoption of the target models as well as the widely used linear regression. As calculated by the quadratic model, the parameters of the six cell lines lead to the following conclusions: (a) the intrinsic radiosensitivity varies greatly among the different cell lines; (b) the interpretation of the fibroblast survival curve is not basically different from that of the tumor cell lines; and (c) the radiosensitivity of these human cell lines is comparable to that of other mammalian cell lines

  17. Statistical analysis of probabilistic models of software product lines with quantitative constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beek, M.H. ter; Legay, A.; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the suitability of statistical model checking for the analysis of probabilistic models of software product lines with complex quantitative constraints and advanced feature installation options. Such models are specified in the feature-oriented language QFLan, a rich process algebra...... of certain behaviour to the expected average cost of products. This is supported by a Maude implementation of QFLan, integrated with the SMT solver Z3 and the distributed statistical model checker MultiVeStA. Our approach is illustrated with a bikes product line case study....

  18. Transmission-line-circuit model of an 85-TW, 25-MA pulsed-power accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    B. T. Hutsel; P. A. Corcoran; M. E. Cuneo; M. R. Gomez; M. H. Hess; D. D. Hinshelwood; C. A. Jennings; G. R. Laity; D. C. Lamppa; R. D. McBride; J. K. Moore; A. Myers; D. V. Rose; S. A. Slutz; W. A. Stygar

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a physics-based transmission-line-circuit model of the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The 33-m-diameter Z machine generates a peak electrical power as high as 85 TW, and delivers as much as 25 MA to a physics load. The circuit model is used to design and analyze experiments conducted on Z. The model consists of 36 networks of transmission-line-circuit elements and resistors that represent each of Zs 36 modules. The model of each module includes a Marx generator, intermediate-en...

  19. Architectures drawn / digital models: the Venices (impossible on line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malvina Borgherini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A contemporary city representation talks not only about architecture and landscape but also about the effects that political institutions, cultural traditions and economic enterprises have on the urban community. Methods and ways traditionally used to present the complexity and, at the same time, the personality of a town, or on a smaller scale of one of his monument, are not suitable with the contemporary reality. A very famous panel presented at Venice Biennale in 1976, Aldo Rossi’s «Città Analoga», within real and ideal architectures, ancient monuments and contemporary landscapes, individual and collective memories, human presences and empty spaces, can be taken as an example for the preparation of a new ‘story’ or a new ‘map’ for a city like Venice. The space of a digital model can become a place for discussion and analysis, a place where to see together historical records and projects never realized, where to put subjective and objective visions, which overlap daily and occasional tracks.

  20. Human embryonic stem cell lines model experimental human cytomegalovirus latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Kalejta, Robert F

    2013-05-28

    Herpesviruses are highly successful pathogens that persist for the lifetime of their hosts primarily because of their ability to establish and maintain latent infections from which the virus is capable of productively reactivating. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a betaherpesvirus, establishes latency in CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells during natural infections in the body. Experimental infection of CD34(+) cells ex vivo has demonstrated that expression of the viral gene products that drive productive infection is silenced by an intrinsic immune defense mediated by Daxx and histone deacetylases through heterochromatinization of the viral genome during the establishment of latency. Additional mechanistic details about the establishment, let alone maintenance and reactivation, of HCMV latency remain scarce. This is partly due to the technical challenges of CD34(+) cell culture, most notably, the difficulty in preventing spontaneous differentiation that drives reactivation and renders them permissive for productive infection. Here we demonstrate that HCMV can establish, maintain, and reactivate in vitro from experimental latency in cultures of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), for which spurious differentiation can be prevented or controlled. Furthermore, we show that known molecular aspects of HCMV latency are faithfully recapitulated in these cells. In total, we present ESCs as a novel, tractable model for studies of HCMV latency.

  1. Modeling Auditory-Haptic Interface Cues from an Analog Multi-line Telephone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begault, Durand R.; Anderson, Mark R.; Bittner, Rachael M.

    2012-01-01

    The Western Electric Company produced a multi-line telephone during the 1940s-1970s using a six-button interface design that provided robust tactile, haptic and auditory cues regarding the "state" of the communication system. This multi-line telephone was used as a model for a trade study comparison of two interfaces: a touchscreen interface (iPad)) versus a pressure-sensitive strain gauge button interface (Phidget USB interface controllers). The experiment and its results are detailed in the authors' AES 133rd convention paper " Multimodal Information Management: Evaluation of Auditory and Haptic Cues for NextGen Communication Dispays". This Engineering Brief describes how the interface logic, visual indications, and auditory cues of the original telephone were synthesized using MAX/MSP, including the logic for line selection, line hold, and priority line activation.

  2. Motorized Activity on Legacy Seismic Lines: A Predictive Modeling Approach to Prioritize Restoration Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornseth, M L; Pigeon, K E; MacNearney, D; Larsen, T A; Stenhouse, G; Cranston, J; Finnegan, L

    2018-05-11

    Natural regeneration of seismic lines, cleared for hydrocarbon exploration, is slow and often hindered by vegetation damage, soil compaction, and motorized human activity. There is an extensive network of seismic lines in western Canada which is known to impact forest ecosystems, and seismic lines have been linked to declines in woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou). Seismic line restoration is costly, but necessary for caribou conservation to reduce cumulative disturbance. Understanding where motorized activity may be impeding regeneration of seismic lines will aid in prioritizing restoration. Our study area in west-central Alberta, encompassed five caribou ranges where restoration is required under federal species at risk recovery strategies, hence prioritizing seismic lines for restoration is of immediate conservation value. To understand patterns of motorized activity on seismic lines, we evaluated five a priori hypotheses using a predictive modeling framework and Geographic Information System variables across three landscapes in the foothills and northern boreal regions of Alberta. In the northern boreal landscape, motorized activity was most common in dry areas with a large industrial footprint. In highly disturbed areas of the foothills, motorized activity on seismic lines increased with low vegetation heights, relatively dry soils, and further from forest cutblocks, while in less disturbed areas of the foothills, motorized activity on seismic lines decreased proportional to seismic line density, slope steepness, and white-tailed deer abundance, and increased proportional with distance to roads. We generated predictive maps of high motorized activity, identifying 21,777 km of seismic lines where active restoration could expedite forest regeneration.

  3. The ability of current micro-velocity models to represent center-limb line profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Testerman, L.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented on the ability of microturbulences, LTE line formation and a homogeneous thermal model to realistically represent the center-limb variation of temporally and spacially averaged solar line profiles. Three somewhat similar semi-empirical thermal models have been used in combination with five current microturbulence models which cover the gamut of homogeneous-isotropic to nonhomogeneous-anisotropic. From high resolution photoelectric data for (lambdalambda 5000-6000 at five μ-values(1,0.63,0.4,0.25,0.16) obtained at KPNO, were selected 17 Fe I and 5 Fe II line profiles to be unblended and symmetrized for study. An iterative scheme has been developed to calculate theoretical profiles for the various combination of models and compare them to the observed profile using the abundance at each limb position and the magnitude of the pressure broadening at the center of the disc as parameters. It was found that a microturbulence model, for which the radial and tangential components increase into deeper layers with xisub(tan)>xisub(rad), produces a reasonable good center-limb fit for lines less than 100mA. However for lines stronger than 140mA, microturbulence models with no depth dependence produce the best match between theory and observation. Thus there is reason to question the uniqueness of the microturbulence concept. (Auth.)

  4. Thermal wind model for the broad emission line region of quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weymann, R.J.; Scott, J.S.; Schiano, A.V.R.; Christiansen, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    Arguments are summarized for supposing that the clouds giving rise to the broad emission lines of QSOs are confined by the pressure of an expanding thermal gas and that a flux of relativistic particles with luminosity comparable to the photon luminosity streams through this gas. The resulting heating and momentum deposition produces a transonic thermal wind whose dynamical properties are calculated in detail. This wind accelerates and confines the emission line clouds, thereby producing the broad emission line (BEL) profiles. In a companion paper, the properties of the wind at much larger distances (approx.kpc) than the BEL region are used to explain the production of the broad absorption lines (BAL) observed in some QSOs. The same set of wind parameters can account for the properties of both the BEL and BAL regions, and this unification in the physical description of the BEL and BAL regions is one of the most important advantages of this model. A characteristic size of approx.1 pc for the QSO emission line region is one consequence of the model. This characteristic size is shown to depend upon luminosity in such a way that the ionization parameter is roughly constant over a wide range of luminosities. An X-ray luminosity due to thermal bremsstrahlung of approx.1%--10% of the optical luminosity is another consequence of the model. The trajectories of clouds under the combined influence of ram pressure acceleration and radiative acceleration are calculated. From these trajectories emission line profiles are also calculated, as well as the wind and cloud parameters yielding profiles in fair agreement with observed profiles explored. Opacity in the wind due to electron scattering displaces the line cores of optically thin lines to the blue. This is roughly compensated for by the redward skewing of optically thick lines due to preferential emission of photons from the back side of the clouds.void rapid depletion due to Compton losses are discussed

  5. Modelling cell population growth with applications to cancer therapy in human tumour cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basse, Britta; Baguley, Bruce C; Marshall, Elaine S; Wake, Graeme C; Wall, David J N

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the work undertaken to model a population of cells and the effects of cancer therapy. We began with a theoretical one compartment size structured cell population model and investigated its asymptotic steady size distributions (SSDs) (On a cell growth model for plankton, MMB JIMA 21 (2004) 49). However these size distributions are not similar to the DNA (size) distributions obtained experimentally via the flow cytometric analysis of human tumour cell lines (data obtained from the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, New Zealand). In our one compartment model, size was a generic term, but in order to obtain realistic steady size distributions we chose size to be DNA content and devised a multi-compartment mathematical model for the cell division cycle where each compartment corresponds to a distinct phase of the cell cycle (J. Math. Biol. 47 (2003) 295). We then incorporated another compartment describing the possible induction of apoptosis (cell death) from mitosis phase (Modelling cell death in human tumour cell lines exposed to anticancer drug paclitaxel, J. Math. Biol. 2004, in press). This enabled us to compare our model to flow cytometric data of a melanoma cell line where the anticancer drug, paclitaxel, had been added. The model gives a dynamic picture of the effects of paclitaxel on the cell cycle. We hope to use the model to describe the effects of other cancer therapies on a number of different cell lines. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Multi-objective Analysis for a Sequencing Planning of Mixed-model Assembly Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yoshiaki; Waki, Toshiya; Yoo, Jae Kyu

    Diversified customer demands are raising importance of just-in-time and agile manufacturing much more than before. Accordingly, introduction of mixed-model assembly lines becomes popular to realize the small-lot-multi-kinds production. Since it produces various kinds on the same assembly line, a rational management is of special importance. With this point of view, this study focuses on a sequencing problem of mixed-model assembly line including a paint line as its preceding process. By taking into account the paint line together, reducing work-in-process (WIP) inventory between these heterogeneous lines becomes a major concern of the sequencing problem besides improving production efficiency. Finally, we have formulated the sequencing problem as a bi-objective optimization problem to prevent various line stoppages, and to reduce the volume of WIP inventory simultaneously. Then we have proposed a practical method for the multi-objective analysis. For this purpose, we applied the weighting method to derive the Pareto front. Actually, the resulting problem is solved by a meta-heuristic method like SA (Simulated Annealing). Through numerical experiments, we verified the validity of the proposed approach, and discussed the significance of trade-off analysis between the conflicting objectives.

  7. Energy Limits of Electron Acceleration in the Plasma Sheet During Substorms: A Case Study with the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Mauk, B. H.; Cohen, I. J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Craft, J. V.; Wilder, F. D.; Baker, D. N.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present multipoint observations of earthward moving dipolarization fronts and energetic particle injections from NASAs Magnetospheric Multiscale mission with a focus on electron acceleration. From a case study during a substorm on 02 August 2015, we find that electrons are only accelerated over a finite energy range, from a lower energy threshold at approx. 7-9 keV up to an upper energy cutoff in the hundreds of keV range. At energies lower than the threshold energy, electron fluxes decrease, potentially due to precipitation by strong parallel electrostatic wavefields or initial sources in the lobes. Electrons at energies higher than the threshold are accelerated cumulatively by a series of impulsive magnetic dipolarization events. This case demonstrates how the upper energy cutoff increases, in this case from approx. 130 keV to >500 keV, with each depolarization/injection during sustained activity. We also present a simple model accounting for these energy limits that reveals that electron energization is dominated by betatron acceleration.

  8. Modeling the Impacts of Climate Change on Phytogeographical Units. A Case Study of the Moesz Line

    OpenAIRE

    Bede-Fazekas, Ákos

    2013-01-01

    Regional climate models (RCMs) provide reliable climatic predictions for the next 90 years with high horizontal and temporal resolution. In the 21st century northward latitudinal and upward altitudinal shift of the distribution of plant species and phytogeographical units is expected. It is discussed how the modeling of phytogeographical unit can be reduced to modeling plant distributions. Predicted shift of the Moesz line is studied as case study (with three different modeling approaches) us...

  9. A photoionization model for the optical line emission from cooling flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Megan; Voit, G. M.

    1991-01-01

    The detailed predictions of a photoionization model previously outlined in Voit and Donahue (1990) to explain the optical line emission associated with cooling flows in X-ray emitting clusters of galaxies are presented. In this model, EUV/soft X-ray radiation from condensing gas photoionizes clouds that have already cooled. The energetics and specific consequences of such a model, as compared to other models put forth in the literature is discussed. Also discussed are the consequences of magnetic fields and cloud-cloud shielding. The results illustrate how varying the individual column densities of the ionized clouds can reproduce the range of line ratios observed and strongly suggest that the emission-line nebulae are self-irradiated condensing regions at the centers of cooling flows.

  10. New bounds on the phase transition line in a non-compact abelian lattice Higgs model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nill, F.

    1987-01-01

    The Higgs expectation value and the 't Hooft loop are investigated as order respectively disorder parameters in a fixed-length Higgs model of Villain type with gauge group R. Based on either observable the phase transition line is shown to be monotonically decreasing and Lipschitz continuous with Lipschitz constant 4d in dimension d ≥ 3. This gives new bounds on the phase transition line in terms of its endpoints, i.e. the critical couplings of the Z-gauge model and the XY-model with Villain action, respectively. (orig.)

  11. Beyond accessibility? Toward an on-line and memory-based model of framing effects

    OpenAIRE

    Matthes, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    This theoretical article investigates the effects of media frames on individuals' judgments. In contrast to previous theorizing, we suggest that framing scholars should embrace both, on-line and memory-based judgment formation processes. Based on that premise, we propose a model that distinguishes between two phases of framing effects. Along the first phase, the media's framing contributes to the formation of an on-line or a memory-based judgment. The second phase describes six hypothetical r...

  12. On-line supercapacitor dynamic models for energy conversion and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.H.; Hung, Y.H.; Hong, C.W.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► On-line supercapacitor dynamic models are derived from time and frequency domains. ► Equivalent circuits with an ANN identifier are derived for nonlinear effects. ► Nonlinear effects include environmental temperature and operating voltage. ► Supercapacitor models can achieve both system fidelity and computation efficiency. - Abstract: This paper develops on-line nonlinear dynamic models of electrochemical supercapacitors which are for energy conversion and management. Based on the theory of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, extensive alternative current impedance tests have been conducted to investigate the frequency-domain dynamics of these supercapacitors. A Nyquist diagram is plotted to help establish an equivalent electric circuit, which is regarded as the first-phase linear model. Two performance-influencing factors, environmental temperature and operating voltage, are considered as nonlinear effects. The nonlinear relationships among parameters of the capacitances and resistances in the first-phase model are established by a multi-layer artificial neural network. The neural parameters are trained using a back-propagation algorithm by feeding the experimental data bank. Combining the first-phase model and the on-line neural “parameter identifier”, the algorithm produces an on-line nonlinear dynamic model. Simulation results have proved that this proposed model is able to achieve both system fidelity and computational efficiency.

  13. The phase transition lines in pair approximation for the basic reinfection model SIRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stollenwerk, Nico; Martins, Jose; Pinto, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    For a spatial stochastic epidemic model we investigate in the pair approximation scheme the differential equations for the moments. The basic reinfection model of susceptible-infected-recovered-reinfected or SIRI type is analysed, its phase transition lines calculated analytically in this pair approximation

  14. Genomic prediction based on data from three layer lines using non-linear regression models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, H.; Windig, J.J.; Vereijken, A.; Calus, M.P.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background - Most studies on genomic prediction with reference populations that include multiple lines or breeds have used linear models. Data heterogeneity due to using multiple populations may conflict with model assumptions used in linear regression methods. Methods - In an attempt to alleviate

  15. Model for Assembly Line Re-Balancing Considering Additional Capacity and Outsourcing to Face Demand Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadhi, TMAA; Sumihartati, Atin

    2016-02-01

    The most critical stage in a garment industry is sewing process, because generally, it consists of a number of operations and a large number of sewing machines for each operation. Therefore, it requires a balancing method that can assign task to work station with balance workloads. Many studies on assembly line balancing assume a new assembly line, but in reality, due to demand fluctuation and demand increased a re-balancing is needed. To cope with those fluctuating demand changes, additional capacity can be carried out by investing in spare sewing machine and paying for sewing service through outsourcing. This study develops an assembly line balancing (ALB) model on existing line to cope with fluctuating demand change. Capacity redesign is decided if the fluctuation demand exceeds the available capacity through a combination of making investment on new machines and outsourcing while considering for minimizing the cost of idle capacity in the future. The objective of the model is to minimize the total cost of the line assembly that consists of operating costs, machine cost, adding capacity cost, losses cost due to idle capacity and outsourcing costs. The model develop is based on an integer programming model. The model is tested for a set of data of one year demand with the existing number of sewing machines of 41 units. The result shows that additional maximum capacity up to 76 units of machine required when there is an increase of 60% of the average demand, at the equal cost parameters..

  16. Common lines modeling for reference free Ab-initio reconstruction in cryo-EM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Ido; Shkolnisky, Yoel

    2017-11-01

    We consider the problem of estimating an unbiased and reference-free ab initio model for non-symmetric molecules from images generated by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. The proposed algorithm finds the globally optimal assignment of orientations that simultaneously respects all common lines between all images. The contribution of each common line to the estimated orientations is weighted according to a statistical model for common lines' detection errors. The key property of the proposed algorithm is that it finds the global optimum for the orientations given the common lines. In particular, any local optima in the common lines energy landscape do not affect the proposed algorithm. As a result, it is applicable to thousands of images at once, very robust to noise, completely reference free, and not biased towards any initial model. A byproduct of the algorithm is a set of measures that allow to asses the reliability of the obtained ab initio model. We demonstrate the algorithm using class averages from two experimental data sets, resulting in ab initio models with resolutions of 20Å or better, even from class averages consisting of as few as three raw images per class. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Substorm related changes in precipitation in the dayside auroral zone – a multi instrument case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Kavanagh

    Full Text Available A period (08:10–14:40 MLT, 11 February 1997 of enhanced electron density in the D- and E-regions is investigated using EISCAT, IRIS and other complementary instruments. The precipitation is determined to be due to substorm processes occurring close to magnetic midnight. Energetic electrons drift eastward after substorm injection and precipitate in the morning sector. The precipitation is triggered by small pulses in the solar wind pressure, which drive wave particle interactions. The characteristic energy of precipitation is inferred from drift timing on different L-shells and apparently verified by EISCAT measurements. The IMF influence on the precipitation in the auroral zone is also briefly discussed. A large change in the precipitation spectrum is attributed to increased numbers of ions and much reduced electron fluxes. These are detected by a close passing DMSP satellite. The possibility that these ions are from the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL is discussed with reference to structured narrow band Pc1 waves observed by a search coil magnetometer, co-located with IRIS. The intensity of the waves grows with increased distance equatorward of the cusp position (determined by both satellite and HF radar, contrary to expectations if the precipitation is linked to the LLBL. It is suggested that the ion precipitation is, instead, due to the recovery phase of a small geomagnetic storm, following on from very active conditions. The movement of absorption in the later stages of the event is compared with observations of the ionospheric convection velocities. A good agreement is found to exist in this time interval suggesting that E × B drift has become the dominant drift mechanism over the gradient-curvature drift separation of the moving absorption patches observed at the beginning of the morning precipitation event.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms

  18. Substorm related changes in precipitation in the dayside auroral zone – a multi instrument case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Kavanagh

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A period (08:10–14:40 MLT, 11 February 1997 of enhanced electron density in the D- and E-regions is investigated using EISCAT, IRIS and other complementary instruments. The precipitation is determined to be due to substorm processes occurring close to magnetic midnight. Energetic electrons drift eastward after substorm injection and precipitate in the morning sector. The precipitation is triggered by small pulses in the solar wind pressure, which drive wave particle interactions. The characteristic energy of precipitation is inferred from drift timing on different L-shells and apparently verified by EISCAT measurements. The IMF influence on the precipitation in the auroral zone is also briefly discussed. A large change in the precipitation spectrum is attributed to increased numbers of ions and much reduced electron fluxes. These are detected by a close passing DMSP satellite. The possibility that these ions are from the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL is discussed with reference to structured narrow band Pc1 waves observed by a search coil magnetometer, co-located with IRIS. The intensity of the waves grows with increased distance equatorward of the cusp position (determined by both satellite and HF radar, contrary to expectations if the precipitation is linked to the LLBL. It is suggested that the ion precipitation is, instead, due to the recovery phase of a small geomagnetic storm, following on from very active conditions. The movement of absorption in the later stages of the event is compared with observations of the ionospheric convection velocities. A good agreement is found to exist in this time interval suggesting that E × B drift has become the dominant drift mechanism over the gradient-curvature drift separation of the moving absorption patches observed at the beginning of the morning precipitation event.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms

  19. The Origin of the Near-Earth Plasma Population During a Substorm on November 24, 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; El-Alaoui, M.; Peroomian, V.; Walker, R. J.; Raeder, J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the origins and the transport of ions observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet during the growth and expansion phases of a magnetospheric substorm that occurred on November 24, 1996. Ions observed at Geotail were traced backward in time in time-dependent magnetic and electric fields to determine their origins and the acceleration mechanisms responsible for their energization. Results from this investigation indicate that, during the growth phase of the substorm, most of the ions reaching Geotail had origins in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and had already entered the magnetosphere when the growth phase began. Late in the growth phase and in the expansion phase a higher proportion of the ions reaching Geotail had their origin in the plasma mantle. Indeed, during the expansion phase more than 90% of the ions seen by Geotail were from the mantle. The ions were accelerated enroute to the spacecraft; however, most of the ions' energy gain was achieved by non-adiabatic acceleration while crossing the equatorial current sheet just prior to their detection by Geotail. In general, the plasma mantle from both southern and northern hemispheres supplied non-adiabatic ions to Geotail, whereas the LLBL supplied mostly adiabatic ions to the distributions measured by the spacecraft. Distribution functions computed at the ion sources indicate that ionospheric ions reaching Geotail during the expansion phase were significantly heated. Plasma mantle source distributions indicated the presence of a high-latitude reconnection region that allowed ion entry into the magnetosphere when the IMF was northward. These ions reached Geotail during the expansion phase. Ions from the traditional plasma mantle had access to the spacecraft throughout the substorm.

  20. Association between substorm onsets in auroral all-sky images and geomagnetic Pi2pulsations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, T.; Ieda, A.; Teramoto, M.; Kawashima, T.

    2017-12-01

    Substorms are explosive disturbances in the magnetosphere and ionosphere of Earth. Substorm onsets are often identified usingsudden auroral brightenings (auroral breakup) or geomagnetic Pi2 pulsations. These auroral brightenings and Pi2 pulsations aresupposed to occur simultaneously within approximately 1 min of each other. However, as auroral brightenings typically includea two-stage development, this simultaneity is not straightforward. In this study, we clarify the correspondence between Pi2 pulsations and auroral brightenings, including the two-stage development.The first stage of the development is the sudden brightening of an auroral arc near the midnight (initial brightening)and the second stage is the poleward expansion of the auroral arc. We compared all-sky images (3 s resolution) in Canada andgeomagnetic observations (0.5-1 s resolution) in North and Central America, using data from the THEMIS project. In this study,we examined three substorms events that exhibit evidence of the two-stage auroral development. In the first event (4 March 2008), an auroral initial brightening occurred at 0533:57 UT and a poleward expansion was observedat 0538:12 UT (4 min after the initial brightening) in Gillam (magnetic latitude:66.0 °, longitude:333 °, MLT:22.9). In contract,the Pi2 pulsation started at 0539:30 UT, which is closer to the time of the poleward expansion, in Carson City (magnetic latitude:45.0 °, longitude:304 °). and San Juan (magnetic latitude:27.9 °, longitude:6.53 °). Thus, we consider this Pi2 pulsation ascorresponding to the poleward expansion rather than the initial brightening. This correspondence was also seen in the other twoevents, suggesting that it is not exceptional. We interpret that the Pi2 pulsation corresponds to the poleward expansion becauseboth are caused by the magnetic field dipolarization, which is a drastic change that propagates from low- to high-latitude fieldlines.

  1. An empirical line-by-line model for the infrared solar transmittance spectrum from 700 to 5000cm{sup -1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hase, F. [Institut fuer Meteorologie und Klimaforschung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. E-mail: frank.hase@imk.fzk.de; Demoulin, P. [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, allee du VI aout, 17, batiment B5a, B-4000, Liege (Belgium); Sauval, A.J. [Observatoire Royal de Belgique, avenue circulaire, 3, B-1180, Bruxelles (Belgium); Toon, G.C. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bernath, P.F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., Canada N2L3G1 (Canada); Goldman, A. [Department of Physics, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208 (United States); Hannigan, J.W. [Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Rinsland, C.P. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681-2199 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    An empirical line-by-line model for the infrared solar transmittance spectrum is presented. The model can be incorporated into radiative transfer codes to allow fast calculation of all relevant emission and absorption features in the solar spectrum in the mid-infrared region from 700 to 5000cm{sup -1}. The transmittance is modelled as a function of the diameter of the field-of-view centered on the solar disk: the line broadening due to solar rotation as well as center-to-limb variations in strength and width are taken into account for stronger lines. Applications of the model presented here are in the fields of terrestrial remote sensing in the mid-infrared spectral region when the sun is used as radiation source or scattered solar radiation contributes to the measured signal and in the fields of atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms which compute the propagation of infrared solar radiation in the terrestrial atmosphere.

  2. Rocket measurements of electric fields, electron density and temperature during the three phases of auroral substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, G.; Block, L.; Lindqvist, P.-A.

    1979-12-01

    On Jan. 27, 1979, three rocket payloads were launched from Kiruna, Sweden, into different phases of two successive auroral substorms. Among other experiments, the payloads carried the RIT double probe electric field experiments, providing electric field, electron density and temperature data, which are presented here. These are discussed in association with observations of particles, ionospheric drifts (STARE) and electric fields in the equatorial plane (GEOS). The motions of the auroral forms, as obtained from auroral pictures are compared with the E x B/B 2 drifts and the currents calculated from the rocket electric field and density measurements with the equivalent current system deduced from ground based magnetometer data (SMA). (Auth.)

  3. The concept of Magnetically Driven Magnetosphere: storm/substorm dynamics and organization of the magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Nikolai

    A set of novel ideas and approaches have been found in the long-lasting attempts to better understand how the magnetosphere operates. It is proposed a certain vision of the substorm/storm scenario, of the tail structure with moderate magnetic By-component, and with intrinsic turbulence. Particle acceleration and the place of the tail's current sheet(s) in the proposed vision are discussed as well. For the reasoning of the proposal, several key ideas on the purely magnetospheric topics are included in the presentation.

  4. Dynamics of night-side auroral oval associated with substorm activity during magnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tverskaya, L.V.; Tel'tsov, M.V.; Shkol'nikova, S.I.; AN SSSR, Moscow

    1989-01-01

    Data of measurements of precipitated electrons with E=1 keV and longitudinal currents, conducted on INTERCOSMOS-BOLGARIYA-1300 satellite, were used to analyze variations of latitude sizes of the night section of auroral oval during heavy magnetic storm on 1-4.3 1982. Rapid (during ∼ 0.5 h) oval expansion on the night side both to the pole and to the equator at the moment of suddent shift of the west polar electrojet to the equator was revealed. It is shown that the width of the night region of auroral electron precipitation in the process of world magnetic storm development increases during certain substorms

  5. Plasma behavior during energetic electron streaming events: Further evidence for substorm-associated magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieber, J.W.; Stone, E.C.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Baker, D.N.; Bame, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    A recent study showed that streaming energetic (>200 keV) electrons in Earth's magnetotail are statistically associated with southward magnetic fields and with enhancements of the AE index. It is shown here that the streaming electrons characteristically are preceded by aapprox.15 minute period of tailward plasma flow and followed by a dropout of the plasma sheet, thus demonstrating a clear statistical association between substorms and the classical signatures of magnetic reconnection and plasmoid formation. Additionally, a brief upward surge of mean electron energy preceded plasma dropout in several of the events studied, providing direct evidence of localized, reconnection-associated heating processes

  6. Parameters Investigation of Mathematical Model of Productivity for Automated Line with Availability by DMAIC Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Chan Sin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automated line is widely applied in industry especially for mass production with less variety product. Productivity is one of the important criteria in automated line as well as industry which directly present the outputs and profits. Forecast of productivity in industry accurately in order to achieve the customer demand and the forecast result is calculated by using mathematical model. Mathematical model of productivity with availability for automated line has been introduced to express the productivity in terms of single level of reliability for stations and mechanisms. Since this mathematical model of productivity with availability cannot achieve close enough productivity compared to actual one due to lack of parameters consideration, the enhancement of mathematical model is required to consider and add the loss parameters that is not considered in current model. This paper presents the investigation parameters of productivity losses investigated by using DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control concept and PACE Prioritization Matrix (Priority, Action, Consider, and Eliminate. The investigated parameters are important for further improvement of mathematical model of productivity with availability to develop robust mathematical model of productivity in automated line.

  7. Biased resistor network model for electromigration failure and related phenomena in metallic lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennetta, C.; Alfinito, E.; Reggiani, L.; Fantini, F.; Demunari, I.; Scorzoni, A.

    2004-11-01

    Electromigration phenomena in metallic lines are studied by using a biased resistor network model. The void formation induced by the electron wind is simulated by a stochastic process of resistor breaking, while the growth of mechanical stress inside the line is described by an antagonist process of recovery of the broken resistors. The model accounts for the existence of temperature gradients due to current crowding and Joule heating. Alloying effects are also accounted for. Monte Carlo simulations allow the study within a unified theoretical framework of a variety of relevant features related to the electromigration. The predictions of the model are in excellent agreement with the experiments and in particular with the degradation towards electrical breakdown of stressed Al-Cu thin metallic lines. Detailed investigations refer to the damage pattern, the distribution of the times to failure (TTFs), the generalized Black’s law, the time evolution of the resistance, including the early-stage change due to alloying effects and the electromigration saturation appearing at low current densities or for short line lengths. The dependence of the TTFs on the length and width of the metallic line is also well reproduced. Finally, the model successfully describes the resistance noise properties under steady state conditions.

  8. Moving contact lines: linking molecular dynamics and continuum-scale modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward R; Theodorakis, Panagiotis E; Craster, Richard V; Matar, Omar K

    2018-05-04

    Despite decades of research, the modelling of moving contact lines has remained a formidable challenge in fluid dynamics whose resolution will impact numerous industrial, biological, and daily-life applications. On the one hand, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has the ability to provide unique insight into the microscopic details that determine the dynamic behavior of the contact line, which is not possible with either continuum-scale simulations or experiments. On the other hand, continuum-based models provide the link to the macroscopic description of the system. In this Feature Article, we explore the complex range of physical factors, including the presence of surfactants, which govern the contact line motion through MD simulations. We also discuss links between continuum- and molecular-scale modelling, and highlight the opportunities for future developments in this area.

  9. Ultrafast method of calculating the dynamic spectral line shapes for integrated modelling of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsa, V.S.

    2009-01-01

    An ultrafast code for spectral line shape calculations is presented to be used in the integrated modelling of plasmas. The code is based on the close analogy between two mechanisms: (i) Dicke narrowing of the Doppler-broadened spectral lines and (ii) transition from static to impact regime in the Stark broadening. The analogy makes it possible to describe the dynamic Stark broadening in terms of an analytical functional of the static line shape. A comparison of new method with the widely used Frequency Fluctuating Method (FFM) developed by the Marseille University group (B. Talin, R. Stamm, et al.) shows good agreement, with the new method being faster than the standard FFM by nearly two orders of magnitude. The method proposed may significantly simplify the radiation transport modeling and opens new possibilities for integrated modeling of the edge and divertor plasma in tokamaks. (author)

  10. Microscopic simulation model of superconducting transmission lines for standard microwave CAD programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefer, G.J.; Kratz, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    Superconducting lines are very promising candidates for fast signal transmission in integrated circuits, because of their low losses and dispersion, which result in large usable bandwidths. Coplanar waveguides are of special interest, since only one superconducting layer is needed for their implementation. This requirement fits well the present day capabilities of the high temperature superconductor technology. At present, the major drawback of this type of transmission line is the lack of accurate and fast CAD models including the special properties of superconducting electrodes. In the following we will briefly describe the essentials of a model for the case of superconducting lines. For a complete description the reader is referenced to. The model has been proven to be useful in conjunction with commercially available microwave CAD programs. (orig.)

  11. Study on blast furnace cooling stave for various refractory linings based on numerical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, T R; Sahoo, S K; Moharana, M K

    2016-01-01

    Cooling technology for refractory lining of blast furnace is very important for the metallurgical industry, because it can substantially increase output and operation life of furnaces. A three dimensional mathematical model for the temperature field of the blast furnace stave cooler with refractory lining has been developed and analyzed. The temperature and heat dissipated by stave cooler is examined by using the finite element method. The cast steel stave is studied and computational analysis is made to know the effect of the cooling water velocity, temperature, and the lining material on the maximum temperature of the stave hot surface. The refractory lining materials, which are used in this experiment, are high alumina bricks with different stave materials (copper, aluminum and cast iron). The obtained numerical calculations are compared with that obtained from experiments performed at Rourkela Steel Plant, Odisha taking a stave in belly zone having maximum heat load shows very good agreement. (paper)

  12. Transmission line model for coupled rectangular double split‐ring resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Lei; Tang, Meng; Krozer, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a model based on a coupled transmission line formulation is developed for microstrip rectangular double split‐ring resonators (DSRRs). This model allows using the physical dimensions of the DSRRs as an input avoiding commonly used extraction of equivalent parameters. The model inclu...... simulations of the DSRR structures. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microwave Opt Technol Lett 53:1311–1315, 2011; View this article online at wileyonlinelibrary.com. DOI 10.1002/mop.25988...

  13. Assessment of different models for computing the probability of a clear line of sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojin, Sorin; Paulescu, Marius; Badescu, Viorel

    2017-12-01

    This paper is focused on modeling the morphological properties of the cloud fields in terms of the probability of a clear line of sight (PCLOS). PCLOS is defined as the probability that a line of sight between observer and a given point of the celestial vault goes freely without intersecting a cloud. A variety of PCLOS models assuming the cloud shape hemisphere, semi-ellipsoid and ellipsoid are tested. The effective parameters (cloud aspect ratio and absolute cloud fraction) are extracted from high-resolution series of sunshine number measurements. The performance of the PCLOS models is evaluated from the perspective of their ability in retrieving the point cloudiness. The advantages and disadvantages of the tested models are discussed, aiming to a simplified parameterization of PCLOS models.

  14. Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approach for Model-Based Testing of Product Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Weißleder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Systems tend to become more and more complex. This has a direct impact on system engineering processes. Two of the most important phases in these processes are requirements engineering and quality assurance. Two significant complexity drivers located in these phases are the growing number of product variants that have to be integrated into the requirements engineering and the ever growing effort for manual test design. There are modeling techniques to deal with both complexity drivers like, e.g., feature modeling and model-based test design. Their combination, however, has been seldom the focus of investigation. In this paper, we present two approaches to combine feature modeling and model-based testing as an efficient quality assurance technique for product lines. We present the corresponding difficulties and approaches to overcome them. All explanations are supported by an example of an online shop product line.

  15. A MODEL FOR TYPE 2 CORONAL LINE FOREST (CLiF) AGNs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glidden, Ana [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Rose, Marvin; Elvis, Martin; McDowell, Jonathan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-06-10

    We present a model for the classification of Coronal Line Forest Active Galactic Nuclei (CLiF AGNs). CLiF AGNs are of special interest due to their remarkably large number of emission lines, especially forbidden high-ionization lines (FHILs). Rose et al. suggest that their emission is dominated by reflection from the inner wall of the obscuring region rather than direct emission from the accretion disk. This makes CLiF AGNs laboratories to test AGN-torus models. Modeling an AGN as an accreting supermassive black hole surrounded by a cylinder of dust and gas, we show a relationship between the viewing angle and the revealed area of the inner wall. From the revealed area, we can determine the amount of FHIL emission at various angles. We calculate the strength of [Fe vii] λ 6087 emission for a number of intermediate angles (30°, 40°, and 50°) and compare the results with the luminosity of the observed emission line from six known CLiF AGNs. We find that there is good agreement between our model and the observational results. The model also enables us to determine the relationship between the type 2:type 1 AGN fraction vs the ratio of torus height to radius, h / r .

  16. PhenoLines: Phenotype Comparison Visualizations for Disease Subtyping via Topic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glueck, Michael; Naeini, Mahdi Pakdaman; Doshi-Velez, Finale; Chevalier, Fanny; Khan, Azam; Wigdor, Daniel; Brudno, Michael

    2018-01-01

    PhenoLines is a visual analysis tool for the interpretation of disease subtypes, derived from the application of topic models to clinical data. Topic models enable one to mine cross-sectional patient comorbidity data (e.g., electronic health records) and construct disease subtypes-each with its own temporally evolving prevalence and co-occurrence of phenotypes-without requiring aligned longitudinal phenotype data for all patients. However, the dimensionality of topic models makes interpretation challenging, and de facto analyses provide little intuition regarding phenotype relevance or phenotype interrelationships. PhenoLines enables one to compare phenotype prevalence within and across disease subtype topics, thus supporting subtype characterization, a task that involves identifying a proposed subtype's dominant phenotypes, ages of effect, and clinical validity. We contribute a data transformation workflow that employs the Human Phenotype Ontology to hierarchically organize phenotypes and aggregate the evolving probabilities produced by topic models. We introduce a novel measure of phenotype relevance that can be used to simplify the resulting topology. The design of PhenoLines was motivated by formative interviews with machine learning and clinical experts. We describe the collaborative design process, distill high-level tasks, and report on initial evaluations with machine learning experts and a medical domain expert. These results suggest that PhenoLines demonstrates promising approaches to support the characterization and optimization of topic models.

  17. Development of a hydrological model for simulation of runoff from catchments unbounded by ridge lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vema, Vamsikrishna; Sudheer, K. P.; Chaubey, I.

    2017-08-01

    Watershed hydrological models are effective tools for simulating the hydrological processes in the watershed. Although there are a plethora of hydrological models, none of them can be directly applied to make water conservation decisions in irregularly bounded areas that do not confirm to topographically defined ridge lines. This study proposes a novel hydrological model that can be directly applied to any catchment, with or without ridge line boundaries. The model is based on the water balance concept, and a linear function concept to approximate the cross-boundary flow from upstream areas to the administrative catchment under consideration. The developed model is tested in 2 watersheds - Riesel Experimental Watershed and a sub-basin of Cedar Creek Watershed in Texas, USA. Hypothetical administrative catchments that did not confirm to the location of ridge lines were considered for verifying the efficacy of the model for hydrologic simulations. The linear function concept used to account the cross boundary flow was based on the hypothesis that the flow coming from outside the boundary to administrative area was proportional to the flow generated in the boundary grid cell. The model performance was satisfactory with an NSE and r2 of ≥0.80 and a PBIAS of administrative catchments of the watersheds were in good agreement with the observed hydrographs, indicating a satisfactory performance of the model in the administratively bounded areas.

  18. Substorm observations in the early morning sector with Equator-S and Geotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nakamura

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Data from Equator-S and Geotail are used to study the dynamics of the plasma sheet observed during a substorm with multiple intensifications on 25 April 1998, when both spacecraft were located in the early morning sector (03–04 MLT at a radial distance of 10–11 RE. In association with the onset of a poleward expansion of the aurora and the westward electrojet in the premidnight and midnight sector, both satellites in the morning sector observed plasma sheet thinning and changes toward a more tail-like field configuration. During the subsequent poleward expansion in a wider local time sector (20–04 MLT, on the other hand, the magnetic field configuration at both satellites changed into a more dipolar configuration and both satellites encountered again the hot plasma sheet. High-speed plasma flows with velocities of up to 600 km/s and lasting 2–5 min were observed in the plasma sheet and near its boundary during this plasma sheet expansion. These high-speed flows included significant dawn-dusk flows and had a shear structure. They may have been produced by an induced electric field at the local dipolarization region and/or by an enhanced pressure gradient associated with the injection in the midnight plasma sheet.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; plasma sheet; storms and substorms

  19. Distribution in magnetotail of O+ ions from Cusp/Cleft ionosphere: A possible substorm trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cladis, J.B.; Francis, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    The transport of O + ions from the cusp/cleft ionosphere to the magnetotail during highly disturbed times was determined by computing the guiding-center trajectories of the ions to a distance of 6 R E from the ionosphere and the full-motion trajectories at later times. Case histories were tallied in six planes perpendicular to the X GSM axis, three planes perpendicular to the Y GSM axis, and in the center plane of the tail. At various times relatives to the enhancement of the convection electric field, the following ion properties were constructed from the case histories; number density, mean energy, energy and pitch angle distributions of the flux, and ion pressure components parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. It was found that after about 1.7 hours the ion flux in the near-Earth magnetotail increased dramatically and the spectrum hardened, much as observed during periods just preceding substorms. This increase is attributed to (1) the increase in the O + outflux from the ionosphere, (2) the increased energization of the ions by the convection electric field, and (3) ion trapping, which generally occurs because the ion magnetic generally increase after the ions first cross the geomagnetotail center plane. Moreover, the parallel pressure of the ions exceeds the energy density of the magnetic field at X GSM E . On the basis of the expected alterations of the magnetic and electric fields in response to this O + pressure, a substorm trigger mechanism is suggested

  20. The Fluka Linebuilder and Element Database: Tools for Building Complex Models of Accelerators Beam Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, A; Cerutti, F; Versaci, R; Vlachoudis, V

    2012-01-01

    Extended FLUKA models of accelerator beam lines can be extremely complex: heavy to manipulate, poorly versatile and prone to mismatched positioning. We developed a framework capable of creating the FLUKA model of an arbitrary portion of a given accelerator, starting from the optics configuration and a few other information provided by the user. The framework includes a builder (LineBuilder), an element database and a series of configuration and analysis scripts. The LineBuilder is a Python program aimed at dynamically assembling complex FLUKA models of accelerator beam lines: positions, magnetic fields and scorings are automatically set up, and geometry details such as apertures of collimators, tilting and misalignment of elements, beam pipes and tunnel geometries can be entered at user’s will. The element database (FEDB) is a collection of detailed FLUKA geometry models of machine elements. This framework has been widely used for recent LHC and SPS beam-machine interaction studies at CERN, and led to a dra...

  1. Reliability Analysis of an Extended Shock Model and Its Optimization Application in a Production Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renbin Liu

    2014-01-01

    some important reliability indices are derived, such as availability, failure frequency, mean vacation period, mean renewal cycle, mean startup period, and replacement frequency. Finally, a production line controlled by two cold-standby computers is modeled to present numerical illustration and its optimal part-time job policy at a maximum profit.

  2. modelling for optimal number of line storage reservoirs in a water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    RESERVOIRS IN A WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM. By. B.U. Anyata. Department ... water distribution systems, in order to balance the ... distribution line storage systems to meet peak demands at .... Evaluation Method. The criteria ... Pipe + Energy Cost (N). 191, 772 ... Economic Planning Model for Distributed information ...

  3. LBQ2D, Extending the Line Broadened Quasilinear Model to TAE-EP Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghantous, Katy; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Berk, Herbert

    2012-10-01

    The line broadened quasilinear model was proposed and tested on the one dimensional electrostatic case of the bump on tailfootnotetextH.L Berk, B. Breizman and J. Fitzpatrick, Nucl. Fusion, 35:1661, 1995 to study the wave particle interaction. In conventional quasilinear theory, the sea of overlapping modes evolve with time as the particle distribution function self consistently undergo diffusion in phase space. The line broadened quasilinear model is an extension to the conventional theory in a way that allows treatment of isolated modes as well as overlapping modes by broadening the resonant line in phase space. This makes it possible to treat the evolution of modes self consistently from onset to saturation in either case. We describe here the model denoted by LBQ2D which is an extension of the proposed one dimensional line broadened quasilinear model to the case of TAEs interacting with energetic particles in two dimensional phase space, energy as well as canonical angular momentum. We study the saturation of isolated modes in various regimes and present the analytical derivation and numerical results. Finally, we present, using ITER parameters, the case where multiple modes overlap and describe the techniques used for the numerical treatment.

  4. Modeling and Control of a Manufacturing Flow Line using Partial Differential Equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den R.A.; Lefeber, A.A.J.; Rooda, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    This brief deals with a control framework for manufacturing flow lines. For this framework, a continuous approximation model of the manufacturing system is required, which is computationally feasible and able to accurately describe the dynamics of the system (both throughput and flow time). Often

  5. Combined pseudo-spectral / actuator line model for wind turbine applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dag, Kaya Onur

    2017-01-01

    of the developed code is presented and verifications are carried out. In the second part, by using the new LES code, a comprehensive investigation is made for the well-known actuator line model (ALM), which is cost-efficient for investigation of the loading estimations on wind turbine blades. In ALM, the body...

  6. Optimal control of a head-of-line processor sharing model with regular and opportunity customers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van A.C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by a workload control setting, we study a model where two types of customers are served by a single server according to the head-of-line processor sharing discipline. Regular customers and opportunity customers are arriving to the system according to two independent Poisson processes, each

  7. Mathematical modeling of an in-line low-NOx calciner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iliuta, Ion; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Jensen, Lars Skaarup

    2002-01-01

    The reduction of the NOx content in in-line-calciner-type kiln systems can be made by optimization of the primary filing in the rotary kiln and of the secondary firing in the calciner. Because the optimization of calciner offers greater opportunities the mathematical modeling of this reactor...

  8. A Closed-Form Error Model of Straight Lines for Improved Data Association and Sensor Fusing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Sommer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Linear regression is a basic tool in mobile robotics, since it enables accurate estimation of straight lines from range-bearing scans or in digital images, which is a prerequisite for reliable data association and sensor fusing in the context of feature-based SLAM. This paper discusses, extends and compares existing algorithms for line fitting applicable also in the case of strong covariances between the coordinates at each single data point, which must not be neglected if range-bearing sensors are used. Besides, in particular, the determination of the covariance matrix is considered, which is required for stochastic modeling. The main contribution is a new error model of straight lines in closed form for calculating quickly and reliably the covariance matrix dependent on just a few comprehensible and easily-obtainable parameters. The model can be applied widely in any case when a line is fitted from a number of distinct points also without a priori knowledge of the specific measurement noise. By means of extensive simulations, the performance and robustness of the new model in comparison to existing approaches is shown.

  9. A SEMI-ANALYTICAL LINE TRANSFER MODEL TO INTERPRET THE SPECTRA OF GALAXY OUTFLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarlata, C.; Panagia, N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a semi-analytical line transfer model, (SALT), to study the absorption and re-emission line profiles from expanding galactic envelopes. The envelopes are described as a superposition of shells with density and velocity varying with the distance from the center. We adopt the Sobolev approximation to describe the interaction between the photons escaping from each shell and the remainder of the envelope. We include the effect of multiple scatterings within each shell, properly accounting for the atomic structure of the scattering ions. We also account for the effect of a finite circular aperture on actual observations. For equal geometries and density distributions, our models reproduce the main features of the profiles generated with more complicated transfer codes. Also, our SALT line profiles nicely reproduce the typical asymmetric resonant absorption line profiles observed in starforming/starburst galaxies whereas these absorption profiles cannot be reproduced with thin shells moving at a fixed outflow velocity. We show that scattered resonant emission fills in the resonant absorption profiles, with a strength that is different for each transition. Observationally, the effect of resonant filling depends on both the outflow geometry and the size of the outflow relative to the spectroscopic aperture. Neglecting these effects will lead to incorrect values of gas covering fraction and column density. When a fluorescent channel is available, the resonant profiles alone cannot be used to infer the presence of scattered re-emission. Conversely, the presence of emission lines of fluorescent transitions reveals that emission filling cannot be neglected

  10. Establishing an in vivo model of canine prostate carcinoma using the new cell line CT1258

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fork, Melani AM; Bullerdiek, Jörn; Nolte, Ingo; Escobar, Hugo Murua; Soller, Jan T; Sterenczak, Katharina A; Willenbrock, Saskia; Winkler, Susanne; Dorsch, Martina; Reimann-Berg, Nicola; Hedrich, Hans J

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a frequent finding in man. In dogs, malignant disease of the prostate is also of clinical relevance, although it is a less common diagnosis. Even though there are numerous differences in origin and development of the disease, man and dog share many similarities in the pathological presentation. For this reason, the dog might be a useful animal model for prostate malignancies in man. Although prostate cancer is of great importance in veterinary medicine as well as in comparative medicine, there are only few cell lines available. Thus, it was the aim of the present study to determine whether the formerly established prostate carcinoma cell line CT1258 is a suitable tool for in vivo testing, and to distinguish the growth pattern of the induced tumours. For characterisation of the in vivo behaviour of the in vitro established canine prostate carcinoma cell line CT1258, cells were inoculated in 19 NOD.CB17-Prkdc Scid /J (in the following: NOD-Scid) mice, either subcutaneously or intraperitoneally. After sacrifice, the obtained specimens were examined histologically and compared to the pattern of the original tumour in the donor. Cytogenetic investigation was performed. The cell line CT 1258 not only showed to be highly tumourigenic after subcutaneous as well as intraperitoneal inoculation, but also mimicked the behaviour of the original tumour. Tumours induced by inoculation of the cell line CT1258 resemble the situation in naturally occurring prostate carcinoma in the dog, and thus could be used as in vivo model for future studies

  11. Line-Shape Code Comparison through Modeling and Fitting of Experimental Spectra of the C ii 723-nm Line Emitted by the Ablation Cloud of a Carbon Pellet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Koubiti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Various codes of line-shape modeling are compared to each other through the profile of the C ii 723-nm line for typical plasma conditions encountered in the ablation clouds of carbon pellets, injected in magnetic fusion devices. Calculations were performed for a single electron density of 1017 cm−3 and two plasma temperatures (T = 2 and 4 eV. Ion and electron temperatures were assumed to be equal (Te = Ti = T. The magnetic field, B, was set equal to either to zero or 4 T. Comparisons between the line-shape modeling codes and two experimental spectra of the C ii 723-nm line, measured perpendicularly to the B-field in the Large Helical Device (LHD using linear polarizers, are also discussed.

  12. A contact angle hysteresis model based on the fractal structure of contact line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuai; Ma, Ming

    2017-11-01

    Contact angle is one of the most popular concept used in fields such as wetting, transport and microfludics. In practice, different contact angles such as equilibrium, receding and advancing contact angles are observed due to hysteresis. The connection among these contact angles is important in revealing the chemical and physical properties of surfaces related to wetting. Inspired by the fractal structure of contact line, we propose a single parameter model depicting the connection of the three angles. This parameter is decided by the fractal structure of the contact line. The results of this model agree with experimental observations. In certain cases, it can be reduced to other existing models. It also provides a new point of view in understanding the physical nature of the contact angle hysteresis. Interestingly, some counter-intuitive phenomena, such as the binary receding angles, are indicated in this model, which are waited to be validated by experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. NEW UPPER AND LOWER BOUNDS LINE OF SIGHT PATH LOSS MODELS FOR MOBILE PROPAGATION IN BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supachai Phaiboon

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method to predict line-of-sight (LOS path loss in buildings. We performed measurements in two different type of buildings at a frequency of 1.8 GHz and propose new upper and lower bounds path loss models which depend on max and min values of sample path loss data. This makes our models limit path loss within the boundary lines. The models include time-variant effects such as people moving and cars in parking areas with their influence on wave propagation that is very high.  The results have shown that the proposed models will be useful for the system and cell design of indoor wireless communication systems.

  14. Leadership line care rounds: Application of the engage, educate, execute, and evaluate improvement model for the prevention of central line-associated bloodstream infections in children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owings, Angie; Graves, JoBeth; Johnson, Sherry; Gilliam, Craig; Gipson, Mike; Hakim, Hana

    2018-02-01

    To prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), leadership line care rounds (LLCRs) used the engage, educate, execute, and evaluate improvement model to audit compliance, identify barriers and opportunities, empower patients and families, and engage leadership. Findings of excellence and improvement opportunities were communicated to unit staff and managers. LLCRs contributed to compliance with CLABSI prevention interventions. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sustainable Entrepreneurship (SE): A Revised Model Based on Triple Bottom Line (TBL)

    OpenAIRE

    Izaidin Abdul Majid; Wei-Loon Koe

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the years, researchers have suggested several fields of entrepreneurship studies, such as regular entrepreneurship, green entrepreneurship, social entrepreneurship and sustainable entrepreneurship. This literature review focused on sustainable entrepreneurship, in which a definition was proposed. Then, based upon the concept of triple bottom line, a revised model of sustainable entrepreneurship was suggested at the end of paper. The model consisted of four domains, namely economica...

  16. Joint two-dimensional observations of ground magnetic and ionospheric electric fields associated with auroral zone currents 1. Three-dimensional current flows associated with a substorm-intensified eastward electrojet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumjohann, W.; Untiedt, J.; Greenwald, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Two-dimensional distributions of ground magnetic and ionospheric electric fields in the evening sector auroral oval have been simultaneously observed by the Scandinavian Magnetometer Array and the Scandinavian Twin Auroral Radar Experiment (Stare) radars, respectively, on February 15, 1977. They were associated with varying, substorm-intensified, eastward electrojet current systems of the western, middle, and eastern segment of the eastward electrojet. We conclude that the substorm-intensified eastward electroject was a nearly pure Hall current driven by northward electric fields. The observed eastward increase of the current in the western segment of the electrojet was due to a gradual enhancement of the Hall conductivity. Here, the electrojet was fed by a broad sheet of net downward field-aligned current. During one period, the eastern-terminating part of the eastward electrojet diverged up the field lines in a rather local area because of a strong longitudinal decrease in the northward-directed electric field. On another occasion, it diverged northward within the ionosphere and joined the westward-flowing current because of a rotation of the northward electric field with increasing latitude through west- to southward. These two observed mechanisms of current divergence in the region where eastward and westward electrojects coexist may shed some new light on the controversy over the existence of upward field-aligned current flow in the Harang discontinuity

  17. Multi-point observations of large-amplitude electric fields during substorms obtained by THEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Hori, T.; Takada, T.; Miyashita, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bonnell, J. W.; McFadden, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Large-amplitude electric fields over 100 mV/m have been observed around the equatorial magnetosphere. These electric fields may contribute to energy transport and particle acceleration in the magnetosphere [e.g., Wygant et al., 2000, 2002], and seem to be related to fast plasma flows with a size of a few Re [Nakamura et al., 2001]. In order to understand their macroscopic characteristics and the effects to magnetic activities, it is important to observe both fields and particles simultaneously at multiple locations within several Re. Five THEMIS probes can frequently provide such chances. In this paper, we show the several events with large-amplitude electric fields during substorms obtained by THEMIS. One of the events is found in 05:50-06:00 UT on 11 March 2008, when TH-D (Xsm=-10.7 Re, Ysm=4.8 Re) and TH-E (Xsm=-10.3 Re, Ysm=5.6 Re) observed intense electric fields. At 05:54 UT, THEMIS GBO-s clearly showed the auroral onset signature. The great intensification was near the SNKQ station, and this structure moved westward with the speed of ~6 km/s. It corresponds to ~200 km/s, as mapped to the TH-D/E location. The footprints of TH-A (Xsm=-6.8 Re, Ysm=-0.4 Re), D, and E were close to the site of the aurora. The location of TH-D was beside that of TH-E, and TH-A was located earthward and eastward from the former two. The enhanced electric fields observed by TH-D and E were associated with magnetic dipolarization and earthward high-speed plasma flow. They were also associated with the depletion of electron density estimated by the spacecraft potential. These features are consistent with the model of plasma bubbles [e.g., Pontius and Wolf, 1990]. The Y components of plasma flows were 200-300 km/s, roughly consistent with the westward auroral motion as mapped to the equatorial magnetosphere. Also, we found that Poynting flux of low frequency was efficient to illuminate the auroral emissions. This fact suggests that electromagnetic energy is transported to the

  18. New chondrosarcoma cell lines and mouse models to study the link between chondrogenesis and chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monderer, David; Luseau, Alexandrine; Bellec, Amélie; David, Emmanuelle; Ponsolle, Stéphanie; Saiagh, Soraya; Bercegeay, Sylvain; Piloquet, Philippe; Denis, Marc G; Lodé, Laurence; Rédini, Françoise; Biger, Marine; Heymann, Dominique; Heymann, Marie-Françoise; Le Bot, Ronan; Gouin, François; Blanchard, Frédéric

    2013-10-01

    Chondrosarcomas are cartilage-forming, poorly vascularized tumors. They represent the second malignant primary bone tumor of adults after osteosarcoma, but in contrast to osteosarcoma they are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, surgical excision remaining the only therapeutic option. Few cell lines and animal models are available, and the mechanisms behind their chemoresistance remain largely unknown. Our goal was to establish new cell lines and animal cancer models from human chondrosarcoma biopsies to study their chemoresistance. Between 2007 and 2012, 10 chondrosarcoma biopsies were collected and used for cell culture and transplantation into nude mice. Only one transplanted biopsy and one injected cell line has engrafted successfully leading to conventional central high-grade chondrosarcoma similar to the original biopsies. In culture, two new stable cell lines were obtained, one from a dedifferentiated and one from a grade III conventional central chondrosarcoma biopsy. Their genetic characterization revealed triploid karyotypes, mutations in IDH1, IDH2, and TP53, deletion in CDKN2A and/or MDM2 amplification. These cell lines expressed mesenchymal membrane markers (CD44, 73, 90, 105) and were able to produce a hyaline cartilaginous matrix when cultured in chondrogenic three-dimensional (3D) pellets. Using a high-throughput quantitative RT-PCR approach, we observed that cell lines cultured in monolayer had lost expression of several genes implicated in cartilage development (COL2A1, COMP, ACAN) but restored their expression in 3D cultures. Chondrosarcoma cells in monolayer were sensitive to several conventional chemotherapeutic agents but became resistant to low doses of mafosfamide or doxorubicin when cultured in 3D pellets, in parallel with an altered nucleic accumulation of the drug. Our results indicate that the cartilaginous matrix produced by chondrosarcoma cells may impair diffusion of several drugs and thus contribute to chemoresistance

  19. THP-1 cell line: an in vitro cell model for immune modulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanput, Wasaporn; Mes, Jurriaan J; Wichers, Harry J

    2014-11-01

    THP-1 is a human leukemia monocytic cell line, which has been extensively used to study monocyte/macrophage functions, mechanisms, signaling pathways, and nutrient and drug transport. This cell line has become a common model to estimate modulation of monocyte and macrophage activities. This review attempts to summarize and discuss recent publications related to the THP-1 cell model. An overview on the biological similarities and dissimilarities between the THP-1 cell line and human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) derived-monocytes and macrophages, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the use of THP-1 cell line, is included. The review summarizes different published co-cultivation studies of THP-1 cells with other cell types, for instance, intestinal cells, adipocytes, T-lymphocytes, platelets, and vascular smooth muscle cells, which can be an option to study cell-cell interaction in vitro and can be an approach to better mimic in vivo conditions. Macrophage polarization is a relatively new topic which gains interest for which the THP-1 cell line also may be relevant. Besides that an overview of newly released commercial THP-1 engineered-reporter cells and THP-1 inflammasome test-cells is also given. Evaluation of recent papers leads to the conclusion that the THP-1 cell line has unique characteristics as a model to investigate/estimate immune-modulating effects of compounds in both activated and resting conditions of the cells. Although the THP-1 response can hint to potential responses that might occur ex vivo or in vivo, these should be, however, validated by in vivo studies to draw more definite conclusions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. A simple model for predicting solute concentration in agricultural tile lines shortly after application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Steenhuis

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural tile drainage lines have been implicated as a source of pesticide contamination of surface waters. Field experiments were conducted and a simple model was developed to examine preferential transport of applied chemicals to agricultural tile lines. The conceptual model consists of two linear reservoirs, one near the soil surface and one near the tile drain. The connection between the two reservoirs is via preferential flow paths with very little interaction with the soil matrix. The model assumes that only part of the field contributes solutes to the tile drain. The model was evaluated with data from the field experiments in which chloride, 2,4-D, and atrazine concentrations were measured on eight tile-drained plots that were irrigated twice. Atrazine was applied two months prior to the experiment, 2,4-D was sprayed just before the first irrigation, and chloride before the second irrigation. All three chemicals were found in the tile effluent shortly after the rainfall began. Generally, the concentration increased with increased flow rates and decreased exponentially after the rainfall ceased. Although the simple model could simulate the observed chloride concentration patterns in the tile outflow for six of the eight plots, strict validation was not possible because of the difficulty with independent measurement of the data needed for a preferential flow model applied to field conditions. The results show that, to simulate pesticide concentration in tile lines, methods that can measure field averaged preferential flow characteristics need to be developed.

  1. Application of Computer Systems of Dynamic Modeling for Evaluation of Protection Behavior of Electric Power Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Romaniouk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems pertaining to mathematical modeling of a transformer substation with protected electric power lines. It is proposed to use systems of dynamic modeling for investigations applying a method of calculative experiment with the purpose to evaluate behavior of protection and automation at short circuits. The paper contains comparison of results obtained with the help of program-simulated complex on the basis of a complex mathematical model of an object and with the help of dynamic modeling system – MathLab.

  2. Equivalent circuit modeling of space charge dominated magnetically insulated transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraoka, Kazuki; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    1997-12-31

    A new equivalent circuit model for space charge dominated MITLs (Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines) was developed. MITLs under high power operation are dominated with space charge current flowing between anode and cathode. Conventional equivalent circuit model does not account for space charge effects on power flow. The model was modified to discuss the power transportation through the high power MITLs. With this model, it is possible to estimate the effects of space charge current on the power flow efficiency, without using complicated particle code simulations. (author). 3 figs., 3 refs.

  3. Testing Disk-Wind Models with Quasar CIV 1549Å Associated Absorption Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Narrow associated C IV 1549Å absorption lines (NALs) with a rest equivalent width EW =3 Å detected in z ˜ 2 radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, (a) exhibit evidence of an origin in radiatively accelerated gas, and (b) may be closely related to broad absorption line (BAL) outflows. These NALs...... and the few BALs detected in this quasar sample obey key predictions of models of radiatively driven disk-winds in which (1) the local disk luminosity launches the wind, (2) the central UV radiation drives it outwards, and (3) the wind acceleration (i.e., terminal velocity) depends on the strength of the X...

  4. Transmission-line-circuit model of an 85-TW, 25-MA pulsed-power accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutsel, B. T.; Corcoran, P. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Gomez, M. R.; Hess, M. H.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Jennings, C. A.; Laity, G. R.; Lamppa, D. C.; McBride, R. D.; Moore, J. K.; Myers, A.; Rose, D. V.; Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Waisman, E. M.; Welch, D. R.; Whitney, B. A.

    2018-03-01

    We have developed a physics-based transmission-line-circuit model of the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The 33-m-diameter Z machine generates a peak electrical power as high as 85 TW, and delivers as much as 25 MA to a physics load. The circuit model is used to design and analyze experiments conducted on Z. The model consists of 36 networks of transmission-line-circuit elements and resistors that represent each of Zs 36 modules. The model of each module includes a Marx generator, intermediate-energy-storage capacitor, laser-triggered gas switch, pulse-forming line, self-break water switches, and tri-plate transmission lines. The circuit model also includes elements that represent Zs water convolute, vacuum insulator stack, four parallel outer magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines (MITLs), double-post-hole vacuum convolute, inner vacuum MITL, and physics load. Within the vacuum-transmission-line system the model conducts analytic calculations of current loss. To calculate the loss, the model simulates the following processes: (i) electron emission from MITL cathode surfaces wherever an electric-field threshold has been exceeded; (ii) electron loss in the MITLs before magnetic insulation has been established; (iii) flow of electrons emitted by the outer-MITL cathodes after insulation has been established; (iv) closure of MITL anode-cathode (AK) gaps due to expansion of cathode plasma; (v) energy loss to MITL conductors operated at high lineal current densities; (vi) heating of MITL-anode surfaces due to conduction current and deposition of electron kinetic energy; (vii) negative-space-charge-enhanced ion emission from MITL anode surfaces wherever an anode-surface-temperature threshold has been exceeded; and (viii) closure of MITL AK gaps due to expansion of anode plasma. The circuit model is expected to be most accurate when the fractional current loss is small. We have performed circuit simulations of 52 Z experiments conducted with a variety of accelerator

  5. Transmission-line-circuit model of an 85-TW, 25-MA pulsed-power accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Hutsel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a physics-based transmission-line-circuit model of the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The 33-m-diameter Z machine generates a peak electrical power as high as 85 TW, and delivers as much as 25 MA to a physics load. The circuit model is used to design and analyze experiments conducted on Z. The model consists of 36 networks of transmission-line-circuit elements and resistors that represent each of Zs 36 modules. The model of each module includes a Marx generator, intermediate-energy-storage capacitor, laser-triggered gas switch, pulse-forming line, self-break water switches, and tri-plate transmission lines. The circuit model also includes elements that represent Zs water convolute, vacuum insulator stack, four parallel outer magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines (MITLs, double-post-hole vacuum convolute, inner vacuum MITL, and physics load. Within the vacuum-transmission-line system the model conducts analytic calculations of current loss. To calculate the loss, the model simulates the following processes: (i electron emission from MITL cathode surfaces wherever an electric-field threshold has been exceeded; (ii electron loss in the MITLs before magnetic insulation has been established; (iii flow of electrons emitted by the outer-MITL cathodes after insulation has been established; (iv closure of MITL anode-cathode (AK gaps due to expansion of cathode plasma; (v energy loss to MITL conductors operated at high lineal current densities; (vi heating of MITL-anode surfaces due to conduction current and deposition of electron kinetic energy; (vii negative-space-charge-enhanced ion emission from MITL anode surfaces wherever an anode-surface-temperature threshold has been exceeded; and (viii closure of MITL AK gaps due to expansion of anode plasma. The circuit model is expected to be most accurate when the fractional current loss is small. We have performed circuit simulations of 52 Z experiments conducted with a

  6. Acceleration and Precipitation of Electrons during Substorm Dipolarization Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Richard, Robert; Donovan, Eric; Zhou, Meng; Goldstein, Mevlyn; El-Alaoui, Mostafa; Schriver, David; Walker, Raymond

    Observations and modeling have established that during geomagnetically disturbed times the Earth’s magnetotail goes through large scale changes that result in enhanced electron precipitation into the ionosphere and earthward propagating dipolarization fronts that contain highly energized plasma. Such events originate near reconnection regions in the magnetotail at about 20-30 R_E down tail. As the dipolarization fronts propagate earthward, strong acceleration of both ions and electrons occurs due to a combination of non-adiabatic and adiabatic (betatron and Fermi) acceleration, with particle energies reaching up to 100 keV within the dipolarization front. One consequence of the plasma transport that occurs during these events is direct electron precipitation into the ionosphere, which form auroral precipitation. Using global kinetic simulations along with spacecraft and ground-based data, causes of electron precipitation are determined during well-documented, disturbed events. It is found that precipitation of keV electrons in the pre-midnight sector at latitudes around 70(°) occur due to two distinct physical processes: (1) higher latitude (≥72(°) ) precipitation due to electrons that undergo relatively rapid non-adiabatic pitch angle scattering into the loss cone just earthward of the reconnection region at around 20 R_E downtail, and (2) lower latitude (≤72(°) ) precipitation due to electrons that are more gradually accelerated primarily parallel to the geomagnetic field during its bounce motion by Fermi acceleration and enter the loss cone much closer to the Earth at 10-15 R_E, somewhat tailward of the dipolarization front. As the dipolarization fronts propagate earthward, the electron precipitation shifts to lower latitudes and occurs over a wider region in the auroral ionosphere. Our results show a direct connection between electron acceleration in the magnetotail and electron precipitation in the ionosphere during disturbed times. The electron

  7. A multisatellite case study of the expansion of a substorm current wedge in the near-Earth magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.E.; Lui, A.T.Y.

    1990-01-01

    This study presents observations made by four spacecraft (AMPTE CCE, AMPTE IRM, GOES 5, and GOES 6) and two ground stations (San Juan and Tucson) during a substorm that occurred at ∼0830 UT on April 19, 1985. The spacecraft were arrayed in a configuration that allows for the examination of the spatial evolution of the substorm current wedge, CCE was located between the GOES spacecraft in longitude, but at a radial distance of 8.0 R E . IRM was located west of the other three spacecraft in the same sector as Tucson, but at a radial distance of 11.6 R E . The relative times at which the signature of the substorm current wedge was first observed at the GOES spacecraft and the ground stations are consistent with a simple longitudinally expanding current wedge. However, the times at which IRM and CCE observed the current wedge are not consistent with a current wedge that expanded only longitudinally, IRM first observed the signature of the current wedge at about the same time the signature was observed by GOES 6 and Tucson, and CCE observed the current wedge only after both GOES satellites and the ground stations had done so. Moreover, both GOES spacecraft observed signatures consistent with entry into the central plasma sheet before CCE and IRM did, even though we estimate that CCE was slightly closer to the neutral sheet than the geosynchronous spacecraft. The sequence of events suggests that during this substorm the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet, the formation of the substorm current wedge, and the expansion of the plasma sheet began in the near-Earth region, and subsequently spread tailward as well as longitudinally

  8. An Analysis of Conjugate Ground-based and Space-based Measurements of Energetic Electrons during Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivadas, N.; Semeter, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Substorms within the Earth's magnetosphere release energy in the form of energetic charged particles and several kinds of waves within the plasma. Depending on their strength, satellite-based navigation and communication systems are adversely affected by the energetic charged particles. Like many other natural phenomena, substorms can have a severe economic impact on a technology-driven society such as ours. Though energization of charged particles is known to occur in the magnetosphere during substorms, the source of this population and its relation to traditional acceleration region dynamics, are not completely understood. Combining measurements of energetic charged particles within the plasmasheet and that of charged particles precipitated in to the ionosphere will provide a better understanding of the role of processes that accelerate these charged particles. In the current work, we present energetic electron flux measured indirectly using data from ground-based Incoherent Scatter Radar and that measured directly at the plasmasheet by the THEMIS spacecraft. Instances of low-altitude-precipitation observed from ground suggest electrons of energy greater than 300 keV, possibly arising from particle injection events during substorms at the magnetically conjugate locations in the plasmasheet. The differences and similarities in the measurements at the plasmasheet and the ionosphere indicate the role different processes play in influencing the journey of these energetic particles form the magnetosphere to the ionosphere. Our observations suggest that there is a lot more to be understood of the link between magnetotail dynamics and energetic electron precipitation during substorms. Understanding this may open up novel and potentially invaluable ways of diagnosing the magnetosphere from the ground.

  9. DISCRETIZATION APPROACH USING RAY-TESTING MODEL IN PARTING LINE AND PARTING SURFACE GENERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jianwen; JIAN Bin; YAN Guangrong; LEI Yi

    2007-01-01

    Surface classification, 3D parting line, parting surface generation and demoldability analysis which is helpful to select optimal parting direction and optimal parting line are involved in automatic cavity design based on the ray-testing model. A new ray-testing approach is presented to classify the part surfaces to core/cavity surfaces and undercut surfaces by automatic identifying the visibility of surfaces. A simple, direct and efficient algorithm to identify surface visibility is developed. The algorithm is robust and adapted to rather complicated geometry, so it is valuable in computer-aided mold design systems. To validate the efficiency of the approach, an experimental program is implemented. Case studies show that the approach is practical and valuable in automatic parting line and parting surface generation.

  10. Improved Frequency Fluctuation Model for Spectral Line Shape Calculations in Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferri, S.; Calisti, A.; Mosse, C.; Talin, B.; Lisitsa, V.

    2010-01-01

    A very fast method to calculate spectral line shapes emitted by plasmas accounting for charge particle dynamics and effects of an external magnetic field is proposed. This method relies on a new formulation of the Frequency Fluctuation Model (FFM), which yields to an expression of the dynamic line profile as a functional of the static distribution function of frequencies. This highly efficient formalism, not limited to hydrogen-like systems, allows to calculate pure Stark and Stark-Zeeman line shapes for a wide range of density, temperature and magnetic field values, which is of importance in plasma physics and astrophysics. Various applications of this method are presented for conditions related to fusion plasmas.

  11. Benchmark models, planes lines and points for future SUSY searches at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AbdusSalam, S.S.; Allanach, B.C.; Dreiner, H.K.

    2012-03-01

    We define benchmark models for SUSY searches at the LHC, including the CMSSM, NUHM, mGMSB, mAMSB, MM-AMSB and p19MSSM, as well as models with R-parity violation and the NMSSM. Within the parameter spaces of these models, we propose benchmark subspaces, including planes, lines and points along them. The planes may be useful for presenting results of the experimental searches in different SUSY scenarios, while the specific benchmark points may serve for more detailed detector performance tests and comparisons. We also describe algorithms for defining suitable benchmark points along the proposed lines in the parameter spaces, and we define a few benchmark points motivated by recent fits to existing experimental data.

  12. On the Use of Variability Operations in the V-Modell XT Software Process Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhrmann, Marco; Méndez Fernández, Daniel; Ternité, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    . In this article, we present a study on the feasibility of variability operations to support the development of software process lines in the context of the V-Modell XT. We analyze which variability operations are defined and practically used. We provide an initial catalog of variability operations...... as an improvement proposal for other process models. Our findings show that 69 variability operation types are defined across several metamodel versions of which, however, 25 remain unused. The found variability operations allow for systematically modifying the content of process model elements and the process......Software process lines provide a systematic approach to develop and manage software processes. It defines a reference process containing general process assets, whereas a well-defined customization approach allows process engineers to create new process variants, e.g., by extending or modifying...

  13. Benchmark models, planes lines and points for future SUSY searches at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AbdusSalam, S.S. [The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Allanach, B.C. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics; Dreiner, H.K. [Bonn Univ. (DE). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Inst.] (and others)

    2012-03-15

    We define benchmark models for SUSY searches at the LHC, including the CMSSM, NUHM, mGMSB, mAMSB, MM-AMSB and p19MSSM, as well as models with R-parity violation and the NMSSM. Within the parameter spaces of these models, we propose benchmark subspaces, including planes, lines and points along them. The planes may be useful for presenting results of the experimental searches in different SUSY scenarios, while the specific benchmark points may serve for more detailed detector performance tests and comparisons. We also describe algorithms for defining suitable benchmark points along the proposed lines in the parameter spaces, and we define a few benchmark points motivated by recent fits to existing experimental data.

  14. Modelling of sedimentation and remobilization in in-line storage sewers for stormwater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frehmann, T; Flores, C; Luekewille, F; Mietzel, T; Spengler, B; Geiger, W F

    2005-01-01

    A special arrangement of combined sewer overflow tanks is the in-line storage sewer with downstream discharge (ISS-down). This layout has the advantage that, besides the sewer system, no other structures are required for stormwater treatment. The verification of the efficiency with respect to the processes of sedimentation and remobilization of sediment within the in-line storage sewer with downstream discharge is carried out in a combination of a field and a pilot plant study. The model study was carried out using a pilot plant model scaled 1:13. The following is intended to present some results of the pilot plant study and the mathematical empirical modelling of the sedimentation and remobilization process.

  15. Benchmark Models, Planes, Lines and Points for Future SUSY Searches at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AbdusSalam, S S; Dreiner, H K; Ellis, J; Ellwanger, U; Gunion, J; Heinemeyer, S; Krämer, M; Mangano, M L; Olive, K A; Rogerson, S; Roszkowski, L; Schlaffer, M; Weiglein, G

    2011-01-01

    We define benchmark models for SUSY searches at the LHC, including the CMSSM, NUHM, mGMSB, mAMSB, MM-AMSB and p19MSSM, as well as models with R-parity violation and the NMSSM. Within the parameter spaces of these models, we propose benchmark subspaces, including planes, lines and points along them. The planes may be useful for presenting results of the experimental searches in different SUSY scenarios, while the specific benchmark points may serve for more detailed detector performance tests and comparisons. We also describe algorithms for defining suitable benchmark points along the proposed lines in the parameter spaces, and we define a few benchmark points motivated by recent fits to existing experimental data.

  16. Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

    2009-11-30

    Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

  17. A finite-element model for moving contact line problems in immiscible two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucala, Alec

    2017-11-01

    Accurate modeling of moving contact line (MCL) problems is imperative in predicting capillary pressure vs. saturation curves, permeability, and preferential flow paths for a variety of applications, including geological carbon storage (GCS) and enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The macroscale movement of the contact line is dependent on the molecular interactions occurring at the three-phase interface, however most MCL problems require resolution at the meso- and macro-scale. A phenomenological model must be developed to account for the microscale interactions, as resolving both the macro- and micro-scale would render most problems computationally intractable. Here, a model for the moving contact line is presented as a weak forcing term in the Navier-Stokes equation and applied directly at the location of the three-phase interface point. The moving interface is tracked with the level set method and discretized using the conformal decomposition finite element method (CDFEM), allowing for the surface tension and the wetting model to be computed at the exact interface location. A variety of verification test cases for simple two- and three-dimensional geometries are presented to validate the current MCL model, which can exhibit grid independence when a proper scaling for the slip length is chosen. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA-0003525.

  18. A model-based approach to on-line process disturbance management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.S.

    1988-01-01

    The methodology developed can be applied to the design of a real-time expert system to aid control-room operators in coping with process abnormalities. The approach encompasses diverse functional aspects required for an effective on-line process disturbance management: (1) intelligent process monitoring and alarming, (2) on-line sensor data validation, (3) on-line sensor and hardware (except sensors) fault diagnosis, and (4) real-time corrective measure synthesis. Accomplishment of these functions is made possible through the application of various models, goal-tree success-tree, process monitor-tree, sensor failure diagnosis, and hardware failure diagnosis models. The models used in the methodology facilitate not only the knowledge-acquisition process - a bottleneck in the development of an expert system - but also the reasoning process of the knowledge-based system. These transparent models and model-based reasoning significantly enhance the maintainability of the real-time expert systems. The proposed approach was applied to the feedwater control system of a nuclear power plant, and implemented into a real-time expert system, MOAS II, using the expert system shell, PICON, on the LMI machine

  19. Modeling of Throughput in Production Lines Using Response Surface Methodology and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Nuñez-Piña

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of assigning buffers in a production line to obtain an optimum production rate is a combinatorial problem of type NP-Hard and it is known as Buffer Allocation Problem. It is of great importance for designers of production systems due to the costs involved in terms of space requirements. In this work, the relationship among the number of buffer slots, the number of work stations, and the production rate is studied. Response surface methodology and artificial neural network were used to develop predictive models to find optimal throughput values. 360 production rate values for different number of buffer slots and workstations were used to obtain a fourth-order mathematical model and four hidden layers’ artificial neural network. Both models have a good performance in predicting the throughput, although the artificial neural network model shows a better fit (R=1.0000 against the response surface methodology (R=0.9996. Moreover, the artificial neural network produces better predictions for data not utilized in the models construction. Finally, this study can be used as a guide to forecast the maximum or near maximum throughput of production lines taking into account the buffer size and the number of machines in the line.

  20. Molecular analysis of urothelial cancer cell lines for modeling tumor biology and drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, M L; Witte, N; Im, K M; Turan, S; Owens, C; Misner, K; Tsang, S X; Cai, Z; Wu, S; Dean, M; Costello, J C; Theodorescu, D

    2017-01-05

    The utility of tumor-derived cell lines is dependent on their ability to recapitulate underlying genomic aberrations and primary tumor biology. Here, we sequenced the exomes of 25 bladder cancer (BCa) cell lines and compared mutations, copy number alterations (CNAs), gene expression and drug response to BCa patient profiles in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We observed a mutation pattern associated with altered CpGs and APOBEC-family cytosine deaminases similar to mutation signatures derived from somatic alterations in muscle-invasive (MI) primary tumors, highlighting a major mechanism(s) contributing to cancer-associated alterations in the BCa cell line exomes. Non-silent sequence alterations were confirmed in 76 cancer-associated genes, including mutations that likely activate oncogenes TERT and PIK3CA, and alter chromatin-associated proteins (MLL3, ARID1A, CHD6 and KDM6A) and established BCa genes (TP53, RB1, CDKN2A and TSC1). We identified alterations in signaling pathways and proteins with related functions, including the PI3K/mTOR pathway, altered in 60% of lines; BRCA DNA repair, 44%; and SYNE1-SYNE2, 60%. Homozygous deletions of chromosome 9p21 are known to target the cell cycle regulators CDKN2A and CDKN2B. This loci was commonly lost in BCa cell lines and we show the deletions extended to the polyamine enzyme methylthioadenosine (MTA) phosphorylase (MTAP) in 36% of lines, transcription factor DMRTA1 (27%) and antiviral interferon epsilon (IFNE, 19%). Overall, the BCa cell line genomic aberrations were concordant with those found in BCa patient tumors. We used gene expression and copy number data to infer pathway activities for cell lines, then used the inferred pathway activities to build a predictive model of cisplatin response. When applied to platinum-treated patients gathered from TCGA, the model predicted treatment-specific response. Together, these data and analysis represent a valuable community resource to model basic tumor biology and to study

  1. A Hierarchical Bayesian Model to Predict Self-Thinning Line for Chinese Fir in Southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongqing Zhang

    Full Text Available Self-thinning is a dynamic equilibrium between forest growth and mortality at full site occupancy. Parameters of the self-thinning lines are often confounded by differences across various stand and site conditions. For overcoming the problem of hierarchical and repeated measures, we used hierarchical Bayesian method to estimate the self-thinning line. The results showed that the self-thinning line for Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.Hook. plantations was not sensitive to the initial planting density. The uncertainty of model predictions was mostly due to within-subject variability. The simulation precision of hierarchical Bayesian method was better than that of stochastic frontier function (SFF. Hierarchical Bayesian method provided a reasonable explanation of the impact of other variables (site quality, soil type, aspect, etc. on self-thinning line, which gave us the posterior distribution of parameters of self-thinning line. The research of self-thinning relationship could be benefit from the use of hierarchical Bayesian method.

  2. Countercurrent Air-Water Flow in a Scale-Down Model of a Pressurizer Surge Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Futatsugi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Steam generated in a reactor core and water condensed in a pressurizer form a countercurrent flow in a surge line between a hot leg and the pressurizer during reflux cooling. Characteristics of countercurrent flow limitation (CCFL in a 1/10-scale model of the surge line were measured using air and water at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The experimental results show that CCFL takes place at three different locations, that is, at the upper junction, in the surge line, and at the lower junction, and its characteristics are governed by the most dominating flow limitation among the three. Effects of inclination angle and elbows of the surge line on CCFL characteristics were also investigated experimentally. The effects of inclination angle on CCFL depend on the flow direction, that is, the effect is large for the nearly horizontal flow and small for the vertical flow at the upper junction. The presence of elbows increases the flow limitation in the surge line, whereas the flow limitations at the upper and lower junctions do not depend on the presence of elbows.

  3. The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia enables predictive modelling of anticancer drug sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barretina, Jordi; Caponigro, Giordano; Stransky, Nicolas; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Margolin, Adam A; Kim, Sungjoon; Wilson, Christopher J; Lehár, Joseph; Kryukov, Gregory V; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Reddy, Anupama; Liu, Manway; Murray, Lauren; Berger, Michael F; Monahan, John E; Morais, Paula; Meltzer, Jodi; Korejwa, Adam; Jané-Valbuena, Judit; Mapa, Felipa A; Thibault, Joseph; Bric-Furlong, Eva; Raman, Pichai; Shipway, Aaron; Engels, Ingo H; Cheng, Jill; Yu, Guoying K; Yu, Jianjun; Aspesi, Peter; de Silva, Melanie; Jagtap, Kalpana; Jones, Michael D; Wang, Li; Hatton, Charles; Palescandolo, Emanuele; Gupta, Supriya; Mahan, Scott; Sougnez, Carrie; Onofrio, Robert C; Liefeld, Ted; MacConaill, Laura; Winckler, Wendy; Reich, Michael; Li, Nanxin; Mesirov, Jill P; Gabriel, Stacey B; Getz, Gad; Ardlie, Kristin; Chan, Vivien; Myer, Vic E; Weber, Barbara L; Porter, Jeff; Warmuth, Markus; Finan, Peter; Harris, Jennifer L; Meyerson, Matthew; Golub, Todd R; Morrissey, Michael P; Sellers, William R; Schlegel, Robert; Garraway, Levi A

    2012-03-28

    The systematic translation of cancer genomic data into knowledge of tumour biology and therapeutic possibilities remains challenging. Such efforts should be greatly aided by robust preclinical model systems that reflect the genomic diversity of human cancers and for which detailed genetic and pharmacological annotation is available. Here we describe the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE): a compilation of gene expression, chromosomal copy number and massively parallel sequencing data from 947 human cancer cell lines. When coupled with pharmacological profiles for 24 anticancer drugs across 479 of the cell lines, this collection allowed identification of genetic, lineage, and gene-expression-based predictors of drug sensitivity. In addition to known predictors, we found that plasma cell lineage correlated with sensitivity to IGF1 receptor inhibitors; AHR expression was associated with MEK inhibitor efficacy in NRAS-mutant lines; and SLFN11 expression predicted sensitivity to topoisomerase inhibitors. Together, our results indicate that large, annotated cell-line collections may help to enable preclinical stratification schemata for anticancer agents. The generation of genetic predictions of drug response in the preclinical setting and their incorporation into cancer clinical trial design could speed the emergence of 'personalized' therapeutic regimens.

  4. The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia enables predictive modeling of anticancer drug sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barretina, Jordi; Caponigro, Giordano; Stransky, Nicolas; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Margolin, Adam A.; Kim, Sungjoon; Wilson, Christopher J.; Lehár, Joseph; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Reddy, Anupama; Liu, Manway; Murray, Lauren; Berger, Michael F.; Monahan, John E.; Morais, Paula; Meltzer, Jodi; Korejwa, Adam; Jané-Valbuena, Judit; Mapa, Felipa A.; Thibault, Joseph; Bric-Furlong, Eva; Raman, Pichai; Shipway, Aaron; Engels, Ingo H.; Cheng, Jill; Yu, Guoying K.; Yu, Jianjun; Aspesi, Peter; de Silva, Melanie; Jagtap, Kalpana; Jones, Michael D.; Wang, Li; Hatton, Charles; Palescandolo, Emanuele; Gupta, Supriya; Mahan, Scott; Sougnez, Carrie; Onofrio, Robert C.; Liefeld, Ted; MacConaill, Laura; Winckler, Wendy; Reich, Michael; Li, Nanxin; Mesirov, Jill P.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Getz, Gad; Ardlie, Kristin; Chan, Vivien; Myer, Vic E.; Weber, Barbara L.; Porter, Jeff; Warmuth, Markus; Finan, Peter; Harris, Jennifer L.; Meyerson, Matthew; Golub, Todd R.; Morrissey, Michael P.; Sellers, William R.; Schlegel, Robert; Garraway, Levi A.

    2012-01-01

    The systematic translation of cancer genomic data into knowledge of tumor biology and therapeutic avenues remains challenging. Such efforts should be greatly aided by robust preclinical model systems that reflect the genomic diversity of human cancers and for which detailed genetic and pharmacologic annotation is available1. Here we describe the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE): a compilation of gene expression, chromosomal copy number, and massively parallel sequencing data from 947 human cancer cell lines. When coupled with pharmacologic profiles for 24 anticancer drugs across 479 of the lines, this collection allowed identification of genetic, lineage, and gene expression-based predictors of drug sensitivity. In addition to known predictors, we found that plasma cell lineage correlated with sensitivity to IGF1 receptor inhibitors; AHR expression was associated with MEK inhibitor efficacy in NRAS-mutant lines; and SLFN11 expression predicted sensitivity to topoisomerase inhibitors. Altogether, our results suggest that large, annotated cell line collections may help to enable preclinical stratification schemata for anticancer agents. The generation of genetic predictions of drug response in the preclinical setting and their incorporation into cancer clinical trial design could speed the emergence of “personalized” therapeutic regimens2. PMID:22460905

  5. A review on pipeline corrosion, in-line inspection (ILI), and corrosion growth rate models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanaei, H.R.; Eslami, A.; Egbewande, A.

    2017-01-01

    Pipelines are the very important energy transmission systems. Over time, pipelines can corrode. While corrosion could be detected by in-line inspection (ILI) tools, corrosion growth rate prediction in pipelines is usually done through corrosion rate models. For pipeline integrity management and planning selecting the proper corrosion ILI tool and also corrosion growth rate model is important and can lead to significant savings and safer pipe operation. In this paper common forms of pipeline corrosion, state of the art ILI tools, and also corrosion growth rate models are reviewed. The common forms of pipeline corrosion introduced in this paper are Uniform/General Corrosion, Pitting Corrosion, Cavitation and Erosion Corrosion, Stray Current Corrosion, Micro-Bacterial Influenced Corrosion (MIC). The ILI corrosion detection tools assessed in this study are Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL), Circumferential MFL, Tri-axial MFL, and Ultrasonic Wall Measurement (UT). The corrosion growth rate models considered in this study are single-value corrosion rate model, linear corrosion growth rate model, non-linear corrosion growth rate model, Monte-Carlo method, Markov model, TD-GEVD, TI-GEVD model, Gamma Process, and BMWD model. Strengths and limitations of ILI detection tools, and also corrosion predictive models with some practical examples are discussed. This paper could be useful for those whom are supporting pipeline integrity management and planning. - Highlights: • Different forms of pipeline corrosion are explained. • Common In-Line Inspection (ILI) tools and corrosion growth rate models are introduced. • Strength and limitations of corrosion growth rate models/ILI tools are discussed. • For pipeline integrity management programs using more than one corrosion growth rate model/ILI tool is suggested.

  6. Lightning Protection Performance Assessment of Transmission Line Based on ATP model Automatic Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Hanwu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method to solve the initial lightning breakdown current by combing ATP and MATLAB simulation software effectively, with the aims to evaluate the lightning protection performance of transmission line. Firstly, the executable ATP simulation model is generated automatically according to the required information such as power source parameters, tower parameters, overhead line parameters, grounding resistance and lightning current parameters, etc. through an interface program coded by MATLAB. Then, the data are extracted from the generated LIS files which can be obtained by executing the ATP simulation model, the occurrence of transmission lie breakdown can be determined by the relative data in LIS file. The lightning current amplitude should be reduced when the breakdown occurs, and vice the verse. Thus the initial lightning breakdown current of a transmission line with given parameters can be determined accurately by continuously changing the lightning current amplitude, which is realized by a loop computing algorithm that is coded by MATLAB software. The method proposed in this paper can generate the ATP simulation program automatically, and facilitates the lightning protection performance assessment of transmission line.

  7. A short model excitation of an asymmetric force free superconducting transmission line magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wake, M.; Sato, H.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Carcagno, R.; Foster, W.; Hays, S.; Kashikhin, V.; Oleck, A.; Piekarz, H.; Rabehl, R,; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    A short model of asymmetric force free magnet with single beam aperture was tested at Fermilab together with the excitation test of VLHC transmission line magnet. The design concept of asymmetric force free superconducting magnet was verified by the test. The testing reached up to 104 kA current and no indication of force imbalance was observed. Since the model magnet length was only 10cm, A 0.75m model was constructed and tested at KEK with low current to ensure the validity of the design. The cool down and the excitation at KEK were also successful finding very small thermal contraction of the conductor and reasonable field homogeneity.

  8. Comparison of numerical and physico-chemical models for on-line spectrophotometric control of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corriou, J.P.; Boisde, G.

    1986-04-01

    In view of on-line spectrophotometric control of fuel reprocessing streams, a physico-chemical model able to predict uranium and nitric acid concentrations in an uranyl nitrate-nitric acid system has been searched. Thus the influences of the following parameters: uranium, nitrate, hydrogen ion concentrations, ionic strength, on the equilibria of complexation of uranium (VI) nitrate have been evaluated. Extinction coefficients for the uranium mononitrate and uranium dinitrate complexes are given between 410 and 440 nm. The apparent equilibrium constants are determined as a function of the ionic strength. The limitations of this predictive model are emphasized and comparisons with numerical models are discussed. (16 refs)

  9. IN SILICO MODELLING OF CYTOTOXIC BEHAVIOUR OF ANTI-LEUKEMIC COMPOUNDS ON HL-60 CELL LINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ebuka Arthur

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This research employs multiple linear regression technique in the modelling of some potent anti-leukemic compounds using paDEL molecular descriptor software calculator, to identify the best relationship between the chemical structure and toxicities of the anticancer datasets against some leukemic cell lines (HL-60. Statistical parameters such as Q2 and R2pred (test set were computed to validate the strength of the model, while Williams plot was used to assess its applicability domain. The mean effects of the molecular descriptors in the models were calculated to illuminate the principal properties of the molecules responsible for their cytotoxicity.

  10. Investigating Margin and Grounding Line Dynamics with a Coupled Ice and Sea Level Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchar, J.; Milne, G. A.

    2017-12-01

    We present results from the coupling of an adaptive mesh glaciological model (BISICLES) with a model of glacial isostatic adjustment and sea level. We apply this coupled model to study the deglaciation of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) from the last glacial maximum. The proximity of the GrIS to the much larger Laurentide results in an east-west gradient in sea level rates across Greenland during the deglaciation. We investigate the impacts of this sea level gradient on ice and grounding line dynamics at the margins, as well as the influence of both local and non-local ice on sea level and ice dynamics.

  11. Dose rate effect models for biological reaction to ionizing radiation in human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Because of biological responses to ionizing radiation are dependent on irradiation time or dose rate as well as dose, simultaneous inclusion of dose and dose rate is required to evaluate the risk of long term irradiation at low dose rates. We previously published a novel statistical model for dose rate effect, modified exponential (MOE) model, which predicts irradiation time-dependent biological response to low dose rate ionizing radiation, by analyzing micronucleus formation and growth inhibition in a human osteosarcoma cell line, exposed to wide range of doses and dose rates of gamma-rays. MOE model demonstrates that logarithm of median effective dose exponentially increases in low dose rates, and thus suggests that the risk approaches to zero at infinitely low dose rate. In this paper, we extend the analysis in various kinds of human cell lines exposed to ionizing radiation for more than a year. We measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H]thymidine uptake in human cell lines including an osteosarcoma, a DNA-dependent protein kinase-deficient glioma, a SV40-transformed fibroblast derived from an ataxia telangiectasia patient, a normal fibroblast, and leukemia cell lines. Cells were exposed to gamma-rays in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci of cobalt-60. After the irradiation, they were cultured for 24 h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and prospidium iodide. The number of binuclear cells bearing a micronucleus was counted under a fluorescence microscope. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and [ 3 H] thymidine was pulsed for 4 h before harvesting. We statistically analyzed the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk. While dose and dose rate relationship cultured within one month followed MOE model in cell lines holding wild-type DNA repair system, dose rate effect was greatly impaired in DNA repair-deficient cell lines

  12. Geocoronal Balmer α line profile observations and forward-model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Bishop, J.; Roesler, F. L.; Nossal, S. M.

    2006-05-01

    High spectral resolution geocoronal Balmer α line profile observations from Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO) are presented in the context of forward-model analysis. Because Balmer series column emissions depend significantly on multiple scattering, retrieval of hydrogen parameters of general aeronomic interest from these observations (e.g., the hydrogen column abundance) currently requires a forward modeling approach. This capability is provided by the resonance radiative transfer code LYAO_RT. We have recently developed a parametric data-model comparison search procedure employing an extensive grid of radiative transport model input parameters (defining a 6-dimensional parameter space) to map-out bounds for feasible forward model retrieved atomic hydrogen density distributions. We applied this technique to same-night (March, 2000) ground-based Balmer α data from PBO and geocoronal Lyman β measurements from the Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta extremo para la Radiación Difusa (EURD) instrument on the Spanish satellite MINISAT-1 (provided by J.F. Gómez and C. Morales of the Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Física Fundamental, INTA, Madrid, Spain) in order to investigate the modeling constraints imposed by two sets of independent geocoronal intensity measurements, both of which rely on astronomical calibration methods. In this poster we explore extending this analysis to the line profile information also contained in the March 2000 PBO Balmer α data set. In general, a decrease in the Doppler width of the Balmer α emission with shadow altitude is a persistent feature in every night of PBO observations in which a wide range of shadow altitudes are observed. Preliminary applications of the LYAO_RT code, which includes the ability to output Doppler line profiles for both the singly and multiply scattered contributions to the Balmer α emission line, displays good qualitative agreement with regard to geocoronal Doppler width trends observed from PBO. Model-data Balmer

  13. Adaptive LINE-P: An Adaptive Linear Energy Prediction Model for Wireless Sensor Network Nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Faisal; Tamberg, Gert; Le Moullec, Yannick; Annus, Paul

    2018-04-05

    In the context of wireless sensor networks, energy prediction models are increasingly useful tools that can facilitate the power management of the wireless sensor network (WSN) nodes. However, most of the existing models suffer from the so-called fixed weighting parameter, which limits their applicability when it comes to, e.g., solar energy harvesters with varying characteristics. Thus, in this article we propose the Adaptive LINE-P (all cases) model that calculates adaptive weighting parameters based on the stored energy profiles. Furthermore, we also present a profile compression method to reduce the memory requirements. To determine the performance of our proposed model, we have used real data for the solar and wind energy profiles. The simulation results show that our model achieves 90-94% accuracy and that the compressed method reduces memory overheads by 50% as compared to state-of-the-art models.

  14. Multiple-Satellite Observation of Magnetic Dip Event During the Substorm on 10 October 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaoguo; Chen, Lunjin; Zhu, Hui; Xia, Zhiyang; Reeves, G. D.; Xiong, Ying; Xie, Lun; Cao, Yong

    2017-09-01

    We present a multiple-satellite observation of the magnetic dip event during the substorm on 10 October 2013. The observation illustrates the temporal and spatial evolution of the magnetic dip and gives a compelling evidence that ring current ions induce the magnetic dip by enhanced plasma beta. The dip moves with the energetic ions in a comparable drift velocity and affects the dynamics of relativistic electrons in the radiation belt. In addition, the magnetic dip provides a favorable condition for the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave generation based on the linear theory analysis. The calculated proton diffusion coefficients show that the observed EMIC wave can lead to the pitch angle scattering losses of the ring current ions, which in turn partially relax the magnetic dip in the observations. This study enriches our understanding of magnetic dip evolution and demonstrates the important role of the magnetic dip for the coupling of radiation belt and ring current.

  15. Substorm effects in MHD and test particle simulations of magnetotail dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1998-01-01

    Recent magnetohydrodynamic simulations demonstrate that a global tail instability, initiated by localized breakdown of MHD, can cause plasmoid formation and ejection as well as dipolarization and the current diversion of the substorm current wedge. The connection between the reconnection process and the current wedge signatures is provided by earthward flow from the reconnection site. Its braking and diversion in the inner magnetosphere causes dipolarization and the magnetic field distortions of the current wedge. The authors demonstrate the characteristic properties of this process and the current systems involved. The strong localized electric field associated with the flow burst and the dipolarization is also the cause of particle acceleration and energetic particle injections. Test particle simulations of orbits in the MHD fields yield results that are quite consistent with observed injection signatures

  16. MESSENGER Observations of Extreme Magnetic Tail Loading and Unloading During its Third Flyby of Mercury: Substorms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Gloeckler, George; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury on September 29, 2009, a variable interplanetary magnetic field produced a series of several minute enhancements of the tail magnetic field hy factors of approx. 2 to 3.5. The magnetic field flaring during these intervals indicates that they result from loading of the tail with magnetic flux transferred from the dayside magnetosphere. The unloading intervals were associated with plasmoids and traveling compression regions, signatures of tail reconnection. The peak tail magnetic flux during the smallest loading events equaled 30% of the magnetic flux emanating from Mercury, and may have reached 100% for the largest event. In this case the dayside magnetic shielding is reduced and solar wind flux impacting the surface may be greatly enhanced. Despite the intensity of these events and their similarity to terrestrial substorm magnetic flux dynamics, no energetic charged particles with energies greater than 36 keV were observed.

  17. Streaming reversal of energetic particles in the magnetotail during a substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Williams, D. J.; Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1984-01-01

    A case of reversal in the streaming anisotropy of energetic ions and in the plasma flow observed from the IMP 8 spacecraft during a substorm on February 8, 1978 is studied in detail using measurements of energetic particles, plasma, and magnetic field. Four new features emerge when high time resolution data are examined in detail. The times of streaming reversal of energetic particles in different energy ranges do not coincide with the time of plasma flow reversal. Qualitatively different velocity distributions are observed in earthward and tailward plasma flows during the observed flow reversal intervals. Strong tailward streaming of energetic particles can be detected during northward magnetic field environments and, conversely, earthward streaming in southward field environments. During the period of tailward streaming of energetic particles, earthward streaming fluxes are occasionally detected.

  18. Effect of the interplanetary magnetic field azimuthal component on dynamics of magnetospheric substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troshichev, O.A.; Kotikov, A.L.; Bolotinskaya, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of azimuthal component of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the dynamics of magnetospheric substorms is considered. The turning of the azimuthal component of IMF from the positive direction to the negative one and, vice versa, negative and positive impulses in B y -component at B z z -component to the North, positive impulses in B z -component, are investigated. The importance of corresponding variations in magnetic activity level is evaluated. It is shown that turning of B y -component from the positive direction to the negative one increases magnetic activity, whereas the reverse transition affects but slightly the level of magnetic activity in the Northern auroral zone. The turning of B z -component to the North also results in the increase of magnetic activity but with a less intensity than in the case of the negative turning in B y -component

  19. New model for gastroenteropancreatic large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma: establishment of two clinically relevant cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Krieg

    Full Text Available Recently, a novel WHO-classification has been introduced that divided gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NEN according to their proliferation index into G1- or G2-neuroendocrine tumors (NET and poorly differentiated small-cell or large-cell G3-neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC. Our knowledge on primary NECs of the GEP-system is limited due to the rarity of these tumors and chemotherapeutic concepts of highly aggressive NEC do not provide convincing results. The aim of this study was to establish a reliable cell line model for NEC that could be helpful in identifying novel druggable molecular targets. Cell lines were established from liver (NEC-DUE1 or lymph node metastases (NEC-DUE2 from large cell NECs of the gastroesophageal junction and the large intestine, respectively. Morphological characteristics and expression of neuroendocrine markers were extensively analyzed. Chromosomal aberrations were mapped by array comparative genomic hybridization and DNA profiling was analyzed by DNA fingerprinting. In vitro and in vivo tumorigenicity was evaluated and the sensitivity against chemotherapeutic agents assessed. Both cell lines exhibited typical morphological and molecular features of large cell NEC. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that both cell lines retained their malignant properties. Whereas NEC-DUE1 and -DUE2 were resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin, etoposide and oxaliplatin, a high sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil was observed for the NEC-DUE1 cell line. Taken together, we established and characterized the first GEP large-cell NEC cell lines that might serve as a helpful tool not only to understand the biology of these tumors, but also to establish novel targeted therapies in a preclinical setup.

  20. A geometrical model of VY Canis Majoris for SiO maser lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zhen-Pu; Kaifu, N.

    1984-01-01

    A new geometrical model of VY CMa is proposed to explain the three-peaked spectra of transition upsilon=1,2 J=1-0 of SiO maser emission. In this model the circumstellar envelope of VY CMa is a rotating disk of gas and dust seen nearly edge-on. The disk consists of two regions: a decelerated steady stream near the photosphere of the star and an accelerated one further away. Other geometries are discussed and eliminated. Calculated profiles of SiO maser lines fit well the observations. It is possible to explain the three-peaked profiles of SiO maser lines emitted by NML Cyg, RR Aql, NML Tau, etc. (orig.)

  1. Multi-Stratum Networks: toward a unified model of on-line identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Luca; Magnani, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    One of the reasons behind the success of Social Network Analysis is its simple and general graph model made of nodes (representing individuals) and ties. However, when we focus on our daily on-line experience we must confront a more complex scenario: people inhabitate several on-line spaces...... interacting to several communities active on various technological infrastructures like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube or FourSquare and with distinct social objectives. This constitutes a complex network of interconnected networks where users' identities are spread and where information propagates navigating...... through different communities and social platforms. In this article we introduce a model for this layered scenario that we call multi-stratum network. Through a theoretical discussion and the analysis of real-world data we show how not only focusing on a single network may provide a very partial...

  2. Model of the lines of sight for an off-axis optical instrument Pleiades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, Dominique; Gaudin-Delrieu, Catherine; Tournier, Thierry

    2017-11-01

    The future Earth observation missions aim at delivering images with a high resolution and a large field of view. These images have to be processed to get a very accurate localisation. In that goal, the individual lines of sight of each photosensitive element must be evaluated according to the localisation of the pixels in the focal plane. But, with off-axis Korsch telescope (like PLEIADES), the classical model has to be adapted. This is possible by using optical ground measurements made after the integration of the instrument. The processing of these results leads to several parameters, which are function of the offsets of the focal plane and the real focal length. All this study which has been proposed for the PLEIADES mission leads to a more elaborated model which provides the relation between the lines of sight and the location of the pixels, with a very good accuracy, close to the pixel size.

  3. Observational study of generation conditions of substorm-associated low-frequency AKR emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olsson

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available It has lately been shown that low-frequency bursts of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR are nearly exclusively associated with substorm expansion phases. Here we study low-frequency AKR using Polar PWI and Interball POLRAD instruments to constrain its possible generation mechanisms. We find that there are more low-frequency AKR emission events during wintertime and equinoxes than during summertime. The dot-AKR emission radial distance range coincides well with the region where the deepest density cavities are seen statistically during Kp>2. We suggest that the dot-AKR emissions originate in the deepest density cavities during substorm onsets. The mechanism for generating dot-AKR is possibly strong Alfvén waves entering the cavity from the magnetosphere and changing their character to more inertial, which causes the Alfvén wave associated parallel electric field to increase. This field may locally accelerate electrons inside the cavity enough to produce low-frequency AKR emission. We use Interball IESP low-frequency wave data to verify that in about half of the cases the dot-AKR is accompanied by low-frequency wave activity containing a magnetic component, i.e. probably inertial Alfvén waves. Because of the observational geometry, this result is consistent with the idea that inertial Alfvén waves might always be present in the source region when dot-AKR is generated. The paper illustrates once more the importance of radio emissions as a powerful remote diagnostic tool of auroral processes, which is not only relevant for the Earth's magnetosphere but may be relevant in the future in studying extrasolar planets.

  4. Radar observations of auroral zone flows during a multiple-onset substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Morelli

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of ground magnetic field, ionospheric flow, geosynchronous particle, and interplanetary data during a multiple-onset substorm on 12 April 1988. Our principal results concern the modulations of the ionospheric flow which occur during the impulsive electrojet activations associated with each onset. During the first hour of the disturbance these take place every ~12.5 min and involve the formation of a new intense westward current filament in the premidnight sector, just poleward of the pre-existing extended current system driven by the large-scale flow. These filaments are ~1 h MLT wide (~600 km, and initially expand poleward to a width of ~300 km before contracting equatorward and coalescing with the pre-existing current, generally leaving the latter enhanced in magnitude and/or expanded in latitude. Within the impulsive electrojets the flow is found to be suppressed to values 50–100 m s–1 or less during the first few minutes, before surging equatorward at 0.5–1.0 km s–1 during the phase of rapid coalescence. The implication is that the precipitation-induced Hall conductivity within the impulsive electrojet initially rises to exceed ~100 mho, before decaying over a few minutes. This value compares with Hall conductivities of ~20 mho in the quasi-steady current regions, and a few mho or less in the regions poleward of the electrojets and in the preonset ionosphere. Preliminary evidence has also been found that the flow surges propagate from midnight to the morning sector where they are associated with arrested equatorward motion or poleward contractions of the current system. These observations are discussed in terms of present theoretical paradigms of the global behaviour of fields and flows which occur during substorms.

  5. Simultaneous Measurements of Substorm-Related Electron Energization in the Ionosphere and the Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivadas, N.; Semeter, J.; Nishimura, Y.; Kero, A.

    2017-10-01

    On 26 March 2008, simultaneous measurements of a large substorm were made using the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm (THEMIS) spacecraft, and all sky cameras. After the onset, electron precipitation reached energies ≳100 keV leading to intense D region ionization. Identifying the source of energetic precipitation has been a challenge because of lack of quantitative and magnetically conjugate measurements of loss cone electrons. In this study, we use the maximum entropy inversion technique to invert altitude profiles of ionization measured by the radar to estimate the loss cone energy spectra of primary electrons. By comparing them with magnetically conjugate measurements from THEMIS-D spacecraft in the nightside plasma sheet, we constrain the source location and acceleration mechanism of precipitating electrons of different energy ranges. Our analysis suggests that the observed electrons ≳100 keV are a result of pitch angle scattering of electrons originating from or tailward of the inner plasma sheet at 9RE, possibly through interaction with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. The electrons of energy 10-100 keV are produced by pitch angle scattering due to a potential drop of ≲10 kV in the auroral acceleration region (AAR) as well as wave-particle interactions in and tailward of the AAR. This work demonstrates the utility of magnetically conjugate ground- and space-based measurements in constraining the source of energetic electron precipitation. Unlike in situ spacecraft measurements, ground-based incoherent scatter radars combined with an appropriate inversion technique can be used to provide remote and continuous-time estimates of loss cone electrons in the plasma sheet.

  6. Deep Learning Based Solar Flare Forecasting Model. I. Results for Line-of-sight Magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Wang, Huaning; Xu, Long; Liu, Jinfu; Li, Rong; Dai, Xinghua

    2018-03-01

    Solar flares originate from the release of the energy stored in the magnetic field of solar active regions, the triggering mechanism for these flares, however, remains unknown. For this reason, the conventional solar flare forecast is essentially based on the statistic relationship between solar flares and measures extracted from observational data. In the current work, the deep learning method is applied to set up the solar flare forecasting model, in which forecasting patterns can be learned from line-of-sight magnetograms of solar active regions. In order to obtain a large amount of observational data to train the forecasting model and test its performance, a data set is created from line-of-sight magnetogarms of active regions observed by SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI from 1996 April to 2015 October and corresponding soft X-ray solar flares observed by GOES. The testing results of the forecasting model indicate that (1) the forecasting patterns can be automatically reached with the MDI data and they can also be applied to the HMI data; furthermore, these forecasting patterns are robust to the noise in the observational data; (2) the performance of the deep learning forecasting model is not sensitive to the given forecasting periods (6, 12, 24, or 48 hr); (3) the performance of the proposed forecasting model is comparable to that of the state-of-the-art flare forecasting models, even if the duration of the total magnetograms continuously spans 19.5 years. Case analyses demonstrate that the deep learning based solar flare forecasting model pays attention to areas with the magnetic polarity-inversion line or the strong magnetic field in magnetograms of active regions.

  7. Establishing an in vivo model of canine prostate carcinoma using the new cell line CT1258

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winkler Susanne

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is a frequent finding in man. In dogs, malignant disease of the prostate is also of clinical relevance, although it is a less common diagnosis. Even though there are numerous differences in origin and development of the disease, man and dog share many similarities in the pathological presentation. For this reason, the dog might be a useful animal model for prostate malignancies in man. Although prostate cancer is of great importance in veterinary medicine as well as in comparative medicine, there are only few cell lines available. Thus, it was the aim of the present study to determine whether the formerly established prostate carcinoma cell line CT1258 is a suitable tool for in vivo testing, and to distinguish the growth pattern of the induced tumours. Methods For characterisation of the in vivo behaviour of the in vitro established canine prostate carcinoma cell line CT1258, cells were inoculated in 19 NOD.CB17-PrkdcScid/J (in the following: NOD-Scid mice, either subcutaneously or intraperitoneally. After sacrifice, the obtained specimens were examined histologically and compared to the pattern of the original tumour in the donor. Cytogenetic investigation was performed. Results The cell line CT 1258 not only showed to be highly tumourigenic after subcutaneous as well as intraperitoneal inoculation, but also mimicked the behaviour of the original tumour. Conclusion Tumours induced by inoculation of the cell line CT1258 resemble the situation in naturally occurring prostate carcinoma in the dog, and thus could be used as in vivo model for future studies.

  8. Analysis of ULF Waves During Substorms Observed in the Ionosphere from the Dayside Ground Magnetometer and in the Solar Wind from the Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Alimaganbetov, M.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorm is one of the most interesting and complicated phenomena of solar-terrestrial interactions. Despite numerous theoretical and experimental studies conducted during last 50 years, its several important phenomena are not completely understood yet. One of them are intense, ultra-low-frequency (from 0.5 mHz to 100 mHz), electromagnetic pulsations which are always observed during the substorms with the ground-based magnetometers and radars at high latitudes. These waves have the largest amplitudes in the power spectral densities during substorms. Hence, they are the most effective drivers of such mechanisms as high-latitude ionosphere energization, ion outflow production, formation of plasma density cavities, etc. In our study, we focus on the waves with frequencies 0.5-1.0 mHz, which is the lowest part of the frequency spectra observed during the substorm. The questions of what phenomena cause these oscillations and what are their spatiotemporal properties are among the most important ones about the physics of the substorm. To answer these questions, we analyzed disturbances of the magnetic field obtained from the two sources for the period from October 2015 to November 2016 during several substorms. One source is the fluxgate magnetometer in Poker Flat, Alaska. Another is the NASA Advanced Composite Explorer satellite in the Lagrangian L1 point that detects most of the solar wind from the Sun. The goal of our project is to find correlations between the disturbances observed from these sources, which will be a strong argument that the solar wind has a strong influence on the electromagnetic coupling between the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth during the substorms. We observed 48 substorms during the abovementioned period. Our findings show that 1) the dominant frequency of the large-amplitude ULF waves observed during the substorms is 1 mHz or less; and 2) the same frequencies are frequently observed in the waves detected from the both

  9. Solving the quasi-static field model of the pulse-line accelerator; relationship to a circuit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, Alex

    2005-01-01

    The Pulse-Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA) is a promising approach to high-gradient acceleration of an ion beam at high line charge density. A recent note by R. J. Briggs suggests that a 'sheath helix' model of such a system can be solved numerically in the quasi-static limit. Such a model captures the correct macroscopic behavior from first principles without the need to time-advance the full Maxwell equations on a grid. This note describes numerical methods that may be used to effect such a solution, and their connection to the circuit model that was described in an earlier note by the author. Fine detail of the fields in the vicinity of the helix wires is not obtained by this approach, but for purposes of beam dynamics simulation such detail is not generally needed

  10. An evaluation of the statistical significance of the association between northward turnings of the interplanetary magnetic field and substorm expansion onsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tung-Shin; McPherron, R. L.

    2002-11-01

    An outstanding problem in magnetospheric physics is deciding whether substorms are always triggered by external changes in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) or solar wind plasma, or whether they sometimes occur spontaneously. Over the past decade, arguments have been made on both sides of this issue. In fact, there is considerable evidence that some substorms are triggered. However, equally persuasive examples of substorms with no obvious trigger have been found. Because of conflicting views on this subject, further work is required to determine whether there is a physical relation between IMF triggers and substorm onset. In the work reported here a list of substorm onsets was created using two independent substorm signatures: sudden changes in the slope of the AL index and the start of a Pi 2 pulsation burst. Possible IMF triggers were determined from ISEE-2 observations. With the ISEE spacecraft near local noon immediately upstream of the bow shock, there can be little question about propagation delay to the magnetopause or whether a particular IMF feature hits the subsolar magnetopause. Thus it eliminates the objections that the calculated arrival time is subject to a large error or that the solar wind monitor missed a potential trigger incident at the subsolar point. Using a less familiar technique, statistics of point process, we find that the time delay between substorm onsets and the propagated arrival time of IMF triggers are clustered around zero. We estimate for independent processes that the probability of this clustering by chance alone is about 10-11. If we take into account the requirement that the IMF must have been southward prior to the onset, then the probability of clustering is higher, ˜10-5, but still extremely unlikely. Thus it is not possible to ascribe the apparent relation between IMF northward turnings and substorm onset to coincidence.

  11. Using Regularization to Infer Cell Line Specificity in Logical Network Models of Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien De Landtsheer

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the functional properties of cells of different origins is a long-standing challenge of personalized medicine. Especially in cancer, the high heterogeneity observed in patients slows down the development of effective cures. The molecular differences between cell types or between healthy and diseased cellular states are usually determined by the wiring of regulatory networks. Understanding these molecular and cellular differences at the systems level would improve patient stratification and facilitate the design of rational intervention strategies. Models of cellular regulatory networks frequently make weak assumptions about the distribution of model parameters across cell types or patients. These assumptions are usually expressed in the form of regularization of the objective function of the optimization problem. We propose a new method of regularization for network models of signaling pathways based on the local density of the inferred parameter values within the parameter space. Our method reduces the complexity of models by creating groups of cell line-specific parameters which can then be optimized together. We demonstrate the use of our method by recovering the correct topology and inferring accurate values of the parameters of a small synthetic model. To show the value of our method in a realistic setting, we re-analyze a recently published phosphoproteomic dataset from a panel of 14 colon cancer cell lines. We conclude that our method efficiently reduces model complexity and helps recovering context-specific regulatory information.

  12. Description of the HIA line in the CEEH integrated modelling chain. CEEH scientific report no. 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meulengracht Flachs, E. [Univ. of Southern Denmark (SDU), Odense (Denmark); Boenloekke, J.H.; Sigsgaard, T. [Aarhus Universitet, Aarhus (Denmark)] [and others

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the different components constituting the HIA-line in the CEEH integrated energy-environment-health-cost modelling. The CEEH framework consists of a number of independent models linked together to assess the impacts and associated costs of emissions from energy production on human health. The HIA-line carries out assessment of the health impact and associated costs of human exposure to air pollution from future scenarios for energy production in Denmark. The methodology employed is the impact pathway, where future emissions from all Danish air pollution sources are modelled in the Balmorel model; the emitted air pollution is then dispersed and chemically transformed in time and space by either the NERI or the DMI Atmospheric Chemical Transport models. The resulting concentration fields of air pollution are then averaged to give municipality based levels, and the resulting health impact and associated societal cost of the Danish population is modelled in the Health Impact Assessment model. The social costs associated with air pollution exposure are then converted from the modelled exposure costs to emission costs to be fed into the Balmorel model as additional energy production costs. The CEEH HIA-line presents a novel way of modelling health related consequences of air pollution, as it directly models, the demography, air pollution, morbidity and mortality, in a dynamic and integrated setup. When modelling the health impact of Danish emitted air pollution in the period from 2005 to 2030 we find 2,000 extra deaths of lung cancer, 3,950 deaths of heart disease, 7,375 deaths of stroke and 1,750 deaths of COPD, and 11.475 premature deaths, amounting to 163,075 lost life years in the modelled 25-year period. The health related social costs sums up to 60.8m Euro for lung cancer, 88.3m Euro for heart disease, 91.6m Euro for stroke, 18.7m Euro for COPD, 26.9m Euro for other cause mortality and in total 282.5m Euro throughout the

  13. Pollutant Dispersion Modeling in Natural Streams Using the Transmission Line Matrix Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safia Meddah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modeling has become an indispensable tool for solving various physical problems. In this context, we present a model of pollutant dispersion in natural streams for the far field case where dispersion is considered longitudinal and one-dimensional in the flow direction. The Transmission Line Matrix (TLM, which has earned a reputation as powerful and efficient numerical method, is used. The presented one-dimensional TLM model requires a minimum input data and provides a significant gain in computing time. To validate our model, the results are compared with observations and experimental data from the river Severn (UK. The results show a good agreement with experimental data. The model can be used to predict the spatiotemporal evolution of a pollutant in natural streams for effective and rapid decision-making in a case of emergency, such as accidental discharges in a stream with a dynamic similar to that of the river Severn (UK.

  14. X-ray spectral models of Galactic bulge sources - the emission-line factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrtilek, S.D.; Swank, J.H.; Kallman, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Current difficulties in finding unique and physically meaningful models for the X-ray spectra of Galactic bulge sources are exacerbated by the presence of strong, variable emission and absorption features that are not resolved by the instruments observing them. Nine Einstein solid state spectrometer (SSS) observations of five Galactic bulge sources are presented for which relatively high resolution objective grating spectrometer (OGS) data have been published. It is found that in every case the goodness of fit of simple models to SSS data is greatly improved by adding line features identified in the OGS that cannot be resolved by the SSS but nevertheless strongly influence the spectra observed by SSS. 32 references

  15. Numerical Modeling of the Transient Chilldown Process of a Cryogenic Propellant Transfer Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason; Vera, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Before cryogenic fuel depots can be fully realized, efficient methods with which to chill down the spacecraft transfer line and receiver tank are required. This paper presents numerical modeling of the chilldown of a liquid hydrogen tank-to-tank propellant transfer line using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). To compare with data from recently concluded turbulent LH2 chill down experiments, seven different cases were run across a range of inlet liquid temperatures and mass flow rates. Both trickle and pulse chill down methods were simulated. The GFSSP model qualitatively matches external skin mounted temperature readings, but large differences are shown between measured and predicted internal stream temperatures. Discrepancies are attributed to the simplified model correlation used to compute two-phase flow boiling heat transfer. Flow visualization from testing shows that the initial bottoming out of skin mounted sensors corresponds to annular flow, but that considerable time is required for the stream sensor to achieve steady state as the system moves through annular, churn, and bubbly flow. The GFSSP model does adequately well in tracking trends in the data but further work is needed to refine the two-phase flow modeling to better match observed test data.

  16. Double-observer line transect surveys with Markov-modulated Poisson process models for animal availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, D L; Langrock, R

    2015-12-01

    We develop maximum likelihood methods for line transect surveys in which animals go undetected at distance zero, either because they are stochastically unavailable while within view or because they are missed when they are available. These incorporate a Markov-modulated Poisson process model for animal availability, allowing more clustered availability events than is possible with Poisson availability models. They include a mark-recapture component arising from the independent-observer survey, leading to more accurate estimation of detection probability given availability. We develop models for situations in which (a) multiple detections of the same individual are possible and (b) some or all of the availability process parameters are estimated from the line transect survey itself, rather than from independent data. We investigate estimator performance by simulation, and compare the multiple-detection estimators with estimators that use only initial detections of individuals, and with a single-observer estimator. Simultaneous estimation of detection function parameters and availability model parameters is shown to be feasible from the line transect survey alone with multiple detections and double-observer data but not with single-observer data. Recording multiple detections of individuals improves estimator precision substantially when estimating the availability model parameters from survey data, and we recommend that these data be gathered. We apply the methods to estimate detection probability from a double-observer survey of North Atlantic minke whales, and find that double-observer data greatly improve estimator precision here too. © 2015 The Authors Biometrics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Biometric Society.

  17. An UWB LNA Design with PSO Using Support Vector Microstrip Line Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Demirel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous and novel design procedure is constituted for an ultra-wideband (UWB low noise amplifier (LNA by exploiting the 3D electromagnetic simulator based support vector regression machine (SVRM microstrip line model. First of all, in order to design input and output matching circuits (IMC-OMC, source ZS and load ZL termination impedance of matching circuit, which are necessary to obtain required input VSWR (Vireq, noise (Freq, and gain (GTreq, are determined using performance characterisation of employed transistor, NE3512S02, between 3 and 8 GHz frequencies. After the determination of the termination impedance, to provide this impedance with IMC and OMC, dimensions of microstrip lines are obtained with simple, derivative-free, easily implemented algorithm Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. In the optimization of matching circuits, highly accurate and fast SVRM model of microstrip line is used instead of analytical formulations. ADCH-80a is used to provide ultra-wideband RF choking in DC bias. During the design process, it is aimed that Vireq = 1.85, Freq = Fmin, and GTreq = GTmax all over operating frequency band. Measurements taken from the realized LNA demonstrate the success of this approximation over the band.

  18. Modeling particle emission and power flow in pulsed-power driven, nonuniform transmission lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichelle Bruner

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed-power driven x-ray radiographic systems are being developed to operate at higher power in an effort to increase source brightness and penetration power. Essential to the design of these systems is a thorough understanding of electron power flow in the transmission line that couples the pulsed-power driver to the load. In this paper, analytic theory and fully relativistic particle-in-cell simulations are used to model power flow in several experimental transmission-line geometries fielded on Sandia National Laboratories’ upgraded Radiographic Integrated Test Stand [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 28, 1653 (2000ITPSBD0093-381310.1109/27.901250]. Good agreement with measured electrical currents is demonstrated on a shot-by-shot basis for simulations which include detailed models accounting for space-charge-limited electron emission, surface heating, and stimulated particle emission. Resonant cavity modes related to the transmission-line impedance transitions are also shown to be excited by electron power flow. These modes can drive oscillations in the output power of the system, degrading radiographic resolution.

  19. Low-latitude boundary layer near noon: An open field line model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, L. R.; Schulz, M.; Pridmore-Brown, D. C.; Roeder, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    We propose that many features of the cusp and low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) observed near noon MLT can be explained by interpreting the LLBL as being on open lines with an inner boundary at the separatrix between open and closed magnetic field lines. This interpretation places the poleward boundary of the LLBL and equatorward boundary of the cusp along the field line that bifurcates at the cusp neutral point. The interpretation accounts for the abrupt boundary of magnetosheath particles at the inner edge of the LLBL, a feature that is inconsistent with LLBL formation by diffusion onto closed field lines, and for the distribution of magnetosheath particles appearing more as one continuous region than as two distinct regions across the noon cusp/LLBL boundary. Furthermore, we can explain the existence of energetic radiation belt electrons and protons with differing pitch angle distributions within the LLBL and their abrupt cutoff at the poleward boundary of the LLBL. By modeling the LLBL and cusp region quantitatively, we can account for a hemispherical difference in the location of the equatorial boundary of the cusp that is observed to be dependent on the dipole tilt angle but not on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) x component. We also find important variations and hemispherical differences in that the size of the LLBL that should depend strongly upon the x component of the IMF. This prediction is observationally testable. Finally, we find that when the IMF is strongly northward, the LLBL may include a narrow region adjacent to the magnetopause where field lines are detached (i.e., have both ends connected to the IMF).

  20. SELF-LEARNING SCORING MODELS – INTRODUCTION OF AN ON-LINE APPROACH TO RISK ASSESMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Kozera

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem considered in this article involves the construction of evaluation model, which could subsequently be used in the fieldof modeling and risk management. The research work is finalizedby a construction of a new model on the basis of observa-tions of the models used for risk management and knowledge of information theory, machine learning and artificialneural networks. The developed tools are trained on-line, using their ability for automatic deduction rules based on data, during model application for evaluation tasks. The model, consequently changes the data analysis stage, limits the scope of the necessary expertise in the area, where the assessment model can be used and, to some extent, the shape of the model becomes independent from the current range of available data. These features increase its ability to general-ize and to cope with the data of previously undefinedclasses, as well as improve its resistance to gaps occurring in the data. Performance of the model presented in this paper is tested and verifiedon the basis of real-life data, which would resemble a potentially real practical application. Preliminary tests performed within the scope of this work indicate that the developed model can form a starting point for further research as some of the used mechanisms have a fairly high efficiency and flexibility.

  1. Simplified microstrip discontinuity modeling using the transmission line matrix method interfaced to microwave CAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James H.; Apel, Thomas R.

    1990-07-01

    A technique for modeling microstrip discontinuities is presented which is derived from the transmission line matrix method of solving three-dimensional electromagnetic problems. In this technique the microstrip patch under investigation is divided into an integer number of square and half-square (triangle) subsections. An equivalent lumped-element model is calculated for each subsection. These individual models are then interconnected as dictated by the geometry of the patch. The matrix of lumped elements is then solved using either of two microwave CAD software interfaces with each port properly defined. Closed-form expressions for the lumped-element representation of the individual subsections is presented and experimentally verified through the X-band frequency range. A model demonstrating the use of symmetry and block construction of a circuit element is discussed, along with computer program development and CAD software interface.

  2. Development of a model for on-line control of crystal growth by the AHP method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonik, M. A.; Lomokhova, A. V.; Gonik, M. M.; Kuliev, A. T.; Smirnov, A. D.

    2007-05-01

    The possibility to apply a simplified 2D model for heat transfer calculations in crystal growth by the axial heat close to phase interface (AHP) method is discussed in this paper. A comparison with global heat transfer calculations with the CGSim software was performed to confirm the accuracy of this model. The simplified model was shown to provide adequate results for the shape of the melt-crystal interface and temperature field in an opaque (Ge) and a transparent crystal (CsI:Tl). The model proposed is used for identification of the growth setup as a control object, for synthesis of a digital controller (PID controller at the present stage) and, finally, in on-line simulations of crystal growth control.

  3. [On-line processing mechanisms in text comprehension: a theoretical review on constructing situation models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Ryuta

    2004-12-01

    This article reviewed research on construction of situation models during reading. To position variety of research in overall process appropriately, an unitary framework was devised in terms of three theories for on-line processing: resonance process, event-indexing model, and constructionist theory. Resonance process was treated as a basic activation mechanism in the framework. Event-indexing model was regarded as a screening system which selected and encoded activated information in situation models along with situational dimensions. Constructionist theory was considered to have a supervisory role based on coherence and explanation. From a view of the unitary framework, some problems concerning each theory were examined and possible interpretations were given. Finally, it was pointed out that there were little theoretical arguments on associative processing at global level and encoding text- and inference-information into long-term memory.

  4. Learning Survival Models with On-Line Simulation Activities in the Actuarial Science Degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fernandez-Morales

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe an on-line survival laboratory designed to enhance teaching and learning in the Statistics courses of the Actuarial Science Degree of the Uni-versity of Málaga. The objective of the on-line survival lab is to help students through a guided program of simulation activities with the understanding of the most important statistical concepts of the stochastic modeling of human survival, from an Actuarial point of view. The graphical interactive simulator is implemented as Java applets for the web version, and as a Javascript animation for a lite iPhone/iPod touch version. Finally, the results of a survey carried out at the end of the course are discussed to have a preliminary assessment of the students’ satisfaction with the resources, and their perception about the usefulness for their learning process.

  5. Monitoring and modelling of a continuous from-powder-to-tablet process line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortier, Séverine T.F.C.; Nopens, Ingmar; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    -time adjustment of critical input variables to ensure that the process stays within the Design Space. Mechanistic models are very useful for this purpose as, once validated, several tools can be applied to gain further process knowledge, for example uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. In addition, several......The intention to shift from batch to continuous production processes within the pharmaceutical industry enhances the need to monitor and control the process in-line and real-time to continuously guarantee the end-product quality. Mass and energy balances have been successfully applied to a drying...... process which is part of a continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line to calculate the residual moisture content of granules leaving the drying unit on the basis of continuously generated data from univariate sensors. Next to monitoring, the application of continuous processes demands also real...

  6. A comparison and assessment of approaches for modelling flow over in-line tube banks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacovides, Hector; Launder, Brian; West, Alastair

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present wall-resolved LES and URANS simulations of periodic flow in heated in-line tube banks. • Simulations of flow in a confined in-line tube-bank are compared with experimental data. • When pitch-to-diameter (P/D) ratio becomes less than 1.6, the periodic flow becomes skewed. • URANS tested here unable to mimic the periodic flow at P/D = 1.6. • In confined tube banks URANS suggest alternate, in the axial direction, flow deflection. - Abstract: The paper reports experiences from applying alternative strategies for modelling turbulent flow and local heat-transfer coefficients around in-line tube banks. The motivation is the simulation of conditions in the closely packed cross-flow heat exchangers used in advanced gas-cooled nuclear reactors (AGRs). The main objective is the flow simulation in large-scale tube banks with confining walls. The suitability and accuracy of wall-resolved large-eddy simulation (LES) and Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes (URANS) approaches are examined for generic, square, in-line tube banks, where experimental data are limited but available. Within the latter approach, both eddy-viscosity and Reynolds-stress-transport models have been tested. The assumption of flow periodicity in all three directions is investigated by varying the domain size. It is found that the path taken by the fluid through the tube-bank configuration differs according to the treatment of turbulence and whether the flow is treated as two- or three-dimensional. Finally, the important effect of confining walls has been examined by making direct comparison with the experiments of the complete test rig of Aiba et al. (1982)

  7. Dosimetry of irradiation models. The 96-well clonogenic assay for testing radiosensitivity of cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulmala, J.; Rantanen, V.; Turku Univ.; Pekkola-Heino, K.; Turku Univ.; Tuominen, J.; Grenman, R.; Turku Univ.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation experiments with cells in single cell suspension in test tubes and on 96-well plates were carried out and compared. The cells originated from cell lines established from carcinomas of the floor of the mouth and from endometrical carcinoma. Two irradiation models were constructed. Both models allowed the absorbed doses to the cells to be administered with a high accuracy in both experimental settings (better than 5.0%). These irradiation models were compared on cancer cell lines with dissimilar inherent radiation sensitivity and histologic type (UM-SCC-1 resistant, UM-SCC-14A sensitive, and UT-EC-2B highly sensitive); various radiation doses were used. The fractions of surviving cells as a function of radiation dose were compared: there was no significant difference between cells irradiated in test tubes and cells irradiated in 96-well plates. Thus, if the absorbed doses in cells suspended in a tube and in a plate were the same, the survival was similar regardless of the type of irradiation model. (orig.)

  8. Extracting valley-ridge lines from point-cloud-based 3D fingerprint models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xufang; Song, Zhan; Xie, Wuyuan

    2013-01-01

    3D fingerprinting is an emerging technology with the distinct advantage of touchless operation. More important, 3D fingerprint models contain more biometric information than traditional 2D fingerprint images. However, current approaches to fingerprint feature detection usually must transform the 3D models to a 2D space through unwrapping or other methods, which might introduce distortions. A new approach directly extracts valley-ridge features from point-cloud-based 3D fingerprint models. It first applies the moving least-squares method to fit a local paraboloid surface and represent the local point cloud area. It then computes the local surface's curvatures and curvature tensors to facilitate detection of the potential valley and ridge points. The approach projects those points to the most likely valley-ridge lines, using statistical means such as covariance analysis and cross correlation. To finally extract the valley-ridge lines, it grows the polylines that approximate the projected feature points and removes the perturbations between the sampled points. Experiments with different 3D fingerprint models demonstrate this approach's feasibility and performance.

  9. Dual-Source Linear Energy Prediction (LINE-P) Model in the Context of WSNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Faisal; Tamberg, Gert; Le Moullec, Yannick; Annus, Paul

    2017-07-20

    Energy harvesting technologies such as miniature power solar panels and micro wind turbines are increasingly used to help power wireless sensor network nodes. However, a major drawback of energy harvesting is its varying and intermittent characteristic, which can negatively affect the quality of service. This calls for careful design and operation of the nodes, possibly by means of, e.g., dynamic duty cycling and/or dynamic frequency and voltage scaling. In this context, various energy prediction models have been proposed in the literature; however, they are typically compute-intensive or only suitable for a single type of energy source. In this paper, we propose Linear Energy Prediction "LINE-P", a lightweight, yet relatively accurate model based on approximation and sampling theory; LINE-P is suitable for dual-source energy harvesting. Simulations and comparisons against existing similar models have been conducted with low and medium resolutions (i.e., 60 and 22 min intervals/24 h) for the solar energy source (low variations) and with high resolutions (15 min intervals/24 h) for the wind energy source. The results show that the accuracy of the solar-based and wind-based predictions is up to approximately 98% and 96%, respectively, while requiring a lower complexity and memory than the other models. For the cases where LINE-P's accuracy is lower than that of other approaches, it still has the advantage of lower computing requirements, making it more suitable for embedded implementation, e.g., in wireless sensor network coordinator nodes or gateways.

  10. Representing grounding line migration in synchronous coupling between a marine ice sheet model and a z-coordinate ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, D. N.; Snow, K.; Holland, P.; Jordan, J. R.; Campin, J.-M.; Heimbach, P.; Arthern, R.; Jenkins, A.

    2018-05-01

    Synchronous coupling is developed between an ice sheet model and a z-coordinate ocean model (the MITgcm). A previously-developed scheme to allow continuous vertical movement of the ice-ocean interface of a floating ice shelf ("vertical coupling") is built upon to allow continuous movement of the grounding line, or point of floatation of the ice sheet ("horizontal coupling"). Horizontal coupling is implemented through the maintenance of a thin layer of ocean ( ∼ 1 m) under grounded ice, which is inflated into the real ocean as the ice ungrounds. This is accomplished through a modification of the ocean model's nonlinear free surface evolution in a manner akin to a hydrological model in the presence of steep bathymetry. The coupled model is applied to a number of idealized geometries and shown to successfully represent ocean-forced marine ice sheet retreat while maintaining a continuous ocean circulation.

  11. Evolution of a beam dynamics model for the transport line in a proton therapy facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoglio, V.; Adelmann, A.; Baumgarten, C.; Frey, M.; Gerbershagen, A.; Meer, D.; Schippers, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    During the conceptual design of an accelerator or beamline, first-order beam dynamics models are essential for studying beam properties. However, they can only produce approximate results. During commissioning, these approximate results are compared to measurements, which will rarely coincide if the model does not include the relevant physics. It is therefore essential that this linear model is extended to include higher-order effects. In this paper, the effects of particle-matter interaction have been included in the model of the transport lines in the proton therapy facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland. The first-order models of these beamlines provide an approximated estimation of beam size, energy loss and transmission. To improve the performance of the facility, a more precise model was required and has been developed with opal (Object Oriented Parallel Accelerator Library), a multiparticle open source beam dynamics code. In opal, the Monte Carlo simulations of Coulomb scattering and energy loss are performed seamless with the particle tracking. Beside the linear optics, the influence of the passive elements (e.g., degrader, collimators, scattering foils, and air gaps) on the beam emittance and energy spread can be analyzed in the new model. This allows for a significantly improved precision in the prediction of beam transmission and beam properties. The accuracy of the opal model has been confirmed by numerous measurements.

  12. Using hidden Markov models to deal with availability bias on line transect surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, D L; Zucchini, W; Heide-Jørgensen, M P; Cañadas, A; Langrock, R

    2013-09-01

    We develop estimators for line transect surveys of animals that are stochastically unavailable for detection while within detection range. The detection process is formulated as a hidden Markov model with a binary state-dependent observation model that depends on both perpendicular and forward distances. This provides a parametric method of dealing with availability bias when estimates of availability process parameters are available even if series of availability events themselves are not. We apply the estimators to an aerial and a shipboard survey of whales, and investigate their properties by simulation. They are shown to be more general and more flexible than existing estimators based on parametric models of the availability process. We also find that methods using availability correction factors can be very biased when surveys are not close to being instantaneous, as can estimators that assume temporal independence in availability when there is temporal dependence. © 2013, The International Biometric Society.

  13. An effective model for ergonomic optimization applied to a new automotive assembly line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duraccio, Vincenzo [University Niccolò Cusano, Rome Via Don Gnocchi,00166, Roma Italy (Italy); Elia, Valerio [Dept. of Innovation Engineering - University of Salento Via Monteroni, 73100, Lecce (Italy); Forcina, Antonio [University Parthenope, Dep. of Engineering Centro Direzionale - Isola C4 80143 - Naples - Italy (Italy)

    2016-06-08

    An efficient ergonomic optimization can lead to a significant improvement in production performance and a considerable reduction of costs. In the present paper new model for ergonomic optimization is proposed. The new approach is based on the criteria defined by National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health and, adapted to Italian legislation. The proposed model provides an ergonomic optimization, by analyzing ergonomic relations between manual work in correct conditions. The model includes a schematic and systematic analysis method of the operations, and identifies all possible ergonomic aspects to be evaluated. The proposed approach has been applied to an automotive assembly line, where the operation repeatability makes the optimization fundamental. The proposed application clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of the new approach.

  14. Dataset of curcumin derivatives for QSAR modeling of anti cancer against P388 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yum Eryanti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The dataset of curcumin derivatives consists of 45 compounds (Table 1 with their anti cancer biological activity (IC50 against P388 cell line. 45 curcumin derivatives were used in the model development where 30 of these compounds were in the training set and the remaining 15 compounds were in the test set. The development of the QSAR model involved the use of the multiple linear regression analysis (MLRA method. Based on the method, r2 value, r2 (CV value of 0.81, 0.67 were obtained. The QSAR model was also employed to predict the biological activity of compounds in the test set. Predictive correlation coefficient r2 values of 0.88 were obtained for the test set.

  15. An effective model for ergonomic optimization applied to a new automotive assembly line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duraccio, Vincenzo; Elia, Valerio; Forcina, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    An efficient ergonomic optimization can lead to a significant improvement in production performance and a considerable reduction of costs. In the present paper new model for ergonomic optimization is proposed. The new approach is based on the criteria defined by National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health and, adapted to Italian legislation. The proposed model provides an ergonomic optimization, by analyzing ergonomic relations between manual work in correct conditions. The model includes a schematic and systematic analysis method of the operations, and identifies all possible ergonomic aspects to be evaluated. The proposed approach has been applied to an automotive assembly line, where the operation repeatability makes the optimization fundamental. The proposed application clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of the new approach.

  16. An effective model for ergonomic optimization applied to a new automotive assembly line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraccio, Vincenzo; Elia, Valerio; Forcina, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    An efficient ergonomic optimization can lead to a significant improvement in production performance and a considerable reduction of costs. In the present paper new model for ergonomic optimization is proposed. The new approach is based on the criteria defined by National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health and, adapted to Italian legislation. The proposed model provides an ergonomic optimization, by analyzing ergonomic relations between manual work in correct conditions. The model includes a schematic and systematic analysis method of the operations, and identifies all possible ergonomic aspects to be evaluated. The proposed approach has been applied to an automotive assembly line, where the operation repeatability makes the optimization fundamental. The proposed application clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of the new approach.

  17. Spherical aberration correction with an in-lens N-fold symmetric line currents model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Shahedul; Ito, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Ryuji

    2018-04-01

    In our previous works, we have proposed N-SYLC (N-fold symmetric line currents) models for aberration correction. In this paper, we propose "in-lens N-SYLC" model, where N-SYLC overlaps rotationally symmetric lens. Such overlap is possible because N-SYLC is free of magnetic materials. We analytically prove that, if certain parameters of the model are optimized, an in-lens 3-SYLC (N = 3) doublet can correct 3rd order spherical aberration. By computer simulation, we show that the required excitation current for correction is less than 0.25 AT for beam energy 5 keV, and the beam size after correction is smaller than 1 nm at the corrector image plane for initial slope less than 4 mrad. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of a moving X-line in a time-dependent reconnection model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Kiehas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of magnetized plasmas, reconnection appears as an essential process for the description of plasma acceleration and changing magnetic field topology. Under the variety of reconnection regions in our solar system, we focus our research onto the Earth's magnetotail. Under certain conditions a Near Earth Neutral Line (NENL is free to evolve in the current sheet of the magnetotail. Reconnection in this region leads to the formation of Earth- and tailward propagating plasma bulges, which can be detected by the Cluster or Geotail spacecraft. Observations give rise to the assumption that the evolved reconnection line does not provide a steady state behavior, but is propagating towards the tail (e.g., Baker et al., 2002. Based on a time-dependent variant of the Petschek model of magnetic reconnection, we present a method that includes an X-line motion and discuss the effects of such a motion. We focus our main interest on the shock structure and the magnetic field behavior, both for the switch-on and the switch-off phase.

  19. Vorticity dipoles and a theoretical model of a finite force at the moving contact line singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peter; Devoria, Adam; Mohseni, Kamran

    2017-11-01

    In the well known works of Moffatt (1964) and Huh & Scriven (1971), an infinite force was reported at the moving contact line (MCL) and attributed to a non-integrable stress along the fluid-solid boundary. In our recent investigation of the boundary driven wedge, a model of the MCL, we find that the classical solution theoretically predicts a finite force at the contact line if the forces applied by the two boundaries that make up the corner are taken into consideration. Mathematically, this force can be obtained by the complex contour integral of the holomorphic vorticity-pressure function given by G = μω + ip . Alternatively, this force can also be found using a carefully defined real integral that incorporates the two boundaries. Motivated by this discovery, we have found that the rate of change in circulation, viscous energy dissipation, and viscous energy flux is also finite per unit contact line length. The analysis presented demonstrates that despite a singular stress and a relatively simple geometry, the no-slip semi-infinite wedge is capable of capturing some physical quantities of interest. Furthermore, this result provides a foundation for other challenging topics such as dynamic contact angle.

  20. A Bilevel Programming Model to Optimize Train Operation Based on Satisfaction for an Intercity Rail Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The passenger travel demands for intercity rail lines fluctuate obviously during different time periods, which makes the rail departments unable to establish an even train operation scheme. This paper considers an optimization problem for train operations which respond to passenger travel demands of different periods in intercity rail lines. A satisfactory function of passenger travelling is proposed by means of analyzing the passengers’ travel choice behavior and correlative influencing factors. On this basis, the paper formulates a bilevel programming model which maximizes interests of railway enterprises and travelling satisfaction of each passenger. The trains operation in different periods can be optimized through upper layer planning of the model, while considering the passenger flow distribution problem based on the Wardrop user equilibrium principle in the lower layer planning. Then, a genetic algorithm is designed according to model features for solving the upper laying. The Frank-Wolfe algorithm is used for solving the lower layer planning. Finally, a numerical example is provided to demonstrate the application of the method proposed in this paper.

  1. Main steam line break accident simulation of APR1400 using the model of ATLAS facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekariansyah, A. S.; Deswandri; Sunaryo, Geni R.

    2018-02-01

    A main steam line break simulation for APR1400 as an advanced design of PWR has been performed using the RELAP5 code. The simulation was conducted in a model of thermal-hydraulic test facility called as ATLAS, which represents a scaled down facility of the APR1400 design. The main steam line break event is described in a open-access safety report document, in which initial conditions and assumptionsfor the analysis were utilized in performing the simulation and analysis of the selected parameter. The objective of this work was to conduct a benchmark activities by comparing the simulation results of the CESEC-III code as a conservative approach code with the results of RELAP5 as a best-estimate code. Based on the simulation results, a general similarity in the behavior of selected parameters was observed between the two codes. However the degree of accuracy still needs further research an analysis by comparing with the other best-estimate code. Uncertainties arising from the ATLAS model should be minimized by taking into account much more specific data in developing the APR1400 model.

  2. The human hepatocyte cell lines IHH and HepaRG: models to study glucose, lipid and lipoprotein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanez, Carolina Huaman; Caron, Sandrine; Briand, Olivier; Dehondt, Hélène; Duplan, Isabelle; Kuipers, Folkert; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Clavey, Véronique; Staels, Bart

    2012-07-01

    Metabolic diseases reach epidemic proportions. A better knowledge of the associated alterations in the metabolic pathways in the liver is necessary. These studies need in vitro human cell models. Several human hepatoma models are used, but the response of many metabolic pathways to physiological stimuli is often lost. Here, we characterize two human hepatocyte cell lines, IHH and HepaRG, by analysing the expression and regulation of genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. Our results show that the glycolysis pathway is activated by glucose and insulin in both lines. Gluconeogenesis gene expression is induced by forskolin in IHH cells and inhibited by insulin in both cell lines. The lipogenic pathway is regulated by insulin in IHH cells. Finally, both cell lines secrete apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins, an effect promoted by increasing glucose concentrations. These two human cell lines are thus interesting models to study the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism.

  3. Modeling a distributed environment for a petroleum reservoir engineering application with software product line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidt, Rafael de Faria; Vilain, Patrícia; Dantas, M A R

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum reservoir engineering is a complex and interesting field that requires large amount of computational facilities to achieve successful results. Usually, software environments for this field are developed without taking care out of possible interactions and extensibilities required by reservoir engineers. In this paper, we present a research work which it is characterized by the design and implementation based on a software product line model for a real distributed reservoir engineering environment. Experimental results indicate successfully the utilization of this approach for the design of distributed software architecture. In addition, all components from the proposal provided greater visibility of the organization and processes for the reservoir engineers

  4. Modeling a distributed environment for a petroleum reservoir engineering application with software product line

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria Scheidt, Rafael; Vilain, Patrícia; Dantas, M. A. R.

    2014-10-01

    Petroleum reservoir engineering is a complex and interesting field that requires large amount of computational facilities to achieve successful results. Usually, software environments for this field are developed without taking care out of possible interactions and extensibilities required by reservoir engineers. In this paper, we present a research work which it is characterized by the design and implementation based on a software product line model for a real distributed reservoir engineering environment. Experimental results indicate successfully the utilization of this approach for the design of distributed software architecture. In addition, all components from the proposal provided greater visibility of the organization and processes for the reservoir engineers.

  5. At-line monitoring of key parameters of nisin fermentation by near infrared spectroscopy, chemometric modeling and model improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei-Liang; Du, Yi-Ping; Zhou, Yong-Can; Yang, Shuang; Lu, Jia-Hui; Zhao, Hong-Yu; Wang, Yao; Teng, Li-Rong

    2012-03-01

    An analytical procedure has been developed for at-line (fast off-line) monitoring of 4 key parameters including nisin titer (NT), the concentration of reducing sugars, cell concentration and pH during a nisin fermentation process. This procedure is based on near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and Partial Least Squares (PLS). Samples without any preprocessing were collected at intervals of 1 h during fifteen batch of fermentations. These fermentation processes were implemented in 3 different 5 l fermentors at various conditions. NIR spectra of the samples were collected in 10 min. And then, PLS was used for modeling the relationship between NIR spectra and the key parameters which were determined by reference methods. Monte Carlo Partial Least Squares (MCPLS) was applied to identify the outliers and select the most efficacious methods for preprocessing spectra, wavelengths and the suitable number of latent variables (n (LV)). Then, the optimum models for determining NT, concentration of reducing sugars, cell concentration and pH were established. The correlation coefficients of calibration set (R (c)) were 0.8255, 0.9000, 0.9883 and 0.9581, respectively. These results demonstrated that this method can be successfully applied to at-line monitor of NT, concentration of reducing sugars, cell concentration and pH during nisin fermentation processes.

  6. Modeling and identification of ARMG models for stochastic processes: application to on-line computation of the power spectral density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwingelstein, Gilles; Thabet, Gabriel.

    1977-01-01

    Control algorithms for components of nuclear power plants are currently based on external diagnostic methods. Modeling and identification techniques for autoregressive moving average models (ARMA) for stochastic processes are described. The identified models provide a means of estimating the power spectral density with improved accuracy and computer time compared with the classical methods. They are particularly will suited for on-line estimation of the power spectral density. The observable stochastic process y (t) is modeled assuming that it is the output of a linear filter driven by Gaussian while noise w (t). Two identification schemes were tested to find the orders m and n of the ARMA (m,n) models and to estimate the parameters of the recursion equation relating the input and output signals. The first scheme consists in transforming the ARMA model to an autoregressive model. The parameters of this AR model are obtained using least squares estimation techniques. The second scheme consists in finding the parameters of the ARMA by nonlinear programming techniques. The power spectral density of y(t) is instantaneously deduced from these ARMA models [fr

  7. Mathematical model and metaheuristics for simultaneous balancing and sequencing of a robotic mixed-model assembly line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zixiang; Janardhanan, Mukund Nilakantan; Tang, Qiuhua; Nielsen, Peter

    2018-05-01

    This article presents the first method to simultaneously balance and sequence robotic mixed-model assembly lines (RMALB/S), which involves three sub-problems: task assignment, model sequencing and robot allocation. A new mixed-integer programming model is developed to minimize makespan and, using CPLEX solver, small-size problems are solved for optimality. Two metaheuristics, the restarted simulated annealing algorithm and co-evolutionary algorithm, are developed and improved to address this NP-hard problem. The restarted simulated annealing method replaces the current temperature with a new temperature to restart the search process. The co-evolutionary method uses a restart mechanism to generate a new population by modifying several vectors simultaneously. The proposed algorithms are tested on a set of benchmark problems and compared with five other high-performing metaheuristics. The proposed algorithms outperform their original editions and the benchmarked methods. The proposed algorithms are able to solve the balancing and sequencing problem of a robotic mixed-model assembly line effectively and efficiently.

  8. Improved cell line IPEC-J2, characterized as a model for porcine jejunal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke S Zakrzewski

    Full Text Available Cell lines matching the source epithelium are indispensable for investigating porcine intestinal transport and barrier properties on a subcellular or molecular level and furthermore help to reduce animal usage. The porcine jejunal cell line IPEC-J2 is established as an in vitro model for porcine infection studies but exhibits atypically high transepithelial resistances (TER and only low active transport rates so that the effect of nutritional factors cannot be reliably investigated. This study aimed to properly remodel IPEC-J2 and then to re-characterize these cells regarding epithelial architecture, expression of barrier-relevant tight junction (TJ proteins, adequate TER and transport function, and reaction to secretagogues. For this, IPEC-J2 monolayers were cultured on permeable supports, either under conventional (fetal bovine serum, FBS or species-specific (porcine serum, PS conditions. Porcine jejunal mucosa was analyzed for comparison. Main results were that under PS conditions (IPEC-J2/PS, compared to conventional FBS culture (IPEC-J2/FBS, the cell height increased 6-fold while the cell diameter was reduced by 50%. The apical cell membrane of IPEC-J2/PS exhibited typical microvilli. Most importantly, PS caused a one order of magnitude reduction of TER and of trans- and paracellular resistance, and a 2-fold increase in secretory response to forskolin when compared to FBS condition. TJ ultrastructure and appearance of TJ proteins changed dramatically in IPEC-J2/PS. Most parameters measured under PS conditions were much closer to those of typical pig jejunocytes than ever reported since the cell line's initial establishment in 1989. In conclusion, IPEC-J2, if cultured under defined species-specific conditions, forms a suitable model for investigating porcine paracellular intestinal barrier function.

  9. Characterization of the replication timing program of 6 human model cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djihad Hadjadj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During the S-phase, the DNA replication process is finely orchestrated and regulated by two programs: the spatial program that determines where replication will start in the genome (Cadoret et al. (2008 Oct 14, Cayrou et al. (2011 Sep, Picard et al. (2014 May 1 [1–3], and the temporal program that determines when during the S phase different parts of the genome are replicated and when origins are activated. The temporal program is so well conserved for each cell type from independent individuals [4] that it is possible to identify a cell type from an unknown sample just by determining its replication timing program. Moreover, replicative domains are strongly correlated with the partition of the genome into topological domains (determined by the Hi-C method, Lieberman-Aiden et al. (2009 Oct 9, Pope et al. (2014 Nov 20 [5,6]. On the one hand, replicative areas are well defined and participate in shaping the spatial organization of the genome for a given cell type. On the other hand, studies on the timing program during cell differentiation showed a certain plasticity of this program according to the stage of cell differentiation Hiratani et al. (2008 Oct 7, 2010 Feb [7,8]. Domains where a replication timing change was observed went through a nuclear re-localization. Thus the temporal program of replication can be considered as an epigenetic mark Hiratani and Gilbert (2009 Feb 16 [9]. We present the genomic data of replication timing in 6 human model cell lines: U2OS (GSM2111308, RKO (GSM2111309, HEK 293T (GSM2111310, HeLa (GSM2111311, MRC5-SV (GSM2111312 and K562 (GSM2111313. A short comparative analysis was performed that allowed us to define regions common to the 6 cell lines. These replication timing data can be taken into account when performing studies that use these model cell lines.

  10. The Impact of Noise Models on Capacity Performance of Distribution Broadband over Power Lines Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios G. Lazaropoulos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers broadband potential of distribution Broadband over Power Lines (BPL networks when different well-known noise models of the BPL literature are applied. The contribution of this paper is twofold. First, the seven most representative and used noise models of the BPL literature are synopsized in this paper. With reference to this set, the broadband performance of a great number of distribution BPL topologies either Overhead (OV or Underground (UN, either Medium-Voltage (MV or Low-Voltage (LV, is investigated in terms of suitable capacity metrics. Second, based on the proposed capacity metrics, a comparative capacity analysis is performed among various well-validated noise models. Through the careful study of its results, it is demonstrated that during capacity computations of distribution BPL networks, the flat Additive White Gaussian Noise (FL noise model can be comfortably assumed as an efficient noise model either in 3–30 MHz or in 3–88 MHz frequency range since its capacity differences with the other well-proven noise models are negligible.

  11. Multi-objective optimization algorithms for mixed model assembly line balancing problem with parallel workstations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rabbani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with mixed model assembly line (MMAL balancing problem of type-I. In MMALs several products are made on an assembly line while the similarity of these products is so high. As a result, it is possible to assemble several types of products simultaneously without any additional setup times. The problem has some particular features such as parallel workstations and precedence constraints in dynamic periods in which each period also effects on its next period. The research intends to reduce the number of workstations and maximize the workload smoothness between workstations. Dynamic periods are used to determine all variables in different periods to achieve efficient solutions. A non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II and multi-objective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO are used to solve the problem. The proposed model is validated with GAMS software for small size problem and the performance of the foregoing algorithms is compared with each other based on some comparison metrics. The NSGA-II outperforms MOPSO with respect to some comparison metrics used in this paper, but in other metrics MOPSO is better than NSGA-II. Finally, conclusion and future research is provided.

  12. High resolution measurements and modeling of auroral hydrogen emission line profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Lanchester

    Full Text Available Measurements in the visible wavelength range at high spectral resolution (1.3 Å have been made at Longyearbyen, Svalbard (15.8 E,78.2 N during an interval of intense proton precipitation. The shape and Doppler shift of hydrogen Balmer beta line profiles have been compared with model line profiles, using as input ion energy spectra from almost coincident passes of the FAST and DMSP spacecraft. The comparison shows that the simulation contains the important physical processes that produce the profiles, and confirms that measured changes in the shape and peak wave-length of the hydrogen profiles are the result of changing energy input. This combination of high resolution measurements with modeling provides a method of estimating the incoming energy and changes in flux of precipitating protons over Svalbard, for given energy and pitch-angle distributions. Whereas for electron precipitation, information on the incident particles is derived from brightness and brightness ratios which require at least two spectral windows, for proton precipitation the Doppler profile of resulting hydrogen emission is directly related to the energy and energy flux of the incident energetic protons and can be used to gather information about the source region. As well as the expected Doppler shift to shorter wavelengths, the measured profiles have a significant red-shifted component, the result of upward flowing emitting hydrogen atoms.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena

  13. High resolution measurements and modeling of auroral hydrogen emission line profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Lanchester

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements in the visible wavelength range at high spectral resolution (1.3 Å have been made at Longyearbyen, Svalbard (15.8 E,78.2 N during an interval of intense proton precipitation. The shape and Doppler shift of hydrogen Balmer beta line profiles have been compared with model line profiles, using as input ion energy spectra from almost coincident passes of the FAST and DMSP spacecraft. The comparison shows that the simulation contains the important physical processes that produce the profiles, and confirms that measured changes in the shape and peak wave-length of the hydrogen profiles are the result of changing energy input. This combination of high resolution measurements with modeling provides a method of estimating the incoming energy and changes in flux of precipitating protons over Svalbard, for given energy and pitch-angle distributions. Whereas for electron precipitation, information on the incident particles is derived from brightness and brightness ratios which require at least two spectral windows, for proton precipitation the Doppler profile of resulting hydrogen emission is directly related to the energy and energy flux of the incident energetic protons and can be used to gather information about the source region. As well as the expected Doppler shift to shorter wavelengths, the measured profiles have a significant red-shifted component, the result of upward flowing emitting hydrogen atoms.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena

  14. Study of coastal line change modelling around the NPP site of Muria Peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumpal Pahala Tua Sinaga; Henu Susiati

    2007-01-01

    Coastal areas always changing due to two energies coming sea and land congregate. The changes are the forward-backward coastal lines alteration. The coastal lines alteration is caused by coastal sediment transport such as Long shore Sediment Transport and Cross-shore Sediment Transport. This research was aimed to model the sediment transport rate, direction and sediment transport volume and also to investigate the abrasion and accretion areas in Muria Peninsula. The method used in this sampling was purposive sampling method and data processing using NEMOS software. Overall result from the sediment transport model in Semenanjung Muria, the sediment transport rate were Q + =2471331.00 m 3 /year, Q - =-1325456.80 m 3 /year, Q gs =3796792.60 m 3 /year and Q net =1145874.40 m 3 /year; average abrasion and accretion distance were -0.982 m/year and 0.770 m/year, transport volume to right = 13431.15 m 3 /year and to left = -7203.53 m 3 /year. (author)

  15. Discrete event model-based simulation for train movement on a single-line railway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiao-Ming; Li Ke-Ping; Yang Li-Xing

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a discrete event model-based approach to simulate train movement with the considered energy-saving factor. We conduct extensive case studies to show the dynamic characteristics of the traffic flow and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. The simulation results indicate that the proposed discrete event model-based simulation approach is suitable for characterizing the movements of a group of trains on a single railway line with less iterations and CPU time. Additionally, some other qualitative and quantitative characteristics are investigated. In particular, because of the cumulative influence from the previous trains, the following trains should be accelerated or braked frequently to control the headway distance, leading to more energy consumption. (general)

  16. Limb-darkening coefficients from line-blanketed non-LTE hot-star model atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, D. C.; Howarth, I. D.

    2016-02-01

    We present grids of limb-darkening coefficients computed from non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE), line-blanketed TLUSTY model atmospheres, covering effective-temperature and surface-gravity ranges of 15-55 kK and 4.75 dex (cgs) down to the effective Eddington limit, at 2×, 1×, 0.5× (Large Magellanic Cloud), 0.2× (Small Magellanic Cloud), and 0.1× solar. Results are given for the Bessell UBVRICJKHL, Sloan ugriz, Strömgren ubvy, WFCAM ZYJHK, Hipparcos, Kepler, and Tycho passbands, in each case characterized by several different limb-darkening `laws'. We examine the sensitivity of limb darkening to temperature, gravity, metallicity, microturbulent velocity, and wavelength, and make a comparison with LTE models. The dependence on metallicity is very weak, but limb darkening is a moderately strong function of log g in this temperature regime.

  17. Computer Simulation for Dispersion of Air Pollution Released from a Line Source According to Gaussian Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emad, A.A.; El Shazly, S.M.; Kassem, Kh.O.

    2010-01-01

    A line source model, developed in laboratory of environmental physics, faculty of science at Qena, Egypt is proposed to describe the downwind dispersion of pollutants near roadways, at different cities in Egypt. The model is based on the Gaussian plume methodology and is used to predict air pollutants' concentrations near roadways. In this direction, simple software has been presented in this paper, developed by authors, adopted completely Graphical User Interface (GUI) technique for operating in various windows-based microcomputers. The software interface and code have been designed by Microsoft Visual basic 6.0 based on the Gaussian diffusion equation. This software is developed to predict concentrations of gaseous pollutants (eg. CO, SO 2 , NO 2 and particulates) at a user specified receptor grid

  18. Hydrogen Balmer alpha intensity distributions and line profiles from multiple scattering theory using realistic geocoronal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. E., Jr.; Meier, R. R.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1987-01-01

    The H Balmer alpha nightglow is investigated by using Monte Carlo models of asymmetric geocoronal atomic hydrogen distributions as input to a radiative transfer model of solar Lyman-beta radiation in the thermosphere and atmosphere. It is shown that it is essential to include multiple scattering of Lyman-beta radiation in the interpretation of Balmer alpha airglow data. Observations of diurnal variation in the Balmer alpha airglow showing slightly greater intensities in the morning relative to evening are consistent with theory. No evidence is found for anything other than a single sinusoidal diurnal variation of exobase density. Dramatic changes in effective temperature derived from the observed Balmer alpha line profiles are expected on the basis of changing illumination conditions in the thermosphere and exosphere as different regions of the sky are scanned.

  19. An interaction analysis of twin surface cracks by the line-spring model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.; Yang, W.H.; Choy, Y.S.; Lee, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    The fracture mechanics analysis of surface cracks is important for the integrity evaluation of flawed structural components. The objective of this paper is to numerically investigate the interaction effect of twin surface cracks in plate and cylindrical geometrie. First the usefulness of the line-spring model is verified by analyzing a single surface crack in a plate, and then the model is extended to twin surface crack in plate and cylindrical geometries. For the case of a finite plate under uniaxial loading, the effect of crack spacing on the stress intensity factor is negligible. However, for the case of a cylinder under moderate internal pressure, a significant increase in stress intensity factor is observed at the deepest point of the surface crack. (orig.)

  20. A renormalized -group attempt to obtain the exact transition line of the square - lattice bond - dilute Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsallis, C.; Levy, S.V.F.

    1979-05-01

    Two different renormalization-group approaches are used to determine approximate solutions for the paramagnetic-ferromagnetic transition line of the square-lattice bond-dilute first-neighbour-interaction Ising model. (Author) [pt

  1. Laser-induced Breakdown spectroscopy quantitative analysis method via adaptive analytical line selection and relevance vector machine regression model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jianhong; Yi, Cancan; Xu, Jinwu; Ma, Xianghong

    2015-01-01

    A new LIBS quantitative analysis method based on analytical line adaptive selection and Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) regression model is proposed. First, a scheme of adaptively selecting analytical line is put forward in order to overcome the drawback of high dependency on a priori knowledge. The candidate analytical lines are automatically selected based on the built-in characteristics of spectral lines, such as spectral intensity, wavelength and width at half height. The analytical lines which will be used as input variables of regression model are determined adaptively according to the samples for both training and testing. Second, an LIBS quantitative analysis method based on RVM is presented. The intensities of analytical lines and the elemental concentrations of certified standard samples are used to train the RVM regression model. The predicted elemental concentration analysis results will be given with a form of confidence interval of probabilistic distribution, which is helpful for evaluating the uncertainness contained in the measured spectra. Chromium concentration analysis experiments of 23 certified standard high-alloy steel samples have been carried out. The multiple correlation coefficient of the prediction was up to 98.85%, and the average relative error of the prediction was 4.01%. The experiment results showed that the proposed LIBS quantitative analysis method achieved better prediction accuracy and better modeling robustness compared with the methods based on partial least squares regression, artificial neural network and standard support vector machine. - Highlights: • Both training and testing samples are considered for analytical lines selection. • The analytical lines are auto-selected based on the built-in characteristics of spectral lines. • The new method can achieve better prediction accuracy and modeling robustness. • Model predictions are given with confidence interval of probabilistic distribution

  2. Model of directed lines for square ice with second-neighbor and third-neighbor interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirov, Mikhail V.

    2018-02-01

    The investigation of the properties of nanoconfined systems is one of the most rapidly developing scientific fields. Recently it has been established that water monolayer between two graphene sheets forms square ice. Because of the energetic disadvantage, in the structure of the square ice there are no longitudinally arranged molecules. The result is that the structure is formed by unidirectional straight-lines of hydrogen bonds only. A simple but accurate discrete model of square ice with second-neighbor and third-neighbor interactions is proposed. According to this model, the ground state includes all configurations which do not contain three neighboring unidirectional chains of hydrogen bonds. Each triplet increases the energy by the same value. This new model differs from an analogous model with long-range interactions where in the ground state all neighboring chains are antiparallel. The new model is suitable for the corresponding system of point electric (and magnetic) dipoles on the square lattice. It allows separately estimating the different contributions to the total binding energy and helps to understand the properties of infinite monolayers and finite nanostructures. Calculations of the binding energy for square ice and for point dipole system are performed using the packages TINKER and LAMMPS.

  3. Numerical Predictions of Sonic Boom Signatures for a Straight Line Segmented Leading Edge Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Wilcox, Floyd J.; Cliff, Susan; Thomas, Scott

    2012-01-01

    A sonic boom wind tunnel test was conducted on a straight-line segmented leading edge (SLSLE) model in the NASA Langley 4- by 4- Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). The purpose of the test was to determine whether accurate sonic boom measurements could be obtained while continuously moving the SLSLE model past a conical pressure probe. Sonic boom signatures were also obtained using the conventional move-pause data acquisition method for comparison. The continuous data acquisition approach allows for accurate signatures approximately 15 times faster than a move-pause technique. These successful results provide an incentive for future testing with greatly increased efficiency using the continuous model translation technique with the single probe to measure sonic boom signatures. Two widely used NASA codes, USM3D (Navier-Stokes) and CART3D-AERO (Euler, adjoint-based adaptive mesh), were used to compute off-body sonic boom pressure signatures of the SLSLE model at several different altitudes below the model at Mach 2.0. The computed pressure signatures compared well with wind tunnel data. The effect of the different altitude for signature extraction was evaluated by extrapolating the near field signatures to the ground and comparing pressure signatures and sonic boom loudness levels.

  4. A Path Loss Model for Non-Line-of-Sight Ultraviolet Multiple Scattering Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadler BrianM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultraviolet (UV signal transmission undergoes rich scattering and strong absorption by atmospheric particulates. We develop a path loss model for a Non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS link. The model is built upon probability theory governing random migration of photons in free space, undergoing scattering, in terms of angular direction and distance. The model analytically captures the contributions of different scattering orders. Thus it relaxes the assumptions of single scattering theory and provides more realistic results. This allows us to assess the importance of high-order scattering, such as in a thick atmosphere environment, where short range NLOS UV communication is enhanced by hazy or foggy weather. By simulation, it is shown that the model coincides with a previously developed Monte Carlo model. Additional numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effects of link geometry and atmospheric conditions. The results indicate the inherent tradeoffs in beamwidth, pointing angles, range, absorption, and scattering and so are valuable for NLOS communication system design.

  5. Development of a plug-in for Variability Modeling in Software Product Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Lucía López-Araujo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Las Líneas de Productos de Software (LPS toman ventaja económica de las similitudes y variación entre un conjunto de sistemas de software dentro de un dominio específico. La Ingeniería de Líneas de Productos de Software por lo tanto, define una serie de procesos para el desarrollo de LPS que consideran las similitudes y variación a lo largo del ciclo devida. El modelado de variabilidad, en consecuencia, es una actividad esencial en un enfoque de Ingeniería de Líneas de Productos de Software. Existen varias técnicas para modelado de variabilidad. Entre ellas resalta COVAMOF que permite modelar los puntos de variación, variantes y dependencias como entidades de primera clase, proporcionando una manera uniforme de representarlos en los diversos niveles de abstracción de una LPS. Para poder aprovechar los beneficios de COVAMOF es necesario contar con una herramienta, de otra manera el modelado y la administración de la variabilidad pueden resultar una labor ardua para el ingeniero de software. Este trabajo presenta el desarrollo de un plug-in de COVAMOF para Eclipse.Software Product Lines (SPL take economic advantage of commonality and variability among a set of software systems that exist within a specific domain. Therefore, Software Product Line Engineering defines a series of processes for the development of a SPL that consider commonality and variability during the software life cycle. Variability modeling is therefore an essential activity in a Software Product Line Engineering approach. There are several techniques for variability modeling nowadays. COVAMOF stands out among them since it allows the modeling of variation points, variants and dependencies as first class elements. COVAMOF, therefore, provides an uniform manner for representing such concepts in different levels of abstraction within a SPL. In order to take advantage of COVAMOF benefits, it is necessary to have a computer aided tool, otherwise variability modeling and

  6. Nanotopography induced contact guidance of the F11 cell line during neuronal differentiation: a neuronal model cell line for tissue scaffold development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieringa, Paul; Micera, Silvestro; Tonazzini, Ilaria; Cecchini, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The F11 hybridoma, a dorsal root ganglion-derived cell line, was used to investigate the response of nociceptive sensory neurons to nanotopographical guidance cues. This established this cell line as a model of peripheral sensory neuron growth for tissue scaffold design. Cells were seeded on substrates of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) films imprinted via nanoimprint lithography (NIL) with a grating pattern of nano-scale grooves and ridges. Different ridge widths were employed to alter the focal adhesion formation, thereby changing the cell/substrate interaction. Differentiation was stimulated with forskolin in culture medium consisting of either 1 or 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Per medium condition, similar neurite alignment was achieved over the four day period, with the 1% serum condition exhibiting longer, more aligned neurites. Immunostaining for focal adhesions found the 1% FBS condition to also have fewer, less developed focal adhesions. The robust response of the F11 to guidance cues further builds on the utility of this cell line as a sensory neuron model, representing a useful tool to explore the design of regenerative guidance tissue scaffolds. (paper)

  7. Silver Nanoparticle-Mediated Cellular Responses in Various Cell Lines: An in Vitro Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have attracted increased interest and are currently used in various industries including medicine, cosmetics, textiles, electronics, and pharmaceuticals, owing to their unique physical and chemical properties, particularly as antimicrobial and anticancer agents. Recently, several studies have reported both beneficial and toxic effects of AgNPs on various prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. To develop nanoparticles for mediated therapy, several laboratories have used a variety of cell lines under in vitro conditions to evaluate the properties, mode of action, differential responses, and mechanisms of action of AgNPs. In vitro models are simple, cost-effective, rapid, and can be used to easily assess efficacy and performance. The cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and biocompatibility of AgNPs depend on many factors such as size, shape, surface charge, surface coating, solubility, concentration, surface functionalization, distribution of particles, mode of entry, mode of action, growth media, exposure time, and cell type. Cellular responses to AgNPs are different in each cell type and depend on the physical and chemical nature of AgNPs. This review evaluates significant contributions to the literature on biological applications of AgNPs. It begins with an introduction to AgNPs, with particular attention to their overall impact on cellular effects. The main objective of this review is to elucidate the reasons for different cell types exhibiting differential responses to nanoparticles even when they possess similar size, shape, and other parameters. Firstly, we discuss the cellular effects of AgNPs on a variety of cell lines; Secondly, we discuss the mechanisms of action of AgNPs in various cellular systems, and try to elucidate how AgNPs interact with different mammalian cell lines and produce significant effects; Finally, we discuss the cellular activation of various signaling molecules in response to AgNPs, and conclude with

  8. Revisiting Vertical Models To Simulate the Line Shape of Electronic Spectra Adopting Cartesian and Internal Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo, Javier; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2016-10-11

    Vertical models for the simulation of spectroscopic line shapes expand the potential energy surface (PES) of the final state around the equilibrium geometry of the initial state. These models provide, in principle, a better approximation of the region of the band maximum. At variance, adiabatic models expand each PES around its own minimum. In the harmonic approximation, when the minimum energy structures of the two electronic states are connected by large structural displacements, adiabatic models can breakdown and are outperformed by vertical models. However, the practical application of vertical models faces the issues related to the necessity to perform a frequency analysis at a nonstationary point. In this contribution we revisit vertical models in harmonic approximation adopting both Cartesian (x) and valence internal curvilinear coordinates (s). We show that when x coordinates are used, the vibrational analysis at nonstationary points leads to a deficient description of low-frequency modes, for which spurious imaginary frequencies may even appear. This issue is solved when s coordinates are adopted. It is however necessary to account for the second derivative of s with respect to x, which here we compute analytically. We compare the performance of the vertical model in the s-frame with respect to adiabatic models and previously proposed vertical models in x- or Q 1 -frame, where Q 1 are the normal coordinates of the initial state computed as combination of Cartesian coordinates. We show that for rigid molecules the vertical approach in the s-frame provides a description of the final state very close to the adiabatic picture. For sizable displacements it is a solid alternative to adiabatic models, and it is not affected by the issues of vertical models in x- and Q 1 -frames, which mainly arise when temperature effects are included. In principle the G matrix depends on s, and this creates nonorthogonality problems of the Duschinsky matrix connecting the normal

  9. On modeling the sound propagation through a lined duct with a modified Ingard-Myers boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Fang, Yi; Zhao, Chao; Zhang, Xin

    2018-06-01

    A duct acoustics model is an essential component of an impedance eduction technique and its computation cost determines the impedance measurement efficiency. In this paper, a model is developed for the sound propagation through a lined duct carrying a uniform mean flow. In contrast to many existing models, the interface between the liner and the duct field is defined with a modified Ingard-Myers boundary condition that takes account of the effect of the boundary layer above the liner. A mode-matching method is used to couple the unlined and lined duct segments for the model development. For the lined duct segment, the eigenvalue problem resulted from the modified boundary condition is solved by an integration scheme which, on the one hand, allows the lined duct modes to be computed in an efficient manner, and on the other hand, orders the modes automatically. The duct acoustics model developed from the solved lined duct modes is shown to converge more rapidly than the one developed from the rigid-walled duct modes. Validation against the experiment data in the literature shows that the proposed model is able to predict more accurately the liner performance measured by the two-source method. This, however, cannot be made by a duct acoustics model associated with the conventional Ingard-Myers boundary condition. The proposed model has the potential to be integrated into an impedance eduction technique for more reliable liner measurement.

  10. Transmission line model and fields analysis of metamaterial absorber in the terahertz band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qi-Ye; Xie, Yun-Song; Zhang, Huai-Wu; Yang, Qing-Hui; Li, Yuan-Xun; Liu, Ying-Li

    2009-10-26

    Metamaterial (MM) absorber is a novel device to provide near-unity absorption to electromagnetic wave, which is especially important in the terahertz (THz) band. However, the principal physics of MM absorber is still far from being understood. In this work, a transmission line (TL) model for MM absorber was proposed, and with this model the S-parameters, energy consumption, and the power loss density of the absorber were calculated. By this TL model, the asymmetric phenomenon of THz absorption in MM absorber is unambiguously demonstrated, and it clarifies that strong absorption of this absorber under studied is mainly related to the LC resonance of the split-ring-resonator structure. The distribution of power loss density in the absorber indicates that the electromagnetic wave is firstly concentrated into some specific locations of the absorber and then be strongly consumed. This feature as electromagnetic wave trapper renders MM absorber a potential energy converter. Based on TL model, some design strategies to widen the absorption band were also proposed for the purposes to extend its application areas.

  11. Modeling a two-layer flow system at the subarctic, subalpine tree line during snowmelt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenders, Erica E.; Woo, Ming-Ko

    2002-10-01

    In the subarctic it is common to encounter a two-layer flow system consisting of a porous organic cover overlying frozen or unfrozen mineral soils with much lower hydraulic conductivities. The "simple lumped reservoir parametric," or "semidistributed land-use-based runoff processes" (SLURP), model was adapted to simulate runoff generated by such a flow system from an upland shrub land to an open woodland downslope. A subalpine site in Wolf Creek, Yukon, Canada, was subdivided into two aggregated simulation areas (ASA), each being a unit characterized by a set of parameters. The model computes the vertical water balance and flow generation from several storages, and then routes the water out of the ASA. When applied to the 1999 snowmelt season, the model simulated the very low lateral flow and a large increase in storage in the mineral soil, as was observed in the field. The model was used to assess the sensitivity of the two-layer flow system under a range of temperature, snow cover, and frost conditions. Results show that within the range of possible climatic conditions, the hydrologic system is unlikely to yield significant runoff across the subalpine tree line, but if ground ice is abundant in the soil pores, percolation will be limited and fast flow from the surface layer is enhanced.

  12. Modeling and simulations for molecular scale hydrodynamics of the moving contact line in immiscible two-phase flows

    KAUST Repository

    Qian, Tiezheng

    2009-10-29

    This paper starts with an introduction to the Onsager principle of minimum energy dissipation which governs the optimal paths of deviation and restoration to equilibrium. Then there is a review of the variational approach to moving contact line hydrodynamics. To demonstrate the validity of our continuum hydrodynamic model, numerical results from model calculations and molecular dynamics simulations are presented for immiscible Couette and Poiseuille flows past homogeneous solid surfaces, with remarkable overall agreement. Our continuum model is also used to study the contact line motion on surfaces patterned with stripes of different contact angles (i.e. surfaces of varying wettability). Continuum calculations predict the stick-slip motion for contact lines moving along these patterned surfaces, in quantitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulation results. This periodic motion is tunable through pattern period (geometry) and contrast in wetting property (chemistry). The consequence of stick-slip contact line motion on energy dissipation is discussed. © 2009 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  13. A transmission line model for propagation in elliptical core optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgantzos, E.; Papageorgiou, C.; Boucouvalas, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The calculation of mode propagation constants of elliptical core fibers has been the purpose of extended research leading to many notable methods, with the classic step index solution based on Mathieu functions. This paper seeks to derive a new innovative method for the determination of mode propagation constants in single mode fibers with elliptic core by modeling the elliptical fiber as a series of connected coupled transmission line elements. We develop a matrix formulation of the transmission line and the resonance of the circuits is used to calculate the mode propagation constants. The technique, used with success in the case of cylindrical fibers, is now being extended for the case of fibers with elliptical cross section. The advantage of this approach is that it is very well suited to be able to calculate the mode dispersion of arbitrary refractive index profile elliptical waveguides. The analysis begins with the deployment Maxwell's equations adjusted for elliptical coordinates. Further algebraic analysis leads to a set of equations where we are faced with the appearance of harmonics. Taking into consideration predefined fixed number of harmonics simplifies the problem and enables the use of the resonant circuits approach. According to each case, programs have been created in Matlab, providing with a series of results (mode propagation constants) that are further compared with corresponding results from the ready known Mathieu functions method.

  14. A transmission line model for propagation in elliptical core optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgantzos, E.; Boucouvalas, A. C.; Papageorgiou, C.

    2015-01-01

    The calculation of mode propagation constants of elliptical core fibers has been the purpose of extended research leading to many notable methods, with the classic step index solution based on Mathieu functions. This paper seeks to derive a new innovative method for the determination of mode propagation constants in single mode fibers with elliptic core by modeling the elliptical fiber as a series of connected coupled transmission line elements. We develop a matrix formulation of the transmission line and the resonance of the circuits is used to calculate the mode propagation constants. The technique, used with success in the case of cylindrical fibers, is now being extended for the case of fibers with elliptical cross section. The advantage of this approach is that it is very well suited to be able to calculate the mode dispersion of arbitrary refractive index profile elliptical waveguides. The analysis begins with the deployment Maxwell’s equations adjusted for elliptical coordinates. Further algebraic analysis leads to a set of equations where we are faced with the appearance of harmonics. Taking into consideration predefined fixed number of harmonics simplifies the problem and enables the use of the resonant circuits approach. According to each case, programs have been created in Matlab, providing with a series of results (mode propagation constants) that are further compared with corresponding results from the ready known Mathieu functions method

  15. A gradient stable scheme for a phase field model for the moving contact line problem

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Min

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, an efficient numerical scheme is designed for a phase field model for the moving contact line problem, which consists of a coupled system of the Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations with the generalized Navier boundary condition [1,2,4]. The nonlinear version of the scheme is semi-implicit in time and is based on a convex splitting of the Cahn-Hilliard free energy (including the boundary energy) together with a projection method for the Navier-Stokes equations. We show, under certain conditions, the scheme has the total energy decaying property and is unconditionally stable. The linearized scheme is easy to implement and introduces only mild CFL time constraint. Numerical tests are carried out to verify the accuracy and stability of the scheme. The behavior of the solution near the contact line is examined. It is verified that, when the interface intersects with the boundary, the consistent splitting scheme [21,22] for the Navier Stokes equations has the better accuracy for pressure. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  16. Modeling of RFID-Enabled Real-Time Manufacturing Execution System in Mixed-Model Assembly Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To quickly respond to the diverse product demands, mixed-model assembly lines are well adopted in discrete manufacturing industries. Besides the complexity in material distribution, mixed-model assembly involves a variety of components, different process plans and fast production changes, which greatly increase the difficulty for agile production management. Aiming at breaking through the bottlenecks in existing production management, a novel RFID-enabled manufacturing execution system (MES, which is featured with real-time and wireless information interaction capability, is proposed to identify various manufacturing objects including WIPs, tools, and operators, etc., and to trace their movements throughout the production processes. However, being subject to the constraints in terms of safety stock, machine assignment, setup, and scheduling requirements, the optimization of RFID-enabled MES model for production planning and scheduling issues is a NP-hard problem. A new heuristical generalized Lagrangian decomposition approach has been proposed for model optimization, which decomposes the model into three subproblems: computation of optimal configuration of RFID senor networks, optimization of production planning subjected to machine setup cost and safety stock constraints, and optimization of scheduling for minimized overtime. RFID signal processing methods that could solve unreliable, redundant, and missing tag events are also described in detail. The model validity is discussed through algorithm analysis and verified through numerical simulation. The proposed design scheme has important reference value for the applications of RFID in multiple manufacturing fields, and also lays a vital research foundation to leverage digital and networked manufacturing system towards intelligence.

  17. A theoretical model of rain–wind–induced in-plane galloping on overhead transmission tower-lines system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rain–wind–induced galloping phenomenon often occurs on overhead transmission tower-lines system, just as icing galloping and vortex-excited vibration; this kind of instability oscillation can cause power-line breakage or tower failure. However, the existing theoretical models of rain–wind–induced galloping are mainly based on the hypothesis of the overhead power-lines with fixed ends, which is inconsistent with the actual operation situation. Therefore, this article thus presents a preliminary theoretical study and proposes a new theoretical model taking into account the effect of tower excitations on the in-plane galloping of the overhead power-line and on the motion of the upper rain-line. The theoretical model is solved by Galerkin method and verified by the comparison with the test data obtained in the available literature involved with the overhead power-lines with fixed towers or moving towers. It turns out that the tower excitations may intensify the in-plane galloping amplitude of the overhead power-line within a certain range of frequency ratio and enable better comprehension of rain–wind–induced galloping mechanism.

  18. On-Line Junction Temperature Monitoring of Switching Devices with Dynamic Compact Thermal Models Extracted with Model Order Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Di Napoli

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Residual lifetime estimation has gained a key point among the techniques that improve the reliability and the efficiency of power converters. The main cause of failures are the junction temperature cycles exhibited by switching devices during their normal operation; therefore, reliable power converter lifetime estimation requires the knowledge of the junction temperature time profile. Since on-line dynamic temperature measurements are extremely difficult, in this work an innovative real-time monitoring strategy is proposed, which is capable of estimating the junction temperature profile from the measurement of the dissipated powers through an accurate and compact thermal model of the whole power module. The equations of this model can be easily implemented inside a FPGA, exploiting the control architecture already present in modern power converters. Experimental results on an IGBT power module demonstrate the reliability of the proposed method.

  19. Olfactory discrimination and memory deficits in the Flinders Sensitive Line rodent model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, A; Pfeiffer, L-M; Thiele, S; Coenen, V A; Döbrössy, M D

    2017-10-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is a heterogeneous psychiatric disorder with broad symptomatic manifestations. The current study examined, for the first time, olfactory memory and discrimination in the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rodent model of depression. Male FSL rats and controls were trained on an Olfactory Discrimination (OD) and a Social Interaction (SI) test. On the OD test, the FSL and controls performed similarly at the shortest inter-trial interval (5min), however, with extended delay of 30min, the FSLs had a recall and odour discrimination deficit. At the longest delay (60min) both groups performed poorly. The FSL rats i.) had a deficit in olfactory discrimination suggesting impairment in olfactory memory and recall; ii.) were less likely to socialize with unfamiliar rats. The data suggests that FSL animals have an impaired olfactory information processing capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Towards realistic modelling of spectral line formation - lessons learnt from red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Karin

    2015-08-01

    Many decades of quantitative spectroscopic studies of red giants have revealed much about the formation histories and interlinks between the main components of the Galaxy and its satellites. Telescopes and instrumentation are now able to deliver high-resolution data of superb quality for large stellar samples and Galactic archaeology has entered a new era. At the same time, we have learnt how simplifying physical assumptions in the modelling of spectroscopic data can bias the interpretations, in particular one-dimensional homogeneity and local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). I will present lessons learnt so far from non-LTE spectral line formation in 3D radiation-hydrodynamic atmospheres of red giants, the smaller siblings of red supergiants.

  1. Development and application of model RAIA uranium on-line analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yanwu; Song Yufen; Zhu Yaokun; Cong Peiyuan; Cui Songru

    1999-01-01

    The working principle, structure, adjustment and application of model RAIA on-line analyser are reported. The performance of this instrument is reliable. For identical sample, the signal fluctuation in continuous monitoring for four months is less than +-1%. According to required measurement range, appropriate length of sample cell is chosen. The precision of measurement process is better than 1% at 100 g/L U. The detection limit is 50 mg/L. The uranium concentration in process stream can be displayed automatically and printed at any time. It presents 4∼20 mA current signal being proportional to the uranium concentration. This makes a long step towards process continuous control and computer management

  2. Time Domain Analysis of Graphene Nanoribbon Interconnects Based on Transmission LineModel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Haji Nasiri

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Time domain analysis of multilayer graphene nanoribbon (MLGNR interconnects, based on ‎transmission line modeling (TLM using a six-order linear parametric expression, has been ‎presented for the first time. We have studied the effects of interconnect geometry along with ‎its contact resistance on its step response and Nyquist stability. It is shown that by increasing ‎interconnects dimensions their propagation delays are increased and accordingly the system ‎becomes relatively more stable. In addition, we have compared time responses and Nyquist ‎stabilities of MLGNR and SWCNT bundle interconnects, with the same external dimensions. ‎The results show that under the same conditions, the propagation delays for MLGNR ‎interconnects are smaller than those of SWCNT bundle interconnects are. Hence, SWCNT ‎bundle interconnects are relatively more stable than their MLGNR rivals.‎

  3. A catapult model for the narrow-line region in Seyferts and radio galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    The kinematics and stability of clouds falling radially into a supersonic wind are studied. A critical parameter is found, the ejection coefficient, which separates clouds which continue to gravitate inwards from those which are catapulted out by the ram pressure of the wind. This leads to a maximum size for ejected clouds. The clouds are partially broken up by fluid dynamic instabilities and the fragments expelled with enhanced velocities. This model is applied to the narrow-line region of Seyferts and radio galaxies. A quasi-steady picture may be established for the wind-ambient medium interaction zone. The wind is shocked and escapes through jets or bubbles; the ambient medium cools, forming the clouds which gravitate inwards. (author)

  4. Modeling for Friction of Four Stroke Four Cylinder In-Line Petrol Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Mishra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A four stroke four cylinder in-line petrol engine is modeled to estimate various performance parameters. The solution is based on tribology and dynamics principle. The detailed parameters relating to engine friction and lubrication are computed numerically for the engine firing order 1-3-4-2. The numerical method is based on finite difference method that solves coupled Reynolds Equation and Energy Equation. Output includes the movie thickness, friction force, friction power loss and temperature rise in the ring liner conjunction in all four cylinders. Transient regime of ring liner lubrication isaddressed while the same changes from hydrodynamic to mixed in an engine cycle. Momentary cessation near the top and bottom dead center that causes boundary interaction is analyzed through asperity contact. The non - Newtonian behavior of lubricant film due to pressure and temperature is addresses using viscosity -pressure- temperature inter relationship.

  5. Effect of feeders in 3D modeling of low impedance multilayer CPW transmission line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaini, R. I.; Kyabaggu, P. B. K.; Sinulingga, E. P.

    2018-02-01

    Improved characteristics with low dissipation loss MMICs are highly desirable for wireless communications. However, the current industrial MMIC design is mainly based on microstrip concept which suffered from parasitic and unwanted phenomenon especially at higher frequency (>20 GHz). On the other hand, for future wireless technology, higher frequency operation is required and on-wafer microwave characterizations as well as precise modeling of 3D Multilayer CPW components are vital. This project concerns with understanding of the microwave characteristics behavior of Multilayer CPW components in MMIC applications. Feeder effect as unwanted parts in the characteristics has been investigated to determine its relation with the half wavelength resonance of the Multilayer CPW Low Impedance Transmission Line.

  6. Validation of the Actuator Line Model for Simulating Flows past Yawed Wind Turbine Rotors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun; Yang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The Actuator Line/Navier-Stokes model is validated against wind tunnel measurements for flows past the yawed MEXICO rotor and past the yawed NREL Phase VI rotor. The MEXICO rotor is operated at a rotational speed of 424 rpm, a pitch angle of −2.3˚, wind speeds of 10, 15, 24 m/s and yaw angles of 15......˚, 30˚ and 45˚. The computed loads as well as the velocity field behind the yawed MEXICO rotor are compared to the detailed pressure and PIV measurements which were carried out in the EU funded MEXICO project. For the NREL Phase VI rotor, computations were carried out at a rotational speed of 90.2 rpm...

  7. Simulation of a 7.7 MW onshore wind farm with the Actuator Line Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggeri, A.; Draper, M.; Usera, G.

    2017-05-01

    Recently, the Actuator Line Model (ALM) has been evaluated with coarser resolution and larger time steps than what is generally recommended, taking into account an atmospheric sheared and turbulent inflow condition. The aim of the present paper is to continue these studies, assessing the capability of the ALM to represent the wind turbines’ interactions in an onshore wind farm. The ‘Libertad’ wind farm, which consists of four 1.9MW Vestas V100 wind turbines, was simulated considering different wind directions, and the results were compared with the wind farm SCADA data, finding good agreement between them. A sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the influence of the spatial resolution, finding acceptable agreement, although some differences were found. It is believed that these differences are due to the characteristics of the different Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) simulations taken as inflow condition (precursor simulations).

  8. Global off-line evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP flood model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decharme, B.; Alkama, R.; Faroux, S.; Douville, H. [GAME-CNRM/CNRS - Meteo-France, Toulouse (France); Papa, F. [NOAA-CREST, City College of New York, New York, NY (United States); Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement IRD-LEGOS, Toulouse (France); Prigent, C. [CNRS/Laboratoire d' Etudes du Rayonnement et de la Matiere en Astrophysique, Observatoire de Paris, Paris (France)

    2012-04-15

    This study presents an off-line global evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP hydrological model including a two-way flood scheme. The flood dynamics is indeed described through the daily coupling between the ISBA land surface model and the TRIP river routing model including a prognostic flood reservoir. This reservoir fills when the river height exceeds the critical river bankfull height and vice versa. The flood interacts with the soil hydrology through infiltration and with the overlying atmosphere through precipitation interception and free water surface evaporation. The model is evaluated over a relatively long period (1986-2006) at 1 resolution using the Princeton University 3-hourly atmospheric forcing. Four simulations are performed in order to assess the model sensitivity to the river bankfull height. The evaluation is made against satellite-derived global inundation estimates as well as in situ river discharge observations at 122 gauging stations. First, the results show a reasonable simulation of the global distribution of simulated floodplains when compared to satellite-derived estimates. At basin scale, the comparison reveals some discrepancies, both in terms of climatology and interannual variability, but the results remain acceptable for a simple large-scale model. In addition, the simulated river discharges are improved in term of efficiency scores for more than 50% of the 122 stations and deteriorated for 4% only. Two mechanisms mainly explain this positive impact: an increase in evapotranspiration that limits the annual discharge overestimation found when flooding is not taking into account and a smoothed river peak flow when the floodplain storage is significant. Finally, the sensitivity experiments suggest that the river bankfull depth is potentially tunable according to the river discharge scores to control the accuracy of the simulated flooded areas and its related increase in land surface evaporation. Such a tuning could be relevant at least for climate

  9. Validation of an Actuator Line Model Coupled to a Dynamic Stall Model for Pitching Motions Characteristic to Vertical Axis Turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, Victor; Goude, Anders; Bachant, Peter; Wosnik, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT) can be used to extract renewable energy from wind flows. A simpler design, low cost of maintenance, and the ability to accept flow from all directions perpendicular to the rotor axis are some of the most important advantages over conventional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT). However, VAWT encounter complex and unsteady fluid dynamics, which present significant modeling challenges. One of the most relevant phenomena is dynamic stall, which is caused by the unsteady variation of angle of attack throughout the blade rotation, and is the focus of the present study. Dynamic stall is usually used as a passive control for VAWT operating conditions, hence the importance of predicting its effects. In this study, a coupled model is implemented with the open-source CFD toolbox OpenFOAM for solving the Navier-Stokes equations, where an actuator line model and dynamic stall model are used to compute the blade loading and body force. Force coefficients obtained from the model are validated with experimental data of pitching airfoil in similar operating conditions as an H-rotor type VAWT. Numerical results show reasonable agreement with experimental data for pitching motion. (paper)

  10. Validation of an Actuator Line Model Coupled to a Dynamic Stall Model for Pitching Motions Characteristic to Vertical Axis Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Victor; Bachant, Peter; Wosnik, Martin; Goude, Anders

    2016-09-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT) can be used to extract renewable energy from wind flows. A simpler design, low cost of maintenance, and the ability to accept flow from all directions perpendicular to the rotor axis are some of the most important advantages over conventional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT). However, VAWT encounter complex and unsteady fluid dynamics, which present significant modeling challenges. One of the most relevant phenomena is dynamic stall, which is caused by the unsteady variation of angle of attack throughout the blade rotation, and is the focus of the present study. Dynamic stall is usually used as a passive control for VAWT operating conditions, hence the importance of predicting its effects. In this study, a coupled model is implemented with the open-source CFD toolbox OpenFOAM for solving the Navier-Stokes equations, where an actuator line model and dynamic stall model are used to compute the blade loading and body force. Force coefficients obtained from the model are validated with experimental data of pitching airfoil in similar operating conditions as an H-rotor type VAWT. Numerical results show reasonable agreement with experimental data for pitching motion.

  11. Tetrahedral node for Transmiss